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Sample records for similar bond lengths

  1. Bond-Length Distortions in Strained Semiconductor Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woicik, J.C.; Pellegrino, J.G.; Steiner, B.; Miyano, K.E.; Bompadre, S.G.; Sorensen, L.B.; Lee, T.; Khalid, S.

    1997-01-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements performed at In-K edge have resolved the outstanding issue of bond-length strain in semiconductor-alloy heterostructures. We determine the In-As bond length to be 2.581±0.004 Angstrom in a buried, 213 Angstrom thick Ga 0.78 In 0.22 As layer grown coherently on GaAs(001). This bond length corresponds to a strain-induced contraction of 0.015±0.004 Angstrom relative to the In-As bond length in bulk Ga 1-x In x As of the same composition; it is consistent with a simple model which assumes a uniform bond-length distortion in the epilayer despite the inequivalent In-As and Ga-As bond lengths. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Bond lengths and bond strengths in compounds of the 5f elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The variation of bond length (D) with bond strength (S) in normal valence compounds of 3d, 4d, 5d-4f, and 6d-5f elements can be represented approximately as D(S)=D(0.5) F(S), where D(0.5) is a characteristic constant for a given bond and F(S) an empirical function which is the same for all bonds. A bond strength Ssub(ij)=ssub(ji) is assigned to the bond between atoms i and j such that Σsub(j) Ssub(ij)=vsub(i) and Σsub(i) Ssub(ij)=vsub(j), where vsub(i) and vsub(j) are the normal valences of the two atoms. The function F(S) decreases monotonically with increasing S, and is normalized to unity at S=0.5, so that the constant D(0.5) has the physical meaning of being the bond length adjusted to S=0.5. The method described above was used to interpret and systematize the experimental results on bond lengths in oxides, halides, and oxyhalides of the 5f elements. (U.S.)

  3. Origin of the X-Hal (Hal = Cl, Br) bond-length change in the halogen-bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizhou; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-05-01

    The origin of the X-Hal bond-length change in the halogen bond of the X-Hal...Y type has been investigated at the MP2(full)/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory using a natural bond orbital analysis, atoms in molecules procedure, and electrostatic potential fitting methods. Our results have clearly shown that various theories explaining the nature of the hydrogen bond cannot be applied to explain the origin of the X-Hal bond-length change in the halogen bond. We provide a new explanation for this change. The elongation of the X-Hal bond length is caused by the electron-density transfer to the X-Hal sigma* antibonding orbital. For the blue-shifting halogen bond, the electron-density transfer to the X-Hal sigma* antibonding orbital is only of minor importance; it is the electrostatic attractive interaction that causes the X-Hal bond contraction.

  4. Analysis of surface bond lengths reported for chemisorption on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of bond length information available from the techniques of surface crystallography (particularly with LEED, SEXAFS and photoelectron diffraction) for chemisorption on well-defined surfaces of metals (M). For adsorbed main-group atoms (X), measured X-M interatomic distances for 38 combinations of X and M have been assessed with a bond order-bond length relation in combination with the Schomaker-Stevenson approach for determining single-bond lengths. When the surface bond orders are fixed primarily by the valency of X, this approach appears to provide a simple framework for predicing X-M surface bond lengths. Further, in cases where agreement has been reached from different surface crystallographic techniques, this framework has the potential for assessing refinements to the surface bonding model (e.g. in determining the roles of the effective surface valency of M, and of coordinate bonding and supplementary π bonding between X and M). Preliminary comparisons of structural data are also given for molecular adsorption (CO and ethylidyne) and for the chemisorption of other metal atoms.

  5. Similarities between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in RNA kissing complexes found by means of cross-correlated relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, Jens; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    The bond lengths and dynamics of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in an RNA kissing complex have been characterized by determining the NMR relaxation rates of various double- and triple-quantum coherences that involve an imino proton and two neighboring nitrogen-15 nuclei belonging to opposite bases. New experiments allow one to determine the chemical shift anisotropy of the imino protons. The bond lengths derived from dipolar relaxation and the lack of modulations of the nitrogen chemical shifts indicate that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds which hold the kissing complex together are very similar to the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the double-stranded stem of the RNA

  6. The extended variant of the bond valence-bond length correlation curve for boron(III)-oxygen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidey, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The extended variant of the bond valence (s)-bond length (r) correlation curve for boron(III)-oxygen bonds has been closely approximated using the three-parameter function s = [k/(r - l)] - m, where s is measured in valence units (vu), r is measured in Aa, k = 0.53 Aa.vu, l = 0.975(1) Aa and m = 0.32 vu. The function s = exp[(r 0 - r)/b] traditionally used in the modern bond valence model requires the separate set of the bond valence parameters (r 0 = 1.362 Aa; b = 0.23 Aa) in order to approximate the above s-r curve for the bonds shorter than ∝1.3 Aa.

  7. Studies of technetium chemistry. Pt.8. The regularities of the bond length and configuration of rhenium and technetium complexes in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozheng; Liu Boli

    1995-01-01

    Some bond length regularities in MO 6 , MO-4, MX 5 α and MX 4 αβ moieties of technetium and rhenium compounds are summarized and rationalized by cavity model. The chemical properties of technetium and rhenium are so similar that their corresponding complexes have almost the same configuration and M-X bond lengths when they are in cavity-controlled state. Technetium and Rhenium combine preferably with N, O, F, S, Cl and Br when they are in higher oxidation states (>3), but preferably with P, Se etc. when they are in lower oxidation states ( 4 αβ is approximately constant; (2) the average M-X bond length of MX 6 varies moderately with the oxidation state of M; (3) the bond length of M-X trans to M-α in MX 5 α has a linear relationship with the angle

  8. Comparative study on direct and indirect bracket bonding techniques regarding time length and bracket detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Vinicius Bozelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the time spent for direct (DBB - direct bracket bonding and indirect (IBB - indirect bracket bonding bracket bonding techniques. The time length of laboratorial (IBB and clinical steps (DBB and IBB as well as the prevalence of loose bracket after a 24-week follow-up were evaluated. METHODS: Seventeen patients (7 men and 10 women with a mean age of 21 years, requiring orthodontic treatment were selected for this study. A total of 304 brackets were used (151 DBB and 153 IBB. The same bracket type and bonding material were used in both groups. Data were submitted to statistical analysis by Wilcoxon non-parametric test at 5% level of significance. RESULTS: Considering the total time length, the IBB technique was more time-consuming than the DBB (p < 0.001. However, considering only the clinical phase, the IBB took less time than the DBB (p < 0.001. There was no significant difference (p = 0.910 for the time spent during laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical session for IBB in comparison to the clinical procedure for DBB. Additionally, no difference was found as for the prevalence of loose bracket between both groups. CONCLUSION: the IBB can be suggested as a valid clinical procedure since the clinical session was faster and the total time spent for laboratorial positioning of the brackets and clinical procedure was similar to that of DBB. In addition, both approaches resulted in similar frequency of loose bracket.

  9. Scaling of the critical free length for progressive unfolding of self-bonded graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Kenny; Cranford, Steven W., E-mail: s.cranford@neu.edu [Laboratory of Nanotechnology in Civil Engineering (NICE), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northeastern University, 400 Snell Engineering, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Like filled pasta, rolled or folded graphene can form a large nanocapsule surrounding a hollow interior. Use as a molecular carrier, however, requires understanding of the opening of such vessels. Here, we investigate a monolayer sheet of graphene as a theoretical trial platform for such a nanocapsule. The graphene is bonded to itself via aligned disulfide (S-S) bonds. Through theoretical analysis and atomistic modeling, we probe the critical nonbonded length (free length, L{sub crit}) that induces fracture-like progressive unfolding as a function of folding radius (R{sub i}). We show a clear linear scaling relationship between the length and radius, which can be used to determine the necessary bond density to predict mechanical opening/closing. However, stochastic dissipated energy limits any exact elastic formulation, and the required energy far exceeds the dissociation energy of the S-S bond. We account for the necessary dissipated kinetic energy through a simple scaling factor (Ω), which agrees well with computational results.

  10. The Influences of Overlap Length, Bond Line Thickness and Pretreatmant on the Mechanical Properties of Adhesives : Focussing on Bonding Glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervloed, J.; Kwakernaak, A.; Poulis, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences of overlap length, bond line thickness and pretreatment on the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds. In order to determine the bond strength, lap shear tests were performed. The researched adhesives are a 2 component epoxy and MS polymer. The smallest overlap

  11. Predicted bond length variation in wurtzite and zinc-blende InGaN and AlGaN alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, T.; Zunger, A.

    1999-01-01

    Valence force field simulations utilizing large supercells are used to investigate the bond lengths in wurtzite and zinc-blende In x Ga 1-x N and Al x Ga 1-x N random alloys. We find that (i) while the first-neighbor cation endash anion shell is split into two distinct values in both wurtzite and zinc-blende alloys (R Ga-N 1 ≠R In-N 1 ), the second-neighbor cation endash anion bonds are equal (R Ga-N 2 =R In-N 2 ). (ii) The second-neighbor cation endash anion bonds exhibit a crucial difference between wurtzite and zinc-blende binary structures: in wurtzite we find two bond distances which differ in length by 13% while in the zinc-blende structure there is only one bond length. This splitting is preserved in the alloy, and acts as a fingerprint, distinguishing the wurtzite from the zinc-blende structure. (iii) The small splitting of the first-neighbor cation endash anion bonds in the wurtzite structure due to nonideal c/a ratio is preserved in the alloy, but is obscured by the bond length broadening. (iv) The cation endash cation bond lengths exhibit three distinct values in the alloy (Ga endash Ga, Ga endash In, and In endash In), while the anion endash anion bonds are split into two values corresponding to N endash Ga endash N and N endash In endash N. (v) The cation endash related splitting of the bonds and alloy broadening are considerably larger in InGaN alloy than in AlGaN alloy due to larger mismatch between the binary compounds. (vi) The calculated first-neighbor cation endash anion and cation endash cation bond lengths in In x Ga 1-x N alloy are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The remaining bond lengths are provided as predictions. In particular, the predicted splitting for the second-neighbor cation endash anion bonds in the wurtzite structure awaits experimental testing. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  12. Bond length variation in Zn substituted NiO studied from extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. D.; Poswal, A. K.; Kamal, C.; Rajput, Parasmani; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Jha, S. N.; Ganguli, Tapas

    2017-06-01

    Bond length behavior for Zn substituted NiO is determined through extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements performed at ambient conditions. We report bond length value of 2.11±0.01 Å for Zn-O of rock salt (RS) symmetry, when Zn is doped in RS NiO. Bond length for Zn substituted NiO RS ternary solid solutions shows relaxed behavior for Zn-O bond, while it shows un-relaxed behavior for Ni-O bond. These observations are further supported by first-principles calculations. It is also inferred that Zn sublattice remains nearly unchanged with increase in lattice parameter. On the other hand, Ni sublattice dilates for Zn compositions up to 20% to accommodate increase in the lattice parameter. However, for Zn compositions more than 20%, it does not further dilate. It has been attributed to the large disorder that is incorporated in the system at and beyond 20% of Zn incorporation in the cubic RS lattice of ternary solid solutions. For these large percentages of Zn incorporation, the Ni and the Zn atoms re-arrange themselves microscopically about the same nominal bond length rather than systematically increase in magnitude to minimize the energy of the system. This results in an increase in the Debye-Waller factor with increase in the Zn concentration rather than a systematic increase in the bond lengths.

  13. Bond lengths in Cd1-xZnxTe beyond linear laws revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koteski, V.; Haas, H.; Holub-Krappe, E.; Ivanovic, N.; Mahnke, H.-E.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the development of local bond lengths with composition in the Cd 1-x Zn x Te mixed system by measuring the fine structure in X-ray absorption (EXAFS) at all three constituent atoms. The bond strength is found to dominate over the averaging of the bulk so that the local bond length deviates only slightly from its natural value determined for the pure binary components ZnTe and CdTe, respectively. The deviations are significantly less than predicted by a simple radial force constant model for tetrahedrally co-ordinated binary systems, and the bond-length variation with concentration is significantly non-linear. For the second shell, bimodal anion-anion distances are found while the cation-cation distances can already be described by the virtual crystal approximation. In the diluted regime close to the end-point compounds, we have complemented our experimental work by ab initio calculations based on density functional theory with the WIEN97 program using the linearised augmented plane wave method. Equilibrium atomic lattice positions have been calculated for the substitutional isovalent metal atom in a 32-atom super cell, Zn in the CdTe lattice or Cd in the ZnTe lattice, respectively, yielding good agreement with the atomic distances as determined in our EXAFS experiments

  14. Bond length effects during the dissociation of O2 on Ni(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuttleworth, I.G.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The dissociation of O 2 on Ni(1 1 1) has been investigated using the Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) technique. • An exceptional correlation has been identified between the O/Ni bond order and the O 2 bond length for a series of sterically different reaction paths. • Direct magnetic phenomena accompany these processes suggesting further mechanisms for experimental control. - Abstract: The interaction between O 2 and Ni(1 1 1) has been investigated using spin-polarised density functional theory. A series of low activation energy (E A = 103–315 meV) reaction pathways corresponding to precursor and non-precursor mediated adsorption have been identified. It has been seen that a predominantly pathway-independent correlation exists between O−Ni bond order and the O 2 bond length. This correlation demonstrates that the O−O interaction predominantly determines the bonding of this system

  15. Bond-length fluctuations in the copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B [Texas Materials Institute, ETC 9.102, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2003-02-26

    Superconductivity in the copper oxides occurs at a crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behaviour, a transition that is first order. A spinodal phase segregation is normally accomplished by atomic diffusion; but where it occurs at too low a temperature for atomic diffusion, it may be realized by cooperative atomic displacements. Locally cooperative, fluctuating atomic displacements may stabilize a distinguishable phase lying between a localized-electron phase and a Fermi-liquid phase; this intermediate phase exhibits quantum-critical-point behaviour with strong electron-lattice interactions making charge transport vibronic. Ordering of the bond-length fluctuations at lower temperatures would normally stabilize a charge-density wave (CDW), which suppresses superconductivity. It is argued that in the copper oxide superconductors, crossover occurs at an optimal doping concentration for the formation of ordered two-electron/two-hole bosonic bags of spin S = 0 in a matrix of localized spins; the correlation bags contain two holes in a linear cluster of four copper centres ordered within alternate Cu-O-Cu rows of a CuO{sub 2} sheet. This ordering is optimal at a hole concentration per Cu atom of p {approx} 1/6, but it is not static. Hybridization of the vibronic electrons with the phonons that define long-range order of the fluctuating (Cu-O) bond lengths creates barely itinerant, vibronic quasiparticles of heavy mass. The heavy itinerant vibrons form Cooper pairs having a coherence length of the dimension of the bosonic bags. It is the hybridization of electrons and phonons that, it is suggested, stabilizes the superconductive state relative to a CDW state. (topical review)

  16. The Golden ratio, ionic and atomic radii and bond lengths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Rajalakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 103, 6-8 (2005), s. 877-882 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 1H-PK/42 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Bohr radius * bond lengths * axial ratios Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.351, year: 2005

  17. Relation between frequency and H bond length in heavy water: Towards the understanding of the unusual properties of H bond dynamics in nanoporous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommeret, Stanislas; Leicknam, Jean-Claude; Bratos, Savo; Musat, Raluca; Renault, Jean Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The published work on H bond dynamics mainly refers to diluted solutions HDO/D 2 O rather than to normal water. The reasons for this choice are both theoretical and experimental. Mechanical isolation of the OH vibrator eliminating the resonant energy transfer makes it a better probe of the local H bond network, while the dilution in heavy water reduces the infrared absorption, which permits the use of thicker experimental cells. The isotopic substitution does not alter crucially the nature of the problem. The length r of an OH . . . O group is statistically distributed over a large interval comprised between 2.7 and 3.2 A with a mean value r 0 = 2.86 A. Liquid water may thus be viewed as a mixture of hydrogen bonds of different length. Two important characteristics of hydrogen bonding must be mentioned. (i) The OH stretching vibrations are strongly affected by this interaction. The shorter the length r of the hydrogen bond, the strongest the H bond link and the lower is its frequency ω: the covalent OH bond energy is lent to the OH. . .O bond and reinforces the latter. A number of useful relationships between ω and r were published to express this correlation. The one adopted in our previous work is the relationship due to Mikenda. (ii) Not only the OH vibrations, but also the HDO rotations are influenced noticeably by hydrogen bonding. This is due to steric forces that hinder the HDO rotations. As they are stronger in short than in long hydrogen bonds, rotations are slower in the first case than in the second. This effect was only recently discovered, but its existence is hardly to be contested. In the present contribution, we want to revisit the relationship between the frequency of the OH vibrator and the distance OH. . .O.

  18. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Ruben, Eliza A; Liu, Corey W; Piccoli, Paula M B; Hohenstein, Edward G; Martínez, Todd J; Schultz, Arthur J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (ΔGf) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to ΔGf, but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H···O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite ΔGf differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond ΔGf are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  19. Performance of quantum Monte Carlo for calculating molecular bond lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleland, Deidre M., E-mail: deidre.cleland@csiro.au; Per, Manolo C., E-mail: manolo.per@csiro.au [CSIRO Virtual Nanoscience Laboratory, 343 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia)

    2016-03-28

    This work investigates the accuracy of real-space quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods for calculating molecular geometries. We present the equilibrium bond lengths of a test set of 30 diatomic molecules calculated using variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. The effect of different trial wavefunctions is investigated using single determinants constructed from Hartree-Fock (HF) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) orbitals with LDA, PBE, and B3LYP functionals, as well as small multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) multi-determinant expansions. When compared to experimental geometries, all DMC methods exhibit smaller mean-absolute deviations (MADs) than those given by HF, DFT, and MCSCF. The most accurate MAD of 3 ± 2 × 10{sup −3} Å is achieved using DMC with a small multi-determinant expansion. However, the more computationally efficient multi-determinant VMC method has a similar MAD of only 4.0 ± 0.9 × 10{sup −3} Å, suggesting that QMC forces calculated from the relatively simple VMC algorithm may often be sufficient for accurate molecular geometries.

  20. Effect of Different Bar Embedment Length on Bond-Slip in Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.; Chopra, M.B.; Kunnath, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This research aims to study the behaviour of the concrete-steel bond using numerical models, taking into account the effect of the different bar embedment length. Both plain and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are modeled. The interface bond stress as well as load-displacement response of the

  1. σ-Bond Electron Delocalization in Oligosilanes as Function of Substitution Pattern, Chain Length, and Spatial Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Hlina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Polysilanes are known to exhibit the interesting property of σ-bond electron delocalization. By employing optical spectroscopy (UV-vis, it is possible to judge the degree of delocalization and also differentiate parts of the molecules which are conjugated or not. The current study compares oligosilanes of similar chain length but different substitution pattern. The size of the substituents determines the spatial orientation of the main chain and also controls the conformational flexibility. The chemical nature of the substituents affects the orbital energies of the molecules and thus the positions of the absorption bands.

  2. Bond length contraction in Au nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into thin SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giraud, V.; Cheung, A.; Glover, C.J.; Azevedo, G. de M; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and annealing were investigated by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A bond length contraction was observed and can be explained by surface tension effects in a simple liquid-drop model. Such results are consistent with previous reports on nonembedded NCs implying a negligible influence of the SiO 2 matrix. Cumulant analysis of the EXAFS data suggests surface reconstruction or relaxation involving a further shortened bond length. A deviation from the octahedral closed shell structure is apparent for NCs of size 25 A

  3. Charge transfer and bond lengths in YBa2Cu3-xMxO6+y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Rhyne, J.J.; Neumann, D.A.; Miceli, P.F.; Tarascon, J.M.; Greene, L.H.; Barboux, P.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the effects of doping on the Cu chain sites in YBa 2 Cu 3-x M x O 6+y . The relationship between bond lengths obtained from neutron scattering and charge transfer is evaluated in terms of bond valence. In particular, it is concluded that removing an oxygen from the chains transfers one electron to the planes. 24 refs., 3 figs

  4. 共价键长的变化规律及计算%Variation Rule of Covalent Bond Length and Its Calculation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐永群; 陈年友

    2001-01-01

    研究了共价键长的变化规律,提出了两个影响键长的参数,即配位体的半径与中心原子半径之比Rratio和由中心原子组成的基团的拓扑指数F2,用BP神经网络法逼近了50个、预测了11个简单无机分子中非含氢原子键的键长,其计算误差基本上在2pm以内。%The variation rule of covalent bond lengths is investigated.Two parameters which influence covalent bond lengths are presented: the radius ratio of the ligand to the centre atom and the topological index of the group of centre atom.With BP neural networks, 50 bond lengths have been approached and other 11 bond lengths have been forecasted. Errors of calculated bond lengths is almost within 2pm.

  5. Bond-length strain in buried Ga1-xInxAs thin-alloy films grown coherently on InP(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woicik, J.C.; Gupta, J.A.; Watkins, S.P.; Crozier, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    The bond lengths in a series of strained, buried Ga 1-x In x As thin-alloy films grown coherently on InP(001) have been determined by high-resolution extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements. Comparison with a random-cluster calculation demonstrates that the external in-plane epitaxial strain imposed by pseudomorphic growth opposes the natural bond-length distortions due to alloying.copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  6. Dependence of the length of the hydrogen bond on the covalent and cationic radii of hydrogen, and additivity of bonding distances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovská, Raji

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 432, č. 1-3 (2006), s. 348-351 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : length of the hydrogen bond * ionic radius * Golden ratio Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.462, year: 2006

  7. Doping and bond length contributions to Mn K-edge shift in La1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... corresponds to the shift in the center of gravity of the unoccupied Mn 4-band contributing to the Mn K-absorption edge region. This correspondence is then used to separate the doping and size contributions to the edge shift due to variation in the number of electrons in valence band and Mn-O bond lengths, respectively, ...

  8. Time, number and length: similarities and differences in discrimination in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Clément, Angélique; Fayol, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on similarities in the discrimination of three different quantities--time, number, and line length--using a bisection task involving children aged 5 and 8 years and adults, when number and length were presented nonsequentially (Experiment 1) and sequentially (Experiment 2). In the nonsequential condition, for all age groups, although to a greater extent in the younger children, the psychophysical functions were flatter, and the Weber ratio higher for time than for number and length. Number and length yielded similar psychophysical functions. Thus, sensitivity to time was lower than that to the other quantities, whether continuous or not. However, when number and length were presented sequentially (Experiment 2), the differences in discrimination performance between time, number, and length disappeared. Furthermore, the Weber ratio values as well as the bisection points for all quantities presented sequentially appeared to be close to that found for duration in the nonsequential condition. The results are discussed within the framework of recent theories suggesting a common mechanism for all analogical quantities.

  9. Short Carboxylic Acid–Carboxylate Hydrogen Bonds Can Have Fully Localized Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiusheng; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A.

    2017-01-17

    Short hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) have been proposed to play key functional roles in several proteins. The location of the proton in short H-bonds is of central importance, as proton delocalization is a defining feature of low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs). Experimentally determining proton location in H-bonds is challenging. Here, bond length analysis of atomic (1.15–0.98 Å) resolution X-ray crystal structures of the human protein DJ-1 and its bacterial homologue, YajL, was used to determine the protonation states of H-bonded carboxylic acids. DJ-1 contains a buried, dimer-spanning 2.49 Å H-bond between Glu15 and Asp24 that satisfies standard donor–acceptor distance criteria for a LBHB. Bond length analysis indicates that the proton is localized on Asp24, excluding a LBHB at this location. However, similar analysis of the Escherichia coli homologue YajL shows both residues may be protonated at the H-bonded oxygen atoms, potentially consistent with a LBHB. A Protein Data Bank-wide screen identifies candidate carboxylic acid H-bonds in approximately 14% of proteins, which are typically short [O–O> = 2.542(2) Å]. Chemically similar H-bonds between hydroxylated residues (Ser/Thr/Tyr) and carboxylates show a trend of lengthening O–O distance with increasing H-bond donor pKa. This trend suggests that conventional electronic effects provide an adequate explanation for short, charge-assisted carboxylic acid–carboxylate H-bonds in proteins, without the need to invoke LBHBs in general. This study demonstrates that bond length analysis of atomic resolution X-ray crystal structures provides a useful experimental test of certain candidate LBHBs.

  10. Distinguishing the Effects of Bond-Length Alternation versus Bond-Order Alternation on the Nonlinear Optical Properties of π-Conjugated Chromophores

    KAUST Repository

    Gieseking, Rebecca L.; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between the molecular nonlinear optical (NLO) properties and the bond-length alternation (BLA) or π-bond-order alternation (BOA) along the molecular backbone of linear π-conjugated systems has proven widely useful in the development of NLO organic chromophores and materials. Here, we examine model polymethines to elucidate the reliability of these relationships. While BLA is solely a measure of molecular geometric structure, BOA includes information pertaining to the electronic structure. As a result, BLA is found to be a good predictor of NLO properties only when optimized geometries are considered, whereas BOA is more broadly applicable. Proper understanding of the distinction between BLA and BOA is critical when designing computational studies of NLO properties, especially for molecules in complex environments or in nonequilibrium geometries. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  11. Distinguishing the Effects of Bond-Length Alternation versus Bond-Order Alternation on the Nonlinear Optical Properties of π-Conjugated Chromophores

    KAUST Repository

    Gieseking, Rebecca L.

    2015-06-18

    Understanding the relationships between the molecular nonlinear optical (NLO) properties and the bond-length alternation (BLA) or π-bond-order alternation (BOA) along the molecular backbone of linear π-conjugated systems has proven widely useful in the development of NLO organic chromophores and materials. Here, we examine model polymethines to elucidate the reliability of these relationships. While BLA is solely a measure of molecular geometric structure, BOA includes information pertaining to the electronic structure. As a result, BLA is found to be a good predictor of NLO properties only when optimized geometries are considered, whereas BOA is more broadly applicable. Proper understanding of the distinction between BLA and BOA is critical when designing computational studies of NLO properties, especially for molecules in complex environments or in nonequilibrium geometries. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  12. Raman spectroscopic determination of the length, strength, compressibility, Debye temperature, elasticity, and force constant of the C-C bond in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X X; Li, J W; Zhou, Z F; Wang, Y; Yang, L W; Zheng, W T; Sun, Chang Q

    2012-01-21

    From the perspective of bond relaxation and bond vibration, we have formulated the Raman phonon relaxation of graphene, under the stimuli of the number-of-layers, the uni-axial strain, the pressure, and the temperature, in terms of the response of the length and strength of the representative bond of the entire specimen to the applied stimuli. Theoretical unification of the measurements clarifies that: (i) the opposite trends of the Raman shifts, which are due to the number-of-layers reduction, of the G-peak shift and arises from the vibration of a pair of atoms, while the D- and the 2D-peak shifts involve the z-neighbor of a specific atom; (ii) the tensile strain-induced phonon softening and phonon-band splitting arise from the asymmetric response of the C(3v) bond geometry to the C(2v) uni-axial bond elongation; (iii) the thermal softening of the phonons originates from bond expansion and weakening; and (iv) the pressure stiffening of the phonons results from bond compression and work hardening. Reproduction of the measurements has led to quantitative information about the referential frequencies from which the Raman frequencies shift as well as the length, energy, force constant, Debye temperature, compressibility and elastic modulus of the C-C bond in graphene, which is of instrumental importance in the understanding of the unusual behavior of graphene.

  13. Recall of short word lists presented visually at fast rates: effects of phonological similarity and word length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltheart, V; Langdon, R

    1998-03-01

    Phonological similarity of visually presented list items impairs short-term serial recall. Lists of long words are also recalled less accurately than are lists of short words. These results have been attributed to phonological recoding and rehearsal. If subjects articulate irrelevant words during list presentation, both phonological similarity and word length effects are abolished. Experiments 1 and 2 examined effects of phonological similarity and recall instructions on recall of lists shown at fast rates (from one item per 0.114-0.50 sec), which might not permit phonological encoding and rehearsal. In Experiment 3, recall instructions and word length were manipulated using fast presentation rates. Both phonological similarity and word length effects were observed, and they were not dependent on recall instructions. Experiments 4 and 5 investigated the effects of irrelevant concurrent articulation on lists shown at fast rates. Both phonological similarity and word length effects were removed by concurrent articulation, as they were with slow presentation rates.

  14. Similar strength of the NH⋯O and NH⋯S hydrogen bonds in binary complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Cecilie Lindholm; Jensen, Christine S.; Mackeprang, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    to be extremely small with only 5 and 19 cm-1 for DMA-DME and DMA-DMS, respectively. The experimentally determined integrated absorbance has been combined with a calculated oscillator strength to determine an equilibrium constant of 2 × 10-3 and 4 × 10-3 for the DMA-DME and DMA-DMS complexes, respectively....... The topological analyses reveal that several hydrogen bond interactions are present in the complexes. The calculated binding energies, geometric parameters, observed redshifts, and topological analyses suggest that oxygen and sulfur are hydrogen bond acceptors of similar strength. (Graph Presented)....

  15. A method of coupling the Paternò-Büchi reaction with direct infusion ESI-MS/MS for locating the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond in glycerophospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2016-06-21

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with soft ionization is established as an essential platform for lipid analysis; however, determining high order structural information, such as the carbon-carbon double bond (C[double bond, length as m-dash]C) location, remains challenging. Recently, our group demonstrated a method for sensitive and confident lipid C[double bond, length as m-dash]C location determination by coupling online the Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction with nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) and MS/MS. Herein, we aimed to expand the scope of the PB reaction for lipid analysis by enabling the reaction with infusion ESI-MS/MS at much higher flow rates than demonstrated in the nanoESI setup (∼20 nL min(-1)). In the new design, the PB reaction was effected in a fused silica capillary solution transfer line, which also served as a microflow UV reactor, prior to ESI. This setup allowed PB reaction optimization and kinetics studies. Under optimized conditions, a maximum of 50% PB reaction yield could be achieved for a standard glycerophosphocholine (PC) within 6 s of UV exposure over a wide flow rate range (0.1-10 μL min(-1)). A solvent composition of 7 : 3 acetone : H2O (with 1% acid or base modifier) allowed the highest PB yields and good lipid ionization, while lower yields were obtained with an addition of a variety of organic solvents. Radical induced lipid peroxidation was identified to induce undesirable side reactions, which could be effectively suppressed by eliminating trace oxygen in the solution via N2 purge. Finally, the utility of coupling the PB reaction with infusion ESI-MS/MS was demonstrated by analyzing a yeast polar lipid extract where C[double bond, length as m-dash]C bond locations were revealed for 35 glycerophospholipids (GPs).

  16. Length dependence of force generation exhibit similarities between rat cardiac myocytes and skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanft, Laurin M; McDonald, Kerry S

    2010-08-01

    According to the Frank-Starling relationship, increased ventricular volume increases cardiac output, which helps match cardiac output to peripheral circulatory demand. The cellular basis for this relationship is in large part the myofilament length-tension relationship. Length-tension relationships in maximally calcium activated preparations are relatively shallow and similar between cardiac myocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. During twitch activations length-tension relationships become steeper in both cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, it remains unclear whether length dependence of tension differs between striated muscle cell types during submaximal activations. The purpose of this study was to compare sarcomere length-tension relationships and the sarcomere length dependence of force development between rat skinned left ventricular cardiac myocytes and fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres. Muscle cell preparations were calcium activated to yield 50% maximal force, after which isometric force and rate constants (k(tr)) of force development were measured over a range of sarcomere lengths. Myofilament length-tension relationships were considerably steeper in fast-twitch fibres compared to slow-twitch fibres. Interestingly, cardiac myocyte preparations exhibited two populations of length-tension relationships, one steeper than fast-twitch fibres and the other similar to slow-twitch fibres. Moreover, myocytes with shallow length-tension relationships were converted to steeper length-tension relationships by protein kinase A (PKA)-induced myofilament phosphorylation. Sarcomere length-k(tr) relationships were distinct between all three cell types and exhibited patterns markedly different from Ca(2+) activation-dependent k(tr) relationships. Overall, these findings indicate cardiac myocytes exhibit varied length-tension relationships and sarcomere length appears a dominant modulator of force development rates. Importantly, cardiac myocyte length

  17. Non-destructive testing of full-length bonded rock bolts based on HHT signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z. M.; Liu, L.; Peng, M.; Liu, C. C.; Tao, F. J.; Liu, C. S.

    2018-04-01

    Full-length bonded rock bolts are commonly used in mining, tunneling and slope engineering because of their simple design and resistance to corrosion. However, the length of a rock bolt and grouting quality do not often meet the required design standards in practice because of the concealment and complexity of bolt construction. Non-destructive testing is preferred when testing a rock bolt's quality because of the convenience, low cost and wide detection range. In this paper, a signal analysis method for the non-destructive sound wave testing of full-length bonded rock bolts is presented, which is based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). First, we introduce the HHT analysis method to calculate the bolt length and identify defect locations based on sound wave reflection test signals, which includes decomposing the test signal via empirical mode decomposition (EMD), selecting the intrinsic mode functions (IMF) using the Pearson Correlation Index (PCI) and calculating the instantaneous phase and frequency via the Hilbert transform (HT). Second, six model tests are conducted using different grouting defects and bolt protruding lengths to verify the effectiveness of the HHT analysis method. Lastly, the influence of the bolt protruding length on the test signal, identification of multiple reflections from defects, bolt end and protruding end, and mode mixing from EMD are discussed. The HHT analysis method can identify the bolt length and grouting defect locations from signals that contain noise at multiple reflected interfaces. The reflection from the long protruding end creates an irregular test signal with many frequency peaks on the spectrum. The reflections from defects barely change the original signal because they are low energy, which cannot be adequately resolved using existing methods. The HHT analysis method can identify reflections from the long protruding end of the bolt and multiple reflections from grouting defects based on mutations in the instantaneous

  18. Branch length similarity entropy-based descriptors for shape representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ohsung; Lee, Sang-Hee

    2017-11-01

    In previous studies, we showed that the branch length similarity (BLS) entropy profile could be successfully used for the shape recognition such as battle tanks, facial expressions, and butterflies. In the present study, we proposed new descriptors, roundness, symmetry, and surface roughness, for the recognition, which are more accurate and fast in the computation than the previous descriptors. The roundness represents how closely a shape resembles to a circle, the symmetry characterizes how much one shape is similar with another when the shape is moved in flip, and the surface roughness quantifies the degree of vertical deviations of a shape boundary. To evaluate the performance of the descriptors, we used the database of leaf images with 12 species. Each species consisted of 10 - 20 leaf images and the total number of images were 160. The evaluation showed that the new descriptors successfully discriminated the leaf species. We believe that the descriptors can be a useful tool in the field of pattern recognition.

  19. Bond-Slip Relationship for CFRP Sheets Externally Bonded to Concrete under Cyclic Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Cao, Shuangyin; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Juntao

    2018-02-26

    The objective of this paper was to explore the bond-slip relationship between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and concrete under cyclic loading through experimental and analytical approaches. Modified beam tests were performed in order to gain insight into the bond-slip relationship under static and cyclic loading. The test variables are the CFRP-to-concrete width ratio, and the bond length of the CFRP sheets. An analysis of the test results in this paper and existing test results indicated that the slope of the ascending segment of the bond-slip curve decreased with an increase in the number of load cycles, but the slip corresponding to the maximum shear stress was almost invariable as the number of load cycles increased. In addition, the rate of reduction in the slope of the ascending range of the bond-slip curve during cyclic loading decreased as the concrete strength increased, and increased as the load level or CFRP-to-concrete width ratio enhanced. However, these were not affected by variations in bond length if the residual bond length was longer than the effective bond length. A bilinear bond-slip model for CFRP sheets that are externally bonded to concrete under cyclic loading, which considered the effects of the cyclic load level, concrete strength, and CFRP-to-concrete ratio, was developed based on the existing static bond-slip model. The accuracy of this proposed model was verified by a comparison between this proposed model and test results.

  20. Examining the relationship between free recall and immediate serial recall: Similar patterns of rehearsal and similar effects of word length, presentation rate, and articulatory suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatarah, Parveen; Ward, Geoff; Smith, Jessica; Hayes, Louise

    2009-07-01

    In five experiments, rehearsal and recall phenomena were examined using the free recall and immediate serial recall (ISR) tasks. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with lists of eight words, were precued or postcued to respond using free recall or ISR, and rehearsed out loud during presentation. The patterns of rehearsal were similar in all the conditions, and there was little difference between recall in the precued and postcued conditions. In Experiment 2, both free recall and ISR were sensitive to word length and presentation rate and showed similar patterns of rehearsal. In Experiment 3, both tasks were sensitive to word length and articulatory suppression. The word length effects generalized to 6-item (Experiment 4) and 12-item (Experiment 5) lists. These findings suggest that the two tasks are underpinned by highly similar rehearsal and recall processes.

  1. Effect of Bonding Pressure and Bonding Time on the Tensile Properties of Cu-Foam / Cu-Plate Diffusion Bonded Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Heo, Hoe-Jun; Kang, Chung-Yun; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Open cell Cu foam, which has been widely utilized in various industries because of its high thermal conductivity, lightweight and large surface area, was successfully joined with Cu plate by diffusion bonding. To prevent excessive deformation of the Cu foam during bonding process, the bonding pressure should be lower than 500 kPa at 800 ℃ for 60 min and bonding pressure should be lowered with increasing holding time. The bonding strength was evaluated by tensile tests. The tensile load of joints increased with the bonding pressure and holding time. In the case of higher bonding pressure or time, the bonded length at the interface was usually longer than the cross-sectional length of the foam, so fracture occurred at the foam. For the same reason, base metal (foam) fracture mainly occurred at the node-plate junction rather than in the strut-plate junction because the bonded surface area of the node was relatively larger than that of the strut.

  2. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies

  3. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å 3 for bulk to 57 Å 3 for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10 −6 K −1 for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10 −6 K −1 for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  4. Models for mean bonding length, melting point and lattice thermal expansion of nanoparticle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin-Erbil, Arbil, Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Three models are derived to explain the nanoparticles size dependence of mean bonding length, melting temperature and lattice thermal expansion applied on Sn, Si and Au. The following figures are shown as an example for Sn nanoparticles indicates hilly applicable models for nanoparticles radius larger than 3 nm. Highlights: ► A model for a size dependent mean bonding length is derived. ► The size dependent melting point of nanoparticles is modified. ► The bulk model for lattice thermal expansion is successfully used on nanoparticles. -- Abstract: A model, based on the ratio number of surface atoms to that of its internal, is derived to calculate the size dependence of lattice volume of nanoscaled materials. The model is applied to Si, Sn and Au nanoparticles. For Si, that the lattice volume is increases from 20 Å{sup 3} for bulk to 57 Å{sup 3} for a 2 nm size nanocrystals. A model, for calculating melting point of nanoscaled materials, is modified by considering the effect of lattice volume. A good approach of calculating size-dependent melting point begins from the bulk state down to about 2 nm diameter nanoparticle. Both values of lattice volume and melting point obtained for nanosized materials are used to calculate lattice thermal expansion by using a formula applicable for tetrahedral semiconductors. Results for Si, change from 3.7 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a bulk crystal down to a minimum value of 0.1 × 10{sup −6} K{sup −1} for a 6 nm diameter nanoparticle.

  5. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, the gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.

  6. Inhibition of nuclear T3 binding by fatty acids: dependence on chain length, unsaturated bonds, cis-trans configuration and esterification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Platvoet-ter Schiphorst, M.

    1990-01-01

    1. Fatty acids have the capacity for inhibition of nuclear T3 binding (INB). The present studies were undertaken to describe the INB-activity of fatty acids as a function of chain length, unsaturated bonds, cis-trans configuration, and esterification. 2. Isolated rat liver nuclei were incubated with

  7. Amide proton temperature coefficients as hydrogen bond indicators in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierpicki, Tomasz; Otlewski, Jacek

    2001-01-01

    Correlations between amide proton temperature coefficients (Δσ HN /ΔT) and hydrogen bonds were investigated for a data set of 793 amides derived from 14 proteins. For amide protons showing temperature gradients more positive than -4.6 ppb/K there is a hydrogen bond predictivity value exceeding 85%. It increases to over 93% for amides within the range between -4 and -1 ppb/K. Detailed analysis shows an inverse proportionality between amide proton temperature coefficients and hydrogen bond lengths. Furthermore, for hydrogen bonds of similar bond lengths, values of temperature gradients in α-helices are on average 1 ppb/K more negative than in β-sheets. In consequence, a number of amide protons in α-helices involved in hydrogen bonds shorter than 2 A show Δσ HN /ΔT 10 helices and 98% in β-turns have temperature coefficients more positive than -4.6ppb/K. Ring current effect also significantly influences temperature coefficients of amide protons. In seven out of eight cases non-hydrogen bonded amides strongly deshielded by neighboring aromatic rings show temperature coefficients more positive than -2 ppb/K. In general, amide proton temperature gradients do not change with pH unless they correspond to conformational changes. Three examples of pH dependent equilibrium showing hydrogen bond formation at higher pH were found. In conclusion, amide proton temperature coefficients offer an attractive and simple way to confirm existence of hydrogen bonds in NMR determined structures

  8. Effect of Silica fume and superplasticizer on steel-concrete bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the influence of silica fume and super plasticizer on bond strength. The study included tests of fifty short length pull-out specimens in five series. The effect of silica fume and super plasticizer on bond strength was evaluated separately by tests of specimens made of concretes with similar strengths but different admixtures. Test results showed that the addition of silica fume in the concrete mixture had not a negative effect on bond strength. Also, there was not a considerable decrease in bond strength of specimens made of concrete with super plasticizer. Comparing the measured bond strengths normalized with respect to the square root of the concrete compressive strength, it was seen that the normalized bond strength increased with the concrete strength. this result agrees with the model previously proposed by the author for local bond strength. For the specimens made of high strength concrete including silica fume and super plasticizer, the normalized bond strength did not increase with the concrete strength

  9. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  10. Noble gas bond and the behaviour of XeO3 under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chunju; Wang, Xianlong; Botana, Jorge; Miao, Maosheng

    2017-10-18

    Over the past few decades, the concept of hydrogen bonds, in which hydrogen is electrophilic, has been extended to halogen bonds, chalcogen bonds and pnicogen bonds. Herein, we show that such a non-covalent bonding also exists in noble gas compounds. Using first principles calculations, we illustrate the OXe-O bond in molecular crystal XeO 3 and its effect on the behavior of this compound under pressure. Our calculations show that the covalent Xe-O bond lengths were elongated with increasing pressure and correspondingly the Xe-O stretching vibration frequencies were red shifted, which is similar to the change of H-bonds under pressure. The OXe-O bond and related hopping of O between neighboring Xe sites also correspond to the structural changes in the XeO 3 compounds at about 2 GPa. Our study extends the concept of hydrogen bonding to include all p-block elements and show a new bonding type for Noble gas elements in which it acts as an electrophilic species.

  11. Proposal of new bonding technique 'Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) Bonding'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue-Chang; Nakagawa, Hiroji; Matsuda, Fukuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    A new bonding technique named ''Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) bonding'' suitable mainly for welding dissimilar materials was proposed by which instantaneous melting of one or two of the faying surfaces is utilized. The processes of ILP bonding are mainly consisted of three stages, namely the first stage forming thin liquid layer by rapid heating, the second stage joining both specimens by thin liquid layer, and the third stage cooling the specimens rapidly to avoid the formation of brittle layer. The welding temperatures of the specimens to be welded in ILP bonding are generally differentiated from each other. ILP bonding was applied for a variety of combinations of dissimilar materials of aluminum, aluminum alloys, titanium, titanium alloy, carbon steel, austenitic stainless steel, copper and tungsten, and for similar materials of stainless steel and nickel-base alloy. There were no microvoids in these welding joints, and the formation of brittle layer at the bonding interface was suppressed. The welded joints of Al + Ti, Cu + carbon steel and Cu + austenitic stainless steel showed the fracture in base metal having lower tensile strength. Further, the welded joints of Al + carbon steel, Al alloy + Ti, Al alloy + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel, Ti + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel showed better tensile properties in the comparison with diffusion welding. Furthermore, ILP bonding was available for welding same materials susceptible to hot cracking. Because of the existence of liquid layer, the welding pressure required was extremely low, and preparation of faying surface by simple tooling or polishing by no.80 emery paper was enough. The change in specimen length before and after welding was relatively little, only depending on the thickness of liquid layer. The welding time was very short, and thus high welding efficiency was obtained. (author)

  12. Determination by vibrational spectra of the strength and the bond length of atoms U and O in uranyl complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Martinez Q, E.

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds were studied. The wave number was related to the harmonic oscillator model and to the mathematical expression of Badger as modified by Jones, to determine the strength and the bond length of atoms U and O in UO 2 2+ . A mathematical simplification develop by us is proposed and its results compared with values obtained by other methods. (Author)

  13. A novel disulfide bond in the SH2 Domain of the C-terminal Src kinase controls catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jamie E; Whitford, Paul C; Shaffer, Jennifer; Onuchic, Jose N; Adams, Joseph A; Jennings, Patricia A

    2007-02-02

    The SH2 domain of the C-terminal Src kinase [Csk] contains a unique disulfide bond that is not present in other known SH2 domains. To investigate whether this unusual disulfide bond serves a novel function, the effects of disulfide bond formation on catalytic activity of the full-length protein and on the structure of the SH2 domain were investigated. The kinase activity of full-length Csk decreases by an order of magnitude upon formation of the disulfide bond in the distal SH2 domain. NMR spectra of the fully oxidized and fully reduced SH2 domains exhibit similar chemical shift patterns and are indicative of similar, well-defined tertiary structures. The solvent-accessible disulfide bond in the isolated SH2 domain is highly stable and far from the small lobe of the kinase domain. However, reduction of this bond results in chemical shift changes of resonances that map to a cluster of residues that extend from the disulfide bond across the molecule to a surface that is in direct contact with the small lobe of the kinase domain in the intact molecule. Normal mode analyses and molecular dynamics calculations suggest that disulfide bond formation has large effects on residues within the kinase domain, most notably within the active-site cleft. Overall, the data indicate that reversible cross-linking of two cysteine residues in the SH2 domain greatly impacts catalytic function and interdomain communication in Csk.

  14. Origin of the X-Hal (Hal ) Cl, Br) Bond-Length Change in the Halogen-Bonded Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, Weizhou; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 17 (2008), s. 4114-4119 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : hal ogen bonded complexes * MP2(full)/6-311++G(d,p) method * natural bond orbital analysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.871, year: 2008

  15. Crystallochemistry of rhenium compounds with metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koz'min, P.A.; Surazhskaya, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented including a brief description of atomic structure of 59 coordination rhenium compounds with metal-metal bond. The most important bond lengths and valent angles are presented for each compound. The dependence of rhenium-rhenium bond length on its multiplicity is discussed and possible causes of deviations from this dependence (namely, axial ligand presence, steric repulsion of ligands) are considered. On the basis of qualitative comparison of electronegativity of ligands in dimer compounds with quarternary bond of rhenium-rhenium a supposition is made on the influence of formal charge of atomic group and summary electro-negativity of ligands on the possibility of the metal-metal bond formation

  16. Utilisation of an eta(3)-allyl hydride complex, formed by UV irradiation, as a controlled source of 16-electron (eta(5)-C(5)Me(5))Rh(CH(2)[double bond, length as m-dash]CHMe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Catherine J; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Lledós, Agustí; Duckett, Simon B

    2008-10-21

    Low temperature UV irradiation of solutions of (eta(5)-C(5)Me(5))Rh(CH(2)[double bond, length as m-dash]CHMe)(2) yields (eta(5)-C(5)Me(5))Rh(eta(3)-CH(2)CHCH(2))(H), which provides controlled access to the 16-electron fragment (eta(5)-C(5)Me(5))Rh(CH(2)[double bond, length as m-dash]CHMe).

  17. Bond length and electric current oscillation of long linear carbon chains: Density functional theory, MpB model, and quantum spin transport studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeiras, R. Y.; Silva, E. Z. da

    2014-01-01

    Carbon linear atomic chains attached to graphene have experimentally been produced. Motivated by these results, we study the nature of the carbon bonds in these nanowires and how it affects their electrical properties. In the present study we investigate chains with different numbers of atoms and we observe that nanowires with odd number of atoms present a distinct behavior than the ones with even numbers. Using graphene nanoribbons as leads, we identify differences in the quantum transport of the chains with the consequence that even and odd numbered chains have low and high electrical conduction, respectively. We also noted a dependence of current with the wire size. We study this unexpected behavior using a combination of first principles calculations and simple models based on chemical bond theory. From our studies, the electrons of carbon nanowires present a quasi-free electron behavior and this explains qualitatively the high electrical conduction and the bond lengths with unexpected values for the case of odd nanowires. Our study also allows the understanding of the electric conduction dependence with the number of atoms and their parity in the chain. In the case of odd number chains a proposed π-bond (MpB) model describes unsaturated carbons that introduce a mobile π-bond that changes dramatically the structure and transport properties of these wires. Our results indicate that the nature of bonds plays the main role in the oscillation of quantum electrical conduction for chains with even and odd number of atoms and also that nanowires bonded to graphene nanoribbons behave as a quasi-free electron system, suggesting that this behavior is general and it could also remain if the chains are bonded to other materials

  18. What is a hydrogen bond?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What is a hydrogen bond? Precise definition of a hydrogen bond is still elusive!1. Several criteria are listed usually for X-H•••Y, X and Y initially thought to be F, O and N only1. Structural: The X-Y bond length is less than the sum of their van der Waals radii. X-H•••Y is ...

  19. Driving force for hydrophobic interaction at different length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangi, Ronen

    2011-03-17

    We study by molecular dynamics simulations the driving force for the hydrophobic interaction between graphene sheets of different sizes down to the atomic scale. Similar to the prediction by Lum, Chandler, and Weeks for hard-sphere solvation [J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 4570-4577], we find the driving force to be length-scale dependent, despite the fact that our model systems do not exhibit dewetting. For small hydrophobic solutes, the association is purely entropic, while enthalpy favors dissociation. The latter is demonstrated to arise from the enhancement of hydrogen bonding between the water molecules around small hydrophobes. On the other hand, the attraction between large graphene sheets is dominated by enthalpy which mainly originates from direct solute-solute interactions. The crossover length is found to be inside the range of 0.3-1.5 nm(2) of the surface area of the hydrophobe that is eliminated in the association process. In the large-scale regime, different thermodynamic properties are scalable with this change of surface area. In particular, upon dimerization, a total and a water-induced stabilization of approximately 65 and 12 kJ/mol/nm(2) are obtained, respectively, and on average around one hydrogen bond is gained per 1 nm(2) of graphene sheet association. Furthermore, the potential of mean force between the sheets is also scalable except for interplate distances smaller than 0.64 nm which corresponds to the region around the barrier for removing the last layer of water. It turns out that, as the surface area increases, the relative height of the barrier for association decreases and the range of attraction increases. It is also shown that, around small hydrophobic solutes, the lifetime of the hydrogen bonds is longer than in the bulk, while around large hydrophobes it is the same. Nevertheless, the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bond network for both length-scale regimes is slower than in bulk water. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    Undervisningsmateriale. A bond is a debt security, similar to an ”I Owe You document” (IOU). When you purchase a bond, you are lending money to a government, municipality, corporation, federal agency or other entity known as the issuer. In return for the loan, the issuer promises to pay you...... a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...... securities and foreign government bonds....

  1. Safe-by-Design CuO Nanoparticles via Fe-Doping, Cu-O Bond Length Variation, and Biological Assessment in Cells and Zebrafish Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naatz, Hendrik; Lin, Sijie; Li, Ruibin; Jiang, Wen; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Köser, Jan; Thöming, Jorg; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Mädler, Lutz; Pokhrel, Suman

    2017-01-24

    The safe implementation of nanotechnology requires nanomaterial hazard assessment in accordance with the material physicochemical properties that trigger the injury response at the nano/bio interface. Since CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used industrially and their dissolution properties play a major role in hazard potential, we hypothesized that tighter bonding of Cu to Fe by particle doping could constitute a safer-by-design approach through decreased dissolution. Accordingly, we designed a combinatorial library in which CuO was doped with 1-10% Fe in a flame spray pyrolysis reactor. The morphology and structural properties were determined by XRD, BET, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM, EFTEM, and EELS, which demonstrated a significant reduction in the apical Cu-O bond length while simultaneously increasing the planar bond length (Jahn-Teller distortion). Hazard screening was performed in tissue culture cell lines and zebrafish embryos to discern the change in the hazardous effects of doped vs nondoped particles. This demonstrated that with increased levels of doping there was a progressive decrease in cytotoxicity in BEAS-2B and THP-1 cells, as well as an incremental decrease in the rate of hatching interference in zebrafish embryos. The dissolution profiles were determined and the surface reactions taking place in Holtfreter's solution were validated using cyclic voltammetry measurements to demonstrate that the Cu + /Cu 2+ and Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ redox species play a major role in the dissolution process of pure and Fe-doped CuO. Altogether, a safe-by-design strategy was implemented for the toxic CuO particles via Fe doping and has been demonstrated for their safe use in the environment.

  2. Application of Berlin's theorem to bond-length changes in isolated molecules and red- and blue-shifting H-bonded clusters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, Weizhou; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, 6/7 (2008), s. 862-872 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA AV ČR IAA400550510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Berlin's theorem * H-bonding * Blue -shifting H-bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2008

  3. Investigation of field corrosion performance and bond/development length of galvanized reinforcing steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In reinforced concrete systems, ensuring that a good bond between the concrete and the embedded reinforcing steel is critical to : long-term structural performance. Without good bond between the two, the system simply cannot behave as intended. The b...

  4. The Hydrogen Bonded Structures of Two 5-Bromobarbituric Acids and Analysis of Unequal C5–X and C5–X′ Bond Lengths (X = X′ = F, Cl, Br or Me in 5,5-Disubstituted Barbituric Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gelbrich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the methanol hemisolvate of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid (1MH displays an H-bonded layer structure which is based on N–H∙∙∙O=C, N–H∙∙∙O(MeOH and (MeOHO–H∙∙∙O interactions. The barbiturate molecules form an H-bonded substructure which has the fes topology. 5,5′-Methanediylbis(5-bromobarbituric acid 2, obtained from a solution of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid in nitromethane, displays a N–H···O=C bonded framework of the sxd type. The conformation of the pyridmidine ring and the lengths of the ring substituent bonds C5–X and C5–X′ in crystal forms of 5,5-dibromobarbituric acid and three closely related analogues (X = X′ = Br, Cl, F, Me have been investigated. In each case, a conformation close to a C5-endo envelope is correlated with a significant lengthening of the axial C5–X′ in comparison to the equatorial C5–X bond. Isolated molecule geometry optimizations at different levels of theory confirm that the C5-endo envelope is the global conformational energy minimum of 5,5-dihalogenbarbituric acids. The relative lengthening of the axial bond is therefore interpreted as an inherent feature of the preferred envelope conformation of the pyrimidine ring, which minimizes repulsive interactions between the axial substituent and pyrimidine ring atoms.

  5. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, Jarosław; Poznańska, Anna; Shugar, David

    2014-01-01

    Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  6. Nonperfect synchronization of bond-forming and bond-rupturing processes in the reaction H + H2 → H2 + H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.K.; Rao, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    The simplest prototypical hydrogen transfer reaction, i.e., H + H 2 → H 2 + H, is studied by the quantum-mechanical ab initio methods. Results reveal that during this reaction free valence which almost equals the square of the spin density develops on the migrating hydrogen atom. Bond orders are calculated using Mayer's formalism. Both the variations of bond orders and bond lengths along the reaction path are examined. This analysis reveals that the bond formation and bond cleavage processes in this reaction are not perfectly synchronous. The bond clevage process is slightly more advanced on the reaction path. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  8. Research on the Bond Anchorage Properties of Alkali-Activated Slag Cementitious Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Zheng, W. Z.; Leng, Y. F.; Qin, C. Z.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2017-12-01

    By bond-anchorage property tests at 20°C ∼500°C, the distribution of shear stress between carbon fiber sheets and concrete at all levels of loading and anchorage lengths were measured, which means the bond lengths during CFRP sheets are pulled off at the same time when the concrete is torn and stripped were gotten. The failure modes were obtained. In addition, the failure loads were measured, and the calculated formulas of anchorage lengths were identified by fitting at high temperature. It can be seen that the anchorage lengths of carbon fiber sheets increase with increasing temperature at 20°C ∼100°C, the anchorage lengths of carbon fiber sheets decrease with increasing temperature at 100°C ∼500°C. Tests prove that AASCM has favorable high-temperature resistant and bond anchorage properties.

  9. Pullout Performances of Grouted Rockbolt Systems with Bond Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Zihan; Wang, Shanyong; Wang, Shuren; Fu, Lei; Tang, Chunan

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the pullout behaviour of fully grouted rockbolts with bond defects. The cohesive zone model (CZM) is adopted to model the bond-slip behaviour between the rockbolt and grout material. Tensile tests were also conducted to validate the numerical model. The results indicate that the defect length can obviously influence the load and stress distributions along the rockbolt as well as the load-displacement response of the grouted system. Moreover, a plateau in the stress distribution forms due to the bond defect. The linear limit and peak load of the load-displacement response decrease as the defect length increases. A bond defect located closer to the loaded end leads to a longer nonlinear stage in the load-displacement response. However, the peak loads measured from the specimens made with various defect locations are almost approximately the same. The peak load for a specimen with the defects equally spaced along the bolt is higher than that for a specimen with defects concentrated in a certain zone, even with the same total defect length. Therefore, the dispersed pattern of bond defects would be much safer than the concentrated pattern. For the specimen with dispersed defects, the peak load increases with an increase in the defect spacing, even if the total defect length is the same. The peak load for a grouted rockbolt system with defects increases with an increases in the bolt diameter. This work leads to a better understanding of the load transfer mechanism for grouted rockbolt systems with bond defects, and paves the way towards developing a general evaluation method for damaged rockbolt grouted systems.

  10. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Poznański

    Full Text Available Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  11. Identification of the formation of metal-vinylidene interfacial bonds of alkyne-capped platinum nanoparticles by isotopic labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Limei; Deming, Christopher P; Bonny, Lewis W; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-07

    Stable platinum nanoparticles were prepared by the self-assembly of 1-dodecyne and dodec-1-deuteroyne onto bare platinum colloid surfaces. The nanoparticles exhibited consistent core size and optical properties. FTIR and NMR measurements confirmed the formation of Pt-vinylidene (Pt[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]CH-) interfacial linkages rather than Pt-acetylide (Pt-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-) and platinum-hydride (Pt-H) bonds.

  12. A Study of Bond of Structural Timber and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtaeg LEE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The increase of well-being culture of problem related to environmental depletion of resource is not the growing interest in timber the natural material of construction markets. Also, the perception for historic preservation has been increased in respond to heightened interest. However, it is fairly difficult for architectural properties to maintain their durability because it was made by timber construction. Preventing traditional structure from damage and structural performance reduction is paramount in maintenance problem. A number of studies of reinforced method have been conducted in order to solve such a problem. In this paper, external bonded reinforcement and near-surface mounted was used as a way to reinforce timber structure’s durability. Bond strength for specimens with different bond length was investigated. As a result showed, maximum bond strength in bond length 300 mm from all method, was found to be not increased of bond strength over the certain bond length.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9702

  13. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro: the sequel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Van Eijck, Bouke P.; Kroon, Jan

    1991-02-01

    In the framework of our comparative research concerning hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and liquid phases we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid methanol. Six different rigid three site models are compared. Five of them had been reported in the literature and one (OM2) we developed by a fit to the experimental molar volume, heat of vaporization and neutron weighted radial distribution function. In general the agreement with experiment is satisfactory for the different models. None of the models has an explicit hydrogen bond potential, but five of the six models show a degree of hydrogen bonding comparable to experiments on liquid methanol. The analysis of the simulation hydrogen bonds indicates that there is a distinct preference of the O⋯O axis to lie in the acceptor lone pairs plane, but hardly any for the lone pair directions. Ab initio calculations and crystal structure statistics of OH⋯O hydrogen bonds agree with this observation. The O⋯O hydrogen bond length distributions are similar for most models. The crystal structures show a sharper O⋯O distribution. Explicit introduction of harmonic motion with a quite realistic root mean square amplitude of 0.08 Å to the thermally averaged crystal distribution results in a distribution comparable to OM2 although the maximum of the former is found at shorter distance. On the basis of the analysis of the static properties of all models we conclude that our OM2, Jorgenson's OPLS and Haughney, Ferrario and McDonald's HFM1 models are good candidates for simulations of liquid methanol under isothermal, isochoric conditions. Partly flexible and completely rigid OM2 are simulated at constant pressure and with fixed volume. The flexible simulations give essentially the same (correct) results under both conditions, which is not surprising because the flexible form was fitted under both conditions. Rigid OM2 has a similar potential energy but larger pressure in the

  14. Safe and Liquid Mortgage Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Lund, Jesper

    This paper shows that strict match pass-through funding of covered bonds provides safe and liquid mortgage bonds. Despite a 30% drop in house prices during the 2008 global crisis Danish mortgage bonds remained as liquid as most European government bonds. The Danish pass-through system effectively...... eliminates credit risk from the investor's perspective. Similar to other safe bonds, funding liquidity becomes the main driver of mortgage bond liquidity and this creates commonality in liquidity across markets and countries. These findings have implications for how to design a robust mortgage bond system...

  15. How Is the Enamel Affected by Different Orthodontic Bonding Agents and Polishing Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Heravi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the effect of new bonding techniques on enamel surface.Materials and Methods: Sixty upper central incisors were randomly divided into two equal groups. In the first group, metal brackets were bonded using Trans- bondXT and, in the second group, the same brackets were bonded with MaxcemElite. The shear bond strength (SBS of both agents to enamel was measured and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding, after debonding and after polishing were compared. The number of visible cracks and the adhesive remnant index (ARI scores in each group were also measured.Results: There were significantly more enamel cracks in the Transbond XT group after debonding and polishing compared to the Maxcem Elite group. There was no significant difference in the length of enamel cracks between the two groups; but, in each group, a significant increase in the length of enamel cracks was noticeable after debonding. Polishing did not cause any statistically significant change in crack length. The SBS of Maxcem Elite was significantly lower than that of Transbond XT (95% confidence interval.Conclusion: Maxcem Elite offers clinically acceptable bond strength and can thus be used as a routine adhesive for orthodontic purposes since it is less likely todamage the enamel.

  16. How Is the Enamel Affected by Different Orthodontic Bonding Agents and Polishing Techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Shafaee, Hooman; Abdollahi, Mojtaba; Rashed, Roozbeh

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of new bonding techniques on enamel surface. Sixty upper central incisors were randomly divided into two equal groups. In the first group, metal brackets were bonded using TransbondXT and, in the second group, the same brackets were bonded with Maxcem Elite. The shear bond strength (SBS) of both agents to enamel was measured and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding, after debonding and after polishing were compared. The number of visible cracks and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores in each group were also measured. There were significantly more enamel cracks in the Transbond XT group after debonding and polishing compared to the Maxcem Elite group. There was no significant difference in the length of enamel cracks between the two groups; but, in each group, a significant increase in the length of enamel cracks was noticeable after debonding. Polishing did not cause any statistically significant change in crack length. The SBS of Maxcem Elite was significantly lower than that of Transbond XT (95% confidence interval). Maxcem Elite offers clinically acceptable bond strength and can thus be used as a routine adhesive for orthodontic purposes since it is less likely to damage the enamel.

  17. Strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds prepared using ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.E.; Campbell, G.H.; Wien, W.L.; Stoner, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have measured the cross-breaking strength of Al and Al-Mg alloys bonded with alumina. Diffusion bonding of Al and Al-Mg alloys requires significantly more bonding time than previously thought to obtain complete bonding. In contrast to previous diffusion bonding studies, fracture morphologies are similar to those obtained in bonds formed by liquid phase reaction; i.e., bonds are as strong or stronger than the ceramic; and fracture tends to propagate in the metal for pure Al and near the interface in the ceramic for the alloys. There are indications that the fracture morphology depends on Mg content and therefore on plasticity in the metal

  18. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  19. Redshift or adduct stabilization -- a computational study of hydrogen bonding in adducts of protonated carboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Solveig Gaarn; Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    It is generally expected that the hydrogen bond strength in a D-H-A adduct is predicted by the difference between the proton affinities of D and A, measured by the adduct stabilization, and demonstrated by the IR redshift of the D-H bond stretching vibrational frequency. These criteria do...... not always yield consistent predictions, as illustrated by the hydrogen bonds formed by the E and Z OH groups of protonated carboxylic acids. The delta-PA and the stabilization of a series of hydrogen bonded adducts indicate that the E OH group forms the stronger hydrogen bonds, whereas the bond length...... carboxylic acids are different. The OH bond length and IR redshift afford the better measure of hydrogen bond strength....

  20. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  1. Experimental Assessment on the Flexural Bonding Performance of Concrete Beam with GFRP Reinforcing Bar under Repeated Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkwan Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to investigate the flexural bond performance of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforcing bar under repeated loading. The flexural bond tests reinforced with GFRP reinforcing bars were carried out according to the BS EN 12269-1 (2000 specification. The bond test consisted of three loading schemes: static, monotonic, and variable-amplitude loading to simulate ambient loading conditions. The empirical bond length based on the static test was 225 mm, whereas it was 317 mm according to ACI 440 1R-03. Each bond stress on the rib is released and bonding force is enhanced as the bond length is increased. Appropriate level of bond length may be recommended with this energy-based analysis. For the monotonic loading test, the bond strengths at pullout failure after 2,000,000 cycles were 10.4 MPa and 6.5 MPa, respectively: 63–70% of the values from the static loading test. The variable loading test indicated that the linear cumulative damage theory on GFRP bonding may not be appropriate for estimating the fatigue limit when subjected to variable-amplitude loading.

  2. Study on the Connecting Length of CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiongfei; Li, Yue; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-05-01

    The paper studied the varying mode of shear stress in the connecting zone of CFRP. Using epoxy resin (EP) as bond material, performance of specimens with different connecting length of CFRP was tested to obtain the conclusion. CFRP-confined concrete column was tested subsequently to verify the conclusion. The results show that: (1) The binding properties of modified epoxy resin with CFRP is good; (2) As the connecting length increased, the ultimate tensile strength of CFRP increased as well in the range of the experiment parameters; (3) Tensile strength of CFRP can reach the ultimate strength when the connecting length is 90mm;(4) The connecting length of 90mm of CFRP meet the reinforcement requirements.

  3. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    century and most chemists appear to think of 'chemi- cal bond' as ..... These complexes, in their global min- ima, have ... taneously act as hydrogen bond donor and acceptor displaying ... also has a local minimum, which is linear and similar to.

  4. Bonding in Sulfur-Oxygen Compounds-HSO/SOH and SOO/OSO: An Example of Recoupled Pair π Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Woon, David E; Dunning, Thom H

    2013-10-08

    The ground states (X(2)A″) of HSO and SOH are extremely close in energy, yet their molecular structures differ dramatically, e.g., re(SO) is 1.485 Å in HSO and 1.632 Å in SOH. The SO bond is also much stronger in HSO than in SOH: 100.3 kcal/mol versus 78.8 kcal/mol [RCCSD(T)-F12/AVTZ]. Similar differences are found in the SO2 isomers, SOO and OSO, depending on whether the second oxygen atom binds to oxygen or sulfur. We report generalized valence bond and RCCSD(T)-F12 calculations on HSO/SOH and OSO/SOO and analyze the bonding in all four species. We find that HSO has a shorter and stronger SO bond than SOH due to the presence of a recoupled pair bond in the π(a″) system of HSO. Similarly, the bonding in SOO and OSO differs greatly. SOO is like ozone and has substantial diradical character, while OSO has two recoupled pair π bonds and negligible diradical character. The ability of the sulfur atom to form recoupled pair bonds provides a natural explanation for the dramatic variation in the bonding in these and many other sulfur-oxygen compounds.

  5. Sensitivity of hydrogen bonds of DNA and RNA to hydration, as gauged by 1JNH measurements in ethanol-water mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, Marlon N.; Kong Xiangming; LiWang, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond lengths of nucleic acids are (1) longer in DNA than in RNA, and (2) sequence dependent. The physicochemical basis for these variations in hydrogen-bond lengths is unknown, however. Here, the notion that hydration plays a significant role in nucleic acid hydrogen-bond lengths is tested. Watson-Crick N1...N3 hydrogen-bond lengths of several DNA and RNA duplexes are gauged using imino 1 J NH measurements, and ethanol is used as a cosolvent to lower water activity. We find that 1 J NH values of DNA and RNA become less negative with added ethanol, which suggests that mild dehydration reduces hydrogen-bond lengths even as the overall thermal stabilities of these duplexes decrease. The 1 J NH of DNA are increased in 8 mol% ethanol to those of RNA in water, which suggests that the greater hydration of DNA plays a significant role in its longer hydrogen bonds. The data also suggest that ethanol-induced dehydration is greater for the more hydrated G:C base pairs and thereby results in greater hydrogen-bond shortening than for the less hydrated A:T/U base pairs of DNA and RNA

  6. Measurements of the microwave spectrum, Re-H bond length, and Re quadrupole coupling for HRe(CO)5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolich, Stephen G.; Sickafoose, Shane M.

    1993-11-01

    Rotational transition frequencies for rhenium pentacarbonyl hydride were measured in the 4-10 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type microwave spectrometer. The rotational constants and Re nuclear quadrupole coupling constants for the four isotopomers, (1) H187Re(CO)5, (2) H185Re(CO)5, (3) D187Re(CO)5, and (4) D185Re(CO)5, were obtained from the spectra. For the most common isotopomer, B(1)=818.5464(2) MHz and eq Q(187Re)=-900.13(3) MHz. The Re-H bond length (r0) determined by fitting the rotational constants is 1.80(1) Å. Although the Re atom is located at a site of near-octahedral symmetry, the quadrupole coupling is large due to the large Re nuclear moments. A 2.7% increase in Re quadrupole coupling was observed for D-substituted isotopomers, giving a rather large isotope effect on the quadrupole coupling. The Cax-Re-Ceq angle is 96(1)°, when all Re-C-O angles are constrained to 180°.

  7. Quantum mechanics models of the methanol dimer: OH⋯O hydrogen bonds of β-d-glucose moieties from crystallographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintrón, Michael Santiago; Johnson, Glenn P; French, Alfred D

    2017-04-18

    The interaction of two methanol molecules, simplified models of carbohydrates and cellulose, was examined using a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) levels of theory. Energy plots for hydrogen bonding distance (H⋯O) and angle (OH⋯O) were constructed. All but two experimental structures were located in stabilized areas on the vacuum phase energy plots. Each of the 399 models was analyzed with Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) theory, which showed a widespread ability by the dimer models to form OH⋯O hydrogen bonds that have bond paths and Bond Critical Points. Continuum solvation calculations suggest that a portion of the energy-stabilized structures could occur in the presence of water. A survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all donor-acceptor interactions in β-D-glucose moieties examined the similarities and differences among the hydroxyl groups and acetal oxygen atoms that participate in hydrogen bonds. Comparable behavior was observed for the O2H, O3H, O4H, and O6H hydroxyls, acting either as acceptors or donors. Ring O atoms showed distinct hydrogen bonding behavior that favored mid-length hydrogen bonds. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of enamel damages following orthodontic bracket debonding in fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baherimoghadam, Tahreh; Akbarian, Sahar; Rasouli, Reza; Naseri, Navid

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) of the orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth using Light Bond with and without adhesion promoters and compare their enamel damages following debonding. In this study, 30 fluorosed (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index = 4-5) and 30 nonfluorosed teeth were randomly distributed between two subgroups according to the bonding materials: Group 1, fluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 2, fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond; Group 3, nonfluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 4, nonfluorosed bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopic evaluation was performed by unbiased stereology in all teeth to determine the amount of adhesive remnants and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and Mann-Whitney test. While fluorosis reduced the SBS of orthodontic bracket (P = 0.017), Enhance Locus Ceruleus LC significantly increased the SBS of the orthodontic bracket in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth (P = 0.039). Significant increasing in the number and length of enamel crack after debonding was found in all four groups. There were no significant differences in the length of enamel crack increased after debonding among four groups (P = 0.768) while increasing in the number of enamel cracks after debonding was significantly different among the four groups (P = 0.023). Teeth in Group 2 showed the highest enamel damages among four groups following debonding. Adhesion promoters could improve the bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but conservative debonding methods for decreasing enamel damages would be necessary.

  9. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Atash Biz Yeganeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS and microleakage during six months of water storage.Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP, Single Bond (SB, Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB, and All-Bond SE (ABSE. After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05.Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage.Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. 

  10. Backbone conformation affects duplex initiation and duplex propagation in hybridisation of synthetic H-bonding oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadevaia, Giulia; Núñez-Villanueva, Diego; Stross, Alexander E; Hunter, Christopher A

    2018-06-06

    Synthetic oligomers equipped with complementary H-bond donor and acceptor side chains form multiply H-bonded duplexes in organic solvents. Comparison of the duplex forming properties of four families of oligomers with different backbones shows that formation of an extended duplex with three or four inter-strand H-bonds is more challenging than formation of complexes that make only two H-bonds. The stabilities of 1 : 1 complexes formed between length complementary homo-oligomers equipped with either phosphine oxide or phenol recognition modules were measured in toluene. When the backbone is very flexible (pentane-1,5-diyl thioether), the stability increases uniformly by an order of magnitude for each additional base-pair added to the duplex: the effective molarities for formation of the first intramolecular H-bond (duplex initiation) and subsequent intramolecular H-bonds (duplex propagation) are similar. This flexible system is compared with three more rigid backbones that are isomeric combinations of an aromatic ring and methylene groups. One of the rigid systems behaves in exactly the same way as the flexible backbone, but the other two do not. For these systems, the effective molarity for formation of the first intramolecular H-bond is the same as that found for the other two backbones, but additional H-bonds are not formed between the longer oligomers. The effective molarities are too low for duplex propagation in these systems, because the oligomer backbones cannot adopt conformations compatible with formation of an extended duplex.

  11. A modification of the Schomaker—Stevenson rule for prediction of single bond distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Richard; Haaland, Arne

    1985-04-01

    A modification of the Schomaker—Stevenson rule: ?c = 8.5 pm, n = 1.4, significantly reduces the discrepancy between experimental calculated bond lengths for every polar bonds between main group elements.

  12. Investigation of field corrosion performance and bond/development length of galvanized reinforcing steel : [tech transfer summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In reinforced concrete systems, ensuring that a good bond between the : concrete and the embedded reinforcing steel is critical to long-term structural : performance. Without good bond between the two, the system simply cannot : behave as intended. :...

  13. The Influence of Disorder in Multifilament Yarns on the Bond Performance in Textile Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the performance of a bond layer between the multi-filament yarn and the cementitious matrix. The performance of the bond layer is a central issue in the development of textile-reinforced concrete. The changes in the microstructure during the loading result in distinguished failure mechanisms on the micro, meso and macro scales. The paper provides a brief review of these effects and describes a modeling strategy capable of reflecting the failure process. Using the model of the bond layer we illuminate the correspondence between the disorder in the microstructure of the yarn and the bonding behavior at the meso- and macro level. Particular interest is paid to the influence of irregularities in the micro-structure (relative differences in filament lengths, varying bond quality, bond-free length for different levels of local bond quality between the filament surface and the matrix. 

  14. Bond–Slip Relationship for CFRP Sheets Externally Bonded to Concrete under Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Cao, Shuangyin; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Juntao

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to explore the bond–slip relationship between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and concrete under cyclic loading through experimental and analytical approaches. Modified beam tests were performed in order to gain insight into the bond–slip relationship under static and cyclic loading. The test variables are the CFRP-to-concrete width ratio, and the bond length of the CFRP sheets. An analysis of the test results in this paper and existing test results indicated that the slope of the ascending segment of the bond–slip curve decreased with an increase in the number of load cycles, but the slip corresponding to the maximum shear stress was almost invariable as the number of load cycles increased. In addition, the rate of reduction in the slope of the ascending range of the bond–slip curve during cyclic loading decreased as the concrete strength increased, and increased as the load level or CFRP-to-concrete width ratio enhanced. However, these were not affected by variations in bond length if the residual bond length was longer than the effective bond length. A bilinear bond–slip model for CFRP sheets that are externally bonded to concrete under cyclic loading, which considered the effects of the cyclic load level, concrete strength, and CFRP-to-concrete ratio, was developed based on the existing static bond–slip model. The accuracy of this proposed model was verified by a comparison between this proposed model and test results. PMID:29495383

  15. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics–quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups

  16. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V; Jansen, Thomas L C; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics-quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid--alcohols--has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECT OF NATURAL TROPICAL WEATHER ON INTERFACIAL BONDING PERFORMANCE OF CFRP-CONCRETE BONDING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHD H. MOHD HASHIM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The existing reinforced concrete structures may require rehabilitation and strengthening to overcome deficiencies due to defect and environmental deterioration. Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP-concrete bonding systems can provide solution for the deficiencies, but the durability of the bonded joint needs to be investigated for reliable structural performance. In this research the interfacial bonding behaviour of CFRP-concrete system under tropical climate exposure is main interest. A 300 mm concrete prism was bonded with CFRP plate on its two sides and exposed for 3, 6, and 9 months to laboratory environment, continuous natural weather, and wet-dry exposure in 3.5% saltwater solution at room and 40 °C temperature. The prisms were subjected to tension and compression load under bonding test to measure the strain and determine stress distribution and shear stress transfer behaviour. The results of the bonding test showed that load transfer was fairly linear and uniform at lower load level and changed to non-linear and non- uniform at higher load level. The force transfers causes the shear stress distribution being shifted along the bonded length. The combination of climate effects may have provided better curing of the bonded joints, but longer duration of exposure may be required to weaken the bond strength. Nevertheless, CFRP-concrete bonding system was only minimally affected under the tropical climate and salt solution.

  18. X-ray diffraction and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical bonds are investigated in sulfamic acid (H 3 N-SO 3 ), sodium sulfonlate dihydrate (H 2 NC 6 H 4 SO 3 Na.2H 2 O), 2,5-dimercaptothiadiazole (HS-C 2 N 2 S-SH), sodium cyanide dihydrate (NaCN.2H 2 O), sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4 SCN) by X-ray diffraction, and if necessary completed with neutron diffraction. Crystal structures and electron densities are determined together with bond length and angles. Also the effects of thermal motion are discussed

  19. TDDFT study on intramolecular hydrogen bond of photoexcited methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Tian, Dongxu

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium geometries, IR-spectra and transition mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen-bonded methyl salicylate in excited state were studied using DFT and TDDFT with 6-31++G (d, p) basis set. The length of hydrogen bond OH⋯OC is decreased from 1.73 Å in the ground state to 1.41 and 1.69 Å in the excited S1 and S3 states. The increase of bond length for HO and CO group also indicates that in excited state the hydrogen bond OH⋯OC is strengthened. IR spectra show HO and CO stretching bands are strongly redshifted by 1387 and 67 cm(-1) in the excited S1 and S3 states comparing to the ground state. The excitation energy and the absorption spectrum show the S3 state is the main excited state of the low-lying excited states. By analyzing the frontier molecular orbitals, the transition from the ground state to the excited S1 and S3 states was predicted to be the π→π∗ mode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Alkyl Radicals as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic, energetic and structural information obtained by DFT and G3-type computational studies demonstrates that charged proton donors can form moderately strong hydrogen bonds to simple alkyl radicals. The presence of these bonds stabilizes the adducts and modifies their structure......, and gives rise to pronounced shifts of IR stretching frequencies and to increased absorption intensities. The hydrogen bond acceptor properties of alkyl radicals equal those of many conventional acceptors, e.g., the bond length changes and IR red-shifts suggest that tert-butyl radicals are slightly better...... acceptors than formaldehyde molecules, while propyl radicals are as good as H2O. The hydrogen bond strength appears to depend on the proton affinity of the proton donor and on the ionization energy of the acceptor alkyl radical, not on the donor-acceptor proton affinity difference, reflecting...

  1. Atomistic spectrometrics of local bond-electron-energy pertaining to Na and K clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: YWang8@hnust.edu.cn [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Huang, Yongli; Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Coordination environment resolves electron binding-energy shift of Na and K clusters. • Cohesive energy of the representative bond determines the core-level shift. • XPS derives the energy level of an isolated atom and its bulk shift. • XPS derives the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density. - Abstract: Consistency between density functional theory calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed our predications on the undercoordination-induced local bond relaxation and core level shift of Na and K clusters. It is clarified that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms cause local densification and local potential well depression and shift the electron binding-energy accordingly. Numerical consistency turns out the energy levels for an isolated Na (E{sub 2p} = 31.167 eV) and K (E{sub 3p} = 18.034 eV) atoms and their respective bulk shifts of 2.401 eV and 2.754 eV, which is beyond the scope of conventional approaches. This strategy has also resulted in quantification of the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density, and atomic cohesive energy associated with the undercoordinated atoms.

  2. Flexural behaviour of partially bonded carbon fibre reinforced polymers strengthened concrete beams: Application to fire protection systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmo, J.P.; Arruda, M.R.T.; Correia, J.R.; Tiago, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behaviour of partially bonded CFRP strengthened beams was modelled. • Two dimensional non-linear finite element models were developed. • Partially bonded beams can present similar flexural strength to fully bonded ones. • Relations between the bonded length and the strength reduction were proposed. • The proposed relations were used for the design of fire protection systems. - Abstract: Recent fire resistance tests on reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) laminates showed that it is possible to attain considerable fire endurance provided that thermal insulation is applied at the anchorage zones of the strengthening system. With such protection, although the CFRP laminate prematurely debonds in the central part of the beam, it transforms into a cable fixed at the extremities until one of the anchorage zones loses its bond strength. The main objective of this paper is to propose a simplified methodology for the design of fire protection systems for CFRP strengthened-RC beams, which is based on applying thicker insulation at the anchorage zones (promoting the above mentioned “cable behaviour”) and a thinner one at the current zone (avoiding tensile rupture of the carbon fibres). As a first step towards the validation of this methodology, finite element (FE) models were developed to simulate the flexural behaviour at ambient temperature of full-scale RC beams strengthened with CFRP laminates according to the externally bonded reinforcement (EBR) and near surface mounted (NSM) techniques, in both cases fully or partially bonded (the latter simulating the cable). The FE models were calibrated with results of 4-point bending tests on small-scale beams and then extended for different beam geometries, with spans (L) varying from 2 m to 5 m, in which the influence of the CFRP bonded length (l b ) and the loading type (point or uniformly distributed) on the strength reduction was

  3. Insertion reactions into Pd[bond]O and Pd[bond]N bonds: preparation of alkoxycarbonyl, carbonato, carbamato, thiocarbamate, and thioureide complexes of palladium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, José; Martínez, M Teresa; Florenciano, Félix; Rodríguez, Venancio; López, Gregorio; Pérez, José; Chaloner, Penny A; Hitchcock, Peter B

    2003-06-02

    Mononuclear palladium hydroxo complexes of the type [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))(OH)] [(N[bond]N = 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me(2)bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmeda)] have been prepared by reaction of [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))(acetone)]ClO(4) with KOH in methanol. These hydroxo complexes react, in methanol, with CO (1 atm, room temperature) to yield the corresponding methoxycarbonyl complexes [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))(CO(2)Me)]. Similar alkoxycarbonyl complexes [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))(CO(2)R)] (N[bond]N = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)methane); R = Me, Et, or (i)Pr) are obtained when [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))Cl] is treated with KOH in the corresponding alcohol ROH and CO is bubbled through the solution. The reactions of [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))(OH)] (N[bond]N = bipy or Me(2)bipy) with CO(2), in tetrahydrofuran, lead to the formation of the binuclear carbonate complexes [(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))Pd(mu-eta(2)-CO(3))Pd(C(6)F(5))(N[bond]N)]. Complexes [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))(OH)] react in alcohol with PhNCS to yield the corresponding N-phenyl-O-alkylthiocarbamate complexes [Pd(N[bond]N)(C(6)F(5))[SC(OR)NPh

  4. Valuing Euro rating-triggered step-up telecom bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe value rating-triggered step-up bonds with three methods: (i) the Jarrow, Lando and Turnbull (1997, JLT) framework, (ii) a similar framework using historical probabilities and (iii) as plain vanilla bonds. We find that the market seems to value single step-up bonds according to the JLT

  5. Valuing Euro Rating-Triggered Step-Up Telecom Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe value rating-triggered step-up bonds with three methods: (i) the Jarrow, Lando and Turnbull (1997, JLT) framework, (ii) a similar framework using historical probabilities and (iii) as plain vanilla bonds. We find that the market seems to value single step-up bonds according to the JLT

  6. How shared preferences in music create bonds between people: values as the missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Diana; Fischer, Ronald; Strack, Micha; Bond, Michael H; Lo, Eva; Lam, Jason

    2011-09-01

    How can shared music preferences create social bonds between people? A process model is developed in which music preferences as value-expressive attitudes create social bonds via conveyed value similarity. The musical bonding model links two research streams: (a) music preferences as indicators of similarity in value orientations and (b) similarity in value orientations leading to social attraction. Two laboratory experiments and one dyadic field study demonstrated that music can create interpersonal bonds between young people because music preferences can be cues for similar or dissimilar value orientations, with similarity in values then contributing to social attraction. One study tested and ruled out an alternative explanation (via personality similarity), illuminating the differential impact of perceived value similarity versus personality similarity on social attraction. Value similarity is the missing link in explaining the musical bonding phenomenon, which seems to hold for Western and non-Western samples and in experimental and natural settings.

  7. Absolute and relative-rate measurement of the rate coefficient for reaction of perfluoro ethyl vinyl ether (C2F5OCF[double bond, length as m-dash]CF2) with OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasulu, G; Bunkan, A J C; Amedro, D; Crowley, J N

    2018-01-31

    The rate coefficient (k 1 ) for the reaction of OH radicals with perfluoro ethyl vinyl ether (PEVE, C 2 F 5 OCF[double bond, length as m-dash]CF 2 ) has been measured as a function of temperature (T = 207-300 K) using the technique of pulsed laser photolysis with detection of OH by laser-induced fluorescence (PLP-LIF) at pressures of 50 or 100 Torr N 2 bath gas. In addition, the rate coefficient was measured at 298 K and in one atmosphere of air by the relative-rate technique with loss of PEVE and reference reactant monitored in situ by IR absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient has a negative temperature dependence which can be parameterized as: k 1 (T) = 6.0 × 10 -13  exp[(480 ± 38/T)] cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and a room temperature value of k 1 (298 K) = (3.0 ± 0.3) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . Highly accurate rate coefficients from the PLP-LIF experiments were achieved by optical on-line measurements of PEVE and by performing the measurements at two different apparatuses. The large rate coefficient and the temperature dependence indicate that the reaction proceeds via OH addition to the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bond, the high pressure limit already being reached at 50 Torr N 2 . Based on the rate coefficient and average OH levels, the atmospheric lifetime of PEVE was estimated to be a few days.

  8. Repeated bonding of fixed retainer increases the risk of enamel fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinvipas, Netrporn; Hasegawa, Yuh; Terada, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influences of repeated bonding, using 2 different orthodontic adhesive systems, on the shear bond strength (SBS) and the enamel surface morphology. Sixty premolars were divided into 2 groups (n = 30), and either Transbond XT (T group) or Fuji Ortho LC (F group) adhesives were used. SBS was measured 24 h after bonding, using a universal testing machine. Then, the enamel surfaces were investigated and the mode of failure was described using adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. After each debonding, 10 teeth from each group were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine the penetration of adhesives, the length of resin tags, and the state of the enamel surface. The other teeth were subjected to two more bonding/debonding procedures. In T group, the second debonding sequences had significantly higher bond strengths than the other sequences. The length of resin tags was greatest in the second debonding sequence, although there was no significant difference. In F group, the SBS increased with further rebonding and the failure mode tended towards cohesive failure. In both groups, the ARI scores increased with rebonding. Enamel loss could have occurred with both adhesives, although the surfaces appeared unchanged to the naked eye. From this study, we suggest that enamel damage caused by repeated bonding is of concern. To prevent bond failure, we should pay attention to the adhesion method used for bondable retainers.

  9. Microscopic mechanism of electron transfer through the hydrogen bonds between carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. The atomic structure and the electron transfer properties of hydrogen bonds formed between two carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Three types of molecular junctions are constructed, in which one carboxyl alkanethiol molecule contains two methylene, -CH2, groups and the other one is composed of one, two, or three -CH2 groups. Our calculations show that, similarly to the cases of isolated carboxylic acid dimers, in these molecular junctions the two carboxyl, -COOH, groups form two H-bonds resulting in a cyclic structure. When self-interaction corrections are explicitly considered, the calculated transmission coefficients of these three H-bonded molecular junctions at the Fermi level are in good agreement with the experimental values. The analysis of the projected density of states confirms that the covalent Au-S bonds localized at the molecule-electrode interfaces and the electronic coupling between -COOH and S dominate the low-bias junction conductance. Following the increase of the number of the -CH2 groups, the coupling between -COOH and S decreases deeply. As a result, the junction conductance decays rapidly as the length of the H-bonded molecules increases. These findings not only provide an explanation to the observed distance dependence of the electron transfer properties of H-bonds, but also help the design of molecular devices constructed through H-bonds.

  10. Microscopic mechanism of electron transfer through the hydrogen bonds between carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang

    2014-11-07

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. The atomic structure and the electron transfer properties of hydrogen bonds formed between two carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Three types of molecular junctions are constructed, in which one carboxyl alkanethiol molecule contains two methylene, -CH2, groups and the other one is composed of one, two, or three -CH2 groups. Our calculations show that, similarly to the cases of isolated carboxylic acid dimers, in these molecular junctions the two carboxyl, -COOH, groups form two H-bonds resulting in a cyclic structure. When self-interaction corrections are explicitly considered, the calculated transmission coefficients of these three H-bonded molecular junctions at the Fermi level are in good agreement with the experimental values. The analysis of the projected density of states confirms that the covalent Au-S bonds localized at the molecule-electrode interfaces and the electronic coupling between -COOH and S dominate the low-bias junction conductance. Following the increase of the number of the -CH2 groups, the coupling between -COOH and S decreases deeply. As a result, the junction conductance decays rapidly as the length of the H-bonded molecules increases. These findings not only provide an explanation to the observed distance dependence of the electron transfer properties of H-bonds, but also help the design of molecular devices constructed through H-bonds.

  11. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  12. Dynamic breaking of a single gold bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pobelov, Ilya V.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Yoshida, Koji

    2017-01-01

    While one might assume that the force to break a chemical bond gives a measure of the bond strength, this intuition is misleading. If the force is loaded slowly, thermal fluctuations may break the bond before it is maximally stretched, and the breaking force will be less than the bond can sustain...... of a single Au-Au bond and show that the breaking force is dependent on the loading rate. We probe the temperature and structural dependencies of breaking and suggest that the paradox can be explained by fast breaking of atomic wires and slow breaking of point contacts giving very similar breaking forces....

  13. Making a robust carbon-cobalt(III) bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; Madsen, Anders Østergaard; Kofod, Pauli

    2009-01-01

    The coordination ion with a well-characterized carbon-cobalt(III) bond, the (1,4,7-triazacyclononane)(1,6-diamino-3-thia-4-hexanido)cobalt(III) dication, [Co(tacn)(C-aeaps)](2+) (aeaps, for aminoethylaminopropylsulfide), has been reacted with iodomethane, and the S-methyl thionium derivative has...... been isolated. The crystal structure of the resulting [Co(tacn)(C-aeaps-SCH(3))]Br(3) x 3 H(2)O at 122 K has been determined by X-ray diffraction techniques to verify the structure. The crystal structure determination shows that the carbon-cobalt bond length is even shorter (2.001(4) A) than in [Co......(tacn)(C-aeaps)](2+) participates in bonding to cobalt(III), having implications for the transformation between the carbon- and sulfur-bound forms of the aeaps ligand....

  14. A theoretical perspective of the nature of hydrogen-bond types - the atoms in molecules approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Pandiyan, B.; Kolandaivel, P.; Deepa, P.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen bonds and their strength were analysed based on their X-H proton-donor bond properties and the parameters of the H-Y distance (Y proton acceptor). Strong, moderate and weak interactions in hydrogen-bond types were verified through the proton affinities of bases (PA), deprotanation enthalpies of acids (DPE) and the chemical shift (σ). The aromaticity and anti-aromaticity were analysed by means of the NICS (0) (nucleus-independent chemical shift), NICS (1) and ΔNICS (0), ΔNICS (1) of hydrogen-bonded molecules. The strength of a hydrogen bond depends on the capacity of hydrogen atom engrossing into the electronegative acceptor atom. The correlation between the above parameters and their relations were discussed through curve fitting. Bader's theory of atoms in molecules has been applied to estimate the occurrence of hydrogen bonds through eight criteria reported by Popelier et al. The lengths and potential energy shifts have been found to have a strong negative linear correlation, whereas the lengths and Laplacian shifts have a strong positive linear correlation. This study illustrates the common factors responsible for strong, moderate and weak interactions in hydrogen-bond types.

  15. Physical mechanisms of copper-copper wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.; Hingerl, K.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the physical mechanisms driving Cu-Cu wafer bonding allowed for reducing the bonding temperatures below 200 °C. Metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding results obtained at such low temperatures are very encouraging and suggest that the process is possible even at room temperature if some boundary conditions are fulfilled. Sputtered (PVD) and electroplated Cu thin layers were investigated, and the analysis of both metallization techniques demonstrated the importance of decreasing Cu surface roughness. For an equal surface roughness, the bonding temperature of PVD Cu wafers could be even further reduced due to the favorable microstructure. Their smaller grain size enhances the length of the grain boundaries (observed on the surface prior bonding), acting as efficient mass transfer channels across the interface, and hence the grains are able to grow over the initial bonding interface. Due to the higher concentration of random high-angle grain boundaries, this effect is intensified. The model presented is explaining the microstructural changes based on atomic migration, taking into account that the reduction of the grain boundary area is the major driving force to reduce the Gibbs free energy, and predicts the subsequent microstructure evolution (grain growth) during thermal annealing

  16. Chemical Speciation and Bond Lengths of Organic Solutes by Core-Level Spectroscopy: pH and Solvent Influence on p-Aminobenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Gainar, Adrian; Suljoti, Edlira; Xiao, Jie; Golnak, Ronny; Aziz, Emad F; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-05-04

    Through X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, the chemical, electronic and structural properties of organic species in solution can be observed. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the nitrogen K-edge of para-aminobenzoic acid reveal both pH- and solvent-dependent variations in the ionisation potential (IP), 1s→π* resonances and HOMO-LUMO gap. These changes unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic or anionic) present in solution. It is shown how this incisive chemical state sensitivity is further enhanced by the possibility of quantitative bond length determination, based on the analysis of chemical shifts in IPs and σ* shape resonances in the NEXAFS spectra. This provides experimental access to detecting even minor variations in the molecular structure of solutes in solution, thereby providing an avenue to examining computational predictions of solute properties and solute-solvent interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Analyses of Non-bonding Length, Partial Atomics Charge and Electrostatic Energy from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Phospholipase A2 – Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirwan Syarif

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports molecular dynamics simulation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2– substrate that has been done. Non-bonding length, partial atomic charge and electrostatic energy were used to evaluation the interaction between PLA2 and substrate. The research was subjected for three types of PLA2 of different sources, i.e, homo sapien, bovinus and porcinus, by using computer files of their molecular structures. The files with code 3elo, 1bp2, dan 1y6o were downloaded from protein data bank. Substrate structure can be found in 1y60 and was separated from its enzyme structure and docked into two other PLA2 structures for simulation purpose. Molecular dynamics simulations were done for 30000 steps with constant in number of molecules, volume and temperature (NVT. The results showed the existing of flip-flop mechanism as basic feature of PLA2 – substrate reactions. Interaction length analysis results indicated the presence of water molecules on the structures of 1bp2 and 3elo at the time of the simulation was completed. The existence of aspagine at the reaction site confirmed the theory that this amino acid is responsible for the survival of the reaction. the electrostatic energy increased substantially in the interaction after homo sapien PLA2 (3elo and Bovinus (1bp2 with the substrate. Inverse effect took place in the PLA porcinus (1y6o.

  18. Occurrence of protein disulfide bonds in different domains of life: a comparison of proteins from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bošnjak, I; Bojović, V; Šegvić-Bubić, T; Bielen, A

    2014-03-01

    Disulfide bonds (SS bonds) are important post-translational modifications of proteins. They stabilize a three-dimensional (3D) structure (structural SS bonds) and also have the catalytic or regulatory functions (redox-active SS bonds). Although SS bonds are present in all groups of organisms, no comparative analyses of their frequency in proteins from different domains of life have been made to date. Using the Protein Data Bank, the number and subcellular locations of SS bonds in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya have been compared. Approximately three times higher frequency of proteins with SS bonds in eukaryotic secretory organelles (e.g. endoplasmic reticulum) than in bacterial periplasmic/secretory pathways was calculated. Protein length also affects the SS bond frequency: the average number of SS bonds is positively correlated with the length for longer proteins (>200 amino acids), while for the shorter and less stable proteins (proteins (250-350 amino acids) indicated a high number of SS bonds only in Archaea which could be explained by the need for additional protein stabilization in hyperthermophiles. The results emphasize higher capacity for the SS bond formation and isomerization in Eukarya when compared with Archaea and Bacteria.

  19. Competition of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds in complexes of hypohalous acids with nitrogenated bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Blanco, Fernando; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Elguero, Jose

    2008-10-30

    A theoretical study of the complexes formed by hypohalous acids (HOX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At) with three nitrogenated bases (NH 3, N 2, and NCH) has been carried out by means of ab initio methods, up to MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational method. In general, two minima complexes are found, one with an OH...N hydrogen bond and the other one with a X...N halogen bond. While the first one is more stable for the smallest halogen derivatives, the two complexes present similar stabilities for the iodine case and the halogen-bonded structure is the most stable one for the hypoastatous acid complexes.

  20. Structure and bonding in compounds containing the NpO2+ and NpO22+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Burns, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of oxo cations of Np(V) and Np(VI) were made on single crystals using X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods. Quantitative measurements of the geometry of the triatomic ion and its uranyl(VI) analog made it possible to assess the effects on bond lengths of the nature of equatorial secondary bonds, the change in valence from V to VI, and the actinide contraction. Absorption spectra showed marked changes in the solid state compared to the same ion in solution, especially anisotropy with crystal orientation (dichroism). The compounds analyzed were Na 4 NpO 2 (O 2 ) 3 .9H 2 O, Na 4 UO 2 (O 2 ) 3 .9H 2 O, K 4 NpO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 , and BaNpO 2 (H 3 C 2 O 2 ).2H 2 O. All actinyl ions were found to be linear. The largest difference in M=O bond lengths is between 1.776 in the compound having the relatively weak secondary linkage to carbonate, and 1.843 A in which the peroxide forms much stronger covalent bonds. Between compounds identical except for change of U to Np the M=O bond length contracts by only about 0.01 A. However an elongation of about 0.11A is observed when neptunium(VI) is reduced to neptunium(V) without change in the equatorial ligand. (U.S.)

  1. Performance of various density functionals for the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, T.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Swart, M.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the performance of seven popular density functionals (B3LYP, BLYP, BP86, mPW, OPBE, PBE, PW91) for describing the geometry and stability of the hydrogen bonds in DNA base pairs. For the gas-phase situation, the hydrogen-bond lengths and strengths in the DNA pairs have been

  2. Peculiarities of structure of rare earth β-diketonates and carboxylates with mostly ionic type of bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'mina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data on β-diketonates and carboxylates of rare earths (3) have been analyzed. Essential features of the compounds structure have been formulated. It is shown that in the compounds mentioned irregular distortions of chelate cycles over the length and angles of bonds are observed, there is no regularity in the ratios of metal-ligand bridge and chelate bond lengths both in the series of compounds of different composition and inside one compound. 2 refs

  3. Bonding techniques for flexural strengthening of R.C. beams using CFRP laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Morsy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of an alternative method of attaching FRP laminates to reinforced concrete beams by the way of fasting steel rivets through the FRP laminate and concrete substrate. Five full scale R.C. beams were casted and strengthened in flexural using FRP laminate bonded with conventional epoxy and compared with other beams strengthened with FRP laminate and bonded with fastener “steel rivets” of 50 mm length and 10 mm diameter. Based on experimental evidence the beam strengthened with conventional bonding methods failed due to de-bonding with about 13% increase over the un-strengthened beam. On the other hand, the beams strengthened with FRP laminate and bonded by four steel fastener rivets only failed by de-bonding also but at higher flexural capacity with increase 19% over the un-strengthened beam.

  4. Physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Modern manufacturing processes of complex integrated semiconductor devices are based on wafer-level manufacturing of components which are subsequently interconnected. When compared with classical monolithic bi-dimensional integrated circuits (2D ICs), the new approach of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs) exhibits significant benefits in terms of signal propagation delay and power consumption due to the reduced metal interconnection length and allows high integration levels with reduced form factor. Metal thermo-compression bonding is a process suitable for 3D interconnects applications at wafer level, which facilitates the electrical and mechanical connection of two wafers even processed in different technologies, such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Due to its high electrical conductivity, copper is a very attractive material for electrical interconnects. For Cu-Cu wafer bonding the process requires typically bonding for around 1 h at 400°C and high contact pressure applied during bonding. Temperature reduction below such values is required in order to solve issues regarding (i) throughput in the wafer bonder, (ii) wafer-to-wafer misalignment after bonding and (iii) to minimise thermo-mechanical stresses or device degradation. The aim of this work was to study the physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu bonding and based on this study to further optimise the bonding process for low temperatures. The critical sample parameters (roughness, oxide, crystallinity) were identified using selected analytical techniques and correlated with the characteristics of the bonded Cu-Cu interfaces. Based on the results of this study the impact of several materials and process specifications on the bonding result were theoretically defined and experimentally proven. These fundamental findings subsequently facilitated low temperature (LT) metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding and even room temperature direct

  5. Hydrogen bonded networks in formamide [HCONH2]n (n = 1 – 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gns

    Table S1: Comparison of interaction energy (I.E) in kcal/mol in four arrangements of formamide n=1-10 at B3LYP/D95** level of theory. n = #monomers. Table S2: O---H bond length (in Å) for formamide clusters n = (2-10). Table S3: N-H bond stretching frequency (in cm-1) for four arrangements of formamide clusters n.

  6. INVESTMENTS IN BONDS ON ROMANIA’S CAPITAL MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILIE RĂSCOLEAN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Capital market, both the primary and secondary record financial transactions not only through property titles, but also issues debt securities, designed to attract monetary funds in the form of loans or medium term. Bonds are securities, consisting of a long-term debt on a company giving the holder of Bonds (Bondholders claim equal rights, corresponding nominal value of the bond. Bonds can be bought either in the public offering period, from banks or corporations Brokerage Financial Services Distributors, or from the stock through a brokerage firm by a procedure similar to that for action. Investing in bonds also entails risks, among which include the risk of default, interest rate risks and currency risks.

  7. The chemical bond as an emergent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jon C; Ho, Vinh; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-05-07

    We first argue that the covalent bond and the various closed-shell interactions can be thought of as symmetry broken versions of one and the same interaction, viz., the multi-center bond. We use specially chosen molecular units to show that the symmetry breaking is controlled by density and electronegativity variation. We show that the bond order changes with bond deformation but in a step-like fashion, regions of near constancy separated by electronic localization transitions. These will often cause displacive transitions as well so that the bond strength, order, and length are established self-consistently. We further argue on the inherent relation of the covalent, closed-shell, and multi-center interactions with ionic and metallic bonding. All of these interactions can be viewed as distinct sectors on a phase diagram with density and electronegativity variation as control variables; the ionic and covalent/secondary sectors are associated with on-site and bond-order charge density wave, respectively, the metallic sector with an electronic fluid. While displaying a contiguity at low densities, the metallic and ionic interactions represent distinct phases separated by discontinuous transitions at sufficiently high densities. Multi-center interactions emerge as a hybrid of the metallic and ionic bond that results from spatial coexistence of delocalized and localized electrons. In the present description, the issue of the stability of a compound is that of the mutual miscibility of electronic fluids with distinct degrees of electron localization, supra-atomic ordering in complex inorganic compounds coming about naturally. The notions of electronic localization advanced hereby suggest a high throughput, automated procedure for screening candidate compounds and structures with regard to stability, without the need for computationally costly geometric optimization.

  8. Crystallographic and infrared spectroscopic study of bond distances in Ln[Fe(CN)6].4H2O (Ln=lanthanide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xianju; Wong, W.-T.; Faucher, Michele D.; Tanner, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Along with crystallographic data of Ln[Fe(CN) 6 ].4H 2 O (Ln=lanthanide), the infrared spectra are reassigned to examine bond length trends across the series of Ln. The changes in mean Ln-O, Ln-N, C≡N and Fe-C distances are discussed and the bond natures of Ln-N and Ln-O are studied by bond length linear or quadratic fitting and comparisons with relevant ionic radii. The two different C≡N bond distances have been simulated by the covalo-electrostatic model. - Graphical abstract: Crystallographic and FTIR data for Ln[Fe(CN) 6 ].4H 2 O enable the changes in Ln-O, Ln-N, C≡N and Fe-C distances to be determined and modeled across the lanthanide series

  9. Extended model of bond charges and its application in calculation of optical properties of crystals with different types of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsirelson, V.G.; Korolkova, O.V.; Rez, I.S.; Ozerov, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    A method for calculating the optical characteristics of crystals with different types of chemical bonds within the framework of the dielectric theory of chemical bond put forward by Philips and Van Vechten is suggested. The calculating scheme which does not contain adjustable parameters is based on the bond charge model designed by Levine, which is generalized for the case of multiple bonds and modified involving the density functional method data on the spatial distribution of electrons in atoms. The structural elements of the method are: the screened Coulomb potentials and radii of the atomic core, bond lengths and charges, and the distances from the nuclei to the centers of gravity of the latter. The calculated characteristics of the crystals (dielectric permittivity, quadratic and cubic non-linear susceptibilities, electrooptical constants) are in good accordance with experimental findings. An attempt is made to predict the non-linear optical characteristics according to precision X-ray diffraction data on the electron structure of its only representative, lithium formate deuterate LiHCO 2 xD 2 O, whereby a fairly good fit with the experimental data is achieved. (author)

  10. Corrosion resistance and development length of steel reinforcement with cementitious coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiaofei

    This research program focused on the corrosion resistance and development length of reinforcing steel coated with Cementitious Capillary Crystalline Waterproofing (CCCW) materials. The first part of this research program involved using the half-cell potential method to evaluate the corrosion resistance of CCCW coating materials. One hundred and two steel bars were embedded in concrete cylinders and monitored. In total, 64 steel reinforcing bars were coated with CCCW prior to embedment, 16 mortar cylinders were externally coated with CCCW, and 22 control (uncoated) samples were tested. All the samples were immersed in a 3.5% concentration chloride solution for a period of one year. Three coating types were studied: CCCW-B, CCCW-B+ C and CCCW-C+D. The test results showed that the CCCW coating materials delayed the corrosion activity to varying degrees. In particular, CCCW-C+D applied on the reinforcing steel surface dramatically delayed the corrosion activity when compared to the control samples. After being exposed to the chloride solution for a period of one year, no sign of corrosion was observed for the cylinders where the concrete surface was coated. The second part of this research evaluated the bond strength and development length of reinforcing steel coated with two types of CCCW coating materials (CCCW-B+C and CCCW-C+D) using a modified pull-out test method. A self-reacting inverted T-shaped beam was designed to avoid compression in the concrete surrounding the reinforcing steel. Steel reinforcing bars were embedded along the web portion of the T-beam with various embedded lengths and were staggered side by side. In total, six T-beams were fabricated and each beam contained 8 samples. Both short-term (7 days) and long-term (3 months) effects of water curing were evaluated. The reinforcing steel bars coated with CCCW-B+C demonstrated a higher bond strength than did samples coated with CCCW-C+D. However, the bond strengths of samples with coating materials

  11. Deuteriation of an asymmetric short hydrogen bond. X-ray crystal structure of KF.(CH2CO2D)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, J.; Jones, D.J.; Kuroda, R.

    1981-01-01

    Deuteriation of the strong hydrogen bonds of KF.(CH 2 CO 2 H) 2 shows no isotope effect on the bond lengths. The only significant change is in the bond angle at the fluoride ion which widens to 128.5 from 116 0 . The i.r. spectrum shows very little change. Since the O-H ... F - hydrogen bonds are highly asymmetric, these observations challenge previous predictions about the effects of deuteriation on such bonds. (author)

  12. Material size effects on crack growth along patterned wafer-level Cu–Cu bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    together. Crack growth along the bond interface is here studied numerically using finite element analyses. The experiments have shown that plasticity in the Cu films makes a major contribution to the macroscopic interface toughness. To account for the size dependence of the plastic flow a strain gradient...... plasticity model is applied here for the metal. A cohesive zone model is applied to represent the crack growth along the bond between the two Cu films. This cohesive zone model incorporates the effect of higher order stresses in the continuum, such that the higher order tractions on the crack faces decay...... the toughness peak and the subsequent plateau level are highly sensitive to the value of the characteristic material length. A small material length, relative to the thickness of the Cu film, gives high toughness whereas a length comparable to the film thickness gives much reduced crack growth resistance...

  13. Water and saliva contamination effect on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ascensión; Mena, Ana; Ortiz, Antonio José; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of water and saliva contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system. Brackets were bonded to 240 bovine lower incisors divided into 12 groups. Four bonding procedures were evaluated, including (1) TSEP/Transbond XT, (2) TMIP/ Transbond XT, (3) TSEP/Transbond PLUS, and (4) TMIP/Transbond PLUS, each under three different bonding conditions: without contamination, with water contamination, and with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant on the teeth was quantified with the use of image analyzing equipment. Without contamination, bond strengths for the four procedures were similar (P > .05). TSEP/Tranbond PLUS and TMIP/Transbond PLUS left significantly less adhesive on the teeth after debonding than TSEP/Transbond XT and TMIP/Transbond XT (P .017), although for TMIP/ Transbond XT, both variables showed significant reductions after contamination (P < .017). TSEP/Transbond PLUS, TMIP/Transbond PLUS, and TSEP/Transbond XT showed greater tolerance to wet conditions than was shown by TMIP/Transbond XT.

  14. From covalent bonding to coalescence of metallic nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soohwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Growth of metallic nanorods by physical vapor deposition is a common practice, and the origin of their dimensions is a characteristic length scale that depends on the three-dimensional Ehrlich-Schwoebel (3D ES barrier. For most metals, the 3D ES barrier is large so the characteristic length scale is on the order of 200 nm. Using density functional theory-based ab initio calculations, this paper reports that the 3D ES barrier of Al is small, making it infeasible to grow Al nanorods. By analyzing electron density distributions, this paper shows that the small barrier is the result of covalent bonding in Al. Beyond the infeasibility of growing Al nanorods by physical vapor deposition, the results of this paper suggest a new mechanism of controlling the 3D ES barrier and thereby nanorod growth. The modification of local degree of covalent bonding, for example, via the introduction of surfactants, can increase the 3D ES barrier and promote nanorod growth, or decrease the 3D ES barrier and promote thin film growth.

  15. Towards a unified description of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water: A dynamics based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Zhou, Tiecheng; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) is intimately related to the topological and dynamic properties of the hydrogen bond network within liquid water. The development of a universal H-bond definition for water is an active area of research as it would remove many ambiguities in the network properties that derive from the fixed definition employed to assign whether a water dimer is hydrogen bonded. This work investigates the impact that an electronic-structure based definition, an energetic, and a geometric definition of the H-bond has upon both topological and dynamic network behavior of simulated water. In each definition, the use of a cutoff (either geometric or energetic) to assign the presence of a H-bond leads to the formation of transiently bonded or broken dimers, which have been quantified within the simulation data. The relative concentration of transient species, and their duration, results in two of the three definitions sharing similarities in either topological or dynamic features (H-bond distribution, H-bond lifetime, etc.), however no two definitions exhibit similar behavior for both classes of network properties. In fact, two networks with similar local network topology (as indicated by similar average H-bonds) can have dramatically different global network topology (as indicated by the defect state distributions) and altered H-bond lifetimes. A dynamics based correction scheme is then used to remove artificially transient H-bonds and to repair artificially broken bonds within the network such that the corrected network exhibits the same structural and dynamic properties for two H-bond definitions (the properties of the third definition being significantly improved). The algorithm described represents a significant step forward in the development of a unified hydrogen bond network whose properties are independent of the original hydrogen bond definition that is employed

  16. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, J J

    2008-01-01

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, two distinct values of B have been considered for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, mixed models with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of ordering or crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of the abrupt change in the curves associated with a thermodynamic transition. It is concluded that ordering is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves, which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches

  17. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jfreire@invi.uned.es

    2008-07-16

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, two distinct values of B have been considered for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, mixed models with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of ordering or crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of the abrupt change in the curves associated with a thermodynamic transition. It is concluded that ordering is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves, which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches.

  18. Bonded exciplex formation: electronic and stereoelectronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingsheng; Haze, Olesya; Dinnocenzo, Joseph P; Farid, Samir; Farid, Ramy S; Gould, Ian R

    2008-12-18

    As recently proposed, the singlet-excited states of several cyanoaromatics react with pyridine via bonded-exciplex formation, a novel concept in photochemical charge transfer reactions. Presented here are electronic and steric effects on the quenching rate constants, which provide valuable support for the model. Additionally, excited-state quenching in poly(vinylpyridine) is strongly inhibited both relative to that in neat pyridine and also to conventional exciplex formation in polymers, consistent with a restrictive orientational requirement for the formation of bonded exciplexes. Examples of competing reactions to form both conventional and bonded exciplexes are presented, which illustrate the delicate balance between these two processes when their reaction energetics are similar. Experimental and computational evidence is provided for the formation of a bonded exciplex in the reaction of the singlet excited state of 2,6,9,10-tetracyanoanthracene (TCA) with an oxygen-substituted donor, dioxane, thus expanding the scope of bonded exciplexes.

  19. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpouve, N.; Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T g .

  20. Information resources and material selection in bonded restorations among Korean dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juhea; Kim, Hae-Young; Cho, Byeong Hoon; Lee, In Bog; Son, Ho Hyun

    2009-12-01

    To elucidate how dentists access knowledge sources when choosing adhesive agents for bonded restoration and whether these resources influenced the selection of materials. A national survey was carried out involving dentists in South Korea. The questionnaire included the status of the operator, clinical techniques, and materials. A total of 12,193 e-mails were distributed, 2632 were opened by recipients, and 840 responses were collected. For primary information resources in material selection, 55.8% (n = 469) of the responders mentioned continuing education. This selection criteria varied according to the working status of the clinician (p choice of bonding system was influenced by of the length of the career (p < 0.0001), and the preferred bonding systems differed according to the source of the information (p = 0.035). The popular bonding systems were not ranked according to the bonding strategy, but a preference was found for specific brands or manufacturers. To decrease the confusion of clinicians related to the selection of bonding materials, evidence-based guidelines need to be comprehensibly organized and efficiently approached in clinics.

  1. Structure determination of the Si(001)-(2 x 1)-H reconstruction by surface X-ray diffraction: Weakening of the dimer bond by the addition of hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, E.M.; Baker, J.; Nielsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The atomic structure of the monohydride Si(001)-(2 x 1)-H reconstruction has been investigated by surface X-ray diffraction. Atomic relaxations down to the eighth layer have been determined. The bond length of the hydrogenated silicon dimers was found to be 2.47 +/- 0.02 Angstrom. which is longer...... than the dimer bond of the clean (2 x 1)-reconstructed Si(001) surface and also 5% longer than the bulk bond length of 2.35 Angstrom. The differences to the (2 x 1) structure of the clean surface are discussed in terms of the elimination of the weak pi-bond character of the dimer bond by the addition...

  2. Microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesives to primary enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquezan, Marcela; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Rodrigues, Célia Regina Martins Delgado; Kramer, Paulo Floriani

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bond strength of three self-etching and two total-etch adhesive systems bonded to primary tooth enamel and dentin. Forty extracted primary human molars were selected and abraded in order to create flat buccal enamel and occlusal dentin surfaces. Teeth were assigned to one of the adhesive systems: Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and AdheSE. Immediately to adhesive application, a composite resin (Filtek Z250) block was built up. After 3 months of water storage, each sample was sequentially sectioned in order to obtain sticks with a square cross-sectional area of about 0.72 mm2. The specimens were fixed lengthways to a microtensile device and tested using a universal testing machine with a 50-N load cell at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength values were recorded in MPa and compared by Analysis of Variance and the post hoc Tukey test (a = 0.05). In enamel, Clearfil SE Bond presented the highest values, followed by Adper Single Bond 2, AdheSE and Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, without significant difference. The highest values in dentin were obtained with Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and all other adhesives did not present significant different values from that, except Adper Prompt L-Pop that achieved the lowest bond strength in both substrates. Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and Adper Single Bond 2 presented significantly lower values in enamel than in dentin although all other adhesives presented similar results in both substrates. contemporary adhesive systems present similar behaviors when bonded to primary teeth, with the exception of the one-step self-etching system; and self-etching systems can achieve bond strength values as good in enamel as in dentin of primary teeth.

  3. Relaxation of the chemical bond skin chemisorption size matter ZTP mechanics H2O myths

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explore the detectable properties of a material to the parameters of bond and non-bond involved and to clarify the interdependence of various properties. This book is composed of four parts; Part I deals with the formation and relaxation dynamics of bond and non-bond during chemisorptions with uncovering of the correlation among the chemical bond, energy band, and surface potential barrier (3B) during reactions; Part II is focused on the relaxation of bonds between atoms with fewer neighbors than the ideal in bulk with unraveling of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) correlation mechanism, which clarifies the nature difference between nanostructures and bulk of the same substance; Part III deals with the relaxation dynamics of bond under heating and compressing with revealing of rules on the temperature-resolved elastic and plastic properties of low-dimensional materials; Part IV is focused on the asymmetric relaxation dynamics of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the anomalous behav...

  4. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Two Different Techniques with that of Initially Bonded Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Zafarmand

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: However, there was no significant difference in the shear strength responses of three groups. The results of the study showed that both techniques of rebonding of failed brackets can provide effective bonding strengths similar to the primary strength.

  5. Effect of root canal rinsing protocol on dentin bond strength of two resin cements using three different method of test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Sheikhi, Mohammadreza; Khalilian-Gourtani, Amirhossein; Soleimani, Bahram

    2016-07-01

    Different studies have used different tests to evaluate bond strength of resin cements to root dentin. In this in vitrostudy, three different tests were used to evaluate the bond strength of two resin cements to root dentin using two root dentin irrigation protocols. Ninety-six intact single-rooted teeth were selected for this study. Forty-eight teeth, with a root length of 15mm, were randomly divided into two groups and irrigated with normal saline or 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solutions during root canal preparation, respectively. For each 12 specimens from each group, fiber post #1 was bonded using an etch-and-rinse (Duo-Link) and a self-adhesive (BisCem) resin cement, respectively. After incubation, two specimens were prepared for the push-out test from the middle thirds of the roots. In another 24 teeth, after two 1.5-mm sections were prepared from the middle thirds of the prepared roots, sections of the post were bonded in two subgroups with each of the cements mentioned above and the samples were prepared for the pull-out test. For shear test, the crowns of 48 teeth were cut away, the dentin surfaces were prepared, the two irrigation solutions were used, and the resin cements were bonded. Data collected from the three tests were evaluated by ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey and Weibull tests (α=0.05). There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values between the three bond strength tests (Pstrength in all tests (P>0.05). Under the limitations of the present study, the method of the test used had an effect on the recorded bond strength between the resin cement and root dentin. Cement type and irrigation protocol resulted in similar variations with all the tests. Push-out and shear tests exhibited more coherent results. Bond strength, endodontically treated tooth, fiber post, resin cement, sodium hypochlorite.

  6. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgun, H.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-02-01

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic degradation of Amaranth dye on mesoporous anatase TiO2: evidence of C-N, N[double bond, length as m-dash]N bond cleavage and identification of new intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Amarja P; Salkar, Akshay V; Majik, Mahesh S; Morajkar, Pranay P

    2017-07-01

    The photocatalytic degradation mechanism of Amaranth, a recalcitrant carcinogenic azo dye, was investigated using mesoporous anatase TiO 2 under sunlight. Mesoporous anatase TiO 2 of a high photocatalytic activity has been synthesized using a sol-gel method and its photocatalytic activity for the degradation of Amaranth dye has been evaluated with respect to Degussa P25. The effect of bi-dentate complexing agents like oxalic acid, ethylene glycol and urea on the surface properties of TiO 2 catalyst has been investigated using TG-DTA, FTIR, HR-TEM, SAED, PXRD, EDS, UV-DRS, PL, BET N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm studies and BJH analysis. The influence of catalyst properties such as the mesoporous network, pore volume and surface area on the kinetics of degradation of Amaranth as a function of irradiation time under natural sunlight has been monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The highest rate constant value of 0.069 min -1 was obtained for the photocatalytic degradation of Amaranth using TiO 2 synthesized via a urea assisted sol-gel synthesis method. The effect of the reaction conditions such as pH, TiO 2 concentration and Amaranth concentration on the photodegradation rate has been investigated. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of synthesized TiO 2 in comparison with P25 is attributed to the mesoporous nature of the catalyst leading to increased pore diameter, pore volume, surface area and enhanced charge carrier separation efficiency. New intermediates of photocatalytic degradation of Amaranth, namely, sodium-3-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulphonate, 3-hydroxynaphthalene, sodium-4-aminonaphthalenesulphonate and sodium-4-aminobenzenesulphonate have been identified using LC-ESI-MS for the very first time, providing direct evidence for simultaneous bond cleavage pathways (-C-N-) and (-N[double bond, length as m-dash]N-). A new plausible mechanism of TiO 2 catalysed photodegradation of Amaranth along with the comparison of its toxicity to that of its degradation

  8. Numerical approach of the bond stress behavior of steel bars embedded in self-compacting concrete and in ordinary concrete using beam models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Almeida Filho

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the bond behavior between steel bars and concrete by means of a numerical analysis based on Finite Element Method. Results of a previously conducted experimental program on reinforced concrete beams subjected to monotonic loading are also presented. Two concrete types, self-compacting concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered in the study. Non-linear constitutive relations were used to represent concrete and steel in the proposed numerical model, aiming to reproduce the bond behavior observed in the tests. Experimental analysis showed similar results for the bond resistances of self-compacting and ordinary concrete, with self-compacting concrete presenting a better performance in some cases. The results given by the numerical modeling showed a good agreement with the tests for both types of concrete, especially in the pre-peak branch of the load vs. slip and load vs. displacement curves. As a consequence, the proposed numerical model could be used to estimate a reliable development length, allowing a possible reduction of the structure costs.

  9. Real space in situ bond energies: toward a consistent energetic definition of bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-Crespo, Daniel; Costales, Aurora; Francisco, Evelio; Martin Pendas, Angel

    2018-04-14

    A rigorous definition of intrinsic bond strength based on the partitioning of a molecule into real space fragments is presented. Using the domains provided by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) together with the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) energetic decomposition, we show how an in situ bond strength, matching all the requirements of an intrinsic bond energy, can be defined between each pair of fragments. Total atomization or fragmentation energies are shown to be equal to the sum of these in situ bond energies (ISBEs) if the energies of the fragments are measured with respect to their in-the-molecule state. These energies usually lie above the ground state of the isolated fragments by quantities identified with the standard fragment relaxation or deformation energies, which are also provided by the protocol. Deformation energies bridge dissociation energies with ISBEs, and can be dissected using well-known tools of real space theories of chemical bonding. Similarly, ISBEs can be partitioned into ionic and covalent contributions, and this feature adds to the chemical appeal of the procedure. All the energetic quantities examined are observable and amenable, in principle, to experimental determination. Several systems, exemplifying the role of each energetic term herein presented are used to show the power of the approach. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A metallization and bonding approach for high performance carbon nanotube thermal interface materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, Robert; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A; Fisher, Timothy; Xu Xianfan; Gall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed to create vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) thermal interface materials that can be attached to a variety of metallized surfaces. VACNT films were grown on Si substrates using standard CVD processing followed by metallization using Ti/Au. The coated CNTs were then bonded to metallized substrates at 220 deg. C. By reducing the adhesion of the VACNTs to the growth substrate during synthesis, the CNTs can be completely transferred from the Si growth substrate and used as a die attachment material for electronic components. Thermal resistance measurements using a photoacoustic technique showed thermal resistances as low as 1.7 mm 2 K W -1 for bonded VACNT films 25-30 μm in length and 10 mm 2 K W -1 for CNTs up to 130 μm in length. Tensile testing demonstrated a die attachment strength of 40 N cm -2 at room temperature. Overall, these metallized and bonded VACNT films demonstrate properties which are promising for next-generation thermal interface material applications.

  11. An Ab Initio MP2 Study of HCN-HX Hydrogen Bonded Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Regiane C.M.U.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An ab initio MP2/6-311++G** study has been performed to obtain geometries, binding energies and vibrational properties of HCN-HX H-bonded complexes with X = F, Cl, NC, CN and CCH. These MP2/6-311++G** results have revealed that: (i the calculated H-bond lengths are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; (ii the H-bond strength is associated with the intermolecular charge transfer and follows the order: HCN-HNC ~ HCN-HF > HCN-HCl ~ HCN-HCN > HCN-HCCH; (iii BSSE correction introduces an average reduction of 2.4 kJ/mol on the MP2/6-311++G** binding energies, i.e. 11% of the uncorrected binding energy; (iv the calculated zero-point energies reduce the stability of these complexes and show a good agreement with the available experimental values; (v the H-X stretching frequency is shifted downward upon H-bond formation. This displacement is associated with the H-bond length; (vi The more pronounced effect on the infrared intensities occurs with the H-X stretching intensity. It is much enhanced after complexation due to the charge-flux term; (vii the calculated intermolecular stretching frequencies are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; and, finally, (viii the results obtained for the HCN-HX complexes follow the same profile as those found for the acetylene-HX series but, in the latter case, the effects on the properties of the free molecules due to complexation are less pronounced than those in HCN-HX.

  12. Bond strength and microleakage of current dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, D; Swift, E J; Denehy, G E; Reinhardt, J W

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate shear bond strengths and microleakage of seven current-generation dentin adhesive systems. Standard box-type Class V cavity preparations were made at the cemento-enamel junction on the buccal surfaces of eighty extracted human molars. These preparations were restored using a microfill composite following application of either All-Bond 2 (Bisco), Clearfil Liner Bond (Kuraray), Gluma 2000 (Miles), Imperva Bond (Shofu), OptiBond (Kerr), Prisma Universal Bond 3 (Caulk), Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M), or Scotchbond Dual-Cure (3M) (control). Lingual dentin of these same teeth was exposed and polished to 600-grit. Adhesives were applied and composite was bonded to the dentin using a gelatin capsule technique. Specimens were thermocycled 500 times. Shear bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine, and microleakage was evaluated using a standard silver nitrate staining technique. Clearfill Liner Bond and OptiBond, adhesive systems that include low-viscosity, low-modulus intermediate resins, had the highest shear bond strengths (13.3 +/- 2.3 MPa and 12.9 +/- 1.5 MPa, respectively). Along with Prisma Universal Bond 3, they also had the least microleakage at dentin margins of Class V restorations. No statistically significant correlation between shear bond strength and microleakage was observed in this study. Adhesive systems that include a low-viscosity intermediate resin produced the high bond strengths and low microleakage. Similarly, two materials with bond strengths in the intermediate range had significantly increased microleakage, and one material with a bond strength in the low end of the spectrum exhibited microleakage that was statistically greater. Thus, despite the lack of statistical correlation, there were observable trends.

  13. Marriage Matters: Spousal Similarity in Life Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich Schimmack; Richard Lucas

    2006-01-01

    Examined the concurrent and cross-lagged spousal similarity in life satisfaction over a 21-year period. Analyses were based on married couples (N = 847) in the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP). Concurrent spousal similarity was considerably higher than one-year retest similarity, revealing spousal similarity in the variable component of life satisfac-tion. Spousal similarity systematically decreased with length of retest interval, revealing simi-larity in the changing component of life sati...

  14. A tensegrity model for hydrogen bond networks in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Robert P

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen-bonding networks in proteins considered as structural tensile elements are in balance separately from any other stabilising interactions that may be in operation. The hydrogen bond arrangement in the network is reminiscent of tensegrity structures in architecture and sculpture. Tensegrity has been discussed before in cells and tissues and in proteins. In contrast to previous work only hydrogen bonds are studied here. The other interactions within proteins are either much stronger - covalent bonds connecting the atoms in the molecular skeleton or weaker forces like the so-called hydrophobic interactions. It has been demonstrated that the latter operate independently from hydrogen bonds. Each category of interaction must, if the protein is to have a stable structure, balance out. The hypothesis here is that the entire hydrogen bond network is in balance without any compensating contributions from other types of interaction. For sidechain-sidechain, sidechain-backbone and backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins, tensegrity balance ("closure") is required over the entire length of the polypeptide chain that defines individually folding units in globular proteins ("domains") as well as within the repeating elements in fibrous proteins that consist of extended chain structures. There is no closure to be found in extended structures that do not have repeating elements. This suggests an explanation as to why globular domains, as well as the repeat units in fibrous proteins, have to have a defined number of residues. Apart from networks of sidechain-sidechain hydrogen bonds there are certain key points at which this closure is achieved in the sidechain-backbone hydrogen bonds and these are associated with demarcation points at the start or end of stretches of secondary structure. Together, these three categories of hydrogen bond achieve the closure that is necessary for the stability of globular protein domains as well as repeating elements in fibrous proteins.

  15. Bonding characteristics in NiAl intermetallics with O impurity: a first-principles computational tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xuelan; Zhang Ying; Lu Guanghong; Wang Tianmin

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a first-principles computational tensile test on NiAl intermetallics with O impurity along the [001] crystalline direction on the (110) plane to investigate the tensile strength and the bonding characteristics of the NiAl-O system. We show that the ideal tensile strength is largely reduced due to the presence of O impurity in comparison with pure NiAl. The investigations of the atomic configuration and bond-length evolution show that O prefers to bond with Al, forming an O-Al cluster finally with the break of O-Ni bonds. The O-Ni bonds are demonstrated to be weaker than the O-Al bonds, and the reduced tensile strength originates from such weaker O-Ni bonds. A void-like structure forms after the break of the O-Ni and some Ni-Al bonds. Such a void-like structure can act as the initial nucleation or the propagation path of the crack, and thus produce large effects on the mechanical properties of NiAl.

  16. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpouve, N., E-mail: delpouve.nicolas@gmail.com [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M. [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2012-09-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T{sub g}.

  17. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Vladilo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a “covalent-bond stage” to a “hydrogen-bond stage” in prebiotic chemistry.

  18. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a “covalent-bond stage” to a “hydrogen-bond stage” in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:29301382

  19. Hydrogen Bonds and Life in the Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Hassanali, Ali

    2018-01-03

    The scientific community is allocating more and more resources to space missions and astronomical observations dedicated to the search for life beyond Earth. This experimental endeavor needs to be backed by a theoretical framework aimed at defining universal criteria for the existence of life. With this aim in mind, we have explored which chemical and physical properties should be expected for life possibly different from the terrestrial one, but similarly sustained by genetic and catalytic molecules. We show that functional molecules performing genetic and catalytic tasks must feature a hierarchy of chemical interactions operating in distinct energy bands. Of all known chemical bonds and forces, only hydrogen bonds are able to mediate the directional interactions of lower energy that are needed for the operation of genetic and catalytic tasks. For this reason and because of the unique quantum properties of hydrogen bonding, the functional molecules involved in life processes are predicted to have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities. A molecular medium generating a hydrogen-bond network is probably essential to support the activity of the functional molecules. These hydrogen-bond requirements constrain the viability of hypothetical biochemistries alternative to the terrestrial one, provide thermal limits to life molecular processes, and offer a conceptual framework to define a transition from a "covalent-bond stage" to a "hydrogen-bond stage" in prebiotic chemistry.

  20. Bond behavior of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponmalar S.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The success of an optimum design lies in the effective load transfer done by the bond forces at the steel-concrete interface. Self Compacting Concrete, is a new innovative concrete capable of filling intrinsic reinforcement and gets compacted by itself, without the need of external mechanical vibration. For this reason, it is replacing the conventional vibrated concrete in the construction industry. The present paper outlays the materials and methods adopted for attaining the self compacting concrete and describes about the bond behavior of this concrete. The bond stress-slip curve is similar in the bottom bars for both SCC and normal concrete whereas a higher bond stress and stiffness is experienced in the top and middle bars, for SCC compared to normal concrete. Also the interfacial properties revealed that the elastic modulus and micro-strength of interfacial transition zone [ITZ] were better on the both top and bottom side of horizontal steel bar in the SCC mixes than in normal vibrated concrete. The local bond strength of top bars for SCC is about 20% less than that for NC. For the bottom bars, however, the results were almost the same.

  1. Bond behavior of self compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponmalar, S.

    2018-03-01

    The success of an optimum design lies in the effective load transfer done by the bond forces at the steel-concrete interface. Self Compacting Concrete, is a new innovative concrete capable of filling intrinsic reinforcement and gets compacted by itself, without the need of external mechanical vibration. For this reason, it is replacing the conventional vibrated concrete in the construction industry. The present paper outlays the materials and methods adopted for attaining the self compacting concrete and describes about the bond behavior of this concrete. The bond stress-slip curve is similar in the bottom bars for both SCC and normal concrete whereas a higher bond stress and stiffness is experienced in the top and middle bars, for SCC compared to normal concrete. Also the interfacial properties revealed that the elastic modulus and micro-strength of interfacial transition zone [ITZ] were better on the both top and bottom side of horizontal steel bar in the SCC mixes than in normal vibrated concrete. The local bond strength of top bars for SCC is about 20% less than that for NC. For the bottom bars, however, the results were almost the same.

  2. Amino Acid Patterns around Disulfide Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Drury

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Disulfide bonds provide an inexhaustible source of information on molecular evolution and biological specificity. In this work, we described the amino acid composition around disulfide bonds in a set of disulfide-rich proteins using appropriate descriptors, based on ANOVA (for all twenty natural amino acids or classes of amino acids clustered according to their chemical similarities and Scheffé (for the disulfide-rich proteins superfamilies statistics. We found that weakly hydrophilic and aromatic amino acids are quite abundant in the regions around disulfide bonds, contrary to aliphatic and hydrophobic amino acids. The density distributions (as a function of the distance to the center of the disulfide bonds for all defined entities presented an overall unimodal behavior: the densities are null at short distances, have maxima at intermediate distances and decrease for long distances. In the end, the amino acid environment around the disulfide bonds was found to be different for different superfamilies, allowing the clustering of proteins in a biologically relevant way, suggesting that this type of chemical information might be used as a tool to assess the relationship between very divergent sets of disulfide-rich proteins.

  3. Molecular identification of similar species of the genus Biomphalaria (Mollusca: Planorbidae determined by a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldeira Roberta Lima

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater snails Biomphalaria straminea, B. intermedia, B. kuhniana and B. peregrina, are morphologically similar; based on this similarity the first three species were therefore grouped in the complex B. straminea. The morphological identification of these species is based on characters such as vaginal wrinkling, relation between prepuce: penial sheath:deferens vas and number of muscle layers in the penis wall. In this study the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was used for molecular identification of these molluscs. This technique is based on the amplification of the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 e ITS2 of the ribosomal RNA gene and subsequent digestion of these fragments by restriction enzymes. Six enzymes were tested: Dde I, Mnl I, Hae III, Rsa I, Hpa II e Alu I. The restriction patterns obtained with DdeI presented the best profile for separation of the four species of Biomphalaria. The profiles obtained with all the enzymes were used to estimate the genetic distances among the species through analysis of common banding patterns.

  4. Hydrogen Bonding in DNA Base Pairs: Reconciliation of Theory and Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Snijders, J.G.; Baerends, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Up till now, there has been a significant disagreement between theory and experiment regarding hydrogen bond lengths in Watson - Crick base pairs. To investigate the possible sources of this discrepancy, we have studied numerous model systems for adenine - thymine (AT) and guanine - cytosine (GC)

  5. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in (2-Hydroxybenzoyl)benzoylmethane Enol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Winther, Morten; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    , and the dienol form of 1,3-dibenzoylacetone. But in these examples the two H-bonds are equivalent, while in the case of OHDBM they are chemically different, involving one enolic and one phenolic hydroxy group. OHDBM is thus an interesting model compound with two competing H-bonds to the same carbonyl group......In the stable enol tautomer of the title compound (OHDBM), one carbonyl group is flanked by two β-hydroxy groups, giving rise to bifold intramolecular H-bonding. A similar situation is found in other β,β'-dihydroxy carbonyl compounds like chrysazin, anthralin, 2,2'-dihydroxybenzophenone...

  6. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  7. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-01-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends

  8. Local Similarity in the Stable Boundary Layer and Mixing-Length Approaches : Consistency of Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Wiel, B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; De Ronde, W.H.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In stably stratified flows vertical movement of eddies is limited by the fact that kinetic energy is converted into potential energy, leading to a buoyancy displacement scale z B . Our new mixing-length concept for turbulent transport in the stable boundary layer follows a rigid-wall analogy, in the

  9. Local similarity in the stable boundary layer and mixing-length approaches: consistency of concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Ronde, W.H.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In stably stratified flows vertical movement of eddies is limited by the fact that kinetic energy is converted into potential energy, leading to a buoyancy displacement scale z B . Our new mixing-length concept for turbulent transport in the stable boundary layer follows a rigid-wall analogy, in the

  10. Local similarity in the stable boundary layer and mixing-length approaches : consistency of concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Ronde, de W.H.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In stably stratified flows vertical movement of eddies is limited by the fact that kinetic energy is converted into potential energy, leading to a buoyancy displacement scale zB. Our new mixing-length concept for turbulent transport in the stable boundary layer follows a rigid-wall analogy, in the

  11. Hydrogen bonded C-H···Y (Y = O, S, Hal) molecular complexes: A natural bond orbital analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen bonded C-H···Y complexes formed by H2O, H2S molecules, hydrogen halides, and halogen-ions with methane, halogen substituted methane as well as with the C2H2 and NCH molecules were studied at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The structure of NBOs corresponding to lone pair of acceptor Y, n Y, and vacant anti-σ-bond C-H of proton donor was analyzed and estimates of second order perturbation energy E(2) characterizing donor-acceptor n Y → σ C-H * charge-transfer interaction were obtained. Computational results for complexes of methane and its halogen substituted derivatives show that for each set of analogous structures, the EnY→σ*C-H (2) energy tends to grow with an increase in the s-component percentage in the lone pair NBO of acceptor Y. Calculations for different C···Y distances show that the equilibrium geometries of complexes lie in the region where the E(2) energy is highest and it changes symbatically with the length of the covalent E-H bond when the R(C···Y) distance is varied. The performed analysis allows us to divide the hydrogen bonded complexes into two groups, depending on the pattern of overlapping for NBOs of the hydrogen bridge.

  12. Parental care influences leukocyte telomere length with gender specificity in parents and offsprings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokido, Masanori; Suzuki, Akihito; Sadahiro, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Kuwahata, Fumikazu; Takahashi, Nana; Goto, Kaoru; Otani, Koichi

    2014-10-03

    There have been several reports suggesting that adverse childhood experiences such as physical maltreatment and long institutionalization influence telomere length. However, there has been no study examining the relationship of telomere length with variations in parental rearing. In the present study, we examined the relationship of leukocyte telomere length with parental rearing in healthy subjects. The subjects were 581 unrelated healthy Japanese subjects. Perceived parental rearing was assessed by the Parental Bonding Instrument consisting of the care and protection factors. Leukocyte relative telomere length was determined by a quantitative real-time PCR method for a ratio of telomere/single copy gene. In the multiple regression analyses, shorter telomere length in males was related to lower scores of paternal care (β = 0.139, p care (β = 0.195, p parental care and telomere length which covers both lower and higher ends of parental care, and that the effects of parental care on telomere length are gender-specific in parents and offsprings.

  13. Cooperativity of halogen, chalcogen, and pnictogen bonds in infinite molecular chains by electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Janine; Deringer, Volker L; Dronskowski, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Halogen bonds (XBs) are intriguing noncovalent interactions that are frequently being exploited for crystal engineering. Recently, similar bonding mechanisms have been proposed for adjacent main-group elements, and noncovalent "chalcogen bonds" and "pnictogen bonds" have been identified in crystal structures. A fundamental question, largely unresolved thus far, is how XBs and related contacts interact with each other in crystals; similar to hydrogen bonding, one might expect "cooperativity" (bonds amplifying each other), but evidence has been sparse. Here, we explore the crucial step from gas-phase oligomers to truly infinite chains by means of quantum chemical computations. A periodic density functional theory (DFT) framework allows us to address polymeric chains of molecules avoiding the dreaded "cluster effects" as well as the arbitrariness of defining a "large enough" cluster. We focus on three types of molecular chains that we cut from crystal structures; furthermore, we explore reasonable substitutional variants in silico. We find evidence of cooperativity in chains of halogen cyanides and also in similar chalcogen- and pnictogen-bonded systems; the bonds, in the most extreme cases, are amplified through cooperative effects by 79% (I···N), 90% (Te···N), and 103% (Sb···N). Two experimentally known organic crystals, albeit with similar atomic connectivity and XB characteristics, show signs of cooperativity in one case but not in another. Finally, no cooperativity is observed in alternating halogen/acetone and halogen/1,4-dioxane chains; in fact, these XBs weaken each other by up to 26% compared to the respective gas-phase dimers.

  14. Tetrel Bonding as a Vehicle for Strong and Selective Anion Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Scheiner

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetrel atoms T (T = Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb can engage in very strong noncovalent interactions with nucleophiles, which are commonly referred to as tetrel bonds. The ability of such bonds to bind various anions is assessed with a goal of designing an optimal receptor. The Sn atom seems to form the strongest bonds within the tetrel family. It is most effective in the context of a -SnF3 group and a further enhancement is observed when a positive charge is placed on the receptor. Connection of the -SnF3 group to either an imidazolium or triazolium provides a strong halide receptor, which can be improved if its point of attachment is changed from the C to an N atom of either ring. Aromaticity of the ring offers no advantage nor is a cyclic system superior to a simple alkyl amine of any chain length. Placing a pair of -SnF3 groups on a single molecule to form a bipodal dicationic receptor with two tetrel bonds enhances the binding, but falls short of a simple doubling. These two tetrel groups can be placed on opposite ends of an alkyl diamine chain of any length although SnF3+NH2(CH2nNH2SnF3+ with n between 2 and 4 seems to offer the strongest halide binding. Of the various anions tested, OH− binds most strongly: OH− > F− > Cl− > Br− > I−. The binding energy of the larger NO3− and HCO3− anions is more dependent upon the charge of the receptor. This pattern translates into very strong selectivity of binding one anion over another. The tetrel-bonding receptors bind far more strongly to each anion than an equivalent number of K+ counterions, which leads to equilibrium ratios in favor of the former of many orders of magnitude.

  15. Shear bond strength of a new one-bottle dentin adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, E J; Bayne, S C

    1997-08-01

    To test the shear bond strength of a new adhesive, 3M Single Bond, to dentin surfaces containing different degrees of moisture. Two commercially available one-bottle adhesives (Prime & Bond, One-Step) and a conventional three-step system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) were included for comparison. 120 bovine teeth were embedded in acrylic and the labial surfaces were polished to 600 grit to create standardized dentin surfaces for testing. Resin composite was bonded to dentin using a gelatin capsule technique. Four adhesive systems were evaluated with three different degrees of surface moisture (moist, wet, and overwet). Shear bond strengths of adhesives to dentin were determined using a universal testing machine and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. Single Bond had mean shear bond strengths of 19.2, 23.2 and 20.3 MPa to moist, wet, and overwet dentin, respectively. Bond strengths of the three-component system Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus ranged from 23.1 to 25.3 MPa, but were not significantly higher than the values for Single Bond. Prime & Bond had bond strengths similar to those of Single Bond, but One-Step had significantly lower bond strengths (P < 0.05) in the wet and overwet conditions.

  16. Personality Similarity and Conflict among Female College Roommates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckert, Teresa M.; Mueller, Michael A.; Roberts, Lisa L.; Hannah, Aaron P.; Jones, Matt A.; Masters, Shauna; Bibbs, Shari; Bergman, Shawn M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of personality similarity on compatibility and conflict was studied among roommate pairs. Self-reported data were collected for frequency of conflict, liking, personality measures, "morningness," choice vs. assigned, length of rooming together, length of relationship, and socioeconomic variables. Although some variables show…

  17. Nuclear markers reveal that inter-lake cichlids' similar morphologies do not reflect similar genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Daud; Seki, Shingo; Horic, Michio; Yamaoka, Kosaku

    2006-08-01

    The apparent inter-lake morphological similarity among East African Great Lakes' cichlid species/genera has left evolutionary biologists asking whether such similarity is due to sharing of common ancestor or mere convergent evolution. In order to answer such question, we first used Geometric Morphometrics, GM, to quantify morphological similarity and then subsequently used Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism, AFLP, to determine if similar morphologies imply shared ancestry or convergent evolution. GM revealed that not all presumed morphological similar pairs were indeed similar, and the dendrogram generated from AFLP data indicated distinct clusters corresponding to each lake and not inter-lake morphological similar pairs. Such results imply that the morphological similarity is due to convergent evolution and not shared ancestry. The congruency of GM and AFLP generated dendrograms imply that GM is capable of picking up phylogenetic signal, and thus GM can be potential tool in phylogenetic systematics.

  18. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  19. Bond rearrangement caused by sudden single and multiple ionization of water molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Itzhak, I.; Sayler, A. Max; Leonard, M.; Maseberg, J.W.; Hathiramani, D.; Wells, E.; Smith, M.A.; Xia, Jiangfan; Wang, Pengqian; Carnes, K.D.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    Bond rearrangement, namely the dissociation of water into H 2 + +O q+ following ionization by fast proton and highly charged ion impact, was investigated. Single ionization by fast proton impact exhibits a strong isotopic effect, the dissociation of H 2 O + ->H 2 + +O being about twice as likely as D 2 O + ->D 2 + +O, with HDO + ->HD + +O in between. This suggests that the bond rearrangement does not happen during the slow dissociation, but rather during the very fast ionization, and thus H 2 + should also be produced when the water molecule is multiply ionized. We observed that the H 2 + +O + and H 2 + +O 2+ production in 1MeV/amu F 7+ +H 2 O collisions are 0.209+/-0.006% and 0.0665+/-0.003%, respectively, of the main double-ionization dissociation product, H 2 O 2+ ->H + +OH + . This ratio is similar to the triple to double ionization ratio in similar collisions with atomic targets thus suggesting that the bond-rearrangement fraction out of each ionization level is approximately constant. Similar dissociation channels in the heavier water isotopes, which are expected to be smaller, are under study. Finally, the fragmentation of HDO exhibits very strong isotopic preference for breaking the OH bond over the OD bond

  20. Effect of investment type and mold temperature on casting accuracy and titanium-ceramic bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the casting accuracy of crown margins and metal-ceramic shear bond strength (SBS) of pure titanium injected into casting molds made using 2 investment types at 3 mold temperatures. Sixty crown (30-degree beveled finish line) and 60 cylinder (5mm diameter × 8mm high) patterns were divided into 6 groups (n=10), and cast using a phosphate-bonded investment (P) and a magnesium oxide-bonded investment (U), at 400°C (groups P400 and U400), 550°C (groups P550 and U550) and 700°C (groups P700 and U700) mold temperatures. Crown margins were recorded in impression material, the degree of marginal rounding was measured and margin length deficiencies (µm) were calculated. Titanium-ceramic specimens were prepared using Triceram ceramic (2mm high) and SBS was tested. Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). For casting accuracy, expressed by marginal deficiency (µm), investment U provided more accurate results (64 ± 11) than P (81 ± 23) (pcasting accuracy for U700 (55 ± 7) and worse for P700 (109 ± 18). Casting accuracy at 700°C (82 ± 31) was significantly different from 400°C (69 ± 9) and 550°C (68 ± 9) (pcasting accuracy than investment P. The SBS was similar for all combinations of investments and temperatures.

  1. Ab initio study of symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in bcc Fe: structural units, magnetic moments, interfacial bonding, local energy and local stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori; Shiihara, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    We present first-principle calculations on symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc Fe. Using density functional theory (DFT), we studied the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Σ3(111) and Σ11(332) GBs formed by rotation around the [110] axis. The optimized structures, GB energies and GB excess free volumes are consistent with previous DFT and classical simulation studies. The GB configurations can be interpreted by the structural unit model as given by Nakashima and Takeuchi (2000 ISIJ 86 357). Both the GBs are composed of similar structural units of three- and five-membered rings with different densities at the interface according to the rotation angle. The interface atoms with larger atomic volumes reveal higher magnetic moments than the bulk value, while the interface atoms with shorter bond lengths have reduced magnetic moments in each GB. The charge density and local density of states reveal that the interface bonds with short bond lengths have more covalent nature, where minority-spin electrons play a dominant role as the typical nature of ferromagnetic Fe. In order to understand the structural stability of these GBs, we calculated the local energy and local stress for each atomic region using the scheme of Shiihara et al (2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 075441). In each GB, the interface atoms with larger atomic volumes and enhanced magnetic moments reveal larger local energy increase and tensile stress. The interface atoms constituting more covalent-like bonds with reduced magnetic moments have lower local energy increase, contributing to the stabilization, while compressive stress is generated at these atoms. The relative stability between the two GBs can be understood by the local energies at the structural units. The local energy and local stress analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the structural properties of GBs based on the behavior of valence electrons. (paper)

  2. Shear bond strength of two bonding systems on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'Magro, Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the shear bond strength of two bonding dentin systems, one 'one step' (Single Bond - 3M) and one 'self-etching' (Prompt-L-ESPE), when applied on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser (2,94μm) that underwent ar not, acid etched. Forty one human molars just extracted were selected and after the cut with diamond disc and included in acrylic resin, resulting in 81 specimens (hemi crowns). After, the specimens were divided in one group treated with sand paper and another two groups treated with Er:YAG laser with 200 mJ and 250 mJ of energy and 2 Hz of frequency. Next, the prepared surfaces received three treatments with following application: 1) acid + Single Bond + Z 250 resin, 2) prompt-L-Pop + Z 250 resin, and 3) acid without, Single Bond + Z 250 resin. The Z 250 resin was applied and photopolymerized in increments on a Teflon matrix that belonged to an apparatus called 'Assembly Apparatus' machine producing cylinders of 3,5 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. After these specimens were submitted to thermo cycling during 1 minute the 55 deg C and during 1 minute with 5 deg C with a total of 500 cycles for specimen, and the measures of shear bond strength were abstained using EMIC model DL 2000 rehearsed machine, with speed of 0,5 mm/min, measuring the final rupture tension (Mpa). The results showed an statistic superiority of 5% of probability level in dentin flattened with sandpaper and with laser using 200 mJ of energy with aspect to the ones flattened with laser using 250 mJ of energy. It was observed that using 'Single Bond' bonding dentin system the marks were statistically superior at 5% of probability with reference to the use of the Prompt-L-Pop adhesive system. So, it was concluded that Er:YAG Laser with 200 mJ of energy produced similar dentin cavity prepare than sandpaper and Single Bond seemed the best bonding agent system between restorative material and dentin. (author)

  3. Experimental Study on Bond-Slip Behavior of Bamboo Bolt-Modified Slurry Interface under Pull-Out Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of bamboo bolt-modified slurry interfaces based on 26 in situ axial pull-out tests intended to highlight the mechanical behavior of interface under a fracture mode. Three impact factors are analyzed: anchorage length, bolt diameter, and bolt hole diameter, using the same materials of bamboo and modified slurry. The result shows that the interface between the bamboo bolt and anchoring agent is the control interface of an anchorage system, and the local behavior of the interface involves four stages: elastic, soften, friction, and decoupling. Distribution law and change trend of slippage, stress, and strain of anchoring interface along with the axial direction of an anchor bolt were analyzed. The result shows that there is effective anchoring length limit in this kind of interface, and that the complete decoupling phenomenon should not be neglected. Through a comparative analysis of the existing bond-slip model and interface bond-slip curve, and considering the correspondence of the strain-slip curve and trilinear bond-slip model simultaneously, a modified trilinear bond-slip model has been proposed. The friction section of this model is limited, and shearing stress in the complete decoupling section is zero.

  4. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  5. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP; in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching; and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  6. Molecularly Tuning the Radicaloid N-H···O═C Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Norman; Chung, Wei-Cheng; Ley, Rebecca M; Lin, Kwan-Yu; Francisco, Joseph S; Negishi, Ei-Ichi

    2016-03-03

    Substituent effects on the open shell N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond has never been reported. This study examines how 12 functional groups composed of electron donating groups (EDG), halogen atoms and electron withdrawing groups (EWG) affect the N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond properties in a six-membered cyclic model system of O═C(Y)-CH═C(X)N-H. It is found that group effects on this open shell H-bonding system are significant and have predictive trends when X = H and Y is varied. When Y is an EDG, the N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond is strengthened; and when Y is an EWG, the bond is weakened; whereas the variation in electronic properties of X group do not exhibit a significant impact upon the hydrogen bond strength. The structural impact of the stronger N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond are (1) shorter H and O distance, r(H···O) and (2) a longer N-H bond length, r(NH). The stronger N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond also acts to pull the H and O in toward one another which has an effect on the bond angles. Our findings show that there is a linear relationship between hydrogen-bond angle and N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond energy in this unusual H-bonding system. In addition, there is a linear correlation of the r(H···O) and the hydrogen bond energy. A short r(H···O) distance corresponds to a large hydrogen bond energy when Y is varied. The observed trends and findings have been validated using three different methods (UB3LYP, M06-2X, and UMP2) with two different basis sets.

  7. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  8. A space-efficient algorithm for local similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X Q; Hardison, R C; Miller, W

    1990-10-01

    Existing dynamic-programming algorithms for identifying similar regions of two sequences require time and space proportional to the product of the sequence lengths. Often this space requirement is more limiting than the time requirement. We describe a dynamic-programming local-similarity algorithm that needs only space proportional to the sum of the sequence lengths. The method can also find repeats within a single long sequence. To illustrate the algorithm's potential, we discuss comparison of a 73,360 nucleotide sequence containing the human beta-like globin gene cluster and a corresponding 44,594 nucleotide sequence for rabbit, a problem well beyond the capabilities of other dynamic-programming software.

  9. The Bond Fluctuation Model and Other Lattice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcus

    Lattice models constitute a class of coarse-grained representations of polymeric materials. They have enjoyed a longstanding tradition for investigating the universal behavior of long chain molecules by computer simulations and enumeration techniques. A coarse-grained representation is often necessary to investigate properties on large time- and length scales. First, some justification for using lattice models will be given and the benefits and limitations will be discussed. Then, the bond fluctuation model by Carmesin and Kremer [1] is placed into the context of other lattice models and compared to continuum models. Some specific techniques for measuring the pressure in lattice models will be described. The bond fluctuation model has been employed in more than 100 simulation studies in the last decade and only few selected applications can be mentioned.

  10. 26 CFR 1.1397E-1 - Qualified zone academy bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... obligation the interest on which is excluded from gross income under section 103(a). (h) Reimbursement. An... purpose, rules similar to those in § 1.150-2 shall apply. (i) and (j) [Reserved] For further guidance, see... for rules relating to amortizable bond premium. See § 1.61-7(d) for the seller's treatment of a bond...

  11. A tensegrity model for hydrogen bond networks in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Bywater

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bonding networks in proteins considered as structural tensile elements are in balance separately from any other stabilising interactions that may be in operation. The hydrogen bond arrangement in the network is reminiscent of tensegrity structures in architecture and sculpture. Tensegrity has been discussed before in cells and tissues and in proteins. In contrast to previous work only hydrogen bonds are studied here. The other interactions within proteins are either much stronger − covalent bonds connecting the atoms in the molecular skeleton or weaker forces like the so-called hydrophobic interactions. It has been demonstrated that the latter operate independently from hydrogen bonds. Each category of interaction must, if the protein is to have a stable structure, balance out. The hypothesis here is that the entire hydrogen bond network is in balance without any compensating contributions from other types of interaction. For sidechain-sidechain, sidechain-backbone and backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins, tensegrity balance (“closure” is required over the entire length of the polypeptide chain that defines individually folding units in globular proteins (“domains” as well as within the repeating elements in fibrous proteins that consist of extended chain structures. There is no closure to be found in extended structures that do not have repeating elements. This suggests an explanation as to why globular domains, as well as the repeat units in fibrous proteins, have to have a defined number of residues. Apart from networks of sidechain-sidechain hydrogen bonds there are certain key points at which this closure is achieved in the sidechain-backbone hydrogen bonds and these are associated with demarcation points at the start or end of stretches of secondary structure. Together, these three categories of hydrogen bond achieve the closure that is necessary for the stability of globular protein domains as well as repeating

  12. Silicon waveguides produced by wafer bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mette; Jensen, Flemming; Bunk, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    X-ray waveguides are successfully produced employing standard silicon technology of UV photolithography and wafer bonding. Contrary to theoretical expectations for similar systems even 100 mu m broad guides of less than 80 nm height do not collapse and can be used as one dimensional waveguides...

  13. Electro-optical parameters of bond polarizability model for aluminosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel; Tandon, Poonam

    2006-04-06

    Electro-optical parameters (EOPs) of bond polarizability model (BPM) for aluminosilicate structures were derived from quantum-chemical DFT calculations of molecular models. The tensor of molecular polarizability and the derivatives of the tensor with respect to the bond length are well reproduced with the BPM, and the EOPs obtained are in a fair agreement with available experimental data. The parameters derived were found to be transferable to larger molecules. This finding suggests that the procedure used can be applied to systems with partially ionic chemical bonds. The transferability of the parameters to periodic systems was tested in molecular dynamics simulation of the polarized Raman spectra of alpha-quartz. It appeared that the molecular Si-O bond EOPs failed to reproduce the intensity of peaks in the spectra. This limitation is due to large values of the longitudinal components of the bond polarizability and its derivative found in the molecular calculations as compared to those obtained from periodic DFT calculations of crystalline silica polymorphs by Umari et al. (Phys. Rev. B 2001, 63, 094305). It is supposed that the electric field of the solid is responsible for the difference of the parameters. Nevertheless, the EOPs obtained can be used as an initial set of parameters for calculations of polarizability related characteristics of relevant systems in the framework of BPM.

  14. The effects of surface bond relaxation on electronic structure of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-films by first-principles calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C., E-mail: canli1983@gmail.com; Zhao, Y. F.; Fu, C. X.; Gong, Y. Y. [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); Chi, B. Q. [College of Modem Science and Technology, Jiliang University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Sun, C. Q. [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-10-15

    The effects of vertical compressive stress on Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-films have been investigated by the first principles calculation, including stability, electronic structure, crystal structure, and bond order. It is found that the band gap of nano-film is sensitive to the stress in Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nano-film and the critical thickness increases under compressive stress. The band gap and band order of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film has been affected collectively by the surface and internal crystal structures, the contraction ratio between surface bond length of nano-film and the corresponding bond length of bulk decides the band order of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} film.

  15. Theoretical investigation on hydrogen bond interaction of diketo/keto-enol form uracil and thymine tautomers with intercalators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anithaa, V S; Vijayakumar, S; Sudha, M; Shankar, R

    2017-11-06

    The interaction of diketo and keto-enol form of thymine and uracil tautomers with acridine (Acr), phenazine (Phen), benzo[c]cinnoline (Ben), 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-Phe), and 4,7-phenenthroline (4,7-Phe) intercalating drug molecules was studied using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G** and M05-2×/6-311++G** levels of theory. From the interaction energy, it is found that keto-enol form tautomers have stronger interaction with intercalators than diketone form tautomers. On complex formation of thymine and uracil tautomers with benzo[c]cinnoline the drug molecules have high interaction energy values of -20.14 (BenT3) and -20.55 (BenU3) kcal mol -1 , while phenazine has the least interaction energy values of -6.52 (PhenT2) and -6.67 (PhenU2) kcal mol -1 . The closed shell intermolecular type interaction between the molecules with minimum elliptical value of 0.018 and 0.019 a.u at both levels of theory has been found from topological analysis. The benzo[c]cinnoline drug molecule with thymine and uracil tautomers has short range intermolecular N-H…N, C-H…O, and O-H...N hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) resulting in higher stability than other drug molecules. The proper hydrogen bonds N-H..N and O-H..N have the frequency shifted toward the lower side (red shifted) with the elongation in their bond length while the improper hydrogen bond C-H...O has the frequency shifted toward the higher side (blue shifted) of the spectral region with the contraction in their bond length. Further, the charge transfer between proton acceptor and donor along with stability of the bond is studied using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Graphical abstract Hydrogen bond interaction of diketo/keto-enol form uracil and thymine tautomers with intercalators.

  16. Covalent bond force profile and cleavage in a single polymer chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Lionel; Gauthier-Manuel, Bernard; van der Vegte, Eric W.; Snijders, Jaap; Hadziioannou, Georges

    2000-08-01

    We present here the measurement of the single-polymer entropic elasticity and the single covalent bond force profile, probed with two types of atomic force microscopes (AFM) on a synthetic polymer molecule: polymethacrylic acid in water. The conventional AFM allowed us to distinguish two types of interactions present in this system when doing force spectroscopic measurements: the first interaction is associated with adsorption sites of the polymer chains onto a bare gold surface, the second interaction is directly correlated to the rupture process of a single covalent bond. All these bridging interactions allowed us to stretch the single polymer chain and to determine the various factors playing a role in the elasticity of these molecules. To obtain a closer insight into the bond rupture process, we moved to a force sensor stable in position when measuring attractive forces. By optimizing the polymer length so as to fulfill the elastic stability conditions, we were able for the first time to map out the entire force profile associated with the cleavage of a single covalent bond. Experimental data coupled with molecular quantum mechanical calculations strongly suggest that the breaking bond is located at one end of the polymer chain.

  17. History-dependence of muscle slack length following contraction and stretch in the human vastus lateralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Peter W; Walsh, Lee D; D'Souza, Arkiev; Héroux, Martin E; Bolsterlee, Bart; Gandevia, Simon C; Herbert, Robert D

    2018-06-01

    In reduced muscle preparations, the slack length and passive stiffness of muscle fibres have been shown to be influenced by previous muscle contraction or stretch. In human muscles, such behaviours have been inferred from measures of muscle force, joint stiffness and reflex magnitudes and latencies. Using ultrasound imaging, we directly observed that isometric contraction of the vastus lateralis muscle at short lengths reduces the slack lengths of the muscle-tendon unit and muscle fascicles. The effect is apparent 60 s after the contraction. These observations imply that muscle contraction at short lengths causes the formation of bonds which reduce the effective length of structures that generate passive tension in muscles. In reduced muscle preparations, stretch and muscle contraction change the properties of relaxed muscle fibres. In humans, effects of stretch and contraction on properties of relaxed muscles have been inferred from measurements of time taken to develop force, joint stiffness and reflex latencies. The current study used ultrasound imaging to directly observe the effects of stretch and contraction on muscle-tendon slack length and fascicle slack length of the human vastus lateralis muscle in vivo. The muscle was conditioned by (a) strong isometric contractions at long muscle-tendon lengths, (b) strong isometric contractions at short muscle-tendon lengths, (c) weak isometric contractions at long muscle-tendon lengths and (d) slow stretches. One minute after conditioning, ultrasound images were acquired from the relaxed muscle as it was slowly lengthened through its physiological range. The ultrasound image sequences were used to identify muscle-tendon slack angles and fascicle slack lengths. Contraction at short muscle-tendon lengths caused a mean 13.5 degree (95% CI 11.8-15.0 degree) shift in the muscle-tendon slack angle towards shorter muscle-tendon lengths, and a mean 5 mm (95% CI 2-8 mm) reduction in fascicle slack length, compared to the

  18. Orbital Exponent Optimization in Elementary VB Calculations of the Chemical Bond in the Ground State of Simple Molecular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnasco, Valerio

    2008-01-01

    Orbital exponent optimization in the elementary ab-initio VB calculation of the ground states of H[subscript 2][superscript +], H[subscript 2], He[subscript 2][superscript +], He[subscript 2] gives a fair description of the exchange-overlap component of the interatomic interaction that is important in the bond region. Correct bond lengths and…

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach

  20. Impact of SiO2 on Al–Al thermocompression wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Nishant; Finstad, Terje G; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Poppe, Erik U; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2015-01-01

    Al–Al thermocompression bonding suitable for wafer level sealing of MEMS devices has been investigated. This paper presents a comparison of thermocompression bonding of Al films deposited on Si with and without a thermal oxide (SiO 2 film). Laminates of diameter 150 mm containing device sealing frames of width 200 µm were realized. The wafers were bonded by applying a bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 300–550 °C for bonding times of 15, 30 or 60 min. The effects of these process variations on the quality of the bonded laminates have been studied. The bond quality was estimated by measurements of dicing yield, tensile strength, amount of cohesive fracture in Si and interfacial characterization. The mean bond strength of the tested structures ranged from 18–61 MPa. The laminates with an SiO 2 film had higher dicing yield and bond strength than the laminates without SiO 2 for a 400 °C bonding temperature. The bond strength increased with increasing bonding temperature and bond force. The laminates bonded for 30 and 60 min at 400 °C and 60 kN had similar bond strength and amount of cohesive fracture in the bulk silicon, while the laminates bonded for 15 min had significantly lower bond strength and amount of cohesive fracture in the bulk silicon. (paper)

  1. Statics and dynamics of free and hydrogen-bonded OH groups at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Bolhuis, Peter G; Campen, R Kramer

    2012-08-09

    We use classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two water models (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) to investigate the orientation and reorientation dynamics of two subpopulations of OH groups belonging to water molecules at the air/water interface at 300 K: those OH groups that donate a hydrogen bond (called "bonded") and those that do not (called "free"). Free interfacial OH groups reorient in two distinct regimes: a fast regime from 0 to 1 ps and a slow regime thereafter. Qualitatively similar behavior was reported by others for free OH groups near extended hydrophobic surfaces. In contrast, the net reorientation of bonded OH groups occurs at a rate similar to that of bulk water. This similarity in reorientation rate results from compensation of two effects: decreasing frequency of hydrogen-bond breaking/formation (i.e., hydrogen-bond exchange) and faster rotation of intact hydrogen bonds. Both changes result from the decrease in density at the air/water interface relative to the bulk. Interestingly, because of the presence of capillary waves, the slowdown of hydrogen-bond exchange is significantly smaller than that reported for water near extended hydrophobic surfaces, but it is almost identical to that reported for water near small hydrophobic solutes. In this sense water at the air/water interface has characteristics of water of hydration of both small and extended hydrophobic solutes.

  2. Development of HIP bonding procedure and mechanical properties of HIP bonded joints for reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Hatano, Toshihisa; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1997-03-01

    Structural materials of blanket components in fusion DEMO reactors will receive a neutron wall load more than 3-5MW/m 2 as well as exposed by surface heat flux more than 0.5MW/m 2 . A reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H has been developed by JAERI in collaboration with NKK from viewpoints of resistance for high temperature and neutron loads and lower radioactivity. This study intends to obtain basic performance of F-82H to establish the fabrication procedure of the first wall and blanket box by using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) bonding. Before HIP bonding tests, effects of heat treatment temperature and surface roughness on mechanical properties of joints were investigated in the heat treatment tests and diffusion bonding tests, respectively. From these results, the optimum HIP bonding conditions and the post heat treatment were selected. Using these conditions, the HIP bonding tests were carried out to evaluate HIP bondability and to obtain mechanical properties of the joints. Sufficient HIP bonding performance was obtained under the temperature of 1040degC, the compressive stress of 150MPa, the holding time of 2h, and the surface roughness ∼μ m. Mechanical properties of HIP bonded joints with these conditions were similar to those of as-received base metal. An oxide formation on the surface to be bonded would need to be avoided for sufficient bonding. The bonding ratio, Charpy impact value and fatigue performance of the joints strongly depended on the HIP conditions, especially temperature, while micro-structure, Vickers hardness and tensile properties had little dependence on the HIP temperature. The surface roughness strongly affected the bonding ratio and would be required to be in the level of a few μ m. In the HIP bonding test of the welded material, the once-melted surface could be jointed by the HIP bonding under the above-mentioned procedure. (J.P.N.)

  3. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao

    2018-01-01

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm2. On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm2. 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm2). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties. PMID:29425152

  4. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  5. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated posts on bonding of resin cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeld, Anne; Asmussen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments of prefabricated posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White) and zirconia (Cerapost) on the bonding of two resin cements: ParaPost Cement and Panavia F by a diametral tensile strength (DTS) test...... the start of mixing the resin cement, the specimen was freed from the mold and stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Following water storage, the specimen was wet-ground to a final length of approximately 3 mm. The DTS of specimens was determined in a Universal Testing Machine. The bonding...

  6. Recrystallization texture in nickel heavily deformed by accumulative roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, O. V.; Zhang, Y. B.; Godfrey, A.

    2017-07-01

    The recrystallization behavior of Ni processed by accumulative roll bonding to a total accumulated von Mises strain of 4.8 has been examined, and analyzed with respect to heterogeneity in the deformation microstructure. The regions near the bonding interface are found to be more refined and contain particle deformation zones around fragments of the steel wire brush used to prepare the surface for bonding. Sample-scale gradients are also observed, manifested as differences between the subsurface, intermediate and central layers, where the distributions of texture components are different. These heterogeneities affect the progress of recrystallization. While the subsurface and near-interface regions typically contain lower frequencies of cube-oriented grains than anywhere else in the sample, a strong cube texture forms in the sample during recrystallization, attributed to both a high nucleation rate and fast growth rate of cube-oriented grains. The observations highlight the sensitivity of recrystallization to heterogeneity in the deformation microstructure and demonstrate the importance of characterizing this heterogeneity over several length scales.

  7. Relativistic contributions to the bonding in Cu2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of relativity on the spectroscopic parameters of Cu 2 has been investigated by evaluating the mass-velocity and one electron Darwin terms of the Breit--Pauli Hamiltonian in the first order of perturbation theory. The relativistic corrections are of the order of 10% of the SCF and GVB results and result in a deeper (approx.1.5 kcal), stiffer (approx.15 cm - 1 ) well, with the bond length contracted by about 0.1a 0

  8. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  9. Effect of ethanol-wet-bonding technique on resin–enamel bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The ethanol-wet-bonding technique may increase the bond strength of commercial adhesives to enamel. The chemical composition of the adhesives can affect the bond strength of adhesives when bonding to acid-etched enamel, using the ethanol-wet-bonding technique. Some adhesive systems used in the present study may simultaneously be applied to enamel and dentin using ethanol-wet-bonding. Furthermore, deploying ethanol-wet-bonding for the tested commercial adhesives to enamel can increase the adhesion abilities of these adhesives to enamel.

  10. Development of bonding techniques between W and Cu-alloys for plasma facing components by HIP method (3). Bonding tests with Au-foil insert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shigeru

    2002-07-01

    In recent years, it has been considered that W (tungsten) is one of candidate materials for armor tiles of plasma a facing components (PFC), like first wall or divertor, of fusion reactor. On the other hand, Cu-alloys, like OFHC-Cu or DS-Cu, are proposed as heat sink materials behind the plasma facing materials because of its high thermal conductivity. It is necessary to develop a reliable bonding techniques in order to fabricate PFC. JAERI has developed the hot isostatic press (HIP) bonding process to bond W with Cu-alloys. In this experiments, bonding tests with Au-foil insert were performed. We could get the best HIP bonding conditions for W and Cu-alloys with Au-foil as 1123K x 2hours x 147MPa. It was shown that the HIP temperature was 150K lower than that of without Au-foil. Furthermore, the tensile strength was similar to that of with without Au-foil. (author)

  11. Asymmetrical bonding in cold spraying of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, R.; Seyedein, S. H.; Kheirandish, S.; Assadi, H.; Jodoin, B.

    2018-06-01

    Characteristics of particle bonding, especially for dissimilar materials, remains a key question in cold spray deposition. There are limited reports in direct correlation to particle/substrate bonding and peripheral shear zones. Cold spraying experiments and numerical simulations are conducted to characterise and analyse the correlation between bonding and peripheral shear zones for asymmetric particle/substrate pairs of intermetallic-forming elements of nickel and titanium. The correlation between metallic bonding and highly strained areas is explored in view of the growth of the intermetallic phase at the particle/substrate interface during subsequent heat treatments. Characterisation of the as-sprayed samples reveal that for the Ni(particle)/Ti(substrate) pair, plastic deformation of the particle is dominating over substrate deformation. However, for the Ti(particle)/Ni(substrate) pair, it is observed that the substrate and particle deform to similar extents. Characterisation of the samples after a brief heat treatment at 700 °C indicate that intermetallic formation, and hence metallurgical bonding of the pairs is more likely to occur at the particle peripheries where the interface areas are highly strained, and rarely achieved at the particle base. Results also reveal that bonding extends from peripheries toward the central part of the interfaces with increasing the impact velocity. The kinetics of interfacial intermetallic formation at peripheral areas and its correlation to particle bonding is discussed in view of deformation-enhanced interdiffusion.

  12. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  13. The comparison between the length of vertical dimension of occlusion and the length of thumb on undergraduate Mongoloid students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Li Teng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Thumb Rule of Leonardo da Vinci states that many proportions of the face show relationship with the length of thumb which is measured from the proximal tip of the proximal phalanx to the distal tip of the distal phalanx. Previous studies have shown that the length of the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO is similar to the length of thumb of the Caucasoid race. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the length of VDO have correlations with the length of thumb among those of the Mongoloid race. This study took a survey method with the analytical cross-sectional approach. A total of 80 students of Faculty of Dentistry who have fulfilled all population criteria were randomly chosen to measure the length of VDO and the length of the thumb. Results analyzed with Student's t-test statistic revealed that there was a significant difference between males and females in the length of VDO and the length of the thumb, however, there was no significant difference between the length of VDO and the length of the thumb. There were very strong correlations (P<0.05 between the length of VDO and the length of the thumb. As a conclusion, the length of thumb can be suggested as an objective method to determine the length of VDO in this population.

  14. The centroidal algorithm in molecular similarity and diversity calculations on confidential datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepalin, Sergey; Osadchiy, Nikolay

    2005-09-01

    Chemical structure provides exhaustive description of a compound, but it is often proprietary and thus an impediment in the exchange of information. For example, structure disclosure is often needed for the selection of most similar or dissimilar compounds. Authors propose a centroidal algorithm based on structural fragments (screens) that can be efficiently used for the similarity and diversity selections without disclosing structures from the reference set. For an increased security purposes, authors recommend that such set contains at least some tens of structures. Analysis of reverse engineering feasibility showed that the problem difficulty grows with decrease of the screen's radius. The algorithm is illustrated with concrete calculations on known steroidal, quinoline, and quinazoline drugs. We also investigate a problem of scaffold identification in combinatorial library dataset. The results show that relatively small screens of radius equal to 2 bond lengths perform well in the similarity sorting, while radius 4 screens yield better results in diversity sorting. The software implementation of the algorithm taking SDF file with a reference set generates screens of various radii which are subsequently used for the similarity and diversity sorting of external SDFs. Since the reverse engineering of the reference set molecules from their screens has the same difficulty as the RSA asymmetric encryption algorithm, generated screens can be stored openly without further encryption. This approach ensures an end user transfers only a set of structural fragments and no other data. Like other algorithms of encryption, the centroid algorithm cannot give 100% guarantee of protecting a chemical structure from dataset, but probability of initial structure identification is very small-order of 10-40 in typical cases.

  15. Measurement of the x-ray mass-attenuation coefficients of gold, derived quantities between 14 keV and 21 keV and determination of the bond lengths of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, J L; Chantler, C T; Barnea, Z; Rae, N A; Tran, C Q

    2010-01-01

    The x-ray mass-attenuation coefficients of gold are measured at 91 energies between 14 keV and 21 keV using synchrotron radiation. The measurements are accurate to between 0.08% and 0.1%. The photoelectric mass-absorption coefficients and the imaginary component of the form factors of gold are also determined. The results include the L I edge and are the most accurate and extensive gold dataset available in this energy range. An analysis of the L I edge XAFS showed excellent agreement between the measured and simulated XAFS and yielded highly accurate values of the bond lengths of gold. When our results are compared with earlier measurements and with predictions of major theoretical tabulations, significant discrepancies are noted. The comparison raises questions about the nature of discrepancies between experimental and theoretical values of mass-attenuation coefficients.

  16. Metal-Ligand Bonds of Second- and Third-Row d-Block Metals Characterized by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper P.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents systematic data for 200 neutral diatomic molecules ML (M is a second- or third-row d-block metal and L = H, F, Cl, Br, I, C, N, O, S, or Se) computed with the density functionals TPSSh and BP86. With experimental structures and bond enthalpies available for many of these molecules, the computations first document the high accuracy of TPSSh, giving metal-ligand bond lengths with a mean absolute error of ˜0.01 Å for the second row and 0.03 Å for the third row. TPSSh provides metal-ligand bond enthalpies with mean absolute errors of 37 and 44 kJ/mol for the second- and third-row molecules, respectively. Pathological cases (e.g., HgC and HgN) have errors of up to 155 kJ/mol, more than thrice the mean (observed with both functionals). Importantly, the systematic error component is negligible as measured by a coefficient of the linear regression line of 0.99. Equally important, TPSSh provides uniform accuracy across all three rows of the d-block, which is unprecedented and due to the 10% exact exchange, which is close to optimal for the d-block as a whole. This work provides an accurate and systematic prediction of electronic ground-state spins, characteristic metal-ligand bond lengths, and bond enthalpies for many as yet uncharacterized diatomics, of interest to researchers in the field of second- and third-row d-block chemistry. We stress that the success of TPSSh cannot be naively extrapolated to other special situations such as, e.g., metal-metal bonds. The high accuracy of the procedure further implies that the effective core functions used to model relativistic effects are necessary and sufficient for obtaining accurate geometries and bond enthalpies of second- and third-row molecular systems.

  17. Microleakage under Orthodontic Metal Brackets Bonded with Three Different Bonding Techniques with/without Thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berahman Sabzevari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of beneath the orthodontic brackets bonded with 3 different bonding techniques and evaluate the effect of thermocycling. Methods: One hundred and twenty premolars were randomly divided into 6 groups, received the following treatment: group 1: 37% phosphoric acid gel+Unite primer+Unite adhesive, group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel+ Transbond XT primer+Transbond XT adhesive, group 3: Transbond plus Self Etching Primer (TSEP+Transbond XT adhesive. Groups 4, 5, and 6 were similar to groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Evaluation of microleakage was done following to thermocycling test. After bonding, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish except for 1 mm around the brackets and then stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine. The specimens were sectioned at buccolingual direction in 2 parallel planes and evaluated under a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of microleakage at bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces from gingival and occlusal margins. Results: Microleakage was observed in all groups, and increased significantly after thermocycling at some interfaces of Unite adhesive group and conventional etching+Transbond XT adhesive group, but the increase was not significant in any interface of TSEP group. With or without thermocycling, TSEP displayed more microleakage than other groups. In most groups, microleakage at gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal margin. Conclusion: Thermocycling and type of bonding technique significantly affect the amount of microleakage.

  18. Oxidation study on as-bonded intermetallic of copper wire–aluminum bond pad metallization for electronic microchip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph Sahaya Anand, T.; Yau, Chua Kok; Huat, Lim Boon

    2012-01-01

    samples. ► Both samples have similar ball shear strength. ► Estimated interfacial temperature of as-bonded Forming Gas ON sample ∼437 °C.

  19. Oxidation study on as-bonded intermetallic of copper wire-aluminum bond pad metallization for electronic microchip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Sahaya Anand, T., E-mail: anand@utem.edu.my [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, University Technical Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Yau, Chua Kok [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, University Technical Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); University of Technical Malaysia Supported by Infineon Technology - Malaysia - Sdn. Bhd., Melaka (Malaysia); Huat, Lim Boon [Department of Innovation, Infineon Technology - Malaysia - Sdn. Bhd., FTZ Batu Berendam, 75350 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    in sample prepared with Forming Gas OFF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voids are present at the bonding interfaces of both samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both samples have similar ball shear strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated interfacial temperature of as-bonded Forming Gas ON sample {approx}437 Degree-Sign C.

  20. Self-Assembly of Chip-Size Components with Cavity Structures: High-Precision Alignment and Direct Bonding without Thermal Compression for Hetero Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsumasa Koyanagi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available New surface mounting and packaging technologies, using self-assembly with chips having cavity structures, were investigated for three-dimensional (3D and hetero integration of complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS. By the surface tension of small droplets of 0.5 wt% hydrogen fluoride (HF aqueous solution, the cavity chips, with a side length of 3 mm, were precisely aligned to hydrophilic bonding regions on the surface of plateaus formed on Si substrates. The plateaus have micro-channels to readily evaporate and fully remove the liquid from the cavities. The average alignment accuracy of the chips with a 1 mm square cavity was found to be 0.4 mm. The alignment accuracy depends, not only on the area of the bonding regions on the substrates and the length of chip periphery without the widths of channels in the plateaus, but also the area wetted by the liquid on the bonding regions. The precisely aligned chips were then directly bonded to the substrates at room temperature without thermal compression, resulting in a high shear bonding strength of more than 10 MPa.

  1. The demagnetising factors for bonded neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.

    2000-10-01

    Both analytical and computational methods have been, for the first time, employed to study the demagnetising factors for bonded magnets. The demagnetising factors for bonded NdFeB magnets are dependent on the external shape of the bonded magnet, the shapes of magnetic particles, the magnetic loading percentage and the distributions of magnetic particles. Particularly, it has been shown that the demagnetising factor along the length of an infinitely long bonded magnet is not equal to zero but that it also depends on the shapes of the magnetic particles, magnetic loading percentage and the distribution of magnetic particles. However, the sum of the demagnetising factors along the x, y and z directions is, as expected, unity for all bonded magnets. The demagnetising factor for a fully dense magnet, which is dependent only on the external shape of the magnet, can be considered as a special case of bonded magnets in which the magnetic loading is 100%. Simplified formulae for calculating the demagnetising factors for simple shaped magnets such as cuboid, cylindroid and ellipsoid shapes were obtained and the values are in reasonable agreement with precise analytical solutions. A Lorentz ''sphere'' concept has, for the first time, been employed to calculate the demagnetising factors for hollow magnets and bonded NdFeB magnets. The simplified formulae for hollow magnets and bonded magnets were derived. Computer programmes based on the basic energy method were developed and employed to calculate the demagnetising factors for bonded magnet models, such as a one-dimensional NdFeB ribbon array, two-dimensional bonded magnets and three-dimensional bonded magnets. A finite difference method and a finite element method have been, for the first time, employed to calculate the demagnetising factors for two-dimensional bonded magnet models and the results are comparable with those obtained using the basic energy method. Procedures for calculating demagnetising curves (J vs H) for

  2. Development of bonding techniques between tungsten and copper alloy for plasma facing components by HIP method. 1. Bonding between tungsten and oxygen free copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni; Akiba, Masato

    1999-08-01

    In recent years, it has been considered that W (tungsten) is one of candidate materials for armor tiles of plasma facing components, like first wall or divertor, of fusion reactor. On the other hand, oxygen free high thermal conductivity (OFHC)-copper is proposed as heat sink materials behind the plasma facing materials because of its high thermal conductivity. However, plasma facing components are exposed to cyclic high heat load and heavily irradiated by 14 MeV neutron. Under these conditions, many unfavorable effects, for instance, thermal stresses of bonding interface, irradiation damage and He atom production by nuclear transmutation, will be decreased bonding strength between W and Cu alloys. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a reliable bonding techniques in order to make plasma facing components which can resist them. Then, we started the bonding technology development by hot isostatic press (HIP) method to bond W with Cu alloys. In this experiments, to optimize HIP bonding conditions, four point bending were performed for each bonded conditions at temperature from R.T. to 873 K and we could get the best HIP bonding conditions for W and OFHC-Cu as 1273 K x 2 hours x 147 MPa. To evaluate bonding strength of the specimen bonded at these conditions, tensile tests were also performed at same temperature range. The tensile strength was similar with OFHC-Cu which were treated at same conditions. (author)

  3. Nitrogen-tuned bonding mechanism of Li and Ti adatom embedded graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen defects on the bonding mechanism and resultant binding energy between the metal and graphene layer were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the graphitic N-doped graphene, Li adatom exhibited ionic bonding character, while Ti adatom showed features of covalent bonding similar to that of pristine graphene. However, in the cases of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures, partially covalent bonding characteristic occurred around N atoms in the process of binding with metals, and this particular bond formation enhanced the bond strength of metal on the graphene layer as much as it exceeded the cohesive energy of the metal bulk. Thus, Li and Ti metals are expected to be dispersed with atomic accuracy on the pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene layers. These results demonstrate that the bonding mechanism of metal–graphene complex can change according to the type of N defect, and this also affects the binding results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nitrogen defects changed the bonding mechanism between metal and graphene. • Bonding character and binding results were investigated using DFT calculations. • Covalent bonding character occurred around pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene. • Pyridinic and pyrrolic N atoms are effective for metal dispersion on the graphene

  4. At least 10% shorter C–H bonds in cryogenic protein crystal structures than in current AMBER forcefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping, E-mail: pang@mayo.edu

    2015-03-06

    High resolution protein crystal structures resolved with X-ray diffraction data at cryogenic temperature are commonly used as experimental data to refine forcefields and evaluate protein folding simulations. However, it has been unclear hitherto whether the C–H bond lengths in cryogenic protein structures are significantly different from those defined in forcefields to affect protein folding simulations. This article reports the finding that the C–H bonds in high resolution cryogenic protein structures are 10–14% shorter than those defined in current AMBER forcefields, according to 3709 C–H bonds in the cryogenic protein structures with resolutions of 0.62–0.79 Å. Also, 20 all-atom, isothermal–isobaric, 0.5-μs molecular dynamics simulations showed that chignolin folded from a fully-extended backbone formation to the native β-hairpin conformation in the simulations using AMBER forcefield FF12SB at 300 K with an aggregated native state population including standard error of 10 ± 4%. However, the aggregated native state population with standard error reduced to 3 ± 2% in the same simulations except that C–H bonds were shortened by 10–14%. Furthermore, the aggregated native state populations with standard errors increased to 35 ± 3% and 26 ± 3% when using FF12MC, which is based on AMBER forcefield FF99, with and without the shortened C–H bonds, respectively. These results show that the 10–14% bond length differences can significantly affect protein folding simulations and suggest that re-parameterization of C–H bonds according to the cryogenic structures could improve the ability of a forcefield to fold proteins in molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Cryogenic crystal structures are commonly used in computational studies of proteins. • C–H bonds in the cryogenic structures are shorter than those defined in forcefields. • A survey of 3709 C–H bonds shows that the cryogenic bonds are 10–14% shorter. • The

  5. Topology of charge density of flucytosine and related molecules and characteristics of their bond charge distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgich, Juan; Franco, Héctor J; San-Blas, Gioconda

    2006-08-24

    The molecular charge distribution of flucytosine (4-amino-5-fluoro-2-pyrimidone), uracil, 5-fluorouracil, and thymine was studied by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The resulting distributions were analyzed by means of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. Bonds were characterized through vectors formed with the charge density value, its Laplacian, and the bond ellipticity calculated at the bond critical point (BCP). Within each set of C=O, C-H, and N-H bonds, these vectors showed little dispersion. C-C bonds formed three different subsets, one with a significant degree of double bonding, a second corresponding to single bonds with a finite ellipticity produced by hyperconjugation, and a third one formed by a pure single bond. In N-C bonds, a decrease in bond length (an increase in double bond character) was not reflected as an increase in their ellipticity, as in all C-C bonds studied. It was also found that substitution influenced the N-C, C-O, and C-C bond ellipticity much more than density and its Laplacian at the BCP. The Laplacian of charge density pointed to the existence of both bonding and nonbonding maxima in the valence shell charge concentration of N, O, and F, while only bonding ones were found for the C atoms. The nonbonding maxima related to the sites for electrophilic attack and H bonding in O and N, while sites of nucleophilic attack were suggested by the holes in the valence shell of the C atoms of the carbonyl groups.

  6. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Mittal, Sanjeev; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non-significant (p > 0.05). Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement.

  7. Bi-directional ultrasonic wave coupling to FBGs in continuously bonded optical fiber sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Junghyun; Hackney, Drew; Bradford, Philip; Peters, Kara

    2017-09-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are typically spot-bonded onto the surface of a structure to detect ultrasonic waves in laboratory demonstrations. However, to protect the rest of the optical fiber from any environmental damage during real applications, bonding the entire length of fiber, called continuous bonding, is commonly done. In this paper, we investigate the impact of continuously bonding FBGs on the measured Lamb wave signal. In theory, the ultrasonic wave signal can bi-directionally transfer between the optical fiber and the plate at any adhered location, which could potentially produce output signal distortion for the continuous bonding case. Therefore, an experiment is performed to investigate the plate-to-fiber and fiber-to-plate signal transfer, from which the signal coupling coefficient of each case is theoretically estimated based on the experimental data. We demonstrate that the two coupling coefficients are comparable, with the plate-to-fiber case approximately 19% larger than the fiber-to-plate case. Finally, the signal waveform and arrival time of the output FBG responses are compared between the continuous and spot bonding cases. The results indicate that the resulting Lamb wave signal output is only that directly detected at the FBG location; however, a slight difference in signal waveform is observed between the two bonding configurations. This paper demonstrates the practicality of using continuously bonded FBGs for ultrasonic wave detection in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications.

  8. Theoretical determination of molecular structure and conformation. 20. Reevaluation of the strain energies of cyclopropane and cyclobutane - CC and CH bond energies, 1,3 interactions, and sigma-aromaticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, D.; Gauss, J.

    1986-11-26

    In order to rationalize the striking similarity of the strain energies (SE) of cyclopropane (1, 28 kcal/mol) and cyclobutane (2, 27 kcal/mol), the energetic consequences of Pitzer strain, Baeyer strain, hybridization effects (CH bond strengthening), Dunitz-Schomaker strain (1,3 CC interactions), and bond stretching effects have been quantitatively assessed at the HF/6-31G** level of theory. Calculations have been based on chemically meaningful definitions of bond length, bond angle, bond energy, and bending force constant in strained molecules. Results reveal that Pitzer strain in both 1 and 2 is just 4 kcal/mol and that CH bond strengthening stabilizes 1 by 6 kcal/mol (2 by 3 kcal/mol), far less than has been assumed previously. The calculated Baeyer strain of 1 and 2 is 41 and 13 kcal/mol, respectively. SE(1) and SE(2) can only be compared if a correction term of 9 kcal/mol due to Dunitz-Schomaker strain (present in 2, but absent in 1) is taken into account. The analysis of the various energy contributions to the SEs of 1 and 2 reveals that 1 is stabilized by at least 17 kcal/mol. Both MO and electron density analysis suggest that 1 is totally different from the other cycloalkanes in being stabilized by 3-center 2-electron delocalization. sigma-Electrons are delocalized in the surface of the three-membered ring, a phenomenon which may be described by the term sigma-aromaticity.

  9. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (padhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  10. Neutron diffraction of α, β and γ cyclodextrins: hydrogen bonding patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingerty, B.E.; Klar, B.; Hardgrove, G.; Betzel, C.; Saenger, W.

    1983-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CD's) are torus-shaped molecules composed of six (α), seven (β) or eight (γ) (1 → 4) linked glucoses. α-CD has been shown to have two different structures with well-defined hydrogen bonds, one tense and the other relaxed. An induced-fit-like mechanism for α-CD complex formation has been proposed. Circular hydrogen bond networks have also been found for α-CD due to the energetically favored cooperative effect. β-CD with a disordered water structure possesses an unusual flip-flop hydrogen bonding system of the type O-H H-O representing an equilibrium between two states; O-H O reversible H-O. γ-CD with a disordered water structure similar to β-CD also possesses the flip-flop hydrogen bond. This study demonstrates that hydrogen bonds are operative in disordered systems and display dynamics even in the solid state

  11. Amalgam shear bond strength to dentin using different bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M A; Denehy, G E; Ratananakin, T

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using five different bonding agents: Amalgambond Plus, Optibond, Imperva Dual, All-Bond 2, and Clearfil Liner Bond. Flat dentin surfaces obtained by grinding the occlusal portion of 50 human third molars were used for this study. To contain the amalgam on the tooth surface, cylindrical plastic molds were placed on the dentin and secured with sticky wax. The bonding agents were then applied according to the manufacturers' instructions or light activated and Tytin amalgam was condensed into the plastic molds. The samples were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Analysis by one-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the five groups (P < 0.05). The bond strength of amalgam to dentin was significantly higher with Amalgambond Plus using the High-Performance Additive than with the other four bonding agents.

  12. Mechanical and Non-Destructive Study of CFRP Adhesive Bonds Subjected to Pre-Bond Thermal Treatment and De-Icing Fluid Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł H. Malinowski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials are commonly used in many branches of industry. One of the effective methods to join the carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP parts includes the use of adhesives. There is a search on effective methods for quality assurance of bonded parts. In the research here reported the influence of surface pre-bond modification on the adhesive bonds of CFRP plates has been analyzed. Adherends surface modifications, to include defects affecting the bonding quality, were obtained through surface thermal treatment, surface contamination with de-icing fluid and a combination of both the previously described treatments. Characterization of bonded joints was performed by means of mechanical testing, ultrasounds and electromechanical impedance (EMI measurements. The study here proposed has also the aim to evaluate the ability of different destructive and non-destructive techniques to assess the quality of the bonds. While mechanical tests were strongly affected by the surface modifications, results obtained ultrasound and EMI test have demonstrate only a limited ability of these techniques to differentiate between the different samples. In fact, ultrasounds did not show any changes in the bondline, due to pre-bond modifications. However, this technique was able to detect delamination in CFRP for one of the samples thermally treated at 280 °C. Electromechanical impedance (EMI measurements showed similar behavior as mechanical tests for samples thermally treated at 260 °C and 280 °C, and for the sample whose surface modification was made with a combination of thermally and de-icing fluid treatments.

  13. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Vajihesadat; Fathi, Mohammadhosein; Ataei, Ebrahim; Khodaeian, Niloufar; Askari, Navid

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP), and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB)) and unfilled (Single Bond (SB)) adhesive systems (n = 12). A universal resin composite was placed into the translucent plastic cylinders (3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in length) and seated against the enamel and dentine surfaces and polymerized for 40 seconds. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, and the results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Tukey HSD post hoc test with a 5% level of significance.There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the adhesive systems in enamel, but CSEB and SB exhibited significantly higher and lower bond strength to dentine, respectively, than the other tested adhesive systems while there were no statistically significant differences between PBNT and OBSP. PMID:23209471

  14. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP, and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and unfilled (Single Bond (SB adhesive systems (n=12. A universal resin composite was placed into the translucent plastic cylinders (3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in length and seated against the enamel and dentine surfaces and polymerized for 40 seconds. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, and the results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Tukey HSD post hoc test with a 5% level of significance.There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the adhesive systems in enamel, but CSEB and SB exhibited significantly higher and lower bond strength to dentine, respectively, than the other tested adhesive systems while there were no statistically significant differences between PBNT and OBSP.

  15. Thermodynamics of single polyethylene and polybutylene glycols with hydrogen-bonding ends: A transition from looped to open conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsang; Paul, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    A variety of linear polymer precursors with hydrogen bonding motifs at both ends enable us to design supramolecular polymer systems with tailored macroscopic properties including self-healing. In this study, we investigate thermodynamic properties of single polyethylene and polybutylene glycols with hydrogen bonding motifs. In this context, we first build a coarse-grained model of building blocks of the supramolecular polymer system based on all-atom molecular structures. The density of states of the single precursor is obtained using the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo method. Constructing canonical partition functions from the density of states, we find the transition from looped to open conformations at transition temperatures which are non-monotonously changing with an increasing degree of polymerization due to the competition between chain stiffness and loop-forming entropy penalty. In the complete range of chain length under investigation, a coexistence of the looped and open morphologies at the transition temperature is shown regardless of whether the transition is first-order-like or continuous. Polyethylene and polybutylene glycols show similar behavior in all the thermodynamic properties but the transition temperature of the more flexible polybutylene glycol is shown to change more gradually.

  16. Comparison of enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives in self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Hosoya, Yumiko; Nojiri, Kie; Nagura, Yuko; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    To comparatively evaluate universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives for enamel bond fatigue durability in self-etch mode. Three universal adhesives (Clearfil Universal Bond; G-Premio Bond; Scotchbond Universal Adhesive) and three two-step self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond; Clearfil SE Bond 2; OptiBond XTR) were used. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of the adhesive to enamel in self-etch mode were determined. The initial shear bond strengths of the universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode was significantly lower than those of two-step self-etch adhesives and initial shear bond strengths were not influenced by type of adhesive in each adhesive category. The shear fatigue strengths of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode were significantly lower than that of Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil SE Bond 2, but similar to that OptiBond XTR. Unlike two-step self-etch adhesives, the initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode was not influenced by the type of adhesive. This laboratory study showed that the enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives was lower than Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil SE Bond 2, similar to Optibond XTR, and was not influenced by type of adhesive, unlike two-step self-etch adhesives.

  17. Convertible bond valuation focusing on Chinese convertible bond market

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke

    2010-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the methods of valuation of convertible bonds in Chinese market. Different from common convertible bonds in European market, considering the complicate features of Chinese convertible bond, this paper represents specific pricing approaches for pricing convertible bonds with different provisions along with the increment of complexity of these provisions. More specifically, this paper represents the decomposing method and binomial tree method for pricing both of Non-...

  18. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Aisha de Souza Gomes; Bergmann, Carlos; Prietsch, José Renato; Vicenzi, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests) demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared, but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  19. Development of bonding techniques between tungsten and copper alloy for plasma facing components by HIP method (2). Bonding between tungsten and DS-copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Eto, Motokuni; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Akiba, Masato

    2000-02-01

    Recently, W (tungsten)-alloys are considered as plasma facing material (PFM) for ITER because of these many favorable properties such as high melting point (3655 K), relatively high thermal conductivity and higher resistivity for plasma sputtering. On the other hand, Cu-alloys, especially DS (dispersion strengthened)-Cu, are proposed as heat sink materials because of its high thermal conductivity and good mechanical properties at high temperature. Plasma facing components (PFC) are designed as the duplex structure where W armor tiles are bonded with Cu-alloy heat sink. Then, we started the bonding technology development by hot isostatic press (HIP) method to bond W with Cu-alloys because of its many advantages. Until now, it was reported that we could get the best HIP bonding conditions for W and OFHC-Cu and the tensile strength was similar with HIP treated OFHC-Cu. In this experiments, bonding tests of W and DS-Cu with insert material were performed. As insert material, OFHC-Cu was used with different thickness. Bonding conditions were selected as 1273 K x 2 hours x 147 MPa. Bonding tests with 0.3 to 1.8 mm thickness OFHC-Cu were successfully bonded but with 0.1 mm thickness was not bonded. From the results of tensile tests, the tensile strength of the specimens with 0.3 and 0.5 mm thickness were decreased at elevated temperature. It was shown that over 1.0 mm thickness OFHC-Cu insert may be needed and the tensile strength were a little higher than that of HIP treated OFHC-Cu. (author)

  20. Tuning the electronic properties by width and length modifications of narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes for nanomedicine

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert; Saliner, Ana Gallegos; Cavallo, Luigi; Poch, Manel P.; Solà , Miquel; Worth, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive characteristics of nanoparticles, resulting from properties that arise at the nano-scale, underlie their potential applications in the biomedical sector. However, the very same characteristics also result in widespread concerns about the potentially toxic effects of nanoparticles. Given the large number of nanoparticles that are being developed for possible biomedical use, there is a need to develop rapid screening methods based on in silico methods. This study illustrates the application of conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT) to some carbon nanotubes (CNTs) optimized by means of static DFT calculations. The computational efforts are focused on the geometry of a family of packed narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by units from four to twelve carbons evaluating the strength of the C-C bonds by means of Mayer Bond Orders (MBO). Thus, width and length are geometrical features that might be used to tune the electronic properties of the CNTs. At infinite length, partial semi-conductor characteristics are expected. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.

  1. Tuning the electronic properties by width and length modifications of narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes for nanomedicine

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2012-10-01

    The distinctive characteristics of nanoparticles, resulting from properties that arise at the nano-scale, underlie their potential applications in the biomedical sector. However, the very same characteristics also result in widespread concerns about the potentially toxic effects of nanoparticles. Given the large number of nanoparticles that are being developed for possible biomedical use, there is a need to develop rapid screening methods based on in silico methods. This study illustrates the application of conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT) to some carbon nanotubes (CNTs) optimized by means of static DFT calculations. The computational efforts are focused on the geometry of a family of packed narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) formed by units from four to twelve carbons evaluating the strength of the C-C bonds by means of Mayer Bond Orders (MBO). Thus, width and length are geometrical features that might be used to tune the electronic properties of the CNTs. At infinite length, partial semi-conductor characteristics are expected. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.

  2. Chemical bonding in Tl cuprates studied by x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, R.P.; Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Ren, Z.F.; Lao, J.Y.; Wang, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8 , Tl 2 Ba 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 , and Tl 0.78 Bi 0.22 Ba 0.4 Sr 1.6 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 9-δ are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6+δ and TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7-δ , comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E s -E m ) and a lower intensity ratio (I s /I m ) are found to correlate with higher values of T c . Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T c are related to low values of the O 2p→Cu 3d charge transfer energy. In the O 1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba 2+ ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T c is observed to occur when the Tl 4f 7/2 binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl 4f 7/2 binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl 1+ , are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O 1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  3. Properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate-reinforced resin composites with two different fiber length distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiting; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lin, Zhengmei; He, Jingwei; Qin, Wei; Liu, Fang; Vallittu, Pekka Kalevi; Lassila, Lippo Veli Juhana

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the reinforcing efficiency and light curing properties of discontinuous S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composite and to examine length distribution of discontinuous S2-glass fibers after a mixing process into resin composite. Experimental S2-glass fiber-particulate reinforced resin composites were prepared by mixing 10wt% of discontinuous S2-glass fibers, which had been manually cut into two different lengths (1.5 and 3.0mm), with various weight ratios of dimethacrylate based resin matrix and silaned BaAlSiO 2 filler particulates. The resin composite made with 25wt% of UDMA/SR833s resin system and 75wt% of silaned BaAlSiO 2 filler particulates was used as control composite which had similar composition as the commonly used resin composites. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WOF) were measured. Fractured specimens were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Double bond conversion (DC) and fiber length distribution were also studied. Reinforcement of resin composites with discontinuous S2-glass fibers can significantly increase the FS, FM and WOF of resin composites over the control. The fibers from the mixed resin composites showed great variation in final fiber length. The mean aspect ratio of experimental composites containing 62.5wt% of particulate fillers and 10wt% of 1.5 or 3.0mm cutting S2-glass fibers was 70 and 132, respectively. No difference was found in DC between resin composites containing S2-glass fibers with two different cutting lengths. Discontinuous S2-glass fibers can effectively reinforce the particulate-filled resin composite and thus may be potential to manufacture resin composites for high-stress bearing application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Bond behavior between CFRP sheet and concrete. Part 2. Improvement of bond strength by out-of plane confinement; CFRP sheet to concrete no fuchaku kyodo (2). Mengai kosoku ni yoru fuchaku tairyoku no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kobatake, Y. [Obayashigumi Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-30

    Behavior of phase at the bond interface between CFRP sheet and concrete is modeled basing on the result of anchoring experiment, and specimens are subjected to finite element analysis to investigate necessary confining stress and anchoring length. Improvement of bonding strength is confirmed by providing lateral sheet for anchoring on the sheet bonded on concrete. The out-of-plane stress acted on the sheet and the out-of-plane displacement during confinement in the experiment are estimated as average 0.5MPa and 0.16mm, respectively. Providing appropriate angle to a two-node joint and setting proper stress/deformation relation of springs crossing each other, the behavior of the phase at the bond interface subjected to out-of-plane confinement is modeled. The maximum bond stress is improved from 4.56MPa to 5.10MPa, and the area where the bond stress becomes larger than 4.56MPa increases from 25mm to 30mm. To anchor the sheet employed in this experiment, larger than 30mm out-of-plane confining stress of 0.5MPa must be provided in the direction of fiber. 16 refs., 17 figs., (plus 1 appended fig.), 3 tabs.

  5. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  6. Microshear bond strength of preheated silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbuga, Sezer; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Cantekin, Kenan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating on microshear bond strength (MSBS) of silorane and methacrylate-based composite resins to human dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into three main groups: (1) composite resins were heated upto 68 °C; (2) cooled to 4 °C; and (3) control [room temperature (RT)]. Each group was then randomly subdivided into four subgroups according to adhesive system used [Solobond M (Voco), All Bond SE (Bisco), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), Silorane adhesive system (SAS) (3M ESPE)]. Resin composite cylinders were formed (0.9 mm diameter × 0.7 mm length) and MSBS of each specimen was tested. The preheated groups exhibited the highest MSBS (p composite resins may be an alternative way to increase the MSBS of composites on dentin. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Positively charged phosphorus as a hydrogen bond acceptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Schou; Du, Lin; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an element that is essential to the life of all organisms, and the atmospheric detection of phosphine suggests the existence of a volatile biogeochemical P cycle. Here, we investigate the ability of P to participate in the formation of OH···P hydrogen bonds. Three bimolecular......-stretching frequency red shifts and quantum chemical calculations, we find that P is an acceptor atom similar in strength to O and S and that all three P, O, and S atoms are weaker acceptors than N. The quantum chemical calculations show that both H and P in the OH···P hydrogen bond have partial positive charges......, as expected from their electronegativities. However, the electrostatic potentials show a negative potential area on the electron density surface around P that facilitates formation of hydrogen bonds....

  8. Evaluation of a new nano-filled restorative material for bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Samir E; Ajlouni, Raed; Soliman, Manal M; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Laffoon, John F; Warren, John

    2007-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-hybrid restorative material, Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany), to that of a traditional adhesive material (Transbond XT; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) when bonding orthodontic brackets. Forty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: 20 teeth were bonded with the Transbond adhesive system and the other 20 teeth with the Grandio restorative system, following manufacturer's instructions. Student t test was used to compare the shear bond strength of the 2 systems. Significance was predetermined at P 5 .05. The t test comparisons (t = 0.55) of the shear bond strength between the 2 adhesives indicated the absence of a significant (P = .585) difference. The mean shear bond strength for Grandio was 4.1 +/- 2.6 MPa and that for Transbond XT was 4.6 +/- 3.2 MPa. During debonding, 3 of 20 brackets (15%) bonded with Grandio failed without registering any force on the Zwick recording. None of the brackets bonded with Transbond XT had a similar failure mode. The newly introduced nano-filled composite materials can potentially be used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth if its consistency can be more flowable to readily adhere to the bracket base.

  9. Experimental study on flexural members strengthened with variable bonded pre-stressed CFRP plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baojing; Shang, Shouping

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the problem that the structural adhesive between CFRP and concrete interface is aging with time and then lost the bond strength, the concept of variable bond prestressed CFRP is put forward. In order to obtain the bearing capacity and failure pattern of the beam strengthened with variable bonding prestressed CFRP plate, three concrete beams of 5.6m long were strengthened by the technology of non-bonding, bonding and variable bonding strengthened with prestressed CFRP plates respectively, the mechanical properties and crack changes of the test beams under three conditions had been compared and analyzed. Test results show that the variable bond strengthened with prestressed CFRP plates with unbonded prestressed CFRP, cracking load was increased by 36%, yield load increased by 4%, the ultimate load increased by 12%; The reinforcement technology of variable bonding prestressed CFRP plate has the characteristics of non-bonding and bonding prestressed CFRP plate reinforcement, which is similar to that of the bonded reinforcement in the early stage of the development of the cracks, then is gradually developing into the non-bonding prestressed reinforcement, the crack spacing and width have the same characteristics as the bonding reinforcement (both crack spacing and width are small), which is more conducive to enhance the durability of the structure.

  10. Improving the Bond Strength of Rice Husk Ash Concrete by Incorporating Polymer: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Bangwar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an insight of how to improve the bond strength of cement in which concrete is replaced with rice husk ash. A concrete mix was prepared and was used in different types of mixes i.e. Control Mix, 10% cement substituted concrete with rice husk ash and polymer modified concrete by incorporation different dosages of polymer in the 10% cement substituted concrete. A bar of 12mm diameter, 300mm in length was placed in the center of the cylindrical specimens for pull out test. It was observed that the bond strength between concrete and steel decreases with the replacement of cement with ash, conversely the bond strength improves with the addition of polymer dosages.

  11. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  12. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  13. Room temperature Cu-Cu direct bonding using surface activated bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Howlader, M.M.R.; Itoh, T.; Suga, T.

    2003-01-01

    Thin copper (Cu) films of 80 nm thickness deposited on a diffusion barrier layered 8 in. silicon wafers were directly bonded at room temperature using the surface activated bonding method. A low energy Ar ion beam of 40-100 eV was used to activate the Cu surface prior to bonding. Contacting two surface-activated wafers enables successful Cu-Cu direct bonding. The bonding process was carried out under an ultrahigh vacuum condition. No thermal annealing was required to increase the bonding strength since the bonded interface was strong enough at room temperature. The chemical constitution of the Cu surface was examined by Auger electron spectroscope. It was observed that carbon-based contaminations and native oxides on copper surface were effectively removed by Ar ion beam irradiation for 60 s without any wet cleaning processes. An atomic force microscope study shows that the Ar ion beam process causes no surface roughness degradation. Tensile test results show that high bonding strength equivalent to bulk material is achieved at room temperature. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observations reveal the presence of void-free bonding interface without intermediate layer at the bonded Cu surfaces

  14. Influence of adhesion promoters and curing-light sources on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tavares Machado

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The conventional orthodontic adhesive presented higher bond strength than the nanofilled composite, although both materials interacted similarly to the teeth. The curing-light devices tested did not influence on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  15. Pressure bonding molybdenum alloy (TZM) to reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffsmith, S.A.; Landingham, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Topping cycles could boost the energy efficiencies of a variety of systems by using what is now waste heat. One such topping cycle uses a ceramic helical expander and would require that a reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) rotor be bonded to a shaft of TZM (Mo-0.5 wt % Ti-0.08 wt % Zr). Coupon studies show that TZM can be bonded to RBSN at 1300 0 C and 69 MPa if there is an interlayer of MoSi 2 . A layer of finely ground (10 μm) MoSi 2 facilitates bond formation and provides a thicker bond interface. The hardness and grain structure of the TZM and RBSN were not affected by the temperature and pressure required to bond the coupons

  16. Waterborne polyurethane single-ion electrolyte from aliphatic diisocyanate and various molecular length of polyethylene glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The waterborne polyurethane (WPU dispersions from the reaction of cycloaliphatic diisocyanates [4,4’-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate (H12MDI and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI] and polyethylene glycol (PEG with various molecular lengths were synthesized using our modified acetone process. Differetial scanning calorimeter (DSC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were utilized to characterize WPU films for the behavior of their crystallinity and H-bonding of WPU films. The Tg value of WPU increases with increasing the molecular length of PEG, whereas the Tm of WPU decreases with increasing PEG length. Alternating current (AC impedance experiments were performed to determine the ionic conductivities of WPU films. The WPU gel electrolytes exhibits an ionic conductivity as high as ~ 10-5 S/cm at room temperature.

  17. Preservation of atomically clean silicon surfaces in air by contact bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Francois; Ljungberg, Karin

    1997-01-01

    When two hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces are placed in contact under cleanroom conditions, a weak bond is formed. Cleaving this bond under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, and observing the surfaces with low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we find that the or...... reconstruction from oxidation in air, Contact bonding opens the way to novel applications of reconstructed semiconductor surfaces, by preserving their atomic structure intact outside of a UHV chamber. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics.......When two hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces are placed in contact under cleanroom conditions, a weak bond is formed. Cleaving this bond under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, and observing the surfaces with low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we find...... that the ordered atomic structure of the surfaces is protected from oxidation, even after the bonded samples have been in air for weeks. Further, we show that silicon surfaces that have been cleaned and hydrogen-passivated in UHV can be contacted in UHV in a similarly hermetic fashion, protecting the surface...

  18. Identification and H(D)-bond energies of C-H(D)Cl interactions in chloride-haloalkane clusters: a combined X-ray crystallographic, spectroscopic, and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryanskaya, Tatiyana V; Novikov, Alexander S; Gushchin, Pavel V; Haukka, Matti; Asfin, Ruslan E; Tolstoy, Peter M; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2016-05-18

    The cationic (1,3,5-triazapentadiene)Pt(II) complex [Pt{NH[double bond, length as m-dash]C(N(CH2)5)N(Ph)C(NH2)[double bond, length as m-dash]NPh}2]Cl2 ([]Cl2) was crystallized from four haloalkane solvents giving [][Cl2(CDCl3)4], [][Cl2(CHBr3)4], [][Cl2(CH2Cl2)2], and [][Cl2(C2H4Cl2)2] solvates that were studied by X-ray diffraction. In the crystal structures of [][Cl2(CDCl3)4] and [][Cl2(CHBr3)4], the Cl(-) ion interacts with two haloform molecules via C-DCl(-) and C-HCl(-) contacts, thus forming the negatively charged isostructural clusters [Cl(CDCl3)2](-) and [Cl(CHBr3)2](-). In the structures of [][Cl2(CH2Cl2)2] and [][Cl2(C2H4Cl2)2], cations [](2+) are linked to a 3D-network by a system of H-bondings including one formed by each Cl(-) ion with CH2Cl2 or C2H4Cl2 molecules. The lengths and energies of these H-bonds in the chloride-haloalkane clusters were analyzed by DFT calculations (M06 functional) including AIM analysis. The crystal packing noticeably affected the geometry of the clusters, and energy of C-HCl(-) hydrogen bonds ranged from 1 to 6 kcal mol(-1). An exponential correlation (R(2) > 0.98) between the calculated Cl(-)H distances and the energies of the corresponding contacts was found and used to calculate hydrogen bond energies from the experimental Cl(-)H distances. Predicted energy values (3.3-3.9 kcal mol(-1) for the [Cl(CHCl3)2](-) cluster) are in a reasonable agreement with the energy of the Cl3C-HCl(-) bond estimated using ATRFTIR spectroscopy (2.7 kcal mol(-1)).

  19. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  20. Types, risks and market of municipal bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grujić Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal bonds are issued by cities, municipalities or other local communities in order to quickly raise funds to cover current budget deficits, finish infrastructure projects for production and distribution of thermal energy, improve water supply, road construction, sports and recreation centers, schools or to fund such projects on more favorable terms than to borrow from banks. In this manner, necessary conditions are created for faster development of the real sector. The aim of this study is to evaluate the importance, possibilities and effects of the bond issue in the Republika Srpska aimed at securing funding for and development of local communities. Good examples that local government bonds enhance community development include capital markets in countries that have made the transition from the socialist system design, similar to the market of the Republika Srpska, like the Polish, Slovakian, Hungarian and Croatian markets. Issues of municipal bonds in the Republika Srpska succeeded mostly due to the workings of Investment-Development Bank of RS. However, it certainly shows that further high-quality municipal bonds could attract more interest from various institutional investors, especially mutual funds and insurance companies, and investors who are more risk-averse will be able to familiarize and inform themselves with the functioning of capital markets. In this manner, our capital market would confirm its essential role and thus become a generator of overall economic development of the Republika Srpska because it would enable more efficient collection and allocation of capital resources.

  1. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  2. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  3. A Cost-Effective Physical Modeling Exercise to Develop Students' Understanding of Covalent Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kristy L.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical bonding is one of the basic concepts in chemistry, and the topic of covalent bonding forms an important core of knowledge for the high school chemistry student. For many teachers it is a challenging concept to teach, not least because it relies mainly on traditional instruction and written work. Similarly, many students find the topic…

  4. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  5. Analysis of factors influencing the bond strength in roll bonding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Kavan; Wulfinghoff, Stephan; Reese, Stefanie

    2018-05-01

    Cold Roll Bonding (CRB) is recognized as an industrial technique in which the metal sheets are joined together in order to produce laminate metal composites. In this technique, a metallurgical bond resulting from severe plastic deformation is formed between the rolled metallic layers. The main objective of this paper is to analyse different factors which may affect the bond formation in rolling processes. To achieve this goal, first, an interface model is employed which describes both the bonding and debonding. In this model, the bond strength evolution between the metallic layers is calculated based on the film theory of bonding. On the other hand, the debonding process is modelled by means of a bilinear cohesive zone model. In the numerical section, different scenarios are taken into account to model the roll bonding process of metal sheets. The numerical simulation includes the modelling of joining during the roll bonding process followed by debonding in a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) peeling test. In all simulations, the metallic layers are regarded as elastoplastic materials subjected to large plastic deformations. Finally, the effects of some important factors on the bond formation are numerically investigated.

  6. The Strength of Hydrogen Bonds between Fluoro-Organics and Alcohols, a Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Robert E

    2018-05-10

    Fluorinated organic compounds are ubiquitous in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries. To better discern the mode of action of these compounds, it is critical to understand the strengths of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine. There are only a few published examples of the strengths of these bonds. This study provides a high level ab initio study of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds between RF and R'OH, where R and R' are aryl, vinyl, alkyl, and cycloalkyl. Intermolecular binding energies average near 5 kcal/mol, while intramolecular binding energies average about 3 kcal/mol. Inclusion of zero-point energies and applying a counterpoise correction lessen the difference. In both series, modest increases in binding energies are seen with increased acidity of R'OH and increased electron donation of R in RF. In the intramolecular compounds, binding energy increases with the rigidity of the F-(C) n -OH ring. Inclusion of free energy corrections at 298 K results in exoergic binding energies for the intramolecular compounds and endoergic binding energies for the intermolecular compounds. Parameters such as bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, and atomic populations are consistent with formation of a hydrogen bond and with slightly stronger binding in the intermolecular cases over the intramolecular cases. However, these parameters correlated poorly with binding energies.

  7. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  8. Laser-assisted fibrinogen bonding of umbilical vein grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, M C; Williams, M R; Souza, J E; Dardik, H; Treat, M R; Bass, L S; Nowygrod, R

    1993-06-01

    Despite success with autologous tissue welding, laser welding of synthetic vascular prostheses has not been possible. The graft material appears inert and fails to allow the collagen breakdown and electrostatic bonding that results in tissue welding. To develop a laser welding system for graft material, we repaired glutaraldehyde-tanned human umbilical cord vein graft incisions using laser-assisted fibrinogen bonding (LAFB) technology. Modified umbilical vein graft was incised transversely (1.2 cm). Incisions were repaired using sutures, laser energy alone, or LAFB. For LAFB, indocyanine green dye was mixed with human fibrinogen and the compound applied with forceps onto the weld site prior to exposure to 808 nm diode laser energy (power density 4.8 W/cm 2). Bursting pressures for sutured repairs (126.6 +/- 23.4 mm Hg) were similar to LAFB anastomoses (111.6 +/- 55.0 mm Hg). No evidence of collateral thermal injury to the graft material was noted. In vivo evaluation of umbilical graft bonding with canine arteries demonstrates that LAFB can reliably reinforce sutured anastomoses. The described system for bonding graft material with laser exposed fibrinogen may allow creation or reinforcement of vascular anastomoses in procedures where use of autologous tissue is not feasible.

  9. Correlation length estimation in a polycrystalline material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovski, I.; Cizelj, L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the correlation length estimated from a mesoscopic model of a polycrystalline material. The correlation length can be used in some macroscopic material models as a material parameter that describes the internal length. It can be estimated directly from the strain and stress fields calculated from a finite-element model, which explicitly accounts for the selected mesoscopic features such as the random orientation, shape and size of the grains. A crystal plasticity material model was applied in the finite-element analysis. Different correlation lengths were obtained depending on the used set of crystallographic orientations. We determined that the different sets of crystallographic orientations affect the general level of the correlation length, however, as the external load is increased the behaviour of correlation length is similar in all the analyzed cases. The correlation lengths also changed with the macroscopic load. If the load is below the yield strength the correlation lengths are constant, and are slightly higher than the average grain size. The correlation length can therefore be considered as an indicator of first plastic deformations in the material. Increasing the load above the yield strength creates shear bands that temporarily increase the values of the correlation lengths calculated from the strain fields. With a further load increase the correlation lengths decrease slightly but stay above the average grain size. (author)

  10. Simultaneous bond degradation and bond formation during phenol-formaldehyde curing with wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of wood using phenol–formaldehyde adhesive develops highly durable bonds. Phenol– formaldehyde is believed to form primary bonds with wood cell wall polymers (e.g., lignin). However, it is unclear how this adhesive interacts and bonds to lignin. Through wood solubilisation methodologies, earlywood and latewood bonded assemblies were characterized using two-...

  11. Controlling the bond scission sequence of oxygenates for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.

    The so called "Holy Grail" of heterogeneous catalysis is a fundamental understanding of catalyzed chemical transformations which span multidimensional scales of both length and time, enabling rational catalyst design. Such an undertaking is realizable only with an atomic level understanding of bond formation and destruction with respect to intrinsic properties of the metal catalyst. In this study, we investigate the bond scission sequence of small oxygenates (methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol) on bimetallic transition metal catalysts and transition metal carbide catalysts. Oxygenates are of interest both as hydrogen carriers for reforming to H2 and CO and as fuels in direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC). To address the so-called "materials gap" and "pressure gap" this work adopted three parallel research approaches: (1) ultra high vacuum (UHV) studies including temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) on polycrystalline surfaces; (2) DFT studies including thermodynamic and kinetic calculations; (3) electrochemical studies including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). Recent studies have suggested that tungsten monocarbide (WC) may behave similarly to Pt for the electrooxidation of oxygenates. TPD was used to quantify the activity and selectivity of oxygenate decomposition for WC and Pt-modifiedWC (Pt/WC) as compared to Pt. While decomposition activity was generally higher on WC than on Pt, scission of the C-O bond resulted in alkane/alkene formation on WC, an undesired product for DAFC. When Pt was added to WC by physical vapor deposition C-O bond scission was limited, suggesting that Pt synergistically modifies WC to improve the selectivity toward C-H bond scission to produce H2 and CO. Additionally, TPD confirmed WC and Pt/WC to be more CO tolerant than Pt. HREELS results verified that surface intermediates were different on Pt/WC as compared to Pt or WC and evidence of aldehyde

  12. Modeling and experimental evaluation of the diffusion bonding of the oxide dispersion strengthened steel PM2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittel, Wiebke; Basuki, Widodo W.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-01-01

    A modeling based optimization process of the solid state diffusion bonding is presented for joining ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steels PM2000. An optimization study employing varying bonding temperatures and pressures results in almost the same strength and toughness of the bonded compared to the as received material. TEM investigations of diffusion bonded samples show a homogeneous distribution of oxide particles at the bonding seam similar to that in the bulk. Hence, no loss in strength or creep resistance due to oxide particle agglomeration is found, as verified by the mechanical properties observed for the joint.

  13. Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper for linear collider accelerator structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Elmer

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion bonding and brazing of high purity copper were investigated to develop procedures for joining precision machined copper components for the Next Linear Collider (NLC. Diffusion bonds were made over a range of temperatures from 400 °C to 1000 °C, under two different loading conditions [3.45 kPa (0.5 psi and 3.45 MPa (500 psi], and on two different diamond machined surface finishes. Brazes were made using pure silver, pure gold, and gold-nickel alloys, and different heating rates produced by both radiation and induction heating. Braze materials were applied by both physical vapor deposition (PVD and conventional braze alloy shims. Results of the diffusion bonding experiments showed that bond strengths very near that of the copper base metal could be made at bonding temperatures of 700 °C or higher at 3.45 MPa bonding pressure. At lower temperatures, only partial strength diffusion bonds could be made. At low bonding pressures (3.45 kPa, full strength bonds were made at temperatures of 800 °C and higher, while no bonding (zero strength was observed at temperatures of 700 °C and lower. Observations of the fracture surfaces of the diffusion bonded samples showed the effects of surface finish on the bonding mechanism. These observations clearly indicate that bonding began by point asperity contact, and flatter surfaces resulted in a higher percentage of bonded area under similar bonding conditions. Results of the brazing experiments indicated that pure silver worked very well for brazing under both conventional and high heating rate scenarios. Similarly, pure silver brazed well for both the PVD layers and the braze alloy shims. The gold and gold-containing brazes had problems, mainly due to the high diffusivity of gold in copper. These problems led to the necessity of overdriving the temperature to ensure melting, the presence of porosity in the joint, and very wide braze joints. Based on the overall findings of this study, a two

  14. Solid-state diffusion bonding of high-Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: sh-noh@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel joined by solid-state diffusion bonding. > Free of precipitates and micro-voids at the bonding interface was existed. > Joints had the same tensile properties with anisotropy of the base material. > USE of joints was fully reserved in L-R bonding orientation. > Cracks did not propagate on the bonding interface at the Charpy impact test. - Abstract: Solid-state diffusion bonding (SSDB) was employed to join high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.2Ti-0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) blocks under uniaxial hydrostatic pressure using a high-vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. High-Cr ODS ferritic steels were successfully diffusion bonded at 1200 deg. C for 1 h, without precipitates and microvoids at the bonding interface or degradation in the base materials. Transmission electron microscopic observation revealed that the nano-oxide particles near the bonding interface were uniformly distributed in the matrix and that the chemical composition across the bonding interface was virtually constant. At room temperature, the joint had nearly the same tensile properties and exhibited anisotropic behavior similar to that of the base material. The tensile strength of the joint region at elevated temperatures is nearly the same as that of the base material, with necking behavior at several micrometers from the bonding interface. The total elongation of the joint region decreased slightly at 700 {sup o}C, with an exfoliation fracture surface at the bonding interface. Although a small ductile-brittle transition temperature shift was observed in the joints, the upper shelf energy was fully reserved in the case of joints with L-R bonding orientation, for which cracks did not propagate on the bonding interface. Therefore, it is concluded that SSDB can be potentially employed as a joining method for high-Cr ODS ferritic steel owing to

  15. Bond strength of masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, van der R.; Vermeltfoort, A.Th.

    1992-01-01

    Bond strength is not a well defined property of masonry. Normally three types of bond strength can be distinguished: - tensile bond strength, - shear (and torsional) bond strength, - flexural bond strength. In this contribution the behaviour and strength of masonry in deformation controlled uniaxial

  16. From bifluorenylidene dianion to dibenzo[g,p]chrysene dianion: sensitivity of anisotropy changes to bonding structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenhar, R.; Beust, R.; Hagen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the C-26 series having similar bonding structure yield dianions upon reduction with lithium metal. Anisotropy changes, revealed from an advanced charge distribution analysis performed on these dianions, show a correlation to the bonding structure...

  17. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with two different bonding agents under dry conditions and with saliva contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashallah Khanehmasjedi

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Application of Single Bond and Assure bonding agents resulted in adequate bond strength of brackets to tooth structures. Contamination with saliva significantly decreased the bond strength of Assure bonding agent compared with dry conditions.

  18. Recent Advances in Adhesive Bonding - The Role of Biomolecules, Nanocompounds, and Bonding Strategies in Enhancing Resin Bonding to Dental Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Bottino, Marco C

    2017-09-01

    To present an overview on the main agents (i.e., biomolecules and nanocompounds) and/or strategies currently available to amplify or stabilize resin-dentin bonding. According to studies retrieved for full text reading (2014-2017), there are currently six major strategies available to overcome resin-dentin bond degradation: (i) use of collagen crosslinking agents, which may form stable covalent bonds with collagen fibrils, thus strengthening the hybrid layer; (ii) use of antioxidants, which may allow further polymerization reactions over time; (iii) use of protease inhibitors, which may inhibit or inactivate metalloproteinases; (iv) modification of the bonding procedure, which may be performed by using the ethanol wet-bonding technique or by applying an additional adhesive (hydrophobic) coating, thereby strengthening the hybrid layer; (v) laser treatment of the substrate prior to bonding, which may cause specific topographic changes in the surface of dental substrates, increasing bonding efficacy; and (vi) reinforcement of the resin matrix with inorganic fillers and/or remineralizing agents, which may positively enhance physico-mechanical properties of the hybrid layer. With the present review, we contributed to the better understanding of adhesion concepts and mechanisms of resin-dentin bond degradation, showing the current prospects available to solve that problematic. Also, adhesively-bonded restorations may be benefited by the use of some biomolecules, nanocompounds or alternative bonding strategies in order to minimize bond strength degradation.

  19. Ultra-stiff metallic glasses through bond energy density design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Volker; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Bednarcik, Jozef; Clegg, William J; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M

    2017-07-05

    The elastic properties of crystalline metals scale with their valence electron density. Similar observations have been made for metallic glasses. However, for metallic glasses where covalent bonding predominates, such as metalloid metallic glasses, this relationship appears to break down. At present, the reasons for this are not understood. Using high energy x-ray diffraction analysis of melt spun and thin film metallic glasses combined with density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the physical origin of the ultrahigh stiffness in both metalloid and non-metalloid metallic glasses is best understood in terms of the bond energy density. Using the bond energy density as novel materials design criterion for ultra-stiff metallic glasses, we are able to predict a Co 33.0 Ta 3.5 B 63.5 short range ordered material by density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations with a high bond energy density of 0.94 eV Å -3 and a bulk modulus of 263 GPa, which is 17% greater than the stiffest Co-B based metallic glasses reported in literature.

  20. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with two different bonding agents under dry conditions and with saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanehmasjedi, Mashallah; Naseri, Mohammad Ali; Khanehmasjedi, Samaneh; Basir, Leila

    2017-02-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with Single Bond and Assure bonding agents under dry and saliva-contamination conditions. Sixty sound premolar teeth were selected, and stainless-steel brackets were bonded on enamel surfaces with Single Bond and Assure bonding agents under dry condition or with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength values of brackets were measured in a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index scores were determined after debonding of the brackets under a stereomicroscope. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze bond strength. Two-by-two comparisons were made with post hoc Tukey tests (pbrackets to tooth structure were 9.29±8.56 MPa and 21.25±8.93 MPa with the use of Assure resin bonding agent under saliva-contamination and dry conditions, respectively. These values were 10.13±6.69 MPa and 14.09±6.6 MPa, respectively, under the same conditions with the use of Single Bond adhesive. Contamination with saliva resulted in a significant decrease in the bond strength of brackets to tooth structure with the application of Assure adhesive resin (pbrackets to tooth structures. Contamination with saliva significantly decreased the bond strength of Assure bonding agent compared with dry conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  1. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  2. Modeling the Conditional Covariance between Stock and Bond Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Goeij (Peter); W.A. Marquering (Wessel)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo analyze the intertemporal interaction between the stock and bond market returns, we allow the conditional covariance matrix to vary over time according to a multivariate GARCH model similar to Bollerslev, Engle and Wooldridge (1988). We extend the model such that it allows for

  3. Development of PNTDs synthesized from monomers with different molecular length and analysis of molecular damages by heavy ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hajime; Kodaira, Satoshi; Ihara, Daisuke; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Kusumoto, Tamon; Mori, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Benton, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Our interests for years lay to investigate the reason why CR-39 polymer has such high sensitivity as plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) on chemical structural aspects. We developed three PNTDs from three diacrylate compounds as monomers bearing different molecular length as well as different numbers of internal ether bonds. The polymer products obtained were colorless and transparent with 3-D molecular structures as CR-39 and different lattice structures each other. Our purpose of the current study was to investigate structural damages caused in newly prepared PNTDs and CR-39 by irradiation of Nitrogen ion (6 MeV/n, fluence of 5 x 10 11 cm -2 ). The structural damage by irradiation was analyzed by the magnitude of the relative absorbance of specific functional groups such as ester, C=O, ether and C-H bonds by means of FT-IR (ATR) method. The correlation between the relative absorbance and the molecular length of the monomers were discussed. (author)

  4. 29 CFR 2580.412-19 - Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-19 Term of the bond, discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses... new bond must be obtained each year. There is nothing in the Act that prohibits a bond for a term...

  5. Investigation of ball bond integrity for 0.8 mil (20 microns) diameter gold bonding wire on low k die in wire bonding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudtarkar, Santosh Anil

    Microelectronics technology has been undergoing continuous scaling to accommodate customer driven demand for smaller, faster and cheaper products. This demand has been satisfied by using novel materials, design techniques and processes. This results in challenges for the chip connection technology and also the package technology. The focus of this research endeavor was restricted to wire bond interconnect technology using gold bonding wires. Wire bond technology is often regarded as a simple first level interconnection technique. In reality, however, this is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of the interactions between the design, material and process variables, and their impact on the reliability of the bond formed during this process. This research endeavor primarily focused on low diameter, 0.8 mil thick (20 mum) diameter gold bonding wire. Within the scope of this research, the integrity of the ball bond formed by 1.0 mil (25 mum) and 0.8 mil (20 mum) diameter wires was compared. This was followed by the evaluation of bonds formed on bond pads having doped SiO2 (low k) as underlying structures. In addition, the effect of varying the percentage of the wire dopant, palladium and bonding process parameters (bonding force, bond time, ultrasonic energy) for 0.8 mil (20 mum) bonding wire was also evaluated. Finally, a degradation empirical model was developed to understand the decrease in the wire strength. This research effort helped to develop a fundamental understanding of the various factors affecting the reliability of a ball bond from a design (low diameter bonding wire), material (low k and bonding wire dopants), and process (wire bonding process parameters) perspective for a first level interconnection technique, namely wire bonding. The significance of this research endeavor was the systematic investigation of the ball bonds formed using 0.8 mil (20 microm) gold bonding wire within the wire bonding arena. This research addressed low k

  6. Diffusion bonding of reduced activation ferritic steel F82H for demo blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    1996-01-01

    A reduced activation ferritic steel, a grade F82H developed by JAERI, is a promising candidate structural material for the blanket and the first wall of DEMO reactors. In the present study, diffusion bonding of F82H has been investigated to develop the fabrication procedures of the blanket box and the first wall panel with cooling channels embedded by F82H. The parameters examined are the bonding temperature (810-1050 C), bonding pressure (2-10 MPa) and roughness of the bonding surface (0.5-12.8 μR max ), and metallurgical examination and mechanical tests of the diffusion bonded joints have been conducted. From the tests, sufficient bonding was obtained under the temperatures of 840-1 050 C (compressive stress of 3-12 MPa), and it was found that heat treatment following diffusion bonding is essential to obtain the mechanical properties similar to that of the base metal. (orig.)

  7. Structure phenomena in the bond zone of explosively bonded plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livne, Z.

    1979-12-01

    In the bond areas of couples of explosively bonded plates, there are often zones, generally designated as ''molten pockets'', which have undergone melting and solidification. The object of the present study was to investigate molten pockets, which have a decisive effect on bond quality. The experimental samples for the study were chosen in consideration of the mutual behaviour of the plates constituting the couples, according to their equilibrium phase diagrams. To facilitate the investigation, large plates were bonded under conditions that enabled to to obtain wavy bond zones that included relatively large molten pockets. To clarify the complex nature of molten pockets and their surroundings, a wide variety of methods were employed. It was found that the shape and composition of molten pockets largely depend upon the mechanism of formation of both the bond wave and the molten pockets. It was also found that the composition of molten pockets is not homogeneous, which is manifest in the modification of the composition of the pockets, the solidification morphology, the phases, which have been identified by X-ray diffraction, and the bond strenght and hardness. Moreover, the different solidification morphologies revealed by metallography were found to depend upon the types of plates bonded, the bonding conditions and the location of pockets in the wavy interface. For molten pockets, cooling rates of 10 4 to 10 5 (degC/sec) have been deduced from interdendritic spacing, and found to be in good agreement with calculations after a mathematical model. It seems that the fast cooling rates and the steep temperature gradients are at the origin of the particular solidification phenomena observed in molten pockets

  8. Chemical Bonding in Tl Cuprates Studied by X-Ray Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, J.Y.; Overmyer, D.L.; Ren, Z.F.; Siegal, M.P.; Vasquez, R.P.; Wang, J.H.

    1999-04-05

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, and TL{sub 0.78}Bi{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 1.6}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9{minus}{delta}} are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} and TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E{sub s}-E{sub m}) and a lower intensity ratio (I{sub s}/I{sub m}) are found to correlate with higher values of T{sub c}. Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T{sub c} are related to low values of the O 2p {r_arrow} Cu 3d charge transfer energy. In the O 1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba{sup 2+} ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T{sub c} is observed to occur when the Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl{sup 1+}, are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O 1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding.

  9. Chemical bonding in Tl cuprates studied by x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, R.P. [Center for Space Microelectronics Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Ren, Z.F.; Lao, J.Y.; Wang, J.H. [Materials Synthesis Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Epitaxial thin films of the Tl cuprate superconductors Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, and Tl{sub 0.78}Bi{sub 0.22}Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 1.6}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9{minus}{delta}} are studied with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. These data, together with previous measurements in this lab of Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} and TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}, comprise a comprehensive data set for a comparative study of Tl cuprates with a range of chemical and electronic properties. In the Cu 2p spectra, a larger energy separation between the satellite and main peaks (E{sub s}{minus}E{sub m}) and a lower intensity ratio (I{sub s}/I{sub m}) are found to correlate with higher values of T{sub c}. Analysis of these spectra within a simple configuration interaction model suggests that higher values of T{sub c} are related to low values of the O&hthinsp;2p{r_arrow}Cu&hthinsp;3d charge transfer energy. In the O&hthinsp;1s region, a smaller bond length between Ba and Cu-O planar oxygen is found to correlate with a lower binding energy for the signal associated with Cu-O bonding, most likely resulting from the increased polarization screening by Ba{sup 2+} ions. For samples near optimum doping, maximum T{sub c} is observed to occur when the Tl 4f{sub 7/2} binding energy is near 117.9 eV, which is near the middle of the range of values observed for Tl cuprates. Higher Tl&hthinsp;4f{sub 7/2} binding energies, corresponding to formal oxidation states nearer Tl{sup 1+}, are also found to correlate with longer bond lengths between Ba and Tl-O planar oxygen, and with higher binding energies of the O&hthinsp;1s signal associated with Tl-O bonding. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Sánchez-Ayala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S 3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06. None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76. When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05 at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3–Q1, 1.25–0.00 compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3–Q1, 0.25–0.00. The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin.

  11. Multi-Scale Scattering Transform in Music Similarity Measuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruobai

    Scattering transform is a Mel-frequency spectrum based, time-deformation stable method, which can be used in evaluating music similarity. Compared with Dynamic time warping, it has better performance in detecting similar audio signals under local time-frequency deformation. Multi-scale scattering means to combine scattering transforms of different window lengths. This paper argues that, multi-scale scattering transform is a good alternative of dynamic time warping in music similarity measuring. We tested the performance of multi-scale scattering transform against other popular methods, with data designed to represent different conditions.

  12. A Similarity Search Using Molecular Topological Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Fukunishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular similarity measure has been developed using molecular topological graphs and atomic partial charges. Two kinds of topological graphs were used. One is the ordinary adjacency matrix and the other is a matrix which represents the minimum path length between two atoms of the molecule. The ordinary adjacency matrix is suitable to compare the local structures of molecules such as functional groups, and the other matrix is suitable to compare the global structures of molecules. The combination of these two matrices gave a similarity measure. This method was applied to in silico drug screening, and the results showed that it was effective as a similarity measure.

  13. Exact valence bond entanglement entropy and probability distribution in the XXX spin chain and the potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J L; Saleur, H

    2008-02-29

    We determine exactly the probability distribution of the number N_(c) of valence bonds connecting a subsystem of length L>1 to the rest of the system in the ground state of the XXX antiferromagnetic spin chain. This provides, in particular, the asymptotic behavior of the valence-bond entanglement entropy S_(VB)=N_(c)ln2=4ln2/pi(2)lnL disproving a recent conjecture that this should be related with the von Neumann entropy, and thus equal to 1/3lnL. Our results generalize to the Q-state Potts model.

  14. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mello de Andrade

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350 and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE] on the microtensile (μTBS and microshear bond strength (μSBS tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for μTBS and the other one for μSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37(0C/24 h specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/min. Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05. For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05. The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91 and significant (p=0.01 correlation between the tests. CONCLUSIONS: The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions.

  15. Bond index: relation to second-order density matrix and charge fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Jorge, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that, in the same way as the atomic charge is an invariant built from the first-order density matrix, the closed-shell generalized bond index is an invariant associated with the second-order reduced density matrix. The active charge of an atom (sum of bond indices) is shown to be the sum of all density correlation functions between it and the other atoms in the molecule; similarly, the self-charge is the fluctuation of its total charge. (Author) [pt

  16. Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Zhang, Xi [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089 eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461 eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

  17. Zn Coordination Chemistry:  Development of Benchmark Suites for Geometries, Dipole Moments, and Bond Dissociation Energies and Their Use To Test and Validate Density Functionals and Molecular Orbital Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Elizabeth A; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-01-01

    We present nonrelativistic and relativistic benchmark databases (obtained by coupled cluster calculations) of 10 Zn-ligand bond distances, 8 dipole moments, and 12 bond dissociation energies in Zn coordination compounds with O, S, NH3, H2O, OH, SCH3, and H ligands. These are used to test the predictions of 39 density functionals, Hartree-Fock theory, and seven more approximate molecular orbital theories. In the nonrelativisitic case, the M05-2X, B97-2, and mPW1PW functionals emerge as the most accurate ones for this test data, with unitless balanced mean unsigned errors (BMUEs) of 0.33, 0.38, and 0.43, respectively. The best local functionals (i.e., functionals with no Hartree-Fock exchange) are M06-L and τ-HCTH with BMUEs of 0.54 and 0.60, respectively. The popular B3LYP functional has a BMUE of 0.51, only slightly better than the value of 0.54 for the best local functional, which is less expensive. Hartree-Fock theory itself has a BMUE of 1.22. The M05-2X functional has a mean unsigned error of 0.008 Å for bond lengths, 0.19 D for dipole moments, and 4.30 kcal/mol for bond energies. The X3LYP functional has a smaller mean unsigned error (0.007 Å) for bond lengths but has mean unsigned errors of 0.43 D for dipole moments and 5.6 kcal/mol for bond energies. The M06-2X functional has a smaller mean unsigned error (3.3 kcal/mol) for bond energies but has mean unsigned errors of 0.017 Å for bond lengths and 0.37 D for dipole moments. The best of the semiempirical molecular orbital theories are PM3 and PM6, with BMUEs of 1.96 and 2.02, respectively. The ten most accurate functionals from the nonrelativistic benchmark analysis are then tested in relativistic calculations against new benchmarks obtained with coupled-cluster calculations and a relativistic effective core potential, resulting in M05-2X (BMUE = 0.895), PW6B95 (BMUE = 0.90), and B97-2 (BMUE = 0.93) as the top three functionals. We find significant relativistic effects (∼0.01 Å in bond lengths, ∼0

  18. Development of a method to accurately calculate the Dpb and quickly predict the strength of a chemical bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Xia; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method from new respect to characterize and measure the bond strength is proposed. ► We calculate the D pb of a series of various bonds to justify our approach. ► A quite good linear relationship of the D pb with the bond lengths for series of various bonds is shown. ► Take the prediction of strengths of C–H and N–H bonds for base pairs in DNA as a practical application of our method. - Abstract: A new approach to characterize and measure bond strength has been developed. First, we propose a method to accurately calculate the potential acting on an electron in a molecule (PAEM) at the saddle point along a chemical bond in situ, denoted by D pb . Then, a direct method to quickly evaluate bond strength is established. We choose some familiar molecules as models for benchmarking this method. As a practical application, the D pb of base pairs in DNA along C–H and N–H bonds are obtained for the first time. All results show that C 7 –H of A–T and C 8 –H of G–C are the relatively weak bonds that are the injured positions in DNA damage. The significance of this work is twofold: (i) A method is developed to calculate D pb of various sizable molecules in situ quickly and accurately; (ii) This work demonstrates the feasibility to quickly predict the bond strength in macromolecules

  19. Engineering a disulfide bond in the lid hinge region of Rhizopus chinensis lipase: increased thermostability and altered acyl chain length specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Yu

    Full Text Available The key to enzyme function is the maintenance of an appropriate balance between molecular stability and structural flexibility. The lid domain which is very important for "interfacial activation" is the most flexible part in the lipase structure. In this work, rational design was applied to explore the relationship between lid rigidity and lipase activity by introducing a disulfide bond in the hinge region of the lid, in the hope of improving the thermostability of R. chinensis lipase through stabilization of the lid domain without interfering with its catalytic performance. A disulfide bridge between F95C and F214C was introduced into the lipase from R. chinensis in the hinge region of the lid according to the prediction of the "Disulfide by Design" algorithm. The disulfide variant showed substantially improved thermostability with an eleven-fold increase in the t(1/2 value at 60°C and a 7°C increase of T(m compared with the parent enzyme, probably contributed by the stabilization of the geometric structure of the lid region. The additional disulfide bond did not interfere with the catalytic rate (k(cat and the catalytic efficiency towards the short-chain fatty acid substrate, however, the catalytic efficiency of the disulfide variant towards pNPP decreased by 1.5-fold probably due to the block of the hydrophobic substrate channel by the disulfide bond. Furthermore, in the synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters, the maximum conversion rate by RCLCYS reached 95% which was 9% higher than that by RCL. This is the first report on improving the thermostability of the lipase from R. chinensis by introduction of a disulfide bond in the lid hinge region without compromising the catalytic rate.

  20. Two methods to simulate intrapulpal pressure: effects upon bonding performance of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, V P; Gotti, V B; Grohmann, C V; Abuná, G; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr, A B

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of two methods to simulate physiological pulpal pressure on the dentine bonding performance of two all-in-one adhesives and a two-step self-etch silorane-based adhesive by means of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage surveys. The self-etch adhesives [G-Bond Plus (GB), Adper Easy Bond (EB) and silorane adhesive (SIL)] were applied to flat deep dentine surfaces from extracted human molars. The restorations were constructed using resin composites Filtek Silorane or Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE). After 24 h using the two methods of simulated pulpal pressure or no pulpal pressure (control groups), the bonded teeth were cut into specimens and submitted to μTBS and silver uptake examination. Results were analysed with two-way anova and Tukey's test (P adhesives. No difference between control and pulpal pressure groups was found for SIL and GB. EB led significant drop (P = 0.002) in bond strength under pulpal pressure. Silver impregnation was increased after both methods of simulated pulpal pressure for all adhesives, and it was similar between the simulated pulpal pressure methods. The innovative method to simulate pulpal pressure behaved similarly to the classic one and could be used as an alternative. The HEMA-free one-step and the two-step self-etch adhesives had acceptable resistance against pulpal pressure, unlike the HEMA-rich adhesive. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Fundamental length and relativistic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    It si noted that the introduction of fundamental length contradicts the conventional representations concerning the contraction of the longitudinal size of fast-moving objects. The use of the concept of relativistic length and the following ''elongation formula'' permits one to solve this problem

  2. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  3. Interaction between benzenedithiolate and gold: Classical force field for chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yongsheng; Krstić, Predrag S.; Wells, Jack C.; Cummings, Peter T.; Dean, David J.

    2005-06-01

    We have constructed a group of classical potentials based on ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations to describe the chemical bonding between benzenedithiolate (BDT) molecule and gold atoms, including bond stretching, bond angle bending, and dihedral angle torsion involved at the interface between the molecule and gold clusters. Three DFT functionals, local-density approximation (LDA), PBE0, and X3LYP, have been implemented to calculate single point energies (SPE) for a large number of molecular configurations of BDT-1, 2 Au complexes. The three DFT methods yield similar bonding curves. The variations of atomic charges from Mulliken population analysis within the molecule/metal complex versus different molecular configurations have been investigated in detail. We found that, except for bonded atoms in BDT-1, 2 Au complexes, the Mulliken partial charges of other atoms in BDT are quite stable, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in partial charge selections in classical molecular simulations. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structure of BDT self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the adsorption geometry of S adatoms on Au (111) surface. We found that the bond-stretching potential is the most dominant part in chemical bonding. Whereas the local bonding geometry of BDT molecular configuration may depend on the DFT functional used, the global packing structure of BDT SAM is quite independent of DFT functional, even though the uncertainty of some force-field parameters for chemical bonding can be as large as ˜100%. This indicates that the intermolecular interactions play a dominant role in determining the BDT SAMs global packing structure.

  4. Directionality of Cation/Molecule Bonding in Lewis Bases Containing the Carbonyl Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeigi, Younes; Gal, Jean-François

    2017-09-14

    Relationship between the C═O-X + (X = H, Li, Na, K, Al, Cu) angle and covalent characteristic of the X + -M (M = CH 2 O, CH 3 CHO, acetone, imidazol-2-one (C 2 H 2 N 2 O), cytosine, γ-butyrolactone) was investigated, theoretically. The calculated electron densities ρ at the bond critical points revealed that the covalency of the M-X + interaction depended on the nature of the cation and varied as H + > Cu + > Al + > Li + > Na + > K + . The alkali cations tended to participate in electrostatic interactions and aligned with the direction of the molecule dipole or local dipole of C═O group to form linear C═O-X geometries. Because of overlapping with lone-pair electrons of the sp 2 carbonyl oxygen, the H + and Cu + formed a bent C═O-X angle. Al + displayed an intermediate behavior; the C═O-Al angle was 180° in [CH 2 O/Al] + (mainly electrostatic), but when the angle was bent (146°) under the effect of local dipole of an adjacent imine group in cytosine, the covalency of the CO-Al + interaction increased. The C═O-X angles in M/X + adduct ions were scanned in different O-X bond lengths. It was found that the most favorable C═O-X angle depended on the O-X bond length. This dependency was attributed to variation of covalent and electrostatic contributions with O-X distance. In addition, the structures of [CH 2 S/X] + and [CH 2 Se/X] + were studied, and only bent C═S-X and C═Se-X angles were obtained for all cations, although the dipole vectors of CH 2 S and CH 2 Se coincide with the C═S and C═Se bonds. The bending of the C═S-X and C═Se-X angles was attributed to the covalent characteristic of S-X and Se-X interactions due to high polarizability of S and Se atoms.

  5. Electric field gradient and electronic structure of linear-bonded halide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.E.; Guenzburger, D.J.R.; Jansen, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of covalent metal-ligand interactions in determining hyperfine fields and energy-level structure of MX 2 linear-bonded halide compounds has been studied, using the self-consistent local density molecular orbital approach. Results for FeCl 2 , FeBr 2 and EuCl 2 obtained using the Discrete Variational Method with numerical basis sets are presented. The high spin configuration for the iron compounds, first predicted by Berkowitz, et al., is verified; a successful comparison with gas phase photoelectron spectra is made. Variation of the predicted electric field gradient with bond length R is found to be rapid; the need for an EXAFS measurement of R for the matrix isolated species and experimental determination of the spin of the EFG is seen to be crucial for more accurate determinations of the sub(57) Fe quadrupole moment. (Author) [pt

  6. Editing disulphide bonds: error correction using redox currencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Koreaki

    2010-01-01

    The disulphide bond-introducing enzyme of bacteria, DsbA, sometimes oxidizes non-native cysteine pairs. DsbC should rearrange the resulting incorrect disulphide bonds into those with correct connectivity. DsbA and DsbC receive oxidizing and reducing equivalents, respectively, from respective redox components (quinones and NADPH) of the cell. Two mechanisms of disulphide bond rearrangement have been proposed. In the redox-neutral 'shuffling' mechanism, the nucleophilic cysteine in the DsbC active site forms a mixed disulphide with a substrate and induces disulphide shuffling within the substrate part of the enzyme-substrate complex, followed by resolution into a reduced enzyme and a disulphide-rearranged substrate. In the 'reduction-oxidation' mechanism, DsbC reduces those substrates with wrong disulphides so that DsbA can oxidize them again. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Berkmen and his collaborators show that a disulphide reductase, TrxP, from an anaerobic bacterium can substitute for DsbC in Escherichia coli. They propose that the reduction-oxidation mechanism of disulphide rearrangement can indeed operate in vivo. An implication of this work is that correcting errors in disulphide bonds can be coupled to cellular metabolism and is conceptually similar to the proofreading processes observed with numerous synthesis and maturation reactions of biological macromolecules.

  7. Anomalous length dependence of the conductance of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, Ante

    2013-01-01

    Charge transport through two sets of symmetric graphene nanoribbons with zigzag shaped edges in a two-terminal device has been investigated, using density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The conductance has been explored as a function of nanoribbon length, bias voltage, and the strength of terminal coupling. The set of narrower nanoribbons, in the form of thiolated linear acenes, shows an anomalous length dependence of the conductance, which at first exhibits a drop and a minimum, followed by an evident rise. The length trend is shown to arise because of a gradual transformation in the transport mechanism, which changes from being governed by a continuum of out-of-plane π type and in-plane state channels to being fully controlled by a single, increasingly more resonant, occupied π state channel. For the set of nanoribbons with a wider profile, a steady increase is observed across the whole length range, owing to the absence of the former transport mechanism. The predicted trends are confirmed by the inclusion of self-interaction correction in the calculations. For both sets of nanoribbons the replacement of the strongly coupling thiol groups by weakly bonding phenathroline has been found to cause a strong attenuation with the length and a generally low conductance. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Voltage-assisted polymer wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsanik, J S; Bernstein, J J

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wafer bonding is a widely used process for fabrication of microfluidic devices. However, best practices for polymer bonds do not achieve sufficient bond strength for many applications. By applying a voltage to a polymer bond in a process called voltage-assisted bonding, bond strength is shown to improve dramatically for two polymers (Cytop™ and poly(methyl methacrylate)). Several experiments were performed to provide a starting point for further exploration of this technique. An optimal voltage range is experimentally observed with a reduction in bonding strength at higher voltages. Additionally, voltage-assisted bonding is shown to reduce void diameter due to bond defects. An electrostatic force model is proposed to explain the improved bond characteristics. This process can be used to improve bond strength for most polymers. (paper)

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conventional Acid-Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M.H.; Namvar, F.; Chalipa, J.; Saber, K.; Chiniforush, N.; Sarmadi, S.; Mirhashemi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching. Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types. Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively. Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning. PMID:22924098

  10. Mo-Mo Quintuple Bond is Highly Reactive in H-H, C-H, and O-H σ-Bond Cleavages Because of the Polarized Electronic Structure in Transition State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2017-04-03

    The recently reported high reactivity of the Mo-Mo quintuple bond of Mo 2 (N ∧ N) 2 (1) {N ∧ N = μ-κ 2 -CH[N(2,6-iPr 2 C 6 H 3 )] 2 } in the H-H σ-bond cleavage was investigated. DFT calculations disclosed that the H-H σ-bond cleavage by 1 occurs with nearly no barrier to afford the cis-dihydride species followed by cis-trans isomerization to form the trans-dihydride product, which is consistent with the experimental result. The O-H and C-H bond cleavages by 1 were computationally predicted to occur with moderate (ΔG° ⧧ = 9.0 kcal/mol) and acceptable activation energies (ΔG° ⧧ = 22.5 kcal/mol), respectively, suggesting that the Mo-Mo quintuple bond can be applied to various σ-bond cleavages. In these σ-bond cleavage reactions, the charge-transfer (CT Mo→XH ) from the Mo-Mo quintuple bond to the X-H (X = H, C, or O) bond and that (CT XH→Mo ) from the X-H bond to the Mo-Mo bond play crucial roles. Though the HOMO (dδ-MO) of 1 is at lower energy and the LUMO + 2 (dδ*-MO) of 1 is at higher energy than those of RhCl(PMe 3 ) 2 (LUMO and LUMO + 1 of 1 are not frontier MO), the H-H σ-bond cleavage by 1 more easily occurs than that by the Rh complex. Hence, the frontier MO energies are not the reason for the high reactivity of 1. The high reactivity of 1 arises from the polarization of dδ-type MOs of the Mo-Mo quintuple bond in the transition state. Such a polarized electronic structure enhances the bonding overlap between the dδ-MO of the Mo-Mo bond and the σ*-antibonding MO of the X-H bond to facilitate the CT Mo→XH and reduce the exchange repulsion between the Mo-Mo bond and the X-H bond. This polarized electronic structure of the transition state is similar to that of a frustrated Lewis pair. The easy polarization of the dδ-type MOs is one of the advantages of the metal-metal multiple bond, because such polarization is impossible in the mononuclear metal complex.

  11. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonds and bonding requirements. 281.33 Section 281.33 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.33...

  12. Is the word-length effect linked to subvocal rehearsal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemot, Charlotte; Dupoux, Emmanuel; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Models of phonological short-term memory (pSTM) generally distinguish between two components: a phonological buffer and a subvocal rehearsal. Evidence for these two components comes, respectively, from the phonological similarity effect and the word-length effect which disappears under articulatory suppression. But alternative theories posit that subvocal rehearsal is only an optional component of the pSTM. According to them, the depletion of the length effect under articulatory suppression results from the interference of the self-produced speech rather than the disruption of subvocal rehearsal. In order to disentangle these two theories, we tested two patients with a short-term memory deficit. FA, who presents a pseudoword repetition deficit, and FL, who does not. FA's deficit allowed for the observance of an ecological case of subvocal rehearsal disruption without any articulatory suppression task. FA's performance in pSTM tasks reveals as controls a phonological similarity effect, and contrary to controls no word-length effect. In contrast, the second patient, FL, exhibits the same effects as control subjects. This result is in accordance with models of pSTM in which the word-length effect emerges from subvocal rehearsal and disappears when this latter is disrupted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  13. Are Bonding Agents being Effective on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to the Composite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Farzanegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the clinical problems in orthodontics is the bonding of brackets tocomposite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bondstrength of brackets bonded to composite restorations using Excite. Methods:Forty brackets were bonded to composite surfaces, which were embedded inacrylic resin. One of the following four protocols was employed for surfacepreparation of the composite: group 1 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group2 roughening with a diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group3 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and the applying Excite®, group4 roughening with diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds andapplying Excite®. Maxillary central brackets were bonded onto thecomposite prepared samples with Transbond XT. Shear Bond Strength (SBS wasmeasured by a universal testing machine. The ANOVA and Tukey test was utilizedfor data analysis. Results: There was a significant difference betweenthe four groups (P

  14. Computational and Empirical Trans-hydrogen Bond Deuterium Isotope Shifts Suggest that N1-N3 A:U Hydrogen Bonds of RNA are Shorter than those of A:T Hydrogen Bonds of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Ick; Manalo, Marlon N.; Perez, Lisa M.; LiWang, Andy

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations of isolated Watson-Crick A:U and A:T base pairs predict that adenine 13 C2 trans-hydrogen bond deuterium isotope shifts due to isotopic substitution at the pyrimidine H3, 2h Δ 13 C2, are sensitive to the hydrogen-bond distance between the N1 of adenine and the N3 of uracil or thymine, which supports the notion that 2h Δ 13 C2 is sensitive to hydrogen-bond strength. Calculated 2h Δ 13 C2 values at a given N1-N3 distance are the same for isolated A:U and A:T base pairs. Replacing uridine residues in RNA with 5-methyl uridine and substituting deoxythymidines in DNA with deoxyuridines do not statistically shift empirical 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Thus, we show experimentally and computationally that the C7 methyl group of thymine has no measurable affect on 2h Δ 13 C2 values. Furthermore, 2h Δ 13 C2 values of modified and unmodified RNA are more negative than those of modified and unmodified DNA, which supports our hypothesis that RNA hydrogen bonds are stronger than those of DNA. It is also shown here that 2h Δ 13 C2 is context dependent and that this dependence is similar for RNA and DNA

  15. Relationship between x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy and the local H-bond environment in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Besley, Nicholas A.; Fransson, Thomas; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2018-04-01

    The connection between specific features in the water X-ray absorption spectrum and X-ray emission spectrum (XES) and the local H-bond coordination is studied based on structures obtained from path-integral molecular dynamics simulations using either the opt-PBE-vdW density functional or the MB-pol force field. Computing the XES spectrum using all molecules in a snapshot results in only one peak in the lone-pair (1b1) region, while the experiment shows two peaks separated by 0.8-0.9 eV. Different H-bond configurations were classified based on the local structure index (LSI) and a geometrical H-bond cone criterion. We find that tetrahedrally coordinated molecules characterized by high LSI values and two strong donated and two strong accepted H-bonds contribute to the low energy 1b1 emission peak and to the post-edge region in absorption. Molecules with the asymmetric H-bond environment with one strong accepted H-bond and one strong donated H-bond and low LSI values give rise to the high energy 1b1 peak in the emission spectrum and mainly contribute to the pre-edge and main-edge in the absorption spectrum. The 1b1 peak splitting can be increased to 0.62 eV by imposing constraints on the H-bond length, i.e., for very tetrahedral structures short H-bonds (less than 2.68 Å) and for very asymmetric structures elongated H-bonds (longer than 2.8 Å). Such structures are present, but underrepresented, in the simulations which give more of an average of the two extremes.

  16. Relationship between x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy and the local H-bond environment in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Besley, Nicholas A; Fransson, Thomas; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2018-04-14

    The connection between specific features in the water X-ray absorption spectrum and X-ray emission spectrum (XES) and the local H-bond coordination is studied based on structures obtained from path-integral molecular dynamics simulations using either the opt-PBE-vdW density functional or the MB-pol force field. Computing the XES spectrum using all molecules in a snapshot results in only one peak in the lone-pair (1b 1 ) region, while the experiment shows two peaks separated by 0.8-0.9 eV. Different H-bond configurations were classified based on the local structure index (LSI) and a geometrical H-bond cone criterion. We find that tetrahedrally coordinated molecules characterized by high LSI values and two strong donated and two strong accepted H-bonds contribute to the low energy 1b 1 emission peak and to the post-edge region in absorption. Molecules with the asymmetric H-bond environment with one strong accepted H-bond and one strong donated H-bond and low LSI values give rise to the high energy 1b 1 peak in the emission spectrum and mainly contribute to the pre-edge and main-edge in the absorption spectrum. The 1b 1 peak splitting can be increased to 0.62 eV by imposing constraints on the H-bond length, i.e., for very tetrahedral structures short H-bonds (less than 2.68 Å) and for very asymmetric structures elongated H-bonds (longer than 2.8 Å). Such structures are present, but underrepresented, in the simulations which give more of an average of the two extremes.

  17. The Nature of the Hydrogen Bond Outline of a Comprehensive Hydrogen Bond Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gilli, Gastone

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (H-bond) effects are known: it makes sea water liquid, joins cellulose microfibrils in trees, shapes DNA into genes and polypeptide chains into wool, hair, muscles or enzymes. Its true nature is less known and we may still wonder why O-H...O bond energies range from less than 1 to more than 30 kcal/mol without apparent reason. This H-bond puzzle is re-examined here from its very beginning and presented as an inclusive compilation of experimental H-bond energies andgeometries.New concepts emerge from this analysis: new classes of systematically strong H-bonds (CAHBs and RAHBs: cha

  18. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  19. Thermally controllable reflective characteristics from rupture and self-assembly of hydrogen bonds in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wang; Cao, Hui; Song, Li; Zhao, Haiyan; Li, Sijin; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai

    2009-10-22

    A cholesteric liquid crystal (Ch-LC) composite, made of a series of cholesteryl esters, a nematic LC, and a hydrogen bond (H-bond) chiral dopant (HCD), was prepared and filled into a planar treated cell. When the cell was heated, the selective reflection of the cell exhibited an unusual blue shift. One of the reasonable mechanisms was that the helical twisting power (HTP) value of cholesteryl esters increased with an increasing temperature. The other one was that the H-bonds of HCD were ruptured when the temperature was above 60.0 degrees C and HCD was split into two kinds of new chiral dopants, which made the HTP value of the chiral dopants change a lot, thus changing the pitch length of the composite greatly. On the basis of this mechanism, a novel thermally controllable reflective color paper could be achieved.

  20. “Oversized” Penile Length In The Black People; Myth Or Reality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... penile lengths, and flaccid penile lengths, were measured in 115 adult men of the Black race in Nigeria. The results were compared with reported similar main studies on people of other races, which were accessible to the authors. These studies were done in Italy, Greece, Korea, Britain, and the United States of America.

  1. Enamel Bond Strength of New Universal Adhesive Bonding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, D E; Meyers, E J; Guillory, V L; Vandewalle, K S

    2015-01-01

    Universal bonding agents have been introduced for use as self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesives depending on the dental substrate and clinician's preference. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to enamel using universal adhesives compared to a self-etch adhesive when applied in self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes over time. Extracted human third molars were used to create 120 enamel specimens. The specimens were ground flat and randomly divided into three groups: two universal adhesives and one self-etch adhesive. Each group was then subdivided, with half the specimens bonded in self-etch mode and half in etch-and-rinse mode. The adhesives were applied as per manufacturers' instructions, and composite was bonded using a standardized mold and cured incrementally. The groups were further divided into two subgroups with 10 specimens each. One subgroup was stored for 24 hours and the second for six months in 37°C distilled water and tested in shear. Failure mode was also determined for each specimen. A three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) found a significant difference between groups based on bonding agent (p0.05). Clearfil SE in etch-and-rinse and self-etch modes had more mixed fractures than either universal adhesive in either mode. Etching enamel significantly increased the SBS of composite to enamel. Clearfil SE had significantly greater bond strength to enamel than either universal adhesive, which were not significantly different from each other.

  2. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  3. The effect of pretreatment with fluoride on the tensile strength of orthodontic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.N.; Sheen, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    White spot decalcifications and caries occurring adjacent to bonded orthodontic brackets have long been a concern to orthodontists. One procedure suggested to overcome this problem is fluoride treatment prior to bonding. The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of orthodontic self-cured resin from Concise on teeth rinsed 4 minutes in 1.23% APF with untreated controls. Measurements were made on an Instron machine. Debonding interfaces were observed with a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Distributions were calculated. The tensile bond strengths of the fluoride-treated teeth and the untreated teeth were not significantly different. The debonding interfaces between resin and bracket base, within the resin itself, and between enamel and resin were similar in the two experimental groups. However, greater enamel detachment was seen within the fluoride pretreatment group. So while fluoride pretreatment does not significantly affect tensile bond strength, it may cause enamel detachment after debonding

  4. [Bonding strength of resin and tooth enamel after teeth bleaching with cold plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-meng; Wang, Guo-min; Sun, Ke; Li, Ying-long; Pan, Jie

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the immediate bond strength and surface structure of resin and the tooth enamel which treated by cold plasma. In the study, 40 bovine incisors were divided into two equal parts. In this sense, all enamel adhesive samples were prepared and then randomly divided into 4 groups (n =20). group 1: acid + single bond 2+resin composite (control group); group 2:beyond bleaching+ acid+single bond 2+resin composite; group 3: treated by cold plasma for 5 minutes+ acid+single bond 2+resin composite; group 4: treated by cold plasma for 5 minutes+single bond 2+resin composite. Single bond 2 bonding system and Filtek Z250 resin were used in this experiment. The shear bond strength was tested by universal testing machine. The surface of the enamel in different processes was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Statistical analyses by the single factor analysis of variance and multiple pairwise comparisons were performed with SPSS 17.0 . The shear bond strength of group 4 (8.60 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the other three groups (Penamel treated by cold plasma had slight molten form, which was different from etched enamel surface.The fractured surface of group 3 was mix fracture, which was similar to the control group (group 1). Compared with the conventional clinic bleaching, immediate bond strength of resin-enamel that treated by cold plasma has not been affected.

  5. Cooperativity of hydrogen-bonded networks in 7-azaindole(CH3OH)n (n=2,3) clusters evidenced by IR-UV ion-dip spectroscopy and natural bond orbital analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakota, Kenji; Kageura, Yutaka; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2008-08-07

    IR-UV ion-dip spectra of the 7-azaindole (7AI)(CH(3)OH)(n) (n=1-3) clusters have been measured in the hydrogen-bonded NH and OH stretching regions to investigate the stable structures of 7AI(CH(3)OH)(n) (n=1-3) in the S(0) state and the cooperativity of the H-bonding interactions in the H-bonded networks. The comparison of the IR-UV ion-dip spectra with IR spectra obtained by quantum chemistry calculations shows that 7AI(CH(3)OH)(n) (n=1-3) have cyclic H-bonded structures, where the NH group and the heteroaromatic N atom of 7AI act as the proton donor and proton acceptor, respectively. The H-bonded OH stretch fundamental of 7AI(CH(3)OH)(2) is remarkably redshifted from the corresponding fundamental of (CH(3)OH)(2) by 286 cm(-1), which is an experimental manifestation of the cooperativity in H-bonding interaction. Similarly, two localized OH fundamentals of 7AI(CH(3)OH)(3) also exhibit large redshifts. The cooperativity of 7AI(CH(3)OH)(n) (n=2,3) is successfully explained by the donor-acceptor electron delocalization interactions between the lone-pair orbital in the proton acceptor and the antibonding orbital in the proton donor in natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses.

  6. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of 4-chlorobenzothioamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 4-chlorobenzothioamide were investigated. The FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of 4-chlorobenzothioamide in the solid phase were recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared and Raman intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 4-chlorobenzothioamide was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯S hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  7. Self-similarity in incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Ali; Kavvas, M Levent

    2015-12-01

    The self-similarity conditions of the 3-dimensional (3D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained by utilizing one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations. It is found that the scaling exponents of length dimensions in i = 1, 2, 3 coordinates in 3-dimensions are not arbitrary but equal for the self-similarity of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. It is also shown that the self-similarity in this particular flow process can be achieved in different time and space scales when the viscosity of the fluid is also scaled in addition to other flow variables. In other words, the self-similarity of Navier-Stokes equations is achievable under different fluid environments in the same or different gravity conditions. Self-similarity criteria due to initial and boundary conditions are also presented. Utilizing the proposed self-similarity conditions of the 3D hydrodynamic flow process, the value of a flow variable at a specified time and space can be scaled to a corresponding value in a self-similar domain at the corresponding time and space.

  8. Hierarchical self-assembly of two-length-scale multiblock copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Loos, Katja; Vukovic, Ivana; Du Sart, Gerrit Gobius

    2011-01-01

    The self-assembly in diblock copolymer-based supramolecules, obtained by hydrogen bonding short side chains to one of the blocks, as well as in two-length-scale linear terpolymers results in hierarchical structure formation. The orientation of the different domains, e.g. layers in the case of a lamellar-in-lamellar structure, is determined by the molecular architecture, graft-like versus linear, and the relative magnitude of the interactions involved. In both cases parallel and perpendicular arrangements have been observed. The comb-shaped supramolecules approach is ideally suited for the preparation of nanoporous structures. A bicontinuous morphology with the supramolecular comb block forming the channels was finally achieved by extending the original approach to suitable triblock copolymer-based supramolecules.

  9. Relationships among hamstring muscle optimal length and hamstring flexibility and strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglin Wan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Hamstring flexibility may affect hamstring muscle maximum strain in movements. With similar hamstring flexibility, hamstring muscle maximal strain in a given movement may be different between genders. Hamstring muscle lengths in standing should not be used as an approximation of their optimal lengths in calculation of hamstring muscle strain in musculoskeletal system modeling.

  10. Molecular single-bond covalent radii for elements 1-118.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyykkö, Pekka; Atsumi, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent system of additive covalent radii, R(AB)=r(A) + r(B), is set up for the entire periodic table, Groups 1-18, Z=1-118. The primary bond lengths, R, are taken from experimental or theoretical data corresponding to chosen group valencies. All r(E) values are obtained from the same fit. Both E-E, E-H, and E-CH(3) data are incorporated for most elements, E. Many E-E' data inside the same group are included. For the late main groups, the system is close to that of Pauling. For other elements it is close to the methyl-based one of Suresh and Koga [J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5940] and its predecessors. For the diatomic alkalis MM' and halides XX', separate fits give a very high accuracy. These primary data are then absorbed with the rest. The most notable exclusion are the transition-metal halides and chalcogenides which are regarded as partial multiple bonds. Other anomalies include H(2) and F(2). The standard deviation for the 410 included data points is 2.8 pm.

  11. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conven-tional Acid-Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching.Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types.Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively.Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning.

  12. Bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors to ground versus unground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Ruya; Yildirim, Zeren; Ertan, Atila; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of several self-etch adhesives to their two-step predecessors to ground and unground enamel. Seventy-five extracted, non-carious human third molar teeth were selected for this study. The buccal surfaces of each tooth were mechanically ground to obtain flat enamel surfaces (ground enamel), while the lingual surfaces were left intact (unground enamel). The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the adhesive systems (n=15): one-step self-etch adhesive - Clearfil S3 Bond, its two-step predecessor - Clearfil SE Bond, one-step self-etch adhesive - AdheSE One, and its two-step predecessor - AdheSE, and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive - Adper Single Bond 2(control). After application of the adhesives to the buccal and lingual enamel surfaces of each tooth, a cylindrical capsule filled with a hybrid composite resin (TPH) was seated against the surfaces. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, followed by thermocy-cling (5°C-55°C/500 cycles). They were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The data were compared using a two-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test at Padhesives exhibited statistically similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel except for the etch-and-rinse adhesive that showed significantly higher bond strengths than the self-etch adhesives (Padhesives tested (P=.17). Similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel were achieved with one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors. Enamel preparation did not influence the bonding performance of the adhesives tested.

  13. Bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors to ground versus unground enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Yildirim, Zeren; Ertan, Atila; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of several self-etch adhesives to their two-step predecessors to ground and unground enamel. Methods: Seventy-five extracted, non-carious human third molar teeth were selected for this study. The buccal surfaces of each tooth were mechanically ground to obtain flat enamel surfaces (ground enamel), while the lingual surfaces were left intact (unground enamel). The teeth were randomly divided into five groups according to the adhesive systems (n=15): one-step self-etch adhesive - Clearfil S3 Bond, its two-step predecessor - Clearfil SE Bond, one-step self-etch adhesive - AdheSE One, and its two-step predecessor - AdheSE, and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive - Adper Single Bond 2(control). After application of the adhesives to the buccal and lingual enamel surfaces of each tooth, a cylindrical capsule filled with a hybrid composite resin (TPH) was seated against the surfaces. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, followed by thermocy-cling (5°C–55°C/500 cycles). They were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The data were compared using a two-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni test at Padhesives exhibited statistically similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel except for the etch-and-rinse adhesive that showed significantly higher bond strengths than the self-etch adhesives (Penamel for any of the adhesives tested (P=.17). Conclusion: Similar bond strengths to ground and unground enamel were achieved with one-step self-etch adhesives and their predecessors. Enamel preparation did not influence the bonding performance of the adhesives tested. PMID:22904656

  14. Development of bonding techniques for cryogenic components (2). HIP bonding between Cu Alloys and Ti, cryogenic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Shigeru; Ouchi, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Fukaya, Kiyoshi [Nihon Advanced Technology Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ishiyama, Shintaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Hideo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Several joints between dissimilar materials are required in the superconducting (SC) magnet system of SC linear accelerator or fusion reactor, Pure titanium (Ti) is one of candidate materials for a jacket of SC coil of fusion reactor because Ti is non-magnetic material and has a feature that its thermal expansion is similar to SC material in addition to good corrosion resistance and workability. Also, Ti does not require strict control of environment during reaction heat treatment of SC material. Copper (Cu) or Cu-alloy is used in electrical joints and cryogenic stainless steel (SS) is used in cryogenic pipes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new bonding techniques for joints between Ti, Cu, and SS because jacket, electrical joint and cryogenic pipe have to be bonded each other to cool SC coils. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has started to develop dissimilar material joints bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), which can bring a high strength joint with good tolerance and can applied to a large or complex geometry device. HIP conditions for Cu-Ti, Cu alloy-Ti, Cu alloy-SS were investigated in this study and most stable HIP condition were evaluated by microscopic observation, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. (author)

  15. Utility of telomere length measurements for age determination of humpback whales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Tange Olsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the applicability of telomere length measurements by quantitative PCR as a tool for minimally invasive age determination of free-ranging cetaceans. We analysed telomere length in skin samples from 28 North Atlantic humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, ranging from 0 to 26 years of age. The results suggested a significant correlation between telomere length and age in humpback whales. However, telomere length was highly variable among individuals of similar age, suggesting that telomere length measured by quantitative PCR is an imprecise determinant of age in humpback whales. The observed variation in individual telomere length was found to be a function of both experimental and biological variability, with the latter perhaps reflecting patterns of inheritance, resource allocation trade-offs, and stochasticity of the marine environment.

  16. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  17. Explosive bonding and its application in the Advanced Photon Source front-end and beamline components design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, D.; Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Explosive bonding is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bonding between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. Since 1991, a number of explosive-bonding joints have been designed for high-thermal-load ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) compatible components in the Advanced Photon Source. A series of standardized explosive bonded joint units has also been designed and tested, such as: oxygen-free copper (OFHC) to stainless-steel vacuum joints for slits and shutters, GlidCop to stainless-steel vacuum joints for fixed masks, and GlidCop to OFHC thermal and mechanical joints for shutter face-plates, etc. The design and test results for the explosive bonding units to be used in the Advanced Photon Source front ends and beamlines will be discussed in this paper

  18. Comparative TEM study of bonded silicon/silicon interfaces fabricated by hydrophilic, hydrophobic and UHV wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznicek, A.; Scholz, R.; Senz, S.; Goesele, U.

    2003-01-01

    Wafers of Czochralski-grown silicon were bonded hydrophilically, hydrophobically and in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at room temperature. Wafers bonded hydrophilically adhere together by hydrogen bonds, those bonded hydrophobically by van der Waals forces and UHV-bonded ones by covalent bonds. Annealing the pre-bonded hydrophilic and hydrophobic wafer pairs in argon for 2 h at different temperatures increases the initially low bonding energy. UHV-bonded wafer pairs were also annealed to compare the results. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations show nano-voids at the interface. The void density depends on the initial bonding strength. During annealing the shape, coverage and density of the voids change significantly

  19. Powder alignment system for anisotropic bonded NdFeB Halbach cylinders \\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z.Q.; Xia, Z.P.; Atallah, K.; Jewell, G.W.; Howe, D.

    2000-01-01

    A Halbach cylinder, fabricated from pre-magnetized sintered NdFeB magnet segments, is proposed for the powder aligning system during the compression or injection moulding of anisotropic bonded Halbach oriented NdFeB ring magnets. The influence of leading design parameters of the powder aligning system, viz. the number of magnet segments per pole, their axial length and radial thickness, and their clearance from the mould, is investigated by finite element analysis, and validated experimentally

  20. Evaluation of a New Nano-filled Bonding Agent for Bonding Orthodontic Brackets as Compared to a Conventional Bonding Agent: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh S Pai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Although both bonding agents provide clinically acceptable levels of bond strength, the technique to bond the nano-filled Prime and Bond NT is more cumbersome as compared to the Transbond XT material, which makes the latter a more popular choice in the clinical set up. If the application procedures for the Prime and Bond NT can be simplified then it could be a convenient option in the orthodontic practice.

  1. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infected dentin was excavated with the help of caries detector dye. On the remaining hard dentin, a standardized smear layer was created by polishing with 600-grit SiC paper. Teeth were divided into three groups and treated with one of the three tested adhesives: Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (3M ESPE), a 2-step etch-andrinse adhesive, Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), a 1-step self-etching or all-in-one adhesive, and Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Five-mm-thick composite buildups (Z-250, 3M ESPE) were built and light cured. After water storage for 24 h at 37ºC, the bonded specimens were sectioned into bars (1.0 x 1.0 mm; n = 20 to 30). Microtensile bond strength of normal dentin specimens and caries-affected dentin specimens was measured in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed = 1 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p adhesives were found. Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and Clearfil S3 Bond showed significantly lower bond strength values to caries-affected dentin. For Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values to normal and caries-affected dentin were not significantly different. All the tested simplified adhesives showed similar bond strength values to normal dentin. For the tested 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and the all-in-one adhesive, the bond strength values to caries-affected dentin were lower than to normal dentin.

  2. Kekulé-based Valence Bond Model.I. The Ground-state Properties of Conjugated π-Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Shu-Hua(黎书华); MA,Jing(马晶); JIANG,Yuan-Sheng(江元生)

    2002-01-01

    The Kekulé-based valence bond ( VB ) method, in which the VB model is solved using covalent Kekulé structures as basis functions, is justified in the present work. This method is dimonstrated to provide satisfactory descriptions for resoance energies and bond ang lengths of benzenoid hydrocarbons, being in good agreement with SCF-MO and experimental results. In additicn, an alternative way of discyssing characters of localizedsubstructures within a polyclic benzenoid system is suggested based upon such sunokufied VB calculations. Finally,the symmetries of VB ground states for nonalternant conjugated systems are also illustrated to be obtainable through these calculations, presenting very useful information for understanding the chemical behaviors of some nonalternant conjugated molecules.

  3. PMMA to SU-8 Bonding for Polymer Based Lab-on-a-chip Systems with Integrated Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Nielsen, Theodor; Nilsson, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    An adhesive bonding technique for wafer-level sealing of SU-8 based lab-on-a-chip microsystems with integrated optical components is presented. Microfluidic channels and optical components, e.g. waveguides, are fabricated in cross-linked SU-8 and sealed with a Pyrex glass substrate by means...... strength of 16 MPa is achieved at bonding temperatures between 110 oC and 120oC, at a bonding force of 2000 N on a 4-inch wafer. The optical propagation loss of multi-mode 10ym (thickness)x 30ym (width)SU-8 waveguides is measured. The propagation loss in PMMA bonded waveguide struc-tures is more than 5 d......B/cm lower, at wavelengths between 600nm and 900 nm, than in similar structures bonded by an intermediate layer of SU-8. Furthermore 950K PMMA shows no tendency to flow into the bonded structures during bonding because of its high viscosity....

  4. Social impact bonds and their application to preventive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, John L

    2013-05-01

    Although preventive health in Australia has been acknowledged as central to national health and wellbeing, efforts to reform the delivery of preventive health have to date produced limited results. The financing of preventive health at a national level is based on outcome- or performance-based funding mechanisms; however, delivery of interventions and activities at a state level have not been subjected to outcome-based funding processes. A new financing tool being applied in the area of social services (social impact bonds) has emerged as a possible model for application in the prevention arena. This paper explores key issues in the consideration of this funding model in the prevention arena. When preventive health is conceptualised as a merit good, the role of government is clarified and outcome measures fully articulated, social impact bonds may be a viable funding option to supplement core public health activities. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? The complexities of outcome monitoring in preventive health are well understood.Likewise, the problem of linking funding to outcomes from preventive health practice has also been debated at length in health policy. However, not much is known about the application of social impact bonds into the preventive health arena.WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper discusses the limitations and opportunities facing the application of the social impact bond financing model in the preventive health arena. This has not been undertaken previously.WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? Social impact bonds have received significant recent attention from federal and state government treasury departments as potential financing tools for government. Health policy practitioners are watching this space very closely to see the outcomes of a New South Wales trial. Health promotion practitioners and primary care practitioners who deliver preventive services will need to keep abreast of this issue as it will have significant impact on their

  5. Microshear bond strength of self-etching systems associated with a hydrophobic resin layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Moraes, André Guaraci; Francci, Carlos; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Soares, Silvio Peixoto; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate in vitro the microshear bond strength of adhesive systems applied to dentin according to manufacturers' instructions, associated or not with a hydrophobic layer of unfilled resin. Six self-etching adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical; AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent; Xeno III, Dentsply; I Bond, Heraeus-Kulzer; Bond Force, Tokuyama; Futurabond DC, Voco) were tested. The labial dentin of sixty bovine incisors was exposed, and the teeth were divided into two groups according to the application or not of an extra hydrophobic resin layer (Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus, bottle 3). Six composite cylinders (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were built up on each treated surface. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h and then subjected to the microshear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microshear bond strength values were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. Failure mode was determined using a stereomicroscope under 20X magnification. The application of the hydrophobic resin layer did not affect bond strength, except for AdheSE. However, the bond strengths with the hydrophobic layer were similar among the six tested systems (Clearfil: 17.1 ± 7.9; AdheSE: 14.5 ± 7.1; Xeno lll: 12.8 ± 7.7; I Bond: 9.5 ± 5.8; Bond Force: 17.5 ± 4.1; Futurabond: 7.7 ± 2.3). When used as recommended by the manufacturers, Bond Force presented statistically higher bond strength than AdheSE and I Bond (p AdheSE 1.6 ± 1.6; Xeno lll: 9.0 ± 3.8; I Bond: 3.0 ± 1.5; Bond Force: 14 ± 3.9; Futurabond: 8.8 ± 3.8). Failure mode was predominantly adhesive. The bond strength of the self-etching systems tested was not significantly affected by the application of a hydrophobic layer, but a significant improvement was observed in AdheSE.

  6. The influence of flushing time on the bonding quality of liquid white cast iron on the solid surface of similar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandanadjaja, Beny; Purwadi, Wiwik; Idamayanti, Dewi; Lilansa, Noval; Hanaldi, Kus; Nurzaenal, Friya Kurnia

    2018-05-01

    Hard metal castings are widely used in the coal mill pulverizer as construction material for coal crushers. During its operation crushers and mills experience degradation caused by abrasion load. This research dealed with the surface overlaying of similiar material on the surface of white cast iron by mean of gravity casting. The die blank casting was preheated prior to the casting process of outer layer made of Ni-Hard white cast iron to guarantee bonding processes and avoid any crack. The preheating temperature of die blankin ther range of 500C up to 850C was set up to reach the interface temperature in the range of 887°C -1198°C and the flushing time was varied between 10-20 seconds. Studies carried on the microstructure of sample material revealed a formation of metallurgical bonding at the preheating temperature above 625 °C by pouring temperature ranging from 1438 °C to 1468 °C. Metallographical and chemical composition by mean of EDS examination were performed to observed the resut. This research concludes that the casting of Ni-Hard 1 overlay by applying gravity casting method can be done by preheating the surface of casting to 625 °C, interface temperature of 1150 °C, flushing time of 7 seconds and pouring temperature of 1430 °C. Excellent metallurgical bonding at the contact area between dieblank and overlay material has been achieved in which there is no parting line at the interface area to be observed.

  7. Two developmentally temporal quantitative trait loci underlie convergent evolution of increased branchial bone length in sticklebacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Cleves, Phillip A.; Smith, Alyson S.; Miller, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    In convergent evolution, similar phenotypes evolve repeatedly in independent populations, often reflecting adaptation to similar environments. Understanding whether convergent evolution proceeds via similar or different genetic and developmental mechanisms offers insight towards the repeatability and predictability of evolution. Oceanic populations of threespine stickleback fish, Gasterosteus aculeatus, have repeatedly colonized countless freshwater lakes and streams, where new diets lead to morphological adaptations related to feeding. Here, we show that heritable increases in branchial bone length have convergently evolved in two independently derived freshwater stickleback populations. In both populations, an increased bone growth rate in juveniles underlies the convergent adult phenotype, and one population also has a longer cartilage template. Using F2 crosses from these two freshwater populations, we show that two quantitative trait loci (QTL) control branchial bone length at distinct points in development. In both populations, a QTL on chromosome 21 controls bone length throughout juvenile development, and a QTL on chromosome 4 controls bone length only in adults. In addition to these similar developmental profiles, these QTL show similar chromosomal locations in both populations. Our results suggest that sticklebacks have convergently evolved longer branchial bones using similar genetic and developmental programmes in two independently derived populations. PMID:24966315

  8. The ice-breaker effect: singing mediates fast social bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eiluned; Launay, Jacques; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2015-10-01

    It has been proposed that singing evolved to facilitate social cohesion. However, it remains unclear whether bonding arises out of properties intrinsic to singing or whether any social engagement can have a similar effect. Furthermore, previous research has used one-off singing sessions without exploring the emergence of social bonding over time. In this semi-naturalistic study, we followed newly formed singing and non-singing (crafts or creative writing) adult education classes over seven months. Participants rated their closeness to their group and their affect, and were given a proxy measure of endorphin release, before and after their class, at three timepoints (months 1, 3 and 7). We show that although singers and non-singers felt equally connected by timepoint 3, singers experienced much faster bonding: singers demonstrated a significantly greater increase in closeness at timepoint 1, but the more gradual increase shown by non-singers caught up over time. This represents the first evidence for an 'ice-breaker effect' of singing in promoting fast cohesion between unfamiliar individuals, which bypasses the need for personal knowledge of group members gained through prolonged interaction. We argue that singing may have evolved to quickly bond large human groups of relative strangers, potentially through encouraging willingness to coordinate by enhancing positive affect.

  9. Effect of storage time, thermocycling and resin coating on durability of dentin bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:Along with development of different dental adhesives, concerns about hydrolytic deg-radation of the adhesive components have arisen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro influence of thermocycling, water storage and resin coating on the microshear bond strength of total etch and self etch adhesive systems to dentin. Methods:The superficial coronal dentin of eighty intact third molars were exposed and divided into 5 equal groups. Dental adhesives including Scotch Bond Multi Purpose (SBMP, Single Bond (SB, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Prompt L-Pop (PLP, and Prompt L-Pop plus Margin bond (PLPM were applied according to the manufacturers′ instructions on prepared surfaces in the study groups, respectively. Then composite cylinders were bonded and specimens were divided into two subgroups. One subgroup was stored in water for 24 hours. The second subgroup was subjected to 3000 thermocycle shocks and then was stored in 37°C water for 3 months. Finally, all teeth were subjected to the mi-croshear bond strength test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. One specimen similar to each subgroup was also prepared for SEM evaluation. Results:After one-day storage, the SBMP showed the highest bond strength followed by CSE, PLPM, SB and PLP. After three months storage, the highest bond strength was observed in SBMP followed by PLPM, CSE, SB, and PLP. Conclusion: SBMP showed the best bond strength while CSE represented acceptable bond durabil-ity. Resin coating on PLP improved bond strength and durability.

  10. Experimental investigation of halogen-bond hard-soft acid-base complementarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riel, Asia Marie S; Jessop, Morly J; Decato, Daniel A; Massena, Casey J; Nascimento, Vinicius R; Berryman, Orion B

    2017-04-01

    The halogen bond (XB) is a topical noncovalent interaction of rapidly increasing importance. The XB employs a `soft' donor atom in comparison to the `hard' proton of the hydrogen bond (HB). This difference has led to the hypothesis that XBs can form more favorable interactions with `soft' bases than HBs. While computational studies have supported this suggestion, solution and solid-state data are lacking. Here, XB soft-soft complementarity is investigated with a bidentate receptor that shows similar associations with neutral carbonyls and heavy chalcogen analogs. The solution speciation and XB soft-soft complementarity is supported by four crystal structures containing neutral and anionic soft Lewis bases.

  11. Synthesis of Reusable Silica Nanosphere-Supported Pt(IV Complex for Formation of Disulfide Bonds in Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some peptide-based drugs, including oxytocin, vasopressin, ziconotide, pramlintide, nesiritide, and octreotide, contain one intramolecular disulfide bond. A novel and reusable monodispersed silica nanosphere-supported Pt(IV complex (SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV; TPEA: N-[3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl]ethylenediamine was synthesized via a four-step procedure and was used for the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in peptides. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and chemical mapping results for the Pt(II intermediates and for SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV show that the silica nanospheres possess a monodisperse spherical structure and contain uniformly-distributed Si, O, C, N, Cl, and Pt. The valence state of Pt on the silica nanospheres was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The Pt(IV loaded on SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV was 0.15 mmol/g, as determined by UV-VIS spectrometry. The formation of intramolecular disulfides in six dithiol-containing peptides of variable lengths by the use of SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV was investigated, and the relative oxidation yields were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In addition, peptide 1 (Ac-CPFC-NH2 was utilized to study the reusability of SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV. No significant decrease in the relative oxidation yield was observed after ten reaction cycles. Moreover, the structure of SiO2@TPEA@Pt(IV after being used for ten cycles was determined to be similar to its initial one, demonstrating the cycling stability of the complex.

  12. Relining effects on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rosado Valente ANDRIOLI

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The correct use of glass fiber posts in endodontically treated teeth is essential for the clinical success of restorative treatment. Objective This study evaluated the push-out shear bond strength of relined (R or non-relined (NR glass fiber posts, cemented with self-adhesive resin cement [RelyXTM U100 (U100] and conventional resin cement [RelyXTM ARC (ARC]. Material and method Sixty human single-rooted teeth were endodontically treated and divided into ARC-NR; U100-NR; ARC-R; U100-R groups. The teeth were sectioned into cervical, middle and apical thirds, and subjected to the push-out test. Bond strength was analyzed by the Friedman test; cement and post types were compared by the Mann Whitney test. The pattern of failures was evaluated with digital camera through images at 200x magnification, and was classified as adhesive (at the cement/dentin or cement/post interface, cohesive (cement or post, and mixed failures. Result In ARC-NR, bond strength values were higher in the cervical third; in U100-NR and ARC-R they were similar between the thirds. In U100-R, in the cervical and middle thirds the bond strength values were similar, and there was lower value in the apical third. For non-relined glass fiber posts, the highest mean bond strength values were observed with self-adhesive resin cement. Whereas, relined posts cemented with conventional resin cement had stronger cement layer in comparison with non-relined fiber posts. Conclusion The post relining technique was efficient in ARC-R. ARC-NR and U100-R showed improved bond strength in the cervical region of canal walls. The main failures were adhesive at the cement-post interface.

  13. Normal standards for kidney length as measured with US in premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, A.E.; Hedlund, G.L.; Pierson, W.P.; Null, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to develop normal standards for kidney length in premature infants, the authors measured kidney length by US imaging in 39 (to date) premature infants less than 72 hours old and without known renal disease. Kidney length was compared with four different parameters of body size, including gestational age, birth weight, birth length, and body surface area. Similar standards have been generated previously for normal renal length as measured by US imaging in full-term infants and older children. These standards have proven utility in cases of congenital and acquired disorders that abnormally increase or decrease renal size. Scatter plots of kidney length versus body weight and kidney length versus body surface area conformed well to a logarithmic distribution, with a high correlation coefficient and close-fitting 95% confidence limits (SEE = 2.05)

  14. Determination of the bonding of alkyl monolayers to the Si(111) surface using chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E. [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied by conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction (PED) using synchrotron radiation. Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond on the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, XPS has revealed a C 1s signal chemically shifted to lower binding energy, which we have assigned to carbon bonded to silicon. PED has shown that both preparative methods result in carbon bonded in an atop site with the expected C{endash}Si bond length of 1.85{plus_minus}0.05{Angstrom}. Chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction is a particularly valuable probe of local structure at surfaces that contain the same element in multiple, chemically distinct environments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Determination of the bonding of alkyl monolayers to the Si(111) surface using chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied by conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction (PED) using synchrotron radiation. Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) olefin insertion into the H endash Si bond on the H endash Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl endash Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, XPS has revealed a C 1s signal chemically shifted to lower binding energy, which we have assigned to carbon bonded to silicon. PED has shown that both preparative methods result in carbon bonded in an atop site with the expected C endash Si bond length of 1.85±0.05 Angstrom. Chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction is a particularly valuable probe of local structure at surfaces that contain the same element in multiple, chemically distinct environments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Fine hierarchy of the V-O bonds by advanced solid state NMR: novel Pb4(VO2)(PO4)3 structure as a textbook case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, Grégory; Mentré, Olivier; Cristol, Sylvain; Delevoye, Laurent

    2012-12-17

    We report here a complete structural characterization of a new lead Pb(4)(VO(2))(PO(4))(3) vanadophosphate compound by single crystal X-ray diffraction and (51)V and (31)P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Although structural data are commonly used for the estimation of bond lengths and further delimitation of the true coordination number (e.g., octahedral: 6 versus 5 + 1 versus 4 + 2), we show here for the first time by solid-state NMR a more accurate appreciation of the V-O bonding scheme in this complex oxide which appears well adapted to the full series of vanado-phosphate materials. The direct characterization of V-O-P bridges through the J-mediated correlation (51)V{(31)P} heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (J-HMQC) technique allows a contrasted hierarchy of the V-O electronic delocalization and indirectly supports the presence or not of the V-O bond. In the reported lead vanado-phosphate structure, the two vanadium polyhedra that have been assigned to octahedra from a bond length point of view have been finally reclassified as tetra- and penta-coordinated units on the basis of the solid-state NMR results. More generally, we believe that the improved characterization of interatomic bonds in various vanado-phosphate structures by solid-state NMR will contribute to a better understanding of the structure/property relationships in this important class of materials.

  17. Mechanism of bonding and debonding using surface activated bonding method with Si intermediate layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kai; Fujino, Masahisa; Matsumoto, Yoshiie; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-04-01

    Techniques of handling thin and fragile substrates in a high-temperature process are highly required for the fabrication of semiconductor devices including thin film transistors (TFTs). In our previous study, we proposed applying the surface activated bonding (SAB) method using Si intermediate layers to the bonding and debonding of glass substrates. The SAB method has successfully bonded glass substrates at room temperature, and the substrates have been debonded after heating at 450 °C, in which TFTs are fabricated on thin glass substrates for LC display devices. In this study, we conducted the bonding and debonding of Si and glass in order to understand the mechanism in the proposed process. Si substrates are also successfully bonded to glass substrates at room temperature and debonded after heating at 450 °C using the proposed bonding process. By the composition analysis of bonding interfaces, it is clarified that the absorbed water on the glass forms interfacial voids and cause the decrease in bond strength.

  18. Effect of nanoscale surface roughness on the bonding energy of direct-bonded silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, N.; Spearing, S. M.

    2003-11-01

    Direct wafer bonding of silicon wafers is a promising technology for manufacturing three-dimensional complex microelectromechanical systems as well as silicon-on-insulator substrates. Previous work has reported that the bond quality declines with increasing surface roughness, however, this relationship has not been quantified. This article explicitly correlates the bond quality, which is quantified by the apparent bonding energy, and the surface morphology via the bearing ratio, which describes the area of surface lying above a given depth. The apparent bonding energy is considered to be proportional to the real area of contact. The effective area of contact is defined as the area sufficiently close to contribute to the attractive force between the two bonding wafers. Experiments were conducted with silicon wafers whose surfaces were roughened by a buffered oxide etch solution (BOE, HF:NH4F=1:7) and/or a potassium hydroxide solution. The surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. The wafers were direct bonded to polished "monitor" wafers following a standard RCA cleaning and the resulting bonding energy was measured by the crack-opening method. The experimental results revealed a clear correlation between the bonding energy and the bearing ratio. A bearing depth of ˜1.4 nm was found to be appropriate for the characterization of direct-bonded silicon at room temperature, which is consistent with the thickness of the water layer at the interface responsible for the hydrogen bonds that link the mating wafers.

  19. Microtensile bond strength to enamel affected by hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Batu Can; Ozer, Fusun; Cabukusta, Cigdem Sozen; Eren, Meltem M; Koray, Fatma; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of two different self-etching (SE) and etchand- rinse (ER) adhesive systems to enamel affected by hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (HPAI) and analyzed the enamel etching patterns created by the two adhesive systems using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixteen extracted HPAI-affected molars were used for the bond strength tests and 2 molars were examined under SEM for etching patterns. The control groups consisted of 12 healthy third molars for μTBS tests and two molars for SEM. Mesial and distal surfaces of the teeth were slightly ground flat. The adhesive systems and composite resin were applied to the flat enamel surfaces according to the manufacturers' instructions. The tooth slabs containing composite resin material on their mesial and distal surfaces were cut in the mesio-distal direction with a slow-speed diamond saw. The slabs were cut again to obtain square, 1-mm-thick sticks. Finally, each stick was divided into halves and placed in the μTBS tester. Bond strength tests were performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. There was no significant difference between the bond strength values of ER and SE adhesives (p > 0.05). However, significant differences were found between HPAI and control groups (p systems provide similar bond strengths to HPAI-affected enamel surfaces.

  20. Nano-regime Length Scales Extracted from the First Sharp Diffraction Peak in Non-crystalline SiO2 and Related Materials: Device Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper distinguishes between two different scales of medium range order, MRO, in non-crystalline SiO2: (1 the first is ~0.4 to 0.5 nm and is obtained from the position of the first sharp diffraction peak, FSDP, in the X-ray diffraction structure factor, S(Q, and (2 the second is ~1 nm and is calculated from the FSDP full-width-at-half-maximum FWHM. Many-electron calculations yield Si–O third- and O–O fourth-nearest-neighbor bonding distances in the same 0.4–0.5 nm MRO regime. These derive from the availability of empty Si dπ orbitals for back-donation from occupied O pπ orbitals yielding narrow symmetry determined distributions of third neighbor Si–O, and fourth neighbor O–O distances. These are segments of six member rings contributing to connected six-member rings with ~1 nm length scale within the MRO regime. The unique properties of non-crystalline SiO2 are explained by the encapsulation of six-member ring clusters by five- and seven-member rings on average in a compliant hard-soft nano-scaled inhomogeneous network. This network structure minimizes macroscopic strain, reducing intrinsic bonding defects as well as defect precursors. This inhomogeneous CRN is enabling for applications including thermally grown ~1.5 nm SiO2 layers for Si field effect transistor devices to optical components with centimeter dimensions. There are qualitatively similar length scales in nano-crystalline HfO2 and phase separated Hf silicates based on the primitive unit cell, rather than a ring structure. Hf oxide dielectrics have recently been used as replacement dielectrics for a new generation of Si and Si/Ge devices heralding a transition into nano-scale circuits and systems on a Si chip.

  1. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Anil V. Mishra; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  2. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko; Anić-Milošević, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​: A im: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding.

  3. Studies of Hydrogen Bonding Between N, N-Dimethylacetamide and Primary Alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Manjunath

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen bonding between N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMA and alcohols has been studied in carbon tetrachloride solution by an X-band Microwave bench at 936GHz. The dielectric relaxation time (τ of the binary system are obtained by both Higasi's method and Gopalakrishna method. The most likely association complex between alcohol and DMA is 1:1 stoichiometric complex through the hydroxyl group of the alcohol and the carbonyl group of amide. The results show that the interaction between alcohols and amides is 1:1 complex through the free hydroxyl group of the alcohol and the carbonyl group of amide and the alkyl chain-length of both the alcohols and amide plays an important role in the determination of the strength of hydrogen bond (O-H: C=O formed and suggests that the proton donating ability of alcohols is in the order: 1-propanol < 1-butanol < 1-pentanol and the accepting ability of DMA.

  4. Influence of the chain length on the biological behaviour of 131I fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riche, F.; Mathieu, J.P.; Comet, M.; Vidal, M.; Pernin, C.; Marti-Batlle, D.; Busquet, G.; Bardy, A.

    1983-01-01

    Saturated and acetylenic fatty acids labeled with 131 I in ω position, differing by their chain length (C8 to C20) and the number odd or even of their carbon atoms are injected in mice. The evolution of the activity in myocardium, blood, liver and kidney is measured until 10 minutes after injection. The myocardial activity increases with chain length from C8 to C16 then decreases for C18 and C20. The odd or even number of carbon atoms does not influence myocardial activity but in the liver, activity is inferior with the odd fatty acids. The presence of a triple bond accelerates the output of activity from the myocardium and these fatty acids are not well suited for the study of myocardial metabolism [fr

  5. Integration of European Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I investigate the time variation in the integration of EU government bond markets. The integration is measured by the explanatory power of European factor portfolios for the individual bond markets for each year. The integration of the government bond markets is stronger for EMU than non-EMU memb......I investigate the time variation in the integration of EU government bond markets. The integration is measured by the explanatory power of European factor portfolios for the individual bond markets for each year. The integration of the government bond markets is stronger for EMU than non...

  6. Water’s dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henchman, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water’s heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water’s continuous heterogeneity. (paper)

  7. Optimization of armour geometry and bonding techniques for tungsten-armoured high heat flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giniyatulin, R.N.; Komarov, V.L.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Makhankov, A.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Yablokov, N.A.; Zhuk, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Joining of tungsten with copper-based cooling structure and armour geometry optimization are the major aspects in development of the tungsten-armoured plasma facing components (PFC). Fabrication techniques and high heat flux (HHF) tests of tungsten-armoured components have to reflect different PFC designs and acceptable manufacturing cost. The authors present the recent results of tungsten-armoured mock-ups development based on manufacturing and HHF tests. Two aspects were investigated--selection of armour geometry and examination of tungsten-copper bonding techniques. Brazing and casting tungsten-copper bonding techniques were used in small mock-ups. The mock-ups with armour tiles (20x5x10, 10x10x10, 20x20x10, 27x27x10) mm 3 in dimensions were tested by cyclic heat fluxes in the range of (5-20) MW/m 2 , the number of thermal cycles varied from hundreds to several thousands for each mock-up. The results of the tests show the applicability of different geometry and different bonding technique to corresponding heat loading. A medium-scale mock-up 0.6-m in length was manufactured and tested. HHF tests of the medium-scale mock-up have demonstrated the applicability of the applied bonding techniques and armour geometry for full-scale PFC's manufacturing

  8. Substituent Effects on the Hydrogen Bonding between 4-Substituted Phenols and HF, H2O, NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程宇辉; 傅尧; 刘磊; 郭庆祥

    2003-01-01

    Density function theory UB3LYP/6-31+g(d) calculations were performed to study the hydrogen bonds between para-substituted phenols and HF, H2O, or NH3. It revealed that many properties of the non-covalent complexes, such as the interaction energies, donor-acceptor distances, bond lengths and vibration frequencies, showed well-defined substituent effects. Therefore, from the substituent effects not only the mechanism of a certain non-covalent interaction can be better understood, but also the interaction energies and structures of a certain non-covalent complex, which otherwise might be very hard or resource-consuming to estimate, can be easily predicted.

  9. Self-Similar Symmetry Model and Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohide eSonoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the self-similar symmetry (SSS model that describes the hierarchical structure of the universe. The model is based on the concept of self-similarity, which explains the symmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. The approximate length and time scales of the six hierarchies of the universe---grand unification, electroweak unification, the atom, the pulsar, the solar system, and the galactic system---are derived from the SSS model. In addition, the model implies that the electron mass and gravitational constant could vary with the CMB radiation temperature.

  10. Ground state properties of the bond alternating spin-1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Paul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground state properties, dispersion relations and scaling behaviour of spin gap of a bond alternating spin-1/2 anisotropic Heisenberg chain have been studied where the exchange interactions on alternate bonds are ferromagnetic (FM and antiferromagnetic (AFM in two separate cases. The resulting models separately represent nearest neighbour (NN AFM-AFM and AFM-FM bond alternating chains. Ground state energy has been estimated analytically by using both bond operator and Jordan-Wigner representations and numerically by using exact diagonalization. Dispersion relations, spin gap and several ground state orders have been obtained. Dimer order and string orders are found to coexist in the ground state. Spin gap is found to develop as soon as the non-uniformity in alternating bond strength is introduced in the AFM-AFM chain which further remains non-zero for the AFM-FM chain. This spin gap along with the string orders attribute to the Haldane phase. The Haldane phase is found to exist in most of the anisotropic region similar to the isotropic point.

  11. Crystal structure details of La- and Bi-substituted hydroxyapatites: Evidence for LaO+ and BiO+ with a very short metal–oxygen bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazin, Pavel E.; Pogosova, Mariam A.; Trusov, Lev A.; Kolesnik, Irina V.; Magdysyuk, Oxana V.; Dinnebier, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of substituted apatites with general formula Ca 10−x M x (PO 4 ) 6 (OH 1−δ ) 2−x O x , where M=La, Bi, 0≤x<2, were refined using high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction patterns. Individual positions for Ca 2+ and M 3+ -ions localized near Ca2-site were determined. The M 3+ -ion was found shifted toward the hexagonal channel center with respect to the Ca 2+ -ion, forming very short bond with the intrachannel O 2− , while leaving considerably longer distances to other oxygen atoms, which suggested the existence of a MO + ion. Distinct bands of stretching M–O modes were observed in the Raman and FT-IR spectra of the compounds. The bond lengths for BiO + and LaO + were estimated to be 2.05(1) and 2.09(1) Å correspondingly. The latter was almost 0.3 Å lower than the shortest La–O bond in La 2 O 3 . The realization of such a strong lanthanide–oxygen bond in a crystal lattice could provide a very high axial ligand field and might be implemented to develop high-energy-barrier single-molecule magnets as well as to tune properties of lanthanide-based luminophores. - Graphical abstract: A fragment of the La-for-Ca substituted apatite crystal structure focusing on the La–O bond. - Highlights: • Individual positions in the apatite crystal lattice for a doping atom (La, Bi) and Ca. • The doping atom shifts toward the center of the hexagonal channel. • BiO + and LaO + with estimated short bond lengths of 2.05 and 2.09 Å respectively.

  12. Crystal structure of full-length Zika virus NS5 protein reveals a conformation similar to Japanese encephalitis virus NS5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Anup K.; Cyr, Matthew; Longenecker, Kenton; Tripathi, Rakesh; Sun, Chaohong; Kempf, Dale J. (AbbVie)

    2017-02-21

    The rapid spread of the recentZika virus(ZIKV) epidemic across various countries in the American continent poses a major health hazard for the unborn fetuses of pregnant women. To date, there is no effective medical intervention. The nonstructural protein 5 ofZika virus(ZIKV-NS5) is critical for ZIKV replication through the 5'-RNA capping and RNA polymerase activities present in its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, respectively. The crystal structure of the full-length ZIKV-NS5 protein has been determined at 3.05 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space groupP21212 and containing two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure is similar to that reported for the NS5 protein fromJapanese encephalitis virusand suggests opportunities for structure-based drug design targeting either its MTase or RdRp domain.

  13. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, I; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing shows that the bond strength is large enough for most applications of fluidic interconnects. The bond strength for 525 µm thick silicon, with glass tubes having an outer diameter of 6 mm and with a wall thickness of 2 mm, is more than 60 bars after annealing at a temperature of 800 °C

  14. Telomere length in normal and neoplastic canine tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadile, Casey D; Kitchell, Barbara E; Newman, Rebecca G; Biller, Barbara J; Hetler, Elizabeth R

    2007-12-01

    To determine the mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length in normal and neoplastic canine tissues. 57 solid-tissue tumor specimens collected from client-owned dogs, 40 samples of normal tissue collected from 12 clinically normal dogs, and blood samples collected from 4 healthy blood donor dogs. Tumor specimens were collected from client-owned dogs during diagnostic or therapeutic procedures at the University of Illinois Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, whereas 40 normal tissue samples were collected from 12 control dogs. Telomere restriction fragment length was determined by use of an assay kit. A histologic diagnosis was provided for each tumor by personnel at the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Illinois. Mean of the mean TRF length for 44 normal samples was 19.0 kilobases (kb; range, 15.4 to 21.4 kb), and the mean of the mean TRF length for 57 malignant tumors was 19.0 kb (range, 12.9 to 23.5 kb). Although the mean of the mean TRF length for tumors and normal tissues was identical, tumor samples had more variability in TRF length. Telomerase, which represents the main mechanism by which cancer cells achieve immortality, is an attractive therapeutic target. The ability to measure telomere length is crucial to monitoring the efficacy of telomerase inhibition. In contrast to many other mammalian species, the length of canine telomeres and the rate of telomeric DNA loss are similar to those reported in humans, making dogs a compelling choice for use in the study of human anti-telomerase strategies.

  15. Cement bond evaluation method in horizontal wells using segmented bond tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruolong; He, Li

    2018-06-01

    Most of the existing cement evaluation technologies suffer from tool eccentralization due to gravity in highly deviated wells and horizontal wells. This paper proposes a correction method to lessen the effects of tool eccentralization on evaluation results of cement bond using segmented bond tool, which has an omnidirectional sonic transmitter and eight segmented receivers evenly arranged around the tool 2 ft from the transmitter. Using 3-D finite difference parallel numerical simulation method, we investigate the logging responses of centred and eccentred segmented bond tool in a variety of bond conditions. From the numerical results, we find that the tool eccentricity and channel azimuth can be estimated from measured sector amplitude. The average of the sector amplitude when the tool is eccentred can be corrected to the one when the tool is centred. Then the corrected amplitude will be used to calculate the channel size. The proposed method is applied to both synthetic and field data. For synthetic data, it turns out that this method can estimate the tool eccentricity with small error and the bond map is improved after correction. For field data, the tool eccentricity has a good agreement with the measured well deviation angle. Though this method still suffers from the low accuracy of calculating channel azimuth, the credibility of corrected bond map is improved especially in horizontal wells. It gives us a choice to evaluate the bond condition for horizontal wells using existing logging tool. The numerical results in this paper can provide aids for understanding measurements of segmented tool in both vertical and horizontal wells.

  16. Composite Bonding to Stainless Steel Crowns Using a New Universal Bonding and Single-Bottle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Hattan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80 stainless steel crowns (SSCs were divided into four groups (20 each. Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group, Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany, and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength ( to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  17. Interstellar hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the first extensive study of the existence and effects of interstellar hydrogen bonding. The reactions that occur on the surface of the interstellar dust grains are the dominant processes by which interstellar molecules are formed. Water molecules constitute about 70% of the interstellar ice. These water molecules serve as the platform for hydrogen bonding. High level quantum chemical simulations for the hydrogen bond interaction between 20 interstellar molecules (known and possible) and water are carried out using different ab-intio methods. It is evident that if the formation of these species is mainly governed by the ice phase reactions, there is a direct correlation between the binding energies of these complexes and the gas phase abundances of these interstellar molecules. Interstellar hydrogen bonding may cause lower gas abundance of the complex organic molecules (COMs) at the low temperature. From these results, ketenes whose less stable isomers that are more strongly bonded to the surface of the interstellar dust grains have been observed are proposed as suitable candidates for astronomical observations.

  18. Locking a molecular bond: A case study of CsI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szakács, Tamás; Amstrup, Bjarne; Gross, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This paper treats the problem of locking a molecular bond at a length other than the equilibrium distance, with the help of optical electric fields. Locking conditions for single-color fields are examined, and slowly decaying locked wave functions are sought. These were functions are then used...... as target functions in an optimal control procedure. The resultant solution is an optimal field that creates a wave function as close as possible to the target function, followed by the application of a locking single-color field that can keep a large part of this wave function at the given position...

  19. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature distorting the internal bonding state. A problem arises when studying hydrogen bonding in wood since matched wood specimens of the same species will have very different internal bonding states. Thus, possible changes in the bonding state due to some applied treatment such as conditioning...... maintaining 100 % moisture content of the wood. The hypothesis was that this would enable a fast stress relaxation as a result of reorganization of bonds, since moisture plasticizes the material and temperature promotes faster kinetics. Hereby, all past bond distortions caused by various moisture, temperature...

  20. Noncovalent Halogen Bonding as a Mechanism for Gas-Phase Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegeberg, Christina; Donald, William A.; McKenzie, Christine

    2017-01-01

    in the crystalline phases of PhIO2 and its derivatives serve as models for the structures of larger gas-phase clusters, and calculations on simple model gas-phase dimer and trimer clusters result in similar motifs. This is the first account of halogen bonding playing an extensive role in gas-phase associations....

  1. Microstructure and properties of hot roll bonding layer of dissimilar metals. 2. Bonding interface microstructure of Zr/stainless steel by hot roll bonding and its controlling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Taka, Takao; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi.

    1996-01-01

    The hot roll bonding of zirconium and stainless steel inserted with tantalium was investigated using the newly developed rolling mill. The effect of hot rolling temperatures of zirconium/stainless steel joints on bonding interface structure was evaluated. Intermetallic compound layer containing cracks was observed at the bonding interface between stainless steel and tantalium when the rolling temperature was above 1373K. The hardness of the bonding layer of zirconium and tantalium bonded above 1273K was higher than tantalium or zirconium base metal in spite of absence of intermetallic compound. The growth of reaction layer at the stainless steel and tantalium interface and at the tantalium and zirconium interface was conforming a parabolic low when that was isothermally heated after hot roll bonding, and the growth rate was almost same as that of static diffusion bonding without using hot roll bonding process. It is estimated that the strain caused by hot roll bonding gives no effect on the growth of reaction layer. It was confirmed that the dissimilar joint of zirconium and stainless steel with insert of tantalium having the sound bonding interface were obtained at the suitable bonding temperature of 1173K by the usage of the newly developed hot roll bonding process. (author)

  2. Effect of heating palladium-silver alloys on ceramic bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-yin; Li, Rui-nan; Chang, Shao-hai; Zhuang, Pei-lin; Liao, Juan-kun; Ye, Xiu-hua; Ye, Jian-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effects of different heat treatments on the internal oxidation and metal-ceramic bond in Pd-Ag alloys with different trace elements require further documentation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether heat treatment affects the metal-ceramic bond strength of 2 Pd-Ag alloys containing different trace elements. Thirteen cast specimens (25×3×0.5 mm) from each of 2 Pd-Ag alloy groups (W-1 and Argelite 61+3) were allocated to heat treatments before porcelain application: heating under reduced atmospheric pressure of 0.0014 MPa and 0.0026 MPa and heating under normal atmospheric pressure. Bond strengths were evaluated using a 3-point bending test according to ISO9693. Results were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). Visual observation was used to determine the failure types of the fractured specimens. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study morphologies, elemental compositions, and distributions in the specimens. The W-1 group had a mean bond strength significantly higher than that of Argelite 61+3 (PHeating under reduced atmospheric pressures of 0.0014 MPa and 0.0026 MPa resulted in similar bond strengths (P=.331), and both pressures had significantly higher bond strengths than that of heating under normal atmospheric pressure (P=.002, PHeating under different air pressures resulted in Pd-Ag alloys that contained either Sn or In and Ga, with various degrees of internal oxidation and different quantities of metallic nodules. Heating under reduced atmospheric pressure effectively improved the bond strength of the ceramic-to-Pd-Ag alloys. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  4. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; El-Shall, M. Samy, E-mail: mselshal@vcu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-07

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} clusters, respectively, with n = 1–4. For comparison, the binding of 1–4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}(HCN){sub n} has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH{sup +}⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH{sup +}⋯NCH··NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11–12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CH{sup δ+} centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  5. Structure and weak hydrogen bonds in liquid acetaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordeiro Maria A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to investigate the structure and hydrogen bonds formation in liquid acetaldehyde. An all atom model for the acetaldehyde have been optimized in the present work. Theoretical values obtained for heat of vaporisation and density of the liquid are in good agreement with experimental data. Graphics of radial distribution function indicate a well structured liquid compared to other similar dipolar organic liquids. Molecular mechanics minimization in gas phase leads to a trimer of very stable structure. The geometry of this complex is in very good agreement with the rdf. The shortest site-site correlation is between oxygen and the carbonyl hydrogen, suggesting that this correlation play a important role in the liquid structure and properties. The OxxxH average distance and the C-HxxxO angle obtained are characteristic of weak hydrogen bonds.

  6. Relationship between thin-film bond strength as measured by a scratch test, and indentation hardness for bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Shusuke; Rawls, H Ralph; Hotta, Masato

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate thin-film bond strength between a bonding agent and human dentin, using a scratch test, and the characteristics and accuracy of measurement. One-step bonding agents (BeautiBond; Bond Force; Adper Easy Bond; Clearfil tri-S Bond) and two-step bonding agents (Cleafil SE Bond; FL-Bond II) were investigated in this study. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared for extracted human molars. The dentin surfaces were ground and bonding agents were applied and light cured. The thin-film bond strength test of the specimens was evaluated by the critical load at which the coated bonding agent failed and dentin appeared. The scratch mark sections were then observed under a scanning electron microscope. Indentation hardness was evaluated by the variation in depth under an applied load of 10gf. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA with the Scheffé's post hoc multiple comparison test (pstrength and indentation hardness were analyzed using analysis of correlation and covariance. The thin-film bond strength of two-step bonding agents were found to be significantly higher than that of one-step bonding agents with small standard deviations. Scratch marks consistently showed adhesive failure in the vicinity of the bonding agent/dentin interface. The indentation hardness showed a trend that two-step bonding agents have greater hardness than one-step bonding agents. A moderately significant correlation (r(2)=0.31) was found between thin-film bond strength and indentation hardness. Thin-film bond strength test is a valid and reliable means of evaluating bond strength in the vicinity of the adhesive interface and is more accurate than other methods currently in use. Further, the thin-film bond strength is influenced by the hardness of the cued bonding agent. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets bonded with three light- cured adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Minaei Basharik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The bonding process of the brackets to enamel has been a critical issue in orthodontic research. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of 3 light-cured adhesives (transbond XT, Z250, light bond. Materials &Methods: In this study sixty extracted human premolars were collected and randomly divided into 3 test groups. All teeth were etched by 37% phosphoric acid. In first group brackets were bonded by Transbond XT adhesive, in group two brackets were bonded by Light bond adhesive and in third group were bonded by filtek Z250 composite. All of them were cured with Ortholux xt for 40 seconds.24 hours after thermocycling, Shear Bond Strength (SBS values of these brackets were recorded using a Universal Testing Machine. Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores were determined after the failure of the brackets, using Stereo Microscope the data were analyzed using ANOVA and Chi-square tests. Results: Mean shear bond strength of Transbond XT, light bond and Z250 were 28.9±2.25 MPa, 25.06±1.98 MPa and 26.8±2.57 MPa, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the SBS among the groups and a clinically acceptable SBS was found for the three adhesives. ARI scores were not significantly different between the various groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that the Z250 can be used as light bond and transbond xt to bond orthodontic brackets and ARI and SBS scores were not significantly different.

  8. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of three resin systems for a Base Metal Alloy bonded to

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jlali H

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (F.P.D can be used for conservative treatment of partially edentulous"npatients. There are numerous studies regarding the strength of resin composite bond to base meta! alloys. Shear bond"nstrength of three resin systems were invistigated. In this study these systems consisted of: Panavia Ex, Mirage FLC and"nMarathon V. Thirty base metal specimens were prepared from rexillium III alloy and divided into three groups. Then each"ngroup was bonded to enamel of human extracted molar teeth with these systems. All of specimens were stored in water at"n37ac for 48 hours. A shear force was applied to each specimen by the instron universal testing machine. A statistical"nevaluation of the data using one-way analysis of variance showed that there was highly significant difference (P<0.01"nbetween the bond strengths of these three groups."nThe base metal specimens bonded with panavia Ex luting agent, exhibited the highest mean bond strength. Shear bond"nstrength of the specimens bonded to enamel with Mirage F1C showed lower bond strenght than panavia EX. However, the"nlowest bond strength was obtained by the specimens bonded with Marathon V.

  9. In vitro marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restorations bonded to dentin cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiotis, Christos; Tzoutzas, John; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restoratives bonded to dentin in a cylindrical cavity model. The buccal enamel of 64 human premolars was removed and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.3 mm in depth were prepared on each dentin surface. The cavities were divided into 8 groups of 8 cavities each and restored according to the manufacturers' instructions with the following adhesive/composite systems: Bond 1/Alert, Stae/Glacier, OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable, One-Step/Pyramid, Solidbond/Solitaire, Prime&Bond NT/Surefil, One Coat Bond/Synergy, and Scotchbond 1/Z250. The composite surfaces were pressed against mylar strips, covered with cover slips, and photopolymerized in a single increment for 40 s. The restorations were polished with wet SiC papers of 320 to 1000 grit size to expose dentin margins. The marginal adaptation was evaluated immediately after photopolymerization and again after 1 week of storage in water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Evaluation was performed under a metallographic microscope at 200X magnification by recording the frequency of gap-free restorations (GF), the percentage length of the debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (DM), the width of the maximum marginal gap (MG), and the marginal index (MI = MG x DM / 100). The results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U-test at alpha = 0.05. No incidence of gaps was found in 62.5% of One Coat Bond/Synergy and 37.5% of OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable restorations. All the other restorative systems exhibited restorations with gaps. One Coat Bond/Synergy, Scotchbond 1/Z250, and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable were the groups with the lowest DM values, while Stae/Glacier showed the highest DM values. One Coat Bond/Synergy and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable revealed the lowest MI values and Stae/Glacier the highest. No statistically significant differences were recorded between

  10. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests - a comparative test between light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P. C. G.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased.

  11. Neurobiology of pair bonding in fishes; convergence of neural mechanisms across distant vertebrate lineages

    KAUST Repository

    Nowicki, Jessica; Pratchett, Morgan; Walker, Stefan; Coker, Darren James; O'Connell, Lauren A.

    2017-01-01

    Pair bonding has independently evolved numerous times among vertebrates. The governing neural mechanisms of pair bonding have only been studied in depth in the mammalian model species, the prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster. In this species, oxytocin (OT), arginine vasopressin (AVP), dopamine (DA), and opioid (OP) systems play key roles in signaling in the formation and maintenance of pair bonding by targeting specific social and reward-mediating brain regions. By contrast, the neural basis of pair bonding is poorly studied in other vertebrates, and especially those of early origins, limiting our understanding of the evolutionary history of pair bonding regulatory mechanisms. We compared receptor gene expression between pair bonded and solitary individuals across eight socio-functional brain regions. We found that in females, ITR and V1aR receptor expression varied in the lateral septum-like region (the Vv/Vl), while in both sexes D1R, D2R, and MOR expression varied within the mesolimbic reward system, including a striatum-like region (the Vc); mirroring sites of action in M. ochrogaster. This study provides novel insights into the neurobiology of teleost pair bonding. It also reveals high convergence in the neurochemical mechanisms governing pair bonding across actinopterygians and sarcopterygians, by repeatedly co-opting and similarly assembling deep neurochemical and neuroanatomical homologies that originated in ancestral osteithes.

  12. Neurobiology of pair bonding in fishes; convergence of neural mechanisms across distant vertebrate lineages

    KAUST Repository

    Nowicki, Jessica

    2017-11-14

    Pair bonding has independently evolved numerous times among vertebrates. The governing neural mechanisms of pair bonding have only been studied in depth in the mammalian model species, the prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster. In this species, oxytocin (OT), arginine vasopressin (AVP), dopamine (DA), and opioid (OP) systems play key roles in signaling in the formation and maintenance of pair bonding by targeting specific social and reward-mediating brain regions. By contrast, the neural basis of pair bonding is poorly studied in other vertebrates, and especially those of early origins, limiting our understanding of the evolutionary history of pair bonding regulatory mechanisms. We compared receptor gene expression between pair bonded and solitary individuals across eight socio-functional brain regions. We found that in females, ITR and V1aR receptor expression varied in the lateral septum-like region (the Vv/Vl), while in both sexes D1R, D2R, and MOR expression varied within the mesolimbic reward system, including a striatum-like region (the Vc); mirroring sites of action in M. ochrogaster. This study provides novel insights into the neurobiology of teleost pair bonding. It also reveals high convergence in the neurochemical mechanisms governing pair bonding across actinopterygians and sarcopterygians, by repeatedly co-opting and similarly assembling deep neurochemical and neuroanatomical homologies that originated in ancestral osteithes.

  13. Some transition metal complexes derived from mono- and di-ethynyl perfluorobenzenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitt, David J; Bruce, Michael I; Gaudio, Maryka; Zaitseva, Natasha N; Skelton, Brian W; White, Allan H; Le Guennic, Boris; Halet, Jean-François; Fox, Mark A; Roberts, Rachel L; Hartl, Frantisek; Low, Paul J

    2008-12-21

    Transition metal alkynyl complexes containing perfluoroaryl groups have been prepared directly from trimethylsilyl-protected mono- and di-ethynyl perfluoroarenes by simple desilylation/metallation reaction sequences. Reactions between Me(3)SiC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5) and RuCl(dppe)Cp' [Cp' = Cp, Cp*] in the presence of KF in MeOH give the monoruthenium complexes Ru(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5))(dppe)Cp' [Cp' = Cp (); Cp* ()], which are related to the known compound Ru(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5))(PPh(3))(2)Cp (). Treatment of Me(3)SiC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5) with Pt(2)(mu-dppm)(2)Cl(2) in the presence of NaOMe in MeOH gave the bis(alkynyl) complex Pt(2)(mu-dppm)(2)(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5))(2) (). The Pd(0)/Cu(i)-catalysed reactions between Au(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5))(PPh(3)) and Mo( identical withCBr)(CO)(2)Tp* [Tp* = hydridotris(3.5-dimethylpyrazoyl)borate], Co(3)(mu(3)-CBr)(mu-dppm)(CO)(7) or IC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CFc [Fc = (eta(5)-C(5)H(4))FeCp] afford Mo( identical withCC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5))(CO)(2)Tp* (), Co(3)(mu(3)-CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5))(mu-dppm)(CO)(7) () and FcC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CC(6)F(5) (), respectively. The diruthenium complexes 1,4-{Cp'(PP)RuC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C}(2)C(6)F(4) [(PP)Cp' = (PPh(3))(2)Cp (); (dppe)Cp (); (dppe)Cp* ()] are prepared from 1,4-(Me(3)SiC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C)(2)C(6)F(4) in a manner similar to that described for the monoruthenium complexes -. The non-fluorinated complexes 1,4-{Cp'(PP)RuC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C}(2)C(6)H(4) [(PP)Cp' = (PPh(3))(2)Cp (); (dppe)Cp (); (dppe)Cp* ()], prepared for comparison, are obtained from 1,4-(Me(3)SiC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C)(2)C(6)H(4). Spectro-electrochemical studies of the ruthenium aryl and arylene alkynyl complexes - and -, together with DFT-based computational

  14. Influence of blood contamination during multimode adhesive application on the microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukyilmaz, E; Celik, E U; Akcay, M; Yasa, B

    2017-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups comprising 25 specimens each: two multimode adhesives [Single Bond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal (ABU)] and a conventional one-step self-etch adhesive [Clearfil S3 Bond Plus (CSBP)]. Each group was subdivided as follows: (1) uncontaminated (control): bonding application/light curing as a positive control; (2) contamination-1 (cont-1): bonding application/light curing/blood contamination/dry as a negative control; (3) contamination-2 (cont-2): bonding application/light curing/blood contamination/rinse/dry; (4) contamination-3 (cont-3): bonding application/blood contamination/dry/bonding re-application/light curing; and (5) contamination-4 (cont-4): bonding application/blood contamination/rinse/dry/bonding re-application/light curing. Dentin specimens were prepared for μTBS testing after the composite resin application. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). μTBS values were similar in cont-3 groups, and ABU/cont-4 and corresponding control groups, but were significantly lower in the other groups than in their control groups (P groups showed the lowest μTBS values (P blood contaminants and reapplying the adhesive may regain the dentin adhesion when contamination occurs before light curing. Alternatively, rinsing and drying contaminants followed by adhesive re-application may be effective depending on adhesive type.

  15. Unique Bond Breaking in Crystalline Phase Change Materials and the Quest for Metavalent Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Mio, Antonio M; Keutgen, Jens; Küpers, Michael; Yu, Yuan; Cho, Ju-Young; Dronskowski, Richard; Wuttig, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Laser-assisted field evaporation is studied in a large number of compounds, including amorphous and crystalline phase change materials employing atom probe tomography. This study reveals significant differences in field evaporation between amorphous and crystalline phase change materials. High probabilities for multiple events with more than a single ion detected per laser pulse are only found for crystalline phase change materials. The specifics of this unusual field evaporation are unlike any other mechanism shown previously to lead to high probabilities of multiple events. On the contrary, amorphous phase change materials as well as other covalently bonded compounds and metals possess much lower probabilities for multiple events. Hence, laser-assisted field evaporation in amorphous and crystalline phase change materials reveals striking differences in bond rupture. This is indicative for pronounced differences in bonding. These findings imply that the bonding mechanism in crystalline phase change materials differs substantially from conventional bonding mechanisms such as metallic, ionic, and covalent bonding. Instead, the data reported here confirm a recently developed conjecture, namely that metavalent bonding is a novel bonding mechanism besides those mentioned previously. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Crystal structure, vibrational spectra and DFT studies of hydrogen bonded 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, V.; Thirunarayanan, S.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2017-10-01

    The new hydrogen bonded molecular complex 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate (THS) is prepared by the reaction of 1H-1,2,4-triazole and selenic acid. This complex is stabilised by N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attractive forces between 1H and 1,2,4-triazolium cations and hydrogen selenate anions. The XRD studies revealed that intermolecular proton transfer occur from selenic acid to 1H-1,2,4-triazole molecule, results in the formation of 1,2,4-triazolium hydrogenselenate which contains 1,2,4-triazolium cations and hydrogenselenate anions. The molecular structure of THS crystal has also been optimised by using Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/6-311++G** methods in order to find the whole characteristics of the molecular complex. The theoretical structural parameters such as bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle determined by DFT methods are well agreed with the XRD parameters. The atomic charges and thermodynamic properties are also calculated and analysed. The energies of frontier molecular orbitals HOMO, LUMO, HOMO-1, LUMO+1 and LUMO-HUMO energy gap are calculated to understand the kinetic stability and chemical reactivity of the molecular complex. The natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) has been performed in order to study the intramolecular bonding interactions and delocalisation of electrons. These intra molecular charge transfer may induce biological activities such as antimicrobials, antiinflammatory, antifungal etc. The complete vibrational assignments of THS have been performed by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra.

  17. Phenylacetylene and H bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... all resembling H bonds. Non-linear H bonds due to secondary interactions. C-H stretching frequency shows blue shift. Heavy atom distances are longer than the sum of van der Waals radii. Formed a task group through IUPAC to come up with a modern definition of H bond. 15 international experts including Desiraju.

  18. Bonding performance of universal adhesives to er,cr:YSGG laser-irradiated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Muhammet Kerim; Erdemir, Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Universal adhesives have been recently introduced for use as self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesives depending on the dental substrate and clinical condition. However, their bonding effectiveness to laser-irradiated enamel is still not well-known. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of universal adhesives (Single Bond Universal; Nova Compo-B Plus) applied to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-irradiated enamel with SBS of the same adhesives applied in self-etch and acid-etching modes, respectively. Crown segments of sixty bovine incisors were embedded into standardized acrylic blocks. Flattened enamel surfaces were prepared. Specimens were divided into six groups according to universal adhesives and application modes randomly (n = 10), as follows: Single Bond Universal/acid-etching mode; Nova Compo-B Plus/acid-etching mode; Single Bond Universal/self-etching mode; Nova Compo-B Plus/self-etching mode; and Single Bond Universal/Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-etching mode; Nova Compo-B Plus/Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-etching mode. After surface treatments, universal adhesives were applied onto surfaces. SBS was determined after storage in water for 24 h using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min -1 . Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Data was analyzed using two-way of analyses of variances (ANOVA) (p = 0.05). Two-way ANOVA revealed that adhesive had no effect on SBS (p = 0.88), but application mode significantly influenced SBS (p = 0.00). Acid-etching significantly increased SBS, whereas there are no significant differences between self-etch mode and laser-etching for both adhesives. The bond strength of universal adhesives may depend on application mode. Acid etching may significantly increase bond strength, while laser etching may provide similar bond strength when compared to self-etch mode. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  20. The small FOXP1 isoform predominantly expressed in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and full-length FOXP1 exert similar oncogenic and transcriptional activity in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keimpema, Martine; Grüneberg, Leonie J; Schilder-Tol, Esther J M; Oud, Monique E C M; Beuling, Esther A; Hensbergen, Paul J; de Jong, Johann; Pals, Steven T; Spaargaren, Marcel

    2017-03-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 is generally regarded as an oncogene in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Previous studies have suggested that a small isoform of FOXP1 rather than full-length FOXP1, may possess this oncogenic activity. Corroborating those studies, we herein show that activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells predominantly express a small FOXP1 isoform, and that the 5'-end of the Foxp1 gene is a common insertion site in murine lymphomas in leukemia virus- and transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis screens. By combined mass spectrometry, (quantative) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction/sequencing, and small interfering ribonucleic acid-mediated gene silencing, we determined that the small FOXP1 isoform predominantly expressed in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma lacks the N-terminal 100 amino acids of full-length FOXP1. Aberrant overexpression of this FOXP1 isoform (ΔN100) in primary human B cells revealed its oncogenic capacity; it repressed apoptosis and plasma cell differentiation. However, no difference in potency was found between this small FOXP1 isoform and full-length FOXP1. Furthermore, overexpression of full-length FOXP1 or this small FOXP1 isoform in primary B cells and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines resulted in similar gene regulation. Taken together, our data indicate that this small FOXP1 isoform and full-length FOXP1 have comparable oncogenic and transcriptional activity in human B cells, suggesting that aberrant expression or overexpression of FOXP1, irrespective of the specific isoform, contributes to lymphomagenesis. These novel insights further enhance the value of FOXP1 for the diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. The accuracy of molecular bond lengths computed by multireference electronic structure methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, Ron; Kedziora, Gary S.; Lischka, Hans; Shavitt, Isaiah; Mueller, Thomas; Szalay, Peter G.; Kallay, Mihaly; Seth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We compare experimental R e values with computed R e values for 20 molecules using three multireference electronic structure methods, MCSCF, MR-SDCI, and MR-AQCC. Three correlation-consistent orbital basis sets are used, along with complete basis set extrapolations, for all of the molecules. These data complement those computed previously with single-reference methods. Several trends are observed. The SCF R e values tend to be shorter than the experimental values, and the MCSCF values tend to be longer than the experimental values. We attribute these trends to the ionic contamination of the SCF wave function and to the corresponding systematic distortion of the potential energy curve. For the individual bonds, the MR-SDCI R e values tend to be shorter than the MR-AQCC values, which in turn tend to be shorter than the MCSCF values. Compared to the previous single-reference results, the MCSCF values are roughly comparable to the MP4 and CCSD methods, which are more accurate than might be expected due to the fact that these MCSCF wave functions include no extra-valence electron correlation effects. This suggests that static valence correlation effects, such as near-degeneracies and the ability to dissociate correctly to neutral fragments, play an important role in determining the shape of the potential energy surface, even near equilibrium structures. The MR-SDCI and MR-AQCC methods predict R e values with an accuracy comparable to, or better than, the best single-reference methods (MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)), despite the fact that triple and higher excitations into the extra-valence orbital space are included in the single-reference methods but are absent in the multireference wave functions. The computed R e values using the multireference methods tend to be smooth and monotonic with basis set improvement. The molecular structures are optimized using analytic energy gradients, and the timings for these calculations show the practical advantage of using variational wave

  2. The accuracy of molecular bond lengths computed by multireference electronic structure methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, Ron [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: shepard@tcg.anl.gov; Kedziora, Gary S. [High Performance Technologies Inc., 2435 5th Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States); Lischka, Hans [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Shavitt, Isaiah [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mueller, Thomas [Juelich Supercomputer Centre, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Szalay, Peter G. [Laboratory for Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Kallay, Mihaly [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, P.O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Seth, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive, N.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2008-06-16

    We compare experimental R{sub e} values with computed R{sub e} values for 20 molecules using three multireference electronic structure methods, MCSCF, MR-SDCI, and MR-AQCC. Three correlation-consistent orbital basis sets are used, along with complete basis set extrapolations, for all of the molecules. These data complement those computed previously with single-reference methods. Several trends are observed. The SCF R{sub e} values tend to be shorter than the experimental values, and the MCSCF values tend to be longer than the experimental values. We attribute these trends to the ionic contamination of the SCF wave function and to the corresponding systematic distortion of the potential energy curve. For the individual bonds, the MR-SDCI R{sub e} values tend to be shorter than the MR-AQCC values, which in turn tend to be shorter than the MCSCF values. Compared to the previous single-reference results, the MCSCF values are roughly comparable to the MP4 and CCSD methods, which are more accurate than might be expected due to the fact that these MCSCF wave functions include no extra-valence electron correlation effects. This suggests that static valence correlation effects, such as near-degeneracies and the ability to dissociate correctly to neutral fragments, play an important role in determining the shape of the potential energy surface, even near equilibrium structures. The MR-SDCI and MR-AQCC methods predict R{sub e} values with an accuracy comparable to, or better than, the best single-reference methods (MP4, CCSD, and CCSD(T)), despite the fact that triple and higher excitations into the extra-valence orbital space are included in the single-reference methods but are absent in the multireference wave functions. The computed R{sub e} values using the multireference methods tend to be smooth and monotonic with basis set improvement. The molecular structures are optimized using analytic energy gradients, and the timings for these calculations show the practical

  3. Effect of confinement on bond strength of hot-dip galvanized lap splices in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhran, Mazen

    2004-01-01

    Galvanizing the reinforcing steel is one of the methods used to protect bars against corrosion. Galvanizing is a hot dip process where the reinforcing bars are immersed in an aqueous pre flux solution of zinc ammonium chloride at a controlled temperature between 840 and 850 degrees F. In 2001, a research program was started at AUB to evaluate experimentally the effect of hot dip galvanizing on the bond capacity of tension lap splices anchored in full-scale beam specimens designed to fail in bond splitting mode. The test results indicated that the use of galvanized bars had a negligible effect on bond strength of reinforcement in normal strength. However, galvanizing caused an average of 20 percent decrease in bond strength of reinforcement in high strength concrete. The primary objective of research reported in this thesis, is the need to find a solution to eliminate the bond reduction of galvanized bars in high strength concrete. It is significant to evaluate the positive effect of the addition of transverse reinforcement in the splice region. The hypothesis to be tested is that such transverse reinforcement will insure uniform bond stress distribution over the entire splice region, thus mobilizing all bar lugs along the splice in the stress transfer mechanism between the bar and the surrounding concrete. Such mechanism might reduce the significant decrease in bond strength in high strength concrete due to galvanizing. To achieve this objective, eighteen full-scale beam specimens were tested in positive bending. Each beam was reinforced with bars spliced in a constant moment region at midspam. The splice length was chosen in such a way that the beams failed in bond splitting of the concrete cover in the splice region. The main variables were type of coating (black or galvanized bars), bar size (20, 25 and 32 mm), and amount of transverse reinforcement in the splice region (0, 2 or 4 stirrups). The test results indicated that confinement did not have a significant

  4. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Eshghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives.Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12. Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05. Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation.No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987. There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1. Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918. However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion.Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives.

  5. Effect of Bioactive Glass air Abrasion on Shear Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Resins to Decalcified Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Alireza; Khoroushi, Maryam; Rezvani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Bioactive glass air abrasion is a conservative technique to remove initial decalcified tissue and caries. This study examined the shear bond strength of composite resin to sound and decalcified enamel air-abraded by bioactive glass (BAG) or alumina using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight permanent molars were root-amputated and sectioned mesiodistally. The obtained 96 specimens were mounted in acrylic resin; the buccal and lingual surfaces remained exposed. A demineralizing solution was used to decalcify half the specimens. Both sound and decalcified specimens were divided into two groups of alumina and bioactive glass air abrasion. In each group, the specimens were subdivided into two subgroups of Clearfil SE Bond or OptiBond FL adhesives (n=12). Composite resin cylinders were bonded on enamel surfaces cured and underwent thermocycling. The specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and three-way ANOVA (α=0.05). Similar to the experimental groups, the enamel surface of one specimen underwent SEM evaluation. Results: No significant differences were observed in composite resin bond strength subsequent to alumina or bioactive glass air abrasion preparation techniques (P=0.987). There were no statistically significant differences between the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive groups (P=1). Also, decalcified or intact enamel groups had no significant difference (P=0.918). However, SEM analysis showed much less enamel irregularities with BAG air abrasion compared to alumina air abrasion. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, preparation of both intact and decalcified enamel surfaces with bioactive glass air abrasion results in similar bond strength of composite resin in comparison with alumina air abrasion using etch-&-rinse or self-etch adhesives. PMID:25628694

  6. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  7. Effectiveness of immediate bonding of etch-and-rinse adhesives to simplified ethanol-saturated dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Afonso Guimarães

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immediate bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to demineralized dentin saturated with either water or absolute ethanol. The research hypothesis was that there would be no difference in bond strength to dentin between water or ethanol wet-bonding techniques. The medium dentin of 20 third molars was exposed (n = 5. The dentin surface was then acid-etched, left moist and randomly assigned to be saturated via either water wet-bonding (WBT or absolute ethanol wet-bonding (EBT. The specimens were then treated with one of the following etch-and-rinse adhesive systems: a 3-step, water-based system (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose, or SBMP or a 2-step, ethanol/water-based system (Adper Single Bond 2, or SB. Resin composite build-ups were then incrementally constructed. After water storage for 24 h at 37°C, the tensile strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 5%. The failure modes were verified using a stereomicroscope (40'. For both adhesives, no significant difference in bond strength was observed between WBT and EBT (p > 0.05. The highest bond strength was observed for SB, regardless of the bonding technique (p < 0.05. No significant interaction between adhesives and bonding techniques was noticed (p = 0.597. There was a predominance of adhesive failures for all tested groups. The EBT and WBT displayed similar immediate bond strength means for both adhesives. The SB adhesive exhibited higher means for all conditions tested. Further investigations are needed to evaluate long-term bonding to dentin mediated by commercial etch-and-rinse adhesives using the EBT approach.

  8. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with different self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scougall Vilchis, Rogelio José; Yamamoto, Seigo; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with 4 self-etching adhesives. A total of 175 extracted premolars were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 35). Group I was the control, in which the enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid, and stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). In the remaining 4 groups, the enamel was conditioned with the following self-etching primers and adhesives: group II, Transbond Plus and Transbond XT (3M Unitek); group III, Clearfil Mega Bond FA and Kurasper F (Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan); group IV, Primers A and B, and BeautyOrtho Bond (Shofu, Kyoto, Japan); and group V, AdheSE and Heliosit Orthodontic (Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Liechtenstein). The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and debonded with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) including enamel fracture score was also evaluated. Additionally, the conditioned enamel surfaces were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The SBS values of groups I (19.0 +/- 6.7 MPa) and II (16.6 +/- 7.3 MPa) were significantly higher than those of groups III (11.0 +/- 3.9 MPa), IV (10.1 +/- 3.7 MPa), and V (11.8 +/- 3.5 MPa). Fluoride-releasing adhesives (Kurasper F and BeautyOrtho Bond) showed clinically acceptable SBS values. Significant differences were found in the ARI and enamel fracture scores between groups I and II. The 4 self-etching adhesives yielded SBS values higher than the bond strength (5.9 to 7.8 MPa) suggested for routine clinical treatment, indicating that orthodontic brackets can be successfully bonded with any of these self-etching adhesives.

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. Results: RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (Porthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range. PMID:25628663

  10. Influence of the chain length on the biological behaviour of /sup 131/I fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riche, F.; Mathieu, J.P.; Comet, M.; Vidal, M.; Pernin, C.; Marti-Batlle, D.; Busquet, G. (Universite de Grenoble, 38 (France)); Bardy, A. (C.E.A.-ORIS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1983-01-01

    Saturated and acetylenic fatty acids labeled with /sup 131/I in ..omega.. position, differing by their chain length (C8 to C20) and the number odd or even of their carbon atoms are injected in mice. The evolution of the activity in myocardium, blood, liver and kidney is measured until 10 minutes after injection. The myocardial activity increases with chain length from C8 to C16 then decreases for C18 and C20. The odd or even number of carbon atoms does not influence myocardial activity but in the liver, activity is inferior with the odd fatty acids. The presence of a triple bond accelerates the output of activity from the myocardium and these fatty acids are not well suited for the study of myocardial metabolism.

  11. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of a biomolecule: 5-Hydroxymethyluracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 5-hydroxymethyluracil were investigated. The FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) spectrum of the molecule in the solid phase was recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 5-hydroxymethyluracil molecule was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on its vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while its in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  12. Pullout bond strength of fiber posts luted to different depths and submitted to artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, V C; Souza, N A Y; Faria e Silva, A L; Cotes, C; da Silva, C; Martinelli, M; Kimpara, E T

    2013-01-01

    The extension of fiber post cementation often does not seem to influence the fracture resistance of restorations. This study evaluated the effects of cementation depths on the retention of fiber posts submitted to artificial aging. One hundred and sixty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. Following endodontic treatment, the canals were flared with diamonds burs. Postholes were prepared in lengths of 5 or 10 mm, after which fiber posts were relined with composite resin and luted with RelyX ARC or RelyX Unicem. The samples were then submitted to thermal and/or mechanical cycling before testing their pullout bond strengths. Absence of cycling was used as a control. The results of each cement were submitted to two-way and post hoc Tukey tests (α=0.05). Independent of the aging protocol, a depth of 10 mm showed higher pullout bond strength than did 5 mm, except for RelyX Unicem without cycling. For RelyX ARC, thermomechanical cycling resulted in lower values than in the absence of cycling. Mechanical cycling alone promoted the highest bond strength when the posts were luted with RelyX Unicem. The effect of artificial aging on the pullout bond strength is dependent on the type of material and the depth.

  13. Telomere length of anterior crucial ligament after rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsot, Elodie; Langberg, Henning; Krogsgaard, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    The regeneration of ligaments following injury is a slow process compared to the healing of many other tissues and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the proliferative potential of ligaments by assessing telomere length within three distinct parts...... of human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) obtained during ACL reconstruction: the macroscopically injured proximal part and macroscopically noninjured mid- and distal portions in eight subjects (age 28 ± 8 years). The mean telomere length in ACL was within normal range of values usually reported for other...... tissues indicating that the endogenous machinery responsible for the proliferative potential of ligament is not implicated in its poor healing capacity. The three ACL parts showed similar mean TRF lengths (distal part: 11.5 ± 0.8 kbp, mid-portion: 11.8 ± 1.2 kbp, proximal part: 11.9 ± 1.6 kbp...

  14. Fast and accurate covalent bond predictions using perturbation theory in chemical space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuang-Yu; von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    I will discuss the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among systems of different chemical composition. We have investigated single, double, and triple bonds occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecular species with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order estimates of covalent bonding potentials can achieve chemical accuracy (within 1 kcal/mol) if the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry) among chemical elements from third and fourth row of the periodic table. When applied to nonbonded systems of molecular dimers or solids such as III-V semiconductors, alanates, alkali halides, and transition metals, similar observations hold, enabling rapid predictions of van der Waals energies, defect energies, band-structures, crystal structures, and lattice constants.

  15. Push-out bond strengths of different dental cements used to cement glass fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Ghizoni, Janaina Salomon; Lorenzoni, Fábio César; Ramos, Marcelo Barbosa; Barbosa, Marcelo Ramos; Dos Reis Só, Marcus Vinícius

    2013-08-01

    Since the introduction of glass fiber posts, irreversible vertical root fractures have become a rare occurrence; however, adhesive failure has become the primary failure mode. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts cemented with different luting agents on 3 segments of the root. Eighty human maxillary canines with similar root lengths were randomly divided into 8 groups (n=10) according to the cement assessed (Rely X luting, Luting and Lining, Ketac Cem, Rely X ARC, Biscem, Duo-link, Rely X U100, and Variolink II). After standardized post space preparation, the root dentin was pretreated for dual-polymerizing resin cements and untreated for the other cements. The mixed luting cement paste was inserted into post spaces with a spiral file and applied to the post surface that was seated into the canal. After 7 days, the teeth were sectioned perpendicular to their long axis into 1-mm-thick sections. The push-out test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until extrusion of the post occurred. The results were evaluated by 2-way ANOVA and the all pairwise multiple comparison procedures (Tukey test) (α=.05). ANOVA showed that the type of interaction between cement and root location significantly influenced the push-out strength (Pcements and glass ionomer cements showed significantly higher values compared to dual-polymerizing resin cements. In all root segments, dual-polymerizing resin cements provided significantly lower bond strength. Significant differences among root segments were found only for Duo-link cement. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  17. Composite bonding to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding and single-bottle systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alomari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  18. Coupled cluster valence bond theory for open-shell systems with application to very long range strong correlation in a polycarbene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-07-14

    The Coupled Cluster Valence Bond (CCVB) method, previously presented for closed-shell (CS) systems, is extended to open-shell (OS) systems. The theoretical development is based on embedding the basic OS CCVB wavefunction in a fictitious singlet super-system. This approach reveals that the OS CCVB amplitude equations are quite similar to those of CS CCVB, and thus that OS CCVB requires the same level of computational effort as CS CCVB, which is an inexpensive method. We present qualitatively correct CCVB potential energy curves for all low-lying spin states of P 2 and Mn 2 + . CCVB is successfully applied to the low-lying spin states of some model linear polycarbenes, systems that appear to be a hindrance to standard density functionals. We examine an octa-carbene dimer in a side-by-side orientation, which, in the monomer dissociation limit, exhibits maximal strong correlation over the length of the polycarbene.

  19. 77 FR 29472 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds-Termination: Atlantic Bonding Company, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... be accepted from this company, and bonds that are continuous in nature should not be renewed. The... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds--Termination: Atlantic Bonding Company, Inc. AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Department...

  20. Low-Cost High-Efficiency Solar Cells with Wafer Bonding and Plasmonic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanake, Katsuaki

    We fabricated a direct-bond interconnected multijunction solar cell, a two-terminal monolithic GaAs/InGaAs dual-junction cell, to demonstrate a proof-of-principle for the viability of direct wafer bonding for solar cell applications. The bonded interface is a metal-free n+GaAs/n +InP tunnel junction with highly conductive Ohmic contact suitable for solar cell applications overcoming the 4% lattice mismatch. The quantum efficiency spectrum for the bonded cell was quite similar to that for each of unbonded GaAs and InGaAs subcells. The bonded dual-junction cell open-circuit voltage was equal to the sum of the unbonded subcell open-circuit voltages, which indicates that the bonding process does not degrade the cell material quality since any generated crystal defects that act as recombination centers would reduce the open-circuit voltage. Also, the bonded interface has no significant carrier recombination rate to reduce the open circuit voltage. Engineered substrates consisting of thin films of InP on Si handle substrates (InP/Si substrates or epitaxial templates) have the potential to significantly reduce the cost and weight of compound semiconductor solar cells relative to those fabricated on bulk InP substrates. InGaAs solar cells on InP have superior performance to Ge cells at photon energies greater than 0.7 eV and the current record efficiency cell for 1 sun illumination was achieved using an InGaP/GaAs/InGaAs triple junction cell design with an InGaAs bottom cell. Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells from the InGaAsP-family of III-V materials grown epitaxially on InP substrates would also benefit from such an InP/Si substrate. Additionally, a proposed four-junction solar cell fabricated by joining subcells of InGaAs and InGaAsP grown on InP with subcells of GaAs and AlInGaP grown on GaAs through a wafer-bonded interconnect would enable the independent selection of the subcell band gaps from well developed materials grown on lattice matched substrates. Substitution of

  1. Bonding brackets on white spot lesions pretreated by means of two methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sotero Vianna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of brackets bonded to demineralized enamel pretreated with low viscosity Icon Infiltrant resin (DMG and glass ionomer cement (Clinpro XT Varnish, 3M Unitek with and without aging. Methods: A total of 75 bovine enamel specimens were allocated into five groups (n = 15. Group 1 was the control group in which the enamel surface was not demineralized. In the other four groups, the surfaces were submitted to cariogenic challenge and white spot lesions were treated. Groups 2 and 3 were treated with Icon Infiltrant resin; Groups 4 and 5, with Clinpro XT Varnish. After treatment, Groups 3 and 5 were artificially aged. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT adhesive system and SBS was evaluated by means of a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey post-hoc test. Results: All groups tested presented shear bond strengths similar to or higher than the control group. Specimens of Group 4 had significantly higher shear bond strength values (p < 0.05 than the others. Conclusion: Pretreatment of white spot lesions, with or without aging, did not decrease the SBS of brackets.

  2. UV resonance Raman finds peptide bond-Arg side chain electronic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhavya; Asher, Sanford A

    2011-05-12

    We measured the UV resonance Raman excitation profiles and Raman depolarization ratios of the arginine (Arg) vibrations of the amino acid monomer as well as Arg in the 21-residue predominantly alanine peptide AAAAA(AAARA)(3)A (AP) between 194 and 218 nm. Excitation within the π → π* peptide bond electronic transitions result in UVRR spectra dominated by amide peptide bond vibrations. The Raman cross sections and excitation profiles indicate that the Arg side chain electronic transitions mix with the AP peptide bond electronic transitions. The Arg Raman bands in AP exhibit Raman excitation profiles similar to those of the amide bands in AP which are conformation specific. These Arg excitation profiles distinctly differ from the Arg monomer. The Raman depolarization ratios of Arg in monomeric solution are quite simple with ρ = 0.33 indicating enhancement by a single electronic transition. In contrast, we see very complex depolarization ratios of Arg in AP that indicate that the Arg residues are resonance enhanced by multiple electronic transitions.

  3. Using the Climbing Drum Peel (CDP) Test to Obtain a G(sub IC) value for Core/Facesheet Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.; Gregory, Elizabeth D.; Jackson, Justin R.

    2006-01-01

    A method of measuring the Mode I fracture toughness of core/facesheet bonds in sandwich Structures is desired, particularly with the widespread use of models that need this data as input. This study examined if a critical strain energy release rate, G(sub IC), can be obtained from the climbing drum peel (CDP) test. The CDP test is relatively simple to perform and does not rely on measuring small crack lengths such as required by the double cantilever beam (DCB) test. Simple energy methods were used to calculate G(sub IC) from CDP test data on composite facesheets bonded to a honeycomb core. Facesheet thicknesses from 2 to 5 plies were tested to examine the upper and lower bounds on facesheet thickness requirements. Results from the study suggest that the CDP test, with certain provisions, can be used to find the GIG value of a core/facesheet bond.

  4. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests – a comparative test between light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, P C G; Porto-Neto, S T; Lizarelli, R F Z; Bagnato, V S

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased

  5. Repair Bond Strength of Aged Resin Composite after Different Surface and Bonding Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wendler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different mechanical surface treatments and chemical bonding protocols on the tensile bond strength (TBS of aged composite. Bar specimens were produced using a nanohybrid resin composite and aged in distilled water for 30 days. Different surface treatments (diamond bur, phosphoric acid, silane, and sandblasting with Al2O3 or CoJet Sand, as well as bonding protocols (Primer/Adhesive were used prior to application of the repair composite. TBS of the specimens was measured and the results were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA and the Student–Newman–Keuls test (α = 0.05. Mechanically treated surfaces were characterized under SEM and by profilometry. The effect of water aging on the degree of conversion was measured by means of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. An important increase in the degree of conversion was observed after aging. No significant differences in TBS were observed among the mechanical surface treatments, despite variations in surface roughness profiles. Phosphoric acid etching significantly improved repair bond strength values. The cohesive TBS of the material was only reached using resin bonding agents. Application of an intermediate bonding system plays a key role in achieving reliable repair bond strengths, whereas the kind of mechanical surface treatment appears to play a secondary role.

  6. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond ™ and Scotchbond ™ ) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT ™ . Materials and Methods . A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120 ™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test ( P ≤ 0.05). Results . Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions . Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  7. Predicting Bond Betas using Macro-Finance Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanidis, Nektarios; Christiansen, Charlotte; Cipollini, Andrea

    We conduct in-sample and out-of-sample forecasting using the new approach of combining explanatory variables through complete subset regressions (CSR). We predict bond CAPM betas and bond returns conditioning on various macro-fi…nance variables. We explore differences across long-term government ...... bonds, investment grade corporate bonds, and high-yield corporate bonds. The CSR method performs well in predicting bond betas, especially in-sample, and, mainly high-yield bond betas when the focus is out-of-sample. Bond returns are less predictable than bond betas....

  8. Comparison of bond strength of different endodontic sealers to root dentin: An in vitro push-out test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuri, G Vijaya; Varri, Sujana; Bolla, Nagesh; Mandava, Pragna; Akkala, Lakshmi Swathi; Shaik, Jaheer

    2016-01-01

    To compare the bond strength of four different endodontic sealers to root dentin through push-out test design. Forty single-rooted teeth with completely formed apices were selected. Teeth were decoronated, and working length was determined. Instrumentation and irrigation were performed. The teeth were divided into four groups based upon the sealer used. Group 1: Bioceramic sealer (Endosequence), Group 2: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) based sealer (MTA Fill apex), Group 3: Epoxy resin based sealer (MM-Seal), and Group 4: Dual cure resin-based sealer (Hybrid Root Seal). Manipulation and application of the sealer was done as per the manufacturer instructions. All the teeth were obturated using 6% gutta-percha. After obturation, each tooth was prepared for push-out test with root slices of 2 mm thickness using universal testing machine. The highest bond strength was found in Group 1 (Endosequence) (P strength was found in Group 2 (MTA Fill apex). Statistical analysis is done by two-way ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple post hoc. The push-out bond strength of Bioceramic sealer was highest followed by resin-based sealer and lowest bond strength was observed in MTA-based sealer.

  9. Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding in N-(1-deoxy-β-d-fructopyranos-1-yl-2-aminoisobutyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri V. Mossine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, alternatively called d-fructose-2-aminoisobutyric acid (FruAib, C10H19NO7, (I, crystallizes exclusively in the β-pyranose form, with two conformationally non-equivalent molecules [(IA and (IB] in the asymmetric unit. In solution, FruAib establishes an equilibrium, with 75.6% of the population consisting of β-pyranose, 10.4% β-furanose, 10.1% α-furanose, 3.0% α-pyranose and <0.7% the acyclic forms. The carbohydrate ring in (I has the normal 2C5 chair conformation and the amino acid portion is in the zwitterion form. Bond lengths and valence angles compare well with the average values from related pyranose structures. All carboxyl, hydroxy and ammonium groups are involved in hydrogen bonding and form a three-dimensional network of infinite chains that are connected through homodromic rings and short chains. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds bridge the amino acid and sugar portions in both molecules. A comparative Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of FruAib and four other sugar–amino acids suggests an increasing role of intramolecular heteroatom interactions in crystal structures with an increasing proportion of C—H bonds.

  10. Effect of saliva contamination on bond strength witha hydrophilic composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren Bitencourt Deprá

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to enamel with hydrophilic resin composite. METHODS: Eighty premolars were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20 according to bonding material and contamination: G1 bonded with Transbond XT with no saliva contamination, G2 bonded with Transbond XT with saliva contamination, G3 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with no saliva contamination and G4 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with saliva contamination. The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTS: The means and standard deviations (MPa were: G110.15 ± 3.75; G2 6.8 ± 2.54; G3 9.3 ± 3.36; G4 8.3 ± 2.95. The adhesive remnant index (ARI ranged between 0 and 1 in G1 and G4. In G2 there was a prevalence of score 0 and similar ARI distribution in G3. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination reduced bond strength when Transbond XT hydrophobic resin composite was used. However, the hydrophilic resin Transbond Plus Color Change was not affected by the contamination.OBJETIVO: avaliar a influência da contaminação por saliva na resistência de união de braquetes metálicos colados ao esmalte com um compósito resinoso hidrofílico. MÉTODOS: oitenta pré-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=20, de acordo com o material de colagem e a presença de contaminação - G1 colagem com Transbond XT na ausência de contaminação; G2 colagem com Transbond XT na presença de contaminação; G3 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na ausência de contaminação; G4 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na presença de contaminação. Os resultados foram tratados estatisticamente (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTADOS: as médias e desvios-padrão (MPa foram G1 = 10,15 ± 3,75; G2 = 6,8 ± 2,54; G3 = 9,3 ± 3,36; G4 = 8,3 ± 2,95. O índice de adesivo remanescente (IAR variou entre 0 e 1 no G1 e no G4; no G2, houve predomínio do escore 0 e distribuição similar no

  11. Synergistic effects of sodium 
ascorbate and acetone to restore compromised bond strength 
after enamel bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Manafi, Safa; Cehreli, Zafer C

    To evaluate the effect of a new experimental solution containing sodium ascorbate (SA) and acetone on reversing compromised bonding to enamel immediately after bleaching. The buccal surface of intact, extracted human premolars (n = 60) was bleached. The teeth were then randomly assigned to 6  groups according to the type of pretreatment applied prior to adhesive procedures: 10% SA in acetone-water solution applied for 1 and 5 min (groups 1 and 2, respectively); aqueous solution of 10% SA applied for 10 min (group 3); 100% acetone applied for 10 min (group 4); no pretreatment (negative control; group 5). An additional group (positive control; group 6) comprised unbleached teeth (n = 12). Two composite microcylinders were bonded on each specimen for evaluation of microshear bond strength (MBS) and failure modes. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc and chi-square tests at P = 0.05. Groups 1 and 2 yielded similar MBS values to groups 4 and 6 (positive control). The mean MBS of groups 3 and 5 (negative control) were similar, and significantly lower than that of the positive control group. The application of 10% SA in an acetone-water solution prior to bonding procedures can restore compromised enamel bond strength to its unbleached state within a clinically acceptable time of 1 min.

  12. HIV/AIDS, childhood and governance: sundering the bonds of human society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony

    2005-12-01

    There is a disharmonious resonance between the length of HIV infection in the individual human host and the length of a human generation. In brief, an infected person may have children, these may be orphaned and grow up to become infected, and afterwards they themselves may have children, who can be orphaned in turn. Hence, a basic unit of social structure in most human societies, the three-generation bond between grandparents, parents and the current generation - and on into the future - is repeatedly torn apart in the absence of treatment, a vaccine or behaviour change. This situation should be read against the threat of growing viral resistance. Certain implications of these processes for the future are outlined and discussed. The paper notes the uncertain future confronting societies that already have a relatively high number of orphans, and considers some otherwise unexpected possibilities, as well as the dangers of assuming that large-scale orphaning necessarily leads to social unrest and disorder.

  13. Influence of intrapulpal pressure simulation on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Vivan Cardoso

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intrapulpal pressure simulation on the bonding effectiveness of etch & rinse and self-etch adhesives to dentin. Eighty sound human molars were distributed into eight groups, according to the permeability level of each sample, measured by an apparatus to assess hydraulic conductance (Lp. Thus, a similar mean permeability was achieved in each group. Three etch & rinse adhesives (Prime & Bond NT - PB, Single Bond -SB, and Excite - EX and one self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond - SE were employed, varying the presence or absence of an intrapulpal pressure (IPP simulation of 15 cmH2O. After adhesive and restorative procedures were carried out, the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C, and taken for tensile bond strength (TBS testing. Fracture analysis was performed using a light microscope at 40 X magnification. The data, obtained in MPa, were then submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test ( a = 0.05. The results revealed that the TBS of SB and EX was significantly reduced under IPP simulation, differing from the TBS of PB and SE. Moreover, SE obtained the highest bond strength values in the presence of IPP. It could be concluded that IPP simulation can influence the bond strength of certain adhesive systems to dentin and should be considered when in vitro studies are conducted.

  14. LED Die-Bonded on the Ag/Cu Substrate by a Sn-BiZn-Sn Bonding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y. K.; Hsu, Y. C.; Lin, E. J.; Hu, Y. J.; Liu, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, light emitting diode (LED) chips were die-bonded on a Ag/Cu substrate by a Sn-BixZn-Sn bonding system. A high die-bonding strength is successfully achieved by using a Sn-BixZn-Sn ternary system. At the bonding interface, there is observed a Bi-segregation phenomenon. This Bi-segregation phenomenon solves the problems of the brittle layer-type Bi at the joint interface. Our shear test results show that the bonding interface with Bi-segregation enhances the shear strength of the LED die-bonding joints. The Bi-0.3Zn and Bi-0.5Zn die-bonding cases have the best shear strength among all die-bonding systems. In addition, we investigate the atomic depth profile of the deposited Bi-xZn layer by evaporating Bi-xZn E-gun alloy sources. The initial Zn content of the deposited Bi-Zn alloy layers are much higher than the average Zn content in the deposited Bi-Zn layers.

  15. Television Watching and Telomere Length Among Adults in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hong-Mei; Liu, Qian-Qian; Tian, Guo; Quan, Li-Ming; Zhao, Yong; Cheng, Guo

    2017-09-01

    To explore the independent associations of sedentary behavior and physical activity with telomere length among Chinese adults. Data on total time of sedentary behavior, screen-based sedentary behavior (including television watching and computer or phone use), moderate to vigorous physical activity, and dietary intake of 518 adults in Chengdu, Guizhou, and Xiamen in China (54.25% women) aged 20 to 70 years were obtained between 2013 and 2015 through questionnaires. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured to calculate body mass index and percentage of body fat. Telomere length was measured through Southern blot technique. Television watching was inversely related to adjusted telomere length (-71.75 base pair; SE = 34.40; P  = .04). Furthermore, a similar trend between telomere length and television watching was found in the group aged 20 to 40 years after adjusting for all covariates. Adults aged 20 to 40 years in the highest tertile of daily time spent on watching television had 4.0% shorter telomere length than adults in the lowest tertile (P = .03). Although the association is modest, television watching is inversely related to telomere length among Chinese adults, warranting further investigation in large prospective studies.

  16. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05 Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  17. Physical Attractiveness, Attitude Similarity, and Length of Acquaintance as Contributors to Interpersonal Attraction Among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavior, Norman; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Tenth and twelfth grade males and females who knew each other judged, within grade levels, their classmates on physical attractiveness (PA), perceived attitude similarity (PAS), and interpersonal attraction (IA). Regression analyses supported the hypotheses that PA and PAS are positively correlated. (Author)

  18. Observation of H-bond mediated 3hJH2H3coupling constants across Watson-Crick AU base pairs in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luy, Burkhard; Richter, Uwe; DeJong, Eric S.; Sorensen, Ole W.; Marino, John P.

    2002-01-01

    3h J H2H3 trans-hydrogen bond scalar coupling constants have been observed for the first time in Watson-Crick AU base pairs in uniformly 15 N-labeled RNA oligonucleotides using a new 2h J NN -HNN-E. COSY experiment. The experiment utilizes adenosine H2 (AH2) for original polarization and detection, while employing 2h J NN couplings for coherence transfer across the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds). The H3 protons of uracil bases are unperturbed throughout the experiment so that these protons appear as passive spins in E. COSY patterns. 3h J H2H3 coupling constants can therefore be accurately measured in the acquisition dimension from the displacement of the E. COSY multiplet components, which are separated by the relatively large 1 J H3N3 coupling constants in the indirect dimension of the two-dimensional experiment. The 3h J H2H3 scalar coupling constants determined for AU base pairs in the two RNA hairpins examined here have been found to be positive and range in magnitude up to 1.8 Hz. Using a molecular fragment representation of an AU base pair, density functional theory/finite field perturbation theory (DFT/FPT) methods have been applied to attempt to predict the relative contributions of H-bond length and angular geometry to the magnitude of 3h J H2H3 coupling constants. Although the DFT/FPT calculations did not reproduce the full range of magnitude observed experimentally for the 3h J H2H3 coupling constants, the calculations do predict the correct sign and general trends in variation in size of these coupling constants. The calculations suggest that the magnitude of the coupling constants depends largely on H-bond length, but can also vary with differences in base pair geometry. The dependency of the 3h J H2H3 coupling constant on H-bond strength and geometry makes it a new probe for defining base pairs in NMR studies of nucleic acids

  19. Loan versus Bond Financing of Czech Companies and the influence of the Global Recession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mačí Jan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available European economies are traditionally considered to be bank based regarding the debt financing. However, in times of crises in the bank sector, this feature may indicate a weakness of these economies when the credit squeeze phenomenon may occur and companies’ competitiveness might be negatively affected thanks to unstable financing possibilities. In such conditions, a shift from bank loans to bonds might be expected. That is why this paper focuses on mutual development of corporate bond and business loan markets in the developing Czech economy in the years 2006–2014 with regard to the impacts of the global financial crisis of 2008/2009. The main goal of this article is to identify whether, thanks to the impacts of the global recession in 2009, there was a shift in Czech economy in business financing from the loans to bonds in a similar fashion as in the case of East Asian economies after their financial crisis in the nineties. Since Czech companies practically do not use short-term bonds, a mutual relationship is examined between amounts of long-term corporate bonds and economic development captured by the GDP per capita, and between long-term business loans and development of long-term corporate bonds. The main findings of this study are that since the global financial crisis, bond financing of businesses has been growing faster than loan financing. Czech economy thus shifts and becomes more bond market-based. The development of bond financing is positively correlated with the GDP per capita. Time series of both loans and bonds develop along the same trend. However, residual components are correlated negatively, which confirms the standing of loans and bonds as substitutes. Two main practical implications may be derived from this study. First, a growing usage of bonds increases demands on the market regulator, especially in the field of monitoring. Second, the growing bond market leads to the increased effectiveness, which makes additional

  20. Comparison of the tensile bond strength of high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, D; Nayir, E; Pamuk, S

    2000-11-01

    Although the bond strengths of various resin composite luting materials have been reported in the literature, the evaluation of these systems with various cast alloys of different compositions has not been completely clarified. To evaluate the tensile bond strength of sandblasted high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to etched enamel by 2 different bonding agents of different chemical composition: Panavia-Ex (BIS-GMA) and Super-Bond (4-META acrylic). Flat enamel surfaces were prepared on buccal surfaces of 60 extracted noncarious human incisors. Teeth were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Twenty circular disks of 5 mm diameter were prepared for casting for each group. Group I was cast with a high-noble, group II with a noble, and group III with a base metal alloy. The surfaces of the disks were sandblasted with 250 microm Al(2)O(3). Ten disks of each group were bonded to exposed enamel surfaces with Super-Bond and 10 disks with Panavia-Ex as recommended by the manufacturer. The tensile bond strength was measured with an Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the results. The differences in bond strengths of Super-Bond and Panavia-Ex with different alloys were not significant. The highest bond strengths were obtained in base metal alloys, followed by noble and high-noble alloys. These results were significant. Panavia-Ex and Super-Bond exhibited comparable tensile bond strengths. For both luting agents, the highest bond strengths were achieved with base metal alloys and the lowest with high-noble alloys.

  1. On finding similar items in a stream of transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagna, Andrea; Pagh, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    While there has been a lot of work on finding frequent itemsets in transaction data streams, none of these solve the problem of finding similar pairs according to standard similarity measures. This paper is a first attempt at dealing with this, arguably more important, problem. We start out with ...... in random order, and show that surprisingly, not only is small-space similarity mining possible for the most common similarity measures, but the mining accuracy {\\em improves\\/} with the length of the stream for any fixed support threshold....... with a negative result that also explains the lack of theoretical upper bounds on the space usage of data mining algorithms for finding frequent itemsets: Any algorithm that (even only approximately and with a chance of error) finds the most frequent $k$-itemset must use space $\\Omega...

  2. Accurate characterization of wafer bond toughness with the double cantilever specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kevin T.; Spearing, S. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The displacement loaded double cantilever test, also referred to as the "Maszara test" and the "crack opening method" by the wafer bonding community, is a common technique used to evaluate the interface toughness or surface energy of direct wafer bonds. While the specimen is widely used, there has been a persistent question as to the accuracy of the method since the actual specimen geometry differs from the ideal beam geometry assumed in the expression used for data reduction. The effect of conducting the test on whole wafer pairs, in which the arms of cantilevers are wide plates rather than slender beams, is examined in this work using finite element analysis. A model is developed to predict the equilibrium shape of the crack front and to develop a corrected expression for calculating interface toughness from crack length measurements obtained in tests conducted on whole wafer pairs. The finite element model, which is validated through comparison to experiments, demonstrates that using the traditional beam theory-based expressions for data reduction can lead to errors of up to 25%.

  3. Low-temperature Au/a-Si wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Errong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    The Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, which can also be used for the bonding of non-silicon material, was investigated for the first time in this paper. The bond quality test showed that the bond yield, bond repeatability and average shear strength are higher for this bonding structure. The interfacial microstructure analysis indicated that the Au-induced crystallization of the amorphous silicon process leads to big Si grains extending across the bond interface and Au filling the other regions of the bond interface, which result into a strong and void-free bond interface. In addition, the Au-induced crystallization reaction leads to a change in the IR images of the bond interface. Therefore, the IR microscope can be used to evaluate and compare the different bond strengths qualitatively. Furthermore, in order to verify the superiority of the bonding structure, the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si (i.e. no Ti/Au layer on the a-Si surface) and Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structures (i.e. Au thermocompression bonding) were also investigated. For the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is due to the native oxide layer on the a-Si surface, and for the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is caused by the wafer surface roughness which prevents intimate contact and limits the interdiffusion at the bond interface.

  4. Bane of Hydrogen-Bond Formation on the Photoinduced Charge-Transfer Process in Donor–Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2017-03-14

    Controlling the ultrafast dynamical process of photoinduced charge transfer at donor acceptor interfaces remains a major challenge for physical chemistry and solar cell communities. The process is complicated by the involvement of other complex dynamical processes, including hydrogen bond formation, energy transfer, and solvation dynamics occurring on similar time scales. In this study, we explore the remarkable impact of hydrogen-bond formation on the interfacial charge transfer between a negatively charged electron donating anionic porphyrin and a positively charged electron accepting pi-conjugated polymer, as a model system in solvents with different polarities and capabilities for hydiogen bonding using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Unlike the conventional understanding of the key role of hydrogen bonding in promoting the charge-transfer process, our steadystate and time-resolved results reveal that the intervening hydrogen-bonding environment and, consequently, the probable longer spacing between the donor and acceptor molecules significantly hinders the charge-transfer process between them. These results show that site-specific hydrogen bonding and geometric considerations between donor and acceptor can be exploited to control both the charge-transfer dynamics and its efficiency not only at donor acceptor interfaces but also in complex biological systems.

  5. 3-Axis Fully-Integrated Capacitive Tactile Sensor with Flip-Bonded CMOS on LTCC Interposer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Sho; Muroyama, Masanori; Nakayama, Takahiro; Hata, Yoshiyuki; Nonomura, Yutaka; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-10-25

    This paper reports a 3-axis fully integrated differential capacitive tactile sensor surface-mountable on a bus line. The sensor integrates a flip-bonded complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) with capacitive sensing circuits on a low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) interposer with Au through vias by Au-Au thermo-compression bonding. The CMOS circuit and bonding pads on the sensor backside were electrically connected through Au bumps and the LTCC interposer, and the differential capacitive gap was formed by an Au sealing frame. A diaphragm for sensing 3-axis force was formed in the CMOS substrate. The dimensions of the completed sensor are 2.5 mm in width, 2.5 mm in length, and 0.66 mm in thickness. The fabricated sensor output coded 3-axis capacitive sensing data according to applied 3-axis force by three-dimensional (3D)-printed pins. The measured sensitivity was as high as over 34 Count/mN for normal force and 14 to 15 Count/mN for shear force with small noise, which corresponds to less than 1 mN. The hysteresis and the average cross-sensitivity were also found to be less than 2% full scale and 11%, respectively.

  6. Manufacturing study of beryllium bonded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Hirai, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Oda, Y.; Shimizu, K.

    2004-01-01

    Manufacturing study has been conducted on Be-bonded structures employed in the first-wall panel of the blanket system for the ITER. For Be tiles bonded to the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy heat sink with stainless-steel cooling pipes, a one-axis hot press with two heating process has been used to bond the three materials. First, Cu-alloy and SS materials are bonded diffusively. Then, Be tiles are bonded to the pre-bonded structure under 20 MPa and at 560 degree C. An Al-Si base interlayer has been used to bond Be to the Cu-Alloy. Because of the limited heat processes using a conventional hot press, the manufacturing cost can be minimized. Using the above bonding techniques, a partial mockup of a blanket first-wall panel with 16 Be tiles (with 50 mm in size) has been successfully manufactured. (author)

  7. Characterization of electron-deficient chemical bonding of diborane with attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics and laser response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Takehiro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of non-adiabatic electrons-nuclei coupled dynamics of diborane H 2 BH 2 BH 2 under several types of short pulse lasers. This molecule is known to have particularly interesting geometrical and electronic structures, which originate from the electron-deficient chemical bondings. We revisit the chemical bonding of diborane from the view point of electron wavepacket dynamics coupled with nuclear motions, and attempt to probe the characteristics of it by examining its response to intense laser fields. We study in the following three aspects, (i) bond formation of diborane by collision between two monoboranes, (ii) attosecond electron wavepacket dynamics in the ground state and first excited state by circularly polarized laser pulse, and (iii) induced fragmentation back to monoborane molecules by linearly polarized laser. The wave lengths of two types of laser field employed are 200 nm (in UV range) and 800 nm (in IR range), and we track the dynamics from hundreds of attoseconds up to few tens of femtoseconds. To this end, we apply the ab initio semiclassical Ehrenfest theory, into which the classical vector potential of a laser field is introduced. Basic features of the non-adiabatic response of electrons to the laser fields is elucidated in this scheme. To analyze the electronic wavepackets thus obtained, we figure out bond order density that is a spatial distribution of the bond order and bond order flux density arising only from the bonding regions, and so on. Main findings in this work are: (i) dimerization of monoboranes to diborane is so efficient that even intense laser is hard to prevent it; (ii) collective motions of electron flux emerge in the central BHHB bonding area in response to the circularly polarized laser fields; (iii) laser polarization with the direction of central two BH bonding vector is efficient for the cleavage of BH 3 -BH 3 ; and (iv) nuclear derivative coupling plays a critical role in the field induced

  8. The choice among non-callable bonds and make whole, claw back and otherwise ordinary callable bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, LD; Gounopoulos, D; Skinner, F

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to explain determinates of the choice and the pricing of various types of callable and non-callable bonds. We find that the popularity of different types of callable and non-callable bonds is significantly related to the economic environment. In addition, the popularity of claw back bonds appear to be driven by agency considerations, make whole bonds by the debt overhang problem, ordinary callable bonds by the need by banks to deal with interest rate changes and non-callable ...

  9. Proposal of guideline for bonding to prevention of hydrogen embrittlement at Ta/Zr bond interface. Hydrogen embrittlement in SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence condition of hydrogen embrittlement cracking at Ta/Zr bond interface was investigated with respect to the hydrogen content and applied stress in order to propose a guideline for the explosive bonding procedure to prevention of hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen charging test was conducted for SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joints applied the different flexural strains. A hydrogen embrittlement crack occurred in the Zr substrate at Ta/Zr bond interface after hydrogen charging, and it was initiated at shorter charging times when the augmented strain was increased. The occurrence condition of hydrogen embrittlement cracking at Ta/Zr bond interface was shifted to lower stress and hydrogen content with an increase in the amount of explosive during bonding. It was suggested that hydrogen embrittlement in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint could be inhibited by reducing the initial hydrogen content in Ta substrate less than approx. 5 ppm. (author)

  10. Coordination-resolved local bond relaxation, electron binding-energy shift, and Debye temperature of Ir solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Yang, Xuexian [Department of Physics, Jishou University, Jishou, Hunan 416000 (China); Yang, Yezi [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Cohesive energy of the representative bond determines the core-level shift. • XPS derives the energy level of an isolated atom and its bulk shift. • XPS derives the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density. • Thermal XPS resolves the Debye temperature and atomic cohesive energy. - Abstract: Numerical reproduction of the measured 4f{sub 7/2} energy shift of Ir(1 0 0), (1 1 1), and (2 1 0) solid skins turns out the following: (i) the 4f{sub 7/2} level of an isolated Ir atom shifts from 56.367 eV to 60.332 eV by 3.965 eV upon bulk formation; (ii) the local energy density increases by up to 130% and the atomic cohesive energy decreases by 70% in the skin region compared with the bulk values. Numerical match to observation of the temperature dependent energy shift derives the Debye temperature that varies from 285.2 K (Surface) to 315.2 K (Bulk). We clarified that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms cause local densification and quantum entrapment of electron binding energy, which perturbs the Hamiltonian and the core shifts in the skin region.

  11. Effect of 10% sodium bicarbonate on bond strength of enamel and dentin after bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Medeiros Darzé

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionBy-products of hydrogen peroxide degradation released during dental bleaching influence the polymerization of adhesive systems and composite resins, causing a reduction in shear bond strength to the tooth.Objectivethe aim of this article was to evaluate the effect of 10% sodium bicarbonate (SB, applied for different lengths of time, on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin after bleaching.Material and methodEnamel and dentin blocks were divided into groups (n=10: (1 control: no bleaching; (2 immediate: bleaching immediately followed by restoration; (3 14-day: bleaching, restoration 14 days later; (4 SB for 10 minutes: bleaching, SB gel for 10 minutes, immediately followed by restoration; (5 SB for 20 minutes: bleaching, SB gel for 20 minutes, immediately followed by restoration. A 38% hydrogen peroxide gel (Opalescence Boost/Ultradent was used. After application of the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were mounted on the surface of the substrates in order to test shear bond strength. Result: ANOVA and Tukey tests showed significantly higher mean enamel bond strength values for the 14-day follow-up group and without significant differences for control group. Mean bond strength values obtained for the other groups were intermediate. When testing dentin, the Tukey test revealed a significantly higher mean bond strength value for the 14-day follow-up group when compared with application of SB for 20 minutes.ConclusionSB gel applied was unable to reverse the low bond strength to enamel and dentin after bleaching treatment.

  12. Effects of wall roughness and entry length on void profile in vertical bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study of upward air-water bubbly two-phase flow in an entry region was performed with various rough wall test tubes. The objective of the work is to clarify the effects of wall roughness and entry length on void profile. The fluid flows in the vertical circular test tube of 25 mm I.D. under nearly atmospheric pressure, at room temperature. The void profile changes from a pattern similar in appearance to the saddle shape which has local void peaks near the wall, into the power law shape whose curve is approximated by a power law formula, with increasing wall roughness and/or entry length. That is, wall roughness and entry length have a similar effect upon void profile. There are two patterns in the power law shape, a pattern with sharp center peak and a pattern with obtuse center peak. As wall roughness and/or entry length increase, the void profile changes from the former pattern to the latter pattern. At enough long entry length (L/D ≅ 150), every void profile has almost the same power law shape independent of wall roughness. Some void profiles are asymmetric to the axis. (author)

  13. Quasi regular polygons and their duals with Coxeter symmetries Dn represented by complex numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca, M; Koca, N O

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with tiling of the plane by quasi regular polygons and their duals. The problem is motivated from the fact that the graphene, infinite number of carbon molecules forming a honeycomb lattice, may have states with two bond lengths and equal bond angles or one bond length and different bond angles. We prove that the Euclidean plane can be tiled with two tiles consisting of quasi regular hexagons with two different lengths (isogonal hexagons) and regular hexagons. The dual lattice is constructed with the isotoxal hexagons (equal edges but two different interior angles) and regular hexagons. We also give similar tilings of the plane with the quasi regular polygons along with the regular polygons possessing the Coxeter symmetries D n , n=2,3,4,5. The group elements as well as the vertices of the polygons are represented by the complex numbers.

  14. Charge-Shift Corrected Electronegativities and the Effect of Bond Polarity and Substituents on Covalent-Ionic Resonance Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew M; Laconsay, Croix J; Galbraith, John Morrison

    2017-07-13

    Bond dissociation energies and resonance energies for H n A-BH m molecules (A, B = H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Li, and Na) have been determined in order to re-evaluate the concept of electronegativity in the context of modern valence bond theory. Following Pauling's original scheme and using the rigorous definition of the covalent-ionic resonance energy provided by the breathing orbital valence bond method, we have derived a charge-shift corrected electronegativity scale for H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Li, and Na. Atomic charge shift character is defined using a similar approach resulting in values of 0.42, 1.06, 1.43, 1.62, 1.64, 1.44, 0.46, and 0.34 for H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Li, and Na, respectively. The charge-shift corrected electronegativity values presented herein follow the same general trends as Pauling's original values with the exception of Li having a smaller value than Na (1.57 and 1.91 for Li and Na respectively). The resonance energy is then broken down into components derived from the atomic charge shift character and polarization effects. It is then shown that most of the resonance energy in the charge-shift bonds H-F, H 3 C-F, and Li-CH 3 and borderline charge-shift H-OH is associated with polarity rather than the intrinsic atomic charge-shift character of the bonding species. This suggests a rebranding of these bonds as "polar charge-shift" rather than simply "charge-shift". Lastly, using a similar breakdown method, it is shown that the small effect the substituents -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -OH, and -F have on the resonance energy (<10%) is mostly due to changes in the charge-shift character of the bonding atom.

  15. Use of paired, bonded NdFeB magnets in redox magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Prabhu U; Clark, Emily A; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2005-02-15

    Bonded neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) permanent magnets in a paired configuration were successfully used to control mass transport in redox-based, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Control of fluid flow based on magnetic fields has potential for use in portable lab-on-a-chip (LOAC) and analytical devices. Bonded magnets, composed of magnetic powder and organic binder materials, are less expensive and easier to fabricate and pattern than electromagnets and sintered permanent magnets, which have been previously used in MHD studies on electrochemical systems. The ability to pattern bonded magnets near and around the electrodes is expected to allow for better control over the magnetic field distribution and solution flow. Current was generated at an 800-microm-radius platinum disk electrode in a solution of 0.06 M nitrobenzene and 0.5 M tetra-n-butylammonium hexafluorophosphate in acetonitrile. Increases in limiting current in the presence of the magnetic field, which indicate enhancement in mass transport, for sintered (210+/-14%, N = 4, where B(r) = 1.23 T and magnetic field strength is 0.55 T) and bonded (94+/-8%, N = 4, where B(r) = 0.41 T and magnetic field strength is 0.20 T) magnets, were similar to those obtained using an electromagnet with the same magnetic flux densities. The magnetic field strength and not the magnet type is important in controlling fluid flow, which is encouraging for integration of bonded permanent magnets into LOAC devices.

  16. Formation of the market of high-bond (junk bonds in the United States in 1970–1980 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshenskyi S.Z.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Market of high-yield bonds (also known as «junk bonds» began to emerge in the US in the mid-1970s and was associated with the activities of «junk bond king» Michael Milken from Drexel investment company. Junk bonds emitents are small and newly established companies which cannot get a high credit rating. Emission of high-yield (8–10 % bond was their only chance to find its place in the financial market. Michael Milken realized the potential of these bonds, which, in fact, were often quite reliable securities, and started organizing their emissions by selling junk bonds to Savings and Loan Associations and other investors. In the 1980 issue of such bonds used for aggressive corporate takeovers, which supplied the capital from junk bonds market. Some of takeovers carried out in violation of laws that led to the arrest of Michael Milken, Drexel bankruptcy and the collapse of the entire junk bonds market.

  17. Evaluation of Efficient Line Lengths for Better Readability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the major findings of a formal experiment about onscreen text line lengths are presented. The experiment examined the effects of four different line lengths on the reading speed and the reading efficiency. Efficiency is defined as a combination of reading speed and accuracy. Sixteen people between the age of 24 and 36 participated at the experiment. The subjects had to read four different texts with an average line length around 2000 characters. The texts contained substitution words, which had to be detected by the subjects to measure reading accuracy. Besides objective measures like reading speed and accuracy, the subjects were asked to subjectively vote on their reading experience. The results from our objective measures show strong similarities to those of the work done previously by different researchers. The absolute reading speed grows when the line length grows from CPL (Characters Per Line 30-120. The measured reading efficiency, however, doesn\\\\\\'t grow steadily, although a growing trend can be seen. This is due to the fact, that the test persons found in average more substitution words from the 60 CPL text than they did from the 30 and 90 CPL texts. The reading speed seems to increase while the line length increases but the overall comprehension seems to peak at medium line lengths. As in the previous studies, our test persons also prefer the medium (60 and 90 CPL line lengths, although they perform better when reading longer lines. In the overall subjective opinion 13 out of 16 test persons selected the 60 or 90 CPL line length as their favorite. The literature doesn\\\\\\'t truly provide a scientific explanation for the difference between the objective performance and the subjective preference. A natural hypothesis would be that the line length that is the fastest to read would also feel most comfortable to the readers but in the light of this and the earlier research it seems like this is not the case.

  18. Nucleophilicities of Lewis Bases B and Electrophilicities of Lewis Acids A Determined from the Dissociation Energies of Complexes B⋯A Involving Hydrogen Bonds, Tetrel Bonds, Pnictogen Bonds, Chalcogen Bonds and Halogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Legon, Anthony C

    2017-10-23

    It is shown that the dissociation energy D e for the process B⋯A = B + A for 250 complexes B⋯A composed of 11 Lewis bases B (N₂, CO, HC≡CH, CH₂=CH₂, C₃H₆, PH₃, H₂S, HCN, H₂O, H₂CO and NH₃) and 23 Lewis acids (HF, HCl, HBr, HC≡CH, HCN, H₂O, F₂, Cl₂, Br₂, ClF, BrCl, H₃SiF, H₃GeF, F₂CO, CO₂, N₂O, NO₂F, PH₂F, AsH₂F, SO₂, SeO₂, SF₂, and SeF₂) can be represented to good approximation by means of the equation D e = c ' N B E A , in which N B is a numerical nucleophilicity assigned to B, E A is a numerical electrophilicity assigned to A, and c ' is a constant, conveniently chosen to have the value 1.00 kJ mol -1 here. The 250 complexes were chosen to cover a wide range of non-covalent interaction types, namely: (1) the hydrogen bond; (2) the halogen bond; (3) the tetrel bond; (4) the pnictogen bond; and (5) the chalcogen bond. Since there is no evidence that one group of non-covalent interaction was fitted any better than the others, it appears the equation is equally valid for all the interactions considered and that the values of N B and E A so determined define properties of the individual molecules. The values of N B and E A can be used to predict the dissociation energies of a wide range of binary complexes B⋯A with reasonable accuracy.

  19. The length-weight and length-length relationships of bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix (Linnaeus, 1766 from Samsun, middle Black Sea region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Özpiçak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, length-weight relationship (LWR and length-length relationship (LLR of bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix were determined. A total of 125 specimens were sampled from Samsun, the middle Black Sea in 2014 fishing season. Bluefish specimens were monthly collected from commercial fishing boats from October to December 2014. All captured individuals (N=125 were measured to the nearest 0.1 cm for total, fork and standard lengths. The weight of each fish (W was recorded to the nearest 0.01 g. According to results of analyses, there were no statistically significant differences between sexes in term of length and weight (P˃0.05. The minimum and maximum total, fork and standard lengths of bluefish ranged between 13.5-23.6 cm, 12.50-21.80 cm and 10.60-20.10 cm, respectively. The equation of length-weight relationship were calculated as W=0.008TL3.12 (r2>0.962. Positive allometric growth was observed for bluefish (b>3. Length-length relationship was also highly significant (P<0.001 with coefficient of determination (r2 ranging from 0.916 to 0.988.

  20. Local structure and disorder in crystalline Pb9Al8O21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, Alex C.; Barney, Emma R.; Holland, Diane; Knight, Kevin S.

    2008-01-01

    Crystalline Pb 9 Al 8 O 21 is a model compound for the structure of non-linear optical glasses containing lone-pair ions, and its structure has been investigated by neutron powder diffraction and total scattering, and 27 Al magic angle spinning NMR. Rietveld analysis (space group Pa3-bar (No. 205), a=13.25221(4) A) shows that some of the Pb and O sites have partial occupancies, due to lead volatilisation during sample preparation, and the non-stoichiometric sample composition is Pb 9-δ Al 8 O 21-δ with δ=0.54. The NMR measurements show evidence for a correlation between the chemical shift and the variance of the bond angles at the aluminium sites. The neutron total correlation function shows that the true average Al-O bond length is 0.8% longer than the apparent bond length determined by Rietveld refinement. The thermal variation in bond length is much smaller than the thermal variation in longer interatomic distances determined by Rietveld refinement. The total correlation function is consistent with an interpretation in which AlO 3 groups with an Al-O bond length of 1.651 A occur as a result of the oxygen vacancies in the structure. The width of the tetrahedral Al-O peak in the correlation function for the crystal is very similar to that for lead aluminate glass, indicating that the extent of static disorder is very similar in the two phases. - Graphical abstract: Combined neutron powder diffraction and total scattering, and 27 Al NMR on crystalline Pb 9 Al 8 O 21 shows it to be a non-stoichiometric compound with vacancies due to PbO volatilisation. A detailed consideration of the thermal and static disorder is given, showing that glass and crystal phases have very similar disorder at short range

  1. Isomorphous Crystals from Diynes and Bromodiynes Involved in Hydrogen and Halogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baillargeon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Isomorphous crystals of two diacetylene derivatives with carbamate functionality (BocNH-CH2-diyne-X, where X = H or Br have been obtained. The main feature of these structures is the original 2D arrangement (as supramolecular sheets or walls in which the H bond and halogen bond have a prominent effect on the whole architecture. The two diacetylene compounds harbor neighboring carbamate (Boc protected amine and conjugated alkyne functionalities. They differ only by the nature of the atom located at the penultimate position of the diyne moiety, either a hydrogen atom or a bromine atom. Both of them adopt very similar 2D wall organizations with antiparallel carbamates (as in antiparallel beta pleated sheets. Additional weak interactions inside the same walls between molecular bricks are H bond interactions (diyne-H···O=C or halogen bond interactions (diyne-Br···O=C, respectively. Based on crystallographic atom coordinates, DFT (B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p and DFT (M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p calculations were performed on these isostructural crystals to gain insight into the intermolecular interactions.

  2. Shear bond strength of composite bonded with three adhesives to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-prepared enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Cafer; Sazak-Oveçoğlu, Hesna; Günday, Mahir; Güngör, Gülşad; Durkan, Meral; Oksüz, Mustafa

    2010-06-01

    To assess in vitro the shear bond strength of a nanohybrid composite resin bonded with three adhesive systems to enamel surfaces prepared with acid and Er,Cr:YSGG laser etching. Sixty extracted caries- and restoration-free human maxillary central incisors were used. The teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin with the labial surfaces facing up. The labial surfaces were prepared with 0.5-mm reduction to receive composite veneers. Thirty specimens were etched with Er,Cr:YSGG laser. This group was also divided into three subgroups, and the following three bonding systems were then applied on the laser groups and the other three unlased groups: (1) 37% phosphoric acid etch + Bond 1 primer/adhesive (Pentron); (2) Nano-bond self-etch primer (Pentron) + Nano-bond adhesive (Pentron); and (3) all-in-one adhesive-single dose (Futurabond NR, Voco). All of the groups were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Smile, Pentron). Shear bond strength was measured with a Zwick universal test device with a knife-edge loading head. The data were analyzed with two-factor ANOVA. There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between self-etch primer + adhesive and all-in-one adhesive systems for nonetched and laser-etched enamel groups (P > .05). However, bond strength values for the laser-etched + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (48.00 +/- 13.86 MPa) were significantly higher than the 37% phosphoric acid + Bond 1 primer/adhesive group (38.95 +/- 20.07 MPa) (P enamel surface more effectively than 37% phosphoric acid for subsequent attachment of composite material.

  3. A novel stibacarbaborane cluster with adjacent antimony atoms exhibiting unique pnictogen bond formation that dominates its crystal packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Josef; Melichar, Petr; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Vrána, Jan; Wann, Derek A; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Hnyk, Drahomír; Růžička, Aleš

    2017-10-17

    We have prepared nido-7,8,9,11-Sb 2 C 2 B 7 H 9 , the first cluster with simultaneous Sb-B, Sb-C and Sb-Sb atom pairs with interatomic separations with magnitudes that approach the respective sums of covalent radii. However, the length of the Sb-Sb separation in this cluster is slightly less than the sum of the covalent radii. Quantum chemical analysis has revealed that the crystal packing of nido-7,8,9,11-Sb 2 C 2 B 7 H 9 is predominantly dictated by pnictogen (Pn) bonding, an unconventional σ-hole interaction. Indeed, the interaction energy of a very strong Sb 2 H-B Pn-bond in the nido-7,8,9,11-Sb 2 C 2 B 7 H 9 dimer exceeds -6.0 kcal mol -1 . This is a very large value and is comparable to the strengths of known Pn-bonds in Cl 3 Pnπ complexes (Pn = As, Sb).

  4. Fatigue aging of adhesive bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLollis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    A year long study has been made of the effect of fatigue on the bond between two epoxy encapsulant formulations and a fused alumina disc. The variables studied included isothermal aging at temperatures up to and including the cure temperature and cyclic thermal aging from +74 to -54 0 C. The encapsulants were glass microballoon filled epoxies differing only in curing agents. One was cured with an aromatic amine eutectic (Shell Curing Agent Z). The other was cured with diethanolamine. The Z cured encapsulant bond failed completely at the bond interface with little or no aging; infrared evidence indicated a soluble interlayer as a possible cause of failure. The diethanolamine cured encapsulant survived a year of isothermal aging with little or no evidence of bond degradation. Cyclic thermal aging resulted in gradual bond failure with time. An extrapolation of the cyclic aging data indicates that the stresses induced by thermal cycling would result in complete bond failure in about 1200 days

  5. Association of bond, market, operational, and financial factors with multi-hospital system bond issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, C E; McCue, M J; Hossack, J B

    2001-01-01

    Despite the growth of multi-hospital systems in the 1990s, their performance in the tax-exempt bond market has not been adequately evaluated. The purpose of this study is to compare bonds issued by multi-hospital systems to those issued by individual hospitals in terms of bond, market, operational, and financial characteristics. The study sample includes 2,078 newly issued, tax-exempt, revenue bonds between 1991 and 1997. The findings indicate that multi-hospital systems issued larger amounts of debt at a lower cost, were more likely to be insured, had higher debt service coverage and higher operating margins.

  6. Shear bond strength of self-etch and total-etch bonding systems at different dentin depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Maito Villela-Rosa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dentin shear bond strength of four adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Magic Bond DE and Self Etch Bond in regards to buccal and lingual surfaces and dentin depth. Forty extracted third molars had roots removed and crowns bisected in the mesiodistal direction. The buccal and lingual surfaces were fixed in a PVC/acrylic resin ring and were divided into buccal and lingual groups assigned to each selected adhesive. The same specimens prepared for the evaluation of superficial dentin shear resistance were used to evaluate the different depths of dentin. The specimens were identified and abraded at depths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm. Each depth was evaluated by ISO TR 11405 using an EMIC-2000 machine regulated at 0.5 mm/min with a 200 Kgf load cell. We performed statistical analyses on the results (ANOVA, Tukey and Scheffé tests. Data revealed statistical differences (p < 0.01 in the adhesive and depth variation as well as adhesive/depth interactions. The Adper Single Bond 2 demonstrated the highest mean values of shear bond strength. The Prompt L-Pop product, a self-etching adhesive, revealed higher mean values compared with Magic Bond DE and Self Etch Bond adhesives, a total and self-etching adhesive respectively. It may be concluded that the shear bond strength of dentin is dependent on material (adhesive system, substrate depth and adhesive/depth interaction.

  7. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  8. A novel bonding method for fabrication of PET planar nanofluidic chip with low dimension loss and high bonding strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Zhifu; Zou, Helin; Sun, Lei; Xu, Shenbo; Qi, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Plastic planar nanofluidic chips are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present bonding methods for planar nanofluidic chips suffer from high dimension loss and low bonding strength. In this work, a novel thermal bonding technique based on O 2 plasma and ethanol treatment was proposed. With the assistance of O 2 plasma and ethanol, the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) planar nanofluidic chip can be bonded at a low bonding temperature of 50 °C. To increase the bonding rate and bonding strength, the O 2 plasma parameters and thermal bonding parameters were optimized during the bonding process. The tensile test indicates that the bonding strength of the PET planar nanofluidic chip can reach 0.954 MPa, while the auto-fluorescence test demonstrates that there is no leakage or blockage in any of the bonded micro- or nanochannels. (paper)

  9. Oregon School Bond Manual. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    To help school districts comply with Oregon's school bond laws, this manual provides guidelines for school district attorneys and personnel in the issuance and sale of school bonds. The document describes the proper time sequence of the bonding procedure, including elections, school board authorizations, necessary certificates, bond registration…

  10. Comparison of shear bond strength between unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The use of dentine bondings on enamel and dentin in total etch protocols has recently become popular. Unfilled resin is hydrophobic and dentin bonding is hydrophilic in nature. This chemical difference could be effective in enamel bonding process. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of unfilled resin to dry enamel and dentin bonding to dry and moist enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 30 incisor teeth were used. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups of 10. 37% phosphoric acid etchant was applied to the enamel surfaces in each group for 15 seconds, rinsed with water for 20 seconds and dried for 20 seconds with compressed air in groups one and two. After conditioning, group 1 received unfilled resin (Margin Bond, Colten and group 2 received dentin bonding (Single Bond, 3M and in group 3 after conditioning and rinsing with water, a layer of dentin bonding (Single Bond was applied on wet enamel. The enamel and dentin bonding were light cured for 20 seconds. A ring mold 3.5 mm in diameter and 2 mm height was placed over the specimens to receive the composite filling material (Z100, 3M. The composite was cured for 40 seconds. The specimens were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The findings were analyzed by ANOVA One-Way and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Shear bond strength of dentin bonding to dry enamel was significantly less than unfilled resin to dry enamel (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between the bond strength of dentin bonding to moist and dry enamel. In addition bond strength of dentin bonding to wet enamel was not significantly different from unfilled resin to dry enamel. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, it is suggested that enamel surface should remain slightly moist after etching before bonding with single bond but when using unfilled resin, the

  11. Crystal structure details of La- and Bi-substituted hydroxyapatites: Evidence for LaO{sup +} and BiO{sup +} with a very short metal–oxygen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazin, Pavel E., E-mail: kazin@inorg.chem.msu.ru [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pogosova, Mariam A.; Trusov, Lev A.; Kolesnik, Irina V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Magdysyuk, Oxana V.; Dinnebier, Robert E. [Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Crystal structures of substituted apatites with general formula Ca{sub 10−x}M{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH{sub 1−δ}){sub 2−x}O{sub x}, where M=La, Bi, 0≤x<2, were refined using high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction patterns. Individual positions for Ca{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+}-ions localized near Ca2-site were determined. The M{sup 3+}-ion was found shifted toward the hexagonal channel center with respect to the Ca{sup 2+}-ion, forming very short bond with the intrachannel O{sup 2−}, while leaving considerably longer distances to other oxygen atoms, which suggested the existence of a MO{sup +} ion. Distinct bands of stretching M–O modes were observed in the Raman and FT-IR spectra of the compounds. The bond lengths for BiO{sup +} and LaO{sup +} were estimated to be 2.05(1) and 2.09(1) Å correspondingly. The latter was almost 0.3 Å lower than the shortest La–O bond in La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The realization of such a strong lanthanide–oxygen bond in a crystal lattice could provide a very high axial ligand field and might be implemented to develop high-energy-barrier single-molecule magnets as well as to tune properties of lanthanide-based luminophores. - Graphical abstract: A fragment of the La-for-Ca substituted apatite crystal structure focusing on the La–O bond. - Highlights: • Individual positions in the apatite crystal lattice for a doping atom (La, Bi) and Ca. • The doping atom shifts toward the center of the hexagonal channel. • BiO{sup +} and LaO{sup +} with estimated short bond lengths of 2.05 and 2.09 Å respectively.

  12. 9 CFR 201.32 - Trustee in market agency, dealer and packer bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trustee in market agency, dealer and packer bonds. 201.32 Section 201.32 Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS... similar trade associations, attorneys at law, banks and trust companies, or their officers, are deemed...

  13. Substituent Effects on the Hydrogen Bonding Between Phenolate and HF, H2O and NH3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    B3LYP/6-31+g(d) calculations were performed on the hydrogen bonded complexes between substituted phenolates and HF, H2O as well as NH3. It was found that some properties of the non-covalent complexes, including the interaction energies, donor-acceptor (host-guest) distances, bond lengths, and vibration frequencies, could show well-defined substituent effects. Thus, from the substituent studies we can not only understand the mechanism of a particular non-covalent interaction better, but also easily predict the interaction energies and structures of a particular non-covalent complex, which might otherwise be very hard or resource-consuming to be known. This means that substituent effect is indeed a useful tool to be used in supramolecular chemistry and therefore, many valuable studies remain to be carried out.

  14. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form 25...

  16. Common Factors in International Bond Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, J.J.A.G.; Melenberg, B.; Nijman, T.E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we estimate and interpret the factors that jointly determine bond returns of different maturities in the US, Germany and Japan.We analyze both currency-hedged and unhedged bond returns.For currency-hedged bond returns, we find that five factors explain 96.5% of the variation of bond

  17. 7 CFR 1726.27 - Contractor's bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contractor's bonds. 1726.27 Section 1726.27... AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES General § 1726.27 Contractor's bonds. (a) RUS Form 168b, Contractor's Bond, shall be used when a contractor's bond is required by RUS Forms 200, 257...

  18. Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, Vesselin, E-mail: vesselin@uctm.edu [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

  19. Sonographic Measurement of Fetal Ear Length in Turkish Women with a Normal Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucize Eriç Özdemir

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal fetal ear length is a feature of chromosomal disorders. Fetal ear length measurement is a simple measurement that can be obtained during ultrasonographic examinations. Aims: To develop a nomogram for fetal ear length measurements in our population and investigate the correlation between fetal ear length, gestational age, and other standard fetal biometric measurements. Study Design: Cohort study. Methods: Ear lengths of the fetuses were measured in normal singleton pregnancies. The relationship between gestational age and fetal ear length in millimetres was analysed by simple linear regression. In addition, the correlation of fetal ear length measurements with biparietal diameter, head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length were evaluated.Ear length measurements were obtained from fetuses in 389 normal singleton pregnancies ranging between 16 and 28 weeks of gestation. Results: A nomogram was developed by linear regression analysis of the parameters ear length and gestational age. Fetal ear length (mm = y = (1.348 X gestational age-12.265, where gestational ages is in weeks. A high correlation was found between fetal ear length and gestational age, and a significant correlation was also found between fetal ear length and the biparietal diameter (r=0.962; p<0.001. Similar correlations were found between fetal ear length and head circumference, and fetal ear length and femur length. Conclusion: The results of this study provide a nomogram for fetal ear length. The study also demonstrates the relationship between ear length and other biometric measurements.

  20. Relationship between surface area for adhesion and tensile bond strength--evaluation of a micro-tensile bond test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, H; Shono, T; Sonoda, H; Takatsu, T; Ciucchi, B; Carvalho, R; Pashley, D H

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the null hypothesis that there is no relationship between the bonded surface area of dentin and the tensile strength of adhesive materials. The enamel was removed from the occlusal surface of extracted human third molars, and the entire flat surface was covered with resin composite bonded to the dentin to form a flat resin composite crown. Twenty-four hours later, the bonded specimens were sectioned parallel to the long axis of the tooth into 10-20 thin sections whose upper part was composed of resin composite with the lower half being dentin. These small sections were trimmed using a high speed diamond bur into an hourglass shape with the narrowest portion at the bonded interface. Surface area was varied by altering the specimen thickness and width. Tensile bond strength was measured using custom-made grips in a universal testing machine. Tensile bond strength was inversely related to bonded surface area. At surface areas below 0.4 mm2, the tensile bond strengths were about 55 MPa for Clearfil Liner Bond 2 (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), 38 MPa for Scotchbond MP (3M Dental Products), and 20 MPa for Vitremer (3M Dental Products). At these small surface areas all of the bond failures were adhesive in nature. This new method permits measurement of high bond strengths without cohesive failure of dentin. It also permits multiple measurements to be made within a single tooth.

  1. Components inspection of Monju, a sodium bonded type control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Matsushita, Yuichi; Lee, Chunchan; Abe, Hideaki; Watahiki, Naohisa

    2002-03-01

    This Report addresses a result of a sodium test conducted on components of a Double Poral Filter Sodium Bonded Type Control Rod that is expected to be a next generation, long life Control Rod. Upper and lower Poral Filter Sodium Bonded Type Control Rod components were mocked up to conduct a sodium test. During the test, sodium chargeability, formation of Gas Plenum at the upper part of the components, sodium drain-ability and NaOH clean-ability were recognized under actual plant condition. The following are results obtained: (1) Sodium Chargeability at Control Rod Insertion to EVST. Sodium was charged into the components when the mocked-up was inserted in sodium of 190degC, with insertion speed of 6 m/min which is an actual insertion speed to EVST. (2) Formation of Upper Gas Plenum by Helium Gas generated in Control Rod Components Gas Plenum formation within deviation of 9% was confirmed by releasing helium gas into the mocked-up which is immersed in sodium of 620degC and 190degC. Length of Gas Plenum is confirmed to be retained in certain length even if helium gas is further released into formed Gas Plenum. (3) Sodium Drain-ability of Control Rod Components when Drawing from EVST. Drain-ability was confirmed to be sufficient and no sodium residue was found in the mocked-up when the mocked-up was drawn out from sodium of 190degC, with drawing speed of 6 m/min which is an actual drawing speed from EVST. (4) Clean-ability of NaOH Solution against Sodium Residue in Control Rod Components. Sodium and NaOH solution reacted calmly, however, clean-ability was not sufficient. When Sodium fully remained in Control Rod Components, it made circulation of NaOH solution not enough. (author)

  2. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-Filled Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Chalipa, Javad; Akhondi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Arab, Sepideh; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT) was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel...

  3. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1965-04-01

    Aluminum can be bonded to zirconium without difficulty even when a thin layer of oxide is present on the surface of the zirconium . No detectable diffusion takes place during the bonding process. The bond layer can be stretched as much. as 8% without affecting the bond. The bond can be heated for 1000 hours at 260 o C (500 o F), and can be water quenched from 260 o C (500 o F) without any noticeable change in the bond strength. An extrusion technique has been devised for making transition sections of aluminum bonded to zirconium which can then be used to join these metals by conventional welding. Welding can be done close to the bond zone without seriously affecting the integrity of the bond. This method of bonding aluminum to Zircaloy-2 is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965. (author)

  4. Mechatronic modeling and simulation using bond graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shuvra

    2009-01-01

    Introduction to Mechatronics and System ModelingWhat Is Mechatronics?What Is a System and Why Model Systems?Mathematical Modeling Techniques Used in PracticeSoftwareBond Graphs: What Are They?Engineering SystemsPortsGeneralized VariablesBond GraphsBasic Components in SystemsA Brief Note about Bond Graph Power DirectionsSummary of Bond Direction RulesDrawing Bond Graphs for Simple Systems: Electrical and MechanicalSimplification Rules for Junction StructureDrawing Bond Graphs for Electrical SystemsDrawing Bond Graphs for Mechanical SystemsCausalityDrawing Bond Graphs for Hydraulic and Electronic Components and SystemsSome Basic Properties and Concepts for FluidsBond Graph Model of Hydraulic SystemsElectronic SystemsDeriving System Equations from Bond GraphsSystem VariablesDeriving System EquationsTackling Differential CausalityAlgebraic LoopsSolution of Model Equations and Their InterpretationZeroth Order SystemsFirst Order SystemsSecond Order SystemTransfer Functions and Frequency ResponsesNumerical Solution ...

  5. Factors affecting the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to different ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Abu AlReesh, Issam A; AlWahadni, Ahed M S

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to two different all-ceramic crowns, IPS Empress 2 and In-Ceram Alumina, to compare the SBS between hydrofluoric acid (HFA), phosphoric acid etched, and sandblasted, non-etched all-ceramic surfaces. Ninety-six all-ceramic crowns were fabricated resembling a maxillary left first premolar. The crowns were divided into eight groups: (1) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (2) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (3) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (4) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (5) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (6) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched In-Ceram crowns; (7) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; and (8) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched In-Ceram crowns. Metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded using a conventional light polymerizing adhesive resin. An Instron universal testing machine was used to determine the SBS at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/minute. Comparison between groups was performed using a univariate general linear model and chi-squared tests. The highest mean SBS was found in group 3 (120.15 +/- 45.05 N) and the lowest in group 8 (57.86 +/- 26.20 N). Of all the variables studied, surface treatment was the only factor that significantly affected SBS (P Empress 2 and In-Ceram groups.

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