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Sample records for silicon oxycarbide cmc

  1. Synthesis, Characterization and Optical Constants of Silicon Oxycarbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Faisal Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High refractive index glasses are preferred in integrated photonics applications to realize higher integration scale of passive devices. With a refractive index that can be tuned between SiO2 (1.45 and a-SiC (3.2, silicon oxycarbide SiOC offers this flexibility. In the present work, silicon oxycarbide thin films from 0.1 – 2.0 μm thickness are synthesized by reactive radio frequency magnetron sputtering a silicon carbide SiC target in a controlled argon and oxygen environment. The refractive index n and material extinction coefficient k of the silicon oxycarbide films are acquired with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry over the UV-Vis-NIR wavelength range. Keeping argon and oxygen gases in the constant ratio, the refractive index n is found in the range from 1.41 to 1.93 at 600 nm which is almost linearly dependent on RF power of sputtering. The material extinction coefficient k has been estimated to be less than 10-4 for the deposited silicon oxycarbide films in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. Morphological and structural characterizations with SEM and XRD confirms the amorphous phase of the SiOC films.

  2. Experimental analysis of silicon oxycarbide thin films and waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Faisal Ahmed; Morichetti, Francesco; Somaschini, Claudio; Iseni, Giosue; Melloni, Andrea

    2017-05-01

    Silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) thin films are produced with reactive rf magnetron sputtering of a silicon carbide (SiC) target on Si (100) and SiO2/Si substrates under varying deposition conditions. The optical properties of the deposited SiOC thin films are characterized with spectroscopic ellispometry at multiple angles of incidence over a wavelength range 300- 1600 nm. The derived optical constants of the SiOC films are modeled with Tauc-Lorentz model. The refractive index n of the SiOC films range from 1.45 to 1.85 @ 1550 nm and the extinction coefficient k is estimated to be less than 10-4 in the near-infrared region above 1000 nm. The topography of SiOC films is studied with SEM and AFM giving rms roughness of 0.9 nm. Channel waveguides with a SiOC core with a refractive index of 1.7 have been fabricated to demonstrate the potential of sputtered SiOC for integrated photonics applications. Propagation loss as low as 0.39 +/- 0.05 dB/mm for TE and 0.41 +/- 0.05 dB/mm for TM polarizations at telecommunication wavelength 1550 nm is demonstrated.

  3. Strong Photoluminescence Enhancement of Silicon Oxycarbide through Defect Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Ford

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The following study focuses on the photoluminescence (PL enhancement of chemically synthesized silicon oxycarbide (SiCxOy thin films and nanowires through defect engineering via post-deposition passivation treatments. SiCxOy materials were deposited via thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD, and exhibit strong white light emission at room-temperature. Post-deposition passivation treatments were carried out using oxygen, nitrogen, and forming gas (FG, 5% H2, 95% N2 ambients, modifying the observed white light emission. The observed white luminescence was found to be inversely related to the carbonyl (C=O bond density present in the films. The peak-to-peak PL was enhanced ~18 and ~17 times for, respectively, the two SiCxOy matrices, oxygen-rich and carbon-rich SiCxOy, via post-deposition passivations. Through a combinational and systematic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and PL study, it was revealed that proper tailoring of the passivations reduces the carbonyl bond density by a factor of ~2.2, corresponding to a PL enhancement of ~50 times. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent and temperature-dependent time resolved PL (TDPL and TD-TRPL behaviors of the nitrogen and forming gas passivated SiCxOy thin films were investigated to acquire further insight into the ramifications of the passivation on the carbonyl/dangling bond density and PL yield.

  4. Optimization of sol-gel/pyrolysis routes to silicon oxycarbide glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strachota, Adam; Černý, Martin; Chlup, Zdeněk; Šlouf, Miroslav; Hromádková, Jiřina; Pleštil, Josef; Šandová, Hana; Glogar, Petr; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Havelcová, Martina; Schweigstillová, Jana; Dlouhý, Ivo; Kozák, Vladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 358, č. 20 (2012), s. 2771-2782 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : silicon oxycarbide * siloxane * pyrolysis Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; JI - Composite Materials (USMH-B); JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics (UFM-A) Impact factor: 1.597, year: 2012

  5. Polymer-Derived Silicon Oxycarbide Ceramics as Promising Next-Generation Sustainable Thermoelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousaalya, Adhimoolam Bakthavachalam; Zeng, Xiaoyu; Karakaya, Mehmet; Tritt, Terry; Pilla, Srikanth; Rao, Apparao M

    2018-01-24

    We demonstrate the potential of polymer-derived ceramics (PDC) as next-generation sustainable thermoelectrics. Thermoelectric behavior of polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) ceramics (containing hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) as filler) was studied as a function of measurement temperature. SiOC, sintered at 1300 °C exhibited invariant low thermal conductivity (∼1.5 W/(m·K)) over 30-600 °C, coupled with a small increase in both Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, with increase in measurement temperature (30-150 °C). SiOC ceramics containing 1 wt % h-BN showed the highest Seebeck coefficient (-33 μV/K) for any PDC thus far.

  6. Use of hexamethyldisiloxane for p-type microcrystalline silicon oxycarbide layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Prabal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO as an oxygen source for the growth of p-type silicon-based layers deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition is evaluated. The use of this source led to the incorporation of almost equivalent amounts of oxygen and carbon, resulting in microcrystalline silicon oxycarbide thin films. The layers were examined with characterisation techniques including Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Dark Conductivity, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy to check material composition and structure. Materials studies show that the refractive indices of the layers can be tuned over the range from 2.5 to 3.85 (measured at 600 nm and in-plane dark conductivities over the range from 10-8 S/cm to 1 S/cm, suggesting that these doped layers are suitable for solar cell applications. The p-type layers were tested in single junction amorphous silicon p-i-n type solar cells.

  7. Synthesis and In Vitro Activity Assessment of Novel Silicon Oxycarbide-Based Bioactive Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gonzalo-Juan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel bioactive glasses based on a Ca- and Mg-modified silicon oxycarbide (SiCaMgOC were prepared from a polymeric single-source precursor, and their in vitro activity towards hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated upon incubating the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF at 37 °C. The as-prepared materials exhibit an outstanding resistance against devitrification processes and maintain their amorphous nature even after exposure to 1300 °C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the SiCaMgOC samples after the SBF test showed characteristic reflections of apatite after only three days, indicating a promising bioactivity. The release kinetics of the Ca2+ and Mg2+ and the adsorption of H+ after immersion of SiCaMgOC in simulated body fluid for different soaking times were analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The results show that the mechanism of formation of apatite on the surface of the SiCaMgOC powders is similar to that observed for standard (silicate bioactive glasses. A preliminary cytotoxicity investigation of the SiOC-based bioactive glasses was performed in the presence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF as well as human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293. Due to their excellent high-temperature crystallization resistance in addition to bioactivity, the Ca- and Mg-modified SiOC glasses presented here might have high potential in applications related to bone repair and regeneration.

  8. Preparation and characterisation of mixed silicon oxycarbide materials; Preparacion y caracterizacion de materiales de oxicarburo de silicio mixtos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellez, L.; Tamayo, A.; Mazo, M. A.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.

    2010-07-01

    In this work different mixed Silicon oxicarbide materials have been prepared. Si, Si-Ti, Si-Zr and Si-Al oxicarbide materials have been obtained from pyrolisis at 1000 degree centigrade and 1300 degree centigrade of the respective preceramic materials. After pyrolisis X, D and T units of the oxycarbide structure have been observed in such materials. They show the presence of Si-C and Si-O bonds in a given material. The characterization has been carried out by means of FT-IR, Raman NMR {sup 2}9Si, NMR {sup 1}3C and XRD. The formation of Si-Ti, Si-Zr and Si-Al bonds has been estimated in accordance with the decrease of the Si-O-Si wave number observed in the FT-IR spectra. Si and Si-Ti oxycarbide materials do not lead to crystallisation after pyrolisis at highest temperatures, however for Si-Zr and Si-Al oxycarbide materials different crystalline phases have been observed. All pyrolised materials present free and carbidic carbon. After pyrolisis at 1300 degree centigrade the free carbon reacts with Si-O bonds to form SiC{sub 4} groups which must be assigned to nucleus of the {beta}-SiC crystals. (Author)

  9. Changes in structure and in mechanical properties during the pyrolysis conversion of crosslinked polymethylsiloxane and polymethylphenylsiloxane resins to silicon oxycarbide glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Martin; Chlup, Zdeněk; Strachota, Adam; Halasová, Martina; Rýglová, Šárka; Schweigstillová, Jana; Svítilová, Jaroslava; Havelcová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2015), s. 6237-6247 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/12/2445 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68081723 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : hardness * silicon oxycarbide * pyrolysis * indentation modulus * precursor Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials; JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.758, year: 2015

  10. A cytotoxicity study of silicon oxycarbide nanowires as cell scaffold for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagonegro, P.; Rossi, F. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Galli, C., E-mail: carlo.galli@unipr.it [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Smerieri, A. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Alinovi, R.; Pinelli, S. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Rimoldi, T. [Physics and Earth Science Department, Parma University, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Attolini, G. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Macaluso, G.; Macaluso, C. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological, and Translational Sciences, Parma University, via Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Saddow, S.E. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, ENB118 Tampa, Florida (United States); Salviati, G. [IMEM-CNR Institute, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy)

    2017-04-01

    Goal: Nanowires are promising biomaterials in multiple clinical applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of carbon-doped silica nanowires (SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs) on a fibroblastic cell line in vitro. Materials and methods: SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs were grown on Si substrates by CVD process. Murine L929 fibroblasts were cultured in complete DMEM and indirect and direct cytotoxicity tests were performed in agreement with ISO 19003-5, by quantitating cell viability at MTT and chemiluminescent assay. Cell cultures were investigated at Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and immunocytochemistry to observe their morphology and investigate cell-NWs interactions. Furthermore, hemocompatibility with Platelet-rich Plasma was assayed at SEM and by ELISA assay. Results: SiOxCy NWs proved biocompatible and did not impair cell proliferation at contact assays. L929 were able to attach on NWs and proliferate. Most interestingly, L929 reorganised the NW scaffold by displacing the nanostructure and creating tunnels within the NW network. NWs moreover did not impair platelet activation and behaved similarly to flat SiO{sub 2}. Conclusions: Our data show that SiOxCy NWs did not release cytotoxic species and acted as a viable and adaptable scaffold for fibroblastic cells, thus representing a promising platform for implantable devices. - Highlights: • NWs did not release cytotoxic species. • Fibroblasts reorganised the NWs network, adapting it to their needs. • Blood tests with platelet-rich plasma and dynamic blood coagulation tests showed oxycarbide NWs induced platelet activation. • Carbon-doped SiO{sub x}C{sub y} NWs network are a promising biomaterial for implantable scaffolds for tissue regeneration.

  11. Surface modification of aluminum nitride by polysilazane and its polymer-derived amorphous silicon oxycarbide ceramic for the enhancement of thermal conductivity in silicone rubber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien Tang; Sukachonmakul, Tanapon; Kuo, Ming Tai; Wang, Yu Hsiang; Wattanakul, Karnthidaporn

    2014-02-01

    Polysilazane (PSZ) and its polymer-derived amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) ceramic were coated on aluminum nitride (AlN) by using a dip-coating method to allow moisture-crosslinking of PSZ on AlN, followed by heat treatment at 700 °C in air to convert PSZ into SiOC on AlN. The results from FTIR, XPS and SEM indicated that the surface of AlN was successfully coated by PSZ and SiOC film. It was found that the introduction of PSZ and SiOC film help improve in the interfacial adhesion between the modified AlN (PSZ/AlN and SiOC/AlN) and silicone rubber lead to the increase in the thermal conductivity of the composites since the thermal boundary resistance at the filler-matrix interface was decreased. However, the introduction of SiOC as an intermediate layer between AlN and silicone rubber could help increase the thermal energy transport at the filler-matrix interface rather than using PSZ. This result was due to the decrease in the surface roughness and thickness of SiOC film after heat treatment at 700 °C in air. Thus, in the present work, a SiOC ceramic coating could provide a new surface modification for the improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the thermally conductive filler and the matrix in which can enhance the thermal conductivity of the composites.

  12. Tailored synthesis of monodispersed nano/submicron porous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) spheres with improved Li-storage performance as an anode material for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huimin; Yuan, Anbao; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2017-10-01

    A spherical silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) material (monodispersed nano/submicron porous SiOC spheres) is successfully synthesized via a specially designed synthetic strategy involving pyrolysis of phenyltriethoxysilane derived pre-ceramic polymer spheres at 900 °C. In order to prevent sintering of the pre-ceramic polymer spheres upon heating, a given amount of hollow porous SiO2 nanobelts which are separately prepared from tetraethyl orthosilicate with CuO nanobelts as templates are introduced into the pre-ceramic polymer spheres before pyrolysis. This material is investigated as an anode for lithium-ion batteries in comparison with the large-size bulk SiOC material synthesized under the similar conditions but without hollow SiO2 nanobelts. The maximum reversible specific capacity of ca. 900 mAh g-1 is delivered at the current density of 100 mA g-1 and ca. 98% of the initial capacity is remained after 100 cycles at 100 mA g-1 for the SiOC spheres material, which are much superior to the bulk SiOC material. The improved lithium storage performance in terms of specific capacity and cyclability is attributed to its particular morphology of monodisperse nano/submicron porous spheres as well as its modified composition and microstructure. This SiOC material has higher Li-storage activity and better stability against volume expansion during repeated lithiation and delithiation cycling.

  13. Type of precursor and synthesis of silicon oxycarbide (SiOxCyH) thin films with a surfatron microwave oxygen/argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkiewicz-Pietrzykowska, Agnieszka; Espinos, J. P.; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R.

    2006-01-01

    Siliconelike thin films (i.e., SiO x C y H z ) were prepared in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor from structurally different organosilicon precursors [i.e., hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), dimethylsilane (DMS), and tetramethylsilane (TMS)]. The films were deposited at room temperature by using different oxygen/argon ratios in the plasma gas. By changing the type of precursor and the relative concentration of oxygen in the plasma, thin films with different compositions (i.e., O/C ratio) and properties are obtained. In general, raising the oxygen concentration in the plasma produces the progressive removal of the organic moieties from the films whose composition and structure then approach those of silicon dioxide. The deposition rate was highly dependent on the type of precursor, following the order HMDSO>>DMS>TMS. The polarizabilities, optical band gaps, and surface free energy of the films also depended on the thin film composition and structure. It is proposed that the Si-O bonds existing in HMDSO is the main factor controlling the distinct reactivity of this precursor and is also responsible for the different compositions and properties of the SiO x C y H z thin films prepared with very low or no oxygen in the plasma gas

  14. Synthesis and structural characterization of Al4SiC4-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbide, [Al4.4Si0.6][O1.0C2.0]C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Motoaki; Iwata, Tomoyuki; Nakano, Hiromi; Fukuda, Koichiro

    2010-01-01

    A new quaternary layered oxycarbide, [Al 4.39(5) Si 0.61(5) ] Σ5 [O 1.00(2) C 2.00(2) ] Σ3 C, has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The title compound was found to be hexagonal with space group P6 3 /mmc, Z=2, and unit-cell dimensions a=0.32783(1) nm, c=2.16674(7) nm and V=0.20167(1) nm 3 . The atom ratios Al:Si were determined by EDX, and the initial structural model was derived by the direct methods. The final structural model showed the positional disordering of one of the three types of Al/Si sites. The maximum-entropy methods-based pattern fitting (MPF) method was used to confirm the validity of the split-atom model, in which conventional structure bias caused by assuming intensity partitioning was minimized. The reliability indices calculated from the MPF were R wp =3.73% (S=1.20), R p =2.94%, R B =1.04% and R F =0.81%. The crystal was an inversion twin. Each twin-related individual was isostructural with Al 4 SiC 4 (space group P6 3 mc, Z=2). - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbide discovered in the Al-Si-O-C system, Al 4 SiC 4 -homeotypic [Al 4.4 Si 0.6 ][O 1.0 C 2.0 ]C. The crystal is an inversion twin, and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. The three-dimensional electron density distributions are determined by the maximum-entropy methods-based pattern fitting, being consistent with the disordered structural model.

  15. (CMC)/gum arabic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    material, which is widely used as food additives, washes, paste, etc. It is an anionic and ... This was ascribed to the good interaction between cassava starch and CMC ... drugs and also release the heavy metals to improve the agricultural soil.

  16. The composition and character of oxycarbide phase in uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kezhao; Lai Xinchun; Yu Yong; Ni Ranfu

    1999-08-01

    The oxide layer of uranium metal formed by vacuum heating were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). XPS results indicated that the air-exposed surface of the oxide layer were mainly consisted of UO 2 and free carbon. After the air-exposed surface were removed by low energy argon ion sputtering, C1s spectra shifted from 284.8 eV to 281.8 eV, indicating the existence of carbide phase. AES results of C(KVV) Auger transitions confirmed this result. Resolved and fitted using a combination of Gaussian and Lorentzian peak shape, U4f 7/2 spectra showed that three uranium chemical states existed in the layer, there were uranium dioxide, uranium carbide (or oxycarbide, UC x O 1-x ) and uranium metal phase. Calculated the AES data by relatively sensitive factor, the composition of oxycarbide was given as UC 0.41+-0.04 O 0.62+-0.01

  17. An unusual temperature dependence in the oxidation of oxycarbide layers on uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walton P.

    1981-09-01

    An anomalous temperature dependence has been observed for the oxidation kinetics of outermost oxycarbide layers on polycrystalline uranium metal. Normally, oxidation or corrosion reactions are expected to proceed more rapidly as the temperature is elevated. Thus, it came as a surprise when we observed that the removal of the outermost atomic layers of carbon from uranium oxycarbide by O 2 reproducibly proceeds at a much faster rate at 25°C than at 280°C.

  18. Phase transformations in titanium oxycarbide TiC0.545O0.08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.; Em, V.T.; Savenko, B.N.; Batdemberel, G.

    2003-01-01

    Phase transformations in titanium oxycarbide TiC 0.545 O 0.08 have been studied by the methods of neutron diffraction and X-ray structure analysis. It was established that the ordered cubic structure δ ' (sp. gr. Fd3m) of the oxycarbide sample is the low-temperature ordered phase existing up to 990 K. The order-disorder phase transition (990 K) results in the formation of an ordered trigonal structure (sp. gr. R3-barm or P3 1 21). The α-Ti-phase is separated at the temperature 1020 K. The order-disorder phase transition was found at T = 1040 K

  19. Synthesis of Titanium Oxycarbide from Titanium Slag by Methane-Containing Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jie; Fatollahi-Fard, Farzin; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2018-02-01

    In this study, reaction steps of a process for synthesis of titanium oxycarbide from titanium slag were demonstrated. This process involves the reduction of titanium slag by a methane-hydrogen-argon mixture at 1473 K (1200 °C) and the leaching of the reduced products by hydrofluoric acid near room temperature to remove the main impurity (Fe3Si). Some iron was formed by disproportionation of the main M3O5 phase before gaseous reduction started. Upon reduction, more iron formed first, followed by reduction of titanium dioxide to suboxides and eventually oxycarbide.

  20. Fabrication of Uranium Oxycarbide Kernels for HTR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, Charles; Richardson, Clay; Nagley, Scott; Hunn, John; Shaber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has been producing high quality uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels for Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel tests at the Idaho National Laboratory. In 2005, 350-(micro)m, 19.7% 235U-enriched UCO kernels were produced for the AGR-1 test fuel. Following coating of these kernels and forming the coated-particles into compacts, this fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 2006 until November 2009. B and W produced 425-(micro)m, 14% enriched UCO kernels in 2008, and these kernels were used to produce fuel for the AGR-2 experiment that was inserted in ATR in 2010. B and W also produced 500-(micro)m, 9.6% enriched UO2 kernels for the AGR-2 experiments. Kernels of the same size and enrichment as AGR-1 were also produced for the AGR-3/4 experiment. In addition to fabricating enriched UCO and UO2 kernels, B and W has produced more than 100 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels which are being used in coating development tests. Successive lots of kernels have demonstrated consistent high quality and also allowed for fabrication process improvements. Improvements in kernel forming were made subsequent to AGR-1 kernel production. Following fabrication of AGR-2 kernels, incremental increases in sintering furnace charge size have been demonstrated. Recently small scale sintering tests using a small development furnace equipped with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) has increased understanding of how kernel sintering parameters affect sintered kernel properties. The steps taken to increase throughput and process knowledge have reduced kernel production costs. Studies have been performed of additional modifications toward the goal of increasing capacity of the current fabrication line to use for production of first core fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and providing a basis for the design of a full scale fuel fabrication facility.

  1. CMC and Japanese University Students Studying English

    OpenAIRE

    Claro, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication (CMC) is becoming common in foreign language classes worldwide. In many countries, Japan included, students study English for years, rarely have the chance to use it. CMC has proven to be a viable and possibly even preferable alternative to face-to-face communication, providing an ideal environment in which English can be used in communicative situations. In addition to begin an environment where using learning, and modifying English takes place. CMC offers man...

  2. Control panel for CMC 8080 crate controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masayuki Inokuchi

    1978-01-01

    The main features of Control Panel for CAMAC Crate Controller CMC 8080 are described. The control panel can be directly connected with CRATE CONTROLLER's front panel connector with a 50 lines cable without any changes in CMC 8080 system circuits. (author)

  3. Proximity and Force Characteristics of CMC Touch Sensor with Square/Dome-shaped Sensor Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, T; Inaguma, N; Kakizaki, Y; Yamada, H; Tani, K

    2013-01-01

    A tactile sensor called Carbon Micro Coil (CMC) touch sensor was developed by CMC Technology Development Co., Ltd. The sensor's elements used in the experiments of this paper are made of silicon rubber containing CMCs several micrometers in diameter. One of the elements is molded into a square 30 mm on a side and 3 mm thick; the other is a dome 16 mm in diameter and 2 mm height. CMCs in the sensor element contribute to the electrical conductivity and the sensor element is considered to constitute an LCR circuit. When an object approaches to the sensor element or the sensor element is deformed mechanically, the impedance changes, and the CMC sensor detects the impedance changes by measuring the modulation of amplitude and phase of an input excitation signal to the sensor element. The CMC sensor also creates voltage signals of the R- and LC-components separately according to the amplitude and phase modulation. In this paper, the characteristics of the CMC sensor with respect to its proximity and force senses are investigated. First, the output of the CMC sensor with the square-shaped sensor element is measured when an object approaches to the sensor element. Next, the output of the CMC sensor with the dome-shaped sensor element is measured when fine deformations of 1 to 5 μm are applied to the sensor element under variable compression force. The results suggest that the CMC sensor can measure the force variance applied to the sensor element as well as the distance between the sensor element and an object.

  4. Milestones Towards Hot CMC Structures for Operational Space Rentry Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, H.; Weihs, H.; Reimer, T.

    2002-01-01

    Hot structures made of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) for space reentry vehicles play a key role regarding feasibility of advanced and reusable future space transportation systems. Thus realization of applicable flight hardware concerning hot primary structures like a nose cap or body flaps and thermal protection systems (TPS) requires system competence w.r.t. sophisticated know how in material processing, manufacturing and qualification of structural components and in all aspects from process control, use of NDI techniques, arc jet testing, hot structure testing to flight concept validation. This goal has been achieved so far by DLR while following a dedicated development road map since more than a decade culminating at present in the supply of the nose cap system for NASA's X-38; the flight hardware has been installed successfully in October 2001. A number of unique hardware development milestones had to be achieved in the past to finally reach this level of system competence. It is the intention of this paper to highlight the most important technical issues and achievements from the essential projects and developments to finally provide a comprehensive insight into DLR's past and future development road map w.r.t. CMC hot structures for space reentry vehicles. Based on DLR's C/C-SiC material which is produced with the inhouse developed liquid silicon infiltration process (LSI) the development strategy first concentrated on basic material properties evaluation in various arc jet testing facilities. As soon as a basic understanding of oxidation and erosion mechanisms had been achieved further efforts concentrated on inflight verification of both materials and design concepts for hot structures. Consequently coated and uncoated C/C-SiC specimens were integrated into the ablative heat shield of Russian FOTON capsules and they were tested during two missions in 1992 and 1994. Following on, a hot structure experiment called CETEX which principally was a kind of a

  5. A review of selected aspects of the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, B.F.

    1994-04-01

    A selective review is presented of previous measurements and the analysis of experiments on the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide. Evidence for the time-dependent composition of the uranium oxycarbide fuel; the diffusional release of fission gas; and the initial, rapid and limited release of stored fission gas is discussed. In regard to the initial, rapid release of fission gas, clear restrictions on mechanistic hypotheses can be deduced from the experimental data. However, more fundamental experiments may be required to establish the mechanism of the rapid release

  6. Ultra-low Cost, Lightweight, Molded, Chalcogenide Glass-Silicon Oxycarbide Composite Mirror Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — After optical performance, the most important metric for advanced optical systems is the areal cost (cost per square meter of collecting aperture). Future NASA space...

  7. CMC vane assembly apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, Anthony L; Gonzalez, Malberto F; Huang, Kuangwei; Radonovich, David C

    2012-10-23

    A metal vane core or strut (64) is formed integrally with an outer backing plate (40). An inner backing plate (38) is formed separately. A spring (74) with holes (75) is installed in a peripheral spring chamber (76) on the strut. Inner and outer CMC shroud covers (46, 48) are formed, cured, then attached to facing surfaces of the inner and outer backing plates (38, 40). A CMC vane airfoil (22) is formed, cured, and slid over the strut (64). The spring (74) urges continuous contact between the strut (64) and airfoil (66), eliminating vibrations while allowing differential expansion. The inner end (88) of the strut is fastened to the inner backing plate (38). A cooling channel (68) in the strut is connected by holes (69) along the leading edge of the strut to peripheral cooling paths (70, 71) around the strut. Coolant flows through and around the strut, including through the spring holes.

  8. Turbine Airfoil With CMC Leading-Edge Concept Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for gas turbine engine hot-sections. When the Navy s Harrier fighter experienced engine (Pegasus F402) failure because of leading-edge durability problems on the second-stage high-pressure turbine vane, the Office of Naval Research came to the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for test support in evaluating a concept for eliminating the vane-edge degradation. The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) was selected for testing since it could provide temperature, pressure, velocity, and combustion gas compositions that closely simulate the engine environment. The study focused on equipping the stationary metal airfoil (Pegasus F402) with a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) leading-edge insert and evaluating the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. The test exposed the component, with and without the CMC insert, to the harsh engine environment in an unloaded condition, with cooling to provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The insert was made using an AlliedSignal Composites, Inc., enhanced HiNicalon (Nippon Carbon Co. LTD., Yokohama, Japan) fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite (SiC/SiC CMC) material fabricated via chemical vapor infiltration. This insert was 45-mils thick and occupied a recessed area in the leading edge and shroud of the vane. It was designed to be free floating with an end cap design. The HPBR tests provided a comparative evaluation of the temperature response and leading-edge durability and included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were aircooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the exact set of internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). In addition to documenting the temperature response of the metal vane for comparison with the CMC, a demonstration of improved leading-edge durability was a primary goal. First, the

  9. Preparation of silicon oxynitrocarbide (SiONC) and of its ceramic-fibre-composites via hydrosilylation/radical polymerization/pyrolysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strachota, Adam; Černý, Martin; Chlup, Zdeněk; Šlouf, Miroslav; Brus, Jiří; Pleštil, Josef; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Havelcová, Martina; Halasová, Martina

    423-424, 1 September (2015), s. 9-17 ISSN 0022-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/12/2445 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : silicon oxynitrocarbide * silicon oxycarbide * hydrosilylation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; JI - Composite Materials (USMH-B); JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics (UFM-A) Impact factor: 1.825, year: 2015

  10. Annealing of chromium oxycarbide coatings deposited by plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) for aluminum die casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; He, X.M.; Trkula, M.; Nastasi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Chromium oxycarbide coatings have been investigated for use as non-wetting coatings for aluminum die casting. This paper examines Cr-C-O coating stability and non-wetability at elevated temperatures for extended periods. Coatings were deposited onto 304 stainless steel from chromium carbonyl [Cr(CO) 6 ] by plasma immersion ion processing. The coatings were annealed in air at an aluminum die casting temperature of 700 deg. C up to 8 h. Coatings were analyzed using resonant ion backscattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometry. Molten aluminum was used to determine coating wetting and contact angle. Results indicate that the surface oxide layer reaches a maximum thickness of 900 nm. Oxygen concentrations in the coatings increased from 24% to 34%, while the surface concentration rose to almost 45%. Hardness values ranged from 22.1 to 6.7 GPa, wear coefficients ranged from 21 to 8x10 -6 mm 3 /Nm and contact angles ranged from 156 deg. to 127 deg

  11. Qualification Approach for the CMC Nose Cap of X-38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, H.; Gülhan, A.

    2002-01-01

    In October 2001 the flight hardware of the TPS nose assembly of X-38 has been installed at the main structure of the X-38 V201 vehicle at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. X-38 is a test vehicle for the planned Crew Return Vehicle CRV for the International Space Station ISS. Currently the flight of the X-38 is scheduled for 2005. Besides the Body flaps (MAN-T) and the nose skirt system (ASTRIUM, MAN-T) the nose cap system is one of the essential hot structure components that were developed within Germany's national TETRA (Technologies for future space transportation systems) programme. The integration of the hardware was an important milestone for the nose cap development which started approx. 5 years ago. DLR-Stuttgart is responsible for the design and manufacturing of the CMC based nose cap system, which has to withstand the extreme thermal loads during re-entry which will induce a maximum temperature up to 1750 °C on the surface of the cap. Thus, the shell of the cap system is designed and manufactured using DLR's C/C-SiC material which is a special kind of carbon based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material produced via the in house liquid silicon infiltration process of DLR. This material has demonstrated its good temperature resistance during FOTON and EXPRESS re-entry capsule missions. Besides the design and manufacturing of the nose cap system, the qualification approach was an important effort of the development work. Missing a test facility which is able to simulate all loading conditions from lift off to re-entry and landing, is was necessary to separate the loads and to use different test facilities. Considering the limitations of the facilities, the budget and time constraints, an optimized test philosophy has been established. The goal was to use a full scale qualification unit including all TPS components of the nose area for most of the tests. These were the simulation of ascent loads given by the shuttle requirements and descent loads

  12. The influence of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) on shale stability; Influencia do carboximetilcelulose (CMC) na estabilidade de folhelhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles Filho, Antonio Alves de; Quezada, Augusto Eduardo Donoso [Grupo Ultra, XX (Brazil). Setor de Vendas Petroleo; Oliveira, Telma de [Grupo Ultra, XX (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento

    1988-12-31

    The methodology used in developing high and low viscosity purified CMC`s specific to salty and saturated drilling fluids is discussed. It is shown how CMC carboxy methyl groups, molecular weight, and uniformity of substitution affect the action of these products, decreasing overall drilling costs, substantially increasing penetration rates, and affording greater well wall stability. (author) 5 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Gradient Interphase, 3-D Fiber Architecture CMC's, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A clear need exists for the next generation of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) for Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), propulsion hardware, and other high temperature...

  14. Thin-walled reinforcement lattice structure for hollow CMC buckets

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter

    2017-06-27

    A hollow ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine bucket with an internal reinforcement lattice structure has improved vibration properties and stiffness. The lattice structure is formed of thin-walled plies made of CMC. The wall structures are arranged and located according to high stress areas within the hollow bucket. After the melt infiltration process, the mandrels melt away, leaving the wall structure to become the internal lattice reinforcement structure of the bucket.

  15. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) are being developed for use as enabling materials for advanced aeropropulsion engine and high speed civil transport applications. The characterization and testing of these advanced materials in hostile, high-temperature environments require accurate measurement of the material temperatures. Commonly used wire Thermo-Couples (TC) can not be attached to this ceramic based material via conventional spot-welding techniques. Attachment of wire TC's with commercially available ceramic cements fail to provide sufficient adhesion at high temperatures. While advanced thin film TC technology provides minimally intrusive surface temperature measurement and has good adhesion on the CMC, its fabrication requires sophisticated and expensive facilities and is very time consuming. In addition, the durability of lead wire attachments to both thin film TC's and the substrate materials requires further improvement. This paper presents a newly developed attachment technique for installation of free filament wire TC's with a unique convoluted design on ceramic based materials such as CMC's. Three CMC's (SiC/SiC CMC and alumina/alumina CMC) instrumented with type IC, R or S wire TC's were tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig. The CMC temperatures measured from these wire TC's were compared to that from the facility pyrometer and thin film TC's. There was no sign of TC delamination even after several hours exposure to 1200 C. The test results proved that this new technique can successfully attach wire TC's on CMC's and provide temperature data in hostile environments. The sensor fabrication process is less expensive and requires very little time compared to that of the thin film TC's. The same installation technique/process can also be applied to attach lead wires for thin film sensor systems.

  16. Lightweight, Ultra-High-Temperature, CMC-Lined Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Matthew J.; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) is an established engineering material used extensively in aerospace. The beneficial properties of C/C include high strength, low density, and toughness. Its shortcoming is its limited usability at temperatures higher than the oxidation temperature of carbon . approximately 400 C. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are used instead, but carry a weight penalty. Combining a thin laminate of CMC to a bulk structure of C/C retains all of the benefits of C/C with the high temperature oxidizing environment usability of CMCs. Ultramet demonstrated the feasibility of combining the light weight of C/C composites with the oxidation resistance of zirconium carbide (ZrC) and zirconium- silicon carbide (Zr-Si-C) CMCs in a unique system composed of a C/C primary structure with an integral CMC liner with temperature capability up to 4,200 F (.2,315 C). The system effectively bridged the gap in weight and performance between coated C/C and bulk CMCs. Fabrication was demonstrated through an innovative variant of Ultramet fs rapid, pressureless melt infiltration processing technology. The fully developed material system has strength that is comparable with that of C/C, lower density than Cf/SiC, and ultra-high-temperature oxidation stability. Application of the reinforced ceramic casing to a predominantly C/C structure creates a highly innovative material with the potential to achieve the long-sought goal of long-term, cyclic high-temperature use of C/C in an oxidizing environment. The C/C substructure provided most of the mechanical integrity, and the CMC strengths achieved appeared to be sufficient to allow the CMC to perform its primary function of protecting the C/C. Nozzle extension components were fabricated and successfully hot-fire tested. Test results showed good thermochemical and thermomechanical stability of the CMC, as well as excellent interfacial bonding between the CMC liner and the underlying C/C structure. In particular, hafnium-containing CMCs on

  17. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points

  18. Large-Scale Molded Silicon Oxycarbide Composite Components for Ultra-Low-Cost Lightweight Mirrors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Next-generation telescopes need mirrors that are extremely stable, lightweight, and affordable. Semplastics has developed a novel, innovative ceramic material which...

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Used to Quantify the Effect of Pyrolysis Conditions on the Oxidative Stability of Silicon Oxycarbide Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This work was undertaken in support of the Low Cost Ceramic Composite Virtual Company, (LC^3), whose members include Northrop Grumman Corporation, AlliedSignal Inc., and Allison Advanced Development Company. LC^3 is a cost-shared effort funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and the LC^3 participants to develop a low-cost fabrication methodology for manufacturing ceramic matrix composite structural components. The program, which is being administered by the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory Materials Directorate, is focused on demonstrating a ceramic matrix composite turbine seal for a regional aircraft engine. This part is to be fabricated by resin transfer molding of a siloxane polymer into a fiber preform that will be transformed into a ceramic by pyrolytic conversion.

  20. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  1. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN CMC SEBAGAI SENYAWA PENSTABIL TERHADAP YOGHURT TEPUNG GEMBILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Cakrawati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to determine the effect of CMC in preventing yoghurt separation in 7 days with the addition of 2% Dioscorea esculenta flour. Organoleptic test using quality hedonic was conducting to find out yoghurt with addition of CMC that had accepted characteristic by panelists. Research was carried out using regression method to determine the total titrated acid, pH and separation level of yoghurt during storage. The concentrations of CMC were added at 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%. The analysis showed the addition of 0.6% CMC showed the lowest separation with high viscosity grades of DPAs 40.25. Yoghurt storage for 7 days shows a graph of the pH value and total titrated acid were parabolic where increasing in total titrated acid value would lower the pH value. Yoghurt was damaged on the 7th day of storage at room temperature characterized by the increasing in the pH value and damage to the organoleptics properties, namely yoghurt flavor and aroma.

  2. Radiation synthesis of superabsorbent CMC based hydrogels for agriculture applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raafat, Amany I.; Eid, Mona; El-Arnaouty, Magda B.

    2012-01-01

    A series of superabsorbent hydrogel based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) crosslinked with gamma irradiation have been proposed for agriculture application. The effect of preparation conditions such as feed solution composition and absorbed irradiation dose on the gelation and swelling degree was evaluated. The structure and the morphology of the superabsorbent CMC/PVP hydrogel were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique (FTIR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Effect of ionic strength and cationic and anionic kinds on the swelling behavior of the obtained hydrogel was investigated. Urea as an agrochemical model was loaded onto the obtained hydrogel to provide nitrogen (N) nutrients. The water retention capability and the urea release behavior of the CMC/PVP hydrogels were investigated. It was found that, the obtained CMC/PVP hydrogels have good swelling degree that greatly affected by its composition and absorbed dose. The swelling was also extremely sensitive to the ionic strength and cationic kind. Owing to its considerable slow urea release, good water retention capacity, being economical, and environment-friendly, it might be useful for its application in agriculture field.

  3. Radiation synthesis of superabsorbent CMC based hydrogels for agriculture applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raafat, Amany I.; Eid, Mona; El-Arnaouty, Magda B.

    2012-07-01

    A series of superabsorbent hydrogel based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) crosslinked with gamma irradiation have been proposed for agriculture application. The effect of preparation conditions such as feed solution composition and absorbed irradiation dose on the gelation and swelling degree was evaluated. The structure and the morphology of the superabsorbent CMC/PVP hydrogel were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique (FTIR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Effect of ionic strength and cationic and anionic kinds on the swelling behavior of the obtained hydrogel was investigated. Urea as an agrochemical model was loaded onto the obtained hydrogel to provide nitrogen (N) nutrients. The water retention capability and the urea release behavior of the CMC/PVP hydrogels were investigated. It was found that, the obtained CMC/PVP hydrogels have good swelling degree that greatly affected by its composition and absorbed dose. The swelling was also extremely sensitive to the ionic strength and cationic kind. Owing to its considerable slow urea release, good water retention capacity, being economical, and environment-friendly, it might be useful for its application in agriculture field.

  4. Radiation synthesis of superabsorbent CMC based hydrogels for agriculture applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raafat, Amany I., E-mail: ismaelraafat_a@hotmail.com [Polymer Chemistry Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Eid, Mona; El-Arnaouty, Magda B. [Polymer Chemistry Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-07-15

    A series of superabsorbent hydrogel based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) crosslinked with gamma irradiation have been proposed for agriculture application. The effect of preparation conditions such as feed solution composition and absorbed irradiation dose on the gelation and swelling degree was evaluated. The structure and the morphology of the superabsorbent CMC/PVP hydrogel were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique (FTIR), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Effect of ionic strength and cationic and anionic kinds on the swelling behavior of the obtained hydrogel was investigated. Urea as an agrochemical model was loaded onto the obtained hydrogel to provide nitrogen (N) nutrients. The water retention capability and the urea release behavior of the CMC/PVP hydrogels were investigated. It was found that, the obtained CMC/PVP hydrogels have good swelling degree that greatly affected by its composition and absorbed dose. The swelling was also extremely sensitive to the ionic strength and cationic kind. Owing to its considerable slow urea release, good water retention capacity, being economical, and environment-friendly, it might be useful for its application in agriculture field.

  5. Does CMC Promote Language Play? Exploring Humor in Two Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergriff, Ilona; Fuchs, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    In view of the growing body of research on humor and language play in computer-mediated communication (CMC) which--more than any other medium--has been associated with goofing off, joking, and other nonserious communication, this paper compares spontaneous foreign language play (L2 play) in text-only synchronous computer-mediated versus…

  6. CMC Hypersurfaces on Riemannian and Semi-Riemannian Manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdomo, Oscar M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the explicit formulas for constant mean curvature (CMC) immersion of hypersurfaces of Euclidean spaces, spheres and hyperbolic spaces given in Perdomo (Asian J Math 14(1):73–108, 2010; Rev Colomb Mat 45(1):81–96, 2011) to provide explicit examples of several families of immersions with constant mean curvature and non constant principal curvatures, in semi-Riemannian manifolds with constant sectional curvature. In particular, we prove that every h is an element of [-1,-(2√n-1/n can be realized as the constant curvature of a complete immersion of S 1 n-1 x R in the (n + 1)-dimensional de Sitter space S 1 n+1 . We provide 3 types of immersions with CMC in the Minkowski space, 5 types of immersion with CMC in the de Sitter space and 5 types of immersion with CMC in the anti de Sitter space. At the end of the paper we analyze the families of examples that can be extended to closed hypersurfaces.

  7. Rationale for Haze Formation after Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) Addition to Red Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Stephan; Dickescheid, Christian; Harbertson, James F; Fischer, Ulrich; Cohen, Seth D

    2016-09-14

    The aim of this study was to identify the source of haze formation in red wine after the addition of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and to characterize the dynamics of precipitation. Ninety commercial wines representing eight grape varieties were collected, tested with two commercial CMC products, and analyzed for susceptibility to haze formation. Seventy-four of these wines showed a precipitation within 14 days independent of the CMC product used. The precipitates of four representative samples were further analyzed for elemental composition (CHNS analysis) and solubility under different conditions to determine the nature of the solids. All of the precipitates were composed of approximately 50% proteins and 50% CMC and polyphenols. It was determined that the interactions between CMC and bovine serum albumin are pH dependent in wine-like model solution. Furthermore, it was found that the color loss associated with CMC additions required the presence of proteins and cannot be observed with CMC and anthocyanins alone.

  8. SYLRAMICTM SiC fibers for CMC reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Richard E.; Petrak, Dan; Rabe, Jim; Szweda, Andy

    2000-01-01

    Dow Corning researchers developed SYLRAMIC SiC fiber specifically for use in ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) components for use in turbine engine hot sections where excellent thermal stability, high strength and high thermal conductivity are required. This is a stoichiometric SiC fiber with a high degree of crystallinity, high tensile strength, high tensile modulus and good thermal conductivity. Owing to the small diameter, this textile-grade fiber can be woven into 2-D and 3-D structures for CMC fabrication. These properties are also of high interest to the nuclear community. Some initial studies have shown that SYLRAMIC fiber shows very good dimensional stability in a neutron flux environment, which offers further encouragement. This paper will review the properties of SYLRAMIC SiC fiber and then present the properties of polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processed CMC made with this fiber at Dow Corning. While these composites may not be directly applicable to applications of interest to this audience, we believe that the properties shown will give good evidence that the fiber should be suitable for high temperature structural applications in the nuclear arena

  9. Molecular precursor derived silicon boron carbonitride/carbon nanotube and silicon oxycarbide/carbon nanotube composite nanowires for energy based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil

    Molecular precursor derived ceramics (also known as polymer-derived ceramics or PDCs) are high temperature glasses that have been studied for applications involving operation at elevated temperatures. Prepared from controlled thermal degradation of liquid-phase organosilicon precursors, these ceramics offer remarkable engineering properties such as resistance to crystallization up to 1400 °C, semiconductor behavior at high temperatures and intense photoluminescence. These properties are a direct result of their covalent bonded amorphous network and free (-sp2) carbon along with mixed Si/B/C/N/O bonds, which otherwise can not be obtained through conventional ceramic processing techniques. This thesis demonstrates synthesis of a unique core/shell type nanowire structure involving either siliconboroncarbonitride (SiBCN) or siliconoxycarbide (SiOC) as the shell with carbon nanotube (CNT) acting as the core. This was made possible by liquid phase functionalization of CNT surfaces with respective polymeric precursor (e.g., home-made boron-modified polyureamethylvinylsilazane for SiBCN/CNT and commercially obtained polysiloxane for SiOC/CNT), followed by controlled pyrolysis in inert conditions. This unique architecture has several benefits such as high temperature oxidation resistance (provided by the ceramic shell), improved electrical conductivity and mechanical toughness (attributed to the CNT core) that allowed us to explore its use in energy conversion and storage devices. The first application involved use of SiBCN/CNT composite as a high temperature radiation absorbant material for laser thermal calorimeter. SiBCN/CNT spray coatings on copper substrate were exposed to high energy laser beams (continuous wave at 10.6 mum 2.5 kW CO2 laser, 10 seconds) and resulting change in its microstructure was studied ex-situ. With the aid of multiple techniques we ascertained the thermal damage resistance to be 15 kW/cm -2 with optical absorbance exceeding 97%. This represents one order of magnitude improvement over bare CNTs (1.4 kW/cm-2) coatings and two orders of magnitude over the conventional carbon paint (0.1 kW/cm -2) currently in use. The second application involved use of SiBCN/CNT and SiOC/CNT composite coatings as energy storage (anode) material in a Li-ion rechargeable battery. Anode coatings (~1mg/cm-2) prepared using SiBCN/CNT synthesized at 1100 °C exhibited high reversible (useable) capacity of 412 mAh/g -1 even after 30 cycles. Further improvement in reversible capacity was obtained for SiOC/CNT coatings with 686 mAh/g-1 at 40 cycles and approximately 99.6% cyclic efficiency. Further, post cycling imaging of dissembled cells indicated good mechanical stability of these anodes and formation of a stable passivating layer necessary for long term cycling of the cell. This improved performance was collectively attributed to the amorphous ceramic shell that offered Li storage sites and the CNT core that provided the required mechanical strength against volume changes associated with repeated Li-cycling. This novel approach for synthesis of PDC nanocomposites and its application based testing offers a starting point to carry out further research with a variety of PDC chemistries at both fundamental and applied levels.

  10. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC whey product as protein source for growing pigs 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Näsi

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available A digestibility and balance trial was performed with three growing pigs to evaluate the nutritive value and protein utilization of a carboxymethyl cellulose(CMC whey product used to replace 50 % or 100 % of the dried skim supplement in a barley-based diet. The effect of CMC whey on clinical chemical blood parameters was also investigated. The CMC whey protein contained 39.6 % crude protein and 36.0 % true protein in DM. The proportion of CMC in the product was 18.3% of DM. CMC whey had high contents of lysine, cystine, methionine and threonine: 10.3, 2.9, 2.1 and 5.6 g/16 g N, respectively. NFE digestibility was lower on the CMC whey diet than on the skim milk diet (P < 0.05. Faecal excretion of CMC averaged 59.0 %. Protein utilization was effective on the CMC whey diet: 69.9 % of absorbed N was retained. Judging from the blood analyses, the CMC whey product did not have any detrimental effect on the metabolism or health of the pigs. The CMC whey product is well suited as a protein supplement in pig feeding because of its high contents of essential amino acids.

  11. Combined Photoemission Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Study of a Mixture of (Oxy)carbides as Potential Innovative Supports and Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo, Laura; Valero-Vidal, Carlos; Agnoli, Stefano; Sezen, Hikmet; Rüdiger, Celine; Kunze-Liebhäuser, Julia; Granozzi, Gaetano

    2016-08-03

    Active and stable non-noble metal materials, able to substitute Pt as catalyst or to reduce the Pt amount, are vitally important for the extended commercialization of energy conversion technologies, such as fuel cells and electrolyzers. Here, we report a fundamental study of nonstoichiometric tungsten carbide (WxC) and its interaction with titanium oxycarbide (TiOxCy) under electrochemical working conditions. In particular, the electrochemical activity and stability of the WxC/TiOxCy system toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction (EOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are investigated. The chemical changes caused by the applied potential are established by combining photoemission spectroscopy and electrochemistry. WxC is not active toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction at room temperature but it is highly stable under these conditions thanks to the formation of a passive thin film on the surface, consisting mainly of WO2 and W2O5, which prevents the full oxidation of WxC. In addition, WxC is able to adsorb ethanol, forming ethoxy groups on the surface, which constitutes the first step for the ethanol oxidation. The interaction between WxC and TiOxCy plays an important role in the electrochemical stability of WxC since specific orientations of the substrate are able to stabilize WxC and prevent its corrosion. The beneficial interaction with the substrate and the specific surface chemistry makes tungsten carbide a good electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells. However, WxC is active toward the HER and chemically stable under hydrogen reduction conditions, since no changes in the chemical composition or dissolution of the film are observed. This makes tungsten carbide a good candidate as electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for the electrochemical production of hydrogen.

  12. Effect of the addition of CMC on the aggregation behaviour of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.; Sabato, S.F.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the aggregation of formulation based on calcium caseinate, commercial whey protein (WPC), and a 1:1 mixture of soy protein isolate (SPI) and whey protein isolate (WPI) was investigated. Protein aggregation could be observed upon addition of CMC, as demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. This aggregation behaviour was enhanced by means of physical treatments, such as heating at 90 deg. C for 30 min or gamma-irradiation at 32 kGy. A synergy resulted from the combination of CMC to gamma-irradiation in Caseinate/CMC and SPI/WPI/CMC formulations. Furthermore, CMC prevented precipitation in irradiated protein solutions for a period of more than 3 months at 4 deg. C

  13. Effect of the addition of CMC on the aggregation behaviour of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.; Sabato, S.F.; D' Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M. E-mail: monique.lacroix@inrs-iaf.uquebec.ca

    2004-10-01

    The effect of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the aggregation of formulation based on calcium caseinate, commercial whey protein (WPC), and a 1:1 mixture of soy protein isolate (SPI) and whey protein isolate (WPI) was investigated. Protein aggregation could be observed upon addition of CMC, as demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. This aggregation behaviour was enhanced by means of physical treatments, such as heating at 90 deg. C for 30 min or gamma-irradiation at 32 kGy. A synergy resulted from the combination of CMC to gamma-irradiation in Caseinate/CMC and SPI/WPI/CMC formulations. Furthermore, CMC prevented precipitation in irradiated protein solutions for a period of more than 3 months at 4 deg. C.

  14. Overview of Cooperative Monitoring Concepts and the CMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biringer, Kent L.

    1999-01-01

    Cooperative monitoring holds the promise of utilizing many technologies from conflicts of the past to implement agreements of peace in the future. Important approaches to accomplish this are to develop the framework for assessing monitoring opportunities and to provide education and training on the technologies and experience available for sharing with others. The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories is working closely with agencies throughout the federal government, academics at home and abroad, and regional organizations to provide the technical tools needed to assess, design, analyze, and implement these cooperative agreements. In doing so, the goals of building regional confidence and increasing trust and communication can be furthered

  15. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of CMC from water hyacinth for lithium-ion battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Sahrul; Susanty, Riveli, Nowo; Suroto, Bambang Joko; Rahayu, Iman

    2018-02-01

    Recently, the most dominating power supply on the mobile electronics market are rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries. This is because of a higher energy density and longer lifetime compared to similar rechargeable battery systems. One of the components that determine the performance of a lithium ion battery is the binder material, whether at the anode or the cathode. In commercial batteries, the material used as the binder is Polyvinylidene Difluoride (PVDF), with n-methyl-2-phyrrolidone (NMP) as the solvent. Both are synthetic materials that are expensive, toxic and harmful to the environment. An alternative binder material for lithium-ion battery electrodes is CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) in a water solvent. CMC is cheaper than PVDF, non-toxic and more environmental friendly. CMC can be synthesized from several types of plants, such as water hyacinth, which is a weed plant with high cellulose content. The synthesis of CMC consists of three main steps, namely 1) the isolation process from water hyacinth, 2) the alkalization and carboxymethylation process and 3) the purification process to obtain CMC in high purity. FTIR characterization of the CMC shows five region of absorption bands. The bands in the region 1330-1400 cm-1 are due to symmetrical deformations of CH2 and OH groups. The ether bonds in CMC occur in the fingerprint region of 1250-1060 cm-1. The presence of new and strong absorption band around 1600 cm-1 is confirmed to the stretching vibration of the carboxyl group (COO-), while the one around 1415 cm-1 is assigned to carboxyl groups as it salts. The broad absorption band above 3400 cm-1 is due to the stretching frequency of the hydroxyl group (-OH). Purity test on three samples (CMC mesh-100, CMC mesh-60 and CMC, mesh-40) gives purity values of 99.89%, 99.99% and 99.89%, respectively. This proves that CMC have actually been formed with high purity.

  17. Assessment of NDE methods for detecting cracks and damage in environmental barrier coated CMC tested under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Gorican, Daniel; Rauser, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    For validating physics based analytical models predicting spallation life of environmental barrier coating (EBC) on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and kinetics of crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under engine operating conditions. In this study, a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS) based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (MI SiC/SiC) specimen was tensile tested at room temperature. Multiple tests were performed on a single specimen with increasing predetermined stress levels until final failure. During loading, the damage occurring in the EBC was monitored by digital image correlation (DIC). After unloading from the predetermined stress levels, the specimen was examined by optical microscopy and computed tomography (CT). Results indicate both optical microscopy and CT could not resolve the primary or secondary cracks developed during tensile loading until failure. On the other hand, DIC did show formation of a primary crack at ~ 50% of the ultimate tensile strength and this crack grew with increasing stress and eventually led to final failure of the specimen. Although some secondary cracks were seen in the DIC strain plots prior to final failure, the existence of these cracks were not confirmed by other methods. By using a higher resolution camera, it is possible to improve the capability of DIC in resolving secondary cracks and damage in coated specimen tested at room temperature, but use of DIC at high temperature requires significant development. Based on the current data, it appears that both optical microscopy and CT do not offer any hope for detecting crack initiation or determining crack growth in EBC coated CMC tested at room or high temperatures after the specimen has been unloaded. Other methods such as, thermography and optical/SEM of the polished cross section of EBC coated CMC specimens stressed to

  18. Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) in L2 Oral Proficiency Development: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huifen

    2015-01-01

    The ever growing interest in the development of foreign or second (L2) oral proficiency in a computer-mediated communication (CMC) classroom has resulted in a large body of studies looking at both the direct and indirect effects of CMC interventions on the acquisition of oral competences. The present study employed a quantitative meta-analytic…

  19. Preparation of crosslinked carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) by 60 Co γ-ray irradiation and its biodegradable properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Youn Mook; Lee, Joon Ho; Nho, Young Chang; Son, Tae Il

    2007-01-01

    Biodegradable and biocompatible carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogels for personal care products such as infants diapers and feminine hygiene products were prepared by a γ- irradiation crosslinking technique. Hydrogels were prepared as a function of the CMC concentration, total dose, and degree of substitution (DS), and their physical properties such as the gel fraction, swelling ratio, pH-responsibility and biodegradability were investigated. The irradiation of an aqueous CMC solution led to a gelation in an aqueous solution of more than 10 w%, and the gel percent increased as the CMC concentration, total dose and DS increased. The equilibrium swelling behaviors of the hydrogels prepared in various conditions were examined in an aqueous solution, and the pH-response at a pH of 1.2 and 6.8 was investigated. CMC hydrogels showed a high gelation at a high CMC concentration with DS 1.2. Lastly, the effects of the crosslinking degree of the CMC on the hydrolysis reaction were examined by cellulase from Trichoderma reseei. It was found that the degradable reaction depended on the degree of the crosslinking of the CMC. Intermolecular crosslinking reactions were confirmed by the ESR spectra

  20. A CMC conference-focus heads-up. Paper A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plourde, J.

    2011-01-01

    'Predictability' [definition - 'Dependable Outcomes Based on Pre-Verified Plans and Processes'] - is key to nuclear industry public and stakeholder confidence - predictability in public, employee, and environmental safety; in reliable production; in improvement and refurbishment project execution; and in overall financial performance. CMC 2011 addresses this by focusing on; Utility experience with optimally-managed outages in well-run plants, on the ways-of-working processes, tools and behaviors required by the industry to succeed; applying lessons-learned to hugely-complex and scope-expansion prone projects like refurbishments- and eventually new-build. Configuration management, operating chemistry, Utility/Service-Provider interfaces, and intelligent replication are explored along the way. (author)

  1. Analysis of cash flow ratios: A study on CMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cash flow ratios help financial users get relevant information about financial resources for a given time. Cash flow ratios are now used more than the traditional ones because it is more effective and justified. Cash flow based ratios are especially surprising because they do not only play a significant role in the credit rating of evaluation, but also forecast the failure of a corporation. In this study, we perform an empirical investigation on a company named CMC. From the study, it is clear that the liquidity and solvency positions of the company were moderate whereas the company maintained low profitability. On the other hand, the efficiency and sufficiency ratios of the study give us a new look on financial judgement.

  2. A CMC conference-focus heads-up. Paper A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plourde, J. [J.A. Plourde Performance Ltd., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    'Predictability' [definition - 'Dependable Outcomes Based on Pre-Verified Plans and Processes'] - is key to nuclear industry public and stakeholder confidence - predictability in public, employee, and environmental safety; in reliable production; in improvement and refurbishment project execution; and in overall financial performance. CMC 2011 addresses this by focusing on; Utility experience with optimally-managed outages in well-run plants, on the ways-of-working processes, tools and behaviors required by the industry to succeed; applying lessons-learned to hugely-complex and scope-expansion prone projects like refurbishments- and eventually new-build. Configuration management, operating chemistry, Utility/Service-Provider interfaces, and intelligent replication are explored along the way. (author)

  3. Drainage Behavior in Soap Films Above and Below the CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, S.; Adelizzi, E. A.; Troian, S. M.

    2003-11-01

    We investigate through laser interferometry the drainage behavior of Newtonian soap films initially entrained on a fiber frame at small and constant capillary number. The initial film thickness is sufficiently small that gravitational drainage is presumed minimal. The drainage of rigid soap films by capillary forces alone should proceed according to h(t) ˜ t^- 1/2. Our experimental results show much more rapid drainage with exponents as large as -2, especially for those solutions whose surfactant concentrations are below the CMC. Video recordings of the entire film surface reveal a variety of structures during the drainage process, some attributable to marginal regeneration. Though still a controversial issue, this regeneration process is believed to be caused by surfactant accumulation in the meniscus region (1). We show that modification of the relevant capillary drainage equation to account for Marangoni effects through a course-grained slip condition at the air-liquid interface produces exponents in better agreement with experimental findings. (1) V. A. Nierstrasz and G. Frens, JCIS 215, 28 (1999).

  4. Peer Evaluation in CMC Learning Environment and Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mellati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peer evaluation and technology-based instruction as the various domains of language teaching perspectives might affect language development. Group work in a technology-based environment might be more successful when learners are involved in developing the assessment process particularly peer assessment. This study investigated the effectiveness of peer evaluation in technology-based language environment and its effects on English writing ability. To reach this goal, 70 Iranian learners were participated in English language writing context. They were divided into two groups, one group assigned to CMC (Computer-Mediated Communication language learning context and the other assigned to a traditional learning environment. Both groups were encouraged to evaluate their classmates’ writing tasks. In addition, interviews were conducted with two learners. Comparing these two groups provides comprehensive guidelines for teachers as well as curriculum designers to set adjusted writing language environment for more effective and creative language teaching and learning. E-collaboration classroom tasks have high intrinsic motivation as well as significant effects on learners’ outcomes. Cooperative tasks specifically in technology-based environment lead learners to group working and consequently group learning. Computer-Mediated Communication is meaningful, especially in contexts in which teachers stimulate group work activities.

  5. Study of induced cross-linking by ionizing radiation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, Mara T.S.; Chirinos, Hugo; Amaral, Renata H.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2005-01-01

    The polymeric hydrogels are materials with capacity to absorb great amount of water. They present interesting characteristics for many applications in the industry and as biomaterials. The hydrogel membrane with PVP, poly ethylene glycol and agar, crosslinked and sterilized simultaneously by radiation was introduced in the European market and now it is reaching other regions. In this work the hydrogel studied was synthesized with PVP and CMC and crosslinked by gamma radiation. It was applied factorial planning methodology using the gel fraction as basic parameter. Antagonistic interaction was observed between PVP and CMC. High concentrations of PVP help the crosslinking and the opposite with CMC. On the other hand, for low concentrations of PVP the dose influences considerable the gel fraction what it does not happen for high concentrations. From these results it was made an analysis of response surface allowing the optimization of the concentrations of the variables PVP and CMC. (author)

  6. A case study of learning writing in service-learning through CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunxiang; Ren, LiLi; Liu, Xiaomian; Song, Yinjie; Wang, Jie; Li, Jiaxin

    2011-06-01

    Computer-mediated communication ( CMC ) through online has developed successfully with its adoption by educators. Service Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates community service with academic instruction and reflection to enrich students further understanding of course content, meet genuine community needs, develop career-related skills, and become responsible citizens. This study focuses on an EFL writing learning via CMC in an online virtual environment of service places by taking the case study of service Learning to probe into the scoring algorithm in CMC. The study combines the quantitative and qualitative research to probe into the practical feasibility and effectiveness of EFL writing learning via CMC in service learning in China.

  7. Calibration of 3D Woven Preform Design Code for CMC Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mechanical and thermal performance of CMC components benefit from low part count, integrally fabricated designs of 3D woven reinforcement. The advantages of these...

  8. Statistical applications for chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC) in the pharmaceutical industry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdick, Richard K; Pfahler, Lori B; Quiroz, Jorge; Sidor, Leslie; Vukovinsky, Kimberly; Zhang, Lanju

    2017-01-01

    This book examines statistical techniques that are critically important to Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Control (CMC) activities. Statistical methods are presented with a focus on applications unique to the CMC in the pharmaceutical industry. The target audience consists of statisticians and other scientists who are responsible for performing statistical analyses within a CMC environment. Basic statistical concepts are addressed in Chapter 2 followed by applications to specific topics related to development and manufacturing. The mathematical level assumes an elementary understanding of statistical methods. The ability to use Excel or statistical packages such as Minitab, JMP, SAS, or R will provide more value to the reader. The motivation for this book came from an American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) short course on statistical methods applied to CMC applications presented by four of the authors. One of the course participants asked us for a good reference book, and the only book recomm...

  9. Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) Daily Snow Depth Analysis Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of a Northern Hemisphere subset of the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) operational global daily snow depth analysis. Data include daily...

  10. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  11. The dynamic magnetoviscoelastic properties of biomineralized (Fe3O4) PVP-CMC hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ayan; Saha, Nabanita; Saha, Petr

    2017-05-01

    The Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) based polymer matrix was used as a template for the preparation of magnetic hydrogel. This freshly prepared PVP-CMC hydrogel template was successfully mineralized by in situ synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) via chemical co-precipitation reaction using liquid diffusion method. The present study emphasizes on the rheological behavior of non-mineralized and mineralized PVP-CMC hydrogels. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-TR), Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and dynamic magneto rheometer were used to study the morphological, physical, chemical and magnetic properties of nanoparticle (Fe3O4) filled PVP-CMC hydrogel respectively in order to monitor how Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles affects the mechanical properties of the hydrogel network. The storage (G') and loss (G") moduli with a complex viscosity of the system was measured using a parallel plate rheometer. Frequency and amplitude sweep with temperature variation was performed to determine the frequency and amplitude dependent magneto viscoelastic moduli for both hydrogel samples. A strong shear thinning effect was observed in both (non-mineralized and mineralized) PVP-CMC hydrogels, which confirm that Fe3O4 filled magnetic hydrogels, are pseudoplastic in nature. This Fe3O4 filled PVP-CMC hydrogel can be considered as stimuli-responsive soft matter that may be used as an actuator in medical devices.

  12. Silicon carbide recovered from photovoltaic industry waste as photocatalysts for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Hu, Yu [College of Material Science and Enginneering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Zeng, Hongmei [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Zhong, Lin, E-mail: zhonglin@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Liu, Kewei; Cao, Hongmei [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Li, Wei [College of Material Science and Enginneering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Yan, Hongjian, E-mail: hjyan@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • SiC was recovered from photovoltaic industry waste. • The recovered SiC is mainly consist of 3C-SiC, 6H-SiC and some silicon oxycarbides. • The recovered SiC shows photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution from water. - Abstract: In recent years, the focus on creating a dependable and efficient means to recycle or recover the valuable parts from the waste material has drawn significantly attention as an environmentally friendly way to deal with the industrial wastes. The silicon carbide (SiC) crystalline is one of reusable material in the slurry wastes generated during wafer slicing. Here we report the use of recovered SiC from the slurry wastes as photocatalysts to produce hydrogen in the presence of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}S as electron donor. The recovered SiC were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra (XPS), UV–vis (UV–vis) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The morphology of SiC loaded with 1 wt% Pt as cocatalyst by thermal-reduction method was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results reveal that the recovered SiC is mainly consist of 3C-SiC, 6H-SiC and some silicon oxycarbides on the surface of the SiC. The highest hydrogen production rate is 191.8 μmol h{sup −1} g{sup −1}. This study provides a way to recycle crystalline SiC from the discharged waste in the photovoltaic industry and reuse it as photocatalyst to yield hydrogen with the advantage of low energy consumption, low pollution and easy operation.

  13. Statistical Analysis of CMC Constituent and Processing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornuff, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are the next "big thing" in high-temperature structural materials. In the case of jet engines, it is widely believed that the metallic superalloys currently being utilized for hot structures (combustors, shrouds, turbine vanes and blades) are nearing their potential limits of improvement. In order to allow for increased turbine temperatures to increase engine efficiency, material scientists have begun looking toward advanced CMCs and SiC/SiC composites in particular. Ceramic composites provide greater strength-to-weight ratios at higher temperatures than metallic alloys, but at the same time require greater challenges in micro-structural optimization that in turn increases the cost of the material as well as increases the risk of variability in the material s thermo-structural behavior. to model various potential CMC engine materials and examines the current variability in these properties due to variability in component processing conditions and constituent materials; then, to see how processing and constituent variations effect key strength, stiffness, and thermal properties of the finished components. Basically, this means trying to model variations in the component s behavior by knowing what went into creating it. inter-phase and manufactured by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and melt infiltration (MI) were considered. Examinations of: (1) the percent constituents by volume, (2) the inter-phase thickness, (3) variations in the total porosity, and (4) variations in the chemical composition of the Sic fiber are carried out and modeled using various codes used here at NASA-Glenn (PCGina, NASALife, CEMCAN, etc...). The effects of these variations and the ranking of their respective influences on the various thermo-mechanical material properties are studied and compared to available test data. The properties of the materials as well as minor changes to geometry are then made to the computer model and the detrimental effects

  14. Preparation of CMC-modified melamine resin spherical nano-phase change energy storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Zhanhua; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-01-30

    A novel carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified melamine-formaldehyde (MF) phase change capsule with excellent encapsulation was prepared by in situ polymerization. Effects of CMC on the properties of the capsules were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the CMC-modified capsules had an average diameter of about 50nm and good uniformity. The phase change enthalpy of the capsules was increased and the cracking ratio decreased by incorporating a suitable amount of CMC. The optimum phase change enthalpy of the nanocapsules was 83.46J/g, and their paraffin content was 63.1%. The heat resistance of the capsule shells decreased after CMC modification. In addition, the nanocapsule cracking ratio of the nanocapsules was 11.0%, which is highly attractive for their application as nano phase change materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiation Synthesis of Super absorbent CMC Based Hydrogels For Agriculture Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raafat, A.I.; Eid, M.; El-Arnaouty, M.B.

    2010-01-01

    A good hydrogels of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) and poly vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) were synthesized by gamma radiation at different doses and compositions. The prepared hydrogels were characterized by (FTIR) and (SEM). The hydrogels properties such as gelation (%), swelling and water retention capability were investigated. As the content of PVP in PVP/CMC hydrogels increased the gelation (%) increased. The swelling ratio of prepared hydrogel decreased with increasing of irradiation doses and the temperature. The (PVP/CMC) hydrogen of composition (40:60) prepared at 20 kGy showed the highest swelling ratio. The addition of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) to the PVP/CMC hydrogels during the irradiation process decreases the swelling ratio. The water retention reveals a similar behavior for the different compositions. The swelling characteristics in the presence of different cations and anions in a swelling medium were studied. The hydrogels were also loaded with urea solutions as a model agrochemical and their potential application for controlled release has been investigated. The improve properties of the prepared materials suggested that, the (PVP/CMC) hydrogels can be use in agriculture applications

  16. Development of the Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences MEDL-CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015 the Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences took a leading role in increasing the level of support for Geoscience instructors by investing in the development of the Geosciences Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC). The MEDL-CMC is an innovative curriculum materials center designed to foster new collaborative teaching and learning environments by providing hands-on physical models combined with education technology for instructors and outreach coordinators. The mission of the MEDL-CMC is to provide advanced curriculum material resources for the purpose of increasing and sustaining high impact instructional capacity in STEM education for both formal and informal learning environments. This presentation describes the development methods being used to implement the MEDL-CMC. Major development methods include: (1) adopting a project management system to support collaborations with stakeholders, (2) using a diversified funding approach to achieve financial sustainability and the ability to evolve with the educational needs of the community, and (3) establishing a broad collection of systems-based physical analog models and data collection tools to support integrated sciences such as the geosciences. Discussion will focus on how these methods are used for achieving organizational capacity in the MEDL-CMC and on their intended role in reducing instructor workload in planning both classroom activities and research grant broader impacts.

  17. Micro-architecture embedding ultra-thin interlayer to bond diamond and silicon via direct fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Cheol; Kim, Jongsik; Xin, Yan; Lee, Jinhyung; Kim, Young-Gyun; Subhash, Ghatu; Singh, Rajiv K.; Arjunan, Arul C.; Lee, Haigun

    2018-05-01

    The continuous demand on miniaturized electronic circuits bearing high power density illuminates the need to modify the silicon-on-insulator-based chip architecture. This is because of the low thermal conductivity of the few hundred nanometer-thick insulator present between the silicon substrate and active layers. The thick insulator is notorious for releasing the heat generated from the active layers during the operation of devices, leading to degradation in their performance and thus reducing their lifetime. To avoid the heat accumulation, we propose a method to fabricate the silicon-on-diamond (SOD) microstructure featured by an exceptionally thin silicon oxycarbide interlayer (˜3 nm). While exploiting the diamond as an insulator, we employ spark plasma sintering to render the silicon directly fused to the diamond. Notably, this process can manufacture the SOD microarchitecture via a simple/rapid way and incorporates the ultra-thin interlayer for minute thermal resistance. The method invented herein expects to minimize the thermal interfacial resistance of the devices and is thus deemed as a breakthrough appealing to the current chip industry.

  18. Radiation crosslinking of CMC-Na at low dose and its application as substitute for hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pengfei; Peng Jing; Li Jiuqiang; Wu Jilan

    2005-01-01

    The slight radiation-crosslinked CMC-Na as a substitute for hydrogel was prepared by gamma irradiation below gelation dose. The effects of various parameters such as absorbed dose, concentration of inorganic salts, pH, swelling temperature and swelling time on the swelling ratio in water were investigated in detail. This kind of slight crosslinked CMC-Na showed good water absorption below 60 deg. C, whereas, it became solution when heated up to 70 deg. C. Such CMC-Na gel is different from the true gel that is insoluble in boiled water; nevertheless, it can be used as hydrogel at room temperature and produced at low dose. Due to its low cost, it might be useful for its application in agriculture or others

  19. Overview of CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Grady, Joseph E.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Wiesner, Valerie L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    In support of NASAs Aeronautics Research Mission, the Glenn Research Center has developed and assessed various constituents for a high temperature (2700F) SiCSiC CMC system for turbine engine applications. Combinations of highly creep-resistant SiC fibers, advanced 3D weaves, durable environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), and a 2700F-capable hybrid SiC matrix are being developed evaluated. The resulting improvements in CMC mechanical properties and durability will be summarized. The development and validation of models for predicting the effects of the environment on the durability of CMCs and EBCs and other operating-environment challenges including the effect of CMAS (calcium magnesium aluminosilicate) degradation of EBCs will be discussed. Progress toward the development of CMC joining technology for 2400F joint applications will also be reviewed.

  20. Effect of CMC and arabic gum in the manufacture of jackfruit velva (Artocarpus heterophyllus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudhistira, B.; Riyadi, N. H.; Pangestika, A. D.; Pertiwi, S. R.

    2018-03-01

    Velva is one type of frozen dessert which is made from fruit/vegetable with ice cream maker, low fat and high fiber content. Jackfruit is a raw material for the manufacture of velva because of the high fiber content of 2.31 gr. The use of a stabilizers combination of CMC and arabic gum in the manufacture of velva will provide a better gel mix than single use. The purpose of this research is to know the influence of variation of CMC and arabic gum stabilizer on the characteristics (physical, chemical, and sensory) of jackfruit velva (Artocarpus heterophyllus) and determine variations in the most appropriate combinations of stabilizers to produce jackfruit velva with the best quality. This research applied Completely Randomized Design consist of one factor which is the combination of CMC and arabic gum levels in the making of jackfruit velva with two replicates and two replications of the analysis. The data obtained then analyzed statistically using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA), when there is a significant difference, then followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT) at significance level of 0.05. The results of this study concluded that the jackfruit velva with the addition of various concentrations of CMC and arabic gum is significantly affecting the taste, texture and overall parameters, but no significant difference on the color and flavor parameters of jackfruit velva. Based on the results of physical characteristics, chemical and sensory jackfruit velva with the addition of a stabilizing concentration of CMC and arabic gum 1: 1 result in best jackfruit velva. The best jackfruit velva with stabilizing the concentration of CMC and arabic gum 1: 1 contains a water content of 61.95%, dietary fiber 2.231%, total dissolved solids 20.38 °Brix, overrun 19.709%, meltdown 28.215 minutes. As for the color attribute score 3.72; Taste 4; flavor 3.60; Texture 3.68, and overall 3.88.

  1. Biodegradation of PVP-CMC hydrogel film: a useful food packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Niladri; Saha, Nabanita; Kitano, Takeshi; Saha, Petr

    2012-06-20

    Hydrogels can offer new opportunities for the design of efficient packaging materials with desirable properties (i.e. durability, biodegradability and mechanical strength). It is a promising and emerging concept, as most of the biopolymer based hydrogels are supposed to be biodegradable, they can be considered as alternative eco-friendly packaging materials. This article reports about synthetic (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)) and biopolymer (carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)) based a novel hydrogel film and its nature of biodegradability under controlled environmental condition. The dry hydrogel films were prepared by solution casting method and designated as 'PVP-CMC hydrogel films'. The hydrogel film containing PVP and CMC in a ratio of 20:80 shows best mechanical properties among all the test samples (i.e. 10:90, 20:80, 50:50, 80:20 and 90:10). Thus, PVP-CMC hydrogel film of 20:80 was considered as a useful food packaging material and further experiments were carried out with this particular hydrogel film. Biodegradation of the PVP-CMC hydrogel films were studied in liquid state (Czapec-Dox liquid medium+soil extracts) until 8 weeks. Variation in mechanical, viscoelastic properties and weight loss of the hydrogel films with time provide the direct evidence of biodegradation of the hydrogels. About 38% weight loss was observed within 8 weeks. FTIR spectra of the hydrogel films (before and after biodegradation) show shifts of the peaks and also change in the peak intensities, which refer to the physico-chemical change in the hydrogel structure and SEM views of the hydrogels show how internal structure of the PVP-CMC film changes in the course of biodegradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. It's Just a Game, Right? Types of Play in Foreign Language CMC

    OpenAIRE

    Chantelle N. Warner

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on the various playful uses of language that occurred during a semester-long study of two German language courses using one type of synchronous network-based medium, the MOO. Research and use of synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) have flourished in the study of second-language acquisition (SLA) since the late 1990s; however, the primary focus has been on the potential benefits of using CMC to increase the amount of communication (Beauvois, 1997; Kern, 1995; W...

  3. Estimation of AOT and SDS CMC in a methanol using conductometry, viscometry and pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsionis, Anastasios I.; Vaimakis, Tiverios C.

    2012-09-01

    Critical micelle concentration (CMC) of two anionic surfactants in methanol was estimated using conductometry, viscometry and pyrene fluorescence spectroscopy methods. The surfactants used, were sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol-OT, AOT) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dispersed in pure methanol. The CMC determination was evaluated in room temperature. The results have shown nearly similar concentrations.

  4. Effects of Synchronous and Asynchronous Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) Oral Conversations on English Language Learners' Discourse Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuSeileek, Ali Farhan; Qatawneh, Khaleel

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of synchronous and asynchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) oral discussions on question types and strategies used by English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. The participants were randomly assigned to two treatment conditions/groups; the first group used synchronous CMC, while the second…

  5. Preparation of crosslinked carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) by {sup 60} Co γ-ray irradiation and its biodegradable properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Youn Mook; Lee, Joon Ho; Nho, Young Chang [Radiation Research Center for Industry and Environment, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Son, Tae Il [Dept. of Biotechnology, College of Industrial Science, Graduate School, Chung Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Biodegradable and biocompatible carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogels for personal care products such as infants diapers and feminine hygiene products were prepared by a γ- irradiation crosslinking technique. Hydrogels were prepared as a function of the CMC concentration, total dose, and degree of substitution (DS), and their physical properties such as the gel fraction, swelling ratio, pH-responsibility and biodegradability were investigated. The irradiation of an aqueous CMC solution led to a gelation in an aqueous solution of more than 10 w%, and the gel percent increased as the CMC concentration, total dose and DS increased. The equilibrium swelling behaviors of the hydrogels prepared in various conditions were examined in an aqueous solution, and the pH-response at a pH of 1.2 and 6.8 was investigated. CMC hydrogels showed a high gelation at a high CMC concentration with DS 1.2. Lastly, the effects of the crosslinking degree of the CMC on the hydrolysis reaction were examined by cellulase from Trichoderma reseei. It was found that the degradable reaction depended on the degree of the crosslinking of the CMC. Intermolecular crosslinking reactions were confirmed by the ESR spectra.

  6. Ni(0-CMC-Na Nickel Colloids in Sodium Carboxymethyl-Cellulose: Catalytic Evaluation in Hydrogenation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Karim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A recyclable catalyst, Ni(0-CMC-Na, composed of nickel colloids dispersed in a water soluble bioorganic polymer, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC-Na, was synthesized by a simple procedure from readily available reagents. The catalyst thus obtained is stable and highly active in alkene hydrogenations.

  7. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  8. Determination of Consciousness and Awareness of the Public in Lefka about the Cyprus Mining Corporation (CMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Serife; Erbulut, Can; Öznacar, Behcet; Bastas, Mert

    2016-01-01

    Supporting the increase of environmental consciousness with environmental education is always important in order to make healthy recommendations specific to the countries. Aim of this study is to determine the awareness and consciousness of the local community against the environmental pollution caused by the CMC mine by survey technique. 123…

  9. Language Learning Going Global: Linking Teachers and Learners via Commercial Skype-Based CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on students' use of face-to-face synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC) for oral language learning. It describes a university English language class designed to prepare students for overseas study in which a Skype-based English conversation school was piloted. The study offers analysis of how students used the CMC…

  10. Compact, Lightweight, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Based Acoustic Liners for Reducing Subsonic Jet Aircraft Engine Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Grady, Joseph E.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments have reduced fan and jet noise contributions to overall subsonic aircraft jet-engine noise. Now, aircraft designers are turning their attention toward reducing engine core noise. The NASA Glenn Research Center and NASA Langley Research Center have teamed to investigate the development of a compact, lightweight acoustic liner based on oxide/oxide ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials. The NASA team has built upon an existing oxide/oxide CMC sandwich structure concept that provides monotonal noise reduction. Oxide/oxide composites have good high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, which could allow them to perform as core liners at temperatures up to 1000C (1832F), and even higher depending on the selection of the composite constituents. NASA has initiated the evaluation of CMC-based liners that use cells of different lengths (variable-depth channels) or effective lengths to achieve broadband noise reduction. Reducing the overall liner thickness is also a major goal, to minimize the volume occupied by the liner. As a first step toward demonstrating the feasibility of our concepts, an oxide/oxide CMC acoustic testing article with different channel lengths was tested. Our approach, summary of test results, current status, and goals for the future are reported.

  11. Persistence of oral coatings of CMC and starch-based custard desserts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Kapper, C.; Borsboom, P.; Prinz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Food coatings that remain after swallowing starch-based or CMC-based custard desserts were investigated for 19 subjects. Foods were orally processed for 5 s using a pre-defined protocol, after which the food was swallowed. The remaining food coating was assessed sensorially as well as instrumentally

  12. Communication Challenges Learners Face Online: Why Addressing CMC and Language Proficiency Will Not Solve Learners' Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Ivannikova, Liubov

    2016-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication (CMC) has been argued to cause (mis)communication issues. Research and practice suggest a range of tactics and strategies for educators focused on how to encourage and foster communication in a virtual learning environment (VLE) (eg, Salmon). However, while frameworks such as Salmon's support the effective…

  13. My First CMC Article Revisited: A Window on Spanish L2 Interlanguage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The computer-assisted language learning (CALL) field seems to change overnight with new technological affordances. Blake revisits his 2000 "LLT" article on computer-mediation communication (CMC) in order to reflect on how the field has examined this topic over the past decade or so. While the Interaction Hypothesis continues to guide…

  14. CMC-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as new MRI probes for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitthichai, Sudarat; Pilapong, Chalermchai; Thongtem, Titipun; Thongtem, Somchai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs) are superparamagnetic. • CMC is water-soluble and nontoxic cellulose-derivative polymer. • CMC-coated Fe 3 O 4 NPs were successfully prepared by co-precipitation method. • The promising NPs that can be used for magnetic resonance imaging application. - Abstract: Pure Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were successfully prepared by co-precipitating of FeCl 2 ·4H 2 O and FeCl 3 ·6H 2 O in the solutions containing ammonia at 80 °C for 3 h. Phase, morphology, particle-sized distribution, surface chemistry, and weight loss were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this research, CMC-coated Fe 3 O 4 MNPs consisting of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ ions with 543.3-mM −1 s −1 high relaxivity were detected and were able to be used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) application with very good contrast for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without any further vectorization.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBOXY METHYL CELLULOSE (CMC FROM Eichornia crassipes (Mart Solms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Wijayani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC, a compound made made of eceng gondok has been implied for its characteristic by a constructive wet system, with media such as methanol, propanol and water. Four consecutive phases involving alkalization, carboxymethylization, neutralization and drainage were used in the making process of CMC. The first two process were prepared by reacting NaOH and ClCH2COONa with NaOH 22; 32.5; 39.2; 45.9 g and 20; 26; 32; 38 g ClCH2COONa respectively. Added acetic acid was used in the neutralization process, whilst drainage only involved heating in the oven. The overall result for each characteristic substitution degree, acidity; viscosity; contens of water consentration of NaCl and purity 0.4 - 0.85, 6.10 - 8.49, 3 - 10 cP, 3.57 - 19.4 %, 12.9 - 22.4 % and 77.96 - 87.09 % respectively. Based on the obtained characteristic, could be concluded that CMC is considered as a technical quality and can also be used as filler constituent in adhesive. Keywords: CMC, alkalization, carboxymethylization

  16. Calorimetric Evidence about the Application of the Concept of CMC to Asphaltene Self-Association

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Daniel Merino; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2005-01-01

    that asphaltenes may also have a concentration at which self-association occurs (CMC). This article presents evidence found by calorimetry and spectroscopic techniques, that suggest that this concept may not be adequate for asphaltene self-association in toluene solutions. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been...

  17. A LES-CMC formulation for premixed flames including differential diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrace, Daniele; Chung, Kyoungseoun; Bolla, Michele; Wright, Yuri M.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2018-05-01

    A finite volume large eddy simulation-conditional moment closure (LES-CMC) numerical framework for premixed combustion developed in a previous studyhas been extended to account for differential diffusion. The non-unity Lewis number CMC transport equation has an additional convective term in sample space proportional to the conditional diffusion of the progress variable, that in turn accounts for diffusion normal to the flame front and curvature-induced effects. Planar laminar simulations are first performed using a spatially homogeneous non-unity Lewis number CMC formulation and validated against physical-space fully resolved reference solutions. The same CMC formulation is subsequently used to numerically investigate the effects of curvature for laminar flames having different effective Lewis numbers: a lean methane-air flame with Leeff = 0.99 and a lean hydrogen-air flame with Leeff = 0.33. Results suggest that curvature does not affect the conditional heat release if the effective Lewis number tends to unity, so that curvature-induced transport may be neglected. Finally, the effect of turbulence on the flame structure is qualitatively analysed using LES-CMC simulations with and without differential diffusion for a turbulent premixed bluff body methane-air flame exhibiting local extinction behaviour. Overall, both the unity and the non-unity computations predict the characteristic M-shaped flame observed experimentally, although some minor differences are identified. The findings suggest that for the high Karlovitz number (from 1 to 10) flame considered, turbulent mixing within the flame weakens the differential transport contribution by reducing the conditional scalar dissipation rate and accordingly the conditional diffusion of the progress variable.

  18. Silicon photonics design from devices to systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chrostowski, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    From design and simulation through to testing and fabrication, this hands-on introduction to silicon photonics engineering equips students with everything they need to begin creating foundry-ready designs. In-depth discussion of real-world issues and fabrication challenges ensures that students are fully equipped for careers in industry. Step-by-step tutorials, straightforward examples, and illustrative source code fragments guide students through every aspect of the design process, providing a practical framework for developing and refining key skills. Offering industry-ready expertise, the text supports existing PDKs for CMOS UV-lithography foundry services (OpSIS, ePIXfab, imec, LETI, IME and CMC) and the development of new kits for proprietary processes and clean-room based research. Accompanied by additional online resources to support students, this is the perfect learning package for senior undergraduate and graduate students studying silicon photonics design, and academic and industrial researchers in...

  19. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  20. Effective utilization of agro-waste by application of CMC dry-gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio

    2008-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking, graft polymerization and degradation are useful technologies to improve polymer materials. Processability of radial tires and heat resistance of wire/cable is improved by crosslinking technology. Polysaccharides such as starch/cellulose of natural polymers and their derivatives are typical degradable polymers. Molecular weight of polysaccharides was remarkably reduced at lower dose, 50 kGy. To expand application field of polysaccharides, it is essential to obtain crosslinking structure. It was found that polysaccharide derivatives such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and carboxymethyl chitosan undergo crosslinking at past-like condition and form hydrogels. Concentration of past-like condition to induce crosslinking should be more than 10%. High molecular weight (Mw) and high degree of substitution (DS) is preferable for crosslinking of polysaccharide derivatives. In this paper, treatment of agro waste and improvement of Japanese traditional paper by addition of CMC dry gel is reported. (author)

  1. Exploring the usefulness of comprehensive care plans for children with medical complexity (CMC: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Home model recommends that Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN receive a medical care plan, outlining the child’s major medical issues and care needs to assist with care coordination. While care plans are a primary component of effective care coordination, the creation and maintenance of care plans is time, labor, and cost intensive, and the desired content of the care plan has not been studied. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the usefulness and desired content of comprehensive care plans by exploring the perceptions of parents and health care providers (HCPs of children with medical complexity (CMC. Methods This qualitative study utilized in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus groups. HCPs (n = 15 and parents (n = 15 of CMC who had all used a comprehensive care plan were recruited from a tertiary pediatric academic health sciences center. Themes were identified through grounded theory analysis of interview and focus group data. Results A multi-dimensional model of perceived care plan usefulness emerged. The model highlights three integral aspects of the care plan: care plan characteristics, activating factors and perceived outcomes of using a care plan. Care plans were perceived as a useful tool that centralized and focused the care of the child. Care plans were reported to flatten the hierarchical relationship between HCPs and parents, resulting in enhanced reciprocal information exchange and strengthened relationships. Participants expressed that a standardized template that is family-centered and includes content relevant to both the medical and social needs of the child is beneficial when integrated into overall care planning and delivery for CMC. Conclusions Care plans are perceived to be a useful tool to both health care providers and parents of CMC. These findings inform the utility and development of a comprehensive care plan template as well as a model of how

  2. METHODOLOGICAL HURDLES IN CAPTURING CMC DATA: THE CASE OF THE MISSING SELF-REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Smith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the use of self-repair among learners of German in a task-based CMC environment. The purpose of the study was two-fold. The first goal sought to establish how potential interpretations of CMC data may be very different depending on the method of data collection and evaluation employed. The second goal was to explicitly examine the nature of CMC self-repair in the task-based foreign language CALL classroom. Paired participants (n=46 engaged in six jigsaw tasks over the course of one university semester via the chat function in Blackboard. Chat data were evaluated first by using only the chat log file and second by examining a video file of the screen capture of the entire interaction. Results show a fundamental difference in the interpretation of the chat interaction which varies as a function of the data collection and evaluation methods employed. The findings also suggest a possible difference in the nature of self-repair across face-to-face and SCMC environments. In view of the results, this paper calls for CALL researchers to abandon the reliance on printed chat log files when attempting to interpret SCMC interactional data.

  3. [Preparation of Coated CMC-Fe0 Using Rheological Phase Reaction Method and Research on Degradation of TCE in Water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-jing; Cheng, Yue; Yu, Shu-zhen; Fan, Xiao-feng

    2015-06-01

    The coated nanoscale zero-valent iron (coated CMC-Fe0) was synthesized with cheap and environment friendly CMC as the coating agent using rheological phase reaction. The sample was characterized by means of XRD, SEM, TEM and N2 adsorption-stripping and used to study reductive dechlorination of TCE. The experimental results indicated that the removal rate of TCE was about 100% when the CMC-Fe0 dosage was 6 g x L(-1), the initial TCE concentration was 5 mg x L(-1) and the reaction time was 40 h. The TCE degradation reaction of coated CMC-Fe0 followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Finally, the product could be simply recovered.

  4. Microwave assisted in situ synthesis of Ag–NaCMC films and their reproducible surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Tao; Li, Junpeng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Binbing; Zhou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Two kinds of Ag–NaCMC films for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) were prepared by conventional heating and microwave assisted in situ reduction methods without any additional capping or reducing agents. A relatively narrow and symmetric surface plasmon resonance band was observed in the absorption spectra of the films fabricated by the microwave assisted in situ reduction method. More uniform silver nanoparticles (NPs) implied by the symmetric absorption spectrum were further confirmed by the scanning electron microscopy images. After the simulation of the E-field intensity distribution around the silver NPs in NaCMC film, the Raman scattering enhancement factors (EFs) of these films were then investigated with 4-mercaptobenzoic acid molecule as a SERS reporter. Improved reproducibility of SERS signal was obtained in the microwave assisted synthesized Ag–NaCMC film, although it maintained an EF as only 1.11 × 10 8 . The reproducible SERS signal of the Ag–NaCMC film is particularly attractive and this microwave assisted in situ reduction method is suitable for the production of excellent substrate for biosensor application. - Highlights: • The synthesis of Ag–NaCMC films was successfully fulfilled by a low-cost microwave method. • More uniform silver nanoparticles were observed in Ag–NaCMC film synthesized by microwave. • Improved reproducibility of SERS signal was obtained in microwave synthesized Ag–NaCMC film. - Abstract: Two kinds of Ag–NaCMC films for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) were prepared by conventional heating and microwave assisted in situ reduction methods without any additional capping or reducing agents. A relatively narrow and symmetric surface plasmon resonance band was observed in the absorption spectra of the films fabricated by the microwave assisted in situ reduction method. More uniform silver nanoparticles (NPs) implied by the symmetric absorption spectrum were further confirmed by

  5. Study of wine tartaric acid salt stabilization by addition of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC: comparison with the « protective colloids » effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Gerbaud

    2010-12-01

    Significance and impact of the study: The OIV-OENO 366-2009 and OIV-OENO 02/2008 resolutions recently authorized the use of CMC to prevent tartaric acid salt precipitation. With no impact on health, and stable under heating and in acid solution, CMC is an efficient candidate for tartaric stabilization. The optimal concentration of 20 mg.L-1 (2 g.hL-1 should however be adapted to local wine storage conditions and KHT crystallization risk.

  6. Oxide_Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Exhaust Mixer Development in the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Bansal, Narottam P.; Szelagowski, James; Sokhey, Jagdish; Heffernan, Tab; Clegg, Joseph; Pierluissi, Anthony; Riedell, Jim; Wyen, Travis; Atmur, Steven; hide

    2015-01-01

    LibertyWorks®, a subsidiary of Rolls-Royce Corporation, first studied CMC (ceramic matrix composite) exhaust mixers for potential weight benefits in 2008. Oxide CMC potentially offered weight reduction, higher temperature capability, and the ability to fabricate complex-shapes for increased mixing and noise suppression. In 2010, NASA was pursuing the reduction of NOx emissions, fuel burn, and noise from turbine engines in Phase I of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project (within the Integrated Systems Research Program). ERA subtasks, including those focused on CMC components, were being formulated with the goal of maturing technology from Proof of Concept Validation (Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3)) to System/Subsystem or Prototype Demonstration in a Relevant Environment (TRL 6). LibertyWorks®, a subsidiary of Rolls-Royce Corporation, first studied CMC (ceramic matrix composite) exhaust mixers for potential weight benefits in 2008. Oxide CMC potentially offered weight reduction, higher temperature capability, and the ability to fabricate complex-shapes for increased mixing and noise suppression. In 2010, NASA was pursuing the reduction of NOx emissions, fuel burn, and noise from turbine engines in Phase I of the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project (within the Integrated Systems Research Program). ERA subtasks, including those focused on CMC components, were being formulated with the goal of maturing technology from Proof of Concept Validation (Technology Readiness Level 3 (TRL 3)) to System/Subsystem or Prototype Demonstration in a Relevant Environment (TRL 6). Oxide CMC component at both room and elevated temperatures. A TRL˜5 (Component Validation in a Relevant Environment) was attained and the CMC mixer was cleared for ground testing on a Rolls-Royce AE3007 engine for performance evaluation to achieve TRL 6.

  7. Improvement of Fish Sauce Quality by Strain CMC5-3-1: A Novel Species of Staphylococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Rodtong, Sureelak; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 isolated from fermented fish sauce at 3 to 7 mo, respectively, showed different characteristics on protein hydrolysis and volatile formation. These Gram-positive cocci were able to grow in up to 15% NaCl with the optimum at 0.5% to 5% NaCl in tryptic soy broth. Based on ribosomal 16S rRNA gene sequences, Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 and CMS5-7-5 showed 99.0% similarity to that of Staphylococcus piscifermentans JCM 6057(T) , but DNA-DNA relatedness was sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 740.5 mM, which was higher than that inoculated by the strain CMS5-7-5 (662.14 mM, P sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 showed the highest content of total glutamic acid (P sauce inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 was 2-methypropanal, contributing to the desirable dark chocolate note. Staphylococcus sp. CMC5-3-1 could be applied as a starter culture to improve the umami and aroma of fish sauce. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Highly Porous Silicon Embedded in a Ceramic Matrix: A Stable High-Capacity Electrode for Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrankovic, Dragoljub; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Kalcher, Constanze; Rohrer, Jochen; Becker, Malin; Stabler, Christina; Trykowski, Grzegorz; Albe, Karsten; Riedel, Ralf

    2017-11-28

    We demonstrate a cost-effective synthesis route that provides Si-based anode materials with capacities between 2000 and 3000 mAh·g Si -1 (400 and 600 mAh·g composite -1 ), Coulombic efficiencies above 99.5%, and almost 100% capacity retention over more than 100 cycles. The Si-based composite is prepared from highly porous silicon (obtained by reduction of silica) by encapsulation in an organic carbon and polymer-derived silicon oxycarbide (C/SiOC) matrix. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the highly porous silicon morphology delivers free volume for the accommodation of strain leading to no macroscopic changes during initial Li-Si alloying. In addition, a carbon layer provides an electrical contact, whereas the SiOC matrix significantly diminishes the interface between the electrolyte and the electrode material and thus suppresses the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase on Si. Electrochemical tests of the micrometer-sized, glass-fiber-derived silicon demonstrate the up-scaling potential of the presented approach.

  9. Effect of pyrolysis atmospheres on the morphology of polymer-derived silicon oxynitrocarbide ceramic films coated aluminum nitride surface and the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien T.; Sukachonmakul, Tanapon; Wang, Chen H.; Wattanakul, Karnthidaporn; Kuo, Ming T.; Wang, Yu H.

    2014-02-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) and silicon oxynitrocarbide (SiONC) ceramic films coated aluminum nitride (AlN) were prepared by using preceramic-polysilazane (PSZ) with dip-coating method, followed by pyrolysis at 700 °C in different (air, Ar, N2 and NH3) atmospheres to converted PSZ into SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic. The existence of amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface was characterized by FTIR, XRD and XPS. The interfacial adhesion between silicone rubber and AlN was significantly improved after the introduction of amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface. It can be observed from AFM that the pyrolysis of PSZ at different atmosphere strongly affected to films morphology on AlN surface as SiOCair and SiONCNH3 ceramic films were more flat and smooth than SiONCN2 and SiONCAr ceramic films. Besides, the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites was found to be related to the decrease in the surface roughness of SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface. This present work provided an alternative surface modification of thermally conductive fillers to improve the thermal conductivity of silicon rubber composites by coating with amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films.

  10. A CMC database for use in the next generation launch vehicles (rockets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Kamala

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC's) are being envisioned as the state-of-the-art material capable of handling the tough structural and thermal demands of advanced high temperature structures for programs such as the SSTO (Single Stage to Orbit), HSCT (High Speed Civil Transport), etc. as well as for evolution of the industrial heating systems. Particulate, whisker and continuous fiber ceramic matrix (CFCC) composites have been designed to provide fracture toughness to the advanced ceramic materials which have a high degree of wear resistance, hardness, stiffness, and heat and corrosion resistance but are notorious for their brittleness and sensitivity to microscopic flaws such as cracks, voids and impurity.

  11. Non-CMC Solutions of the Einstein Constraint Equations on Compact Manifolds with Apparent Horizon Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Michael; Meier, Caleb; Tsogtgerel, G.

    2018-01-01

    In this article we continue our effort to do a systematic development of the solution theory for conformal formulations of the Einstein constraint equations on compact manifolds with boundary. By building in a natural way on our recent work in Holst and Tsogtgerel (Class Quantum Gravity 30:205011, 2013), and Holst et al. (Phys Rev Lett 100(16):161101, 2008, Commun Math Phys 288(2):547-613, 2009), and also on the work of Maxwell (J Hyperbolic Differ Eqs 2(2):521-546, 2005a, Commun Math Phys 253(3):561-583, 2005b, Math Res Lett 16(4):627-645, 2009) and Dain (Class Quantum Gravity 21(2):555-573, 2004), under reasonable assumptions on the data we prove existence of both near- and far-from-constant mean curvature (CMC) solutions for a class of Robin boundary conditions commonly used in the literature for modeling black holes, with a third existence result for CMC appearing as a special case. Dain and Maxwell addressed initial data engineering for space-times that evolve to contain black holes, determining solutions to the conformal formulation on an asymptotically Euclidean manifold in the CMC setting, with interior boundary conditions representing excised interior black hole regions. Holst and Tsogtgerel compiled the interior boundary results covered by Dain and Maxwell, and then developed general interior conditions to model the apparent horizon boundary conditions of Dainand Maxwell for compact manifolds with boundary, and subsequently proved existence of solutions to the Lichnerowicz equation on compact manifolds with such boundary conditions. This paper picks up where Holst and Tsogtgerel left off, addressing the general non-CMC case for compact manifolds with boundary. As in our previous articles, our focus here is again on low regularity data and on the interaction between different types of boundary conditions. While our work here serves primarily to extend the solution theory for the compact with boundary case, we also develop several technical tools that have

  12. Study on novel functional materials carboxymethyl cellulose lithium (CMC-Li) improve high-performance lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Shao, Ziqiang; Xiang, Pan; Wang, Daxiong; Zhou, Zhenwen; Wang, Feijun; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Jianquan

    2014-09-22

    Novel cellulose derivative CMC-Li was synthesized by cotton as raw material. The mechanism of the CMC-Li modified electrode materials by electrospinning was reported. CMC-Li/lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4, LFP) composite fiber coated with LFP and CMC-Li nanofibers was successfully obtained by electrospinning. Then, CMC-Li/LFP nano-composite fiber was carbonized under nitrogen at a high temperature formed CNF/LFP/Li (CLL) composite nanofibers as cathode material. It can increase the contents of Li+, and improving the diffusion efficiency and specific capacity. The battery with CLL as cathode material retained close to 100% of initial reversible capacity after 200 cycles at 168 mAh g(-1), which was nearly the theoretical specific capacity of LFP. The cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were characterizing material performance. The batteries have good electrochemical property, outstanding pollution-free, excellent stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of PVA and CMC on the Properties of Pigment Coating Colors and their Effects on Curtain Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Heui Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC on the properties of ground calcium carbonate (GCC and clay coating colors, as well as its effect on curtain stability during the coating process was investigated. Based on the experimental results of the zeta potential, sediment porosity, rheological measurements, the floc formation mechanisms of the cobinders were proposed. The zeta potential decreased with an increase in the amount of added PVA, while it barely changed when CMC was added. This was attributed to the adsorption of PVA onto the pigment surface, while the adsorption of CMC was hindered by electrostatic repulsion. CMC cobinder increased the low-shear viscosity, but it resulted in relatively low viscosity under high-shear conditions, indicating the disruption of the formed flocs under high shear. The destabilization mechanism of the curtain coating differed depending on the type of cobinder. The PVA cobinder flocculates the coating color via a gelling mechanism, while the CMC cobinder flocculates the colors via a depletion flocculation mechanism.

  14. Development of a Hydrogen Uptake-Release Mg-Based Alloy by Adding a Polymer CMC (Carboxymethylcellulose, Sodium Salt) via Reaction-Accompanying Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Young Jun; Choi, Eunho; Song, Myoung Youp

    2018-03-01

    The addition of carboxymethylcellulose, sodium salt (CMC) might improve the hydrogen uptake and release properties of Mg since it has a relatively low melting point and the melting of CMC during milling in hydrogen (reaction-accompanying milling) may make the milled samples be in good states to absorb and release hydrogen rapidly and to have a large hydrogen-storage capacity. Samples with compositions of 95 w/o Mg + 5 w/o CMC (named Mg-5CMC) and 90 w/o Mg + 10 w/o CMC (named Mg-10CMC) were prepared by adding CMC via reaction-accompanying milling. Activation of Mg-10CMC was completed after about 3 hydrogen uptake-release cycles. Mg-10CMC had a higher initial hydrogen uptake rate and a larger amount of hydrogen absorbed in 60 min, U (60 min), than Mg-5CMC before and after activation. At the cycle number of three (CN = 3), Mg-10CMC had a very high initial hydrogen uptake rate (1.56 w/o H/min) and a large U (60 min) (5.57 w/o H) at 593 K in hydrogen of 12 bar, showing that the activated Mg-10CMC has an effective hydrogen-storage capacity of about 5.6 w/o at 593 K in hydrogen of 12 bar at CN = 3. At CN = 2, Mg-10CMC released 1.00 w/o H in 2.5 min, 4.67 w/o H in 10 min, and 4.76 w/o H in 60 min at 648 K in hydrogen of 1.0 bar. The milling in hydrogen of Mg with CMC is believed to generate imperfections and cracks and reduce the particle size. The addition of 10 w/o CMC was more effective on the initial hydrogen uptake rate and U (60 min) compared with the 10 w/o additions of NbF5, TaF5, Fe2O3, and MnO, and the 10 w/o simultaneous addition of Ni, Fe, and Ti. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first in which a polymer CMC is added to Mg by reaction-accompanying milling to improve the hydrogen storage properties of Mg.

  15. CMC-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as new MRI probes for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthichai, Sudarat; Pilapong, Chalermchai; Thongtem, Titipun; Thongtem, Somchai

    2015-11-01

    Pure Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were successfully prepared by co-precipitating of FeCl2·4H2O and FeCl3·6H2O in the solutions containing ammonia at 80 °C for 3 h. Phase, morphology, particle-sized distribution, surface chemistry, and weight loss were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this research, CMC-coated Fe3O4 MNPs consisting of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions with 543.3-mM-1 s-1 high relaxivity were detected and were able to be used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) application with very good contrast for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without any further vectorization.

  16. It's Just a Game, Right? Types of Play in Foreign Language CMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle N. Warner

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the various playful uses of language that occurred during a semester-long study of two German language courses using one type of synchronous network-based medium, the MOO. Research and use of synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC have flourished in the study of second-language acquisition (SLA since the late 1990s; however, the primary focus has been on the potential benefits of using CMC to increase the amount of communication (Beauvois, 1997; Kern, 1995; Warschauer, 1997, motivate students (Beauvois, 1997; Kern, 1995; Warschauer, 1997 and foster the exchange of ideas (Beauvois, 1997; Kern, 1995; von der Emde, Schneider, & Kötter, 2001; Warschauer, 1997. Only more recently has research within SLA begun to investigate the types of communication that occur online.1 An analysis of the transcripts from a second-semester German course and an upper-level German communication course reveal that a large portion of the language use online cannot be described using standard referential definitions of communication, but rather is playful in nature. Using research from SLA and theories on social interaction, this article investigates the different types of play that occurred within the online discussions and the possible implications of the presence of play in online discourse.

  17. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and Hot Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this paper is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components. The two primary technical challenges impacting the use of CMC TPS and hot structures for hypersonic vehicles are environmental durability and fabrication, and will be discussed briefly.

  18. Spatially distributed damage detection in CMC thermal protection materials using thin-film piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhr, Samuel J.; Blackshire, James L.; Na, Jeong K.

    2009-03-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) of aerospace vehicles are subjected to impacts during in-flight use and vehicle refurbishment. The damage resulting from such impacts can produce localized regions that are unable to resist extreme temperatures. Therefore it is essential to have a reliable method to detect, locate, and quantify the damage occurring from such impacts. The objective of this research is to demonstrate a capability that could lead to detecting, locating and quantifying impact events for ceramic matrix composite (CMC) wrapped tile TPS via sensors embedded in the TPS material. Previous research had shown a correlation between impact energies, material damage state, and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor response for impact energies between 0.07 - 1.00 Joules, where impact events were located directly over the sensor positions1. In this effort, the effectiveness of a sensor array is evaluated for detecting and locating low energy impacts on a CMC wrapped TPS. The sensor array, which is adhered to the internal surface of the TPS tile, is used to detect low energy impact events that occur at different locations. The analysis includes an evaluation of signal amplitude levels, time-of-flight measurements, and signal frequency content. Multiple impacts are performed at each location to study the repeatability of each measurement.

  19. Silicon Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, Thaddeus D. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States); Carroll, Malcolm S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-28

    Silicon is a promising material candidate for qubits due to the combination of worldwide infrastructure in silicon microelectronics fabrication and the capability to drastically reduce decohering noise channels via chemical purification and isotopic enhancement. However, a variety of challenges in fabrication, control, and measurement leaves unclear the best strategy for fully realizing this material’s future potential. In this article, we survey three basic qubit types: those based on substitutional donors, on metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures, and on Si/SiGe heterostructures. We also discuss the multiple schema used to define and control Si qubits, which may exploit the manipulation and detection of a single electron charge, the state of a single electron spin, or the collective states of multiple spins. Far from being comprehensive, this article provides a brief orientation to the rapidly evolving field of silicon qubit technology and is intended as an approachable entry point for a researcher new to this field.

  20. Language, mobile phones and internet : a study of SMS texting, email, IM and SNS chats in computer mediated communication (CMC) in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barasa, Sandra Nekesa

    2010-01-01

    This book examines the use of language in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) genres in Kenya. It focuses on Short Messaging Service (SMS), Email, Instant Messages (IM) and Social Network Sites (SNS) genres. It presents an overview of the use and characteristics of Kenyan languages in CMC texts

  1. An Update on Design Tools for Optimization of CMC 3D Fiber Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J.; DiCarlo, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Describe and up-date progress for NASA's efforts to develop 3D architectural design tools for CMC in general and for SIC/SiC composites in particular. Describe past and current sequential work efforts aimed at: Understanding key fiber and tow physical characteristics in conventional 2D and 3D woven architectures as revealed by microstructures in the literature. Developing an Excel program for down-selecting and predicting key geometric properties and resulting key fiber-controlled properties for various conventional 3D architectures. Developing a software tool for accurately visualizing all the key geometric details of conventional 3D architectures. Validating tools by visualizing and predicting the Internal geometry and key mechanical properties of a NASA SIC/SIC panel with a 3D orthogonal architecture. Applying the predictive and visualization tools toward advanced 3D orthogonal SiC/SIC composites, and combining them into a user-friendly software program.

  2. Establishing an Empirical Link between Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and SLA: A Meta-Analysis of the Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huifen

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on interactionist and socio-cultural theories, tools provided in computer-mediated communication (CMC) environments have long been considered able to create an environment that shares many communicative features with face-to-face communication. Over the past two decades, researchers have employed a variety of strategies to examine the…

  3. Influence of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG in CMC-NH4BR Based Polymer Electrolytes: Conductivity and Electrical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Khalidah Zainuddin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried with new type and promising polymer electrolytes system by development of carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC doped NH4Br and plasticized with polyethylene glycol (PEG. The sample was successfullyprepared via solution casting with no separation phase and good mechanical properties. The electrical conductivity andthermal conductivity of CMC-NH4Br-PEG based PEs system have been measured by the electrical impedancespectroscopy method in the temperature range of 303–373 K. The highest ionic conductivity gained is 2.48 x 10-3 Scm-1at ambient temperature for sample contain with 8 wt. % PEG. It can be concluded that the plasticized is accountable forthe conductance and assist to enhancing the ionic conductivity of the CMC-NH4Br-PEG electrolyte system. The addition of PEG to the CMC-based electrolyte can enhance towards the cation mobility which is turn increases ionic conductivity. The conductivity-temperature of plasticized BdPEs system was found obeys the Arrhenius relation where the ionic conductivity increases with temperature and activation energy for the ions hopping of the highest conducting PEs system only required small value to migrate. The electrical studies show a non-Debye behaviour of BdPEs based on the analyzed data using complex permittivity, ε* and complex electrical modulus, M* of the sample at different temperature.

  4. Teasing apart the effect of visibility and physical co-presence to examine the effect of CMC on interpersonal attraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Emmelyn; Antheunis, Marjolijn; Schouten, Alexander; Krahmer, Emiel

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the possible difference in interpersonal attraction between communicators in cue-rich computer-mediated communication (CMC) and face-to-face (FtF) communication. The first aim was to determine whether physical co-presence and visibility may account for differences in

  5. Postoperative intra-abdominal collections using a sodium hyaluronate-carboxymethylcellulose (HA-CMC) barrier at the time of laparotomy for uterine or cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitao, Mario M; Byrum, Graham V; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Brown, Carol L; Chi, Dennis S; Sonoda, Yukio; Levine, Douglas A; Gardner, Ginger J; Barakat, Richard R

    2010-11-01

    A prior analysis of patients undergoing laparotomy for ovarian malignancies at our institution revealed an increased rate of intra-abdominal collections using HA-CMC film during debulking surgery. The primary objective of the current study was to determine whether the use of HA-CMC is associated with the development of postoperative intra-abdominal collections in patients undergoing laparotomy for uterine or cervical malignancies. We retrospectively identified all laparotomies performed for these malignancies from 3/1/05 to 12/31/07. We identified cases involving the use of HA-CMC via billing records and operative reports. Intra-abdominal collections were defined as localized intraperitoneal fluid accumulations in the absence of re-accumulating ascites. We noted incidences of intra-abdominal collections, as well as other complications. Appropriate statistical tests were applied using SPSS 15.0. We identified 169 laparotomies in which HA-CMC was used and 347 in which HA-CMC was not used. The following were statistically similar in both cohorts: age, body mass index (BMI), primary site, surgery for recurrent disease, prior intraperitoneal surgery, and extent of current surgery. Intra-abdominal collections were seen in 6 (3.6%) of 169 HA-CMC cases compared to 10 (2.9%) of 347 non-HA-CMC cases (p=0.7). The rate of infected collections was similar in both groups (1.2% vs. 1.4%). In the subgroup that underwent tumor debulking, intra-abdominal collections were seen in 3 (11.5%) of 26 HA-CMC cases compared to 2 (5.4%) of 37 non-HA-CMC cases (p=0.6). HA-CMC use does not appear to be associated with postoperative intra-abdominal collections in patients undergoing laparotomy for uterine or cervical cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced Silicon Carbide from Molecular Engineering and Actinide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, D.J.M.; Garcia, J.; Guillaneux, D.; Wong-Chi-Man, M.; Moreau, J.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of nuclear fuels studies for generation IV, carbides or oxycarbides assemblies are one of the engaged material for high temperature reactors. The design of the fuels is not yet defined but some structures are actually considered with SiC as matrix for the actinide fuel. In this work we have studied the synthesis of a multi-scale structure controlled SiC matrix using molecular silicon organometallic precursors. The aim of this work was to develop a way to obtain multi-scale SiC matrix material which could be engineered to fit in any fuel structure defined for generation IV fuels. The control of this multi-scale structure was done using several simulation methods specific of the low temperature solution synthesis of the precursor. In a first step, we have focused our effort on the synthesis of the SiC material. A first level of template was successfully done by the use of solid silica 500 nm balls. A second level of template was studied by the use of meso-porous silica, structured at a 50 nm level. At least, supra-molecular simulation in non aqueous media was considered with the difficulty to build a molecular assembly (inverse micelles). In a second step, we have functionalized the primary silane phase with actinide complexing agent in order to blend directly the actinide inside this primary phase in a controlled way. During these studies, a new one pot synthesis route to obtain the functionalized primary silane phase was developed. (authors)

  7. Development and Property Evaluation of Selected HfO2-Silicon and Rare Earth-Silicon Based Bond Coats and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si and rare earth Si based EBC bond coat EBC systems for SiC/SiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. High temperature properties of the advanced EBC systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep and oxidation resistance have been studied and summarized. The advanced NASA EBC systems showed some promise to achieve 1500C temperature capability, helping enable next generation turbine engines with significantly improved engine component temperature capability and durability.

  8. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  9. "The refer less resolve more" initiative: A five-year experience from CMC Vellore, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jachin Velavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available India′s one billion plus strong population presents huge health care needs. Presently, approximately 250,000 general practitioners and 30,000 Government doctors are a part of the Indian healthcare workforce, but 80% of them are based in urban India. Problems which plague healthcare delivery and attributed to physician practice may be enumerated as - physicians (1 lack competencies, (2 lack updating, (3 prescribe irrationally (pressures from pharmaceutical companies and patients, (4 practice unethically, (5 refer excessively to specialists and other clinical professionals, and (6 investigate for diseases without justification. A multi-competent Family Physician who could provide a single-window, ethical, and holistic healthcare to patients and families is the need of the hour. Therefore, training, equipping, and empowering these 250,000 doctors to become such physicians will reduce health costs considerably. Distance medical education using all the andragogic methods can be used to train large number of individuals without displacing them from their work-places. Distance learning provides a useful interface for rapidly developing a specialized pool of doctors practicing and advocating family medicine as most-needed discipline. This motivated CMC Vellore, a premier institution for medical education in India, to start a the "refer less resolve more initiative" by offering "two year family medicine diploma course" by distance mode. This is an innovatively-written program consisting of problem-based self-learning modules, video-lectures, video-conferencing, and face-to-face contact programs. Ten secondary level hospitals, across the country, under the supervision of national and international family medicine faculty form the pillars of this program. This distance learning program offered by CMC Vellore has become the platform for change as there is special focus is on ethics, rational prescribing, consultation skills, application of family medicine

  10. "The Refer Less Resolve More" Initiative: A Five-year Experience from CMC Vellore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velavan, Jachin

    2012-01-01

    India's one billion plus strong population presents huge health care needs. Presently, approximately 250,000 general practitioners and 30,000 Government doctors are a part of the Indian healthcare workforce, but 80% of them are based in urban India. Problems which plague healthcare delivery and attributed to physician practice may be enumerated as - physicians (1) lack competencies, (2) lack updating, (3) prescribe irrationally (pressures from pharmaceutical companies and patients), (4) practice unethically, (5) refer excessively to specialists and other clinical professionals, and (6) investigate for diseases without justification. A multi-competent Family Physician who could provide a single-window, ethical, and holistic healthcare to patients and families is the need of the hour. Therefore, training, equipping, and empowering these 250,000 doctors to become such physicians will reduce health costs considerably. Distance medical education using all the andragogic methods can be used to train large number of individuals without displacing them from their work-places. Distance learning provides a useful interface for rapidly developing a specialized pool of doctors practicing and advocating family medicine as most-needed discipline. This motivated CMC Vellore, a premier institution for medical education in India, to start a the "refer less resolve more initiative" by offering "two year family medicine diploma course" by distance mode. This is an innovatively-written program consisting of problem-based self-learning modules, video-lectures, video-conferencing, and face-to-face contact programs. Ten secondary level hospitals, across the country, under the supervision of national and international family medicine faculty form the pillars of this program. This distance learning program offered by CMC Vellore has become the platform for change as there is special focus is on ethics, rational prescribing, consultation skills, application of family medicine principles

  11. Effects of salinity, P H and temperature on CMC polymer and X C polymer performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghassem Alaskari, M. K.; Nickdel Teymoori, Reza

    2007-01-01

    The rheological and filtration properties of drilling mud under down-hole conditions may be very different from those measured at ambient pressures and temperatures at the surface. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the temperature and salinity and p H effects on drilling mud rheological and filtration properties. Results are given from tests on water base mud containing CMC polymer and X C polymer. Drilling fluid was investigated at three different temperatures (21.1 d eg C , 48.9 d eg C , 80 d eg C ) containing 8.165 kg/b bl bentonite. The drilling mud salinities in this study were fresh water (Ahwaz water: ppm: 400, Hardness: 120). 2000 ppm, 4000 ppm, 8000 ppm and 40000 ppm. It was found that p H of drilling mud should be kept at range of 8-10, because increasing p H of drilling mud will increase its rheological properties. The salinity and temperature effects show that as the salinity and temperature of drilling mud are increased the effectiveness of polymers in drilling mud will decreased. Moreover, they have a negative effect on filtration properties of drilling mud. In suspensions of sodium montmorillonite that are well dispersed and have low gel strength, both plastic viscosity and yield point decrease with increasing temperature

  12. CMC-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as new MRI probes for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitthichai, Sudarat [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Pilapong, Chalermchai, E-mail: chalermchai.pilapong@cmu.ac.th [Center of Excellence for Molecular Imaging (CEMI), Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Titipun [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Somchai, E-mail: schthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) are superparamagnetic. • CMC is water-soluble and nontoxic cellulose-derivative polymer. • CMC-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were successfully prepared by co-precipitation method. • The promising NPs that can be used for magnetic resonance imaging application. - Abstract: Pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were successfully prepared by co-precipitating of FeCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and FeCl{sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O in the solutions containing ammonia at 80 °C for 3 h. Phase, morphology, particle-sized distribution, surface chemistry, and weight loss were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this research, CMC-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNPs consisting of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions with 543.3-mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} high relaxivity were detected and were able to be used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) application with very good contrast for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) without any further vectorization.

  13. The effect of CMC and arabic gum stabilizer combination on the characteristics of soursop velva (Annona muricata L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnanto, N. H. R.; Yudhistira, B.; Pertiwi, S. R.; Pangestika, A.

    2018-03-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of the combination of CMC and Arabic Gum stabilizer toward the soursop velva characteristics and to determine the best stabilizer combination of soursop velva. This study was performed using Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with one factor: combination of CMC and Arabic Gum stabilizer using two sample replications and the analysis was repeated three times. The result showed that the use of the combination of CMC and Arabic Gum stabilizer gave a significant effect on the overrun value, melting power, total dissolved solids, moisture content, dietary fiber, taste, texture and overalls. Moreover, there were no significant effect on color and flavor of the soursop velva. The experiment showed that soursop velva F4 (3:1) was the best formula with overrun value 9.93%, the melting power was 22 minutes 52 seconds, the total dissolved solids 19,10°Brix, the moisture content 71.508%, dietary fiber 3.301% and it has sensory values of color, taste, flavor, texture, overall at 3.66, 3.267, 3.33, 4.06, 3.10 respectively.

  14. Efficient simultaneous removal of U(VI) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution using core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuhong Hu; Xiaoyan Lin; Wenhui Zhao; Ministry of Education, Sichuan; Xuegang Luo

    2018-01-01

    Core-shell nanoscale zero-valent iron@alginate/carboxymethyl cellulose sodium composite loaded with calcium (nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca) beads were synthesized in this study using coaxial electronic injection method. The adsorbent structure was characterized via FT-IR, SEM, EDX and XPS. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) and Cu(II) on core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca beads was studied under various experimental parameters like pH, contact time and temperature. The isotherm and the kinetic data, pertaining to the adsorption of U(VI) and Cu(II) by core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca beads obeyed both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms model and the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters revealed the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption. The experiment of regeneration and reusability suggested core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca bead was a regenerated material. (author)

  15. Enhanced electrochemical properties of LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode using the carboxymethyl cellulose lithium (CMC-Li) as novel binder in lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Shao, Ziqiang; Wang, Daxiong; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Feijun; Wang, Jianquan

    2014-10-13

    Novel water-based binder CMC-Li is synthesized using cotton as raw material. The mechanism of the CMC-Li as a binder is reported. Electrochemical properties of batteries cathodes based on commercially available lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4, LFP) and CMC-Li as a water-soluble binder are investigated. CMC-Li is a novel lithium-ion binder. Compare with conventional poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) binder, and the battery with CMC-Li as the binder retained 97.8% of initial reversible capacity after 200 cycles at 176 mAh g(-1), which is beyond the theoretical specific capacity of LFP. Constant current charge-discharge test results demonstrate that the LFP electrode using CMC-Li as the binder has the highest rate capability, follow closely by that using PVDF binder. The batteries have good electrochemical property, outstanding pollution-free and excellent stability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  17. Structural, optical and electrical properties of silicon nanocrystals embedded in SixC1−x/SiC multilayer systems for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Vidrier, J.; Hernández, S.; Samà, J.; Canino, M.; Allegrezza, M.; Bellettato, M.; Shukla, R.; Schnabel, M.; Löper, P.; López-Conesa, L.; Estradé, S.; Peiró, F.; Janz, S.; Garrido, B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the structural, optical and electrical properties of Si x C 1−x /SiC multilayers with different Si excess. ► Multilayer structure is destroyed after annealing at 1100 °C. ► Energy filtered TEM confirmed the Si NC formation. ► Sample thickness values from optical simulations are in agreement with TEM observations. ► The crystallization degree of the NCs was evaluated by Raman scattering and R and T techniques. ► The system conductivity depends on the NC size. ► The presence of a defective oxycarbide layer on top did not allow for obtaining useful electrical information. -- Abstract: In this work we present a structural, optical and electrical characterization of Si x C 1−x /SiC multilayer systems with different silicon content. After the deposition process, an annealing treatment was carried out in order to induce the silicon nanocrystals formation. By means of energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) we observed the structural morphology of the multilayers and the presence of crystallized silicon nanoprecipitates for samples annealed up to 1100 °C. We discuss the suitability of optical techniques such as Raman scattering and reflectance and transmittance (R and T) for the evaluation of the crystalline fraction of our samples at different silicon excess ranges. In addition, the combination of R and T measurements with simulation has proved to be a useful instrument to confirm the structural properties observed by EFTEM. Finally, we explore the origin of the extremely high current density revealed by electrical measurements, probably due to the presence of an undesired defective SiC y O z ternary compound layer, already supported by the structural and optical results. Nevertheless, the variation of the electrical measurements with the silicon amount indicates a small but significant contribution from the multilayers

  18. Determination of parameters for successful spray coating of silicon microneedle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Marie G; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Oliveira, Jorge C; Moore, Anne C; Crean, Abina M

    2011-08-30

    Coated microneedle patches have demonstrated potential for effective, minimally invasive, drug and vaccine delivery. To facilitate cost-effective, industrial-scale production of coated microneedle patches, a continuous coating method which utilises conventional pharmaceutical processes is an attractive prospect. Here, the potential of spray-coating silicon microneedle patches using a conventional film-coating process was evaluated and the key process parameters which impact on coating coalescence and weight were identified by employing a fractional factorial design to coat flat silicon patches. Processing parameters analysed included concentration of coating material, liquid input rate, duration of spraying, atomisation air pressure, gun-to-surface distance and air cap setting. Two film-coating materials were investigated; hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). HPMC readily formed a film-coat on silicon when suitable spray coating parameter settings were determined. CMC films required the inclusion of a surfactant (1%, w/w Tween 80) to facilitate coalescence of the sprayed droplets on the silicon surface. Spray coating parameters identified by experimental design, successfully coated 280μm silicon microneedle arrays, producing an intact film-coat, which follows the contours of the microneedle array without occlusion of the microneedle shape. This study demonstrates a novel method of coating microneedle arrays with biocompatible polymers using a conventional film-coating process. It is the first study to indicate the thickness and roughness of coatings applied to microneedle arrays. The study also highlights the importance of identifying suitable processing parameters when film coating substrates of micron dimensions. The ability of a fractional factorial design to identify these critical parameters is also demonstrated. The polymer coatings applied in this study can potentially be drug loaded for intradermal drug and vaccine delivery

  19. Regenerable, innovative porous silicon-based polymer-derived ceramics for removal of methylene blue and rhodamine B from textile and environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Appendini, Marta; Onida, Barbara; Castiglioni, Michele; Del Bubba, Massimo; Vanzetti, Lia; Jana, Prasanta; Sorarù, Gian Domenico; Rivoira, Luca

    2018-04-01

    The presence of residual color in treated textile wastewater above the regulation limits is still a critical issue in many textile districts. Innovative, polymer-derived ceramics of the Si-C-O system were here synthesized in order to obtain porous nanocomposite materials where a free carbon phase is dispersed into a silicon carbide/silicon oxycarbide network. The sorbents were comprehensively characterized for the removal of two model water-soluble dyes (i.e., the cation methylene blue and the zwitterion rhodamine B). Adsorption is very rapid and controlled by intra-particle and/or film diffusion, depending on dye concentration. Among the nanocomposites studied, the SiOC aerogel (total capacity about 45 mg/g, is easily regenerated under mild treatment (250 °C, 2 h). Adsorption of dyes is not affected by the matrix composition: removals of 150 mg/L methylene blue from river water and simulated textile wastewater with high content of metal ions (2-50 mg/L) and chemical oxygen demand (800 mg/L) were higher than 92% and quantitative for a dye concentration of 1 mg/L.

  20. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  1. Practical use of CMC-amended rhizobial inoculant for Mucuna pruriens cultivation to enhance the growth and protection against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeron, Abhinav; Khare, Ekta; Kumar Arora, Naveen; Kumar Maheshwari, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    In many parts of the world Mucuna pruriens is used as an important medicinal, forage and green manure crop. In the present investigation the effect of the addition of CMC in carrier during development of bioformulation on shelflife, plant growth promotive and biocontrol activity against Macrophomina phaseolina was screened taking M. pruriens as a test crop. Ensifer meliloti RMP6(Ery+Kan+) and Bradyrhizobium sp. BMP7(Tet+Kan+) (kanamycin resistance engineered by Tn5 transposon mutagenesis) used in the study showed production of siderophore, IAA, solubilizing phosphate and biocontrol of M. phaseolina. RMP6(Ery+Kan+) also showed ACC deaminase activity. The survival of both the strains in sawdust-based bioformulation was enhanced with an increase in the concentration of CMC from 0 to 1%. At 0% CMC Bradyrhizobium sp. BMP7(Tet+Kan+) showed more increase in nodule number/plant (500.00%) than E. meliloti RMP6(Ery+Kan+) (52.38%), over the control in M. phaseolina-infested soil. There was 185.94% and 59.52% enhancement in nodule number/plant by RMP6(Ery+Kan+) and BMP7(Tet+Kan+) with an increase in the concentration of CMC from 0% to 1% in the bioformulations. However further increase in concentration of CMC did not result in enhancement in survival of either the strains or nodule number/plant.

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 38: Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) and the communication of technical information in aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Daniel J.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computers as a medium for communication (CMC) used by aerospace engineers and scientists to obtain and/or provide technical information related to research and development activities. The data were obtained from a questionnaire survey that yielded 1006 mail responses. In addition to communication media, the research also investigates degrees of task uncertainty, environmental complexity, and other relevant variables that can affect aerospace workers' information-seeking strategies. While findings indicate that many individuals report CMC is an important function in their communication patterns, the research indicates that CMC is used less often and deemed less valuable than other more conventional media, such as paper documents, group meetings, telephone and face-to-face conversations. Fewer than one third of the individuals in the survey account for nearly eighty percent of the reported CMC use, and another twenty percent indicate they do not use the medium at all, its availability notwithstanding. These preliminary findings suggest that CMC is not as pervasive a communication medium among aerospace workers as the researcher expect a priori. The reasons underlying the reported media use are not yet fully known, and this suggests that continuing research in this area may be valuable.

  3. Optimization of formulation of cmc-na, xanthan gum and carrageenan affecting the physicochemical properties of papaya-wolfberry beverage using response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geo, J.Z.H.; Zong, G.L.P.

    2013-01-01

    CMC-Na, xanthan gum and carrageenan are widely employed in food industry. They were used for its thickening properties of aqueous solutions or emulsifying abilities. The present work aims to optimize the formula of the three stabilizers in the process of papaya-wolfberry beverage by response surface methodology (RSM). The results showed that the models were significantly (p<0.05) fitted for describing the viscosity and cloudiness of papaya-wolfberry beverage. The results also indicated that the linear terms of CMC-Na and xanthan gum were the most significant (p<0.05) variables affecting the viscosity, while xanthan gum and carrageenan were the most significant (p<0.05) variable affecting the cloudiness. The interaction of CMC-Na and xanthan gum behaved extremely significant for viscosity. From the optimization procedure, the best formula for viscosity was obtained at the combined level of 0.0652% (w/w) CMC-Na, 0.1070% (w/w) xanthan gum and 0.1485% (w/w) carrageenan, and the other group of 0.0623% (w/w) CMC-Na, 0.1375% (w/w) xanthan gum and 0.1461% (w/w) carrageenan for cloudiness. The results of our study would be used to improve the quality of papaya-wolfberry beverage and increase its economic efficiency. (author)

  4. Silicon heterojunction transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.; Oh-uchi, N.; Hayashi, H.; Yamoto, H.

    1979-01-01

    SIPOS (Semi-insulating polycrystalline silicon) which is used as a surface passivation layer for highly reliable silicon devices constitutes a good heterojunction for silicon. P- or B-doped SIPOS has been used as the emitter material of a heterojunction transistor with the base and collector of silicon. An npn SIPOS-Si heterojunction transistor showing 50 times the current gain of an npn silicon homojunction transistor has been realized by high-temperature treatments in nitrogen and low-temperature annealing in hydrogen or forming gas

  5. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  6. Silicon Microspheres Photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpenguzel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrophotonic integrated circuits (EPICs), or alternatively, optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEICs) are the natural evolution of the microelectronic integrated circuit (IC) with the addition of photonic capabilities. Traditionally, the IC industry has been based on group IV silicon, whereas the photonics industry on group III-V semiconductors. However, silicon based photonic microdevices have been making strands in siliconizing photonics. Silicon microspheres with their high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGMs), are ideal candidates for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in the standard near-infrared communication bands. In this work, we will discuss the possibility of using silicon microspheres for photonics applications in the near-infrared

  7. Survey report for fiscal 1999. Report on basic survey on joint implementation of installing coal moisture control (CMC) facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of the COP3 joint implementation in fiscal 1999, a survey and discussions were given on installing coal moisture control (CMC) facilities in China. The possibility was discussed with the Jinan Steel Group Company and Shougang Company. The subject is a beehive coke furnace, in which coal containing 11% of water is sent to a fluidized bed dryer, and dried up to 6.6%. Stack gas in the coke furnace is used mainly as the drying heat source. The facility consists of a fluidized bed dryer, a dust collector, a coal transporter, and a stack gas recovering device. The energy saving effects made available to the above two companies are as remarkable as 19,868 tons/year and 12,189 tons/year, respectively, as converted to crude oil, and the greenhouse effect gas reduction effect as 61,476 tons/year and 37,715 tons/year, respectively. Because energy price is low in China, the investment recovery time period is set at six years or less as the limit for economic performance evaluation. As a result of the calculation, the recovery time periods for the above two companies were found to be 4.2 and 4.7 years, proving the CMC project highly promising. It is desired that the project will be moved forward once the issues of the fund raising and the discharge right of global warming gas are made clear. (NEDO)

  8. Potential of L-fucose isolated from Brown Seaweeds as Promising Natural Emulsifier compare to Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baarri, A. N.; Legowo, A. M.; Widayat; Abduh, S. B. M.; Lestari, F. P.; Desnasari, D.; Santoso, I. P. M.

    2018-02-01

    L-fucose has been understood as sulfated polysaccharides and it could be extracted and fractionated from brown algae. These polysaccharides contains carbohydrate, sulfate, and protein that may be used as emulsifier. This research was aimed to study the emulsification properties of L-fucose through the determination of total dissolved solids (TDS), color CIE L*a*b* and stability of oil-in-water emulsion. As much as 0.5% of high concentrated L-fucose and 0.5% of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were used as emulsifier in a 10% (v/v) oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion. The emulsifier was added to O/W emulsions and then heated at 72°C. Result of stability emulsion and TDS showed that L-fucose was comparable to the CMC but remarkable changed the color of O/W emulsion. Heating process significantly reduced the stability O/W emulsion when L-fucose was applied. As conclusion, L-fucose might be used as natural emulsifier in O/W emulsion but in the low heat treatment of food processing. This study may provide valuable information for utilizing natural emulsifier from abundant resources from nature.

  9. The optimization of CMC concentration as graphite binder on the anode of LiFePO4 battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, S.; Cahyono, T.; Mindara, J. Y.; Riveli, N.; Alamsyah, W.; Rahayu, I.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, the most dominating power supply on the mobile electronics market are rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries. This is because of a higher energy density and a longer lifetime compared to similar rechargeable battery systems. Graphite is commonly used as anode material in the Lithium-ion batteries, because of its excellent electrochemical characteristics and low cost fabrication. In this paper, we reported the optimization of the concentration of the CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose), that acts as the binder for graphite anode. Based on our experimental results, the best composition of graphite : C : CMC is 90 : 8 : 2 in weight %. Anode with such composition has, based on SEM measurement, a relatively good surface morphology, while it also has relatively high conductivity, about 2.68 S/cm. The result of cyclic voltammogram with a scan rate of 10 mV/s in the voltage range of 0 to 1 Volt, shows the peak of reduction voltage at 0.85 Volts and the peak voltage of oxidation is at -1.5 Volt. The performance of the battery system with LiFePO4 set as the cathode, shows that the working voltage is about 2.67 Volts at 1 mA current-loading, with the efficiency around 47%.

  10. An exploratory examination of the relationship between motivational factors and the degree to which the higher education faculty integrate computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools into their courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murage, Francis Ndwiga

    The stated research problem of this study was to examine the relationship between motivational factors and the degree to which the higher education faculty integrate CMC tools into their courses. The study population and sample involved higher education faculty teaching in science departments at one public university and three public colleges in the state of West Virginia (N = 153). A Likert-type rating scale survey was used to collect data based on the research questions. Two parts of the survey were adopted from previous studies while the other two were self-constructed. Research questions and hypothesis were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential analyses. The study results established a positive relationship between motivational factors and the degree the higher education faculty integrate CMC tools in their courses. The results in addition established that faculty are highly motivated to integrate CMC tools by intrinsic factors, moderately motivated by environmental factors and least motivated by extrinsic factors. The results also established that the most integrated CMC tools were those that support asynchronous methods of communication while the least integrated were those that support synchronous methods of communication. A major conclusion made was that members of higher education faculty are more likely to be motivated to integrate CMC tools into their courses by intrinsic factors rather than extrinsic or environmental factors. It was further concluded that intrinsic factors that supported and enhanced student learning as well as those that were altruistic in nature significantly influenced the degree of CMC integration. The study finally concluded that to larger extent, there is a relationship between motivational factors and the degree to which the higher education faculty integrate CMC tools in their courses. A major implication of this study was that institutions that wish to promote integration of CMC technologies should provide as much

  11. Custom-made silicone hand prosthesis: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S; Lenka, P K; Equebal, A; Biswas, A

    2016-09-01

    Up to now, a cosmetic glove was the most common method for managing transmetacarpal (TMC) and carpometacarpal (CMC) amputations, but it is devoid of markings and body color. At this amputation level, it is very difficult to fit a functional prosthesis because of the short available length, unsightly shape, grafted skin, contracture and lack of functional prosthetic options. A 30-year-old male came to our clinic with amputation at the 1st to 4th carpometacarpal level and a 5th metacarpal that was projected laterally and fused with the carpal bone. The stump had grafted skin, redness, and an unhealed suture line. He complained of pain projected over the metacarpal and suture area. The clinical team members decided to fabricate a custom-made silicone hand prosthesis to accommodate the stump, protect the grafted skin, improve the hand's appearance and provide some passive function. The custom silicone hand prosthesis was fabricated with modified flexible wires to provide passive interphalangeal movement. Basic training, care and maintenance instructions for the prosthesis were given to the patient. The silicone hand prosthesis was able to restore the appearance of the lost digits and provide some passive function. His pain (VAS score) was reduced. Improvement in activities of daily living was found in the DASH questionnaire and Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function test. A silicone glove is a good option for more distal amputations, as it can accommodate any deformity, protect the skin, enhance the appearance and provide functional assistance. This case study provides a simple method to get passively movable fingers after proximal hand amputation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Chiral silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E.; Fahlteich, J.; Hoeche, Th.; Wagner, G.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2006-01-01

    Glancing angle ion beam assisted deposition is used for the growth of amorphous silicon nanospirals onto [0 0 1] silicon substrates in a temperature range from room temperature to 475 deg. C. The nanostructures are post-growth annealed in an argon atmosphere at various temperatures ranging from 400 deg. C to 800 deg. C. Recrystallization of silicon within the persisting nanospiral configuration is demonstrated for annealing temperatures above 800 deg. C. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the silicon samples prior and after temperature treatment

  13. Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  14. Modeling of the Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of Nonionic Surfactants with an Extended Group-Contribution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattei, Michele; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    , those compounds that exhibit larger correlation errors (based only on first- and second-order groups) are assigned to more detailed molecular descriptions, so that better correlations of critical micelle concentrations are obtained. The group parameter estimation has been performed using a data set......A group-contribution (GC) property prediction model for estimating the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of nonionic surfactants in water at 25 °C is presented. The model is based on the Marrero and Gani GC method. A systematic analysis of the model performance against experimental data...... concentration, and in particular, the quantitative structure−property relationship models, the developed GC model provides an accurate correlation and allows for an easier and faster application in computer-aided molecular design techniques facilitating chemical process and product design....

  15. Synthesis and controlling the optical and dielectric properties of CMC/PVA blend via γ-rays irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Sayed, A.M., E-mail: ams06@fayoum.edu.eg

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • PVA/CMC blend films were prepared by solution casting method. • The films were irradiated with γ-rays at the dose range of 0–70 kGy. • UV-vis spectroscopy was performed to study the changes in the optical properties. • The influence of γ-rays irradiation on the dielectric relaxation was studied. -- Abstract: Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) blend films were prepared by solution casting method. Then, these films were irradiated with γ-rays from a Co-60 source at doses over the range 0–70 kGy to investigate the modifications induced in the optical and dielectric properties. The dielectric constant (ε′) was measured in the temperature range 303–408 K and in the frequency range 10 kHz–1 MHz. The indirect optical band gap was found to increase within the dose range 0–10 kGy, and to decrease at the higher doses. The refractive index values, however, showed a reversed behavior. The highest transmittance percentage was obtained at 10 kGy dose. According to the frequency and temperature dependence of ε′, α- relaxation peaks were observed in all samples and assigned to the micro-Brownian motion of the blend chains. The values of ε′ showed a decrease in the dose range 0–10 kGy and an increase in the dose range 10–70 kGy. The ac conductivity σ{sub ac} (T) showed an Arrhenius type behavior separated into two distinct regions. The results of the present system are compared with those of similar materials.

  16. Synthesis and controlling the optical and dielectric properties of CMC/PVA blend via γ-rays irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Sayed, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PVA/CMC blend films were prepared by solution casting method. • The films were irradiated with γ-rays at the dose range of 0–70 kGy. • UV-vis spectroscopy was performed to study the changes in the optical properties. • The influence of γ-rays irradiation on the dielectric relaxation was studied. -- Abstract: Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) blend films were prepared by solution casting method. Then, these films were irradiated with γ-rays from a Co-60 source at doses over the range 0–70 kGy to investigate the modifications induced in the optical and dielectric properties. The dielectric constant (ε′) was measured in the temperature range 303–408 K and in the frequency range 10 kHz–1 MHz. The indirect optical band gap was found to increase within the dose range 0–10 kGy, and to decrease at the higher doses. The refractive index values, however, showed a reversed behavior. The highest transmittance percentage was obtained at 10 kGy dose. According to the frequency and temperature dependence of ε′, α- relaxation peaks were observed in all samples and assigned to the micro-Brownian motion of the blend chains. The values of ε′ showed a decrease in the dose range 0–10 kGy and an increase in the dose range 10–70 kGy. The ac conductivity σ ac (T) showed an Arrhenius type behavior separated into two distinct regions. The results of the present system are compared with those of similar materials

  17. A qualitative study of health care providers' perceptions and experiences of working together to care for children with medical complexity (CMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Lisa; Zurynski, Yvonne; Breen, Christie; Hoffmann, Tim; Woolfenden, Susan

    2018-01-31

    Children with medical complexity (CMC) have a wide range of long term health problems and disabilities that have an adverse impact on their quality of life. They have high levels of family identified health care needs and health care utilisation. There is no Australian literature on the experiences of health care providers working in the Australian tertiary, secondary and primary health care system, whilst managing CMC. This information is essential to inform the design of integrated health care systems for these children. We address this knowledge gap by exploring the perceptions and experiences of health care providers on the provision of health care for CMC aged 0 to 18 years. A qualitative research study was undertaken. Stakeholder forums, group and individual in depth interviews were undertaken using a semi-structured interview guide. The stakeholder forums were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Field notes of the stakeholder forums, group and individual interviews were taken. Inductive thematic analysis was undertaken to identify key themes. One hundred and three providers took part in the stakeholder forums and interviews across 3 local health districts, a tertiary paediatric hospital network, and primary health care organisations. Providers expressed concern regarding family capacity to negotiate the system, which was impacted by the medical complexity of the children and psychosocial complexity of their families. Lack of health care provider capacity in terms of their skills, time and availability to manage CMC was also a key problem. These issues occurred within a health system that had impaired capacity in terms of fragmentation of care and limited communication among health care providers. When designing integrated care models for CMC, it is essential to understand and address the challenges experienced by their health care providers. This requires adequate training of providers, additional resources and time for coordination of care, improved

  18. Konut Transformasyonu Bağlamında Lefke’deki CMC Evlerinin Zaman İçerisindeki Dönüşümü / The Gradual Transformation of CMC Houses in Lefke within the Context of Housing Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağla Beyaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to determine the reflections of the factors affecting the gradual change of the houses constructed for the American mining company CMC (Cyprus Mines Corporation in Lefke between 1916 and 1974. Research has shown that such factors as life standards, needs, politics, environmental factors, climate, geography and cultural factors have changed the housing demand. Having taken all these factors into consideration, we have reached a conclusion regarding the transformation of the houses by analysing the collected data by field research techniques appropriate to CMC houses in Lefke. The field research has been conducted by taking samples from each category and analysing them; and the gradual transformation and the underlying environmental factors have been determined. The field research techniques used in the study are interviews, photos, relieves and archive research. In the result obtained from the general work; Along with the rapid development caused by the effects of the Industrial Revolution, religious, cultural, economical, political and architectural conditions have been shaped in different forms and values. Along with these circumstances, the changes and transformations that observed in the world and affecting the cities have also affected Cyprus Island. In the Lefke region, along with the establishment of the CMC, the positive and negative effects of the terraced houses, built for the first time in Cyprus in four different categories and their close surroundings, draw quite attention. In the study, the transformations of these houses until today and the factors affecting them have been also determined. Öz Çalışma, Lefke Bölgesinde 1916-1974 yılları arasında faaliyet gösteren Amerikan maden şirketi CMC (Cyprus Mines Corporation için yapılmış olan konutların zaman içerisindeki form değişimine etki eden faktörlerin, konut mekânına olan etkilerini saptamaya yöneliktir. Konut ihtiyacının, yaşam

  19. Periodically poled silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  20. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  1. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  2. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  3. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed; Rubin, Andrew; Refaat, Mohamed; Sedky, Sherif; Abdo, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  4. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-loaded Co-Cu doped manganese ferrite nanorods as a new dual-modal simultaneous contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and nanocarrier for drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi Pour, Sajjad; Shaterian, Hamid Reza; Afradi, Mojgan; Yazdani-Elah-Abadi, Afshin

    2017-09-01

    We synthesized Co0.25Cu0.25Mn0.5Fe2O4@CMC (CCMFe2O4@CMC) nanorods as a new dual-modal simultaneous for magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and nanocarrier for drug delivery system. Impact of CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods were investigated on the longitudinal (T1), transverse (T2) and transverse (T2∗) relaxation times for in vitro MRI contrast agent in water and also for drug delivery system, L-dopa was coated on CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods and then in vitro drug release test was carried out at three PHs values and different temperatures. In vitro MR imaging demonstrated that r2 value of CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods is 138.33 mM-1 s-1, CCMFe2O4@CMC is useful as T2 contrast agent relative to other T2 contrast agants. In vitro drug release test shows the amount of released L-dopa from CCMFe2O4@CMC nanorods at medium with pH = 1.2 is more than pH = 5.3 and 7.4.

  5. Process for making silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  6. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  7. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-02-25

    In today\\'s traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  8. Silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Ralf

    1997-09-01

    This work gives an overview of silicon micromachined vibrating gyroscopes. Market perspectives and fields of application are pointed out. The advantage of using silicon micromachining is discussed and estimations of the desired performance, especially for automobiles are given. The general principle of vibrating gyroscopes is explained. Vibrating silicon gyroscopes can be divided into seven classes. for each class the characteristic principle is presented and examples are given. Finally a specific sensor, based on a tuning fork for automotive applications with a sensitivity of 250(mu) V/degrees is described in detail.

  9. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  10. Silicon etch process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.J.; White, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A silicon etch process wherein an area of silicon crystal surface is passivated by radiation damage and non-planar structure produced by subsequent anisotropic etching. The surface may be passivated by exposure to an energetic particle flux - for example an ion beam from an arsenic, boron, phosphorus, silicon or hydrogen source, or an electron beam. Radiation damage may be used for pattern definition and/or as an etch stop. Ethylenediamine pyrocatechol or aqueous potassium hydroxide anisotropic etchants may be used. The radiation damage may be removed after etching by thermal annealing. (author)

  11. Silicon integrated circuit process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-01

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  12. Silicon integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Duck

    1985-12-15

    This book introduces the process of silicon integrated circuit. It is composed of seven parts, which are oxidation process, diffusion process, ion implantation process such as ion implantation equipment, damage, annealing and influence on manufacture of integrated circuit and device, chemical vapor deposition process like silicon Epitaxy LPCVD and PECVD, photolithography process, including a sensitizer, spin, harden bake, reflection of light and problems related process, infrared light bake, wet-etch, dry etch, special etch and problems of etching, metal process like metal process like metal-silicon connection, aluminum process, credibility of aluminum and test process.

  13. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.; Peters, Craig; Brongersma, Mark; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  14. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  15. Joining elements of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of joining together at least two silicon carbide elements (e.g.in forming a heat exchanger) is described, comprising subjecting to sufficiently non-oxidizing atmosphere and sufficiently high temperature, material placed in space between the elements. The material consists of silicon carbide particles, carbon and/or a precursor of carbon, and silicon, such that it forms a joint joining together at least two silicon carbide elements. At least one of the elements may contain silicon. (author)

  16. Photoluminescence and electrical properties of silicon oxide and silicon nitride superlattices containing silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuleiko, D V; Ilin, A S

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence and electrical properties of superlattices with thin (1 to 5 nm) alternating silicon-rich silicon oxide or silicon-rich silicon nitride, and silicon oxide or silicon nitride layers containing silicon nanocrystals prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with subsequent annealing were investigated. The entirely silicon oxide based superlattices demonstrated photoluminescence peak shift due to quantum confinement effect. Electrical measurements showed the hysteresis effect in the vicinity of zero voltage due to structural features of the superlattices from SiOa 93 /Si 3 N 4 and SiN 0 . 8 /Si 3 N 4 layers. The entirely silicon nitride based samples demonstrated resistive switching effect, comprising an abrupt conductivity change at about 5 to 6 V with current-voltage characteristic hysteresis. The samples also demonstrated efficient photoluminescence with maximum at ∼1.4 eV, due to exiton recombination in silicon nanocrystals. (paper)

  17. Advances in silicon nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Pu, Minhao

    Silicon has long been established as an ideal material for passive integrated optical circuitry due to its high refractive index, with corresponding strong optical confinement ability, and its low-cost CMOS-compatible manufacturability. However, the inversion symmetry of the silicon crystal lattice.......g. in high-bit-rate optical communication circuits and networks, it is vital that the nonlinear optical effects of silicon are being strongly enhanced. This can among others be achieved in photonic-crystal slow-light waveguides and in nano-engineered photonic-wires (Fig. 1). In this talk I shall present some...... recent advances in this direction. The efficient coupling of light between optical fibers and the planar silicon devices and circuits is of crucial importance. Both end-coupling (Fig. 1) and grating-coupling solutions will be discussed along with polarization issues. A new scheme for a hybrid III...

  18. Integrated silicon optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Horst

    2000-01-01

    'Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics'assembles optoelectronics and microelectronics The book concentrates on silicon as the major basis of modern semiconductor devices and circuits Starting from the basics of optical emission and absorption and from the device physics of photodetectors, the aspects of the integration of photodetectors in modern bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS technologies are discussed Detailed descriptions of fabrication technologies and applications of optoelectronic integrated circuits are included The book, furthermore, contains a review of the state of research on eagerly expected silicon light emitters In order to cover the topic of the book comprehensively, integrated waveguides, gratings, and optoelectronic power devices are included in addition Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension 'Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics'will be of value to engineers, physicists, and scientists in industry and at universities The book is also recommendable for graduate students speciali...

  19. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed

  20. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  1. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  2. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  3. Pyrene absorption can be a convenient method for probing critical micellar concentration (cmc) and indexing micellar polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu Ray, Gargi; Chakraborty, Indranil; Moulik, Satya P

    2006-02-01

    The critical micellar concentration (cmc) of both ionic and non-ionic surfactants can be conveniently determined from the measurements of UV absorption of pyrene in surfactant solution. The results on a number of surfactants have agreed with that realized from pyrene fluorescence measurements as well as that obtained following conductometric, tensiometric and calorimetric methods. The absorbance vs [surfactant] profiles for all the major UV spectral peaks of pyrene have been found to be sigmoidal in nature which were analyzed according to Sigmoidal-Boltzmann equation (SBE) to evaluate the cmcs of the studied surfactants. The difference between the initial and the final asymptotes (a(i) and a(f), respectively) of the sigmoidal profile, Delta a = (a(f)-a(i)) and the slope of the sigmoid, S(sig) have been observed to depend on the type of the surfactant. The Delta a has shown a linear correlation with the ratio of the fluorescence intensities of the first and the third vibronic peaks, I1/I3 of pyrene which is considered as a measure of the environmental polarity (herein micellar interior) of the probe (pyrene). Thus, Delta a values have the prospect for use as another index for the estimation of polarity of micellar interior.

  4. A new manganese-based oral contrast agent (CMC-001) for liver MRI. Pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, Jan Troest; Rief, Matthias; Wagner, Moritz; Brismar, Torkel B.; Albiin, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metals on earth and is found as a component of more than 100 different minerals. Besides being an essential trace element in relation to the metabolic processes in the body, manganese is also a paramagnetic metal that possesses similar characteristics to gadolinium with regards to T1-weighted (T1-w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese, in the form of manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate, is the active substance in a new targeted oral contrast agent, currently known as CMC-001, indicated for hepatobiliary MRI. Under physiological circumstances manganese is poorly absorbed from the intestine after oral intake, but by the use of specific absorption promoters, L-alanine and vitamin D3, it is possible to obtain a sufficiently high concentration in the liver in order to achieve a significant signal enhancing effect. In the liver manganese is exposed to a very high first-pass effect, up to 98 %, which prevents the metal from reaching the systemic circulation, thereby reducing the number of systemic side-effects. Manganese is one of the least toxic trace elements, and due to its favorable safety profile it may be an attractive alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents for patients undergoing an MRI evaluation for liver metastases in the future. In this review the basic pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects of this new targeted oral hepatobiliary specific contrast agent will be discussed

  5. [Consideration about chemistry, manufacture and control (CMC) key problems in simplified registration of classical traditional Chinese medicine excellent prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Min; Liu, Ju-Yan; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Wang, De-Qin; Yan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Jin-Jin; Gao, Hui-Min; Li, Chun; Wang, Jin-Yu; Li, Chu-Yuan; Ni, Qing-Chun; Huang, Ji-Sheng; Lin, Juan

    2017-05-01

    As an outstanding representative of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) prescriptions accumulated from famous TCM doctors' clinical experiences in past dynasties, classical TCM excellent prescriptions (cTCMeP) are the most valuable part of TCM system. To support the research and development of cTCMeP, a series of regulations and measures were issued to encourage its simplified registration. There is still a long-way to go because many key problems and puzzles about technology, registration and administration in cTCMeP R&D process are not resolved. Based on the analysis of registration and management regulations of botanical drug products in FDA of USA and Japan, and EMA of Europe, the possible key problems and countermeasures in chemistry, manufacture and control (CMC) of simplified registration of cTCMeP were analyzed on the consideration of its actual situation. The method of "reference decoction extract by traditional prescription" (RDETP) was firstly proposed as standard to evaluate the quality and preparation uniformity between the new developing product under simplified registration and traditional original usages of cTCMeP, instead of Standard Decoction method in Japan. "Totality of the evidence" approach, mass balance and bioassay/biological assay of cTCMeP were emphatically suggested to introduce to the quality uniformity evaluation system in the raw drug material, drug substance and final product between the modern product and traditional decoction. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Nanostructured silicon for thermoelectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranz, A.; Kähler, J.; Waag, A.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    Thermoelectric modules convert thermal energy into electrical energy and vice versa. At present bismuth telluride is the most widely commercial used material for thermoelectric energy conversion. There are many applications where bismuth telluride modules are installed, mainly for refrigeration. However, bismuth telluride as material for energy generation in large scale has some disadvantages. Its availability is limited, it is hot stable at higher temperatures (>250°C) and manufacturing cost is relatively high. An alternative material for energy conversion in the future could be silicon. The technological processing of silicon is well advanced due to the rapid development of microelectronics in recent years. Silicon is largely available and environmentally friendly. The operating temperature of silicon thermoelectric generators can be much higher than of bismuth telluride. Today silicon is rarely used as a thermoelectric material because of its high thermal conductivity. In order to use silicon as an efficient thermoelectric material, it is necessary to reduce its thermal conductivity, while maintaining high electrical conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient. This can be done by nanostructuring into arrays of pillars. Fabrication of silicon pillars using ICP-cryogenic dry etching (Inductive Coupled Plasma) will be described. Their uniform height of the pillars allows simultaneous connecting of all pillars of an array. The pillars have diameters down to 180 nm and their height was selected between 1 micron and 10 microns. Measurement of electrical resistance of single silicon pillars will be presented which is done in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with nanomanipulators. Furthermore, measurement of thermal conductivity of single pillars with different diameters using the 3ω method will be shown.

  7. Study on Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervino, G.; Boero, M.; Manfredotti, C.; Icardi, M.; Gabutti, A.; Bagnolatti, E.; Monticone, E.

    1990-01-01

    Prototypes of Silicon microstrip detectors and Silicon large area detectors (3x2 cm 2 ), realized directly by our group, either by ion implantation or by diffusion are presented. The physical detector characteristics and their performances determined by exposing them to different radioactive sources and the results of extensive tests on passivation, where new technological ways have been investigated, are discussed. The calculation of the different terms contributing to the total dark current is reported

  8. Subwavelength silicon photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheben, P.; Bock, P.J.; Schmid, J.H.; Lapointe, J.; Janz, S.; Xu, D.-X.; Densmore, A.; Delage, A.; Lamontagne, B.; Florjanczyk, M.; Ma, R.

    2011-01-01

    With the goal of developing photonic components that are compatible with silicon microelectronic integrated circuits, silicon photonics has been the subject of intense research activity. Silicon is an excellent material for confining and manipulating light at the submicrometer scale. Silicon optoelectronic integrated devices have the potential to be miniaturized and mass-produced at affordable cost for many applications, including telecommunications, optical interconnects, medical screening, and biological and chemical sensing. We review recent advances in silicon photonics research at the National Research Council Canada. A new type of optical waveguide is presented, exploiting subwavelength grating (SWG) effect. We demonstrate subwavelength grating waveguides made of silicon, including practical components operating at telecom wavelengths: input couplers, waveguide crossings and spectrometer chips. SWG technique avoids loss and wavelength resonances due to diffraction effects and allows for single-mode operation with direct control of the mode confinement by changing the refractive index of a waveguide core over a range as broad as 1.6 - 3.5 simply by lithographic patterning. The light can be launched to these waveguides with a coupling loss as small as 0.5 dB and with minimal wavelength dependence, using coupling structures similar to that shown in Fig. 1. The subwavelength grating waveguides can cross each other with minimal loss and negligible crosstalk which allows massive photonic circuit connectivity to overcome the limits of electrical interconnects. These results suggest that the SWG waveguides could become key elements for future integrated photonic circuits. (authors)

  9. Silicon microphotonic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ta'eed, V.; Steel, M.J.; Grillet, C.; Eggleton, B.; Du, J.; Glasscock, J.; Savvides, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Silicon microphotonic devices have been drawing increasing attention in the past few years. The high index-difference between silicon and its oxide (Δn = 2) suggests a potential for high-density integration of optical functions on to a photonic chip. Additionally, it has been shown that silicon exhibits strong Raman nonlinearity, a necessary property as light interaction can occur only by means of nonlinearities in the propagation medium. The small dimensions of silicon waveguides require the design of efficient tapers to couple light to them. We have used the beam propagation method (RSoft BeamPROP) to understand the principles and design of an inverse-taper mode-converter as implemented in several recent papers. We report on progress in the design and fabrication of silicon-based waveguides. Preliminary work has been conducted by patterning silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers using optical lithography and reactive ion etching. Thus far, only rib waveguides have been designed, as single-mode ridge-waveguides are beyond the capabilities of conventional optical lithography. We have recently moved to electron beam lithography as the higher resolutions permitted will provide the flexibility to begin fabricating sub-micron waveguides

  10. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  11. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  12. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  13. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  14. Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) in the new solvent Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO)/Tetrabutylammonium Fluoride (TBAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, M. Y.; Shahruddin, M.; Noormaziah, J.; Rosli, W. D. Wan

    2015-06-01

    The surplus of Oil Palm is the most galore wastes in Malaysia because it produced about half of the world palm oil production, which contributes a major disposal problem Synthesis from an empty fruit bunch produced products such as Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC), could apply in diverse application such as for paper coating, food packaging and most recently, the potential as biomaterials has been revealed. In this study, CMC was prepared by firstly dissolved the bleached pulp from OPEFB in mixture solution of dimethyl sulfoxide(DMSO)/tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF) without any prior chemical modification. It took only 30 minutes to fully dissolve at temperature 60°C before sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were added for activation and monochloroacetateas terrifying agent. The final product is appeared in white powder, which is then will be analyzedby FTIR analysis. FTIR results show peaks appeared at wavenumber between 1609 cm-1 to 1614 cm-1 proved the existence of carboxymethyl groups which substitute OH groups at anhydroglucose(AGU) unit. As a conclusion, mixture solution of DMSO/TBAF is the suitable solvent used for dissolved cellulose before modifying it into CMC with higher Degree of Substitution (DS). Furthermore, the dissolution of the OPEFB bleached pulp was easy, simple and at a faster rate without prior chemical modification at temperature as low as 60°C.

  15. Synthesis and electrospinning carboxymethyl cellulose lithium (CMC-Li) modified 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) high-rate lithium-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Shao, Ziqiang; Liu, Minglong; Wang, Jianquan; Li, Pengfa; Zhao, Ming

    2014-02-15

    New cellulose derivative CMC-Li was synthesized, and nanometer CMC-Li fiber was applied to lithium-ion battery and coated with AQ by electrospinning. Under the protection of inert gas, modified AQ/carbon nanofibers (CNF)/Li nanometer composite material was obtained by carbonization in 280 °C as lithium battery anode materials for the first time. The morphologies and structures performance of materials were characterized by using IR, (1)H NMR, SEM, CV and EIS, respectively. Specific capacity was increased from 197 to 226.4 mAhg(-1) after modification for the first discharge at the rate of 2C. Irreversible reduction reaction peaks of modified material appeared between 1.5 and 1.7 V and the lowest oxidation reduction peak of the difference were 0.42 V, the polarization was weaker. Performance of cell with CMC-Li with the high degree of substitution (DS) was superior to that with low DS. Cellulose materials were applied to lithium battery to improve battery performance by electrospinning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs

  17. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  18. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  19. Silicon containing copolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, Sahar; Amiri, Sanam

    2014-01-01

    Silicones have unique properties including thermal oxidative stability, low temperature flow, high compressibility, low surface tension, hydrophobicity and electric properties. These special properties have encouraged the exploration of alternative synthetic routes of well defined controlled microstructures of silicone copolymers, the subject of this Springer Brief. The authors explore the synthesis and characterization of notable block copolymers. Recent advances in controlled radical polymerization techniques leading to the facile synthesis of well-defined silicon based thermo reversible block copolymers?are described along with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a technique utilized to develop well-defined functional thermo reversible block copolymers. The brief also focuses on Polyrotaxanes and their great potential as stimulus-responsive materials which produce poly (dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) based thermo reversible block copolymers.

  20. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  1. Floating Silicon Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerman, Peter

    2013-12-21

    The Floating Silicon Method (FSM) project at Applied Materials (formerly Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates), has been funded, in part, by the DOE under a “Photovoltaic Supply Chain and Cross Cutting Technologies” grant (number DE-EE0000595) for the past four years. The original intent of the project was to develop the FSM process from concept to a commercially viable tool. This new manufacturing equipment would support the photovoltaic industry in following ways: eliminate kerf losses and the consumable costs associated with wafer sawing, allow optimal photovoltaic efficiency by producing high-quality silicon sheets, reduce the cost of assembling photovoltaic modules by creating large-area silicon cells which are free of micro-cracks, and would be a drop-in replacement in existing high efficiency cell production process thereby allowing rapid fan-out into the industry.

  2. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Tobin@epfl.ch

    2016-09-21

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to the study of heavy flavour physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The primary goal of the experiment is to search for indirect evidence of new physics via measurements of CP violation and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The LHCb detector has a large-area silicon micro-strip detector located upstream of a dipole magnet, and three tracking stations with silicon micro-strip detectors in the innermost region downstream of the magnet. These two sub-detectors form the LHCb Silicon Tracker (ST). This paper gives an overview of the performance and operation of the ST during LHC Run 1. Measurements of the observed radiation damage are shown and compared to the expectation from simulation.

  3. Removal of inclusions from silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Arjan; Engh, Thorvald Abel; Tangstad, Merete; Kvithyld, Anne; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes

    2009-11-01

    The removal of inclusions from molten silicon is necessary to satisfy the purity requirements for solar grade silicon. This paper summarizes two methods that are investigated: (i) settling of the inclusions followed by subsequent directional solidification and (infiltration by ceramic foam filters. Settling of inclusions followed by directional solidification is of industrial importance for production of low-cost solar grade silicon. Filtration is reported as the most efficient method for removal of inclusions from the top-cut silicon scrap.

  4. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Richard Doerr

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  5. Silicon Tracking Upgrade at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, M.C.

    1998-04-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is scheduled to begin recording data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron in early 2000. The silicon tracking upgrade constitutes both the upgrade to the CDF silicon vertex detector (SVX II) and the new Intermediate Silicon Layers (ISL) located at radii just beyond the SVX II. Here we review the design and prototyping of all aspects of these detectors including mechanical design, data acquisition, and a trigger based on silicon tracking

  6. Silicon microphones - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwstra, Siebe; Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Scheeper, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Two application areas of microphones are discussed, those for precision measurement and those for hearing instruments. Silicon microphones are under investigation for both areas, and Danish industry plays a key role in both. The opportunities of silicon, as well as the challenges and expectations......, are discussed. For precision measurement the challenge for silicon is large, while for hearing instruments silicon seems to be very promising....

  7. CMS silicon tracker developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civinini, C.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.D.R.; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; Focardi, E.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Frey, A.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Honma, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B. Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Surrow, B.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Yahong, Li; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    2002-01-01

    The CMS Silicon tracker consists of 70 m 2 of microstrip sensors which design will be finalized at the end of 1999 on the basis of systematic studies of device characteristics as function of the most important parameters. A fundamental constraint comes from the fact that the detector has to be operated in a very hostile radiation environment with full efficiency. We present an overview of the current results and prospects for converging on a final set of parameters for the silicon tracker sensors

  8. Silicon hybrid integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianyao; Yuan Taonu; Shao Shiqian; Shi Zujun; Wang Yi; Yu Yude; Yu Jinzhong

    2011-01-01

    Recently,much attention has concentrated on silicon based photonic integrated circuits (PICs), which provide a cost-effective solution for high speed, wide bandwidth optical interconnection and optical communication.To integrate III-V compounds and germanium semiconductors on silicon substrates,at present there are two kinds of manufacturing methods, i.e., heteroepitaxy and bonding. Low-temperature wafer bonding which can overcome the high growth temperature, lattice mismatch,and incompatibility of thermal expansion coefficients during heteroepitaxy, has offered the possibility for large-scale heterogeneous integration. In this paper, several commonly used bonding methods are reviewed, and the future trends of low temperature wafer bonding envisaged. (authors)

  9. Strained Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf B. Wehrspohn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in the field of strained silicon photonics is presented. The application of strain to waveguide and photonic crystal structures can be used to alter the linear and nonlinear optical properties of these devices. Here, methods for the fabrication of strained devices are summarized and recent examples of linear and nonlinear optical devices are discussed. Furthermore, the relation between strain and the enhancement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility is investigated, which may enable the construction of optically active photonic devices made of silicon.

  10. Elite silicon and solar power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasamanov, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    The article is of popular character, the following issues being considered: conversion of solar energy into electric one, solar batteries in space and on the Earth, growing of silicon large-size crystals, source material problems relating to silicon monocrystals production, outlooks of solar silicon batteries production [ru

  11. Selective formation of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pattern of porous silicon is produced in the surface of a silicon substrate by forming a pattern of crystal defects in said surface, preferably by applying an ion milling beam through openings in a photoresist layer to the surface, and then exposing said surface to a stain etchant, such as HF:HNO3:H2O. The defected crystal will preferentially etch to form a pattern of porous silicon. When the amorphous content of the porous silicon exceeds 70 percent, the porous silicon pattern emits visible light at room temperature.

  12. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Sevilla, Galo T.; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally; Hussain, Aftab M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100

  13. Silicon nitride nanosieve membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tong, D.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gadgil, V.J.; Bostan, C.G.; Berenschot, Johan W.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2004-01-01

    An array of very uniform cylindrical nanopores with a pore diameter as small as 25 nm has been fabricated in an ultrathin micromachined silicon nitride membrane using focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The pore size of this nanosieve membrane was further reduced to below 10 nm by coating it with

  14. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  15. Silicon graphene Bragg gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Domenech, David; Muñoz, Pascual

    2014-03-10

    We propose the use of interleaved graphene sections on top of a silicon waveguide to implement tunable Bragg gratings. The filter central wavelength and bandwidth can be controlled changing the chemical potential of the graphene sections. Apodization techniques are also presented.

  16. On nanostructured silicon success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    Recent Letters by Piggott et al. 1 and Shen et al. 2 claim the smallest ever dielectric wave length and polarization splitters. The associated News & Views article by Aydin3 states that these works “are the first experimental demonstration of on-chip, silicon photonic components based on complex...

  17. Silicon oxynitride based photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worhoff, Kerstin; Klein, E.J.; Hussein, M.G.; Driessen, A.; Marciniak, M.; Jaworski, M.; Zdanowicz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride is a very attractive material for integrated optics. Besides possessing excellent optical properties it can be deposited with refractive indices varying over a wide range by tuning the material composition. In this contribution we will summarize the key properties of this material

  18. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  19. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  20. DELPHI Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    DELPHI was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The silicon tracking detector was nearest to the collision point in the centre of the detector. It was used to pinpoint the collision and catch short-lived particles.

  1. Análisis psicométrico del Cuestionario de Motivos del Consumo de Alcohol (CMC en escolares de la ciudad de Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Pardo Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio consistió en analizar las propiedades psicométricas del Cuestionario de Motivos del Consumo de Alcohol (CMC en escolares de la ciudad de Bogotá. Para ello, se contó con 206 participantes, a quienes se les aplicó el cuestionario. Los resultados fueron objeto de un análisis factorial exploratorio por medio de la extracción de componentes principales, con rotación Varimax, así como de un análisis de confiabilidad por alfa de Cronbach. Los mismos muestran 4 factores con apropiada carga factorial tanto por factor como por reactivo, explicando el 73,359% de la varianza, y un índice de confiabilidad de ,945. Así entonces, el Cuestionario de Motivos del Consumo de Alcohol (CMC presenta una estructura similar a otros estudios, lo que indica que es una escala con adecuada validez de constructo y, por lo tanto, confiable para utilizarse en escolares bogotanos. Abstract The objective of this psychometric study is to analyze the psychometric properties of the Drinking Motives Questionnaire (DMQ in school children in Bogotá city. For this, there were chosen 206 sample participants who were administered the questionnaire, applying an exploratory factor analysis by using a principal component extraction with Varimax rotation, and a Cronbach’s alpha reliability analysis was also performed. The results show four factors with an appropriate factor load, by factor and by reactive, explaining a variance of 73.359% , and a reliability index of 945. The results show that the Drinking motives Questionnaire (CMC show a similar structure in comparison with surveys made in other countries. This indicates an appropriate construct validity, and reliability for its use in school children in Bogotá city.

  2. The cmc-value of a bolalipid with two phosphocholine headgroups and a C24 alkyl chain: Unusual binding properties of fluorescence probes to bolalipid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordts, Martin; Kerth, Andreas; Drescher, Simon; Ott, Maria; Blume, Alfred

    2017-09-01

    Bolalipids with a long alkyl chain and two phosphocholine polar groups self-assemble in water into two different types of aggregate structures, namely helical nanofibers at low temperature and two types of micellar aggregates at higher temperature. We tried to determine the critical aggregation concentration (cac) or critical micellar concentration (cmc) of the bolalipid tetracosane-1,24-bis(phosphocholine) (PC-C24-PC) by using different fluorescent probes. The use of pyrene or pyrene derivatives as fluorophores failed, whereas the probes 1,8-ANS and particularly bis-ANS gave consistent results. The structure of the bolalipid aggregates obviously hinders partitioning or binding of pyrene derivatives into the micellar interior, whereas 1,8-ANS and bis-ANS can bind to the surface of the aggregate structures. The observed large increase in fluorescence intensity of bis-ANS indicates that binding to the hydrophobic surface of the aggregates leads to a reduction of the dye mobility. However, binding of bis-ANS is relatively weak, so that the determination of a cac/cmc-value is difficult. Simulations of the intensity curves for PC-C24-PC lead to estimates of the cac/cmc-value of 0.3-1.0×10 -6 M, depending on the structure of the aggregates. Single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was used to determine the mobility of bis-ANS as a function of concentration of PC-C24-PC. The dye diffusion time and the molecular brightness are lower at low bolalipid concentration, when only free dye is present, and increase at higher concentration when bis-ANS is bound to the aggregates. The experimental cac/cmc-values are higher than those estimated, using an incremental method for the change in Gibbs free energy for micellization with n-alkyl-phosphocholines with only one polar group as a comparison. Apparently, for PC-C24-PC in micellar or fibrous aggregates, more CH 2 groups are exposed to water than in a conventional micelle of an n-alkyl-phosphocholine. Copyright

  3. Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and diffusion to silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Akasaka, Y.; Horie, K.

    1977-01-01

    Arsenic implantation into polycrystalline silicon and drive-in diffusion to silicon substrate have been investigated by MeV He + backscattering analysis and also by electrical measurements. The range distributions of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon are well fitted to Gaussian distributions over the energy range 60--350 keV. The measured values of R/sub P/ and ΔR/sub P/ are about 10 and 20% larger than the theoretical predictions, respectively. The effective diffusion coefficient of arsenic implanted into polycrystalline silicon is expressed as D=0.63 exp[(-3.22 eV/kT)] and is independent of the arsenic concentration. The drive-in diffusion of arsenic from the implanted polycrystalline silicon layer into the silicon substrate is significantly affected by the diffusion atmosphere. In the N 2 atmosphere, a considerable amount of arsenic atoms diffuses outward to the ambient. The outdiffusion can be suppressed by encapsulation with Si 3 N 4 . In the oxidizing atmosphere, arsenic atoms are driven inward by growing SiO 2 due to the segregation between SiO 2 and polycrystalline silicon, and consequently the drive-in diffusion of arsenic is enhanced. At the interface between the polycrystalline silicon layer and the silicon substrate, arsenic atoms are likely to segregate at the polycrystalline silicon side

  4. Silicon epitaxy on textured double layer porous silicon by LPCVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Hong; Shen Honglie; Zhang Lei; Huang Haibin; Lu Linfeng; Tang Zhengxia; Shen Jiancang

    2010-01-01

    Epitaxial silicon thin film on textured double layer porous silicon (DLPS) was demonstrated. The textured DLPS was formed by electrochemical etching using two different current densities on the silicon wafer that are randomly textured with upright pyramids. Silicon thin films were then grown on the annealed DLPS, using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). The reflectance of the DLPS and the grown silicon thin films were studied by a spectrophotometer. The crystallinity and topography of the grown silicon thin films were studied by Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The reflectance results show that the reflectance of the silicon wafer decreases from 24.7% to 11.7% after texturing, and after the deposition of silicon thin film the surface reflectance is about 13.8%. SEM images show that the epitaxial silicon film on textured DLPS exhibits random pyramids. The Raman spectrum peaks near 521 cm -1 have a width of 7.8 cm -1 , which reveals the high crystalline quality of the silicon epitaxy.

  5. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M.; Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R.; Luna L, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 Ω-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N 2 at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  6. The CMS silicon tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focardi, E.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Buffini, A.; Busoni, S.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Della Marina, R.; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Frey, A.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Honma, A.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Leubelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B.Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; Migliore, E.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Papi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raffaelli, F.; Raymond, M.; Rizzo, F.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Surrow, B.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Yahong, Li; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Silicon microstrip Tracker of the CMS experiment at LHC. It consists of a barrel part with 5 layers and two endcaps with 10 disks each. About 10 000 single-sided equivalent modules have to be built, each one carrying two daisy-chained silicon detectors and their front-end electronics. Back-to-back modules are used to read-out the radial coordinate. The tracker will be operated in an environment kept at a temperature of T=-10 deg. C to minimize the Si sensors radiation damage. Heavily irradiated detectors will be safely operated due to the high-voltage capability of the sensors. Full-size mechanical prototypes have been built to check the system aspects before starting the construction

  7. Undepleted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancoita, P.G.; Seidman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Large-size silicon detectors employing relatively low resistivity material can be used in electromagnetic calorimetry. They can operate in strong magnetic fields, under geometric constraints and with microstrip detectors a high resolution can be achieved. Low noise large capacitance oriented electronics was developed to enable good signal-to-noise ratio for single relativistic particles traversing large area detectors. In undepleted silicon detectors, the charge migration from the field-free region has been investigated by comparing the expected peak position (from the depleted layer only) of the energy-loss of relativistic electrons with the measured one. Furthermore, the undepleted detectors have been employed in a prototype of Si/W electromagnetic colorimeter. The sensitive layer was found to be systematically larger than the depleted one

  8. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  9. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  10. Electron beam silicon purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Anatoly [SIA ' ' KEPP EU' ' , Riga (Latvia); Kravtsov, Alexey [' ' KEPP-service' ' Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Purification of heavily doped electronic grade silicon by evaporation of N-type impurities with electron beam heating was investigated in process with a batch weight up to 50 kilos. Effective temperature of the melt, an indicative parameter suitable for purification process characterization was calculated and appeared to be stable for different load weight processes. Purified material was successfully approbated in standard CZ processes of three different companies. Each company used its standard process and obtained CZ monocrystals applicable for photovoltaic application. These facts enable process to be successfully scaled up to commercial volumes (150-300 kg) and yield solar grade silicon. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Electrometallurgy of Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    wind, plants, and water impounded in elevated reservoirs. Photovoltaic or solar cells, which convert sunlight directly to electricity, belongs tc, the...on record is that of St. Claire DeVille, who claimed that silicon was produced by electrolysing an impure melt of NaAlC14, but his material did not...this composition and purified melts were electrolysed at about 14500C in graphite crucible and using graphite electrodes. Applied potentials were

  12. Liquid Silicon Pouch Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Number 15/696,426 Filing Date 6 September 2017 Inventor Charles J. Patrissi et al Address any questions concerning this matter to the...silicon-based anodes during cycling, lithium insertion and deinsertion. Mitigation of this problem has long been sought and will result in improved...design shown. [0032] It will be understood that many additional changes in the details, materials, steps and arrangement of parts, which have been

  13. The CMS silicon tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alessandro, R.; Biggeri, U.; Bruzzi, M.; Catacchini, E.; Civinini, C.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Meschini, M.; Parrini, G.; Pieri, M.; Albergo, S.; Boemi, D.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Angarano, M.; Creanza, D.; Palma, M. de; Fiore, L.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Raso, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Tempesta, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Candelori, A.; Castro, A.; Da Rold, M.; Giraldo, A.; Martignon, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Stavitsky, I.; Babucci, E.; Bartalini, P.; Bilei, G.M.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Passeri, D.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Wang, Y.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Bosi, F.; Borello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Castaldi, R.; Dell'Orso, R.; Giassi, A.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Sguazzoni, G.; Starodumov, A.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Xie, Z.; Breuker, H.; Caner, A.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Feld, L.; Glessing, B.; Hammerstrom, R.; Huhtinen, M.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stefanini, G.; Connotte, J.; Gu, W.H.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Pandoulas, D.; Siedling, R.; Wittmer, B.; Della Marina, R.; Freudenreich, K.; Lustermann, W.; Viertel, G.; Eklund, C.; Karimaeki, V.; Skog, K.; French, M.; Hall, G.; Mc Evoy, B.; Raymond, M.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Piperov, S.; Tuuva, T.; Watts, S.; Silvestris, L.

    1998-01-01

    The new silicon tracker layout (V4) is presented. The system aspects of the construction are discussed together with the expected tracking performance. Because of the high radiation environment in which the detectors will operate, particular care has been devoted to the study of the characteristics of heavily irradiated detectors. This includes studies on performance (charge collection, cluster size, resolution, efficiency) as a function of the bias voltage, integrated fluence, incidence angle and temperature. (author)

  14. Selfsupported epitaxial silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarovici, D.; Popescu, A.

    1975-01-01

    The methods of removing the p or p + support of an n-type epitaxial silicon layer using electrochemical etching are described. So far, only n + -n junctions have been processed. The condition of anodic dissolution for some values of the support and layer resistivity are given. By this method very thin single crystal selfsupported targets of convenient areas can be obtained for channeling - blocking experiments

  15. Silicon and Civilization,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-04

    of a diamond. 7. The particular physical and chemical properties of silicon resulted in the fact that in the periodic system it was found in the III...small quantities. Silica is found in blades of grass and grain, in reed and bamboo shoots, where it serves to stiffen the stalk. 2. Diatomite ... properties desired in technology. Quartz glass is very resistant to temperature change since it has a very small coefficient of thermal expansion, is

  16. Porous silicon: silicon quantum dots for photonic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavesi, L.; Guardini, R.

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon formation and structure characterization are briefly illustrated. Its luminescence properties rae presented and interpreted on the basis of exciton recombination in quantum dot structures: the trap-controlled hopping mechanism is used to describe the recombination dynamics. Porous silicon application to photonic devices is considered: porous silicon multilayer in general, and micro cavities in particular are described. The present situation in the realization of porous silicon LEDs is considered, and future developments in this field of research are suggested. (author). 30 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  17. Photovoltaic characteristics of porous silicon /(n+ - p) silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhafarov, T.D.; Aslanov, S.S.; Ragimov, S.H.; Sadigov, M.S.; Nabiyeva, A.F.; Yuksel, Aydin S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : The purpose of this work is to improve the photovoltaic parameters of the screen-printed silicon solar cells by formation the nano-porous silicon film on the frontal surface of the cell. The photovoltaic characteristics of two type silicon solar cells with and without porous silicon layer were measured and compared. A remarkable increment of short-circuit current density and the efficiency by 48 percent and 20 percent, respectively, have been achieved for PS/(n + - pSi) solar cell comparing to (n + - p)Si solar cell without PS layer

  18. Fabrication of CMC-g-PAM superporous polymer monoliths via eco-friendly Pickering-MIPEs for superior adsorption of methyl violet and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zong, Li; Lu, Taotao; Wang, Aiqin

    2017-06-01

    A series of superporous carboxymethylcellulose-graft-poly(acrylamide) (CMC-g-PAM) polymer monoliths presenting interconnected pore structure and excellent adsorption properties were prepared by one-step free-radical grafting polymerization reaction of CMC and acrylamide (AM) in the oil-in-water (O/W) Pickering-medium internal phase emulsions (Pickering-MIPEs) composed of non-toxic edible oil as a dispersion phase and natural Pal nanorods as stabilizers. The effects of Pal dosage, AM dosage, and co-surfactant Tween-20 (T-20) on the pore structures of the monoliths were studied. It was revealed that the well-defined pores were formed when the dosages of Pal and T-20 are 9-14% and 3%, respectively. The porous monolith can rapidly adsorb 1585 mg/g of methyl violet (MV) and 1625 mg/g of methylene blue (MB). After the monolith was regenerated by adsorption-desorption process for 5 times, the adsorption capacities still reached 92.1% (for MV) and 93.5% (for MB) of the initial maximum adsorption capacities. The adsorption process was fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model very well, which indicate that mono-layer chemical adsorption mainly contribute to the high-capacity adsorption for dyes. The superporous polymer monolith prepared from eco-friendly Pickering-MIPEs shows good adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate, which is potential adsorbent for the decontimination of dye-containing wastewater.

  19. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  20. Radiation Hardening of Silicon Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Leroy, C; Glaser, M

    2002-01-01

    %RD48 %title\\\\ \\\\Silicon detectors will be widely used in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider where high radiation levels will cause significant bulk damage. In addition to increased leakage current and charge collection losses worsening the signal to noise, the induced radiation damage changes the effective doping concentration and represents the limiting factor to long term operation of silicon detectors. The objectives are to develop radiation hard silicon detectors that can operate beyond the limits of the present devices and that ensure guaranteed operation for the whole lifetime of the LHC experimental programme. Radiation induced defect modelling and experimental results show that the silicon radiation hardness depends on the atomic impurities present in the initial monocrystalline material.\\\\ \\\\ Float zone (FZ) silicon materials with addition of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, germanium and tin were produced as well as epitaxial silicon materials with epilayers up to 200 $\\mu$m thickness. Their im...

  1. Retention of storage quality and post-refrigeration shelf-life extension of plum (Prunus domestica L.) cv. Santa Rosa using combination of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coating and gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Peerzada R.; Suradkar, Prashant P.; Wani, Ali M.; Dar, Mohd A.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coatings alone and in combination with gamma irradiation was tested for maintaining the storage quality and extending shelf-life of plum. Matured green plums were CMC coated at levels 0.5–1.0% w/v and gamma irradiated at 1.5 kGy. The treated fruit including control was stored under ambient (temperature 25±2 °C, RH 70%) and refrigerated (temperature 3±1 °C, RH 80%) conditions. In fruits treated with individual treatments of 1.0% w/v CMC; 1.5 kGy irradiation and combination of 1.0% w/v CMC and 1.5 kGy irradiation, no decay was recorded up to 11, 17 and 21 days of ambient storage. Irradiation alone at 1.5 kGy gave 8 days extension in shelf-life of plum compared to 5 days by 1.0% w/v CMC coating following 45 days of refrigeration. All combinatory treatments of CMC coating and irradiation proved beneficial in maintaining the storage quality as well as delaying the decaying of plum during post-refrigerated storage at 25±2 °C, RH 70% but, combination of CMC at 1.0% w/v and 1.5 kGy irradiation was found significantly (p≤0.05) superior to all other treatments in maintaining the storage quality and delaying the decaying of plum. CMC coating of plums at 1.0% w/v followed by irradiation at 1.5 kGy resulted in chlorophyll retention of 19.4% after 16 days compared to 10% in control after 8 days of ambient storage. Under refrigerated conditions, same treatment gave retention of 67.6% in chlorophyll compared to 10.6% in control after 35 days of storage. The above combinatory treatment resulted in extension of 11 days in shelf-life of plum during post-refrigerated storage at 25±2 °C, RH 70% following 45 days of refrigeration. Based on microbial analysis, irradiation alone at 1.5 kGy and in combination with 1.0% w/v CMC resulted in 2.0 and 1.8 log reduction in yeast and mold count of plum fruit after 20 and 35 days of ambient and refrigerated storage, thereby ensuring consumer safety. - Highlights: • Irradiation and CMC alone at 1.5 k

  2. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N.; Franco, A.; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M.; Dunand, S.; Powolny, F.; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  3. Characterization of Czochralski Silicon Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Luukka, Panja-Riina; Haerkoenen, Jaakko

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of irradiated and non-irradiated segmenteddetectors made of high-resistivity (>1 kΩcm) magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) silicon. It isshown that the radiation hardness (RH) of the protons of these detectors is higher thanthat of devices made of traditional materials such as Float Zone (FZ) silicon or DiffusionOxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon due to the presence of intrinsic oxygen (> 5 x1017 cm-3). The MCZ devices therefore present an interesting alter...

  4. Laboratory course on silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Crescio, E; Roe, S; Rudge, A

    2003-01-01

    The laboratory course consisted of four different mini sessions, in order to give the student some hands-on experience on various aspects of silicon sensors and related integrated electronics. The four experiments were. 1. Characterisation of silicon diodes for particle detection 2. Study of noise performance of the Viking readout circuit 3. Study of the position resolution of a silicon microstrip sensor 4. Study of charge transport in silicon with a fast amplifier The data in the following were obtained during the ICFA school by the students.

  5. Silicon processing for photovoltaics II

    CERN Document Server

    Khattak, CP

    2012-01-01

    The processing of semiconductor silicon for manufacturing low cost photovoltaic products has been a field of increasing activity over the past decade and a number of papers have been published in the technical literature. This volume presents comprehensive, in-depth reviews on some of the key technologies developed for processing silicon for photovoltaic applications. It is complementary to Volume 5 in this series and together they provide the only collection of reviews in silicon photovoltaics available.The volume contains papers on: the effect of introducing grain boundaries in silicon; the

  6. Electrical leakage phenomenon in heteroepitaxial cubic silicon carbide on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkumar, Aiswarya; Zielinski, Marcin; Bosi, Matteo; Verzellesi, Giovanni; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Iacopi, Francesca

    2018-06-01

    Heteroepitaxial 3C-SiC films on silicon substrates are of technological interest as enablers to integrate the excellent electrical, electronic, mechanical, thermal, and epitaxial properties of bulk silicon carbide into well-established silicon technologies. One critical bottleneck of this integration is the establishment of a stable and reliable electronic junction at the heteroepitaxial interface of the n-type SiC with the silicon substrate. We have thus investigated in detail the electrical and transport properties of heteroepitaxial cubic silicon carbide films grown via different methods on low-doped and high-resistivity silicon substrates by using van der Pauw Hall and transfer length measurements as test vehicles. We have found that Si and C intermixing upon or after growth, particularly by the diffusion of carbon into the silicon matrix, creates extensive interstitial carbon traps and hampers the formation of a stable rectifying or insulating junction at the SiC/Si interface. Although a reliable p-n junction may not be realistic in the SiC/Si system, we can achieve, from a point of view of the electrical isolation of in-plane SiC structures, leakage suppression through the substrate by using a high-resistivity silicon substrate coupled with deep recess etching in between the SiC structures.

  7. Light emitting structures porous silicon-silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monastyrskii, L.S.; Olenych, I.B.; Panasjuk, M.R.; Savchyn, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The research of spectroscopic properties of porous silicon has been done. Complex of photoluminescence, electroluminescence, cathodoluminescence, thermostimulated depolarisation current analyte methods have been applied to study of geterostructures and free layers of porous silicon. Light emitting processes had tendency to decrease. The character of decay for all kinds of luminescence were different

  8. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  9. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Elsasser, Ch; Gallas Torreira, A; Pérez Trigo, A; Rodríguez Pérez, P; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Dupertuis, F; Haefeli, G; Komarov, I; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Tran, M T; Anderson, J; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; Saornil, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, A; Britsch, M; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is to study rare heavy quark decays and CP vio- lation with the high rate of beauty and charmed hadrons produced in $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The detector is designed as a single-arm forward spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification performance. The Silicon Tracker is a key part of the tracking system to measure the particle trajectories to high precision. This paper reports the performance as well as the results of the radiation damage monitoring based on leakage currents and on charge collection efficiency scans during the data taking in the LHC Run I.

  10. Photovoltaics: sunshine and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirzaker, Mike

    2006-05-15

    Spain's photovoltaic sector grew rapidly in 2004 only to slow down in 2005. While a State-guaranteed feed-in tariff is in place to drive a take-off, some of the smaller administrative cogs are buckling under the pressure. Projects are being further slowed by soaring world silicon prices and module shortages. Nevertheless, market volume is higher than ever before, and bio capital from both home and abroad is betting that the Spanish take-off is around the corner. (Author)

  11. Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-09

    Jun 9, 2013 ... Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention.

  12. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  13. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, L.; Abreu, M.C.; Bell, W.H.; Berglund, P.; Boer, W. de; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Da Via, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, 'resuscitate' when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the 'Lazarus effect'. The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors

  14. Recent developments in silicon calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, J.E.

    1990-11-01

    We present a survey of some of the recent calorimeter applications of silicon detectors. The numerous attractive features of silicon detectors are summarized, with an emphasis on those aspects important to calorimetry. Several of the uses of this technology are summarized and referenced. We consider applications for electromagnetic calorimetry, hadronic calorimetry, and proposals for the SSC

  15. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  16. Flowmeter with silicon flow tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Dijkstra, Marcel; Haneveld, J.; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2009-01-01

    A flowmeter comprising a system chip with a silicon substrate provided on a carrier, in an opening whereof at least one silicon flow tube is provided for transporting a medium whose flow rate is to be measured, said tube having two ends that issue via a wall of the opening into channels coated with

  17. Luneburg lens in silicon photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Falco, Andrea; Kehr, Susanne C; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-03-14

    The Luneburg lens is an aberration-free lens that focuses light from all directions equally well. We fabricated and tested a Luneburg lens in silicon photonics. Such fully-integrated lenses may become the building blocks of compact Fourier optics on chips. Furthermore, our fabrication technique is sufficiently versatile for making perfect imaging devices on silicon platforms.

  18. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Beetz, C P; Steinbeck, J; Lemieux, B; Winn, D R

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of approx 0.5 to approx 25 mu m, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposite...

  19. Chalcogen donnors in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scolfaro, L.M.R.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic stucture of chalcogen impurities in silicon which give rise to deep levels in the forbidden band gap of that semiconductor is studied. The molecular cluster model within the formalism of the multiple scattering method in the Xα local density approximation was used . The surface orbitals were treated by using the Watson sphere model. Studies were carried out for the isolated substitutional sulfur and selenium impurities (Si:S and Si:Se). A pioneer investigation was performed for the nearest-neighbor impurity pairs of sulfur and selenium (Si:S 2 and Si:Se 2 ). All the systems were also analysed in the positive charge states (Si:S + , Si:Se + and Si:Se 2 + ) and for the isolated impurities the calculations were carried out to the spin polarized limit. The obtained results were used to interpret recent photoconductivity, photocapitance, EPR and DLTS data on these centers. It was observed that the adopted model is able to provide a satisfactory description of the electronic structure of the chalcogen impurity centers in silicon. (autor) [pt

  20. Flexible silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakers, A.W.; Armour, T. [Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-08-15

    In order to be useful for certain niche applications, crystalline silicon solar cells must be able to sustain either one-time flexure or multiple non-critical flexures without significant loss of strength or efficiency. This paper describes experimental characterisation of the behaviour of thin crystalline silicon solar cells, under either static or repeated flexure, by flexing samples and recording any resulting changes in performance. Thin SLIVER cells were used for the experiment. Mechanical strength was found to be unaffected after 100,000 flexures. Solar conversion efficiency remained at greater than 95% of the initial value after 100,000 flexures. Prolonged one-time flexure close to, but not below, the fracture radius resulted in no significant change of properties. For every sample, fracture occurred either on the first flexure to a given radius of curvature, or not at all when using that radius. In summary, for a given radius of curvature, either the flexed solar cells broke immediately, or they were essentially unaffected by prolonged or multiple flexing. (author)

  1. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haefner, Petra; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT), made up from silicon micro-strip detectors is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, one of the experiments at CERN LHC. The completed SCT is in very good shape: 99.3% of the SCT strips are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specifications. In the talk the current status of the SCT will be reviewed. We will report on the operation of the detector and observed problems, with stress on the sensor and electronics performance. TWEPP Summary In December 2009 the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) recorded the first proton- proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 900 GeV and this was followed by the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV in March 2010. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signal from the strips is processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data i...

  2. Pure exciton- and magnon-assisted optical transitionsin the one-dimensional antiferromagnet CsMnCl3x2H2O (CMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, W.; Strauss, E.; Yen, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    We report the first observation of the pure electronic transitions in the 4 T 1 state of Mn 2+ ions in the one-dimensional antiferromagnet CsMnCl 3 x2H 2 O (CMC) in the absorption, excitation, and fluorescence spectra. Selection rules are analyzed: the exciton transition is electric dipole allowed, the magnon sideband in emission is a single-ion process, and is both electric and magnetic dipole allowed; however, the magnon sideband in absorption is an ion-pair process and is a weakened-electric-dipole and magnetic-dipole transition. The density of magnon states and the line profile of the magnon sideband have been calculated. The results explain the peculiar line shapes of the observed sideband emission. An exponential decay of the exciton is observed with a lifetime of 0.576 ms

  3. Synthesis, CMC Determination, Antimicrobial Activity and Nucleic Acid Binding of A Surfactant Copper(II) Complex Containing Phenanthroline and Alanine Schiff-Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2014-03-01

    A new water-soluble surfactant copper(II) complex [Cu(sal-ala)(phen)(DA)] (sal-ala = salicylalanine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, DA = dodecylamine), has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of this surfactant-copper(II) complex in aqueous solution were obtained from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data (at 303, 308, 313. 318 and 323 K) served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔG(0)m, ΔH(0)m and ΔS(0)m). The interaction of this complex with nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) has been explored by using electronic absorption spectral titration, competitive binding experiment, cyclic voltammetry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and viscosity measurements. Electronic absorption studies have revealed that the complex can bind to nucleic acids by the intercalative binding mode which has been verified by viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants have also been calculated (Kb = 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for DNA and Kb = 1.6 × 10(5) M(-1) for RNA). Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complex exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound-EB indicating that the complex binds to DNA in strong competition with EB for the intercalative binding site. The presence of hydrophobic ligands, alanine Schiff-base, phenanthroline and long aliphatic chain amine in the complex were responsible for this strong intercalative binding. The surfactant-copper (II) complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activities against various microorganisms. The results were compared with the standard drugs, amikacin(antibacterial) and ketokonazole(antifungal).

  4. Fabrication of CMC-g-PAM Superporous Polymer Monoliths via Eco-Friendly Pickering-MIPEs for Superior Adsorption of Methyl Violet and Methylene Blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zong, Li; Lu, Taotao; Wang, Aiqin

    2017-01-01

    A series of superporous carboxymethylcellulose- graft -poly(acrylamide)/palygorskite (CMC- g -PAM/Pal) polymer monoliths presenting interconnected pore structure and excellent adsorption properties were prepared by one-step free-radical grafting polymerization reaction of CMC and acrylamide (AM) in the oil-in-water (O/W) Pickering-medium internal phase emulsions (Pickering-MIPEs) composed of non-toxic edible oil as a dispersion phase and natural Pal nanorods as stabilizers. The effects of Pal dosage, AM dosage, and co-surfactant Tween-20 (T-20) on the pore structures of the monoliths were studied. It was revealed that the well-defined pores were formed when the dosages of Pal and T-20 are 9-14 and 3%, respectively. The porous monolith can rapidly adsorb 1,585 mg/g of methyl violet (MV) and 1,625 mg/g of methylene blue (MB). After the monolith was regenerated by adsorption-desorption process for five times, the adsorption capacities still reached 92.1% (for MV) and 93.5% (for MB) of the initial maximum adsorption capacities. The adsorption process was fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model very well, which indicate that mono-layer chemical adsorption mainly contribute to the high-capacity adsorption for dyes. The superporous polymer monolith prepared from eco-friendly Pickering-MIPEs shows good adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate, which is potential adsorbent for the decontamination of dye-containing wastewater.

  5. Fabrication of CMC-g-PAM Superporous Polymer Monoliths via Eco-Friendly Pickering-MIPEs for Superior Adsorption of Methyl Violet and Methylene Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of superporous carboxymethylcellulose-graft-poly(acrylamide/palygorskite (CMC-g-PAM/Pal polymer monoliths presenting interconnected pore structure and excellent adsorption properties were prepared by one-step free-radical grafting polymerization reaction of CMC and acrylamide (AM in the oil-in-water (O/W Pickering-medium internal phase emulsions (Pickering-MIPEs composed of non-toxic edible oil as a dispersion phase and natural Pal nanorods as stabilizers. The effects of Pal dosage, AM dosage, and co-surfactant Tween-20 (T-20 on the pore structures of the monoliths were studied. It was revealed that the well-defined pores were formed when the dosages of Pal and T-20 are 9–14 and 3%, respectively. The porous monolith can rapidly adsorb 1,585 mg/g of methyl violet (MV and 1,625 mg/g of methylene blue (MB. After the monolith was regenerated by adsorption-desorption process for five times, the adsorption capacities still reached 92.1% (for MV and 93.5% (for MB of the initial maximum adsorption capacities. The adsorption process was fitted with Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model very well, which indicate that mono-layer chemical adsorption mainly contribute to the high-capacity adsorption for dyes. The superporous polymer monolith prepared from eco-friendly Pickering-MIPEs shows good adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate, which is potential adsorbent for the decontamination of dye-containing wastewater.

  6. The Targeted Antitumor Effects of C- PC/CMC-CD59sp Nanoparticles on HeLa Cells in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujuan; Jiang, Liangqian; Yin, Qifeng; Liu, Huihui; Liu, Guoxiang; Zhu, Guoteng; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The novel C-PC/CMC-CD59sp-NPs were made by carbocymethyl chitosan (CMC) loading C-phycocyanin (C-PC) with the lead of CD59 specific ligand peptide (CD59sp) for targeting, and the characteristics and targeted anti-tumor mechanism were explored in order to realize the targeted therapy of C-PC on the growth of HeLa cells both in vitro and vivo . The targeting nanoparticles were synthesized by ionic-gelation method, and the optimal condition was selected out by orthogonal analysis. The properties of nanoparticles were observed by laser particle analyzer and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR). The effects of nanoparticles on the proliferation of HeLa cells in vitro were assessed by MTT assay. The mice model with tumor was constructed by subcutaneous injection of HeLa cells into the left axilla of NU/NU mice. The weight of tumor and the spleen were tested. The expression quantities of cleaved caspase-3, Bcl-2 were determined by western blot and immunofluorescent staining. Results showed the morphology of the finally prepared nanoparticles was well distributed with a diameter distribution of 200±11.3 nm and zeta potential of -19.5±4.12mV. Under the guidance of CD59sp, the targeting nanoparticles could targetedly and efficiently arrive at the surface of HeLa cells, and had obvious inhibitory effect on HeLa cells proliferation both in vitro and vivo. Moreover, the nanoparticles could induce cell apoptosis by up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3 proteins expression, but down-regulation of Bcl-2 and cyclinD1 proteins. Our study provided a new idea for the research and development of marine drugs, and supplied a theoretical support for the target therapy of anticancer drug.

  7. Relationship between silicon concentration and creatinine clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Y.; Nakai, K.; Itoh, C.; Horikiri, J.; Sera, K.; Sato, M.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon levels in dialysis patients are markedly increasing. Using PIXE we determined the relationship between silicon concentration and creatinine clearance in 30 samples. Urine silicon concentration were significantly correlated to creatinine clearance (p<0.001). And also serum silicon concentration were significantly correlated to creatinine clearance (p<0.0001). (author)

  8. Luminescence of porous silicon doped by erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.P.; Vorozov, N.N.; Dolgij, L.N.; Dorofeev, A.M.; Kazyuchits, N.M.; Leshok, A.A.; Troyanova, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of the 1.54 μm intensive luminescence in the silicon dense porous layers, doped by erbium, with various structures is shown. Low-porous materials of both porous type on the p-type silicon and porous silicon with wood-like structure on the n + type silicon may be used for formation of light-emitting structures

  9. Apparatus for making molten silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A reactor apparatus (10) adapted for continuously producing molten, solar grade purity elemental silicon by thermal reaction of a suitable precursor gas, such as silane (SiH.sub.4), is disclosed. The reactor apparatus (10) includes an elongated reactor body (32) having graphite or carbon walls which are heated to a temperature exceeding the melting temperature of silicon. The precursor gas enters the reactor body (32) through an efficiently cooled inlet tube assembly (22) and a relatively thin carbon or graphite septum (44). The septum (44), being in contact on one side with the cooled inlet (22) and the heated interior of the reactor (32) on the other side, provides a sharp temperature gradient for the precursor gas entering the reactor (32) and renders the operation of the inlet tube assembly (22) substantially free of clogging. The precursor gas flows in the reactor (32) in a substantially smooth, substantially axial manner. Liquid silicon formed in the initial stages of the thermal reaction reacts with the graphite or carbon walls to provide a silicon carbide coating on the walls. The silicon carbide coated reactor is highly adapted for prolonged use for production of highly pure solar grade silicon. Liquid silicon (20) produced in the reactor apparatus (10) may be used directly in a Czochralski or other crystal shaping equipment.

  10. TU-AB-BRC-02: Accuracy Evaluation of GPU-Based OpenCL Carbon Monte Carlo Package (goCMC) in Biological Dose and Microdosimetry in Comparison to FLUKA Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleei, R; Peeler, C; Qin, N; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: One of the most accurate methods for radiation transport is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Long computation time prevents its wide applications in clinic. We have recently developed a fast MC code for carbon ion therapy called GPU-based OpenCL Carbon Monte Carlo (goCMC) and its accuracy in physical dose has been established. Since radiobiology is an indispensible aspect of carbon ion therapy, this study evaluates accuracy of goCMC in biological dose and microdosimetry by benchmarking it with FLUKA. Methods: We performed simulations of a carbon pencil beam with 150, 300 and 450 MeV/u in a homogeneous water phantom using goCMC and FLUKA. Dose and energy spectra for primary and secondary ions on the central beam axis were recorded. Repair-misrepair-fixation model was employed to calculate Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) tool was used to calculate microdosimetry parameters. Results: Physical dose differences on the central axis were <1.6% of the maximum value. Before the Bragg peak, differences in RBE and RBE-weighted dose were <2% and <1%. At the Bragg peak, the differences were 12.5% caused by small range discrepancy and sensitivity of RBE to beam spectra. Consequently, RBE-weighted dose difference was 11%. Beyond the peak, RBE differences were <20% and primarily caused by differences in the Helium-4 spectrum. However, the RBE-weighted dose agreed within 1% due to the low physical dose. Differences in microdosimetric quantities were small except at the Bragg peak. The simulation time per source particle with FLUKA was 0.08 sec, while goCMC was approximately 1000 times faster. Conclusion: Physical doses computed by FLUKA and goCMC were in good agreement. Although relatively large RBE differences were observed at and beyond the Bragg peak, the RBE-weighted dose differences were considered to be acceptable.

  11. Silicon Telescope Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gurov, Yu B; Sandukovsky, V G; Yurkovski, J

    2005-01-01

    The results of research and development of special silicon detectors with a large active area ($> 8 cm^{2}$) for multilayer telescope spectrometers (fulfilled in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR) are reviewed. The detector parameters are listed. The production of totally depleted surface barrier detectors (identifiers) operating under bias voltage two to three times higher than depletion voltage is described. The possibility of fabrication of lithium drifted counters with a very thin entrance window on the diffusion side of the detector (about 10--20 $\\mu$m) is shown. The detector fabrication technique has allowed minimizing detector dead regions without degradation of their spectroscopic characteristics and reliability during long time operation in charge particle beams.

  12. Silicon radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benc, I.; Kerhart, J.; Kopecky, J.; Krca, P.; Veverka, V.; Weidner, M.; Weinova, H.

    1992-01-01

    The silicon radiation detector, which is designed for the detection of electrons with energies above 500 eV and of radiation within the region of 200 to 1100 nm, comprises a PIN or PNN + type photodiode. The active acceptor photodiode is formed by a detector surface of shallow acceptor diffusion surrounded by a collector band of deep acceptor diffusion. The detector surface of shallow P-type diffusion with an acceptor concentration of 10 15 to 10 17 atoms/cm 3 reaches a depth of 40 to 100 nm. One sixth to one eighth of the collector band width is overlapped by the P + collector band at a width of 150 to 300 μm with an acceptor concentration of 10 20 to 10 21 atoms/cm 3 down a depth of 0.5 to 3 μm. This band is covered with a conductive layer, of NiCr for instance. (Z.S.)

  13. Zirconates heteroepitaxy on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fompeyrine, Jean; Seo, Jin Won; Seigwart, Heinz; Rossel, Christophe; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2002-03-01

    In the coming years, agressive scaling in CMOS technology will probably trigger the transition to more advanced materials, for example alternate gate dielectrics. Epitaxial thin films are attractive candidates, as long as the difficult chemical and structural issues can be solved, and superior properties can be obtained. Since very few binary oxides can match the electrical, physical and structural requirements which are needed, a combination of those binaries are used here to investigate other lattice matched oxides. We will report on the growth of crystalline zirconium oxide thin films stabilized with different cationic substitutions. All films have been grown in an oxide-MBE system by direct evaporation of the elements on silicon substrates and exposure to molecular or atomic oxygen. The conditions required to obtain epitaxial thin films will be discussed, and successful examples will be presented.

  14. Silicon in cereal straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murozuka, Emiko

    Silicon (Si) is known to be a beneficial element for plants. However, when plant residues are to be used as feedstock for second generation bioenergy, Si may reduce the suitability of the biomass for biochemical or thermal conversion technologies. The objective of this PhD study was to investigate......, a mutant in Si influx transporter BdLsi1 was identified. BdLsi1 belongs to the major intrinsic protein family. The mutant BdLsi1 protein had an amino acid change from proline to serine in the highly conserved NPA motif. The mutation caused a defect in channeling of Si as well as other substrates...... such as germanium and arsenite. The Si concentration in the mutant plant was significantly reduced by more than 80 %. Rice mutants defective in Si transporters OsLsi1 and OsLsi2 also showed significantly lower straw Si concentration. It is concluded that the quality of straw biomass for bioenergy purposes can...

  15. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  16. Muonium states in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.; Baumeler, H.; Keller, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Schneider, J.W.; Estle, T.L.; Spencer, D.P.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Implanted muons in samples of silicon carbide have been observed to form paramagnetic muonium centers (μ + e - ). Muonium precession signals in low applied magnetic fields have been observed at 22 K in a granular sample of cubic β-SiC, however it was not possible to determine the hyperfine frequency. In a signal crystal sample of hexagonal 6H-SiC, three apparently isotropic muonium states were observed at 20 K and two at 300 K, all with hyperfine frequencies intermediate between those of the isotropic muonium centers in diamond and silicon. No evidence was seen of an anisotropic muonium state analogous to the Mu * state in diamond and silicon. (orig.)

  17. Characterization of Czochralski silicon detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Luukka, Panja-Riina

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the characterization of irradiated and non-irradiated segmented detectors made of high-resistivity (>1 kΩcm) magnetic Czochralski (MCZ) silicon. It is shown that the radiation hardness (RH) of the protons of these detectors is higher than that of devices made of traditional materials such as Float Zone (FZ) silicon or Diffusion Oxygenated Float Zone (DOFZ) silicon due to the presence of intrinsic oxygen (> 5 × 1017 cm−3). The MCZ devices therefore present an interesting ...

  18. Polycrystalline Silicon Gettered by Porous Silicon and Heavy Phosphorous Diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zuming(刘祖明); Souleymane K Traore; ZHANG Zhongwen(张忠文); LUO Yi(罗毅)

    2004-01-01

    The biggest barrier for photovoltaic (PV) utilization is its high cost, so the key for scale PV utilization is to further decrease the cost of solar cells. One way to improve the efficiency, and therefore lower the cost, is to increase the minority carrier lifetime by controlling the material defects. The main defects in grain boundaries of polycrystalline silicon gettered by porous silicon and heavy phosphorous diffusion have been studied. The porous silicon was formed on the two surfaces of wafers by chemical etching. Phosphorous was then diffused into the wafers at high temperature (900℃). After the porous silicon and diffusion layers were removed, the minority carrier lifetime was measured by photo-conductor decay. The results show that the lifetime's minority carriers are increased greatly after such treatment.

  19. Effect of Silicon Nanowire on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Ostadmahmoodi Do; Tahereh Fanaei Sheikholeslami; Hassan Azarkish

    2016-01-01

    Nanowires (NWs) are recently used in several sensor or actuator devices to improve their ordered characteristics. Silicon nanowire (Si NW) is one of the most attractive one-dimensional nanostructures semiconductors because of its unique electrical and optical properties. In this paper, silicon nanowire (Si NW), is synthesized and characterized for application in photovoltaic device. Si NWs are prepared using wet chemical etching method which is commonly used as a simple and low cost method fo...

  20. Efficiency Enhancement of Silicon Solar Cells by Porous Silicon Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenijus SHATKOVSKIS

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon solar cells produced by a usual technology in p-type, crystalline silicon wafer were investigated. The manufactured solar cells were of total thickness 450 mm, the junction depth was of 0.5 mm – 0.7 mm. Porous silicon technologies were adapted to enhance cell efficiency. The production of porous silicon layer was carried out in HF: ethanol = 1 : 2 volume ratio electrolytes, illuminating by 50 W halogen lamps at the time of processing. The etching current was computer-controlled in the limits of (6 ÷ 14 mA/cm2, etching time was set in the interval of (10 ÷ 20 s. The characteristics and performance of the solar cells samples was carried out illuminating by Xenon 5000 K lamp light. Current-voltage characteristic studies have shown that porous silicon structures produced affect the extent of dark and lighting parameters of the samples. Exactly it affects current-voltage characteristic and serial resistance of the cells. It has shown, the formation of porous silicon structure causes an increase in the electric power created of solar cell. Conversion efficiency increases also respectively to the initial efficiency of cell. Increase of solar cell maximum power in 15 or even more percent is found. The highest increase in power have been observed in the spectral range of Dl @ (450 ÷ 850 nm, where ~ 60 % of the A1.5 spectra solar energy is located. It has been demonstrated that porous silicon technology is effective tool to improve the silicon solar cells performance.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.3.2428

  1. Radiation resistant passivation of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, R.M.; Gan, J.Y.; Gruenbaum, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a silicon solar cell having improved stability when exposed to concentrated solar radiation. It comprises a body of silicon material having a major surface for receiving radiation, a plurality of p and n conductivity regions in the body for collecting electrons and holes created by impinging radiation, and a passivation layer on the major surface including a first layer of silicon oxide in contact with the body and a polycrystalline silicon layer on the first layer of silicon oxide

  2. Evanescent field phase shifting in a silicon nitride waveguide using a coupled silicon slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Green, William M. J.

    2015-01-01

    An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration....

  3. Imprinted silicon-based nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate and optically characterize silicon-on-insulator based nanophotonic devices fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. In our demonstration, we have realized ordinary and topology-optimized photonic crystal waveguide structures. The topology-optimized structures require lateral pattern ...

  4. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R and D topics are discussed. -- Highlights: •We are proposing thin pixel silicon sensors with 10's of picoseconds time resolution. •Fast charge collection is coupled with internal charge multiplication. •The truly 4-D sensors will revolutionize imaging and particle counting in many applications.

  5. Vibrational modes of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabra, M.; Naddaf, M.

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of theoretical and experimental investigations, the origin of room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from porous silicon is found to related to chemical complexes constituted the surface, in particular, SiHx, SiOx and SiOH groups. Ab initio atomic and molecular electronic structure calculations on select siloxane compounds were used for imitation of infrared (IR) spectra of porous silicon. These are compared to the IR spectra of porous silicon recorded by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). In contrast to linear siloxane, the suggested circular siloxane terminated with linear siloxane structure is found to well-imitate the experimental spectra. These results are augmented with EDX (energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy) measurements, which showed that the increase of SiOx content in porous silicon due to rapid oxidation process results in considerable decrease in PL peak intensity and a blue shift in the peak position. (author)

  6. Silicon pressure transducers: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves M, M.; Sandoval I, F.

    1994-01-01

    We present a review of the pressure sensors, which use the silicon piezo resistive effect and micro machining technique. Typical pressure sensors, applications, design and other different structures are presented. (Author)

  7. Scattering characteristics from porous silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sabet-Dariani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available   Porous silicon (PS layers come into existance as a result of electrochemical anodization on silicon. Although a great deal of research has been done on the formation and optical properties of this material, the exact mechanism involved is not well-understood yet.   In this article, first, the optical properties of silicon and porous silicon are described. Then, previous research and the proposed models about reflection from PS and the origin of its photoluminescence are reveiwed. The reflecting and scattering, absorption and transmission of light from this material, are then investigated. These experiments include,different methods of PS sample preparation their photoluminescence, reflecting and scattering of light determining different characteristics with respect to Si bulk.

  8. Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, J.

    2004-08-01

    This short brochure describes a milestone in solar (or photovoltaic, PV) research-namely, the 50th anniversary of the invention of the first viable silicon solar cell by three researchers at Bell Laboratories.

  9. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  10. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  11. Quasimetallic silicon micromachined photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temelkuran, B.; Bayindir, Mehmet; Ozbay, E.; Kavanaugh, J. P.; Sigalas, M. M.; Tuttle, G.

    2001-01-01

    We report on fabrication of a layer-by-layer photonic crystal using highly doped silicon wafers processed by semiconductor micromachining techniques. The crystals, built using (100) silicon wafers, resulted in an upper stop band edge at 100 GHz. The transmission and defect characteristics of these structures were found to be analogous to metallic photonic crystals. We also investigated the effect of doping concentration on the defect characteristics. The experimental results agree well with predictions of the transfer matrix method simulations

  12. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhaus, Dirk-Holger; Münzer, Adolf

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future e...

  13. Silicon nanowires: structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhdanov, A.V.; Mashin, A.I.; Razuvaev, A.G.; Ershov, A.V.; Ignatov, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    An attempt to grow silicon nanowires has been made by electron beam evaporation on highly oriented pyrolytic substrate. Needle-like objects are located along the normal to a substrate (density 2 x 10 11 cm -2 ). For modeling quasi-one-dimensional objects calculations of nuclear structure and energy spectra have been accomplished. A fullerene-like structure Si 24 is proposed as a basic atomic configuration of silicon nanowires [ru

  14. Laser tests of silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Gadomski, Szymon; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Sergio; Kodys, Peter; Kubik, Petr; Lacasta, Carlos; Marti, Salvador; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Moorhead, Gareth F.; Phillips, Peter W.; Reznicek, Pavel; Slavik, Radan

    2007-01-01

    This paper collects experiences from the development of a silicon sensor laser testing setup and from tests of silicon strip modules (ATLAS End-cap SCT), pixel modules (DEPFET) and large-area diodes using semiconductor lasers. Lasers of 1060 and 680 nm wavelengths were used. A sophisticated method of focusing the laser was developed. Timing and interstrip properties of modules were measured. Analysis of optical effects involved and detailed discussion about the usability of laser testing for particle detectors are presented

  15. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  16. Enhanced Raman scattering in porous silicon grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Changwu

    2018-03-19

    The enhancement of Raman signal on monocrystalline silicon gratings with varying groove depths and on porous silicon grating were studied for a highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response. In the experiment conducted, porous silicon gratings were fabricated. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were then deposited on the porous silicon grating to enhance the Raman signal of the detective objects. Results show that the enhancement of Raman signal on silicon grating improved when groove depth increased. The enhanced performance of Raman signal on porous silicon grating was also further improved. The Rhodamine SERS response based on Ag NPs/ porous silicon grating substrates was enhanced relative to the SERS response on Ag NPs/ porous silicon substrates. Ag NPs / porous silicon grating SERS substrate system achieved a highly sensitive SERS response due to the coupling of various Raman enhancement factors.

  17. Silicon Photomultiplier charaterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Leonel; Osornio, Leo; Para, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Silicon Photo Multiples (SiPM's) are relatively new photon detectors. They offer many advantages compared to photo multiplier tubes (PMT's) such as insensitivity to magnetic field, robustness at varying lighting levels, and low cost. The SiPM output wave forms are poorly understood. The experiment conducted collected waveforms of responses of Hamamatsu SiPM to incident laser pulse at varying temperatures and bias voltages. Ambient noise was characterized at all temperatures and bias voltages by averaging the waveforms. Pulse shape of the SiPM response was determined under different operating conditions: the pulse shape is nearly independent of the bias voltage but exhibits strong variation with temperature, consistent with the temperature variation of the quenching resistor. Amplitude of responses of the SiPM to low intensity laser light shows many peaks corresponding to the detection of 1,2,3 etc. photons. Amplitude of these pulses depends linearly on the bias voltage, enabling determination of the breakdown voltage at each temperature. Poisson statistics has been used to determine the average number of detected photons at each operating conditions. Department of Education Grant No. P0315090007 and the Department of Energy/ Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  18. Collimation: a silicon solution

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Silicon crystals could be used very efficiently to deflect high-energy beams. Testing at CERN has produced conclusive results, which could pave the way for a new generation of collimators. The set of five crystals used to test the reflection of the beams. The crystals are 0.75 mm wide and their alignment is adjusted with extreme precision. This figure shows the deflection of a beam by channelling and by reflection in the block of five crystals. Depending on the orientation of the crystals: 1) The beam passes without "seeing" the crystals and is not deflected 2) The beam is deflected by channelling (with an angle of around 100 μrad) 3) The beam is reflected (with an angle of around 50 μrad). The intensity of the deflected beam is illustrated by the intensity of the spot. The spot of the reflected beam is clearly more intense than that one of the channelled beam, demonstrating the efficiency of t...

  19. Utilización de lactosuero de queso fresco en la elaboración de una bebida fermentada con adición de pulpa maracuyá (passiflora edulis) variedad púrpura y carbóximetil celulosa (cmc), enriquecida con vitaminas A y D.

    OpenAIRE

    Sepúlveda Valencia José Uriel; Flórez Flórez Luis Eduardo; Peña Álvarez Claudia Milena

    2002-01-01

    Se puede obtener una bebida con características especiales a partir de la fermentación de suero de queso fresco, en presencia de Streptococcus thermophillus y Lactobacillus bulgaricus, comparable con un yogur tradicional. Se utilizaron 150 kg de lactosuero de queso fresco, a cada muestra de 50 kg se le aplicó un tratamiento con estabilizantes comerciales cuya base es carboximetilcelulosa (CMC 27 FG, CMC 28FG y CMC 29FG), cuya función es conferir viscosidad. La bebida que se desarrolló a...

  20. Utilización de lactosuero de queso fresco en la elaboración de una bebida fermentada con adición de pulpa maracuyá (passiflora edulis) variedad púrpura y carbóximetil celulosa (cmc), enriquecida con vitaminas a y d.

    OpenAIRE

    Sepúlveda Valencia, José Uriel; Flórez Flórez, Luis Eduardo; Peña Álvarez, Claudia Milena

    2011-01-01

    Se puede obtener una bebida con características especiales a partir de la fermentación de suero de queso fresco, en presencia de Streptococcus thermophillus y Lactobacillus bulgaricus, comparable con un yogur tradicional. Se utilizaron 150 kg de lactosuero de queso fresco, a cada muestra de 50 kg se le aplicó un tratamiento con estabilizantes comerciales cuya base es carboximetilcelulosa (CMC 27 FG, CMC 28FG y CMC 29FG), cuya función es conferir viscosidad. La bebida que se desarrolló a p...

  1. Next generation structural silicone glazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Clift

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an advanced engineering evaluation, using nonlinear analysis of hyper elastic material that provides significant improvement to structural silicone glazing (SSG design in high performance curtain wall systems. Very high cladding wind pressures required in hurricane zones often result in bulky SSG profile dimensions. Architectural desire for aesthetically slender curtain wall framing sight-lines in combination with a desire to reduce aluminium usage led to optimization of silicone material geometry for better stress distribution.To accomplish accurate simulation of predicted behaviour under structural load, robust stress-strain curves of the silicone material are essential. The silicone manufacturer provided physical property testing via a specialized laboratory protocol. A series of rigorous curve fit techniques were then made to closely model test data in the finite element computer analysis that accounts for nonlinear strain of hyper elastic silicone.Comparison of this advanced design technique to traditional SSG design highlights differences in stress distribution contours in the silicone material. Simplified structural engineering per the traditional SSG design method does not provide accurate forecasting of material and stress optimization as shown in the advanced design.Full-scale specimens subject to structural load testing were performed to verify the design capacity, not only for high wind pressure values, but also for debris impact per ASTM E1886 and ASTM E1996. Also, construction of the test specimens allowed development of SSG installation techniques necessitated by the unique geometry of the silicone profile. Finally, correlation of physical test results with theoretical simulations is made, so evaluation of design confidence is possible. This design technique will introduce significant engineering advancement to the curtain wall industry.

  2. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  3. Silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1998-01-01

    Anodic bending of silicon to silicon 4-in. wafers using an electron-beam evaporated glass (Schott 8329) was performed successfully in air at temperatures ranging from 200 degrees C to 450 degrees C. The composition of the deposited glass is enriched in sodium as compared to the target material....... The roughness of the as-deposited films was below 5 nm and was found to be unchanged by annealing at 500 degrees C for 1 h in air. No change in the macroscopic edge profiles of the glass film was found as a function of annealing; however, small extrusions appear when annealing above 450 degrees C. Annealing...... of silicon/glass structures in air around 340 degrees C for 15 min leads to stress-free structures. Bonded wafer pairs, however, show no reduction in stress and always exhibit compressive stress. The bond yield is larger than 95% for bonding temperatures around 350 degrees C and is above 80% for bonding...

  4. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert; Steinbeck, John; Lemieux, Bryan; Winn, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of ∼0.5 to ∼25 μm, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200 deg. C, also compatible with high-temperature brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposited or nucleated in the channels or the first strike surface. Results on resistivity, secondary emission and gain are presented

  5. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  6. Do I mean what I say and say what I mean? A cross cultural ap-proach to the use of emoticons & emojis in CMC messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifen CHENG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of emoticons and emojis among online messaging users has achieved a globalized level. This article aims at examining how certain emojis and emoticons are chosen by message senders to regular the intensity of emotions in their messages. Or, by means of using them, message senders wish to blur textual rigidity and show interaction empathy during the communication process. This study analyzes the use of these symbols and graphic elements in message exchange through CMC and SNS, where users from different culture background convey their feeling. For it, two empirical studies of a methodological design were carried out: One pilot study was intended for the research instrument validation. The second was a survey study. By testing online messaging habit, this study enabled the researchers to observe whether the senders inclined to linguistic text use only, or they preferred including an additional emoticon or emoji in their message to communicate their feelings. Results of this research show that, at a certain extent, massage senders’ different culture background could influence on their emotional expressivity level.

  7. Patterns of use and toxicity of new para-halogenated substituted cathinones: 4-CMC (clephedrone), 4-CEC (4-chloroethcatinone) and 4-BMC (brephedrone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifell, Marc; Ventura, Mireia; Carbón, Xoán; Quintana, Pol; Galindo, Liliana; Palma, Álvaro; Fornis, Ivan; Gil, Cristina; Farre, Magi; Torrens, Marta

    2017-05-01

    This paper aims to present results of the analysis of clephedrone (4-CMC), 4-chloroethcathinone (4-CEC), and brephedrone (4-BMC) on recreational drug markets and a systematic review of all the available information concerning these substances. Samples collected by the drug checking service of the Spanish harm reduction NGO-Energy Control were analyzed and systematic research was conducted. Between June 2014 and October 2016, 1,471 samples with at least one NPS were analyzed, 397 of which contained cathinones. Clephedrone was found in 29 samples, brephedrone in 8, and both were present in 2 samples. 4-Chloroethcathinone was detected in 5 samples. Eleven out of the 47 purchased samples (23.4%) were tested to contain the substance the user expected. Samples received were mainly sold as 3-MMC, MDMA, ketamine, and other cathinones. No literature on the effects or toxicity of these substances was found; the only information available was on internet fora. On many posts, users exhibit concerns about potential toxicity and side effects of using these substances. Since the emergence of these substances could prove to be the next step to the cat-and-mouse game existing between drug producers and legislation, further clinical and epidemiological research should be carried out in order to build evidence to support policy for public health issues. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Flexible Thermoelectric Generators on Silicon Fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the development of a Thermoelectric Generator on Flexible Silicon Fabric is explored to extend silicon electronics for flexible platforms. Low cost, easily deployable plastic based flexible electronics are of great interest for smart

  9. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  10. A Chemically Modified Curcumin (CMC 2.24) Inhibits Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Inflammatory Bone Loss in Murine Models of LPS-Induced Experimental Periodontitis and Diabetes-Associated Natural Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elburki, Muna S; Rossa, Carlos; Guimarães-Stabili, Morgana R; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Curylofo-Zotti, Fabiana A; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a novel chemically modified curcumin (CMC 2.24) on NF-κB and MAPK signaling and inflammatory cytokine production in two experimental models of periodontal disease in rats. Experimental model I: Periodontitis was induced by repeated injections of LPS into the gingiva (3×/week, 3 weeks); control rats received vehicle injections. CMC 2.24, or the vehicle, was administered by daily oral gavage for 4 weeks. Experimental model II: Diabetes was induced in adult male rats by streptozotocin injection; periodontal breakdown then results as a complication of uncontrolled hyperglycemia. Non-diabetic rats served as controls. CMC 2.24, or the vehicle, was administered by oral gavage daily for 3 weeks to the diabetics. Hemimaxillae and gingival tissues were harvested, and bone loss was assessed radiographically. Gingival tissues were pooled according to the experimental conditions and processed for the analysis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and bone-resorptive cytokines. Activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways was assessed by western blot. Both LPS and diabetes induced an inflammatory process in the gingival tissues associated with excessive alveolar bone resorption and increased activation of p65 (NF-κB) and p38 MAPK. In both models, the administration of CMC 2.24 produced a marked reduction of inflammatory cytokines and MMPs in the gingival tissues, decreased bone loss, and decreased activation of p65 (NF-κB) and p38 MAPK. Inhibition of these cell signaling pathways by this novel tri-ketonic curcuminoid (natural curcumin is di-ketonic) may play a role in its therapeutic efficacy in locally and systemically associated periodontitis.

  11. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Blouw, J.; Hofmann, W.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Loechner, S.; Schmelling, M.; Pugatch, V.; Bay, A.; Carron, B.; Frei, R.; Jiminez-Otero, S.; Tran, M.-T.; Voss, H.; Adeva, B.; Esperante, D.; Lois, C.; Vasquez, P.; Bernhard, R.P.; Bernet, R.; Ermoline, Y.; Gassner, J.; Koestner, S.; Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(Italy) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry

  12. A silicon tracker for Christmas

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CMS experiment installed the world’s largest silicon tracker just before Christmas. Marcello Mannelli: physicist and deputy CMS project leader, and Alan Honma, physicist, compare two generations of tracker: OPAL for the LEP (at the front) and CMS for the LHC (behind). There is quite a difference between 1m2 and 205m2.. CMS received an early Christmas present on 18 December when the silicon tracker was installed in the heart of the CMS magnet. The CMS tracker team couldn’t have hoped for a better present. Carefully wrapped in shiny plastic, the world’s largest silicon tracker arrived at Cessy ready for installation inside the CMS magnet on 18 December. This rounded off the year for CMS with a major event, the crowning touch to ten years of work on the project by over five hundred scientists and engineers. "Building a scientific instrument of this size and complexity is a huge technical a...

  13. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2016-09-21

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  14. The CMS silicon strip tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focardi, E.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Bartalini, P.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Marina, R. Della; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammerstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B. Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Raffaelli, F.; Raso, G.; Raymond, M.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Skog, K.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Wang, Y.; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    1999-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Tracker (SST) is the intermediate part of the CMS Central Tracker System. SST is based on microstrip silicon devices and in combination with pixel detectors and the Microstrip Gas Chambers aims at performing pattern recognition, track reconstruction and momentum measurements for all tracks with p T ≥2 GeV/c originating from high luminosity interactions at √s=14 TeV at LHC. We aim at exploiting the advantages and the physics potential of the precise tracking performance provided by the microstrip silicon detectors on a large scale apparatus and in a much more difficult environment than ever. In this paper we describe the actual SST layout and the readout system. (author)

  15. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  16. The effect of silicon crystallographic orientation on the formation of silicon nanoclusters during anodic electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timokhov, D. F.; Timokhov, F. P.

    2009-01-01

    Possible ways for increasing the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon layers have been investigated. The effect of the anodization parameters on the photoluminescence properties for porous silicon layers formed on silicon substrates with different crystallographic orientations was studied. The average diameters for silicon nanoclusters are calculated from the photoluminescence spectra of porous silicon. The influence of the substrate crystallographic orientation on the photoluminescence quantum yield of porous silicon is revealed. A model explaining the effect of the substrate orientation on the photoluminescence properties for the porous silicon layers formed by anode electrochemical etching is proposed.

  17. Surface Effects in Segmented Silicon Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kopsalis, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Silicon detectors in Photon Science and Particle Physics require silicon sensors with very demanding specifications. New accelerators like the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EuXFEL) and the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), pose new challenges for silicon sensors, especially with respect to radiation hardness. High radiation doses and fluences damage the silicon crystal and the SiO2 layers at the surface, thus changing the sensor properties and limiting their...

  18. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  19. Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVore, P. T. S.; Jiang, Y.; Lynch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths.......Silicon Photonics Cloud (SiCloud.org) is the first silicon photonics interactive web tool. Here we report new features of this tool including mode propagation parameters and mode distribution galleries for user specified waveguide dimensions and wavelengths....

  20. Silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Kamchevska, Valerija; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent work on silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication, including multicore fiber fan-in/fan-out, multicore fiber switches towards reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers. We also present multicore fiber based quantum communication using silicon devices.......We review our recent work on silicon photonics for multicore fiber communication, including multicore fiber fan-in/fan-out, multicore fiber switches towards reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers. We also present multicore fiber based quantum communication using silicon devices....

  1. Simulation of atomistic processes during silicon oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Bongiorno, Angelo

    2003-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) films grown on silicon monocrystal (Si) substrates form the gate oxides in current Si-based microelectronics devices. The understanding at the atomic scale of both the silicon oxidation process and the properties of the Si(100)-SiO2 interface is of significant importance in state-of-the-art silicon microelectronics manufacturing. These two topics are intimately coupled and are both addressed in this theoretical investigation mainly through first-principles calculations....

  2. Thermophysical spectroscopy of defect states in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igamberdyev, Kh.T.; Mamadalimov, A.T.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The present work deals with analyzing the possibilities of using the non-traditional thermophysical methods to study a defect structure in silicon. For this purpose, the temperature dependences of thermophysical properties of defect silicon are investigated. A number of new, earlier unknown physical phenomena in silicon are obtained, and their interpretation has enabled one to establish the main physical mechanisms of formation of deep defect states in silicon

  3. Laser wafering for silicon solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-01-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W p (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs (∼20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions (∼50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 (micro)m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  4. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  5. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from Triton X-100 to 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenol: Varying FRET efficiency with CMC of the donor (Triton X-100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Karmakar, Saswati; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    A heterocyclic compound viz., 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenol (4B2YP) has been synthesized and its photophysics have been examined through steady-state absorption, emission and time resolved emission spectroscopic techniques, in brief. Then 4B2YP has been exploited as an acceptor in the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) process from photoexcited benzene aromatic nucleus of Triton X-100 (TX-100) surfactant. Dependence of the energy transfer efficiency on the donor concentration with respect to its critical micelle concentration (CMC) is clearly reflected in the study. High values of Stern–Volmer constant (K SV ) for quenching of the donor fluorescence in the presence of the acceptor suggest the operation of long-range dipole–dipole interaction in the course of energy transfer process, while the inference is aptly supported from time resolved fluorescence decay results. Experimental results show maximum FRET efficiency at the CMC of the donor (TX-100). -- Highlights: • FRET from neutral surfactant Triton X-100 to chromophore 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenol. • Steady state and time resolved spectroscopy. • Long-range dipole–dipole interaction responsible for FRET. • FRET efficiency as a measure of CMC of surfactant

  6. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from Triton X-100 to 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenol: Varying FRET efficiency with CMC of the donor (Triton X-100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar, E-mail: bijan.paul.chem.cu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Ganguly, Aniruddha [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India); Karmakar, Saswati [Department of Chemistry, Sree Chaitanya College, Habra, North 24 Parganas (India); Guchhait, Nikhil, E-mail: nguchhait@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Calcutta 700009 (India)

    2013-11-15

    A heterocyclic compound viz., 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenol (4B2YP) has been synthesized and its photophysics have been examined through steady-state absorption, emission and time resolved emission spectroscopic techniques, in brief. Then 4B2YP has been exploited as an acceptor in the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) process from photoexcited benzene aromatic nucleus of Triton X-100 (TX-100) surfactant. Dependence of the energy transfer efficiency on the donor concentration with respect to its critical micelle concentration (CMC) is clearly reflected in the study. High values of Stern–Volmer constant (K{sub SV}) for quenching of the donor fluorescence in the presence of the acceptor suggest the operation of long-range dipole–dipole interaction in the course of energy transfer process, while the inference is aptly supported from time resolved fluorescence decay results. Experimental results show maximum FRET efficiency at the CMC of the donor (TX-100). -- Highlights: • FRET from neutral surfactant Triton X-100 to chromophore 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenol. • Steady state and time resolved spectroscopy. • Long-range dipole–dipole interaction responsible for FRET. • FRET efficiency as a measure of CMC of surfactant.

  7. Vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into silicon-on-insulator platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Eftekhar, Ali A; Sodagar, Majid; Xia, Zhixuan; Atabaki, Amir H; Adibi, Ali

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate a vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into the silicon-on-insulator platform for applications at the telecommunication wavelengths. Low-loss silicon nitride films with a thickness of 400 nm are successfully grown, enabling compact silicon nitride microresonators with ultra-high intrinsic Qs (~ 6 × 10(6) for 60 μm radius and ~ 2 × 10(7) for 240 μm radius). The coupling between the silicon nitride microresonator and the underneath silicon waveguide is based on evanescent coupling with silicon dioxide as buffer. Selective coupling to a desired radial mode of the silicon nitride microresonator is also achievable using a pulley coupling scheme. In this work, a 60-μm-radius silicon nitride microresonator has been successfully integrated into the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing a single-mode operation with an intrinsic Q of 2 × 10(6).

  8. Extrinsic doping in silicon revisited

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2010-06-17

    Both n-type and p-type doping of silicon is at odds with the charge transfer predicted by Pauling electronegativities and can only be reconciled if we no longer regarding dopant species as isolated atoms but rather consider them as clusters consisting of the dopant and its four nearest neighbor silicon atoms. The process that gives rise to n-type and p-type effects is the charge redistribution that occurs between the dopant and its neighbors, as we illustrate here using electronic structure calculations. This view point is able to explain why conventional substitutional n-type doping of carbon has been so difficult.

  9. Extrinsic doping in silicon revisited

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Chroneos, Alexander; Grimes, R. W.; Schuster, Cosima

    2010-01-01

    Both n-type and p-type doping of silicon is at odds with the charge transfer predicted by Pauling electronegativities and can only be reconciled if we no longer regarding dopant species as isolated atoms but rather consider them as clusters consisting of the dopant and its four nearest neighbor silicon atoms. The process that gives rise to n-type and p-type effects is the charge redistribution that occurs between the dopant and its neighbors, as we illustrate here using electronic structure calculations. This view point is able to explain why conventional substitutional n-type doping of carbon has been so difficult.

  10. Large volume cryogenic silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braggio, C.; Boscardin, M.; Bressi, G.; Carugno, G.; Corti, D.; Galeazzi, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary measurements for the development of a large volume silicon detector to detect low energy and low rate energy depositions. The tested detector is a one cm-thick silicon PIN diode with an active volume of 31 cm 3 , cooled to the liquid helium temperature to obtain depletion from thermally-generated free carriers. A thorough study has been done to show that effects of charge trapping during drift disappears at a bias field value of the order of 100V/cm.

  11. Large volume cryogenic silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggio, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), via Sommarive 18, I-38100 Povo (Italy); Bressi, G. [INFN sez. di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Carugno, G.; Corti, D. [INFN sez. di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Galeazzi, G. [INFN lab. naz. Legnaro, viale dell' Universita 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), via Sommarive 18, I-38100 Povo (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    We present preliminary measurements for the development of a large volume silicon detector to detect low energy and low rate energy depositions. The tested detector is a one cm-thick silicon PIN diode with an active volume of 31 cm{sup 3}, cooled to the liquid helium temperature to obtain depletion from thermally-generated free carriers. A thorough study has been done to show that effects of charge trapping during drift disappears at a bias field value of the order of 100V/cm.

  12. Production of silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, K.

    1981-01-01

    A body consisting essentially of a coherent mixture of silicon carbide and carbon for subsequent siliconising is produced by casting a slip comprising silicon carbide and carbon powders in a porous mould. Part of the surface of the body, particularly internal features, is formed by providing within the mould a core of a material which retains its shape while casting is in progress but is compressed by shrinkage of the cast body as it dries and is thereafter removable from the cast body. Materials which are suitable for the core are expanded polystyrene and gelatinous products of selected low elastic modulus. (author)

  13. High-End Silicon PDICs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zimmermann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An overview on integrated silicon photodiodes and photodiode integrated circuits (PDICs or optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs for optical storage systems (OSS and fiber receivers is given. It is demonstrated, that by using low-cost silicon technologies high-performance OEICs being true competitors for some III/V-semiconductor OEICs can be realized. OSS-OEICs with bandwidths of up to 380 MHz and fiber receivers with maximum data rates of up to 11 Gbps are described. Low-cost data comm receivers for plastic optical fibers (POF as well as new circuit concepts for OEICs and highly parallel optical receivers are described also in the following.

  14. Radiation damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lindström, G

    2003-01-01

    Radiation damage effects in silicon detectors under severe hadron and gamma-irradiation are surveyed, focusing on bulk effects. Both macroscopic detector properties (reverse current, depletion voltage and charge collection) as also the underlying microscopic defect generation are covered. Basic results are taken from the work done in the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration updated by results of recent work. Preliminary studies on the use of dimerized float zone and Czochralski silicon as detector material show possible benefits. An essential progress in the understanding of the radiation-induced detector deterioration had recently been achieved in gamma irradiation, directly correlating defect analysis data with the macroscopic detector performance.

  15. High yield silicon carbide prepolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Prepolymers which exhibit good handling properties, and are useful for preparing ceramics, silicon carbide ceramic materials and articles containing silicon carbide, are polysilanes consisting of 0 to 60 mole% (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and 40 to 100 mole% CH 3 Si units, all Si valences being satisfied by CH 3 groups, other Si atoms, or by H atoms, the latter amounting to 0.3 to 2.1 weight% of the polysilane. They are prepared by reducing the corresponding chloro- or bromo-polysilanes with at least the stoichiometric amount of a reducing agent, e.g. LiAlH 4 . (author)

  16. Surface Passivation for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deligiannis, D.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) are currently one of the most promising solar cell technologies in the world. The SHJ solar cell is based on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer, passivated on both sides with a thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. Subsequently, p-type

  17. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  18. Highly efficient silicon light emitting diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Minh, P.; Holleman, J.; Wallinga, Hans

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the fabrication, using standard silicon processing techniques, of silicon light-emitting diodes (LED) that efficiently emit photons with energy around the silicon bandgap. The improved efficiency had been explained by the spatial confinement of charge carriers due to a

  19. Engineering piezoresistivity using biaxially strained silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Richter, Jacob; Brandbyge, Mads

    2008-01-01

    of the piezocoefficient on temperature and dopant density is altered qualitatively for strained silicon. In particular, we find that a vanishing temperature coefficient may result for silicon with grown-in biaxial tensile strain. These results suggest that strained silicon may be used to engineer the iezoresistivity...

  20. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  1. ePIXfab - The silicon photonics platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, A.; Drissi, Y.; Dumon, P.; Baets, R.; Absil, P.; Pozo Torres, J.M.; Lo Cascio, D.M.R.; Fournier, M.; Fedeli, J.M.; Fulbert, L.; Zimmermann, L.; Tillack, B.; Aalto, T.; O'Brien, P.; Deptuck, D.; Xu, J.; Gale, D.

    2013-01-01

    ePIXfab-The European Silicon Photonics Support Center continues to provide state-of-the-art silicon photonics solutions to academia and industry for prototyping and research. ePIXfab is a consortium of EU research centers providing diverse expertise in the silicon photonics food chain, from training

  2. Silicon-Based Nanoscale Composite Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    1193-1211. 9. Krishnamohan, G., E.M. Kurian, and H.R. Rao, Thermal Analysis and Inverse Burning Rate Studies on Silicon-Potassium Nitrate System...reported in a journal paper and appears in the Appendix. Multiscale Nanoporous Silicon Combustion Introduction for nanoporous silicon effort While

  3. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing

    1997-01-01

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  4. Porous silicon: X-rays sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenmayer, J.L.; Vibert, Patrick; Mercier, Patrick; Rayer, Claude; Hyvernage, Michel; Herino, Roland; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate that high porosity anodically porous silicon is radioluminescent. Interests of this study are double. Firstly: is the construction of porous silicon X-rays detectors (imagers) possible? Secondly: is it necessary to protect silicon porous based optoelectronic systems from ionising radiations effects (spatial environment)? ((orig.))

  5. Formation and photoluminescence of "Cauliflower" silicon nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, W.; Eilers, J.J.; Huis, van M.A.; Wang, D.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Vece, Di M.

    2015-01-01

    The technological advantages of silicon make silicon nanoparticles, which can be used as quantum dots in a tandem configuration, highly relevant for photovoltaics. However, producing a silicon quantum dot solar cell structure remains a challenge. Here we use a gas aggregation cluster source to

  6. Silicon vertex detector for superheavy elements identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarek A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Silicon vertex detector for superheavy elements (SHE identification has been proposed. It will be constructed using very thin silicon detectors about 5 μm thickness. Results of test of 7.3 μm four inch silicon strip detector (SSD with fission fragments and α particles emitted by 252Cf source are presented

  7. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    carbide ceramics. A K MUKHOPADHYAY. Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz.

  8. Ordered silicon nanostructures for silicon-based photonics devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtík, A.; Valenta, J.; Pelant, Ivan; Kálal, M.; Fiala, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 5, Suppl. (2007), S250-S253 ISSN 1671-7694 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010316 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ME 933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : nanocrystals * silicon * self-assembled monolayers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  9. Liquid phase epitaxial growth of silicon on porous silicon for photovoltaic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Quoizola, S.; Fave, A.; Kaminski, A.; Perichon, S.; Barbier, D.; Laugier, A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to grow a thin silicon layer ( 2 atmosphere, and finally LPE silicon growth with different temperature profiles in order to obtain a silicon layer on the sacrificial porous silicon (p-Si). We observed a pyramidal growth on the surface of the (100) porous silicon but the coalescence was difficult to obtain. However, on a p-Si (111) oriented wafer, homogeneous layers were obtained. (orig.)

  10. 1366 Project Silicon: Reclaiming US Silicon PV Leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2016-02-16

    1366 Technologies’ Project Silicon addresses two of the major goals of the DOE’s PV Manufacturing Initiative Part 2 program: 1) How to reclaim a strong silicon PV manufacturing presence and; 2) How to lower the levelized cost of electricity (“LCOE”) for solar to $0.05-$0.07/kWh, enabling wide-scale U.S. market adoption. To achieve these two goals, US companies must commercialize disruptive, high-value technologies that are capable of rapid scaling, defensible from foreign competition, and suited for US manufacturing. These are the aims of 1366 Technologies Direct Wafer ™ process. The research conducted during Project Silicon led to the first industrial scaling of 1366’s Direct Wafer™ process – an innovative, US-friendly (efficient, low-labor content) manufacturing process that destroys the main cost barrier limiting silicon PV cost-reductions: the 35-year-old grand challenge of making quality wafers (40% of the cost of modules) without the cost and waste of sawing. The SunPath program made it possible for 1366 Technologies to build its demonstration factory, a key and critical step in the Company’s evolution. The demonstration factory allowed 1366 to build every step of the process flow at production size, eliminating potential risk and ensuring the success of the Company’s subsequent scaling for a 1 GW factory to be constructed in Western New York in 2016 and 2017. Moreover, the commercial viability of the Direct Wafer process and its resulting wafers were established as 1366 formed key strategic partnerships, gained entry into the $8B/year multi-Si wafer market, and installed modules featuring Direct Wafer products – the veritable proving grounds for the technology. The program also contributed to the development of three Generation 3 Direct Wafer furnaces. These furnaces are the platform for copying intelligently and preparing our supply chain – large-scale expansion will not require a bigger machine but more machines. SunPath filled the

  11. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  12. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, F.; Reinoso, M.; Huck, H.; Rosenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp 2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Method For Producing Mechanically Flexible Silicon Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-08-28

    A method for making a mechanically flexible silicon substrate is disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes providing a silicon substrate. The method further includes forming a first etch stop layer in the silicon substrate and forming a second etch stop layer in the silicon substrate. The method also includes forming one or more trenches over the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer. The method further includes removing the silicon substrate between the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer.

  14. Transmutation doping of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Young, R. T.; Cleland, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Normal isotopic silicon contains 3.05% of Si-30 which transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron absorption, with a half-life of 2.6 hours. This reaction is used to introduce extremely uniform concentrations of phosphorus into silicon, thus eliminating the areal and spatial inhomogeneities characteristic of chemical doping. Annealing of the lattice damage in the irradiated silicon does not alter the uniformity of dopant distribution. Transmutation doping also makes it possible to introduce phosphorus into polycrystalline silicon without segregation of the dopant at the grain boundaries. The use of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon in solar cell research and development is discussed.

  15. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Bowers, John E.

    2010-01-01

    A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  16. Method For Producing Mechanically Flexible Silicon Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-01-01

    A method for making a mechanically flexible silicon substrate is disclosed. In one embodiment, the method includes providing a silicon substrate. The method further includes forming a first etch stop layer in the silicon substrate and forming a second etch stop layer in the silicon substrate. The method also includes forming one or more trenches over the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer. The method further includes removing the silicon substrate between the first etch stop layer and the second etch stop layer.

  17. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  18. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Bowers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  19. Dispersion toughened silicon carbon ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture resistant silicon carbide ceramics are provided by incorporating therein a particulate dispersoid selected from the group consisting of (a) a mixture of boron, carbon and tungsten, (b) a mixture of boron, carbon and molybdenum, (c) a mixture of boron, carbon and titanium carbide, (d) a mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide, and (e) boron nitride. 4 figures.

  20. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  1. The ARGUS silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.; Ball, S.; Ehret, K.; Geyer, C.; Hesselbarth, J.; Hoelscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holzer, B.; Huepper, A.; Khan, S.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Brogle, M.; Horisberger, R.

    1994-01-01

    A silicon microstrip vertex detector has been built as an upgrade to the ARGUS detector for increased precision and efficiency in the reconstruction of decay vertices. This paper discusses the mechanical and electronic design of this device and presents first results from its successful test operation yielding an impact parameter resolution of about 18 μm. ((orig.))

  2. Impurities of oxygen in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, V.M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic structure of oxygen complex defects in silicon, using molecular cluster model with saturation by watson sphere into the formalism of Xα multiple scattering method is studied. A systematic study of the simulation of perfect silicon crystal and an analysis of the increasing of atom number in the clusters are done to choose the suitable cluster for the calculations. The divacancy in three charge states (Si:V 2 + , Si:V 2 0 , Si:V 2 - ), of the oxygen pair (Si:O 2 ) and the oxygen-vacancy pair (Si:O.V) neighbours in the silicon lattice, is studied. Distortions for the symmetry were included in the Si:V 2 + and Si:O 2 systems. The behavior of defect levels related to the cluster size of Si:V 2 0 and Si:O 2 systems, the insulated oxygen impurity of silicon in interstitial position (Si:O i ), and the complexes involving four oxygen atoms are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Seedless electroplating on patterned silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas Llona, Laura Dolores; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Nickel thin films have been electrodeposited without the use of an additional seed layer, on highly doped silicon wafers. These substrates conduct sufficiently well to allow deposition using a peripherical electrical contact on the wafer. Films 2 μm thick have been deposited using a nickel sulfamate

  4. Aleph silicon microstrip vertex detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This microstrip vertex locator was located at the heart of the ALEPH experiment, one of the four experiments at the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider. In the experiments at CERN's LEP, which ran from 1989 to 2000, modern silicon microvertex detectors, such as those used at ALEPH, monitored the production of short-lived particles close to the beam pipe.

  5. Silicon nanowire hot carrier electroluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plessis, M. du, E-mail: monuko@up.ac.za; Joubert, T.-H.

    2016-08-31

    Avalanche electroluminescence from silicon pn junctions has been known for many years. However, the internal quantum efficiencies of these devices are quite low due to the indirect band gap nature of the semiconductor material. In this study we have used reach-through biasing and SOI (silicon-on-insulator) thin film structures to improve the internal power efficiency and the external light extraction efficiency. Both continuous silicon thin film pn junctions and parallel nanowire pn junctions were manufactured using a custom SOI technology. The pn junctions are operated in the reach-through mode of operation, thus increasing the average electric field within the fully depleted region. Experimental results of the emission spectrum indicate that the most dominant photon generating mechanism is due to intraband hot carrier relaxation processes. It was found that the SOI nanowire light source external power efficiency is at least an order of magnitude better than the comparable bulk CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) light source. - Highlights: • We investigate effect of electric field on silicon avalanche electroluminescence. • With reach-through pn junctions the current and carrier densities are kept constant. • Higher electric fields increase short wavelength radiation. • Higher electric fields decrease long wavelength radiation. • The effect of the electric field indicates intraband transitions as main mechanism.

  6. Silicon quantum dots: surface matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnalová, K.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Kůsová, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 17 (2014), 1-28 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon quantum dots * quantum dot * surface chemistry * quantum confinement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.346, year: 2014

  7. prismane structure by silicon substitution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation (MP2) theoretic method and the cc-pVDZ basis set, it is shown that with an increase in the number of carbon atoms substituted by silicon, the [6]-prismane structure becomes increasingly more stable, relative to the two isolated benzene (like) structures. A similar trend is ...

  8. Thermal carbonization of nanoporous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An interesting phenomenon is observed while carrying out thermal carbonization of porous silicon (PS) with an aim to arrest the natural surface degradation, and it is a burning issue for PS-based device applications. A tubular carbon structure has been observed on the PS surface. Raman, Fourier transform infrared ...

  9. The CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.

    1993-01-01

    A silicon strip vertex detector was designed, constructed and commissioned at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. The mechanical design of the detector, its cooling and monitoring are presented. The front end electronics employing a custom VLSI chip, the readout electronics and various components of the SVX system are described. The system performance and the experience with the operation of the

  10. The CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orso, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    Motivations, design, performance and ongoing upgrade of the CDF Silicon Vertex Trigger are presented. The system provides CDF with a powerful tool for online tracking with offline quality in order to enhance the reach on B-physics and large P t -physics coupled to b quarks

  11. Microelectromechanical pump utilizing porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jeffrey W [Albuquerque, NM; Stalford, Harold L [Norman, OK

    2011-07-19

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) pump is disclosed which includes a porous silicon region sandwiched between an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber. The porous silicon region is formed in a silicon substrate and contains a number of pores extending between the inlet and outlet chambers, with each pore having a cross-section dimension about equal to or smaller than a mean free path of a gas being pumped. A thermal gradient is provided along the length of each pore by a heat source which can be an electrical resistance heater or an integrated circuit (IC). A channel can be formed through the silicon substrate so that inlet and outlet ports can be formed on the same side of the substrate, or so that multiple MEM pumps can be connected in series to form a multi-stage MEM pump. The MEM pump has applications for use in gas-phase MEM chemical analysis systems, and can also be used for passive cooling of ICs.

  12. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether untre...

  13. Flexible Thermoelectric Generators on Silicon Fabric

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the development of a Thermoelectric Generator on Flexible Silicon Fabric is explored to extend silicon electronics for flexible platforms. Low cost, easily deployable plastic based flexible electronics are of great interest for smart textile, wearable electronics and many other exciting applications. However, low thermal budget processing and fundamentally limited electron mobility hinders its potential to be competitive with well established and highly developed silicon technology. The use of silicon in flexible electronics involve expensive and abrasive materials and processes. In this work, high performance flexible thermoelectric energy harvesters are demonstrated from low cost bulk silicon (100) wafers. The fabrication of the micro- harvesters was done using existing silicon processes on silicon (100) and then peeled them off from the original substrate leaving it for reuse. Peeled off silicon has 3.6% thickness of bulk silicon reducing the thermal loss significantly and generating nearly 30% more output power than unpeeled harvesters. The demonstrated generic batch processing shows a pragmatic way of peeling off a whole silicon circuitry after conventional fabrication on bulk silicon wafers for extremely deformable high performance integrated electronics. In summary, by using a novel, low cost process, this work has successfully integrated existing and highly developed fabrication techniques to introduce a flexible energy harvester for sustainable applications.

  14. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  15. Silicon spintronics with ferromagnetic tunnel devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, R; Sharma, S; Dash, S P; Min, B C

    2012-01-01

    In silicon spintronics, the unique qualities of ferromagnetic materials are combined with those of silicon, aiming at creating an alternative, energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are represented by the orientation of the electron spin. Here we review the cornerstones of silicon spintronics, namely the creation, detection and manipulation of spin polarization in silicon. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts are the key elements and provide a robust and viable approach to induce and probe spins in silicon, at room temperature. We describe the basic physics of spin tunneling into silicon, the spin-transport devices, the materials aspects and engineering of the magnetic tunnel contacts, and discuss important quantities such as the magnitude of the spin accumulation and the spin lifetime in the silicon. We highlight key experimental achievements and recent progress in the development of a spin-based information technology. (topical review)

  16. Ultrafast Terahertz Conductivity of Photoexcited Nanocrystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; MacDonald, A. Nicole; Hryciw, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described by a class...... in the silicon nanocrystal films is dominated by trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface states, occurring on a 1–100 ps time scale depending on particle size and hydrogen passivation......The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described...

  17. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  18. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  19. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Saharoui; Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  20. Quantum Properties of Dichroic Silicon Vacancies in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Roland; Widmann, Matthias; Niethammer, Matthias; Dasari, Durga B. R.; Gerhardt, Ilja; Soykal, Öney O.; Radulaski, Marina; Ohshima, Takeshi; Vučković, Jelena; Son, Nguyen Tien; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Bonato, Cristian; Lee, Sang-Yun; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2018-03-01

    Although various defect centers have displayed promise as either quantum sensors, single photon emitters, or light-matter interfaces, the search for an ideal defect with multifunctional ability remains open. In this spirit, we study the dichroic silicon vacancies in silicon carbide that feature two well-distinguishable zero-phonon lines and analyze the quantum properties in their optical emission and spin control. We demonstrate that this center combines 40% optical emission into the zero-phonon lines showing the contrasting difference in optical properties with varying temperature and polarization, and a 100% increase in the fluorescence intensity upon the spin resonance, and long spin coherence time of their spin-3 /2 ground states up to 0.6 ms. These results single out this defect center as a promising system for spin-based quantum technologies.

  1. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  2. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  3. Direct bandgap silicon: tensile-strained silicon nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Hapala, Prokop; Valenta, J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Cibulka, Ondřej; Ondič, Lukáš; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2014), "1300042-1"-"1300042-9" ISSN 2196-7350 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235; GA ČR GAP204/10/0952 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * badstructure * light emission * direct bandgap * surface capping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  4. Creep analysis of silicone for podiatry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeiro-Arocas, Julia; Tarrío-Saavedra, Javier; López-Beceiro, Jorge; Naya, Salvador; López-Canosa, Adrián; Heredia-García, Nicolás; Artiaga, Ramón

    2016-10-01

    This work shows an effective methodology to characterize the creep-recovery behavior of silicones before their application in podiatry. The aim is to characterize, model and compare the creep-recovery properties of different types of silicone used in podiatry orthotics. Creep-recovery phenomena of silicones used in podiatry orthotics is characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Silicones provided by Herbitas are compared by observing their viscoelastic properties by Functional Data Analysis (FDA) and nonlinear regression. The relationship between strain and time is modeled by fixed and mixed effects nonlinear regression to compare easily and intuitively podiatry silicones. Functional ANOVA and Kohlrausch-Willians-Watts (KWW) model with fixed and mixed effects allows us to compare different silicones observing the values of fitting parameters and their physical meaning. The differences between silicones are related to the variations of breadth of creep-recovery time distribution and instantaneous deformation-permanent strain. Nevertheless, the mean creep-relaxation time is the same for all the studied silicones. Silicones used in palliative orthoses have higher instantaneous deformation-permanent strain and narrower creep-recovery distribution. The proposed methodology based on DMA, FDA and nonlinear regression is an useful tool to characterize and choose the proper silicone for each podiatry application according to their viscoelastic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  6. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  7. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-01-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  8. The LHCb Silicon Inner Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, P.

    2002-01-01

    A silicon strip detector has been adopted as baseline technology for the LHCb Inner Tracker system. It consists of nine planar stations covering a cross-shaped area around the LHCb beam pipe. Depending on the final layout of the stations the sensitive surface of the Inner Tracker will be of the order of 14 m 2 . Ladders have to be 22 cm long and the pitch of the sensors should be as large as possible in order to reduce costs of the readout electronics. Major design criteria are material budget, short shaping time and a moderate spatial resolution of about 80 μm. After an introduction on the requirements of the LHCb Inner Tracker we present a description and characterization of silicon prototype sensors. First, laboratory and test beam results are discussed

  9. Macular edema in siliconized eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaya A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Kaya,1 Yakup Aksoy,2 Yıldıray Yildirim,3 Murat Sonmez3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Anittepe Military Dispensary, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Girne Military Hospital, Girne, Cyprus; 3Department of Ophthalmology, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyWe read with great interest the article titled “Value of optical coherence tomography in the detection of macular pathology before the removal of silicone oil” by Rashad et al.1 The authors have evaluated the optical coherence tomography (OCT findings before the removal of silicone oil (SiO. We congratulate the authors for this well-organized study and would like to contribute to their findings.View original paper by Rashad and colleagues.

  10. SVX/silicon detector studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagby, L.; Johnson, M.; Lipton, R.; Gu, W.

    1995-11-01

    AC coupled silicon detectors, being used for the DO upgrade, may have substantial voltage across the coupling capacitor. Failed capacitors can present ∼50 V to the input of the SVX, Silicon Vertex, device. We measured the effects that failed detector coupling capacitors have on the SVXD (rad soft 3μm), SVXH (rad hard 1.2μm), and SVXIIb (rad soft 1.2μm) amplifier / readout devices. The test results show that neighboring channels saturate when an excessive voltage is applied directly to a SVX channel. We believe that the effects are due to current diffusion within the SVX substrate rather than surface currents on the detectors. This paper discusses the magnitude of the saturation and a possible solution to the problem

  11. Characterisation of Silicon Pad Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Hodson, Thomas Connor

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pad sensors are used in high luminosity particle detectors because of their excellent timing resolution, radiation tolerance and possible high granularity. The effect of different design decisions on detector performance can be investigated nondestructively through electronic characterisation of the sensor diodes. Methods for making accurate measurements of leakage current and cell capacitance are described using both a standard approach with tungsten needles and an automated approach with a custom multiplexer and probing setup.

  12. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...

  13. Silicon micropattern detector: a dream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijne, E H.M.; Jarron, P; Olsen, A; Redaelli, N

    1988-12-15

    The present use of silicon microstrip detectors in elementary particle physics experiments is described and future needs are evaluated. Possibilities and problems to be encountered in the development of a true two-dimensional detector with intelligent data collection are discussed. This paper serves as an introduction to various other contributions to the conference proceedings, either dealing with futuristic device designs or with cautious steps on the road of technology development.

  14. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried, E-mail: Selberherr@TUWien.ac.at

    2015-07-14

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized.

  15. Internal friction in irradiated silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalanov, M.U.; Pajzullakhanov, M.S.; Khajdarov, T.; Ummatov, Kh.

    1999-01-01

    The submicroscopic heterogeneities in mono- and polycrystal silicon and the influence of X-ray radiation on them were investigated using the ultrasound resonance method. Disk-shaped samples of 27.5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in thickness, with the flat surface parallel to crystallographic plane (111), were irradiated by X-ray beam of 1 Wt/cm 2 (50 KeV, Mo K α ) during 10 hours. Relations of internal frictions (Q -1 ) of samples and their relative attitude (ψ) - Q -1 (ψ) show that there is a presence of double-humped configuration for monocrystal silicon with the peaks at ψ=900 and 270 degrees. The relations Q -1 (ψ) remain the same after the irradiation. However, the peak width becomes larger. This data show that the configuration and attitude of the heterogeneities remain the same after the irradiation. The double-humped configuration was not discovered for the relations Q -1 (ψ) of polycrystal silicon. It is explained by the fact that there is an isotropic distribution in the content of many blocks and granules

  16. Implantation of boron in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofker, W.K.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution versus depth of boron implanted in silicon and the corresponding electrical activity obtained after annealing are studied. The boron distributions are measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Boron distributions implanted at energies in the range from 30 keV to 800 keV in amorphous and polycrystalline silicon are analysed. Moments of these distributions are determined by a curve-fitting programme and compared with moments calculated by Winterbon. Boron distributions obtained by implantations along a dense crystallographic direction in monocrystalline silicon are found to have penetrating tails. After investigation of some possible mechanisms of tail formation it is concluded that the tails are due to channelling. It was found that the behaviour of boron during annealing is determined by the properties of three boron fractions consisting of precipitated boron, interstitial boron and substitutional boron. The electrical activity of the boron versus depth is found to be consistent with the three boron fractions. A peculiar redistribution of boron is found which is induced by the implantation of a high dose of heavy ions and subsequent annealing. Different mechanisms which may cause the observed effects, such as thermal diffusion which is influenced by lattice strain and damage, are discussed. (Auth.)

  17. Excimer laser decomposition of silicone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, L.D.; Cochrane, C.; Dicara, Cl.; Dupas-Bruzek, C.; Kolev, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excimer laser irradiation of silicone foils is shown in this work to induce decomposition, ablation and activation of such materials. Thin (100 μm) laminated silicone foils are irradiated at 248 nm as a function of impacting laser fluence and number of pulsed irradiations at 1 s intervals. Above a threshold fluence of 0.7 J/cm 2 , material starts decomposing. At higher fluences, this decomposition develops and gives rise to (i) swelling of the irradiated surface and then (ii) emission of matter (ablation) at a rate that is not proportioned to the number of pulses. Taking into consideration the polymer structure and the foil lamination process, these results help defining the phenomenology of silicone ablation. The polymer decomposition results in two parts: one which is organic and volatile, and another part which is inorganic and remains, forming an ever thickening screen to light penetration as the number of light pulses increases. A mathematical model is developed that accounts successfully for this physical screening effect

  18. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  19. Silicon spintronics: Progress and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin attracts much attention as an alternative to the electron charge degree of freedom for low-power reprogrammable logic and non-volatile memory applications. Silicon appears to be the perfect material for spin-driven applications. Recent progress and challenges regarding spin-based devices are reviewed. An order of magnitude enhancement of the electron spin lifetime in silicon thin films by shear strain is predicted and its impact on spin transport in SpinFETs is discussed. A relatively weak coupling between spin and effective electric field in silicon allows magnetoresistance modulation at room temperature, however, for long channel lengths. Due to tunneling magnetoresistance and spin transfer torque effects, a much stronger coupling between the spin (magnetization) orientation and charge current is achieved in magnetic tunnel junctions. Magnetic random access memory (MRAM) built on magnetic tunnel junctions is CMOS compatible and possesses all properties needed for future universal memory. Designs of spin-based non-volatile MRAM cells are presented. By means of micromagnetic simulations it is demonstrated that a substantial reduction of the switching time can be achieved. Finally, it is shown that any two arbitrary memory cells from an MRAM array can be used to perform a logic operation. Thus, an intrinsic non-volatile logic-in-memory architecture can be realized

  20. Memory characteristics of silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals as a charge trapping layer of nonvolatile memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Yang, Hyundeok; Chang, Man; Baek, Sungkweon; Hwang, Hyunsang; Jeon, Sanghun; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, Chungwoo

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals formed by low-energy silicon plasma immersion ion implantation has been investigated as a charge trapping layer of a polycrystalline silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon-type nonvolatile memory device. Compared with the control sample without silicon nanocrystals, silicon nitride with silicon nanocrystals provides excellent memory characteristics, such as larger width of capacitance-voltage hysteresis, higher program/erase speed, and lower charge loss rate at elevated temperature. These improved memory characteristics are derived by incorporation of silicon nanocrystals into the charge trapping layer as additional accessible charge traps with a deeper effective trap energy level

  1. Gelcasting of SiC/Si for preparation of silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.P.; Tsinghua University, Beijing,; Cheng, Y.B.; Lu, J.W.; Huang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper, gelcasting of aqueous slurry with coarse silicon carbide(1mm) and fine silicon particles was investigated to fabricate silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide materials. Through the examination of influence of different polyelectrolytes on the Zeta potential and viscosity of silicon and silicon carbide suspensions, a stable SiC/Si suspension with 60 vol% solid loading could be prepared by using polyelectrolyte of D3005 and sodium alginate. Gelation of this suspension can complete in 10-30 min at 60-80 deg C after cast into mold. After demolded, the wet green body can be dried directly in furnace and the green strength will develop during drying. Complex shape parts with near net size were prepared by the process. Effects of the debindering process on nitridation and density of silicon nitride bonded silicon carbide were also examined. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  2. Single-Event Effects in Silicon and Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Electronics Parts and Packaging program-funded activities over the past year on single-event effects in silicon and silicon carbide power devices are presented, with focus on SiC device failure signatures.

  3. Study on the graphene/silicon Schottky diodes by transferring graphene transparent electrodes on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Li, Dong; Zhang, Qichong; Zou, Liping; Wang, Fengli; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Zengxing

    2015-01-01

    Graphene/silicon heterostructures present a Schottky characteristic and have potential applications for solar cells and photodetectors. Here, we fabricated graphene/silicon heterostructures by using chemical vapor deposition derived graphene and n-type silicon, and studied the electronic and optoelectronic properties through varying their interface and silicon resistivity. The results exhibit that the properties of the fabricated configurations can be effectively modulated. The graphene/silicon heterostructures with a Si (111) interface and high resistivity show a better photovoltaic behavior and should be applied for high-performance photodetectors. With the combined atomic force microscopy and theoretical analysis, the possible origination is discussed. The work here should be helpful on exploring high-performance graphene/silicon photoelectronics. - Highlights: • Different graphene/silicon heterostructures were fabricated. • Electronic and optoelectronic properties of the heterostructures were studied. • Graphene/silicon heterostructures were further explored for photodetectors.

  4. Development of Radiation Hard Radiation Detectors, Differences between Czochralski Silicon and Float Zone Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Tuominen, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop radiation hard silicon detectors. Radiation detectors made ofsilicon are cost effective and have excellent position resolution. Therefore, they are widely used fortrack finding and particle analysis in large high-energy physics experiments. Silicon detectors willalso be used in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment that is being built at the LHC (LargeHadron Collider) accelerator at CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research). This work wasdone in the CMS programme of Helsinki Institute of Physics (HIP).Exposure of the silicon material to particle radiation causes irreversible defects that deteriorate theperformance of the silicon detectors. In HIP CMS Programme, our approach was to improve theradiation hardness of the silicon material with increased oxygen concentration in silicon material. Westudied two different methods: diffusion oxygenation of Float Zone silicon and use of high resistivityCzochralski silicon.We processed, characterised, tested in a parti...

  5. Study on the graphene/silicon Schottky diodes by transferring graphene transparent electrodes on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojuan [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-structured Materials & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Li, Dong; Zhang, Qichong; Zou, Liping; Wang, Fengli [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-structured Materials & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhou, Jun, E-mail: zhoujunzhou@tongji.edu.cn [Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Zengxing, E-mail: zhangzx@tongji.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-structured Materials & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphene/silicon heterostructures present a Schottky characteristic and have potential applications for solar cells and photodetectors. Here, we fabricated graphene/silicon heterostructures by using chemical vapor deposition derived graphene and n-type silicon, and studied the electronic and optoelectronic properties through varying their interface and silicon resistivity. The results exhibit that the properties of the fabricated configurations can be effectively modulated. The graphene/silicon heterostructures with a Si (111) interface and high resistivity show a better photovoltaic behavior and should be applied for high-performance photodetectors. With the combined atomic force microscopy and theoretical analysis, the possible origination is discussed. The work here should be helpful on exploring high-performance graphene/silicon photoelectronics. - Highlights: • Different graphene/silicon heterostructures were fabricated. • Electronic and optoelectronic properties of the heterostructures were studied. • Graphene/silicon heterostructures were further explored for photodetectors.

  6. Formation of multiple levels of porous silicon for buried insulators and conductors in silicon device technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewer, Robert S.; Gullinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A method of forming a multiple level porous silicon substrate for semiconductor integrated circuits including anodizing non-porous silicon layers of a multi-layer silicon substrate to form multiple levels of porous silicon. At least one porous silicon layer is then oxidized to form an insulating layer and at least one other layer of porous silicon beneath the insulating layer is metallized to form a buried conductive layer. Preferably the insulating layer and conductive layer are separated by an anodization barrier formed of non-porous silicon. By etching through the anodization barrier and subsequently forming a metallized conductive layer, a fully or partially insulated buried conductor may be fabricated under single crystal silicon.

  7. Signal development in irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kramberger, Gregor; Mikuz, Marko

    2001-01-01

    This work provides a detailed study of signal formation in silicon detectors, with the emphasis on detectors with high concentration of irradiation induced defects in the lattice. These defects give rise to deep energy levels in the band gap. As a consequence, the current induced by charge motion in silicon detectors is signifcantly altered. Within the framework of the study a new experimental method, Charge correction method, based on transient current technique (TCT) was proposed for determination of effective electron and hole trapping times in irradiated silicon detectors. Effective carrier trapping times were determined in numerous silicon pad detectors irradiated with neutrons, pions and protons. Studied detectors were fabricated on oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon wafers with different bulk resistivities. Measured effective carrier trapping times were found to be inversely proportional to fuence and increase with temperature. No dependence on silicon resistivity and oxygen concentration was observ...

  8. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  9. Use of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 2% for removing adherent silicone oil from silicone intraocular lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Wong , S Chien; Ramkissoon , Yashin D; Lopez , Mauricio; Page , Kristopher; Parkin , Ivan P; Sullivan , Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background / aims: To investigate the effect of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) on the physical interaction (contact angle) between silicone oil and a silicone intraocular lens (IOL). Methods: In vitro experiments were performed, to determine the effect of HPMC (0.5%, 1% or 2%), with or without an additional simple mechanical manoeuvre, on the contact angle of silicone oil at the surface of both silicone and acrylic (control) IOLs. A balanced salt solu...

  10. Silicon Processors Using Organically Reconfigurable Techniques (SPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0132 SILICON PROCESSORS USING ORGANICALLY RECONFIGURABLE TECHNIQUES ( SPORT ) Dennis Prather UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE Final Report 05...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Silicon Processes for Organically Reconfigurable Techniques ( SPORT ) 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0363 5c...Contract: Silicon Processes for Organically Reconfigurable Techniques ( SPORT ) Contract #: FA9550-10-1-0363 Reporting Period: 1 July 2010 – 31 December

  11. Silicon wafers for integrated circuit process

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy , B.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon as a substrate material will continue to dominate the market of integrated circuits for many years. We first review how crystal pulling procedures impact the quality of silicon. We then investigate how thermal treatments affect the behaviour of oxygen and carbon, and how, as a result, the quality of silicon wafers evolves. Gettering techniques are then presented. We conclude by detailing the requirements that wafers must satisfy at the incoming inspection.

  12. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yehezkel, O.

    1983-01-01

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  13. Numerical Simulation Of Silicon-Ribbon Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Ben K.; Kuo, Chin-Po; Utku, Senol; Ray, Sujit Kumar

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical model includes nonlinear effects. In development simulates growth of silicon ribbon from melt. Takes account of entire temperature and stress history of ribbon. Numerical simulations performed with new model helps in search for temperature distribution, pulling speed, and other conditions favoring growth of wide, flat, relatively defect-free silicon ribbons for solar photovoltaic cells at economically attractive, high production rates. Also applicable to materials other than silicon.

  14. A study of positron irradiated porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yuanming; Xue Qing; Zhai Baogai; Xu Aijun; Liu Shewen; Yu Weizhong

    1998-01-01

    The effect of positron irradiation on photoluminescence (PL) of porous silicon has been studied. After four hour positron irradiation, the red PL spectrum of porous silicon blue shifts into greenish spectral region, and a higher energy luminescence band is introduced into this blueshifted spectrum. The fourier transform infrared absorption experiment shows that the positron irradiation can cause further oxidization of porous silicon. A possible mechanism causing this change of PL spectra after positron irradiation is suggested

  15. Silicon photonics for telecommunications and biomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2011-01-01

    Given silicon's versatile material properties, use of low-cost silicon photonics continues to move beyond light-speed data transmission through fiber-optic cables and computer chips. Its application has also evolved from the device to the integrated-system level. A timely overview of this impressive growth, Silicon Photonics for Telecommunications and Biomedicine summarizes state-of-the-art developments in a wide range of areas, including optical communications, wireless technologies, and biomedical applications of silicon photonics. With contributions from world experts, this reference guides

  16. Silicon solid state devices and radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Claude

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the fundamental principles of interaction between radiation and matter, the principles of working and the operation of particle detectors based on silicon solid state devices. It covers a broad scope with respect to the fields of application of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices from low to high energy physics experiments including in outer space and in the medical environment. This book covers stateof- the-art detection techniques in the use of radiation detectors based on silicon solid state devices and their readout electronics, including the latest developments on pixelated silicon radiation detector and their application.

  17. Porous silicon investigated by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, R.M. de la; Pareja, R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the anodic conversion in silicon single crystals is investigated by positron lifetime measurements. Anodization at constant current induces changes in the positron lifetime spectrum of monocrystalline silicon samples. It is found that theses changes are primarily dependent on the silicon resistivity. The annihilation parameter behaviour of anodized samples, treated at high temperature under reducing conditions, is also investigated. The results reveal that positron annihilation can be a useful technique to characterize porous silicon formed by anodizing as well as to investigate its thermal behaviour. (author)

  18. Silicon nanowire-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzner, Th; Pietsch, M; Andrae, G; Falk, F; Ose, E; Christiansen, S [Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.stelzner@ipht-jena.de

    2008-07-23

    The fabrication of silicon nanowire-based solar cells on silicon wafers and on multicrystalline silicon thin films on glass is described. The nanowires show a strong broadband optical absorption, which makes them an interesting candidate to serve as an absorber in solar cells. The operation of a solar cell is demonstrated with n-doped nanowires grown on a p-doped silicon wafer. From a partially illuminated area of 0.6 cm{sup 2} open-circuit voltages in the range of 230-280 mV and a short-circuit current density of 2 mA cm{sup -2} were obtained.

  19. Silicon nanowire-based solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzner, Th; Pietsch, M; Andrae, G; Falk, F; Ose, E; Christiansen, S

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon nanowire-based solar cells on silicon wafers and on multicrystalline silicon thin films on glass is described. The nanowires show a strong broadband optical absorption, which makes them an interesting candidate to serve as an absorber in solar cells. The operation of a solar cell is demonstrated with n-doped nanowires grown on a p-doped silicon wafer. From a partially illuminated area of 0.6 cm 2 open-circuit voltages in the range of 230-280 mV and a short-circuit current density of 2 mA cm -2 were obtained

  20. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  1. Nanofluidics : Silicon for the perfect membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Albert; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Newly developed ultrathin silicon membranes can filter and separate molecules much more effectively than conventional polymer membranes. Many applications, of economic and medical significance, stand to benefit.

  2. Hydrogen passivation of silicon sheet solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Milstein, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Significant improvements in the efficiencies of dendritic web and edge-supported-pulling silicon sheet solar cells have been obtained after hydrogen ion beam passivation for a period of ten minutes or less. We have studied the effects of the hydrogen ion beam treatment with respect to silicon material damage, silicon sputter rate, introduction of impurities, and changes in reflectance. The silicon sputter rate for constant ion beam flux of 0.60 +- 0.05 mA/cm 2 exhibits a maximum at approximately 1400-eV ion beam energy

  3. Element depth profiles of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzev, A.P.; Nikonov, O.A.; Kulik, M.; Zuk, J.; Krzyzanowska, H.; Ochalski, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    Element depth profiles of porous silicon were measured on the Van-de-Graaff accelerator in the energy range of 4 He + ions from 2 to 3.2 MeV. Application of complementary RBS, ERD and 16 O(α,α) 16 O nuclear reaction methods permits us to obtain: 1) the exact silicon, oxygen and hydrogen distribution in the samples, 2) the distribution of partial pore concentrations. The oxygen concentration in porous silicon reaches 30%, which allows one to assume the presence of silicon oxide in the pores and to explain the spectrum shift of luminescence into the blue area

  4. Nano-ridge fabrication by local oxidation of silicon edges with silicon nitride as a mask

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveld, J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Maury, P.A.; Jansen, Henricus V.

    2005-01-01

    A method to fabricate nano-ridges over a full wafer is presented. The fabrication method uses local oxidation of silicon, with silicon nitride as a mask, and wet anisotropic etching of silicon. The realized structures are 7-20 nm wide, 40-100 nm high and centimeters long. All dimensions are easily

  5. Strategies for doped nanocrystalline silicon integration in silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seif, J.; Descoeudres, A.; Nogay, G.; Hänni, S.; de Nicolas, S.M.; Holm, N.; Geissbühler, J.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; Duchamp, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.; Ledinský, Martin; De Wolf, S.; Ballif, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2016), s. 1132-1140 ISSN 2156-3381 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : microcrystalline silicon * nanocrystalline silicon * silicon heterojunctions (SHJs) * solar cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.712, year: 2016

  6. Combination of silicon nitride and porous silicon induced optoelectronic features enhancement of multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabha, Mohamed Ben; Dimassi, Wissem; Gaidi, Mounir; Ezzaouia, Hatem; Bessais, Brahim [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    The effects of antireflection (ARC) and surface passivation films on optoelectronic features of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) were investigated in order to perform high efficiency solar cells. A double layer consisting of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) on porous silicon (PS) was achieved on mc-Si surfaces. It was found that this treatment decreases the total surface reflectivity from about 25% to around 6% in the 450-1100 nm wavelength range. As a result, the effective minority carrier diffusion length, estimated from the Laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) method, was found to increase from 312 {mu}m for PS-treated cells to about 798 {mu}m for SiN{sub x}/PS-treated ones. The deposition of SiN{sub x} was found to impressively enhance the minority carrier diffusion length probably due to hydrogen passivation of surface, grain boundaries and bulk defects. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) shows that the vibration modes of the highly suitable passivating Si-H bonds exhibit frequency shifts toward higher wavenumber, depending on the x ratio of the introduced N atoms neighbors. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. High breakdown-strength composites from liquid silicone rubbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin; Yu, Liyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs) as dielectric elastomer transducers. Commonly used silicones in this application include room-temperature vulcanisable (RTV) silicone elastomers and composites thereof. Pure LSRs and their composites with commercially...

  8. Emerging heterogeneous integrated photonic platforms on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathpour Sasan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photonics has been established as a mature and promising technology for optoelectronic integrated circuits, mostly based on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI waveguide platform. However, not all optical functionalities can be satisfactorily achieved merely based on silicon, in general, and on the SOI platform, in particular. Long-known shortcomings of silicon-based integrated photonics are optical absorption (in the telecommunication wavelengths and feasibility of electrically-injected lasers (at least at room temperature. More recently, high two-photon and free-carrier absorptions required at high optical intensities for third-order optical nonlinear effects, inherent lack of second-order optical nonlinearity, low extinction ratio of modulators based on the free-carrier plasma effect, and the loss of the buried oxide layer of the SOI waveguides at mid-infrared wavelengths have been recognized as other shortcomings. Accordingly, several novel waveguide platforms have been developing to address these shortcomings of the SOI platform. Most of these emerging platforms are based on heterogeneous integration of other material systems on silicon substrates, and in some cases silicon is integrated on other substrates. Germanium and its binary alloys with silicon, III–V compound semiconductors, silicon nitride, tantalum pentoxide and other high-index dielectric or glass materials, as well as lithium niobate are some of the materials heterogeneously integrated on silicon substrates. The materials are typically integrated by a variety of epitaxial growth, bonding, ion implantation and slicing, etch back, spin-on-glass or other techniques. These wide range of efforts are reviewed here holistically to stress that there is no pure silicon or even group IV photonics per se. Rather, the future of the field of integrated photonics appears to be one of heterogenization, where a variety of different materials and waveguide platforms will be used for

  9. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  10. Effect of Silicon Nanowire on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ostadmahmoodi Do

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanowires (NWs are recently used in several sensor or actuator devices to improve their ordered characteristics. Silicon nanowire (Si NW is one of the most attractive one-dimensional nanostructures semiconductors because of its unique electrical and optical properties. In this paper, silicon nanowire (Si NW, is synthesized and characterized for application in photovoltaic device. Si NWs are prepared using wet chemical etching method which is commonly used as a simple and low cost method for producing nanowires of the same substrate material. The process conditions are adjusted to find the best quality of Si NWs. Morphology of Si NWs is studied using a field emission scanning electron microscopic technique. An energy dispersive X-Ray analyzer is also used to provide elemental identification and quantitative compositional information. Subsequently, Schottky type solar cell samples are fabricated on Si and Si NWs using ITO and Ag contacts. The junction properties are calculated using I-V curves in dark condition and the solar cell I-V characteristics are obtained under incident of the standardized light of AM1.5. The results for the two mentioned Schottky solar cell samples are compared and discussed. An improvement in short circuit current and efficiency of Schottky solar cell is found when Si nanowires are employed.

  11. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D.; Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A.

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 μm) and thick (>30μm) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and γ rays. For x-ray, γ ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs

  12. Silicon Nano-Photonic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao

    with the couplers, a silicon ridge waveguide is utilized in nonlinear all-optical signal processing for optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) systems. Record ultra-highspeed error-free optical demultiplexing and waveform sampling are realized and demonstrated for the rst time. Microwave phase shifters and notch...... lters based on tunable microring resonators are proposed and analyzed. Based on a single microring resonator, a maximum radio frequency (RF) phase shift of 336degrees is obtained, but with large power variation. By utilizing a dual-microring resonator, a RF phase shifting range larger than 2pi...

  13. Electronic structure of silicon superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Moriarty, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Utilizing a new complex-band-structure technique, the electronic structure of model Si-Si/sub 1-x/Ge/sub x/ and MOS superlattices has been obtained over a wide range of layer thickness d (11 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 110 A). For d greater than or equal to 44 A, it is found that these systems exhibit a direct fundamental band gap. Further calculations of band-edge effective masses and impurity scattering rates suggest the possibility of a band-structure-driven enhancement in electron mobility over bulk silicon

  14. Silicone cushions for engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    When a complex system composed of materials of very different properties is subjected to varying temperature, differential thermal expansion and contraction will produce intolerable stresses unless the parts are separated by suitable cushions. In addition to accommodating differential thermal expansion and contraction, these cushions must absorb shock and vibration, take up dimensional tolerances in the parts, and distribute and attenuate applied loads. We are studying cellular silicone cushions, starting with raw materials and polymer manufacture, to analysis of mechanical and chemical properties, through short- and long-term life testing, in order to tailor cushions to various specific engineering requirements

  15. A monolithic silicon detector telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardella, G.; Amorini, F.; Cabibbo, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Fallica, G.; Franzo, G.; Figuera, P.; Papa, M.; Pappalardo, G.; Percolla, G.; Priolo, F.; Privitera, V.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrathin silicon detector (1 μm) thick implanted on a standard 400 μm Si-detector has been built to realize a monolithic telescope detector for simultaneous charge and energy determination of charged particles. The performances of the telescope have been tested using standard alpha sources and fragments emitted in nuclear reactions with different projectile-target colliding systems. An excellent charge resolution has been obtained for low energy (less than 5 MeV) light nuclei. A multi-array lay-out of such detectors is under construction to charge identify the particles emitted in reactions induced by low energy radioactive beams. (orig.)

  16. Silicone foam for penetration seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Yoshikazu

    1986-01-01

    In nuclear power plants or general buildings, it is very important to form a fire-resistant seal around cables, cable trays and conduits passing through a wall or a floor. Rockwool, asbestos, glasswool and flame-retarded urethane foam have so far been used for these purposes. However, they were not satisfactory in sealing property, workability and safety. The silicone foam newly developed, ''TOSSEAL'' 300, has cleared these defects. It has now come to be used for fire resistant seal in nuclear power plants. (author)

  17. Fracture dynamics in implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massy, D.; Tardif, S.; Penot, J. D.; Ragani, J.; Rieutord, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Mazen, F.; Madeira, F. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Landru, D.; Kononchuk, O. [SOITEC, Parc Technologique des Fontaines, 38190 Bernin (France)

    2015-08-31

    Crack propagation in implanted silicon for thin layer transfer is experimentally studied. The crack propagation velocity as a function of split temperature is measured using a designed optical setup. Interferometric measurement of the gap opening is performed dynamically and shows an oscillatory crack “wake” with a typical wavelength in the centimetre range. The dynamics of this motion is modelled using beam elasticity and thermodynamics. The modelling demonstrates the key role of external atmospheric pressure during crack propagation. A quantification of the amount of gas trapped inside pre-existing microcracks and released during the fracture is made possible, with results consistent with previous studies.

  18. Imaging monolithic silicon detector telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorini, F.; Sipala, V.; Cardella, G.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, B.; Cosentino, L.; Costa, E.; Di Pietro, A.; Emanuele, U.; Fallica, G.; Figuera, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; La Guidara, E.; Marchetta, C.; Pappalardo, A.; Piazza, A.; Randazzo, N.; Rizzo, F.; Russo, G.V.; Russotto, P.

    2008-01-01

    We show the results of some test beams performed on a new monolithic strip silicon detector telescope developed in collaboration with the INFN and ST-microelectronics. Using an appropriate design, the induction on the ΔE stages, generated by the charge released in the E stage, was used to obtain the position of the detected particle. The position measurement, together with the low threshold for particle charge identification, allows the new detector to be used for a large variety of applications due to its sensitivity of only a few microns measured in both directions

  19. Study on structural properties of epitaxial silicon films on annealed double layer porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Zhihao; Shen Honglie; Cai Hong; Lv Hongjie; Liu Bin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, epitaxial silicon films were grown on annealed double layer porous silicon by LPCVD. The evolvement of the double layer porous silicon before and after thermal annealing was investigated by scanning electron microscope. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the structural properties of the epitaxial silicon thin films grown at different temperature and different pressure. The results show that the surface of the low-porosity layer becomes smooth and there are just few silicon-bridges connecting the porous layer and the substrate wafer. The qualities of the epitaxial silicon thin films become better along with increasing deposition temperature. All of the Raman peaks of silicon films with different deposition pressure are situated at 521 cm -1 under the deposition temperature of 1100 °C, and the Raman intensity of the silicon film deposited at 100 Pa is much closer to that of the monocrystalline silicon wafer. The epitaxial silicon films are all (4 0 0)-oriented and (4 0 0) peak of silicon film deposited at 100 Pa is more symmetric.

  20. Suicide attempt with a mix of synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones: Case report of non-fatal intoxication with AB-CHMINACA, AB-FUBINACA, alpha-PHP, alpha-PVP and 4-CMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavž, Janez; Gorenjak, Maksimiljan; Marinšek, Martin

    2016-08-01

    We report on a case of intoxication with a mix of new psychoactive substances. A 38-year-old male was brought to the emergency department (ED) following the ingestion of an unknown drug in a suicide attempt. During the transport, he became progressively more somnolent and unresponsive to painful stimuli. Urine and stomach content were collected on admission to be screened for drugs of abuse and medicinal drugs. After admission, the patient's next of kin presented five small grip seal plastic bags containing different powders/crystals, and they were sent for analysis along with urine and stomach content to the toxicology laboratory. An easy and rapid sample preparation technique was applied for the extraction of urine and stomach content. Samples were extracted with liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) technique and analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A small amount of powder material from the bags was diluted in methanol and injected directly into the GC-MS instrument. Obtained spectra (EI) were evaluated against SWGDRUG library. Five different designer drugs were identified in the powder material, including synthetic cannabinoids (AB-CHMINACA, AB-FUBINACA) and synthetic cathinones (alpha-PHP, alpha-PVP and 4-CMC). With the exception of 4-CMC, all of these substances were also detected in the stomach content along with the prescription drugs. This is the first time that a positive identification of these five drugs has been made by a clinical laboratory in Slovenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Simple Approach to Superamphiphobic Overhanging Silicon Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with contact angles up to 152 degrees and roll-off angle down to 8 degrees. Such nonlithographic nanoscale overhanging Structures can also be added to silicon nanograss by deposition of a thin SiO2 layer, which equips the silicon rods with 100-300 nm sized overhanging Structures. This is a simple, fast...

  2. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  3. Case Report: Magnetically retained silicone facial prosthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prosthetic camouflaging of facial defects and use of silicone maxillofacial material are the alternatives to the surgical retreatment. Silicone elastomers provide more options to clinician for customization of the facial prosthesis which is simple, esthetically good when coupled with bio magnets for retention. Key words: Magnet ...

  4. Broadband Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Pu, Minhao; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    The fast non-linearity of silicon allows Tbit/s optical signal processing. By choosing suitable dimensions of silicon nanowires their dispersion can be tailored to ensure a high nonlinearity at power levels low enough to avoid significant two-photon abso We have fabricated low insertion...

  5. Radiation cured and monomer modified silicon elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldred, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the production of a tear resistant silicone elastomer, which has improved elongation properties. This elastomer is the radiation induced reaction product of a noncured methyl vinyl silicone resin (VMQ) and uniformly dispersed therein a blend of a polyfunctional acrylic crosslinking monomer and a filler

  6. Low surface damage dry etched black silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym M.; Gaudig, Maria; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Black silicon (bSi) is promising for integration into silicon solar cell fabrication flow due to its excellent light trapping and low reflectance, and a continuously improving passivation. However, intensive ion bombardment during the reactive ion etching used to fabricate bSi induces surface dam...

  7. Mechanism of single atom switch on silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate single atom switch on silicon which operates by displacement of a hydrogen atom on the silicon (100) surface at room temperature. We find two principal effects by which the switch is controlled: a pronounced maximum of the switching probability as function of sample bias...

  8. Silicon drift detectors, present and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J.; Bellwied, R.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Caines, H.; Chen, W.; Dyke, H.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Humanic, T.; Kotov, I.; Kuczewski, P.; Leonhardt, W.; Li, Z.; Lynn, D.; Minor, R.; Munhoz, M.; Ott, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Schambach, J.; Soja, R.; Sugarbaker, E.; Willson, R. M.

    2001-04-01

    Silicon drift detectors provide unambiguous two-dimensional position information for charged particle detection with a single detector layer. A large area silicon drift detector was developed for the inner tracking detector of the STAR experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we discuss the lessons learned and the future prospects of this technology.

  9. Challenges in amorphous silicon solar cell technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaaij, van R.A.C.M.M.; Zeman, M.; Korevaar, B.A.; Smit, C.; Metselaar, J.W.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is nowadays extensively used for a range of devices, amongst others solar cells, Solar cell technology has matured over the last two decades and resulted in conversion efficiencies in excess of 15%. In this paper the operation of amorphous silicon solar cells is

  10. Phosphorous Doping of Nanostructured Crystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Steckel, André

    Nano-textured silicon, known as black silicon (bSi), is attractive with excellent photon trapping properties. bSi can be produced using simple one-step fabrication reactive ion etching (RIE) technique. However, in order to use bSi in photovoltaics doping process should be developed. Due to high s...

  11. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Burckel, D.; Finnegan, Patrick S.; David Henry, M.; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicon topography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  12. Optical and microstructural investigations of porous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) measurements on (100) oriented -type crystalline silicon (-Si) and porous silicon (PS) samples were carried out. PS samples were prepared by anodic etching of -Si under the illumination of light for different etching times of 30, 60 and 90 min. Raman scattering from the ...

  13. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...

  14. Silicon nanostructures produced by laser direct etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Dirac, Paul Andreas Holger; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1995-01-01

    A laser direct-write process has been applied to structure silicon on a nanometer scale. In this process, a silicon substrate, placed in a chlorine ambience, is locally heated above its melting point by a continuous-wave laser and translated by high-resolution direct-current motor stages. Only...

  15. A continuous Czochralski silicon crystal growth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Zhang, H.; Wang, T. H.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2003-03-01

    Demand for large silicon wafers has driven the growth of silicon crystals from 200 to 300 mm in diameter. With the increasing silicon ingot sizes, melt volume has grown dramatically. Melt flow becomes more turbulent as melt height and volume increase. To suppress turbulent flow in a large silicon melt, a new Czochralski (CZ) growth furnace has been designed that has a shallow melt. In this new design, a crucible consists of a shallow growth compartment in the center and a deep feeding compartment around the periphery. Two compartments are connected with a narrow annular channel. A long crystal may be continuously grown by feeding silicon pellets into the dedicated feeding compartment. We use our numerical model to simulate temperature distribution and velocity field in a conventional 200-mm CZ crystal growth system and also in the new shallow crucible CZ system. By comparison, advantages and disadvantages of the proposed system are observed, operating conditions are determined, and the new system is improved.

  16. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  17. Electrochemical properties of ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham minh Tan.

    1979-11-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of ion implanted silicon in contact with hydrofluoric acid solution was investigated. It was shown that the implanted layer on silicon changes profoundly its electrochemical properties (photopotential, interface impedance, rest potential, corrosion, current-potential behaviour, anodic dissolution of silicon, redox reaction). These changes depend strongly on the implantation parameters such as ion dose, ion energy, thermal treatment and ion mass and are weakly dependent on the chemical nature of the implantation ion. The experimental results were evaluated and interpreted in terms of the semiconductor electrochemical concepts taking into account the interaction of energetic ions with the solid surface. The observed effects are thus attributed to the implantation induced damage of silicon lattice and can be used for profiling of the implanted layer and the electrochemical treatment of the silicon surface. (author)

  18. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH 3 ) 2 Si][CH 3 Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 150 0 C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  19. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  20. A study of the characteristics and in vitro permeation properties of CMC/ chitosan microparticles as a skin delivery system for vitamin E Estudo das características e propriedades da permeação in vitro de micropartículas de CMC/quitosana como sitema de liberação cutânea para vitamina E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bucchi Alencastre

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC/chitosan microparticles containing vitamin E were prepared by a complex coacervation method and their potential use as a topical delivery system was evaluated. Morphology, particle size distribution, encapsulation yield, physical and chemical stability, in vitro release and permeation through skin were studied. The microparticles appeared to be spherical, with a homogeneous surface and were not aggregated. Mean diameters ranged from 2.7 to 7.6 µm and the encapsulation yield was 81%. Chemical stability studies indicated a protection of encapsulated vitamin E, of 8.1% for O/W and of 10.83% for W/O emulsions, following storage at 45 °C for 60 days. Forty-eight% of vitamin E, determined by HPLC, were released within 24 hours. In vitro permeation and retention studies showed a higher penetration rate of vitamin E in the free and encapsulated forms, from the W/O emulsion. The carriers studied seem to be promising systems for topical administration.Micropartículas de carboximetilcelulose (CMC/quitosana contendo vitamina E foram preparadas pelo método de coacervação complexa e seu uso potencial como um sistema de liberação tópico foi avaliado. Estudos da morfologia, da distribuição do tamanho de partículas, da eficiência de encapsulação, da estabilidade física e química e da liberação e permeação cutânea in vitro foram realizados. As análises por Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura mostraram que as partículas são esféricas, possuem uma superfície homogênea e ausência de agregados, com diâmetros na faixa de 2,7 a 7,6 µm. A eficiência de encapsulação da vitamina E foi 81%. Os estudos de estabilidade química mostraram proteção da vitamina E encapsulada, sendo que a diferença em relação à quantidade de ativo remanescente na emulsão O/A foi de 8,1% e na A/O, de 10,8%, após armazenamento a 45 °C por um período de 60 dias. O ensaio de liberação in vitro mostrou que 48% da vitamina E

  1. Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

    1996-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  2. The DOe Silicon Track Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, Georg

    2003-01-01

    We describe a trigger preprocessor to be used by the DOe experiment for selecting events with tracks from the decay of long-lived particles. This Level 2 impact parameter trigger utilizes information from the Silicon Microstrip Tracker to reconstruct tracks with improved spatial and momentum resolutions compared to those obtained by the Level 1 tracking trigger. It is constructed of VME boards with much of the logic existing in programmable processors. A common motherboard provides the I/O infrastructure and three different daughter boards perform the tasks of identifying the roads from the tracking trigger data, finding the clusters in the roads in the silicon detector, and fitting tracks to the clusters. This approach provides flexibility for the design, testing and maintenance phases of the project. The track parameters are provided to the trigger framework in 25 μs. The effective impact parameter resolution for high-momentum tracks is 35 μm, dominated by the size of the Tevatron beam

  3. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Holger Neuhaus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future efficiency potential of this technology. In research and development, more various advanced solar cell concepts have demonstrated higher efficiencies. The question which arises is “why are new solar cell concepts not transferred into industrial production more frequently?”. We look into the requirements a new solar cell technology has to fulfill to have an advantage over the current approach. Finally, we give an overview of high-efficiency concepts which have already been transferred into industrial production.

  4. Radiation cured silicone rubber articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, J.G.; Goodwin, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    A process for making radiation cured silicone rubber articles is disclosed wherein a hydroxyl-terminated polysilaxane having a molecular weight from about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, optionally modified by mixing with up to 85% of an end-stopped silicone rubber, is mixed with from about 10 to about 70 parts per hundred of rubber of a finely divided silica filler with a particle size in the reinforcing range and other inert fillers as determined by desired final properties; the composition so prepared is formed into the desired shape at room temperature; the article so formed is precured to improve the mechanical properties of the material with which it is made by exposure to ammonia gas, ammonium hydroxide, or to the vapors or solutions of a volatile amine at room temperature; and the precured article is irradiated with high energy electrons or gamma radiation to effect a permanent cure of the material from which the article is formed

  5. A CMOS silicon spin qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurand, R.; Jehl, X.; Kotekar-Patil, D.; Corna, A.; Bohuslavskyi, H.; Laviéville, R.; Hutin, L.; Barraud, S.; Vinet, M.; Sanquer, M.; de Franceschi, S.

    2016-11-01

    Silicon, the main constituent of microprocessor chips, is emerging as a promising material for the realization of future quantum processors. Leveraging its well-established complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology would be a clear asset to the development of scalable quantum computing architectures and to their co-integration with classical control hardware. Here we report a silicon quantum bit (qubit) device made with an industry-standard fabrication process. The device consists of a two-gate, p-type transistor with an undoped channel. At low temperature, the first gate defines a quantum dot encoding a hole spin qubit, the second one a quantum dot used for the qubit read-out. All electrical, two-axis control of the spin qubit is achieved by applying a phase-tunable microwave modulation to the first gate. The demonstrated qubit functionality in a basic transistor-like device constitutes a promising step towards the elaboration of scalable spin qubit geometries in a readily exploitable CMOS platform.

  6. Low cost silicon solar array project large area silicon sheet task: Silicon web process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Blais, P. D.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Growth configurations were developed which produced crystals having low residual stress levels. The properties of a 106 mm diameter round crucible were evaluated and it was found that this design had greatly enhanced temperature fluctuations arising from convection in the melt. Thermal modeling efforts were directed to developing finite element models of the 106 mm round crucible and an elongated susceptor/crucible configuration. Also, the thermal model for the heat loss modes from the dendritic web was examined for guidance in reducing the thermal stress in the web. An economic analysis was prepared to evaluate the silicon web process in relation to price goals.

  7. Segregation of boron implanted into silicon on angular configurations of silicon/silicon dioxide oxidation interface

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnavskij, G A; Obrekht, M S

    2001-01-01

    One studies segregation of boron implanted into silicon when a wave (interface) of oxidation moves within it. There are four types of angular configurations of SiO sub 2 /Si oxidation interface, that is: direct and reverse shoulders, trench type cavities and a square. By means of computer-aided simulation one obtained and analyzed complex patterns of B concentration distribution within Si, SiO sub 2 domains and at SiO sub 2 /Si interface for all types of angular configurations of the oxidation interface

  8. Comparison of confinement characters between porous silicon and silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tit, Nacir; Yamani, Zain H.; Pizzi, Giovanni; Virgilio, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Confinement character and its effects on photoluminescence (PL) properties are theoretically investigated and compared between porous silicon (p-Si) and silicon nanowires (Si-NWs). The method is based on the application of the tight-binding technique using the minimal sp 3 -basis set, including the second-nearest-neighbor interactions. The results show that the quantum confinement (QC) is not entirely controlled by the porosity, rather it is mainly affected by the average distance between pores (d). The p-Si is found to exhibit weaker confinement character than Si-NWs. The confinement energy of charge carriers decays against d exponentially for p-Si and via a power-law for Si-NWs. This latter type of QC is much stronger and is somewhat similar to the case of a single particle in a quantum box. The excellent fit to the PL data demonstrates that the experimental samples of p-Si do exhibit strong QC character and thus reveals the possibility of silicon clustering into nano-crystals and/or nanowires. Furthermore, the results show that the passivation of the surface dangling bonds by the hydrogen atoms plays an essential role in preventing the appearance of gap states and consequently enhances the optical qualities of the produced structures. The oscillator strength (OS) is found to increase exponentially with energy in Si-NWs confirming the strong confinement character of carriers. Our theoretical findings suggest the existence of Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) of sizes 1-3 nm and/or Si-NWs of cross-sectional sizes in the 1-3 nm range inside the experimental p-Si samples. The experimentally-observed strong photoluminescence from p-Si should be in favor of an exhibition of 3D-confinement character. The favorable comparison of our theoretical results with the experimental data consolidates our above claims. -- Highlights: → Tight-binding is used to study quantum-confinement (QC) effects in p-Si and Si-NWs. → QC is not entirely controlled by the porosity but also by the d

  9. Silicon-Rich Silicon Carbide Hole-Selective Rear Contacts for Crystalline-Silicon-Based Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Josua; Wyss, Philippe; Jeangros, Quentin; Allebé, Christophe; Niquille, Xavier; Debrot, Fabien; Despeisse, Matthieu; Haug, Franz-Josef; Löper, Philipp; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-12-28

    The use of passivating contacts compatible with typical homojunction thermal processes is one of the most promising approaches to realizing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In this work, we investigate an alternative rear-passivating contact targeting facile implementation to industrial p-type solar cells. The contact structure consists of a chemically grown thin silicon oxide layer, which is capped with a boron-doped silicon-rich silicon carbide [SiC x (p)] layer and then annealed at 800-900 °C. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the thin chemical oxide layer disappears upon thermal annealing up to 900 °C, leading to degraded surface passivation. We interpret this in terms of a chemical reaction between carbon atoms in the SiC x (p) layer and the adjacent chemical oxide layer. To prevent this reaction, an intrinsic silicon interlayer was introduced between the chemical oxide and the SiC x (p) layer. We show that this intrinsic silicon interlayer is beneficial for surface passivation. Optimized passivation is obtained with a 10-nm-thick intrinsic silicon interlayer, yielding an emitter saturation current density of 17 fA cm -2 on p-type wafers, which translates into an implied open-circuit voltage of 708 mV. The potential of the developed contact at the rear side is further investigated by realizing a proof-of-concept hybrid solar cell, featuring a heterojunction front-side contact made of intrinsic amorphous silicon and phosphorus-doped amorphous silicon. Even though the presented cells are limited by front-side reflection and front-side parasitic absorption, the obtained cell with a V oc of 694.7 mV, a FF of 79.1%, and an efficiency of 20.44% demonstrates the potential of the p + /p-wafer full-side-passivated rear-side scheme shown here.

  10. Annealing temperature dependence of photoluminescent characteristics of silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon-rich silicon nitride films grown by PECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, D.S.; Liang, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, light emission from silicon nanostructures has gained great interest due to its promising potential of realizing silicon-based optoelectronic applications. In this study, luminescent silicon nanocrystals (Si–NCs) were in situ synthesized in silicon-rich silicon nitride (SRSN) films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). SRSN films with various excess silicon contents were deposited by adjusting SiH 4 flow rate to 100 and 200 sccm and keeping NH 3 one at 40 sccm, and followed by furnace annealing (FA) treatments at 600, 850 and 1100 °C for 1 h. The effects of excess silicon content and post-annealing temperature on optical properties of Si–NCs were investigated by photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The origins of two groups of PL peaks found in this study can be attributed to defect-related interface states and quantum confinement effects (QCE). Defect-related interface states lead to the photon energy levels almost kept constant at about 3.4 eV, while QCE results in visible and tunable PL emission in the spectral range of yellow and blue light which depends on excess silicon content and post-annealing temperature. In addition, PL intensity was also demonstrated to be highly correlative to the excess silicon content and post-annealing temperature due to its corresponding effects on size, density, crystallinity, and surface passivation of Si–NCs. Considering the trade-off between surface passivation and structural properties of Si–NCs, an optimal post-annealing temperature of 600 °C was suggested to maximize the PL intensity of the SRSN films

  11. 3D silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Bates, Richard; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Lozano, Manuel; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pennicard, David; Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina; Szumlak, Tomasz; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the results obtained with 3D-STC-modules.

  12. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  13. Plasma processing of microcrystalline silicon films : filling in the gaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronneberg, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si:H) is a mixed-phase material consisting of crystalline silicon grains, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) tissue, and voids. Microcrystalline silicon is extensively used as absorber layer in thin-film tandem solar cells, combining the advantages of a

  14. Study of effects of radiation on silicone prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedbalkar, A.R.; Devata, A.; Padanilam, T.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation effects on silicone gel and dose distribution of radiation through mammary prostheses were studied. Silicone gel behaves like tissue. Half value thickness for silicone gel and water are almost the same. Linear absorption coefficient for silicone gel and water are comparable

  15. High-efficient solar cells with porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migunova, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that the porous silicon is multifunctional high-efficient coating on silicon solar cells, modifies its surface and combines in it self antireflection and passivation properties., The different optoelectronic effects in solar cells with porous silicon were considered. The comparative parameters of uncovered photodetectors also solar cells with porous silicon and other coatings were resulted. (author)

  16. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  17. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  18. Porous silicon: Synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Awad, F.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of porous silicon by electrochemical etching method of both p and n-type single crystal silicon wafers in HF based solutions has been performed by using three different modes. In addition to DC and pulsed voltage, a novel etching mode is developed to prepare light-emitting porous silicon by applying and holding-up a voltage in gradient steps form periodically, between the silicon wafer and a graphite electrode. Under same equivalent etching conditions, periodic gradient steps voltage etching can yield a porous silicon layer with stronger photoluminescence intensity and blue shift than the porous silicon layer prepared by DC or pulsed voltage etching. It has been found that the holding-up of the applied voltage during the etching process for defined interval of time is another significant future of this method, which highly affects the blue shift. This can be used for tailoring a porous layer with novel properties. The actual mechanism behind the blue shift is not clear exactly, even the experimental observation of atomic force microscope and purist measurements in support with quantum confinement model. It has been seen also from Fourier Transform Infrared study that interplays between O-Si-H and Si-H bond intensities play key role in deciding the efficiency of photoluminescence emission. Study of relative humidity sensing and photonic crystal properties of pours silicon samples has confirmed the advantages of the new adopted etching mode. The sensitivity at room temperature of porous silicon prepared by periodic gradient steps voltage etching was found to be about 70% as compared to 51% and 45% for the porous silicon prepared by DC and pulsed voltage etching, respectively. (author)

  19. Porous silicon: Synthesis and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Awad, F.

    2006-06-01

    Formation of porous silicon by electrochemical etching method of both p and n-type single crystal silicon wafers in HF based solutions has been performed by using three different modes. In addition to DC and pulsed voltage, a novel etching mode is developed to prepare light-emitting porous silicon by applying and holding-up a voltage in gradient steps form periodically, between the silicon wafer and a graphite electrode. Under same equivalent etching conditions, periodic gradient steps voltage etching can yield a porous silicon layer with stronger photoluminescence intensity and blue shift than the porous silicon layer prepared by DC or pulsed voltage etching. It has been found that the holding-up of the applied voltage during the etching process for defined interval of time is another significant future of this method, which highly affects the blue shift. This can be used for tailoring a porous layer with novel properties. The actual mechanism behind the blue shift is not clear exactly, even the experimental observation of atomic force microscope and purist measurements in support with quantum confinement model. It has been seen also from Fourier Transform Infrared study that interplays between O-Si-H and Si-H bond intensities play key role in deciding the efficiency of photoluminescence emission. Study of relative humidity sensing and photonic crystal properties of pours silicon samples has confirmed the advantages of the new adopted etching mode. The sensitivity at room temperature of porous silicon prepared by periodic gradient steps voltage etching was found to be about 70% as compared to 51% and 45% for the porous silicon prepared by DC and pulsed voltage etching, respectively. (author)

  20. Porous silicon technology for integrated microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Jin Zheng

    With the development of micro systems, there is an increasing demand for integrable porous materials. In addition to those conventional applications, such as filtration, wicking, and insulating, many new micro devices, including micro reactors, sensors, actuators, and optical components, can benefit from porous materials. Conventional porous materials, such as ceramics and polymers, however, cannot meet the challenges posed by micro systems, due to their incompatibility with standard micro-fabrication processes. In an effort to produce porous materials that can be used in micro systems, porous silicon (PS) generated by anodization of single crystalline silicon has been investigated. In this work, the PS formation process has been extensively studied and characterized as a function of substrate type, crystal orientation, doping concentration, current density and surfactant concentration and type. Anodization conditions have been optimized for producing very thick porous silicon layers with uniform pore size, and for obtaining ideal pore morphologies. Three different types of porous silicon materials: meso porous silicon, macro porous silicon with straight pores, and macro porous silicon with tortuous pores, have been successfully produced. Regular pore arrays with controllable pore size in the range of 2mum to 6mum have been demonstrated as well. Localized PS formation has been achieved by using oxide/nitride/polysilicon stack as masking materials, which can withstand anodization in hydrofluoric acid up to twenty hours. A special etching cell with electrolytic liquid backside contact along with two process flows has been developed to enable the fabrication of thick macro porous silicon membranes with though wafer pores. For device assembly, Si-Au and In-Au bonding technologies have been developed. Very low bonding temperature (˜200°C) and thick/soft bonding layers (˜6mum) have been achieved by In-Au bonding technology, which is able to compensate the potentially

  1. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  2. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  3. Germanium silicon physics and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, R K; Bean, John C; Hull, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Since its inception in 1966, the series of numbered volumes known as Semiconductors and Semimetals has distinguished itself through the careful selection of well-known authors, editors, and contributors. The "Willardson and Beer" Series, as it is widely known, has succeeded in publishing numerous landmark volumes and chapters. Not only did many of these volumes make an impact at the time of their publication, but they continue to be well-cited years after their original release. Recently, Professor Eicke R. Weber of the University of California at Berkeley joined as a co-editor of the series. Professor Weber, a well-known expert in the field of semiconductor materials, will further contribute to continuing the series' tradition of publishing timely, highly relevant, and long-impacting volumes. Some of the recent volumes, such as Hydrogen in Semiconductors, Imperfections in III/V Materials, Epitaxial Microstructures, High-Speed Heterostructure Devices, Oxygen in Silicon, and others promise that this tradition ...

  4. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, Barry C; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  5. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  6. CMS Silicon Strip Tracker Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Agram, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker (SST), consisting of 9.6 million readout channels from 15148 modules and covering an area of 198 square meters, needs to be precisely calibrated in order to correctly reconstruct the events recorded. Calibration constants are derived from different workflows, from promptly reconstructed events with particles as well as from commissioning events gathered just before the acquisition of physics runs. The performance of the SST has been carefully studied since the beginning of data taking: the noise of the detector, data integrity, signal-over-noise ratio, hit reconstruction efficiency and resolution have been all investigated with time and for different conditions. In this paper we describe the reconstruction strategies, the calibration procedures and the detector performance results from the latest CMS operation.

  7. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabaioli, S., E-mail: simone.rabaioli@gmail.com [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); Berra, A.; Bolognini, D. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Universita degli Studi di Trieste and INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Lietti, D. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Penzo, A. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Prest, M. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); INFN sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy); Stoppani, L. [Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Via Valleggio, 11 - 22100 Como (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2012-12-11

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain ({approx}10{sup 6}). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  8. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  9. Particle identification by silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Denison de Souza

    1997-01-01

    A method is developed for the evaluation of the energy loss, dE/dx, of a charged particle traversing a silicon strip detector. The method is applied to the DELPHI microvertex detector leading to diagrams of dE/dx versus momentum for different particles. The specific case of pions and protons is treated and the most probable value of dE/dx and the width of the dE/dx distribution for those particles in the momentum range of 0.2 GeV/c to 1.5 GeV/c, are obtained. The resolution found is 13.4 % for particles with momentum higher than 2 GeV/c and the separation power is 2.9 for 1.0 GeV/c pions and protons. (author)

  10. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Barry C [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Hollenberg, Lloyd C L [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computer Technology, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew [EDM Studio Inc., Level 2, 850 16 Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta T2R 0S9 (Canada)], E-mail: bsanders@qis.ucalgary.ca, E-mail: lloydch@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: darran@edmstudio.com

    2008-12-15

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  11. The BELLE silicon vertex detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimonti, G.; Aihara, H.; Alexander, J.; Asano, Y.; Bakich, A.; Bozek, A.; Banas, E.; Browder, T.; Dragic, J.; Fukunaga, C.; Gordon, A.; Guler, H.; Everton, C.; Heenan, E.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Hastings, N.; Hara, T.; Hojo, T.; Higuchi, T.; Iwai, G.; Ishino, H.; Jalocha, P.; Korotuschenko, K.; Kaneko, J.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Lange, J.S.; Li, Y.; Marlow, D.; Moloney, G.; Moffitt, L.; Mori, S.; Matsubara, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palka, H.; Peak, L.S.; Ryuko, J.; Rozanska, M.; Sevior, M.; Shimada, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Stock, R.; Stanic, S.; Swain, S.; Taylor, G.; Takasaki, F.; Tajima, H.; Trabelsi, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M. E-mail: tanakam@post.kek.jp; Takahashi, S.; Tomura, T.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsujita, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.E.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamada, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Zhao, H.; Zontar, D

    2000-10-11

    A silicon vertex detector has been developed for the BELLE experiment at the KEK B-factory to be used to determine the relative displacements of B-meson decay vertices for CP violation measurements. The device has been successfully installed and operated with high-luminosity beam conditions. The average strip yield is larger than 96%, including the preamplifier electronics yield and the detector is currently working stably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17-40. The measured impact parameter resolution agrees with expectations based on Monte Carlo simulations, and the measured D{sup 0} lifetime is in good agreement with the particle data group's average of other measurements. Several B{yields}J/{psi}K events produced at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance have been detected and separate decay vertices have been found.

  12. The CMS Silicon Tracker Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Castello, R

    2008-01-01

    The alignment of the Strip and Pixel Tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, with its large number of independent silicon sensors and its excellent spatial resolution, is a complex and challenging task. Besides high precision mounting, survey measurements and the Laser Alignment System, track-based alignment is needed to reach the envisaged precision.\\\\ Three different algorithms for track-based alignment were successfully tested on a sample of cosmic-ray data collected at the Tracker Integration Facility, where 15\\% of the Tracker was tested. These results, together with those coming from the CMS global run, will provide the basis for the full-scale alignment of the Tracker, which will be carried out with the first \\emph{p-p} collisions.

  13. Silicone-based Dielectric Elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Efficient conversion of energy from one form to another (transduction) is an important topic in our daily day, and it is a necessity in moving away from the fossil based society. Dielectric elastomers hold great promise as soft transducers, since they are compliant and light-weight amongst many...... energy efficient solutions are highly sought. These properties allow for interesting products ranging very broadly, e.g. from eye implants over artificial skins over soft robotics to huge wave energy harvesting plants. All these products utilize the inherent softness and compliance of the dielectric...... elastomer transducers. The subject of this thesis is improvement of properties of silicone-based dielectric elastomers with special focus on design guides towards electrically, mechanically, and electromechanically reliable elastomers. Strategies for improving dielectric elastomer performance are widely...

  14. Polycrystalline Silicon: a Biocompatibility Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecheva, E.; Fingarova, D.; Pramatarova, L.; Hikov, T.; Laquerriere, P.; Bouthors, Sylvie; Dimova-Malinovska, D.; Montgomery, P.

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) layers were functionalized through the growth of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) on their surface. HA is the mineral component of bones and teeth and thus possesses excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on both HA-coated and un-coated poly-Si surfaces for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days and toxicity, proliferation and cell morphology were investigated. The results revealed that the poly-Si layers were bioactive and compatible with the osteoblast-like cells. Nevertheless, the HA coating improved the cell interactions with the poly-Si surfaces based on the cell affinity to the specific chemical composition of the bone-like HA and/or to the higher HA roughness.

  15. From silicon to organic nanoparticle memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukalas, D

    2009-10-28

    After introducing the operational principle of nanoparticle memory devices, their current status in silicon technology is briefly presented in this work. The discussion then focuses on hybrid technologies, where silicon and organic materials have been combined together in a nanoparticle memory device, and finally concludes with the recent development of organic nanoparticle memories. The review is focused on the nanoparticle memory concept as an extension of the current flash memory device. Organic nanoparticle memories are at a very early stage of research and have not yet found applications. When this happens, it is expected that they will not directly compete with mature silicon technology but will find their own areas of application.

  16. Superacid Passivation of Crystalline Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, James; Kiriya, Daisuke; Grant, Nicholas; Azcatl, Angelica; Hettick, Mark; Kho, Teng; Phang, Pheng; Sio, Hang C; Yan, Di; Macdonald, Daniel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A; Wallace, Robert M; Cuevas, Andres; Javey, Ali

    2016-09-14

    The reduction of parasitic recombination processes commonly occurring within the silicon crystal and at its surfaces is of primary importance in crystalline silicon devices, particularly in photovoltaics. Here we explore a simple, room temperature treatment, involving a nonaqueous solution of the superacid bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide, to temporarily deactivate recombination centers at the surface. We show that this treatment leads to a significant enhancement in optoelectronic properties of the silicon wafer, attaining a level of surface passivation in line with state-of-the-art dielectric passivation films. Finally, we demonstrate its advantage as a bulk lifetime and process cleanliness monitor, establishing its compatibility with large area photoluminescence imaging in the process.

  17. Silicon photonics III systems and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, David

    2016-01-01

    This book is volume III of a series of books on silicon photonics. It reports on the development of fully integrated systems where many different photonics component are integrated together to build complex circuits. This is the demonstration of the fully potentiality of silicon photonics. It contains a number of chapters written by engineers and scientists of the main companies, research centers and universities active in the field. It can be of use for all those persons interested to know the potentialities and the recent applications of silicon photonics both in microelectronics, telecommunication and consumer electronics market.

  18. Calcinosis Cutis Long after Rhinoplasty with Silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Honda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty is a plastic surgery procedure to reconstruct the nose. Silicone alloplastic materials are most widely used as implants for rhinoplasty, but calcification on the surface occurs with long-term usage. Herein, we report a case of gruel-like calcification approximately 50 years after silicone implant rhinoplasty. In this case, calcification on the silicone surface might have transformed into gruel-like deposits, which presented as a subcutaneous mass at the dorsal area of the nose. The precise mechanism is unclear; a pH change in the tissue might have occurred during the process of inflammation, leading to the dissolution of calcified deposits.

  19. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  20. Hexacoordinate bonding and aromaticity in silicon phthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang

    2010-12-23

    Si-E bondings in hexacoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were analyzed using bond order (BO), energy partition, atoms in molecules (AIM), electron localization function (ELF), and localized orbital locator (LOL). Bond models were proposed to explain differences between hexacoordinate and tetracoordinate Si-E bondings. Aromaticity of silicon phthalocyanine was investigated using nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS), harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA), conceptual density functional theory (DFT), ring critical point (RCP) descriptors, and delocalization index (DI). Structure, energy, bonding, and aromaticity of tetracoordinate silicon phthalocyanine were studied and compared with hexacoordinate one.