WorldWideScience

Sample records for silicon oxide nanostructures

  1. Fluorescence studies of Rhodamine 6G functionalized silicon oxide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertel, Thomas; Borczyskowski, Christian von; Graaf, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Selective anchoring of optically active molecules on nanostructured surfaces is a promising step towards the creation of nanoscale devices with new functionalities. Recently we have demonstrated the electrostatic attachment of charged fluorescent molecules on silicon oxide nanostructures prepared by atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanolithography via local anodic oxidation (LAO) of dodecyl-terminated silicon. In this paper we report on our findings from a more detailed optical investigation of the bound dye Rhodamine 6G. High sensitivity optical wide field microscopy as well as confocal laser microscopy have been used to characterize the Rhodamine fluorescence emission. A highly interesting question concerns the interaction between an emitter close to a silicon surface because mechanisms such as energy transfer and fluorescence quenching will occur which are still not fully understood. Since the oxide thickness can be varied during preparation continuously from 1 to ∼ 5 nm, it is possible to investigate the fluorescence of the bound dye in close proximity to the underlying silicon. Using confocal laser microscopy we were also able to obtain optical spectra from the bound molecules. Together with the results from an analysis of their photochemical bleaching behaviour, we conjecture that some of the Rhodamine 6G molecules on the structure are interacting with the oxide, causing a spectral shift and differences in their photochemical properties.

  2. Passivating electron contact based on highly crystalline nanostructured silicon oxide layers for silicon solar cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stuckelberger, J.; Nogay, G.; Wyss, P.; Jeangros, Q.; Allebe, Ch.; Debrot, F.; Niquille, X.; Ledinský, Martin; Fejfar, Antonín; Despeisse, M.; Haug, F.J.; Löper, P.; Ballif, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 158, Dec (2016), s. 2-10 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : surface passivation * passivating contact * nanostructure * silicon oxide * nanocrystalline * microcrystalline * poly-silicon * crystallization * Raman * transmission line measurement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.784, year: 2016

  3. The effect of thermal oxidation on the luminescence properties of nanostructured silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijia; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2012-08-06

    Herein is reported a detailed study of the luminescence properties of nanostructured Si using X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES). P-type Si nanowires synthesized via electroless chemical etching from Si wafers of different doping levels and porous Si synthesized using electrochemical method are examined under X-ray excitation across the Si K-, L(3,2) -, and O K-edges. It is found that while as-prepared Si nanostructures are weak light emitters, intense visible luminescence is observed from thermally oxidized Si nanowires and porous Si. The luminescence mechanism of Si upon oxidation is investigated by oxidizing nanostructured Si at different temperatures. Interestingly, the two luminescence bands observed show different response with the variation of absorption coefficient upon Si and O core-electron excitation in elemental silicon and silicon oxide. A correlation between luminescence properties and electronic structures is thus established. The implications of the finding are discussed in terms of the behavior of the oxygen deficient center (OCD) and non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Self-limiting and complete oxidation of silicon nanostructures produced by laser ablation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, L.; Messina, F.; Camarda, P.; Gelardi, F. M.; Cannas, M., E-mail: marco.cannas@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Popescu, R.; Schneider, R.; Gerthsen, D. [Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engesserstrasse 7, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-14

    Oxidized Silicon nanomaterials produced by 1064 nm pulsed laser ablation in deionized water are investigated. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy allows to characterize the structural and chemical properties at a sub-nanometric scale. This analysis clarifies that laser ablation induces both self-limiting and complete oxidation processes which produce polycrystalline Si surrounded by a layer of SiO{sub 2} and amorphous fully oxidized SiO{sub 2}, respectively. These nanostructures exhibit a composite luminescence spectrum which is investigated by time-resolved spectroscopy with a tunable laser excitation. The origin of the observed luminescence bands agrees with the two structural typologies: Si nanocrystals emit a μs-decaying red band; defects of SiO{sub 2} give rise to a ns-decaying UV band and two overlapping blue bands with lifetime in the ns and ms timescale.

  5. Mesoporous silicon oxide films and their uses as templates in obtaining nanostructured conductive polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R.; Arteaga, G. C.; Arias, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Obtaining conductive polymers (CPs) for the manufacture of OLEDs, solar cells, electrochromic devices, sensors, etc., has been possible through the use of electrochemical techniques that allow obtaining films of controlled thickness with positive results in different applications. Current trends point towards the manufacture of nanomaterials, and therefore it is necessary to develop methods that allow obtaining CPs with nanostructured morphology. This is possible by using a porous template to allow the growth of the polymeric materials. However, prior and subsequent treatments are required to separate the material from the template so that it can be evaluated in the applications mentioned above. This is why mesoporous silicon oxide films (template) are essential for the synthesis of nanostructured polymers since both the template and the polymer are obtained on the electrode surface, and therefore it is not necessary to separate the material from the template. Thus, the material can be evaluated directly in the applications mentioned above. The dimensions of the resulting nanostructures will depend on the power, time and technique used for electropolymerization as well as the monomer and the surfactant of the mesoporous film.

  6. Chiral silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E.; Fahlteich, J.; Hoeche, Th.; Wagner, G.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2006-01-01

    Glancing angle ion beam assisted deposition is used for the growth of amorphous silicon nanospirals onto [0 0 1] silicon substrates in a temperature range from room temperature to 475 deg. C. The nanostructures are post-growth annealed in an argon atmosphere at various temperatures ranging from 400 deg. C to 800 deg. C. Recrystallization of silicon within the persisting nanospiral configuration is demonstrated for annealing temperatures above 800 deg. C. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the silicon samples prior and after temperature treatment

  7. Formation of superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns by combination of nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide for biological droplet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kaizuma, Yoshihiro; Konishi, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    In this letter, we report a technology for fabricating superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns using a combination of a nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide. In our previous study, we used a combination of hydrophobic and superhydrophilic materials. However, it was difficult to split low-surface-tension liquids such as biological liquids into droplets solely using hydrophobic/hydrophilic patterns. In this study, the contact angle of the hydrophobic region was enhanced from 109.3° to 155.6° by performing nanostructure imprinting on a damage-reduced perfluoropolymer. The developed superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns allowed the splitting of even those media that contained fetal bovine serum into droplets of a desired shape.

  8. Nanostructured silicon for thermoelectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranz, A.; Kähler, J.; Waag, A.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    Thermoelectric modules convert thermal energy into electrical energy and vice versa. At present bismuth telluride is the most widely commercial used material for thermoelectric energy conversion. There are many applications where bismuth telluride modules are installed, mainly for refrigeration. However, bismuth telluride as material for energy generation in large scale has some disadvantages. Its availability is limited, it is hot stable at higher temperatures (>250°C) and manufacturing cost is relatively high. An alternative material for energy conversion in the future could be silicon. The technological processing of silicon is well advanced due to the rapid development of microelectronics in recent years. Silicon is largely available and environmentally friendly. The operating temperature of silicon thermoelectric generators can be much higher than of bismuth telluride. Today silicon is rarely used as a thermoelectric material because of its high thermal conductivity. In order to use silicon as an efficient thermoelectric material, it is necessary to reduce its thermal conductivity, while maintaining high electrical conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient. This can be done by nanostructuring into arrays of pillars. Fabrication of silicon pillars using ICP-cryogenic dry etching (Inductive Coupled Plasma) will be described. Their uniform height of the pillars allows simultaneous connecting of all pillars of an array. The pillars have diameters down to 180 nm and their height was selected between 1 micron and 10 microns. Measurement of electrical resistance of single silicon pillars will be presented which is done in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with nanomanipulators. Furthermore, measurement of thermal conductivity of single pillars with different diameters using the 3ω method will be shown.

  9. Oxide-Free Bonding of III-V-Based Material on Silicon and Nano-Structuration of the Hybrid Waveguide for Advanced Optical Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Pantzas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxide-free bonding of III-V-based materials for integrated optics is demonstrated on both planar Silicon (Si surfaces and nanostructured ones, using Silicon on Isolator (SOI or Si substrates. The hybrid interface is characterized electrically and mechanically. A hybrid InP-on-SOI waveguide, including a bi-periodic nano structuration of the silicon guiding layer is demonstrated to provide wavelength selective transmission. Such an oxide-free interface associated with the nanostructured design of the guiding geometry has great potential for both electrical and optical operation of improved hybrid devices.

  10. Tuning of structural, light emission and wetting properties of nanostructured copper oxide-porous silicon matrix formed on electrochemically etched copper-coated silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, M.

    2017-01-01

    Matrices of copper oxide-porous silicon nanostructures have been formed by electrochemical etching of copper-coated silicon surfaces in HF-based solution at different etching times (5-15 min). Micro-Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that the nature of copper oxide in the matrix changes from single-phase copper (I) oxide (Cu2O) to single-phase copper (II) oxide (CuO) on increasing the etching time. This is accompanied with important variation in the content of carbon, carbon hydrides, carbonyl compounds and silicon oxide in the matrix. The matrix formed at the low etching time (5 min) exhibits a single broad "blue" room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) band. On increasing the etching time, the intensity of this band decreases and a much stronger "red" PL band emerges in the PL spectra. The relative intensity of this band with respect to the "blue" band significantly increases on increasing the etching time. The "blue" and "red" PL bands are attributed to Cu2O and porous silicon of the matrix, respectively. In addition, the water contact angle measurements reveal that the hydrophobicity of the matrix surface can be tuned from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic state by controlling the etching time.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of a chemically oxidized-nanostructured porous silicon based biosensor implementing orienting protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveas, Nelson; Hernandez-Montelongo, Jacobo; Pulido, Ruth; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Villanueva-Guerrero, Raúl; Predestinación García Ruiz, Josefa; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) elicits as a very attractive material for future biosensing systems due to its high surface area, biocompatibility and well-established fabrication methods. In order to engineer its performance as a biosensor transducer platform, the density of immunoglobulins properly immobilized and oriented onto the surface needs to be optimized. In this work we fabricated and characterized a novel biosensing system focusing on the improvement of the biofunctionalization cascade. The system consists on a chemically oxidized PSi platform derivatized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) that is coupled to Staphylococcus protein A (SpA). The chemical oxidation has previously demonstrated to enhance the biofunctionalization process and here "by implementing SpA" a molecularly oriented immunosensor is achieved. The biosensor system is characterized in terms of its chemical composition, wettability and optical reflectance. Finally, this system is successfully exploited to develop a biosensor for detecting asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous molecule involved in cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this work is relevant from the point of view of design and optimization of the biomolecular immobilization cascade on PSi surfaces with the added value of contribution to the development of new assays for detecting ADMA with a view on prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On nanostructured silicon success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    Recent Letters by Piggott et al. 1 and Shen et al. 2 claim the smallest ever dielectric wave length and polarization splitters. The associated News & Views article by Aydin3 states that these works “are the first experimental demonstration of on-chip, silicon photonic components based on complex...

  13. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  14. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  15. Hydrogen isotopic substitution experiments in nanostructured porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, W.D. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina); Koropecki, R.R. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: rkoro@intec.ceride.gov.ar; Arce, R.D. [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Busso, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura - (UNNE), Avenida Libertad 5500, 3400 Corrientes (Argentina)

    2008-04-30

    Nanostructured porous silicon is usually prepared by electrochemical anodization of monocrystalline silicon using a fluorine-rich electrolyte. As a result of this process, the silicon atoms conserve their original crystalline location, and many of the dangling bonds appearing on the surface of the nanostructure are saturated by hydrogen coming from the electrolyte. This work presents an IR study of the effects produced by partial substitution of water in the electrolytic solution by deuterium oxide. The isotopic effects on the IR spectra are analyzed for the as-prepared samples and for the samples subjected to partial thermal effusion of hydrogen and deuterium. We demonstrate that, although deuterium is chemically indistinguishable from hydrogen, it presents a singular behaviour when used in porous silicon preparation. We found that deuterium preferentially bonds forming Si-DH groups. A possible explanation of the phenomenon is presented, based on the different diffusivities of hydrogen and deuterium.

  16. Hydrogen isotopic substitution experiments in nanostructured porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, W.D.; Koropecki, R.R.; Arce, R.D.; Busso, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon is usually prepared by electrochemical anodization of monocrystalline silicon using a fluorine-rich electrolyte. As a result of this process, the silicon atoms conserve their original crystalline location, and many of the dangling bonds appearing on the surface of the nanostructure are saturated by hydrogen coming from the electrolyte. This work presents an IR study of the effects produced by partial substitution of water in the electrolytic solution by deuterium oxide. The isotopic effects on the IR spectra are analyzed for the as-prepared samples and for the samples subjected to partial thermal effusion of hydrogen and deuterium. We demonstrate that, although deuterium is chemically indistinguishable from hydrogen, it presents a singular behaviour when used in porous silicon preparation. We found that deuterium preferentially bonds forming Si-DH groups. A possible explanation of the phenomenon is presented, based on the different diffusivities of hydrogen and deuterium

  17. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  18. Composition of silicon fibrous nanostructures synthesized using ultrafast laser pulses under ambient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the composition of nanostructures generated owing to ablation of crystalline silicon using high repletion rate femtosecond laser under ambient condition is investigated. The web-like silicon fibrous nanostructures are formed in and around the laser irradiated area. Electron Microscopy investigation revealed that the nanostructures are made of nanoparticles of size about 40 nm. In addition Micro-Raman analysis shows that the nanofibrous structures comprises a mixture of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals the oxidized and un-oxidized elemental states of silicon in the nanostructures. Moreover web-like fibrous nanostructures are generated due to condensation of super saturated vapour and subsequent nucleus growth in the laser induced plasma plume.

  19. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  20. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  1. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2018-01-23

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  2. Integration of functional complex oxide nanomaterials on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel eVila-Fungueiriño

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of standard wafer-scale semiconductor processing with the properties of functional oxides opens up to innovative and more efficient devices with high value applications that can be produced at large scale. This review uncovers the main strategies that are successfully used to monolithically integrate functional complex oxide thin films and nanostructures on silicon: the chemical solution deposition approach (CSD and the advanced physical vapor deposition techniques such as oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Special emphasis will be placed on complex oxide nanostructures epitaxially grown on silicon using the combination of CSD and MBE. Several examples will be exposed, with a particular stress on the control of interfaces and crystallization mechanisms on epitaxial perovskite oxide thin films, nanostructured quartz thin films, and octahedral molecular sieve nanowires. This review enlightens on the potential of complex oxide nanostructures and the combination of both chemical and physical elaboration techniques for novel oxide-based integrated devices.

  3. Nanostructured porous silicon-mediated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J; Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Manso-Silván, Miguel; Muñoz-Noval, Álvaro

    2014-08-01

    The particular properties of nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) make it an attractive material for controlled and localized release of therapeutics within the body, aiming at increased efficacy and reduced risks of potential side effects. Since this is a rapidly evolving field as a consequence of the number of research groups involved, a critical review of the state of the art is necessary. In this work, the most promising and successful applications of nanoPS in the field of drug delivery are reviewed and discussed. Two key issues such as drug loading and release are also analyzed in detail. The development of multifunctional (hybrid) systems, aiming at imparting additional functionalities to the nanoPS particles such as luminescence, magnetic response and/or plasmonic effects (allowing simultaneous tracking and guiding), is also examined. Nanostructured materials based on silicon are promising platforms for pharmaceutical applications given their ability to degrade and low toxicity. However, a very limited number of clinical applications have been demonstrated so far.

  4. Nanostructured silicon ferromagnet collected by a permanent neodymium magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Takahisa; Thürmer, Stephan; Kanoh, Hirofumi

    2017-11-30

    Nanostructured silicon (N-Si) was prepared by anodic electroetching of p-type silicon wafers. The obtained magnetic particles were separated by a permanent neodymium magnet as a magnetic nanostructured silicon (mN-Si). The N-Si and mN-Si exhibited different magnetic properties: the N-Si exhibited ferromagnetic-like behaviour, whereas the mN-Si exhibited superparamagnetic-like behaviour.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Chemically Etched Nanostructured Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2012-05-01

    Silicon is an essential element in today’s modern world. Nanostructured Si is a more recently studied variant, which has currently garnered much attention. When its spatial dimensions are confined below a certain limit, its optical properties change dramatically. It transforms from an indirect bandgap material that does not absorb or emit light efficiently into one which can emit visible light at room temperatures. Although much work has been conducted in understanding the properties of nanostructured Si, in particular porous Si surfaces, a clear understanding of the origin of photoluminescence has not yet been produced. Typical synthesis approaches used to produce nanostructured Si, in particular porous Si and nanocrystalline Si have involved complex preparations used at high temperatures, pressures, or currents. The purpose of this thesis is to develop an easier synthesis approach to produce nanostructured Si as well as arrive at a clearer understanding of the origin of photoluminescence in these systems. We used a simple chemical etching technique followed by sonication to produce nanostructured Si suspensions. The etching process involved producing pores on the surface of a Si substrate in a solution containing hydrofluoric acid and an oxidant. Nanocrystalline Si as well as nanoscale amorphous porous Si suspensions were successfully synthesized using this process. We probed into the phase, composition, and origin of photoluminescence in these materials, through the use of several characterization techniques. TEM and SEM were used to determine morphology and phase. FT-IR and XPS were employed to study chemical compositions, and steady state and time resolved optical spectroscopy techniques were applied to resolve their photoluminescent properties. Our work has revealed that the type of oxidant utilized during etching had a significant impact on the final product. When using nitric acid as the oxidant, we formed nanocrystalline Si suspensions composed of

  6. Tuning the Color of Silicon Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Linyou

    2010-07-14

    Empowering silicon (Si) with optical functions constitutes a very important challenge in photonics. The scalable fabrication capabilities for this earth-abundant, environmentally friendly material are unmatched in sophistication and can be unleashed to realize a plethora of high-performance photonic functionalities that find application in information, bio-, display, camouflage, ornamental, and energy technologies. Nanofashioning represents a general strategy to turn Si into a useful optical material and Si structures have already been engineered to enable light emission, optical cloaking, waveguiding, nonlinear optics, enhanced light absorption, and sensing. Here, we demonstrate that a wide spectrum of colors can be generated by harnessing the strong resonant light scattering properties of Si nanostructures under white light illumination. The ability to engineer such colors in a predetermined fashion through a choice of the structure size, dielectric environment, and illumination conditions opens up entirely new applications of Si and puts this material in a new light. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. Superhydrophobic SERS substrates based on silicon hierarchical nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuexian; Wen, Jinxiu; Zhou, Jianhua; Zheng, Zebo; An, Di; Wang, Hao; Xie, Weiguang; Zhan, Runze; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Chen, Huanjun; Deng, Shaozhi

    2018-02-01

    Silicon nanostructures have been cultivated as promising surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates in terms of their low-loss optical resonance modes, facile functionalization, and compatibility with today’s state-of-the-art CMOS techniques. However, unlike their plasmonic counterparts, the electromagnetic field enhancements induced by silicon nanostructures are relatively small, which restrict their SERS sensing limit to around 10-7 M. To tackle this problem, we propose here a strategy for improving the SERS performance of silicon nanostructures by constructing silicon hierarchical nanostructures with a superhydrophobic surface. The hierarchical nanostructures are binary structures consisted of silicon nanowires (NWs) grown on micropyramids (MPs). After being modified with perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOT), the nanostructure surface shows a stable superhydrophobicity with a high contact angle of ˜160°. The substrate can allow for concentrating diluted analyte solutions into a specific area during the evaporation of the liquid droplet, whereby the analytes are aggregated into a small volume and can be easily detected by the silicon nanostructure SERS substrate. The analyte molecules (methylene blue: MB) enriched from an aqueous solution lower than 10-8 M can be readily detected. Such a detection limit is ˜100-fold lower than the conventional SERS substrates made of silicon nanostructures. Additionally, the detection limit can be further improved by functionalizing gold nanoparticles onto silicon hierarchical nanostructures, whereby the superhydrophobic characteristics and plasmonic field enhancements can be combined synergistically to give a detection limit down to ˜10-11 M. A gold nanoparticle-functionalized superhydrophobic substrate was employed to detect the spiked melamine in liquid milk. The results showed that the detection limit can be as low as 10-5 M, highlighting the potential of the proposed superhydrophobic SERS substrate in

  8. Directional Etching of Silicon by Silver Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2011-02-01

    We report directional etching of nanostructures (nanochannels and nanotrenches) into the Si(100) substrates in aqueous HF and H2O2 solution by lithographically defined Ag patterns (nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanorings). The Effect of Ag/Si interface oxide on the directional etching has been studied by etching Ag/SiOx/Si samples of known interface oxide thickness. Based on high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging and TEM-energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra of the Ag/Si interfaces, we propose that maintenance of the sub-nanometer oxide at the Ag/Si interfaces and Ag-Si interaction are the key factors which regulate the directional etching of Si.

  9. Plasma-made silicon nanograss and related nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Jiann; Ravipati, Srikanth; Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2011-01-01

    Plasma-made nanostructures show outstanding potential for applications in nanotechnology. This paper provides a concise overview on the progress of plasma-based synthesis and applications of silicon nanograss and related nanostructures. The materials described here include black silicon, Si nanotips produced using a self-masking technique as well as self-organized silicon nanocones and nanograss. The distinctive features of the Si nanograss, two-tier hierarchical and tilted nanograss structures are discussed. Specific applications based on the unique features of the silicon nanograss are also presented.

  10. Radiation effects in bulk and nanostructured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrom, E.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding radiation effects in silicon (Si) is of great technological importance. The material, being the basis of modern semiconductor electronics and photonics, is subjected to radiation already at the processing stage, and in many applications throughout the lifetime of the manufactured component. Despite decades of research, many fundamental questions on the subject are still not satisfactorily answered, and new ones arise constantly as device fabrication shifts towards the nanoscale. In this study, methods of computational physics are harnessed to tackle basic questions on the radiation response of bulk and nanostructured Si systems, as well as to explain atomic-scale phenomena underlying existing experimental results. Empirical potentials and quantum mechanical models are coupled with molecular dynamics simulations to model the response of Si to irradiation and to characterize the created crystal damage. The threshold displacement energy, i.e., the smallest recoil energy required to create a lattice defect, is determined in Si bulk and nanowires, in the latter system also as a function of mechanical strain. It is found that commonly used values for this quantity are drastically underestimated. Strain on the nanowire causes the threshold energy to drop, with an effect on defect production that is significantly higher than in an another nanostructure with similar dimensions, the carbon nanotube. Simulating ion irradiation of Si nanowires reveals that the large surface area to volume ratio of the nanostructure causes up to a three-fold enhancement in defect production as compared to bulk Si. Amorphous defect clusters created by energetic neutron bombardment are predicted, on the basis of their electronic structure and abundance, to cause a deleterious phenomenon called type inversion in Si strip detectors in high-energy physics experiments. The thinning of Si lamellae using a focused ion beam is studied in conjunction with experiment to unravel the cause for

  11. Temperature-feedback direct laser reshaping of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouassa, M.; Mitsai, E.; Syubaev, S.; Pavlov, D.; Zhizhchenko, A.; Jadli, I.; Hassayoun, L.; Zograf, G.; Makarov, S.; Kuchmizhak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Direct laser reshaping of nanostructures is a cost-effective and fast approach to create or tune various designs for nanophotonics. However, the narrow range of required laser parameters along with the lack of in-situ temperature control during the nanostructure reshaping process limits its reproducibility and performance. Here, we present an approach for direct laser nanostructure reshaping with simultaneous temperature control. We employ thermally sensitive Raman spectroscopy during local laser melting of silicon pillar arrays prepared by self-assembly microsphere lithography. Our approach allows establishing the reshaping threshold of an individual nanostructure, resulting in clean laser processing without overheating of the surrounding area.

  12. Secondary electron emission in nanostructured porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruano, G D; Ferron, J; Koropecki, R R, E-mail: gdruano@ceride.gov.a [INTEC-UNL-CONICET, Gueemes 3450 - 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    We studied the reversible reduction induced by ion bombardment of the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield. This effect has been modelled as due to changes in dynamically sustained dipoles related with ions and electrons penetration ranges. Such charge configuration precludes the escape of electrons from the nanoporous silicon, making the SEE dependent on the flux of impinging ions. Since this dipolar momentum depends on the electric conduction of the porous medium, by controlled oxidation of the nanoporous structure we change the conduction features of the sample, studying the impact on the SEE reduction effect. Li ion bombardment was also used with the intention of changing the parameters determining the effect. FT-IR and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to characterize the oxidation degree of the samples at different depth scales

  13. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  14. Controlling the flow of light with silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W

    2010-01-01

    Silicon is an important material for integrated photonics applications. High refractive index and transparency in the infrared region makes it an ideal platform to implement nanostructures for novel optical devices. We fabricated silicon photonic crystals and experimentally demonstrated negative refraction and self-collimation. We also used heterodyne near-field scanning optical microscope to directly visualize the anomalous wavefronts. When the periodicity is much smaller than wavelength, silicon photonic crystal can be described by the effective medium theory. By engineering effective refractive index with silicon nanorod size, we demonstrated an all-dielectric cloak structure which can hide objects in front of a highly reflecting plane. The work discussed in this review shows the powerful design flexibility and versatility of silicon nanostructures

  15. Investigation of the phase formation from nickel coated nanostructured silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilyaeva, Yulia I.; Pyatilova, Olga V.; Berezkina, Alexandra Yu.; Sysa, Artem V.; Dudin, Alexander A.; Smirnov, Dmitry I.; Gavrilov, Sergey A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of the conditions of chemical and electrochemical nickel plating of nanostructured silicon and subsequent heat treatment on the phase composition of Si/Ni structures with advanced interface is studied. Nanostructured silicon formed by chemical and electrochemical etching was used for the formation of a developed interphase surface. The resulting Si/Ni samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray phase analysis. The experiments have revealed the differences in phase composition of the Si/Ni structures obtained by different methods, both before and after heat treatment.

  16. The fabrication of nitrogen detector porous silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husairi, F. S.; Othman, N.; Eswar, K. A.; Guliling, Muliyadi; Khusaimi, Z.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2018-05-01

    In this study the porous silicon nanostructure used as a the nitrogen detector was fabricated by using anodization method because of simple and easy to handle. This method using 20 mA/ cm2 of current density and the etching time is from 10 - 40 minutes. The properties of the porous silicon nanostructure analyzed using I-V testing (electrical properties) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. From the I-V testing, sample PsiE40 where the sensitivity is 25.4% is a sensitivity of PSiE40 at 10 seconds exposure time.

  17. Directed spatial organization of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Julia [Albuquerque, NM; Liu, Jun [Richland, WA

    2009-02-17

    A method for controllably forming zinc oxide nanostructures on a surface via an organic template, which is formed using a stamp prepared from pre-defined relief structures, inking the stamp with a solution comprising self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules, contacting the stamp to the surface, such as Ag sputtered on Si, and immersing the surface with the patterned SAM molecules with a zinc-containing solution with pH control to form zinc oxide nanostructures on the bare Ag surface.

  18. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.; Flemban, Tahani H.

    2016-01-01

    ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc

  19. Characterization of nanostructured CuO-porous silicon matrixformed on copper coated silicon substrate via electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naddaf, M.; Mrad, O.; Al-Zier, A.

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed anodic etching method has been utilized for nanostructuring of a copper-coated p-type (100) silicon substrate, using HF-based solution as electrolyte. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the formation of a nanostructured matrix that consists of island-like textures with nanosize grains grown onto fiber-like columnar structures separated with etch pits of grooved porous structures. Spatial micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates that the island-like texture is composed of single-phase cupric oxide (CuO) nanocrystals, while the grooved porous structure is barely related to formation of porous silicon (PS). X-ray diffraction shows that both the grown CuO nanostructures and the etched silicon layer have the same preferred (220) orientation. Chemical composition obtained by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis confirms the presence of the single-phase CuO on the surface of the patterned CuO-PS matrix. As compared to PS formed on the bare silicon substrate, the room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) from the CuO-PS matrix exhibits an additional weak (blue) PL band as well as a blue shift in the PL band of PS (S-band). This has been revealed from XPS analysis to be associated with the enhancement in the SiO2 content as well as formation of the carbonyl group on the surface in the case of the CuO-PS matrix.(author)

  20. Characterization of nanostructured CuO-porous silicon matrix formed on copper-coated silicon substrate via electrochemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, M.; Mrad, O.; Al-zier, A.

    2014-06-01

    A pulsed anodic etching method has been utilized for nanostructuring of a copper-coated p-type (100) silicon substrate, using HF-based solution as electrolyte. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the formation of a nanostructured matrix that consists of island-like textures with nanosize grains grown onto fiber-like columnar structures separated with etch pits of grooved porous structures. Spatial micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates that the island-like texture is composed of single-phase cupric oxide (CuO) nanocrystals, while the grooved porous structure is barely related to formation of porous silicon (PS). X-ray diffraction shows that both the grown CuO nanostructures and the etched silicon layer have the same preferred (220) orientation. Chemical composition obtained by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis confirms the presence of the single-phase CuO on the surface of the patterned CuO-PS matrix. As compared to PS formed on the bare silicon substrate, the room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) from the CuO-PS matrix exhibits an additional weak `blue' PL band as well as a blue shift in the PL band of PS (S-band). This has been revealed from XPS analysis to be associated with the enhancement in the SiO2 content as well as formation of the carbonyl group on the surface in the case of the CuO-PS matrix.

  1. Silicon nanostructures for third generation photovoltaic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin; Corkish, Richard; Cho, Young; Cho, Eun-Chel; Jiang, Chu-Wei; Fangsuwannarak, Thipwan; Pink, Edwin; Huang, Yidan; Puzzer, Tom; Trupke, Thorsten; Richards, Bryce; Shalav, Avi; Lin, Kuo-lung

    2006-01-01

    The concept of third generation photovoltaics is to significantly increase device efficiencies whilst still using thin film processes and abundant non-toxic materials. This can be achieved by circumventing the Shockley-Queisser limit for single band gap devices, using multiple energy threshold approaches. At University of NSW, as part of our work on Third Generation devices, we are using the energy confinement of silicon based quantum dot nanostructures to engineer wide band gap materials to be used as upper cell elements in Si based tandem cells. HRTEM data shows Si nanocrystal formation in oxide and nitride matrixes with a controlled nanocrystal size, grown by layered reactive sputtering and layered PECVD. Photoluminescence evidence for quantum confinement in the Si quantum dots in oxide agrees with the calculated increase in PL energy with reduction in dot size. Resistivity measurements with temperature give tentative proof of conduction and we are investigating junction formation in these materials. We are also using similar Si quantum dot structures in double barrier resonant tunneling structures for use in hot carrier solar cell contacts. These must collect carriers over a limited energy range. Negative differential resistance has been observed in room temperature I-V on these samples, a necessary proof of concept for selective energy filter contacts

  2. Optical nano artifact metrics using silicon random nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Naoki; Nishio, Shumpei; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Tate, Naoya; Naruse, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    Nano-artifact metrics exploit unique physical attributes of nanostructured matter for authentication and clone resistance, which is vitally important in the age of Internet-of-Things where securing identities is critical. However, expensive and huge experimental apparatuses, such as scanning electron microscopy, have been required in the former studies. Herein, we demonstrate an optical approach to characterise the nanoscale-precision signatures of silicon random structures towards realising low-cost and high-value information security technology. Unique and versatile silicon nanostructures are generated via resist collapse phenomena, which contains dimensions that are well below the diffraction limit of light. We exploit the nanoscale precision ability of confocal laser microscopy in the height dimension; our experimental results demonstrate that the vertical precision of measurement is essential in satisfying the performances required for artifact metrics. Furthermore, by using state-of-the-art nanostructuring technology, we experimentally fabricate clones from the genuine devices. We demonstrate that the statistical properties of the genuine and clone devices are successfully exploited, showing that the liveness-detection-type approach, which is widely deployed in biometrics, is valid in artificially-constructed solid-state nanostructures. These findings pave the way for reasonable and yet sufficiently secure novel principles for information security based on silicon random nanostructures and optical technologies.

  3. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2016-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses the issues of sensitivity, concentration, and temperature dependency as well as the response and recovery times crucial for sensors. He also presents techniques for synthesizing different metal oxides, particularly those with nanodimensional structures. The text goes on to highlight the gas sensing properties of many nanostructured metal oxides, from aluminum and cerium to iron and titanium to zinc and zirconium. The final...

  4. Simple Approach to Superamphiphobic Overhanging Silicon Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with contact angles up to 152 degrees and roll-off angle down to 8 degrees. Such nonlithographic nanoscale overhanging Structures can also be added to silicon nanograss by deposition of a thin SiO2 layer, which equips the silicon rods with 100-300 nm sized overhanging Structures. This is a simple, fast...

  5. Phosphorous Doping of Nanostructured Crystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Steckel, André

    Nano-textured silicon, known as black silicon (bSi), is attractive with excellent photon trapping properties. bSi can be produced using simple one-step fabrication reactive ion etching (RIE) technique. However, in order to use bSi in photovoltaics doping process should be developed. Due to high s...

  6. Silicon nanostructures produced by laser direct etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Dirac, Paul Andreas Holger; Petersen, Jon Wulff

    1995-01-01

    A laser direct-write process has been applied to structure silicon on a nanometer scale. In this process, a silicon substrate, placed in a chlorine ambience, is locally heated above its melting point by a continuous-wave laser and translated by high-resolution direct-current motor stages. Only...

  7. Characterization of Urea Versus hmta in the Preparation of Zinc Oxide NANOSTRUCTURES by Catalytic Immersion Method Grown on Gold-seeded Silicon Substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azlinda Abdul Aziz; Khusaimi, Z.; Rusop, M.

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nano structured prepared by immersed method were successfully grown on gold-seeded silicon substrate using Zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O) as a precursor was stabilized by a non-toxic urea (CH 4 N 2 O) in a ratio of 1:2 and 1:1 ratio of hexamethylene tetraamine (HMTA). The effect of changing the stabilizer of ZnO solution on the crystal structure, morphology and photoluminescence properties of the resultant ZnO is investigated. X-ray diffraction of the synthesized ZnO shows hexagonal zincite structure. The morphology of the ZnO was characterizing using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The growth of ZnO using urea as stabilizer shows the clusters of ZnO nano flower with serrated broad petals and sharp tips of approximately 25 nm were interestingly formed. ZnO in HMTA showed growth of nano rods. The structures has high surface area, is a potential metal oxide nano structures to be develop for optoelectronic devices and chemical sensors. The formation of ZnO nano structures is found to be significantly affected by the stabilizer. (author)

  8. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  9. Condensation on Superhydrophobic Copper Oxide Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Dou, Nicholas; Nam, Youngsuk; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-01-01

    Condensation is an important process in both emerging and traditional power generation and water desalination technologies. Superhydrophobic nanostructures promise enhanced condensation heat transfer by reducing the characteristic size of departing droplets via a surface-tension-driven mechanism [1]. In this work, we investigated a scalable synthesis technique to produce oxide nanostructures on copper surfaces capable of sustaining superhydrophobic condensation and characterized the growth an...

  10. Electroluminescence from Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The EL and PL intensities occurs at the same energy; however, the EL intensity has sharp Gaussian sub peaks and red shifted compared to the PL intensity. To get our result, we used the idea of quantum confinement model (QCM), that can explain PL and EL on pure Si nanostructures and Si-terminated with impurities.

  11. Novel silicon phases and nanostructures for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wippermann, Stefan; He, Yuping; Vörös, Márton; Galli, Giulia

    2016-12-01

    Silicon exhibits a large variety of different bulk phases, allotropes, and composite structures, such as, e.g., clathrates or nanostructures, at both higher and lower densities compared with diamond-like Si-I. New Si structures continue to be discovered. These novel forms of Si offer exciting prospects to create Si based materials, which are non-toxic and earth-abundant, with properties tailored precisely towards specific applications. We illustrate how such novel Si based materials either in the bulk or as nanostructures may be used to significantly improve the efficiency of solar energy conversion devices.

  12. A Lithium-Ion Battery using a 3 D-Array Nanostructured Graphene-Sulfur Cathode and a Silicon Oxide-Based Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Almudena; Di Lecce, Daniele; Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Caballero, Álvaro; Morales, Julián; Hassoun, Jusef

    2018-05-09

    An efficient lithium-ion battery was assembled by using an enhanced sulfur-based cathode and a silicon oxide-based anode and proposed as an innovative energy-storage system. The sulfur-carbon composite, which exploits graphene carbon with a 3 D array (3DG-S), was synthesized by a reduction step through a microwave-assisted solvothermal technique and was fully characterized in terms of structure and morphology, thereby revealing suitable features for lithium-cell application. Electrochemical tests of the 3DG-S electrode in a lithium half-cell indicated a capacity ranging from 1200 to 1000 mAh g -1 at currents of C/10 and 1 C, respectively. Remarkably, the Li-alloyed anode, namely, Li y SiO x -C prepared by the sol-gel method and lithiated by surface treatment, showed suitable performance in a lithium half-cell by using an electrolyte designed for lithium-sulfur batteries. The Li y SiO x -C/3DG-S battery was found to exhibit very promising properties with a capacity of approximately 460 mAh g S -1 delivered at an average voltage of approximately 1.5 V over 200 cycles, suggesting that the characterized materials would be suitable candidates for low-cost and high-energy-storage applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The structural properties of flower-like ZnO nanostructures on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswar, Kevin Alvin; Suhaimi, Mohd Husairi Fadzillah; Guliling, Muliyadi; Mohamad, Maryam; Khusaimi, Zuraida; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, Saifollah

    2018-05-01

    The flower-like zinc oxide (ZnO) were successfully synthesized on porous silicon (PSi) via hydrothermal method. The characteristic of ZnO nanostructures was investigated using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (X-Ray). The FESEM images show the flower-like ZnO nanostructures composed ZnO nanoparticles. The X-ray diffraction shows that strong intensity of (100), (002) and (101) peaks. The structural analysis revealed that the peaks angles were shifted due to the stress or imperfection of the crystalline of ZnO nanostructures. The crystalline sizes in range of 42.60 to 54.09 nm were produced.

  14. Computational modeling of geometry dependent phonon transport in silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Drew A.

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that thermal properties of semiconductor nanostructures depend on nanostructure boundary geometry. Phonons are quantized mechanical vibrations that are the dominant carrier of heat in semiconductor materials and their aggregate behavior determine a nanostructure's thermal performance. Phonon-geometry scattering processes as well as waveguiding effects which result from coherent phonon interference are responsible for the shape dependence of thermal transport in these systems. Nanoscale phonon-geometry interactions provide a mechanism by which nanostructure geometry may be used to create materials with targeted thermal properties. However, the ability to manipulate material thermal properties via controlling nanostructure geometry is contingent upon first obtaining increased theoretical understanding of fundamental geometry induced phonon scattering processes and having robust analytical and computational models capable of exploring the nanostructure design space, simulating the phonon scattering events, and linking the behavior of individual phonon modes to overall thermal behavior. The overall goal of this research is to predict and analyze the effect of nanostructure geometry on thermal transport. To this end, a harmonic lattice-dynamics based atomistic computational modeling tool was created to calculate phonon spectra and modal phonon transmission coefficients in geometrically irregular nanostructures. The computational tool is used to evaluate the accuracy and regimes of applicability of alternative computational techniques based upon continuum elastic wave theory. The model is also used to investigate phonon transmission and thermal conductance in diameter modulated silicon nanowires. Motivated by the complexity of the transmission results, a simplified model based upon long wavelength beam theory was derived and helps explain geometry induced phonon scattering of low frequency nanowire phonon modes.

  15. Silicon nanostructures for photonics and photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priolo, F.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Galli, M.; Krauss, T.F.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon has long been established as the material of choice for the microelectronics industry. This is not yet true in photonics, where the limited degrees of freedom in material design combined with the indirect bandgap are a major constraint. Recent developments, especially those enabled by

  16. Selective hierarchical patterning of silicon nanostructures via soft nanostencil lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke; Ding, Junjun; Wathuthanthri, Ishan; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2017-11-17

    It is challenging to hierarchically pattern high-aspect-ratio nanostructures on microstructures using conventional lithographic techniques, where photoresist (PR) film is not able to uniformly cover on the microstructures as the aspect ratio increases. Such non-uniformity causes poor definition of nanopatterns over the microstructures. Nanostencil lithography can provide an alternative means to hierarchically construct nanostructures on microstructures via direct deposition or plasma etching through a free-standing nanoporous membrane. In this work, we demonstrate the multiscale hierarchical fabrication of high-aspect-ratio nanostructures on microstructures of silicon using a free-standing nanostencil, which is a nanoporous membrane consisting of metal (Cr), PR, and anti-reflective coating. The nanostencil membrane is used as a deposition mask to define Cr nanodot patterns on the predefined silicon microstructures. Then, deep reactive ion etching is used to hierarchically create nanostructures on the microstructures using the Cr nanodots as an etch mask. With simple modification of the main fabrication processes, high-aspect-ratio nanopillars are selectively defined only on top of the microstructures, on bottom, or on both top and bottom.

  17. Nanostructured silicon anodes for lithium ion rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teki, Ranganath; Datta, Moni K; Krishnan, Rahul; Parker, Thomas C; Lu, Toh-Ming; Kumta, Prashant N; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are integral to today's information-rich, mobile society. Currently they are one of the most popular types of battery used in portable electronics because of their high energy density and flexible design. Despite their increasing use at the present time, there is great continued commercial interest in developing new and improved electrode materials for lithium ion batteries that would lead to dramatically higher energy capacity and longer cycle life. Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials because it has the highest known theoretical charge capacity and is the second most abundant element on earth. However, silicon anodes have limited applications because of the huge volume change associated with the insertion and extraction of lithium. This causes cracking and pulverization of the anode, which leads to a loss of electrical contact and eventual fading of capacity. Nanostructured silicon anodes, as compared to the previously tested silicon film anodes, can help overcome the above issues. As arrays of silicon nanowires or nanorods, which help accommodate the volume changes, or as nanoscale compliant layers, which increase the stress resilience of silicon films, nanoengineered silicon anodes show potential to enable a new generation of lithium ion batteries with significantly higher reversible charge capacity and longer cycle life.

  18. Silicon diatom frustules as nanostructured photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Sweetman, Martin J; Kant, Krishna; Skinner, William; Losic, Dusan; Nann, Thomas; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-09-18

    In the quest for solutions to meeting future energy demands, solar fuels play an important role. A particularly promising example is photocatalysis since even incremental improvements in performance in this process are bound to translate into significant cost benefits. Here, we report that semiconducting and high surface area 3D silicon replicas prepared from abundantly available diatom fossils sustain photocurrents and enable solar energy conversion.

  19. Ordered silicon nanostructures for silicon-based photonics devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojtík, A.; Valenta, J.; Pelant, Ivan; Kálal, M.; Fiala, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 5, Suppl. (2007), S250-S253 ISSN 1671-7694 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010316 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ME 933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : nanocrystals * silicon * self-assembled monolayers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  20. Silicon-germanium (Sige) nanostructures production, properties and applications in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Usami, N

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) provides the prospect of novel and enhanced electronic device performance. This book reviews the materials science and technology of SiGe nanostructures, including crystal growth, fabrication of nanostructures, material properties and applications in electronics.$bNanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) opens up the prospects of novel and enhanced electronic device performance, especially for semiconductor devices. Silicon-germanium (SiGe) nanostructures reviews the materials science of nanostructures and their properties and applications in different electronic devices. The introductory part one covers the structural properties of SiGe nanostructures, with a further chapter discussing electronic band structures of SiGe alloys. Part two concentrates on the formation of SiGe nanostructures, with chapters on different methods of crystal growth such as molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapour deposition. This part also includes chapters covering strain engineering and mo...

  1. Simulation of atomistic processes during silicon oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Bongiorno, Angelo

    2003-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) films grown on silicon monocrystal (Si) substrates form the gate oxides in current Si-based microelectronics devices. The understanding at the atomic scale of both the silicon oxidation process and the properties of the Si(100)-SiO2 interface is of significant importance in state-of-the-art silicon microelectronics manufacturing. These two topics are intimately coupled and are both addressed in this theoretical investigation mainly through first-principles calculations....

  2. Homoepitaxial Nanostructures of Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Plakhova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The homoepitaxial ZnO nanostructures (HENS were obtained on different substrates using various techniques. The first type of homoepitaxial ZnO nanorod arrays was grown on Si or ITO substrates by using two alternative sequences: (a seeding → growth from solution → growth from vapor and contrariwise (b seeding → growth from vapor → growth from solution. As follows from transport and cathode luminescence measurements homoepitaxial growth allows enhancing electrical or luminescence properties. The second type of HENS was prepared by growth of vertically or horizontally oriented ZnO nanorod arrays depending on monocrystalline ZnO wafers with [0001] and [10-10] orientation. In all cases the growth occurs along the c-axis of fast growth.

  3. Composite silicon nanostructure arrays fabricated on optical fibre by chemical etching of multicrystal silicon film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Zewen; Zhu, Kai; Ning, Lixin; Cui, Guanglei; Qu, Jun; Huang, Wanxia; Shi, Yi; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Integrating nanostructures onto optical fibers presents a promising strategy for developing new-fashioned devices and extending the scope of nanodevices’ applications. Here we report the first fabrication of a composite silicon nanostructure on an optical fiber. Through direct chemical etching using an H 2 O 2 /HF solution, multicrystal silicon films with columnar microstructures are etched into a vertically aligned, inverted-cone-like nanorod array embedded in a nanocone array. A faster dissolution rate of the silicon at the void-rich boundary regions between the columns is found to be responsible for the separation of the columns, and thus the formation of the nanostructure array. The morphology of the nanorods primarily depends on the microstructure of the columns in the film. Through controlling the microstructure of the as-grown film and the etching parameters, the structural control of the nanostructure is promising. This fabrication method can be extended to a larger length scale, and it even allows roll-to-roll processing. (paper)

  4. Composite silicon nanostructure arrays fabricated on optical fibre by chemical etching of multicrystal silicon film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zewen; Zhu, Kai; Ning, Lixin; Cui, Guanglei; Qu, Jun; Huang, Wanxia; Shi, Yi; Liu, Hong

    2015-04-17

    Integrating nanostructures onto optical fibers presents a promising strategy for developing new-fashioned devices and extending the scope of nanodevices' applications. Here we report the first fabrication of a composite silicon nanostructure on an optical fiber. Through direct chemical etching using an H2O2/HF solution, multicrystal silicon films with columnar microstructures are etched into a vertically aligned, inverted-cone-like nanorod array embedded in a nanocone array. A faster dissolution rate of the silicon at the void-rich boundary regions between the columns is found to be responsible for the separation of the columns, and thus the formation of the nanostructure array. The morphology of the nanorods primarily depends on the microstructure of the columns in the film. Through controlling the microstructure of the as-grown film and the etching parameters, the structural control of the nanostructure is promising. This fabrication method can be extended to a larger length scale, and it even allows roll-to-roll processing.

  5. Selective Oxidations using Nanostructured Heterogeneous Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen

    and because they produce H2O as the only by-product. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction to basic concepts in heterogeneous catalysis and green chemistry. Furthermore, the chapter gives an overview of the most important strategies to synthesise functional nanostructured materials and highlights how detailed......The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop new efficient methods to oxidise alcohols and amines using heterogeneous catalysts and either O2 or H2O2 as oxidants. From an economic and environmental point of view, these oxidants are ideal, because they are cheap and readily available...... understanding of size, shape and structure can help in the development of new and more efficient heterogeneous catalysts. The chapter is not intended to give a complete survey, but rather to introduce some of the recent developments in the synthesis of nanostructured heterogeneous catalysts. Finally...

  6. Impedance analysis of nanostructured iridium oxide electrocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunde, Svein; Lervik, Ingrid Anne; Tsypkin, Mikhail; Owe, Lars-Erik

    2010-01-01

    Impedance data were collected for nanostructured iridium oxide (NIROF) at potentials below those at which the oxygen evolution reaction commences. The measurements included thin oxide films covered by a protective Nafion TM layer and thicker composite Nafion TM -oxide electrodes. The time constants for the low-frequency diffusion process were approximately the same for both types of electrodes, indicating diffusion in individual particles in the porous electrode rather than across the film. The diffusion process involves trapping of the diffusion species. The impedance data indicated that there were no significant variations in conductivity of the oxides with potential, as opposed to what appears to be the case for anodically formed iridium oxide films (AIROF). This is interpreted to reflect differences in electronic structure between NIROF and AIROF.

  7. Lifetime of ALD Al2O3 Passivated Black Silicon Nanostructured for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nano-structures with excellent light trapping properties. However, most recent RIE techniques for black silicon nano-structuring have one very important limitation for PV applications...

  8. Ion induced segregation in gold nanostructured thin films on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satyam, P.V.

    2008-01-01

    We report a direct observation of segregation of gold atoms to the near surface regime due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion impact on isolated gold nanostructures deposited on silicon. Irradiation at fluences of 6 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 14 and 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 at a high beam flux of 6.3 x 10 12 ions cm -2 s -1 show a maximum transported distance of gold atoms into the silicon substrate to be 60, 45 and 23 nm, respectively. At a lower fluence (6 x 10 13 ions cm -2 ) transport has been found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide (Au 5 Si 2 ). At a high fluence value of 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 , disassociation of gold silicide and out-diffusion lead to the segregation of gold to defect - rich surface and interface regions.

  9. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  10. Photoluminescence and electrical properties of silicon oxide and silicon nitride superlattices containing silicon nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuleiko, D V; Ilin, A S

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence and electrical properties of superlattices with thin (1 to 5 nm) alternating silicon-rich silicon oxide or silicon-rich silicon nitride, and silicon oxide or silicon nitride layers containing silicon nanocrystals prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with subsequent annealing were investigated. The entirely silicon oxide based superlattices demonstrated photoluminescence peak shift due to quantum confinement effect. Electrical measurements showed the hysteresis effect in the vicinity of zero voltage due to structural features of the superlattices from SiOa 93 /Si 3 N 4 and SiN 0 . 8 /Si 3 N 4 layers. The entirely silicon nitride based samples demonstrated resistive switching effect, comprising an abrupt conductivity change at about 5 to 6 V with current-voltage characteristic hysteresis. The samples also demonstrated efficient photoluminescence with maximum at ∼1.4 eV, due to exiton recombination in silicon nanocrystals. (paper)

  11. Nanostructured Porous Silicon Photonic Crystal for Applications in the Infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Recio-Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades great interest has been devoted to photonic crystals aiming at the creation of novel devices which can control light propagation. In the present work, two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D devices based on nanostructured porous silicon have been fabricated. 2D devices consist of a square mesh of 2 μm wide porous silicon veins, leaving 5×5 μm square air holes. 3D structures share the same design although multilayer porous silicon veins are used instead, providing an additional degree of modulation. These devices are fabricated from porous silicon single layers (for 2D structures or multilayers (for 3D structures, opening air holes in them by means of 1 KeV argon ion bombardment through the appropriate copper grids. For 2D structures, a complete photonic band gap for TE polarization is found in the thermal infrared range. For 3D structures, there are no complete band gaps, although several new partial gaps do exist in different high-symmetry directions. The simulation results suggest that these structures are very promising candidates for the development of low-cost photonic devices for their use in the thermal infrared range.

  12. The silicon-silicon oxide multilayers utilization as intrinsic layer on pin solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colder, H.; Marie, P.; Gourbilleau, F.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanostructures are promising candidate for the intrinsic layer on pin solar cells. In this work we report on new material: silicon-rich silicon oxide (SRSO) deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering of a pure silica target and an interesting structure: multilayers consisting of a stack of SRSO and pure silicon oxide layers. Two thicknesses of the SRSO sublayer, t SRSO , are studied 3 nm and 5 nm whereas the thickness of silica sublayer is maintaining at 3 nm. The presence of nanocrystallites of silicon, evidenced by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), leads to photoluminescence (PL) emission at room temperature due to the quantum confinement of the carriers. The PL peak shifts from 1.3 eV to 1.5 eV is correlated to the decreasing of t SRSO from 5 nm down to 3 nm. In the purpose of their potential utilization for i-layer, the optical properties are studied by absorption spectroscopy. The achievement a such structures at promising absorption properties. Moreover by favouring the carriers injection by the tunnel effect between silicon nanograins and silica sublayers, the multilayers seem to be interesting for solar cells

  13. Reflectance analysis of porosity gradient in nanostructured silicon layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurečka, Stanislav; Imamura, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2017-12-01

    In this work we study optical properties of nanostructured layers formed on silicon surface. Nanostructured layers on Si are formed in order to reach high suppression of the light reflectance. Low spectral reflectance is important for improvement of the conversion efficiency of solar cells and for other optoelectronic applications. Effective method of forming nanostructured layers with ultralow reflectance in a broad interval of wavelengths is in our approach based on metal assisted etching of Si. Si surface immersed in HF and H2O2 solution is etched in contact with the Pt mesh roller and the structure of the mesh is transferred on the etched surface. During this etching procedure the layer density evolves gradually and the spectral reflectance decreases exponentially with the depth in porous layer. We analyzed properties of the layer porosity by incorporating the porosity gradient into construction of the layer spectral reflectance theoretical model. Analyzed layer is splitted into 20 sublayers in our approach. Complex dielectric function in each sublayer is computed by using Bruggeman effective media theory and the theoretical spectral reflectance of modelled multilayer system is computed by using Abeles matrix formalism. Porosity gradient is extracted from the theoretical reflectance model optimized in comparison to the experimental values. Resulting values of the structure porosity development provide important information for optimization of the technological treatment operations.

  14. Mechanism of erosion of nanostructured porous silicon drug carriers in neoplastic tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur-Balter, Adi; Shatsberg, Zohar; Beckerman, Margarita; Segal, Ester; Artzi, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) is emerging as a promising platform for drug delivery owing to its biocompatibility, degradability and high surface area available for drug loading. The ability to control PSi structure, size and porosity enables programming its in vivo retention, providing tight control over embedded drug release kinetics. In this work, the relationship between the in vitro and in vivo degradation of PSi under (pre)clinically relevant conditions, using breast cancer mouse model, is defined. We show that PSi undergoes enhanced degradation in diseased environment compared with healthy state, owing to the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the tumour vicinity that oxidize the silicon scaffold and catalyse its degradation. We further show that PSi degradation in vitro and in vivo correlates in healthy and diseased states when ROS-free or ROS-containing media are used, respectively. Our work demonstrates that understanding the governing mechanisms associated with specific tissue microenvironment permits predictive material performance. PMID:25670235

  15. Nanostructured silicon nitride from wheat and rice husks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qadri, S. B.; Rath, B. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Wollmershauser, J. A.; Feng, C. R. [Materials Science and Component Technology Directorate, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

    2016-04-07

    Nanoparticles, submicron-diameter tubes, and rods of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized from the thermal treatment of wheat and rice husks at temperatures at and above 1300 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The whole pattern Rietveld analysis of the observed diffraction data from treatments at 1300 °C showed the formation of only hexagonal α-phase of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with an R-factor of 1%, whereas samples treated at 1400 °C and above showed both α- and β-phases with an R-factor of 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of tubes, rods, and nanoparticles of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. In a two-step process, where pure SiC was produced first from rice or wheat husk in an argon atmosphere and subsequently treated in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1450 °C, a nanostructured composite material having α- and β-phases of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} combined with cubic phase of SiC was formed. The thermodynamics of the formation of silicon nitride is discussed in terms of the solid state reaction between organic matter (silica content), which is inherently present in the wheat and rice husks, with the nitrogen from the furnace atmosphere. Nanostructures of silicon nitride formed by a single direct reaction or their composites with SiC formed in a two-step process of agricultural byproducts provide an uncomplicated sustainable synthesis route for silicon nitride used in mechanical, biotechnology, and electro-optic nanotechnology applications.

  16. Interfaces and nanostructures of oxide octahedral frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felip eSandiumenge

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, the rich physics exhibited by solid interfaces combining octahedral framework structures of transition metal oxides has fascinated the materials science community. However, the behavior of these materials still elude the current understanding of classical semiconductor and metal epitaxy. The reason for that is rooted in the surprising versatility of linked coordination units to adapt to a dissimilar substrate and the strong sensitivity of correlated oxides to external perturbations. The confluence of atomic control in oxide thin film epitaxy, state of the art high spatial resolution characterization techniques, and electronic structure computations, has allowed in recent years to obtain first insights on the underlying microscopic mechanisms governing the epitaxy of these fascinating materials. Here, we shortly review these mechanisms and highlight their potential in the design of novel nanostructures with enhanced functionalities.

  17. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence in silicon oxide films rich in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman M, D.; Piters, T. M.; Aceves M, M.; Berriel V, L. R.; Luna L, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we determined the fluorescence and thermoluminescence (TL) creation spectra of silicon rich oxide films (SRO) with three different silicon excesses. To study the TL of SRO, 550 nm of SRO film were deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition technique on N-type silicon substrates with resistivity in the order of 3 to 5 Ω-cm with silicon excess controlled by the ratio of the gases used in the process, SRO films with Ro= 10, 20 and 30 (12-6% silicon excess) were obtained. Then, they were thermally treated in N 2 at high temperatures to diffuse and homogenize the silicon excess. In the fluorescence spectra two main emission regions are observed, one around 400 nm and one around 800 nm. TL creation spectra were determined by plotting the integrated TL intensity as function of the excitation wavelength. (Author)

  18. Using silicon nanostructures for the improvement of silicon solar cells' efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, J. de la; Bremond, G.; Lemiti, M.; Guillot, G.; Mur, P.; Buffet, N.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon nanostructures (ns-Si) show interesting optical and electrical properties as a result of the band gap widening caused by quantum confinement effects. Along with their potential utilization for silicon-based light emitters' fabrication, they could also represent an appealing option for the improvement of energy conversion efficiency in silicon-based solar cells whether by using their luminescence properties (photon down-conversion) or the excess photocurrent produced by an improved high-energy photon's absorption. In this work, we report on the morphological and optical studies of non-stoichiometric silica (SiO x ) and silicon nitride (SiN x ) layers containing silicon nanostructures (ns-Si) in view of their application for solar cell's efficiency improvement. The morphological studies of the samples performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) unambiguously show the presence of ns-Si in a crystalline form for high temperature-annealed SiO x layers and for low temperature deposition of SiN x layers. The photoluminescence emission (PL) shows a rather high efficiency in both kind of layers with an intensity of only a factor ∼ 100 lower than that of porous silicon (pi-Si). The photocurrent spectroscopy (PC) shows a significant increase of absorption at high photon energy excitation most probably related to photon absorption within ns-Si quantized states. Moreover, the absorption characteristics obtained from PC spectra show a good agreement with the PL emission states unambiguously demonstrating a same origin, related to Q-confined excitons within ns-Si. Finally, the major asset of this material is the possibility to incorporate it to solar cells manufacturing processing for an insignificant cost

  19. Dielectric properties of DNA oligonucleotides on the surface of silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagraev, N. T., E-mail: bagraev@mail.ioffe.ru [St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Chernev, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Klyachkin, L. E. [St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Malyarenko, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Emel’yanov, A. K.; Dubina, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    Planar silicon nanostructures that are formed as a very narrow silicon quantum well confined by δ barriers heavily doped with boron are used to study the dielectric properties of DNA oligonucleotides deposited onto the surface of the nanostructures. The capacitance characteristics of the silicon nanostructures with oligonucleotides deposited onto their surface are determined by recording the local tunneling current–voltage characteristics by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. The results show the possibility of identifying the local dielectric properties of DNA oligonucleotide segments consisting of repeating G–C pairs. These properties apparently give grounds to correlate the segments with polymer molecules exhibiting the properties of multiferroics.

  20. Polarization dependent nanostructuring of silicon with femtosecond vortex pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Rahimian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated conical nanostructures on silicon with a tip dimension of ∼ 70 nm using a single twisted femtosecond light pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (ℓ=±1. The height of the nano-cone, encircled by a smooth rim, increased from ∼ 350 nm to ∼ 1 μm with the pulse energy and number of pulses, whereas the apex angle remained constant. The nano-cone height was independent of the helicity of the twisted light; however, it is reduced for linear polarization compared to circular at higher pulse energies. Fluid dynamics simulations show nano-cones formation when compressive forces arising from the radial inward motion of the molten material push it perpendicular to the surface and undergo re-solidification. Simultaneously, the radial outward motion of the molten material re-solidifies after reaching the cold boundary to form a rim. Overlapping of two irradiated spots conforms to the fluid dynamics model.

  1. Influence of Surface Chemistry on the Release of an Antibacterial Drug from Nanostructured Porous Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengjia; Hartman, Philip S; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T; Bodiford, Nelli; Coffer, Jeffery L

    2015-06-09

    Nanostructured mesoporous silicon possesses important properties advantageous to drug loading and delivery. For controlled release of the antibacterial drug triclosan, and its associated activity versus Staphylococcus aureus, previous studies investigated the influence of porosity of the silicon matrix. In this work, we focus on the complementary issue of the influence of surface chemistry on such properties, with particular regard to drug loading and release kinetics that can be ideally adjusted by surface modification. Comparison between drug release from as-anodized, hydride-terminated hydrophobic porous silicon and the oxidized hydrophilic counterpart is complicated due to the rapid bioresorption of the former; hence, a hydrophobic interface with long-term biostability is desired, such as can be provided by a relatively long chain octyl moiety. To minimize possible thermal degradation of the surfaces or drug activity during loading of molten drug species, a solution loading method has been investigated. Such studies demonstrate that the ability of porous silicon to act as an effective carrier for sustained delivery of antibacterial agents can be sensitively altered by surface functionalization.

  2. Nanostructured porous silicon: The winding road from photonics to cell scaffolds. A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo eHernandez-Montelongo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available For over 20 years nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS has found a vast number of applications in the broad fields of photonics and optoelectronics, triggered by the discovery of its photoluminescent behavior in 1990. Besides, its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioresorbability make porous silicon (PSi an appealing biomaterial. These properties are largely a consequence of its particular susceptibility to oxidation, leading to the formation of silicon oxide which is readily dissolved by body fluids. This paper reviews the evolution of the applications of PSi and nanoPS from photonics through biophotonics, to their use as cell scaffolds, whether as an implantable substitute biomaterial, mainly for bony and ophthalmological tissues, or as an in-vitro cell conditioning support, especially for pluripotent cells. For any of these applications, PSi/nanoPS can be used directly after synthesis from Si wafers, upon appropriate surface modification processes, or as a composite biomaterial. Unedited studies of fluorescently active PSi structures for cell culture are brought to evidence the margin for new developments.

  3. Nanostructured Porous Silicon: The Winding Road from Photonics to Cell Scaffolds – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Muñoz-Noval, Alvaro; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raul J.; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    For over 20 years, nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) has found a vast number of applications in the broad fields of photonics and optoelectronics, triggered by the discovery of its photoluminescent behavior in 1990. Besides, its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioresorbability make porous silicon (PSi) an appealing biomaterial. These properties are largely a consequence of its particular susceptibility to oxidation, leading to the formation of silicon oxide, which is readily dissolved by body fluids. This paper reviews the evolution of the applications of PSi and nanoPS from photonics through biophotonics, to their use as cell scaffolds, whether as an implantable substitute biomaterial, mainly for bony and ophthalmological tissues, or as an in vitro cell conditioning support, especially for pluripotent cells. For any of these applications, PSi/nanoPS can be used directly after synthesis from Si wafers, upon appropriate surface modification processes, or as a composite biomaterial. Unedited studies of fluorescently active PSi structures for cell culture are brought to evidence the margin for new developments. PMID:26029688

  4. Nanostructured manganese oxide thin films as electrode material for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Lai, Man On; Lu, Li

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, also called supercapacitors, are alternative energy storage devices, particularly for applications requiring high power densities. Recently, manganese oxides have been extensively evaluated as electrode materials for supercapacitors due to their low cost, environmental benignity, and promising supercapacitive performance. In order to maximize the utilization of manganese oxides as the electrode material for the supercapacitors and improve their supercapacitive performance, the nanostructured manganese oxides have therefore been developed. This paper reviews the synthesis of the nanostructured manganese oxide thin films by different methods and the supercapacitive performance of different nanostructures.

  5. Formation of porous silicon oxide from substrate-bound silicon rich silicon oxide layers by continuous-wave laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Fricke-Begemann, Th.; Peretzki, P.; Ihlemann, J.; Seibt, M.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide that show room temperature photoluminescence (PL) have great potential in silicon light emission applications. Nanocrystalline silicon particle formation by laser irradiation has the unique advantage of spatially controlled heating, which is compatible with modern silicon micro-fabrication technology. In this paper, we employ continuous wave laser irradiation to decompose substrate-bound silicon-rich silicon oxide films into crystalline silicon particles and silicon dioxide. The resulting microstructure is studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques with considerable emphasis on the formation and properties of laser damaged regions which typically quench room temperature PL from the nanoparticles. It is shown that such regions consist of an amorphous matrix with a composition similar to silicon dioxide which contains some nanometric silicon particles in addition to pores. A mechanism referred to as "selective silicon ablation" is proposed which consistently explains the experimental observations. Implications for the damage-free laser decomposition of silicon-rich silicon oxides and also for controlled production of porous silicon dioxide films are discussed.

  6. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Yu Yingda

    2012-01-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiO x nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiO x nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiO x nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiO x nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiO x nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiO x nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiO x particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect. (paper)

  7. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Yu, Yingda

    2012-02-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiOx nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiOx nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiOx nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiOx nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiOx nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiOx nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiOx particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect.

  8. Subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Sautter, Ken; Davis, Robert C; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-02-03

    Here we present a straightforward patterning technique for silicon: subsurface oxidation for micropatterning silicon (SOMS). In this method, a stencil mask is placed above a silicon surface. Radio-frequency plasma oxidation of the substrate creates a pattern of thicker oxide in the exposed regions. Etching with HF or KOH produces very shallow or much higher aspect ratio features on silicon, respectively, where patterning is confirmed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The oxidation process itself is studied under a variety of reaction conditions, including higher and lower oxygen pressures (2 and 0.5 Torr), a variety of powers (50-400 W), different times and as a function of reagent purity (99.5 or 99.994% oxygen). SOMS can be easily executed in any normal chemistry laboratory with a plasma generator. Because of its simplicity, it may have industrial viability.

  9. Stain-etched porous silicon nanostructures for multicrystalline silicon-based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rabha, M.; Hajji, M.; Belhadj Mohamed, S.; Hajjaji, A.; Gaidi, M.; Ezzaouia, H.; Bessais, B.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we study the optical, optoelectronic and photoluminescence properties of stain-etched porous silicon nanostructures obtained with different etching times. Special attention is given to the use of the stain-etched PS as an antireflection coating as well as for surface passivating capabilities. The surface morphology has been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The evolution of the Si-O and Si-H absorption bands was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry before and after PS treatment. Results show that stain etching of the silicon surface drops the total reflectivity to about 7% in the 400-1100 nm wavelength range and the minority carrier lifetime enhances to about 48 μs.

  10. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  11. Hierarchical and Size Dependent Mechanical Properties of Silica and Silicon Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Chaniotakis. The physical and mechanical properties of composite cements manufactured with cal- careous and clayey greek diatomite mixtures. Cement and...Hierarchical and size dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae by Andre Phillipe Garcia B.S...dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  12. Polarization dependent femtosecond laser modification of MBE-grown III-V nanostructures on silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Zandbergen, Sander R.; Gibson, Ricky; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Mehravar, Soroush; Keiffer, Patrick; Azarm, Ali; Kieu, Khanh

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel, polarization dependent, femtosecond laser-induced modification of surface nanostructures of indium, gallium, and arsenic grown on silicon via molecular beam epitaxy, yielding shape control from linear and circular polarization of laser excitation. Linear polarization causes an elongation effect, beyond the dimensions of the unexposed nanostructures, ranging from 88 nm to over 1 um, and circular polarization causes the nanostructures to flatten out or form loops of material,...

  13. Printable nanostructured silicon solar cells for high-performance, large-area flexible photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Biswas, Roshni; Li, Weigu; Kang, Dongseok; Chan, Lesley; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-10-28

    Nanostructured forms of crystalline silicon represent an attractive materials building block for photovoltaics due to their potential benefits to significantly reduce the consumption of active materials, relax the requirement of materials purity for high performance, and hence achieve greatly improved levelized cost of energy. Despite successful demonstrations for their concepts over the past decade, however, the practical application of nanostructured silicon solar cells for large-scale implementation has been hampered by many existing challenges associated with the consumption of the entire wafer or expensive source materials, difficulties to precisely control materials properties and doping characteristics, or restrictions on substrate materials and scalability. Here we present a highly integrable materials platform of nanostructured silicon solar cells that can overcome these limitations. Ultrathin silicon solar microcells integrated with engineered photonic nanostructures are fabricated directly from wafer-based source materials in configurations that can lower the materials cost and can be compatible with deterministic assembly procedures to allow programmable, large-scale distribution, unlimited choices of module substrates, as well as lightweight, mechanically compliant constructions. Systematic studies on optical and electrical properties, photovoltaic performance in experiments, as well as numerical modeling elucidate important design rules for nanoscale photon management with ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells and their interconnected, mechanically flexible modules, where we demonstrate 12.4% solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency for printed ultrathin (∼ 8 μm) nanostructured silicon solar cells when configured with near-optimal designs of rear-surface nanoposts, antireflection coating, and back-surface reflector.

  14. Carbon and oxide nanostructures. Synthesis, characterisation and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahya, Noorhana [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia). Dept. of Fundamental and Applied Sciences

    2010-07-01

    This volume covers all aspects of carbon and oxide based nanostructured materials. The topics include synthesis, characterization and application of carbon-based namely carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibres, fullerenes, carbon filled composites etc. In addition, metal oxides namely, ZnO, TiO2, Fe2O3, ferrites, garnets etc., for various applications like sensors, solar cells, transformers, antennas, catalysts, batteries, lubricants, are presented. The book also includes the modeling of oxide and carbon based nanomaterials. The book covers the topics: - Synthesis, characterization and application of carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibres, fullerenes - Synthesis, characterization and application of oxide based nanomaterials. - Nanostructured magnetic and electric materials and their applications. - Nanostructured materials for petro-chemical industry. - Oxide and carbon based thin films for electronics and sustainable energy. - Theory, calculations and modeling of nanostructured materials. (orig.)

  15. Engineered valley-orbit splittings in quantum-confined nanostructures in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahman, R.; Verduijn, J.; Kharche, N.; Lansbergen, G.P.; Klimeck, G.; Hollenberg, L.C.L.; Rogge, S.

    2011-01-01

    An important challenge in silicon quantum electronics in the few electron regime is the potentially small energy gap between the ground and excited orbital states in 3D quantum confined nanostructures due to the multiple valley degeneracies of the conduction band present in silicon. Understanding

  16. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing; Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics

  17. Enhanced light absorption of silicon solar cells with dielectric nanostructured back reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rui; Zhong, Zheng

    2018-06-01

    This paper investigates the light absorption property of nanostructured dielectric reflectors in silicon thin film solar cells using numerical simulation. Flat thin film solar cell with ZnO nanostructured back reflector can produce comparable photocurrent to the control model with Ag nanostructured back reflector. Furthermore, when it is integrated with nano-pillar surface decoration, a photocurrent density of 29.5 mA/cm2 can be achieved, demonstrating a photocurrent enhancement of 5% as compared to the model with Ag nanostructured back reflector.

  18. High-density oxidized porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharbi, Ahmed; Souifi, Abdelkader; Remaki, Boudjemaa; Halimaoui, Aomar; Bensahel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We have studied oxidized porous silicon (OPS) properties using Fourier transform infraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy and capacitance–voltage C–V measurements. We report the first experimental determination of the optimum porosity allowing the elaboration of high-density OPS insulators. This is an important contribution to the research of thick integrated electrical insulators on porous silicon based on an optimized process ensuring dielectric quality (complete oxidation) and mechanical and chemical reliability (no residual pores or silicon crystallites). Through the measurement of the refractive indexes of the porous silicon (PS) layer before and after oxidation, one can determine the structural composition of the OPS material in silicon, air and silica. We have experimentally demonstrated that a porosity approaching 56% of the as-prepared PS layer is required to ensure a complete oxidation of PS without residual silicon crystallites and with minimum porosity. The effective dielectric constant values of OPS materials determined from capacitance–voltage C–V measurements are discussed and compared to FTIR results predictions. (paper)

  19. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, Ekaterina; Urbach, Benayahu; Sa'ar, Amir; Feldman, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric measurements accompanied by infrared absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to investigate the electrical and optical properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). As opposed to non-oxidized PS, only high temperature relaxation processes could be resolved for oxidized PS. Two relaxation processes have been observed. The first process is related to dc-conductivity that dominates at high temperatures and low frequencies. After subtraction of dc-conductivity we could analyse a second high-temperature relaxation process that is related to interface polarization induced by charge carriers trapped at the host matrix-pore interfaces. We found that, while the main effect of the oxidation on the PL appears to be a size reduction in the silicon nanocrystals that gives rise to a blue shift of the PL spectrum, its main contribution to the dielectric properties turns out to be blocking of transport channels in the host tissue and activation of hopping conductivity between silicon nanocrystals

  20. Broadband dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelrod, Ekaterina [Department of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Urbach, Benayahu [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Sa' ar, Amir [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feldman, Yuri [Department of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

    2006-04-07

    Dielectric measurements accompanied by infrared absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to investigate the electrical and optical properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). As opposed to non-oxidized PS, only high temperature relaxation processes could be resolved for oxidized PS. Two relaxation processes have been observed. The first process is related to dc-conductivity that dominates at high temperatures and low frequencies. After subtraction of dc-conductivity we could analyse a second high-temperature relaxation process that is related to interface polarization induced by charge carriers trapped at the host matrix-pore interfaces. We found that, while the main effect of the oxidation on the PL appears to be a size reduction in the silicon nanocrystals that gives rise to a blue shift of the PL spectrum, its main contribution to the dielectric properties turns out to be blocking of transport channels in the host tissue and activation of hopping conductivity between silicon nanocrystals.

  1. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid....... Subsequent thermal oxidation is performed in both dry and wet ambients in the temperature range 950◦C to 1100◦C growing a 205 ± 12 nm thick oxide in the etched mask windows. Lifting of the original oxide near the edge of the mask in the range 6 nm to 37 nm is seen with increased lifting for increasing...

  2. Effects of nanostructurized silicon on proliferation of stem and cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osminkina, L A; Luckyanova, E N; Gongalsky, M B; Kudryavtsev, A A; Gaydarova, A Kh; Poltavtseva, R A; Kashkarov, P K; Timoshenko, V Yu; Sukhikh, G T

    2011-05-01

    In vitro experiments showed that stem and cancer cells retained their viability on the surface of porous silicon with 10-100 nm nanostructures, but their proliferation was inhibited. Silicon nanoparticles of 100 nm in size obtained by mechanical grinding of porous silicon films or crystal silicon plates in a concentration below 1 mg/ml in solution did not modify viability and proliferation of mouse fibroblast and human laryngeal cancer cells. Additional ultrasonic exposure of cancer cells in the presence of 1 mg/ml silicon nanoparticles added to nutrient medium led to complete destruction of cells or to the appearance of membrane defects blocking their proliferation and initiating their apoptotic death.

  3. Silicon-germanium and platinum silicide nanostructures for silicon based photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storozhevykh, M. S.; Dubkov, V. P.; Arapkina, L. V.; Chizh, K. V.; Mironov, S. A.; Chapnin, V. A.; Yuryev, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports a study of two types of silicon based nanostructures prospective for applications in photonics. The first ones are Ge/Si(001) structures forming at room temperature and reconstructing after annealing at 600°C. Germanium, being deposited from a molecular beam at room temperature on the Si(001) surface, forms a thin granular film composed of Ge particles with sizes of a few nanometers. A characteristic feature of these films is that they demonstrate signs of the 2 x 1 structure in their RHEED patterns. After short-term annealing at 600°C under the closed system conditions, the granular films reconstruct to heterostructures consisting of a Ge wetting layer and oval clusters of Ge. A mixed type c(4x2) + p(2x2) reconstruction typical to the low-temperature MBE (Tgr Ge. The other type of the studied nanostructures is based on Pt silicides. This class of materials is one of the friendliest to silicon technology. But as silicide film thickness reaches a few nanometers, low resistivity becomes of primary importance. Pt3Si has the lowest sheet resistance among the Pt silicides. However, the development of a process of thin Pt3Si films formation is a challenging task. This paper describes formation of a thin Pt3Si/Pt2Si structures at room temperature on poly-Si films. Special attention is paid upon formation of poly-Si and amorphous Si films on Si3N4 substrates at low temperatures.

  4. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  5. A highly efficient urea detection using flower-like zinc oxide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Manvi; Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Tomar, Monika, E-mail: monikatomar@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2015-12-01

    A novel matrix based on flower-like zinc oxide nanostructures (ZnONF) has been fabricated using hydrothermal method and exploited successfully for the development of urea biosensor. Urease (Urs) is physically immobilized onto the ZnO nanostructure matrix synthesized over platinized silicon substrate. The surface morphology and crystallographic structure of the as-grown ZnONF have been characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The fabricated amperometric biosensor (Urs/ZnONF/Pt/Ti/Si) exhibits a linear sensing response towards urea over the concentration range 1.65 mM to 16.50 mM with an enhanced sensitivity (~ 132 μA/mM/cm{sup 2}) and a fast response time of 4 s. The relatively low value of Michaelis–Menten constant (K{sub m}) of 0.19 mM confirms the high affinity of the immobilized urease on the nanostructured ZnONF surface towards its analyte (urea). The obtained results demonstrate that flower-like ZnO nanostructures serve as a promising matrix for the realization of efficient amperometric urea biosensor with enhanced response characteristics. - Graphical abstract: The article focuses on the synthesis of flower-like morphology possessing zinc oxide nanostructures and its application towards urea detection with high sensitivity as well as selectivity. - Highlights: • Flower-like ZnO nanostructures based urea biosensor has been fabricated. • Grown ZnO nanostructures offer an advantageous urease immobilization platform owing to its very high surface area. • High sensitivity (~ 132 μA/mM/cm{sup 2}) and low Michaelis–Menten parameter (K{sub m}) value (~ 0.19 mM) were observed.

  6. A highly efficient urea detection using flower-like zinc oxide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tak, Manvi; Gupta, Vinay; Tomar, Monika

    2015-01-01

    A novel matrix based on flower-like zinc oxide nanostructures (ZnONF) has been fabricated using hydrothermal method and exploited successfully for the development of urea biosensor. Urease (Urs) is physically immobilized onto the ZnO nanostructure matrix synthesized over platinized silicon substrate. The surface morphology and crystallographic structure of the as-grown ZnONF have been characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The fabricated amperometric biosensor (Urs/ZnONF/Pt/Ti/Si) exhibits a linear sensing response towards urea over the concentration range 1.65 mM to 16.50 mM with an enhanced sensitivity (~ 132 μA/mM/cm 2 ) and a fast response time of 4 s. The relatively low value of Michaelis–Menten constant (K m ) of 0.19 mM confirms the high affinity of the immobilized urease on the nanostructured ZnONF surface towards its analyte (urea). The obtained results demonstrate that flower-like ZnO nanostructures serve as a promising matrix for the realization of efficient amperometric urea biosensor with enhanced response characteristics. - Graphical abstract: The article focuses on the synthesis of flower-like morphology possessing zinc oxide nanostructures and its application towards urea detection with high sensitivity as well as selectivity. - Highlights: • Flower-like ZnO nanostructures based urea biosensor has been fabricated. • Grown ZnO nanostructures offer an advantageous urease immobilization platform owing to its very high surface area. • High sensitivity (~ 132 μA/mM/cm 2 ) and low Michaelis–Menten parameter (K m ) value (~ 0.19 mM) were observed

  7. Thermal oxidation of silicon with two oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild-Maior, A.A.; Filimon, S.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model for the thermal oxidation of silicon in wet oxygen is presented. It is shown that the presence of oxygen in the oxidation furnace has an important effect when the water temperature is not too high (less than about 65 deg C). The model is in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  8. Mn-silicide nanostructures aligned on massively parallel silicon nano-ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Padova, Paola; Ottaviani, Carlo; Ronci, Fabio; Colonna, Stefano; Quaresima, Claudio; Cricenti, Antonio; Olivieri, Bruno; Dávila, Maria E; Hennies, Franz; Pietzsch, Annette; Shariati, Nina; Le Lay, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The growth of Mn nanostructures on a 1D grating of silicon nano-ribbons is investigated at atomic scale by means of scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction and core level photoelectron spectroscopy. The grating of silicon nano-ribbons represents an atomic scale template that can be used in a surface-driven route to control the combination of Si with Mn in the development of novel materials for spintronics devices. The Mn atoms show a preferential adsorption site on silicon atoms, forming one-dimensional nanostructures. They are parallel oriented with respect to the surface Si array, which probably predetermines the diffusion pathways of the Mn atoms during the process of nanostructure formation.

  9. Fabrication of Nanostructured PLGA Scaffolds Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide Templates

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh , Cheng-Chih; Wang , Gou-Jen; Hsu , Shan-Hui; Hung , Huey-Shan

    2008-01-01

    Submitted on behalf of EDA Publishing Association (http://irevues.inist.fr/handle/2042/16838); International audience; PLGA (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) is one of the most used biodegradable and biocompatible materials. Nanostructured PLGA even has great application potentials in tissue engineering. In this research, a fabrication technique for nanostructured PLGA membrane was investigated and developed. In this novel fabrication approach, an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film was use as the...

  10. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  11. Aligned three-dimensional prismlike magnesium nanostructures realized onto silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kaili; Rossi, Carole; Tenailleau, Christophe; Alphonse, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A simple approach is proposed to realize three-dimensional (3D) prismlike Mg nanostructures, which has several advantages over previous investigations such as suitable for mass production, reduced impurities, tailored dimensions, and easier integration into microsystem. 3D Mg nanostructures are realized onto silicon substrate using a conventional thermal evaporator, where the incident angle of Mg vapor flux with respect to the substrate surface normal is fixed at 88 deg. The as-prepared 3D Mg nanostructures are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and surface area measurement

  12. HRTEM analysis of the nanostructure of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Palma, R.J.; Pascual, L.; Landa-Canovas, A.R.; Herrero, P.; Martinez-Duart, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The nanometric structure of porous silicon makes this material to be very suitable for its use in many different fields, including optoelectronics and biological applications. In the present work, the structure of porous silicon was investigated in detail by means of cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image processing, together with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The structure of the Si/porous silicon interface and that of the silicon nanocrystals that compose porous silicon have been analyzed in detail. A strong strain contrast in the Si/porous silicon interface caused by high stresses was observed. Accordingly, dislocation pairs are found to be a possible mechanism of lattice matching between porous silicon and the Si substrate. Finally, high relative concentration of oxygen in the porous silicon layer was observed, together with low relative electron concentration in the conduction band when compared to Si

  13. A new electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of acetaminophen and codeine based on porous silicon/palladium nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A; Ahmadi, Najmeh; Rezaei, Behzad; Abarghoui, Mehdi Mokhtari

    2015-03-01

    A porous silicon/palladium nanostructure was prepared and used as a new electrode material for the simultaneous determination of acetaminophen (ACT) and codeine (COD). Palladium nanoparticles were assembled on porous silicon (PSi) microparticles by a simple redox reaction between the Pd precursor and PSi in an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid. This novel nanostructure was characterized by different spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The high electrochemical activity, fast electron transfer rate, high surface area and good antifouling properties of this nanostructure enhanced the oxidation peak currents and reduced the peak potentials of ACT and COD at the surface of the proposed sensor. Simultaneous determination of ACT and COD was explored using differential pulse voltammetry. A linear range of 1.0-700.0 µmol L(-1) was achieved for ACT and COD with detection limits of 0.4 and 0.3 µmol L(-1), respectively. Finally, the proposed method was used for the determination of ACT and COD in blood serum, urine and pharmaceutical compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-assembled nanostructures in oxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Haris Masood

    Self-assembled nanoislands in the gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC)/ yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) system have recently been discovered. This dissertation is an attempt to study the mechanism by which these nanoislands form. Nanoislands in the GDC/YSZ system form via a strain based mechanism whereby the stress accumulated in the GDC-doped surface layer on the YSZ substrate is relieved by creation of self-assembled nanoislands by a mechanism similar to the ATG instability. Unlike what was previously believed, a modified surface layer is not required prior to annealing, that is, this modification can occur during annealing by surface diffusion of dopants from the GDC sources (distributed on the YSZ surface in either lithographically defined patch or powder form) with simultaneous breakup, which occurs at the hold temperature independent of the subsequent cooling. Additionally, we have developed a simple powder based process of producing nanoislands which bypasses lithography and thin film deposition setups. The versatility of the process is apparent in the fact that it allows us to study the effect of experimental parameters such as soak time, temperature, cooling rate and the effect of powder composition on nanoisland properties in a facile way. With the help of this process, we have shown that nanoislands are not peculiar to Gd containing oxide source materials on YSZ substrates and can also be produced with other source materials such as La2O3, Nd2O3, Sm 2O3, Eu2O3, Tb2O3 and even Y2O3, which is already present in the substrate and hence simplifies the system further. We have extended our work to include YSZ substrates of the (110) surface orientation and have found that instead of nanoisland arrays, we obtain an array of parallel nanobars which have their long axes oriented along the [1-10] direction on the YSZ-(110) surface. STEM EDS performed on both the bars and the nanoislands has revealed that they are solid YSZ-rich solid solutions with the dopant species and

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Chemically Etched Nanostructured Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    dramatically. It transforms from an indirect bandgap material that does not absorb or emit light efficiently into one which can emit visible light at room temperatures. Although much work has been conducted in understanding the properties of nanostructured Si

  16. Towards Ordered Silicon Nanostructures through Self-Assembling Mechanisms and Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Puglisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of innovative architectures for memory storage and energy conversion devices are at the forefront of current research efforts driving us towards a sustainable future. However, issues related to the cost, efficiency, and reliability of current technologies are still severely limiting their overtake of the standard designs. The use of ordered nanostructured silicon is expected to overcome these limitations and push the advancement of the alternative technologies. Specifically, self-assembling of block copolymers has been recognized as a promising and cost-effective approach to organize silicon nanostructures. This work reviews some of the most important findings on block copolymer self-assembling and complements those with the results of new experimental studies. First of all, a quantitative analysis is presented on the ordering and fluctuations expected in the synthesis of silicon nanostructures by using standard synthesis methods like chemical vapour deposition. Then the effects of the several parameters guiding the ordering mechanisms in the block copolymer systems, such as film thickness, molecular weight, annealing conditions, solvent, and substrate topography are discussed. Finally, as a proof of concept, an in-house developed example application to solar cells is presented, based on silicon nanostructures resulting from self-assembling of block copolymers.

  17. Synergistically Enhanced Performance of Ultrathin Nanostructured Silicon Solar Cells Embedded in Plasmonically Assisted, Multispectral Luminescent Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Dhar, Purnim; Chen, Huandong; Montenegro, Angelo; Liaw, Lauren; Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Benderskii, Alexander V.; Yoon, Jongseung

    2017-04-12

    Ultrathin silicon solar cells fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of single-crystalline wafer materials represent an attractive materials platform that could provide many advantages for realizing high-performance, low-cost photovoltaics. However, their intrinsically limited photovoltaic performance arising from insufficient absorption of low-energy photons demands careful design of light management to maximize the efficiency and preserve the cost-effectiveness of solar cells. Herein we present an integrated flexible solar module of ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells capable of simultaneously exploiting spectral upconversion and downshifting in conjunction with multispectral luminescent waveguides and a nanostructured plasmonic reflector to compensate for their weak optical absorption and enhance their performance. The 8 μm-thick silicon solar cells incorporating a hexagonally periodic nanostructured surface relief are surface-embedded in layered multispectral luminescent media containing organic dyes and NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocrystals as downshifting and upconverting luminophores, respectively, via printing-enabled deterministic materials assembly. The ultrathin nanostructured silicon microcells in the composite luminescent waveguide exhibit strongly augmented photocurrent (~40.1 mA/cm2) and energy conversion efficiency (~12.8%) than devices with only a single type of luminescent species, owing to the synergistic contributions from optical downshifting, plasmonically enhanced upconversion, and waveguided photon flux for optical concentration, where the short-circuit current density increased by ~13.6 mA/cm2 compared with microcells in a nonluminescent medium on a plain silver reflector under a confined illumination.

  18. Microwave synthesis of nanostructured oxide sorbents doped with lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrofanov, Andrey A., E-mail: mitrofanov-a@icloud.com; Silyavka, Elena S.; Shilovskikh, Vladimir V.; Kolonitckii, Petr D.; Sukhodolov, Nikolai G.; Selyutin, Artem A., E-mail: selutin@inbox.ru [Saint Petersburg State University, 7/9, Universitetskaya nab., St. Petersburg, 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    A number of nanostructured mesoporous oxide systems based on aluminum oxide, doped with lanthanide ions have been obtained in this study. Structure and morphology of oxides obtained have been examined by X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of the samples was determined by the BET method. The dependence of the adsorption of insulin on synthesized oxides from the concentration was investigated. The containing of insulin in solutions after adsorption was determined by the Bradford method. The isotherms of adsorption of insulin on resulting oxide sorbents were plotted, the dependence capacity of the sorption of insulin from the lanthanide dopant was determined.

  19. Passivation properties of alumina for multicrystalline silicon nanostructure prepared by spin-coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Shen, Honglie; Yang, Wangyang; Zheng, Chaofan; Tang, Quntao; Yao, Hanyu; Raza, Adil; Li, Yufang; Huang, Chunlai

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we report passivation properties of inverted pyramidal nanostructure based multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) by Al2O3 films with spin-coating method. Precursors AlCl3 and Al(acac)3 for Al2O3 films were chosen for comparison. Al2O3/SiO x stacks were found to be able to passivate the nanostructured surface well. With the number of spin-coating up to five, the Al2O3 films could conformally attach the nanostructure. The weighted average reflectance values (ranging from 400-900 nm) of the passivated silicon surface could be reduced to 10.74% (AlCl3) and 11.12% (Al(acac)3), and the effective carrier lifetime could reach 7.84 and 16.98 μs, respectively. This work presented a potential process to fabricate low cost high efficiency mc-Si solar cells.

  20. Hybrid luminescent/magnetic nanostructured porous silicon particles for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Noval, Álvaro; Sánchez-Vaquero, Vanessa; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Gallach, Darío; Ferro-Llanos, Vicente; Javier Serrano, José; Manso-Silván, Miguel; García-Ruiz, Josefa Predestinación; Del Pozo, Francisco; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.

    2011-02-01

    This work describes a novel process for the fabrication of hybrid nanostructured particles showing intense tunable photoluminescence and a simultaneous ferromagnetic behavior. The fabrication process involves the synthesis of nanostructured porous silicon (NPSi) by chemical anodization of crystalline silicon and subsequent in pore growth of Co nanoparticles by electrochemically-assisted infiltration. Final particles are obtained by subsequent sonication of the Co-infiltrated NPSi layers and conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) aiming at enhancing their hydrophilic character. These particles respond to magnetic fields, emit light in the visible when excited in the UV range, and internalize into human mesenchymal stem cells with no apoptosis induction. Furthermore, cytotoxicity in in-vitro systems confirms their biocompatibility and the viability of the cells after incorporation of the particles. The hybrid nanostructured particles might represent powerful research tools as cellular trackers or in cellular therapy since they allow combining two or more properties into a single particle.

  1. Chemical solution route to self-assembled epitaxial oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, X; Puig, T; Gibert, M; Queraltó, A; Zabaleta, J; Mestres, N

    2014-04-07

    Self-assembly of oxides as a bottom-up approach to functional nanostructures goes beyond the conventional nanostructure formation based on lithographic techniques. Particularly, chemical solution deposition (CSD) is an ex situ growth approach very promising for high throughput nanofabrication at low cost. Whereas strain engineering as a strategy to define nanostructures with tight control of size, shape and orientation has been widely used in metals and semiconductors, it has been rarely explored in the emergent field of functional complex oxides. Here we will show that thermodynamic modeling can be very useful to understand the principles controlling the growth of oxide nanostructures by CSD, and some attractive kinetic features will also be presented. The methodology of strain engineering is applied in a high degree of detail to form different sorts of nanostructures (nanodots, nanowires) of the oxide CeO2 with fluorite structure which then is used as a model system to identify the principles controlling self-assembly and self-organization in CSD grown oxides. We also present, more briefly, the application of these ideas to other oxides such as manganites or BaZrO3. We will show that the nucleation and growth steps are essentially understood and manipulated while the kinetic phenomena underlying the evolution of the self-organized networks are still less widely explored, even if very appealing effects have been already observed. Overall, our investigation based on a CSD approach has opened a new strategy towards a general use of self-assembly and self-organization which can now be widely spread to many functional oxide materials.

  2. Nanostructured Transparent Conducting Oxides for Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Titas

    2011-12-01

    Research on transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) has attracted a lot of attention due to the serious concern related to cost and chemical stability of indium tin oxide. The primary aim of this research is to develop low cost alternative transparent conducting oxides with an eye towards (1) increasing the organic solar cell efficiency and (2) fabricating transparent electronic devices utilizing p-type TCOs. To investigate the fundamental properties, the novel TCO films have been grown on sapphire and economical glass substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The films were also grown under different deposition conditions in order to understand the effect of processing parameters on the film properties. The characteristics of the thin films have been investigated in detail using (X-ray diffraction, TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV- photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), four probe resistivity and UV-Vis transmittance measurements) in order to establish processing-structure-property correlation. ZnO doped with group III elements is a promising candidate because of its superior stability in hydrogen environment, benign nature and relatively inexpensive supply. However, ZnO based TCO films suffer from low work function (4.4 eV, compared to that of 4.8 eV for ITO), which increases the energy barrier and affects the carrier transport across ZnGa0.05O/organic layer interface. To overcome this issue of ZnO based TCOs, the growth of bilayered structure consisting of very thin MoOx (2.0 target composition. These optimized bilayer films exhibited good optical transmittance (≥ 80%) and low resistivity of ˜ 10-4 O-cm. The optimized NiO1+x / GZO and MoOx / GZO bilayers showed significant increase in work function values (˜5.3 eV). The work function of the bilayer films was tuned by varying the processing conditions and doping of over layers. Preliminary test device results of the organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs

  3. Photoconduction in silicon rich oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Lopez, J A; Carrillo-Lopez, J; Flores-Gracia, F J; Garcia-Salgado, G [CIDS-ICUAP, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla. Ed. 103 D and C, col. San Manuel, Puebla, Pue. Mexico 72570 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M; Morales-Sanchez, A, E-mail: jluna@buap.siu.m, E-mail: jluna@inaoep.m [INAOE, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1, Apdo. 51, Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico 72000 (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Photoconduction of silicon rich oxide (SRO) thin films were studied by current-voltage (I-V) measurements, where ultraviolet (UV) and white (Vis) light illumination were applied. SRO thin films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) technique, using SiH{sub 4} (silane) and N{sub 2}O (nitrous oxide) as reactive gases at 700 {sup 0}. The gas flow ratio, Ro = [N{sub 2}O]/[SiH{sub 4}] was used to control the silicon excess. The thickness and refractive index of the SRO films were 72.0 nm, 75.5 nm, 59.1 nm, 73.4 nm and 1.7, 1.5, 1.46, 1.45, corresponding to R{sub o} = 10, 20, 30 and 50, respectively. These results were obtained by null ellipsometry. Si nanoparticles (Si-nps) and defects within SRO films permit to obtain interesting photoelectric properties as a high photocurrent and photoconduction. These effects strongly depend on the silicon excess, thickness and structure type. Two different structures (Al/SRO/Si and Al/SRO/SRO/Si metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)-like structures) were fabricated and used as devices. The photocurrent in these structures is dominated by the generation of carriers due to the incident photon energies ({approx}3.0-1.6 eV and 5 eV). These structures showed large photoconductive response at room temperature. Therefore, these structures have potential applications in optoelectronics devices.

  4. Optical properties of tetrapod nanostructured zinc oxide by chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. This work studies the effects of annealing temperature ranging from 100–500 ºC towards its physical and optical properties. FESEM images showed that the structural properties of tetrapod nanostructured ...

  5. Zinc oxide's hierarchical nanostructure and its photocatalytic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Sheikh, Faheem A.; Barakat, Nasser A. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a new hierarchical nanostructure that consists of zinc oxide (ZnO) was produced by the electrospinning process followed by a hydrothermal technique. First, electrospinning of a colloidal solution that consisted of zinc nanoparticles, zinc acetate dihydrate and poly(vinyl alcohol...

  6. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janoš, Pavel; Skoumal, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxides have very important applications in many areas of chemistry, physics and materials science; their properties are dependent on the method of preparation, the morphology and texture. Nanostructured metal oxides can exhibit unique characteristics unlike those of the bulk form depending on their morphology, with a high density of edges, corners and defect surfaces. In recent years, methods have been developed for the preparation of metal oxide powders with tunable control of the primary particle size as well as of a secondary particle size: the size of agglomerates of crystallites. One of the many ways to take advantage of unique properties of nanostructured oxide materials is stoichiometric degradation of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) pollutants on their surfaces.

  7. Nanostructured silicon for photonics from materials to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gaburro, Z; Daldosso, N

    2006-01-01

    The use of light to channel signals around electronic chips could solve several current problems in microelectronic evolution including: power dissipation, interconnect bottlenecks, input/output from/to optical communication channels, poor signal bandwidth, etc. It is unfortunate that silicon is not a good photonic material: it has a poor light-emission efficiency and exhibits a negligible electro-optical effect. Silicon photonics is a field having the objective of improving the physical properties of silicon; thus turning it into a photonic material and permitting the full convergence of elec

  8. Cavity-assisted quantum computing in a silicon nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Bao; Qin Hao; Zhang Rong; Xue Peng; Liu Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We present a scheme of quantum computing with charge qubits corresponding to one excess electron shared between dangling-bond pairs of surface silicon atoms that couple to a microwave stripline resonator on a chip. By choosing a certain evolution time, we propose the realization of a set of universal single- and two-qubit logical gates. Due to its intrinsic stability and scalability, the silicon dangling-bond charge qubit can be regarded as one of the most promising candidates for quantum computation. Compared to the previous schemes on quantum computing with silicon bulk systems, our scheme shows such advantages as a long coherent time and direct control and readout. (general)

  9. Low-energy ion beam synthesis of Ag endotaxial nanostructures in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajappa, Kiran; Guha, Puspendu; Thirumurugan, Arun; Satyam, Parlapalli V.; Bhatta, Umananda M.

    2018-06-01

    Coherently, embedded metal nanostructures (endotaxial) are known to have potential applications concerning the areas of plasmonics, optoelectronics and thermoelectronics. Incorporating appropriate concentrations of metal atoms into crystalline silicon is critical for these applications. Therefore, choosing proper dose of low-energy ions, instead of depositing thin film as a source of metal atoms, helps in avoiding surplus concentration of metal atoms that diffuses into the silicon crystal. In this work, 30 keV silver negative ions are implanted into a SiO x /Si(100) at two different fluences: 1 × 1015 and 2.5 × 1015 Ag- ions/cm2. Later, the samples are annealed at 700 °C for 1 h in Ar atmosphere. Embedded silver nanostructures have been characterized using planar and cross-sectional TEM (XTEM) analysis. Planar TEM analysis shows the formation of mostly rectangular silver nanostructures following the fourfold symmetry of the substrate. XTEM analysis confirms the formation of prism-shaped silver nanostructures embedded inside crystalline silicon. Endotaxial nature of the embedded crystals has been discussed using selected area electron diffraction analysis.

  10. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Oxides for Energy Harvesting Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Abutaha, Anas I.

    2015-01-01

    of thermoelectrics are still limited to one materials system, namely SiGe, since the traditional thermoelectric materials degrade and oxidize at high temperature. Therefore, oxide thermoelectrics emerge as a promising class of materials since they can operate

  11. ``New'' energy states lead to phonon-less optoelectronic properties in nanostructured silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek; Yu, Yixuan; Korgel, Brian; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Silicon is arguably one of the most important technological material for electronic applications. However, indirect bandgap of silicon semiconductor has prevented optoelectronic applications due to phonon assistance required for photon light absorption/emission. Here we show, that previously unexplored surface states in nanostructured silicon can couple with quantum-confined energy levels, leading to phonon-less exciton-recombination and photoluminescence. We demonstrate size dependence (2.4 - 8.3 nm) of this coupling observed in small uniform silicon nanocrystallites, or quantum-dots, by direct measurements of their electronic density of states and low temperature measurements. To enhance the optical absorption of the these silicon quantum-dots, we utilize generation of resonant surface plasmon polariton waves, which leads to several fold increase in observed spectrally-resolved photocurrent near the quantum-confined bandedge states. Therefore, these enhanced light emission and absorption enhancement can have important implications for applications of nanostructured silicon for optoelectronic applications in photovoltaics and LEDs.

  12. Metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bo; Meng, Fan-Li; Liu, Jin-Yun; Jin, Zhen; Kong, Ling-Tao; Liu, Jin-Huai

    2012-01-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors are predominant solid-state gas detecting devices for domestic, commercial and industrial applications, which have many advantages such as low cost, easy production, and compact size. However, the performance of such sensors is significantly influenced by the morphology and structure of sensing materials, resulting in a great obstacle for gas sensors based on bulk materials or dense films to achieve highly-sensitive properties. Lots of metal oxide nanostructures have been developed to improve the gas sensing properties such as sensitivity, selectivity, response speed, and so on. Here, we provide a brief overview of metal oxide nanostructures and their gas sensing properties from the aspects of particle size, morphology and doping. When the particle size of metal oxide is close to or less than double thickness of the space-charge layer, the sensitivity of the sensor will increase remarkably, which would be called "small size effect", yet small size of metal oxide nanoparticles will be compactly sintered together during the film coating process which is disadvantage for gas diffusion in them. In view of those reasons, nanostructures with many kinds of shapes such as porous nanotubes, porous nanospheres and so on have been investigated, that not only possessed large surface area and relatively mass reactive sites, but also formed relatively loose film structures which is an advantage for gas diffusion. Besides, doping is also an effective method to decrease particle size and improve gas sensing properties. Therefore, the gas sensing properties of metal oxide nanostructures assembled by nanoparticles are reviewed in this article. The effect of doping is also summarized and finally the perspectives of metal oxide gas sensor are given.

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mula, Guido, E-mail: guido.mula@unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Tiddia, Maria V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Ruffilli, Roberta [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Falqui, Andrea [Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, S.P. 8 km 0.700, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Palmas, Simonetta; Mascia, Michele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica Chimica e dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Piazza d' Armi, 09126 Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of the electrochemical oxidation process of porous silicon. We analyze the effect of the layer thickness (1.25–22 μm) and of the applied current density (1.1–11.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, values calculated with reference to the external samples surface) on the oxidation process by comparing the galvanostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements and the optical specular reflectivity of the samples. The results of EIS were interpreted using an equivalent circuit to separate the contribution of different sample parts. A different behavior of the electrochemical oxidation process has been found for thin and thick samples: whereas for thin samples the oxidation process is univocally related to current density and thickness, for thicker samples this is no more true. Measurements by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy using a Scanning Electron Microscopy confirmed that the inhomogeneity of the electrochemical oxidation process is increased by higher thicknesses and higher currents. A possible explanation is proposed to justify the different behavior of thin and thick samples during the electrochemical process. - Highlights: • A multidisciplinary approach on porous Si electrochemical oxidation is proposed. • Electrochemical, optical, and structural characterizations are used. • Layer thickness and oxidation current effects are shown. • An explanation of the observed behavior is proposed.

  14. Angle resolved characterization of nanostructured and conventionally textured silicon solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Ormstrup, Jeppe; Ommen, Martin Lind

    2015-01-01

    current, open circuit voltage, fill factor (FF) and power conversion efficiency are each measured as function of the relative incident angle between the solar cell and the light source. The relative incident angle is varied from 0° to 90° in steps of 10° in orthogonal axes, such that each solar cell......We report angle resolved characterization of nanostructured and conventionally textured silicon solar cells. The nanostructured solar cells are realized through a single step, mask-less, scalable reactive ion etching (RIE) texturing of the surface. Photovoltaic properties including short circuit...

  15. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  16. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, Chin-Che; Mendis, Suwan; Chew, Kerlit; Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin; Atabaev, Bakhtiyar; Adedeji, Victor; Rusli

    2010-01-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  17. Segregation of boron implanted into silicon on angular configurations of silicon/silicon dioxide oxidation interface

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnavskij, G A; Obrekht, M S

    2001-01-01

    One studies segregation of boron implanted into silicon when a wave (interface) of oxidation moves within it. There are four types of angular configurations of SiO sub 2 /Si oxidation interface, that is: direct and reverse shoulders, trench type cavities and a square. By means of computer-aided simulation one obtained and analyzed complex patterns of B concentration distribution within Si, SiO sub 2 domains and at SiO sub 2 /Si interface for all types of angular configurations of the oxidation interface

  18. Zinc-oxide-based nanostructured materials for heterostructure solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Somov, P. A.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-01-01

    Results obtained in the deposition of nanostructured zinc-oxide layers by hydrothermal synthesis as the basic method are presented. The possibility of controlling the structure and morphology of the layers is demonstrated. The important role of the procedure employed to form the nucleating layer is noted. The faceted hexagonal nanoprisms obtained are promising for the fabrication of solar cells based on oxide heterostructures, and aluminum-doped zinc-oxide layers with petal morphology, for the deposition of an antireflection layer. The results are compatible and promising for application in flexible electronics

  19. Synthesis engineering of iron oxide raspberry-shaped nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, O; Pichon, B P; Ihiawakrim, D; Florea, I; Moldovan, S; Ersen, O; Begin, D; Grenèche, J-M; Lemonnier, S; Barraud, E; Begin-Colin, S

    2017-01-07

    Magnetic porous nanostructures consisting of oriented aggregates of iron oxide nanocrystals display very interesting properties such as a lower oxidation state of magnetite, and enhanced saturation magnetization in comparison with individual nanoparticles of similar sizes and porosity. However, the formation mechanism of these promising nanostructures is not well understood, which hampers the fine tuning of their magnetic properties, for instance by doping them with other elements. Therefore the formation mechanism of porous raspberry shaped nanostructures (RSNs) synthesized by a one-pot polyol solvothermal method has been investigated in detail from the early stages by using a wide panel of characterization techniques, and especially by performing original in situ HR-TEM studies in temperature. A time-resolved study showed the intermediate formation of an amorphous iron alkoxide phase with a plate-like lamellar structure (PLS). Then, the fine investigation of PLS transformation upon heating up to 500 °C confirmed that the synthesis of RSNs involves two iron precursors: the starting one (hydrated iron chlorides) and the in situ formed iron alkoxide precursor which decomposes with time and heating and contributes to the growth step of nanostructures. Such an understanding of the formation mechanism of RSNs is necessary to envision efficient and rational enhancement of their magnetic properties.

  20. Tailoring the Optical Properties of Silicon with Ion Beam Created Nanostructures for Advanced Photonics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Perveen

    In today's fast life, energy consumption has increased more than ever and with that the demand for a renewable and cleaner energy source as a substitute for the fossil fuels has also increased. Solar radiations are the ultimate source of energy but harvesting this energy in a cost effective way is a challenging task. Si is the dominating material for microelectronics and photovoltaics. But owing to its indirect band gap, Si is an inefficient light absorber, thus requiring a thickness of solar cells beyond tens of microns which increases the cost of solar energy. Therefore, techniques to increase light absorption in thin film Si solar cells are of great importance and have been the focus of research for a few decades now. Another big issue of technology in this fast-paced world is the computing rate or data transfer rate between components of a chip in ultra-fast processors. Existing electronic interconnects suffering from the signal delays and heat generation issues are unable to handle high data rates. A possible solution to this problem is in replacing the electronic interconnects with optical interconnects which have large data carrying capacity. However, optical components are limited in size by the fundamental laws of diffraction to about half a wavelength of light and cannot be combined with nanoscale electronic components. Tremendous research efforts have been directed in search of an advanced technology which can bridge the size gap between electronic and photonic worlds. An emerging technology of "plasmonics'' which exploits the extraordinary optical properties of metal nanostructures to tailor the light at nanoscale has been considered a potential solution to both of the above-mentioned problems. Research conducted for this dissertation has an overall goal to investigate the optical properties of silicon with metal nanostructures for photovoltaics and advanced silicon photonics applications. The first part of the research focuses on achieving enhanced

  1. Nanostructured silicon-based biosensors for the selective identification of analytes of social interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, Sabato; Champdore, Marcella de; Aurilia, Vincenzo; Parracino, Antonietta; Staiano, Maria; Vitale, Annalisa; Rossi, Mose; Rea, Ilaria; Rotiroti, Lucia; Rossi, Andrea M; Borini, Stefano; Rendina, Ivo; Stefano, Luca De

    2006-01-01

    Small analytes such as glucose, L-glutamine (Gln), and ammonium nitrate are detected by means of optical biosensors based on a very common nanostructured material, porous silicon (PSi). Specific recognition elements, such as protein receptors and enzymes, were immobilized on hydrogenated PSi wafers and used as probes in optical sensing systems. The binding events were optically transduced as wavelength shifts of the porous silicon reflectivity spectrum or were monitored via changes of the fluorescence emission. The biosensors described in this article suggest a general approach for the development of new sensing systems for a wide range of analytes of high social interest

  2. Nano-ridge fabrication by local oxidation of silicon edges with silicon nitride as a mask

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveld, J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Maury, P.A.; Jansen, Henricus V.

    2005-01-01

    A method to fabricate nano-ridges over a full wafer is presented. The fabrication method uses local oxidation of silicon, with silicon nitride as a mask, and wet anisotropic etching of silicon. The realized structures are 7-20 nm wide, 40-100 nm high and centimeters long. All dimensions are easily

  3. Electrical Double Layer-Induced Ion Surface Accumulation for Ultrasensitive Refractive Index Sensing with Nanostructured Porous Silicon Interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Stefano; Strambini, Lucanos Marsilio; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2018-03-23

    Herein, we provide the first experimental evidence on the use of electrical double layer (EDL)-induced accumulation of charged ions (using both Na + and K + ions in water as the model) onto a negatively charged nanostructured surface (e.g., thermally growth SiO 2 )-Ion Surface Accumulation, ISA-as a means of improving performance of nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) interferometers for optical refractometric applications. Nanostructured PSi interferometers are very promising optical platforms for refractive index sensing due to PSi huge specific surface (hundreds of m 2 per gram) and low preparation cost (less than $0.01 per 8 in. silicon wafer), though they have shown poor resolution ( R) and detection limit (DL) (on the order of 10 -4 -10 -5 RIU) compared to other plasmonic and photonic platforms ( R and DL on the order of 10 -7 -10 -8 RIU). This can be ascribed to both low sensitivity and high noise floor of PSi interferometers when bulk refractive index variation of the solution infiltrating the nanopores either approaches or is below 10 -4 RIU. Electrical double layer-induced ion surface accumulation (EDL-ISA) on oxidized PSi interferometers allows the interferometer output signal (spectral interferogram) to be impressively amplified at bulk refractive index variation below 10 -4 RIU, increasing, in turn, sensitivity up to 2 orders of magnitude and allowing reliable measurement of refractive index variations to be carried out with both DL and R of 10 -7 RIU. This represents a 250-fold-improvement (at least) with respect to the state-of-the-art literature on PSi refractometers and pushes PSi interferometer performance to that of state-of-the-art ultrasensitive photonics/plasmonics refractive index platforms.

  4. Silicon vacancy-related centers in non-irradiated 6H-SiC nanostructur

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bagraev, N.T.; Danilovskii, E.Yu.; Gets, D.S.; Kalabukhova, E.N.; Klyachkin, L.E.; Koudryavtsev, A.A.; Malyarenko, A.M.; Mashkov, V.A.; Savchenko, Dariia; Shanina, B.D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2015), 649-657 ISSN 1063-7826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-06697P; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron spin resonance * 6H-SiC nanostructures * silicon vacancy related centers * NV centers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.701, year: 2015

  5. Study of the technology of the plasma nanostructuring of silicon to form highly efficient emission structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperin, V. A.; Kitsyuk, E. P. [“Technological Center” Research-and-Production Company (Russian Federation); Pavlov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nanotechnologies in Microelectronics (Russian Federation); Shamanaev, A. A., E-mail: artemiy.shamanaev@tcen.ru [“Technological Center” Research-and-Production Company (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    New methods for silicon nanostructuring and the possibility of raising the aspect ratios of the structures being formed are considered. It is shown that the technology developed relates to self-formation methods and is an efficient tool for improving the quality of field-emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by increasing the Si–CNT contact area and raising the efficiency of the heat sink.

  6. Development of nano-structured silicon carbide ceramics: from synthesis of the powder to sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reau, A.

    2008-12-01

    The materials used inside future nuclear reactors will be subjected to very high temperature and neutrons flux. Silicon carbide, in the form of SiC f /SiC nano-structured composite is potentially interesting for this type of application. It is again necessary to verify the contribution of nano-structure on the behaviour of this material under irradiation. To verify the feasibility and determine the properties of the matrix, it was envisaged to produce it by powder metallurgy from SiC nanoparticles. The objective is to obtain a fully dense nano-structured SiC ceramic without additives. For that, a parametric study of the phases of synthesis and agglomeration was carried out, the objective of which is to determine the active mechanisms and the influence of the key parameters. Thus, studying the nano-powder synthesis by laser pyrolysis allowed to produce, with high production rates, homogeneous batches of SiC nanoparticles whose size can be adjusted between 15 and 90 nm. These powders have been densified by an innovating method: Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The study and the optimization of the key parameters allowed the densification of silicon carbide ceramic without sintering aids while preserving the nano-structure of material. The thermal and mechanical properties of final materials were studied in order to determine the influence of the microstructure on their properties. (author)

  7. Hydrothermal deposition and characterization of silicon oxide nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon oxide nanospheres with the average diameter of about 100 nm have been synthesized by hydrothermal deposition process using silicon and silica as the starting materials. The silicon oxide nanospheres were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, respectively. The results show that large scale silicon oxide nanospheres with the uniform size are composed of Si and O showing the amorphous structure. Strong PL peak at 435 nm is observed demonstrating the good blue light emission property

  8. Metal Oxide Nanostructures in Food Applications: Quality Control and Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Galstyan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide materials have been applied in different fields due to their excellent functional properties. Metal oxides nanostructuration, preparation with the various morphologies, and their coupling with other structures enhance the unique properties of the materials and open new perspectives for their application in the food industry. Chemical gas sensors that are based on semiconducting metal oxide materials can detect the presence of toxins and volatile organic compounds that are produced in food products due to their spoilage and hazardous processes that may take place during the food aging and transportation. Metal oxide nanomaterials can be used in food processing, packaging, and the preservation industry as well. Moreover, the metal oxide-based nanocomposite structures can provide many advantageous features to the final food packaging material, such as antimicrobial activity, enzyme immobilization, oxygen scavenging, mechanical strength, increasing the stability and the shelf life of food, and securing the food against humidity, temperature, and other physiological factors. In this paper, we review the most recent achievements on the synthesis of metal oxide-based nanostructures and their applications in food quality monitoring and active and intelligent packaging.

  9. Zinc oxide nanostructures for electrochemical cortisol biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Tracy, Kathryn; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report on fabrication of a label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical cortisol immunosensors using one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two dimensional nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) as immobilizing matrix. The synthesized ZnO nanostructures (NSs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selective area diffraction (SAED) and photoluminescence spectra (PL) which showed that both ZnO-NRs and ZnO-NFs are single crystalline and oriented in [0001] direction. Anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-Cab) are used as primary capture antibodies to detect cortisol using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The charge transfer resistance increases linearly with increase in cortisol concentration and exhibits a sensitivity of 3.078 KΩ. M-1 for ZnO-NRs and 540 Ω. M -1 for ZnO-NFs. The developed ZnO-NSs based immunosensor is capable of detecting cortisol at 1 pM. The observed sensing parameters are in physiological range. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat to detect cortisol at point-of-care.

  10. Effective Chemical Route to 2D Nanostructured Silicon Electrode Material: Phase Transition from Exfoliated Clay Nanosheet to Porous Si Nanoplate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adpakpang, Kanyaporn; Patil, Sharad B.; Oh, Seung Mi; Kang, Joo-Hee; Lacroix, Marc; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Effective morphological control of porous silicon 2D nanoplate can be achieved by the magnesiothermically-induced phase transition of exfoliated silicate clay nanosheets. The promising lithium storage performance of the obtained silicon materials with huge capacity and excellent rate characteristics underscores the prime importance of porously 2D nanostructured morphology of silicon. - Highlights: • 2D nanostructured silicon electrode materials are successfully synthesized via the magnesiothermically-induced phase transition of exfoliated clay 2D nanosheets. • High discharge capacity and rate capability are achieved from the 2D nanoplates of silicon. • Silicon 2D nanoplates can enhance both Li"+ diffusion and charge-transfer kinetics. • 2D nanostructured silicon is beneficial for the cycling stability by minimizing the volume change during lithiation-delithiation. - Abstract: An efficient and economical route for the synthesis of porous two-dimensional (2D) nanoplates of silicon is developed via the magnesiothermically-induced phase transition of exfoliated clay 2D nanosheets. The magnesiothermic reaction of precursor clay nanosheets prepared by the exfoliation and restacking with Mg"2"+ cations yields porous 2D nanoplates of elemental silicon. The variation in the Mg:SiO_2 ratio has a significant effect on the porosity and connectivity of silicon nanoplates. The porous silicon nanoplates show a high discharge capacity of 2000 mAh g"−"1 after 50 cycles. Of prime importance is that this electrode material still retains a large discharge capacity at higher C-rates, which is unusual for the elemental silicon electrode. This is mainly attributed to the improved diffusion of lithium ions, charge-transfer kinetics, and the preservation of the electrical connection of the porous 2D plate-shaped morphology. This study highlights the usefulness of clay mineral as an economical and scalable precursor of high-performance silicon electrodes with

  11. Correlating the silicon surface passivation to the nanostructure of low-temperature a-Si:H after rapid thermal annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macco, B.; Melskens, J.; Podraza, N.J.; Arts, K.; Pugh, C.; Thomas, O.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been prepared at very low temperatures (<50 °C) to provide crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. Despite the limited nanostructural quality of the a-Si:H bulk, a surprisingly high minority carrier

  12. Ultrafast photoluminescence dynamics of blue-emitting silicon nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žídek, K.; Trojánek, F.; Malý, P.; Pelant, Ivan; Gilliot, P.; Hönerlange, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2011), s. 979-984 ISSN 1862-6351 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : silicon * nanocrystals * time-resolved spectroscopy * luminescence * polarization * two-photon absorption Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pssc.201000394/abstract

  13. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merte, Lindsay Richard; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, G.

    2014-01-01

    , but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer...... islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous...

  14. Elucidation of the electrochromic mechanism of nanostructured iron oxides films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lobato, M.A.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Castro-Roman, M. [Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute, Cinvestav Campus Saltillo, Carr. Saltillo-Monterrey Km. 13, Ramos Arizpe, Coah. 25900 (Mexico); Perry, Dale L. [Mail Stop 70A1150, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zarate, R.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Escobar-Alarcon, L. (Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    Nanostructured hematite thin films were electrochemically cycled in an aqueous solution of LiOH. Through optical, structural, morphological, and magnetic measurements, the coloration mechanism of electrochromic iron oxide thin films was elucidated. The conditions for double or single electrochromic behavior are given in this work. During the electrochemical cycling, it was found that topotactic transformations of hexagonal crystal structures are favored; i.e. {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe(OH){sub 2} and subsequently to {delta}-FeOOH. These topotactic redox reactions are responsible for color changes of iron oxide films. (author)

  15. Annealing-induced Fe oxide nanostructures on GaAs

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Y X; Ahmad, E; Xu, Y B; Thompson, S M

    2005-01-01

    We report the evolution of Fe oxide nanostructures on GaAs(100) upon pre- and post-growth annealing conditions. GaAs nanoscale pyramids were formed on the GaAs surface due to wet etching and thermal annealing. An 8.0-nm epitaxial Fe film was grown, oxidized, and annealed using a gradient temperature method. During the process the nanostripes were formed, and the evolution has been demonstrated using transmission and reflection high energy electron diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy...

  16. Ab initio design of nanostructures for solar energy conversion: a case study on silicon nitride nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Design of novel materials for efficient solar energy conversion is critical to the development of green energy technology. In this work, we present a first-principles study on the design of nanostructures for solar energy harvesting on the basis of the density functional theory. We show that the indirect band structure of bulk silicon nitride is transferred to direct bandgap in nanowire. We find that intermediate bands can be created by doping, leading to enhancement of sunlight absorption. We further show that codoping not only reduces the bandgap and introduces intermediate bands but also enhances the solubility of dopants in silicon nitride nanowires due to reduced formation energy of substitution. Importantly, the codoped nanowire is ferromagnetic, leading to the improvement of carrier mobility. The silicon nitride nanowires with direct bandgap, intermediate bands, and ferromagnetism may be applicable to solar energy harvesting.

  17. Sub-parts per million NO2 chemi-transistor sensors based on composite porous silicon/gold nanostructures prepared by metal-assisted etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainato, Michela; Strambini, Lucanos Marsilio; Rella, Simona; Mazzotta, Elisabetta; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2015-04-08

    Surface doping of nano/mesostructured materials with metal nanoparticles to promote and optimize chemi-transistor sensing performance represents the most advanced research trend in the field of solid-state chemical sensing. In spite of the promising results emerging from metal-doping of a number of nanostructured semiconductors, its applicability to silicon-based chemi-transistor sensors has been hindered so far by the difficulties in integrating the composite metal-silicon nanostructures using the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Here we propose a facile and effective top-down method for the high-yield fabrication of chemi-transistor sensors making use of composite porous silicon/gold nanostructures (cSiAuNs) acting as sensing gate. In particular, we investigate the integration of cSiAuNs synthesized by metal-assisted etching (MAE), using gold nanoparticles (NPs) as catalyst, in solid-state junction-field-effect transistors (JFETs), aimed at the detection of NO2 down to 100 parts per billion (ppb). The chemi-transistor sensors, namely cSiAuJFETs, are CMOS compatible, operate at room temperature, and are reliable, sensitive, and fully recoverable for the detection of NO2 at concentrations between 100 and 500 ppb, up to 48 h of continuous operation.

  18. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Oxides for Energy Harvesting Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Abutaha, Anas I.

    2015-11-24

    As the world strives to adapt to the increasing demand for electrical power, sustainable energy sources are attracting significant interest. Around 60% of energy utilized in the world is wasted as heat. Different industrial processes, home heating, and exhausts in cars, all generate a huge amount of unused waste heat. With such a huge potential, there is also significant interest in discovering inexpensive technologies for power generation from waste heat. As a result, thermoelectric materials have become important for many renewable energy research programs. While significant advancements have been done in improving the thermoelectric properties of the conventional heavy-element based materials (such as Bi2Te3 and PbTe), high-temperature applications of thermoelectrics are still limited to one materials system, namely SiGe, since the traditional thermoelectric materials degrade and oxidize at high temperature. Therefore, oxide thermoelectrics emerge as a promising class of materials since they can operate athigher temperatures and in harsher environments compared to non-oxide thermoelectrics. Furthermore, oxides are abundant and friendly to the environment. Among oxides, crystalline SrTiO3 and ZnO are promising thermoelectric materials. The main objective of this work is therefore to pursue focused investigations of SrTiO3 and ZnO thin films and superlattices grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD), with the goal of optimizing their thermoelectric properties by following different strategies. First, the effect of laser fluence on the thermoelectric properties of La doped epitaxial SrTiO3 films is discussed. Films grown at higher laser fluences exhibit better thermoelectric performance. Second, the role of crystal orientation in determining the thermoelectric properties of epitaxial Al doped ZnO (AZO) films is explained. Vertically aligned (c-axis) AZO films have superior thermoelectric properties compared to other films with different crystal orientations. Third

  19. Conductive transition metal oxide nanostructured electrochromic material and optical switching devices constructed thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Tracy M.; Koo, Bonil; Garcia, Guillermo; Milliron, Delia J.; Trizio, Luca De; Dahlman, Clayton

    2017-10-10

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant, a solid state electrolyte, and a counter electrode. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) spectrum and visible spectrum radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  20. Influence of the fuel in the nanostructure catalyzer oxides synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zampiva, R.Y.S.; Panta, P.C.; Carlos, R.B.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Among the techniques used in catalysts production, the solution combustion synthesis (SCS) has been increasingly applied due the possibility of producing, at low cost, highly pure and homogeneous nanostructured powders. The smaller the particle diameter, the greater the activity of the catalyst. In SCS, the size of the particles produced depends on the process variables. In order to formulate the optimal methodology for the preparation of nanostructured oxides for catalysis, it was studied the fuel-oxidant concentration ratio, and the use of glycine and polyethylene glycol with molecular weight 200 (PEG 200) as fuel in the SCS of Iron, Magnesium and Molybdenum based catalysts. The phase identification of the products was performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle size and surface area analysis were done to characterize the particles size and the samples morphology was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated the formation of high purity nanomaterials obtained for low concentrations of fuel, and a wide variation in the nanostructure sizes depending on the concentration and type of fuel used. (author)

  1. Oxide nanostructures through self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S.; Ogale, S. B.; Ganpule, C. S.; Shinde, S. R.; Novikov, V. A.; Monga, A. P.; Burr, M. R.; Ramesh, R.; Ballarotto, V.; Williams, E. D.

    2001-03-01

    A prominent theme in inorganic materials research is the creation of uniformly flat thin films and heterostructures over large wafers, which can subsequently be lithographically processed into functional devices. This letter proposes an approach that will lead to thin film topographies that are directly counter to the above-mentioned philosophy. Recent years have witnessed considerable research activity in the area of self-assembly of materials, stimulated by observations of self-organized behavior in biological systems. We have fabricated uniform arrays of nonplanar surface features by a spontaneous assembly process involving the oxidation of simple metals, especially under constrained conditions on a variety of substrates, including glass and Si. In this letter we demonstrate the pervasiveness of this process through examples involving the oxidation of Pd, Cu, Fe, and In. The feature sizes can be controlled through the grain size and thickness of the starting metal thin film. Finally, we demonstrate how such submicron scale arrays can serve as templates for the design and development of self-assembled, nanoelectronic devices.

  2. About the optical properties of oxidized black silicon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincik, E.; Brunner, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Mikula, M.; Kučera, M.; Švec, P.; Greguš, J.; Vojtek, P.; Zábudlá, Z.; Imamura, K.; Zahoran, M.

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with the optical and morphological properties of thermally oxidized black silicon (OBSi) nano-crystalline specimens produced by the surface structure chemical transfer method (SSCT). This method can produce a nano-crystalline Si black color layer on c-Si with a range of thickness of ∼50 nm to ∼300 nm by the contact of c-Si immersed in chemical solutions HF + H2O2 with a catalytic mesh. We present and discuss mainly the photoluminescence properties of both polished c-Si and OBSi structures, respectively. The similar photoluminescence (PL) behaviors recorded at liquid helium (6 K) and room temperatures on both polished crystalline Si and OBSi samples, respectively, indicate the similar origin of recorded luminescence light. As the positions of PL maxima of OBSi structures are mainly related to the size of Si nanocrystallites and SiO(x), we therefore suppose that the size of the dominant parts of the luminated OBSi nanostructure is pre-determined by the used polishing Si procedure, and/or the distribution function of the number of formed crystallites on their size is very similar. The blue shift of both PL spectra reaching almost value of 0.40 eV observed after the decrease of the sample temperature to 6 K we relate also with the change of the semiconductor band gap width.

  3. The oxidized porous silicon field emission array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.D.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, T.S.; Kasprowicz, T.B.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Trost, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of developing a highly efficient microwave power source has led the authors to investigate new methods of electron field emission. One method presently under consideration involves the use of oxidized porous silicon thin films. The authors have used this technology to fabricate the first working field emission arrays from this substance. This approach reduces the diameter of an individual emitter to the nanometer scale. Tests of the first samples are encouraging, with extracted electron currents to nearly 1 mA resulting from less than 20 V of pulsed DC gate voltage. Modulated emission at 5 MHz was also observed. Developments of a full-scale emission array capable of delivering an electron beam at 18 GHz of minimum density 100 A/cm 2 is in progress

  4. Silicon photonic crystal nanostructures for refractive index sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, Dominic; Hürlimann, T.; Zabel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The authors present the fabrication and optical investigation of Silicon on Insulator photonic crystal drop-filters for use as refractive index sensors. Two types of defect nanocavities (L3 and H1-r) are embedded between two W1 photonic crystal waveguides to evanescently route light at the cavity...... mode frequency between input and output waveguides. Optical characterization of the structures in air and various liquids demonstrate detectivities in excess of n=n = 0:018 and n=n = 0:006 for the H1-r and L3 cavities, respectively. The measured cavity-frequencies and detector refractive index...... responsivities are in good agreement with simulations, demonstrating that the method provides a background free transducer signal with frequency selective addressing of a specic area of the sensor chip....

  5. Nanostructured gold and platinum electrodes on silicon structures for biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogurtsov, V I; Sheehan, M M

    2005-01-01

    Gold and platinum metal electrodes on Si/SiO 2 having undergone anisotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch treatment are considered. This treatment etches at different rates and directions in the material resulting in creation of numerous pyramid shaped holes in the silicon substrate. This surface is used to make metal electrodes with increased electrode efficiency. The electrodes can serve as the sensors or as the sensor substrates (for surface polymer modification) and because both gold and platinum are inert they have applications for food safety biosensing. Wine, an economically significant food product, was chosen as a matrix, and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was selected as a method of investigation of electrode behaviour. Based on results of EIS, different complexity equivalent circuits were determined by applying fitting mean square root optimisation of sensor complex impedance measurements

  6. Influence of fabrication parameter on the nanostructure and photoluminescence of highly doped p-porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shaoyuan [National Engineering Laboratory for Vacuum Metallurgy, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and energy engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Ma, Wenhui, E-mail: mwhsilicon@163.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Vacuum Metallurgy, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and energy engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Zhou, Yang, E-mail: zhouyangnano@163.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Vacuum Metallurgy, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and energy engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Chen, Xiuhua [Faculty of Physical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Ma, Mingyu [National Engineering Laboratory for Vacuum Metallurgy, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and energy engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Xiao, Yongyin [Faculty of Physical Science and Technology, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091 (China); Xu, Yaohui [National Engineering Laboratory for Vacuum Metallurgy, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and energy engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Porous silicon (PS) was prepared by anodizing highly doped p-type silicon in the solution of H{sub 2}O/ethanol/HF. The effects of key fabrication parameters (HF concentration, etching time and current density) on the nanostructure of PS were carefully investigated by AFM, SEM and TEM characterization. According to the experimental results, a more full-fledged model was developed to explain the crack behaviors on PS surface. The photoluminescence (PL) of resulting PS was studied by a fluorescence spectrophotometer and the results show that PL peak positions shift to shorter wavelength with the increasing current density, anodisation time and dilution of electrolyte. The PL spectra blue shift of the sample with higher porosity is confirmed by HRTEM results that the higher porosity results in smaller Si nanocrystals. A linear model (λ{sub PL/nm}=620.3–0.595P, R=0.905) was established to describe the correlation between PL peak positions and porosity of PS. -- Highlights: • The effect of fabrication parameter on the nanostructure of PS is investigated. • The influence of nanostructure on the photoluminescence behaviors is studied • A full-fledged model for expounding the crack behaviors of PS is presented. • The correlation between the porosity and PL peak blue shift is described by a linear model.

  7. Functionality of novel black silicon based nanostructured surfaces studied by TOF SIMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Aranyosiova, M.; Orinak, A.

    2010-01-01

    A functionality of the novel black silicon based nanostructured surfaces (BS 2) with different metal surface modifications was tested by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF SIMS). Mainly two surface functions were studied: analytical signal enhancement and analyte pre-ionization e......A functionality of the novel black silicon based nanostructured surfaces (BS 2) with different metal surface modifications was tested by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF SIMS). Mainly two surface functions were studied: analytical signal enhancement and analyte pre......-ionization effect in SIMS due to nanostructure type and the assistance of the noble metal surface coating (Ag or Au) for secondary ion formation. As a testing analyte a Rhodamine 6G was applied. Bi+ has been used as SIMS primary ions. It was found out that SIMS signal enhancement of the analyte significantly...... depends on Ag layer thickness and measured ion mode (negative, positive). The best SIMS signal enhancement was obtained at BS2 surface coated with 400 nm of Ag layer. SIMS fragmentation schemes were developed for a model analyte deposited onto a silver and gold surface. Significant differences in pre...

  8. Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintalapalle, Ramana V. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 °C). The structural characteristics and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts≥500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-800 °C. The electronic structure determination indicated that the nanocrystalline Ga2O3films exhibit a band gap of ~5 eV. Tungsten (W) incorporated Ga2O3 films were produced by co-sputter deposition. W-concentration was varied by the applied sputtering-power. No secondary phase formation was observed in W-incorporated Ga2O3 films. W-induced effects were significant on the structure and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films. The band gap of Ga2O3 films without W-incorporation was ~5 eV. Oxygen sensor characteristics evaluated using optical and electrical methods indicate a faster response in W-doped Ga2O3 films compared to intrinsic Ga2O3 films. The results demonstrate the applicability of both intrinsic and W-doped Ga-oxide films for oxygen sensor application at temperatures ≥700 °C.

  9. Thermal conductivity anisotropy in holey silicon nanostructures and its impact on thermoelectric cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zongqing; Lee, Jaeho

    2018-01-01

    Artificial nanostructures have improved prospects of thermoelectric systems by enabling selective scattering of phonons and demonstrating significant thermal conductivity reductions. While the low thermal conductivity provides necessary temperature gradients for thermoelectric conversion, the heat generation is detrimental to electronic systems where high thermal conductivity are preferred. The contrasting needs of thermal conductivity are evident in thermoelectric cooling systems, which call for a fundamental breakthrough. Here we show a silicon nanostructure with vertically etched holes, or holey silicon, uniquely combines the low thermal conductivity in the in-plane direction and the high thermal conductivity in the cross-plane direction, and that the anisotropy is ideal for lateral thermoelectric cooling. The low in-plane thermal conductivity due to substantial phonon boundary scattering in small necks sustains large temperature gradients for lateral Peltier junctions. The high cross-plane thermal conductivity due to persistent long-wavelength phonons effectively dissipates heat from a hot spot to the on-chip cooling system. Our scaling analysis based on spectral phonon properties captures the anisotropic size effects in holey silicon and predicts the thermal conductivity anisotropy ratio up to 20. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the thermoelectric cooling effectiveness of holey silicon is at least 30% greater than that of high-thermal-conductivity bulk silicon and 400% greater than that of low-thermal-conductivity chalcogenides; these results contrast with the conventional perception preferring either high or low thermal conductivity materials. The thermal conductivity anisotropy is even more favorable in laterally confined systems and will provide effective thermal management solutions for advanced electronics.

  10. Thermal conductivity anisotropy in holey silicon nanostructures and its impact on thermoelectric cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zongqing; Lee, Jaeho

    2018-01-26

    Artificial nanostructures have improved prospects of thermoelectric systems by enabling selective scattering of phonons and demonstrating significant thermal conductivity reductions. While the low thermal conductivity provides necessary temperature gradients for thermoelectric conversion, the heat generation is detrimental to electronic systems where high thermal conductivity are preferred. The contrasting needs of thermal conductivity are evident in thermoelectric cooling systems, which call for a fundamental breakthrough. Here we show a silicon nanostructure with vertically etched holes, or holey silicon, uniquely combines the low thermal conductivity in the in-plane direction and the high thermal conductivity in the cross-plane direction, and that the anisotropy is ideal for lateral thermoelectric cooling. The low in-plane thermal conductivity due to substantial phonon boundary scattering in small necks sustains large temperature gradients for lateral Peltier junctions. The high cross-plane thermal conductivity due to persistent long-wavelength phonons effectively dissipates heat from a hot spot to the on-chip cooling system. Our scaling analysis based on spectral phonon properties captures the anisotropic size effects in holey silicon and predicts the thermal conductivity anisotropy ratio up to 20. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the thermoelectric cooling effectiveness of holey silicon is at least 30% greater than that of high-thermal-conductivity bulk silicon and 400% greater than that of low-thermal-conductivity chalcogenides; these results contrast with the conventional perception preferring either high or low thermal conductivity materials. The thermal conductivity anisotropy is even more favorable in laterally confined systems and will provide effective thermal management solutions for advanced electronics.

  11. Self-organized nanostructures in silicon and glass for MEMS, MOEMS and BioMEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilienthal, K.; Fischer, M.; Stubenrauch, M.; Schober, A.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of self-organization in the process workflows for Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) and their derivatives is a smart way to get large areas of nanostructured surfaces for various applications. The generation of nano-masking spots by self-organizing residues in the plasma can lead to needle- or tube-like structures on the surface after (deep-) reactive ion etching. With lengths of 3 up to 25 μm and 150 up to 500 nm in diameter for silicon broad applications in the fields of micro fluidics with catalysts, micro-optical or mechanical mountings or carrier wafer bonding in microelectronics are possible. Now, we also developed dry etching processes for fused silica which shows analogue properties to 'Black Silicon' and investigated these glass nanostructures by a first parameter study to identify new usable structures and hybrids. This innovative starting point allows the transfer of 'Black Silicon' technologies and its applications to another important material class in micro- and nanotechnologies, fused silica.

  12. Self-organized nanostructures in silicon and glass for MEMS, MOEMS and BioMEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, K., E-mail: katharina.lilienthal@tu-ilmenau.de [Research Group ' Micro fluidics and Biosensors' , Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Fischer, M. [Research Group ' Micro fluidics and Biosensors' , Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Stubenrauch, M. [Department of Micromechanical Systems, Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Schober, A. [Research Group ' Micro fluidics and Biosensors' , Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2010-05-25

    The utilization of self-organization in the process workflows for Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) and their derivatives is a smart way to get large areas of nanostructured surfaces for various applications. The generation of nano-masking spots by self-organizing residues in the plasma can lead to needle- or tube-like structures on the surface after (deep-) reactive ion etching. With lengths of 3 up to 25 {mu}m and 150 up to 500 nm in diameter for silicon broad applications in the fields of micro fluidics with catalysts, micro-optical or mechanical mountings or carrier wafer bonding in microelectronics are possible. Now, we also developed dry etching processes for fused silica which shows analogue properties to 'Black Silicon' and investigated these glass nanostructures by a first parameter study to identify new usable structures and hybrids. This innovative starting point allows the transfer of 'Black Silicon' technologies and its applications to another important material class in micro- and nanotechnologies, fused silica.

  13. Nanostructured oxides for energy storage applications in batteries and supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, A.; Roberts, A. J.; Yee, E. L. H.; Slade, R. C. T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured materials are extensively investigated for application in energy storage and power generation devices. This paper deals with the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials based on oxides of vanadium and with their application as electrode materials for energy storage systems viz. supercapacitors. These nano-oxides have been synthesized using a hydrothermal route in the presence of templates: 1-hexadecylamine, Tweens and Brij types. Using templates during synthesis enables tailoring of the particle morphology and physical characteristics of synthesized powders. Broad X-ray diffraction peaks show the formation of nanoparticles, confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations. SEM studies show that a large range of nanostructures such as needles, fibers, particles, etc. can be synthesized. These particles have varying surface areas and electrical conductivity. Enhancement of surface area as much as seven times relative to surface areas of starting parent materials has been observed. These properties make such materials ideal candidates for application as electrode materials in super capacitors. Assembly and characterization of supercapacitors based on electrodes containing these active nano-oxides are discussed. Specific capacitance of >100 F g -1 has been observed. The specific capacitance decreases with cycling: causes of this phenomenon are presented. (authors)

  14. Zinc oxide nanostructured layers for gas sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Cretí, A.; Luches, A.; Lomascolo, M.; Martino, M.; Rella, R.; Valerini, D.

    2011-03-01

    Various kinds of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures, such as columns, pencils, hexagonal pyramids, hexagonal hierarchical structures, as well as smooth and rough films, were grown by pulsed laser deposition using KrF and ArF excimer lasers, without use of any catalyst. ZnO films were deposited at substrate temperatures from 500 to 700°C and oxygen background pressures of 1, 5, 50, and 100 Pa. Quite different morphologies of the deposited films were observed using scanning electron microscopy when different laser wavelengths (248 or 193 nm) were used to ablate the bulk ZnO target. Photoluminescence studies were performed at different temperatures (down to 7 K). The gas sensing properties of the different nanostructures were tested against low concentrations of NO2. The variation in the photoluminescence emission of the films when exposed to NO2 was used as transduction mechanism to reveal the presence of the gas. The nanostructured films with higher surface-to-volume ratio and higher total surface available for gas adsorption presented higher responses, detecting NO2 concentrations down to 3 ppm at room temperature.

  15. Crystal habit dependent quantum confined photoluminescence of zinc oxide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, Ian Harvey J.; Payawan, Leon Jr. M.; Sarmago, Roland V.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse zinc oxide crystal habits namely wire, rods, tubes, whiskers and tetrapods were synthesized via hydrothermal and carbothermal reduction routes. A vapor current induced regionalization in the carbothermal synthesis lead to the isolation of these crystal habits for characterization. The surface morphology of the nanostructures was analyzed via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The morphology and crystallinity of the as-synthesized nanostructure architectural motifs were related to their photoluminescence (PL). The photoluminescence at 157 nm was taken using F2 excimer laser and a crystal habit dependent response was observed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were conducted to deduce the degree of crystallinity showing results consistent with the excitonic emission at the band edge and visible emission at the electron-hole recombination sites. The presence of minimal crystal defects which gave the green emission was supported by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data. Transmission spectroscopy for the tetrapods exhibited an interesting PL reduction associated with high-energy deep traps in the nanostructures. Furthermore, some intensity dependent characteristics were deduced indicating quantum confined properties of these nano structures. (author)

  16. Review of Fabrication Methods, Physical Properties, and Applications of Nanostructured Copper Oxides Formed via Electrochemical Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech J. Stepniowski

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Typically, anodic oxidation of metals results in the formation of hexagonally arranged nanoporous or nanotubular oxide, with a specific oxidation state of the transition metal. Recently, the majority of transition metals have been anodized; however, the formation of copper oxides by electrochemical oxidation is yet unexplored and offers numerous, unique properties and applications. Nanowires formed by copper electrochemical oxidation are crystalline and composed of cuprous (CuO or cupric oxide (Cu2O, bringing varied physical and chemical properties to the nanostructured morphology and different band gaps: 1.44 and 2.22 eV, respectively. According to its Pourbaix (potential-pH diagram, the passivity of copper occurs at ambient and alkaline pH. In order to grow oxide nanostructures on copper, alkaline electrolytes like NaOH and KOH are used. To date, no systemic study has yet been reported on the influence of the operating conditions, such as the type of electrolyte, its temperature, and applied potential, on the morphology of the grown nanostructures. However, the numerous reports gathered in this paper will provide a certain view on the matter. After passivation, the formed nanostructures can be also post-treated. Post-treatments employ calcinations or chemical reactions, including the chemical reduction of the grown oxides. Nanostructures made of CuO or Cu2O have a broad range of potential applications. On one hand, with the use of surface morphology, the wetting contact angle is tuned. On the other hand, the chemical composition (pure Cu2O and high surface area make such materials attractive for renewable energy harvesting, including water splitting. While compared to other fabrication techniques, self-organized anodization is a facile, easy to scale-up, time-efficient approach, providing high-aspect ratio one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. Despite these advantages, there are still numerous challenges that have to be faced, including the

  17. Reduced graphene oxide wrapped Ag nanostructures for enhanced SERS activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anju K.; Kala, M. S.; Thomas, Sabu; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar

    2018-04-01

    Graphene - metal nanoparticle hybrids have received great attention due to their unique electronic properties, large specific surface area, very high conductivity and more charge transfer. Thus, it is extremely advantages to develop a simple and efficient process to disperse metal nanostructures over the surface of graphene sheets. Herein, we report a hydrothermal assisted strategy for developing reduced graphene oxide /Ag nanomorphotypes (cube, wire) for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications, considering the advantages of synergistic effect of graphene and plasmonic properties of Ag nanomorphotypes.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of copper oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillani, Saquf; Jelani, Mohsan; Hassan, Najam Ul; Ahmad, Shahbaz; Hafeez, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    The development of synthetic methods has been broadly accepted as an area of fundamental importance to the understanding and application of nanoscale materials. It allows the individual to modulate basic parameters such as morphology, particle size, size distributions, and composition. Several methods have been developed to synthesize CuO nanostructures with diverse morphologies, sizes, and dimensions using different chemical and physical based approaches. In this work, CuO nanostructures have been synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and simple chemical deposition method. The characterization of these products has been carried out by the x-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Biological activity such as antibacterial nature of synthesized CuO is also explored. XRD peaks analysis revealed the monoclinic crystalline phase of copper oxide nanostructures. While the rod-like and particle-like morphologies have been observed in SEM results. FTIR spectra have confirmed the formation of CuO nanoparticles by exhibiting its characteristic peaks corresponding to 494 cm‑1 and 604 cm‑1. The energy band gap of the as-prepared CuO nanostructures determined from UV–vis spectra is found to be 2.18 eV and 2.0 eV for precipitation and chemically deposited samples respectively. The antibacterial activity results described that the synthesized CuO nanoparticles showed better activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The investigated results suggested the synthesis of highly stable CuO nanoparticles with significant antibacterial activities.

  19. Improvement of Infrared Detectors for Tissue Oximetry using Black Silicon Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Dahl; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Alcala, Lucia R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a nanostructured surface, made of dry etched black silicon, which lowers the reflectance for light incident at all angles. This surface is fabricated on infrared detectors used for tissue oximetry, where the detection of weak diffuse light signals is important. Monte Carlo simulations...... performed on a model of a neonatal head shows that approximately 60% of the injected light will be diffuse reflected. However, the change in diffuse reflected light due to the change in cerebral oxygenation is very low and the light will be completely isotropic scattered. The reflectance of the black...... in quantum efficiency for both normal incident light and light incident at 38°....

  20. Controlling of morphology and electrocatalytic properties of cobalt oxide nanostructures prepared by potentiodynamic deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallaj, Rahman [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhtari, Keivan [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O.Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O.Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltanian, Saied [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Electrodeposited cobalt oxide nanostructures were prepared by Repetitive Triangular Potential Scans (RTPS) as a simple, remarkably fast and scalable potentiodynamic method. Electrochemical deposition of cobalt oxide nanostructures onto GC electrode was performed from aqueous Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, (pH 6) solution using cyclic voltammetry method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of fabricated nanostructures. The evaluation of electrochemical properties of deposited films was performed using cyclic voltametry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (IS) techniques. The analysis of the experimental data clearly showed that the variations of potential scanning ranges during deposition process have drastic effects on the geometry, chemical structure and particle size of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. In addition, the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of prepared nanostructures can be controlled through applying different potential windows in electrodeposition process. The imaging and voltammetric studies suggested to the existence of at least three different shapes of cobalt-oxide nanostructures in various potential windows applied for electrodeposition. With enlarging the applied potential window, the spherical-like cobalt oxide nanoparticles with particles sizes about 30–50 nm changed to the grain-like structures (30 nm × 80 nm) and then to the worm-like cobalt oxide nanostructures with 30 nm diameter and 200–400 nm in length. Furthermore, the roughness of the prepared nanostructures increased with increasing positive potential window. The GC electrodes modified with cobalt oxide nanostructures shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and As (III) oxidation. The electrocatalytic activity of cobalt oxide nanostructures prepared at more positive potential window toward hydrogen peroxide oxidation was increased, while for As(III) oxidation the electrocatalytic

  1. Controlling of morphology and electrocatalytic properties of cobalt oxide nanostructures prepared by potentiodynamic deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaj, Rahman; Akhtari, Keivan; Salimi, Abdollah; Soltanian, Saied

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposited cobalt oxide nanostructures were prepared by Repetitive Triangular Potential Scans (RTPS) as a simple, remarkably fast and scalable potentiodynamic method. Electrochemical deposition of cobalt oxide nanostructures onto GC electrode was performed from aqueous Co(NO 3 ) 2 , (pH 6) solution using cyclic voltammetry method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of fabricated nanostructures. The evaluation of electrochemical properties of deposited films was performed using cyclic voltametry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (IS) techniques. The analysis of the experimental data clearly showed that the variations of potential scanning ranges during deposition process have drastic effects on the geometry, chemical structure and particle size of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. In addition, the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of prepared nanostructures can be controlled through applying different potential windows in electrodeposition process. The imaging and voltammetric studies suggested to the existence of at least three different shapes of cobalt-oxide nanostructures in various potential windows applied for electrodeposition. With enlarging the applied potential window, the spherical-like cobalt oxide nanoparticles with particles sizes about 30–50 nm changed to the grain-like structures (30 nm × 80 nm) and then to the worm-like cobalt oxide nanostructures with 30 nm diameter and 200–400 nm in length. Furthermore, the roughness of the prepared nanostructures increased with increasing positive potential window. The GC electrodes modified with cobalt oxide nanostructures shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 and As (III) oxidation. The electrocatalytic activity of cobalt oxide nanostructures prepared at more positive potential window toward hydrogen peroxide oxidation was increased, while for As(III) oxidation the electrocatalytic activity decreased

  2. Silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp fabrication by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2007-01-01

    The fabrication of silicon oxide nanoimprint stamp employing edge lithography in combination with silicon nitride deposition is presented. The fabrication process is based on conventional photolithography an weg etching methods. Nanoridges with width dimension of sub-20 nm were fabricated by edge

  3. Development of Doped Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide and its Application to Thin‑Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertz, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the development of doped microcrystalline silicon oxide (µc‑SiOx:H) alloys and its application in thin‑film silicon solar cells. The doped µc‑SiOx:H material was prepared from carbon dioxide (CO2), silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) gas mixtures using plasma enhanced

  4. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  5. Nanostructured 2D cellular materials in silicon by sidewall transfer lithography NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syms, Richard R. A.; Liu, Dixi; Ahmad, Munir M.

    2017-07-01

    Sidewall transfer lithography (STL) is demonstrated as a method for parallel fabrication of 2D nanostructured cellular solids in single-crystal silicon. The linear mechanical properties of four lattices (perfect and defected diamond; singly and doubly periodic honeycomb) with low effective Young’s moduli and effective Poisson’s ratio ranging from positive to negative are modelled using analytic theory and the matrix stiffness method with an emphasis on boundary effects. The lattices are fabricated with a minimum feature size of 100 nm and an aspect ratio of 40:1 using single- and double-level STL and deep reactive ion etching of bonded silicon-on-insulator. Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) containing cellular materials are used to demonstrate stretching, bending and brittle fracture. Predicted edge effects are observed, theoretical values of Poisson’s ratio are verified and failure patterns are described.

  6. Enhanced light absorption in an ultrathin silicon solar cell utilizing plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels A.

    2012-10-01

    Nowadays, bringing photovoltaics to the market is mainly limited by high cost of electricity produced by the photovoltaic solar cell. Thin-film photovoltaics offers the potential for a significant cost reduction compared to traditional photovoltaics. However, the performance of thin-film solar cells is generally limited by poor light absorption. We propose an ultrathin-film silicon solar cell configuration based on SOI structure, where the light absorption is enhanced by use of plasmonic nanostructures. By placing a one-dimensional plasmonic nanograting on the bottom of the solar cell, the generated photocurrent for a 200 nm-thickness crystalline silicon solar cell can be enhanced by 90% in the considered wavelength range. These results are paving a promising way for the realization of high-efficiency thin-film solar cells.

  7. Growing Embossed Nanostructures of Polymer Brushes on Wet-Etched Silicon Templated via Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaobin; Yan, Qin; Ma, Yinzhou; Guo, Xin; Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Block copolymer nanolithography has attracted enormous interest in chip technologies, such as integrated silicon chips and biochips, due to its large-scale and mass production of uniform patterns. We further modified this technology to grow embossed nanodots, nanorods, and nanofingerprints of polymer brushes on silicon from their corresponding wet-etched nanostructures covered with pendent SiHx (X = 1-3) species. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to image the topomorphologies, and multiple transmission-reflection infrared spectroscopy (MTR-IR) was used to monitor the surface molecular films in each step for the sequential stepwise reactions. In addition, two layers of polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) brush nanodots were observed, which were attributed to the circumferential convergence growth and the diffusion-limited growth of the polymer brushes. The pH response of PMAA nanodots in the same region was investigated by AFM from pH 3.0 to 9.0.

  8. The fabrication of silicon nanostructures by focused-ion-beam implantation and TMAH wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievilae, Paeivi; Chekurov, Nikolai; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2010-01-01

    Local gallium implantation of silicon by a focused ion beam (FIB) has been used to create a mask for anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) wet etching. The dependence of the etch stop properties of gallium-doped silicon on the implanted dose has been investigated and a dose of 4 x 10 13 ions cm -2 has been determined to be the threshold value for achieving observable etching resistance. Only a thin, approx. 50 nm, surface layer is found to be durable enough to serve as a mask with a high selectivity of at least 2000:1 between implanted and non-implanted areas. The combined FIB-TMAH process has been used to generate various types of 3D nanostructures including nanochannels separated by thin vertical sidewalls with aspect ratios up to 1:30, ultra-narrow (approx. 25 nm) freestanding bridges and cantilevers, and gratings with a resolution of 20 lines μm -1 .

  9. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  10. Density of oxidation-induced stacking faults in damaged silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, F.G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Verwey, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    A model for the relation between density and length of oxidation-induced stacking faults on damaged silicon surfaces is proposed, based on interactions of stacking faults with dislocations and neighboring stacking faults. The model agrees with experiments.

  11. Nanostructured magnesium oxide biosensing platform for cholera detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manoj K.; Azahar Ali, Md.; Agrawal, Ved V.; Ansari, Z. A.; Ansari, S. G.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2013-04-01

    We report fabrication of highly crystalline nanostructured magnesium oxide (NanoMgO, size >30 nm) film electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate for Vibrio cholerae detection. The single stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) probe, consisting of 23 bases (O1 gene sequence) immobilized onto NanoMgO/ITO electrode surface, has been characterized using electrochemical, Fourier Transform-Infra Red, and UltraViolet-visible spectroscopic techniques. The hybridization studies of ssDNA/NanoMgO/ITO bioelectrode with fragmented target DNA conducted using differential pulse voltammetry reveal sensitivity as 16.80 nA/ng/cm2, response time of 3 s, linearity as 100-500 ng/μL, and stability of about 120 days.

  12. Surface nanostructuring by ion-induced localized plasma expansion in zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Said, A. S., E-mail: elsaid@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: a.s.el-said@hzdr.de [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Djebli, M. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics USTHB, B.P. 32 Bab Ezzour, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-06-09

    Creation of hillock-like nanostructures on the surface of zinc oxide single crystals by irradiation with slow highly charged ions is reported. At constant kinetic energy, the nanostructures were only observed after irradiation with ions of potential energies above a threshold between 19.1 keV and 23.3 keV. The size of the nanostructures increases as a function of potential energy. A plasma expansion approach is used to explain the nanostructures creation. The calculations showed that the surface nanostructures became taller with the increase of ionic temperature. The influence of charged cluster formation and the relevance of their polarity are discussed.

  13. Surface nanostructuring by ion-induced localized plasma expansion in zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Said, A. S.; Moslem, W. M.; Djebli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of hillock-like nanostructures on the surface of zinc oxide single crystals by irradiation with slow highly charged ions is reported. At constant kinetic energy, the nanostructures were only observed after irradiation with ions of potential energies above a threshold between 19.1 keV and 23.3 keV. The size of the nanostructures increases as a function of potential energy. A plasma expansion approach is used to explain the nanostructures creation. The calculations showed that the surface nanostructures became taller with the increase of ionic temperature. The influence of charged cluster formation and the relevance of their polarity are discussed.

  14. The influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulinich O. A.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The near-surface silicon layers in silicon – dioxide silicon systems with modern methods of research are investigated. It is shown that these layers have compound structure and their parameters depend on oxidation and initial silicon parameters. It is shown the influence of initial defects on mechanical stress and deformation distribution in oxidized silicon.

  15. Electrochemical Fabrication of Nanostructures on Porous Silicon for Biochemical Sensing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Euna; Hwang, Joonki; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Heon; Lee, Sung Hwan; Tran, Van-Khue; Chung, Woo Sung; Park, Chan Ho; Choo, Jaebum; Seong, Gi Hun

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for the electrochemical patterning of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) or silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on porous silicon, and explore their applications in: (1) the quantitative analysis of hydroxylamine as a chemical sensing electrode and (2) as a highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate for Rhodamine 6G. For hydroxylamine detection, AuNPs-porous silicon can enhance the electrochemical oxidation of hydroxylamine. The current changed linearly for concentrations ranging from 100 μM to 1.32 mM (R(2) = 0.995), and the detection limit was determined to be as low as 55 μM. When used as SERS substrates, these materials also showed that nanoparticles decorated on porous silicon substrates have more SERS hot spots than those decorated on crystalline silicon substrates, resulting in a larger SERS signal. Moreover, AgNPs-porous silicon provided five-times higher signal compared to AuNPs-porous silicon. From these results, we expect that nanoparticles decorated on porous silicon substrates can be used in various types of biochemical sensing platforms.

  16. Nanostructured thin films of indium oxide nanocrystals confined in alumina matrixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouifoulen, A.; Edely, M.; Errien, N.; Kassiba, A.; Outzourhit, A.; Makowska-Janusik, M.; Gautier, N.; Lajaunie, L.; Oueriagli, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystals of indium oxide (In 2 O 3 ) with sizes below 10 nm were prepared in alumina matrixes by using a co-pulverization method. The used substrates such as borosilicate glasses or (100) silicon as well as the substrate temperatures during the deposition process were modified and their effects characterized on the structural and physical properties of alumina-In 2 O 3 films. Complementary investigation methods including X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance in the range 250-1100 nm and transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the nanostructured films. The crystalline order, morphology and optical responses were monitored as function of the deposition parameters and the post-synthesis annealing. The optimal conditions were found and allow realizing suitable nanostructured films with a major crystalline order of cubic phase for the In 2 O 3 nanocrystals. The optical properties of the films were analyzed and the key parameters such as direct and indirect band gaps were evaluated as function of the synthesis conditions and the crystalline quality of the films.

  17. Design and optimization of Ag-dielectric core-shell nanostructures for silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xiang Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal-dielectric core-shell nanostructures have been proposed as a light trapping scheme for enhancing the optical absorption of silicon solar cells. As a potential application of such enhanced effects, the scattering efficiencies of three core-shell structures (Ag@SiO2, Ag@TiO2, and Ag@ZrO2 are discussed using the Mie Scattering theory. For compatibility with experiment results, the core diameter and shell thickness are limited to 100 and 30 nm, respectively, and a weighted scattering efficiency is introduced to evaluate the scattering abilities of different nanoparticles under the solar spectrum AM 1.5. The simulated results indicate that the shell material and thickness are two key parameters affecting the weighted scattering efficiency. The SiO2 is found to be an unsuitable shell medium because of its low refractive index. However, using the high refractive index mediumTiO2 in Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles, only the thicker shell (30 nm is more beneficial for light scattering. The ZrO2 is an intermediate refractive index material, so Ag@ZrO2 nanoparticles are the most effective core-shell nanostructures in these silicon solar cells applications.

  18. Laser ablation of a silicon target in chloroform: formation of multilayer graphite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrafi, Kamal; García-Calzada, Raúl; Sanchez-Royo, Juan F.; Chirvony, Vladimir S.; Agouram, Saïd; Abargues, Rafael; Ibáñez, Rafael; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P.

    2013-04-01

    With the use of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy methods of analysis we show that the laser ablation of a Si target in chloroform (CHCl3) by nanosecond UV pulses (40 ns, 355 nm) results in the formation of about 50-80 nm core-shell nanoparticles with a polycrystalline core composed of small (5-10 nm) Si and SiC mono-crystallites, the core being coated by several layers of carbon with the structure of graphite (the shell). In addition, free carbon multilayer nanostructures (carbon nano-onions) are also found in the suspension. On the basis of a comparison with similar laser ablation experiments implemented in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), where only bare (uncoated) Si nanoparticles are produced, we suggest that a chemical (solvent decomposition giving rise to highly reactive CH-containing radicals) rather than a physical (solvent atomization followed by carbon nanostructure formation) mechanism is responsible for the formation of graphitic shells. The silicon carbonization process found for the case of laser ablation in chloroform may be promising for silicon surface protection and functionalization.

  19. Oxidation of ultra low carbon and silicon bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Lucia [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: lucia.suarez@ctm.com.es; Rodriguez-Calvillo, Pablo [CTM - Technologic Centre, Materials Technology Area, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: pablo.rodriguez@ctm.com.es; Houbaert, Yvan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: Yvan.Houbaert@UGent.be; Colas, Rafael [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)], E-mail: rcolas@mail.uanl.mx

    2010-06-15

    Oxidation tests were carried out in samples from an ultra low carbon and two silicon bearing steels to determine the distribution and morphology of the oxide species present. The ultra low carbon steel was oxidized for short periods of time within a chamber designed to obtain thin oxide layers by controlling the atmosphere, and for longer times in an electric furnace; the silicon steels were reheated only in the electric furnace. The chamber was constructed to study the behaviour encountered during the short period of time between descaling and rolling in modern continuous mills. It was found that the oxide layers formed on the samples reheated in the electric furnace were made of different oxide species. The specimens treated in the chamber had layers made almost exclusively of wustite. Selected oxide samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy to obtain electron backscattered diffraction patterns, which were used to identify the oxide species in the layer.

  20. Oxide layers for silicon detector protection against enviroment effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'tsazh, E.; Brylovska, I.; Valerian, M.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that for protection of silicon detectors of nuclear radiations oxide layers could be used. The layers are produced by electrochemical oxidation of silicon surface with the following low-temperature annealing. These layers have characteristics similar to those for oxide layers produced by treatment of silicon samples at elevated temperature in oxygen flow. To determine properties of oxide layers produced by electrochemical oxidation the α-particle back-scattering method and the method of volt-farad characteristics were used. Protection properties of such layers were checked on the surface-barrier detectors. It was shown that protection properties of such detectors were conserved during long storage at room temperature and during their storage under wet-bulb temperature. Detectors without protection layer have worsened their characteristics

  1. Catalytic oxidation of silicon by cesium ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souzis, A.E.; Huang, H.; Carr, W.E.; Seidl, M.

    1991-01-01

    Results for room-temperature oxidation of silicon using cesium ion bombardment and low oxygen exposure are presented. Bombardment with cesium ions is shown to allow oxidation at O 2 pressures orders of magnitude smaller than with noble gas ion bombardment. Oxide layers of up to 30 A in thickness are grown with beam energies ranging from 20--2000 eV, O 2 pressures from 10 -9 to 10 -6 Torr, and total O 2 exposures of 10 0 to 10 4 L. Results are shown to be consistent with models indicating that initial oxidation of silicon is via dissociative chemisorption of O 2 , and that the low work function of the cesium- and oxygen-coated silicon plays the primary role in promoting the oxidation process

  2. Mechanical grooving of oxidized porous silicon to reduce the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarroug, A.; Dimassi, W.; Ouertani, R.; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre des Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we are interested to use oxidized porous silicon (ox-PS) as a mask. So, we display the creating of a rough surface which enhances the absorption of incident light by solar cells and reduces the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si). It clearly can be seen that the mechanical grooving enables us to elaborate the texturing of monocrystalline silicon wafer. Results demonstrated that the application of a PS layer followed by a thermal treatment under O2 ambient easily gives us an oxide layer of uniform size which can vary from a nanometer to about ten microns. In addition, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy investigations of the PS layer illustrates the possibility to realize oxide layer as a mask for porous silicon. We found also that this simple and low cost method decreases the total reflectivity (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  4. Hierarchically Nanostructured Transition Metal Oxides for Lithium‐Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingbo; Tang, Hao; Li, Lulu; Hu, Qin; Zhang, Li; Xue, Huaiguo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs) have been widely used in the field of portable electric devices because of their high energy density and long cycling life. To further improve the performance of LIBs, it is of great importance to develop new electrode materials. Various transition metal oxides (TMOs) have been extensively investigated as electrode materials for LIBs. According to the reaction mechanism, there are mainly two kinds of TMOs, one is based on conversion reaction and the other is based on intercalation/deintercalation reaction. Recently, hierarchically nanostructured TMOs have become a hot research area in the field of LIBs. Hierarchical architecture can provide numerous accessible electroactive sites for redox reactions, shorten the diffusion distance of Li‐ion during the reaction, and accommodate volume expansion during cycling. With rapid research progress in this field, a timely account of this advanced technology is highly necessary. Here, the research progress on the synthesis methods, morphological characteristics, and electrochemical performances of hierarchically nanostructured TMOs for LIBs is summarized and discussed. Some relevant prospects are also proposed. PMID:29593962

  5. A novel nanostructure of cadmium oxide synthesized by mechanochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadjarodi, A., E-mail: tajarodi@iust.ac.ir [Research Laboratory of Inorganic Materials Synthesis, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Imani, M. [Research Laboratory of Inorganic Materials Synthesis, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} A novel nanostructure of CdO was synthesized by mechanochemical reaction followed by calcination. {yields} Mechanochemical method is a simple and low-cost to synthesize nanomaterials. {yields} The obtained precursor was characterized by FT-IR, NMR techniques and elemental analysis. {yields} SEM images showed cauliflower-like shape of sample with components average diameter of 68 nm. {yields} The rods and tubes bundles with single crystalline nature were revealed by ED pattern and TEM images. -- Abstract: Cauliflower-like cadmium oxide (CdO) nanostructure was synthesized by mechanochemical reaction followed calcination procedure. Cadmium acetate dihydrate and acetamide were used as reagents and the resulting precursor was calcinated at 450 {sup o}C for 2 h in air. The structures of the precursor and resultant product of the heating treatment were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction pattern (ED). SEM and TEM images revealed the cauliflower-like morphology of the sample. This structure includes the bundles of rods and tubes in nanoscale, which combine with each other and form the resulting morphology with the average diameter, 68 nm of the components. ED pattern indicated the single crystal nature of the formed bundles.

  6. A novel nanostructure of cadmium oxide synthesized by mechanochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadjarodi, A.; Imani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel nanostructure of CdO was synthesized by mechanochemical reaction followed by calcination. → Mechanochemical method is a simple and low-cost to synthesize nanomaterials. → The obtained precursor was characterized by FT-IR, NMR techniques and elemental analysis. → SEM images showed cauliflower-like shape of sample with components average diameter of 68 nm. → The rods and tubes bundles with single crystalline nature were revealed by ED pattern and TEM images. -- Abstract: Cauliflower-like cadmium oxide (CdO) nanostructure was synthesized by mechanochemical reaction followed calcination procedure. Cadmium acetate dihydrate and acetamide were used as reagents and the resulting precursor was calcinated at 450 o C for 2 h in air. The structures of the precursor and resultant product of the heating treatment were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction pattern (ED). SEM and TEM images revealed the cauliflower-like morphology of the sample. This structure includes the bundles of rods and tubes in nanoscale, which combine with each other and form the resulting morphology with the average diameter, 68 nm of the components. ED pattern indicated the single crystal nature of the formed bundles.

  7. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  8. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  9. Novel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-09-14

    With its high specific capacity, silicon is a promising anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries, but volume expansion and fracture during lithium reaction have prevented implementation. Si nanostructures have shown resistance to fracture during cycling, but the critical effects of nanostructure size and native surface oxide on volume expansion and cycling performance are not understood. Here, we use an ex situ transmission electron microscopy technique to observe the same Si nanowires before and after lithiation and have discovered the impacts of size and surface oxide on volume expansion. For nanowires with native SiO2, the surface oxide can suppress the volume expansion during lithiation for nanowires with diameters <∼50 nm. Finite element modeling shows that the oxide layer can induce compressive hydrostatic stress that could act to limit the extent of lithiation. The understanding developed herein of how volume expansion and extent of lithiation can depend on nanomaterial structure is important for the improvement of Si-based anodes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  10. Amino acid-assisted synthesis of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljinder; Moudgil, Lovika; Singh, Gurinder; Kaura, Aman

    2018-05-01

    In this manuscript we have used experimental approach that can provide a fundamental knowledge about the role played by biomolecules in designing the shape of nanostructure (NS) at a microscopic level. The three different amino acids (AAs) - Arginine (Arg), Aspartic acid (Asp) and Histidine (His) coated Zinc oxide (ZnO) NSs to explain the growth mechanism of nanoparticles of different shapes. Based on the experimental methodology we propose that AA-ZnO (Asp and Arg) nanomaterials could form of rod like configuration and His-ZnO NPs could form tablet like configuration. The synthesized samples are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results reveal that AAs are responsible for formation of different NSs

  11. Zinc oxide nanostructures: new properties for advances applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupan, Oleg; Chow, Lee; Pauporte, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide is a material which exhibits a variety of new properties at nanometer dimensions. Various synthesis techniques have been carried out to provide growth of nanowires, nanorods, nanorings, nanosprings, and nanobelts of ZnO under various conditions. These nanostructures show that ZnO possesses probably the richest family of nanoarchitectures among all materials, including their structures and properties. Such nanoarchitectures are potential building blocks for novel applications in optoelectronics, sensors, photovoltaic and nano-biomedical sciences. This work presents a review of various nano architectures of ZnO grown by the electrochemical, hydrothermal and solid-vapor phase techniques and their properties. The possible applications of ZnO nanowires as sensors, nano-DSSC, photodetectors and nano-LEDs will be presented.

  12. Fabrication of Up-Conversion Phosphor Films on Flexible Substrates Using a Nanostructured Organo-Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Young-Sun; Kim, Tae-Un; Kim, Seon-Hoon; Lee, Young-Hwan; Choi, Pil-Son; Hwang, Kyu-Seog

    2018-03-01

    Up-conversion phosphors have attracted considerable attention because of their applications in solid-state lasers, optical communications, flat-panel displays, photovoltaic cells, and biological labels. Among them, NaYF4 is reported as one of the most efficient hosts for infrared to visible photon up-conversion of Yb3+ and Er3+ ions. However, a low-temperature method is required for industrial scale fabrication of photonic and optoelectronic devices on flexible organic substrates. In this study, hexagonal β-NaYF4: 3 mol% Yb3+, 3 mol% Er3+ up-conversion phosphor using Ca2+ was prepared by chemical solution method. Then, we synthesized a nanostructured organo-silicon compound from methyl tri-methoxysilane and 3-glycidoxy-propyl-trimethoxy-silane. The transmittance of the organo-silicon compound was found to be over 90% in the wavelength range of 400~1500 nm. Then we prepared a fluoride-based phosphor paste by mixing the organo-silicon compound with Na(Ca)YF4:Yb3+, Er3+. Subsequently, this paste was coated on polyethylene terephthalate, followed by heat-treatment at 120 °C. The visible emission of the infrared detection card was found to be at 655 nm and 661 nm an excitation wavelength of 980 nm.

  13. Improved broadband and quasi-omnidirectional anti-reflection properties with biomimetic silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit; Jen, Yi-Jun; Peng, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Tze-An; Hsu, Yu-Kuei; Pan, Ci-Ling; Lo, Hung-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Hsun; Chang, Yuan-Huei; Lee, Chih-Shan; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2007-12-01

    Nature routinely produces nanostructured surfaces with useful properties, such as the self-cleaning lotus leaf, the colour of the butterfly wing, the photoreceptor in brittlestar and the anti-reflection observed in the moth eye. Scientists and engineers have been able to mimic some of these natural structures in the laboratory and in real-world applications. Here, we report a simple aperiodic array of silicon nanotips on a 6-inch wafer with a sub-wavelength structure that can suppress the reflection of light at a range of wavelengths from the ultraviolet, through the visible part of the spectrum, to the terahertz region. Reflection is suppressed for a wide range of angles of incidence and for both s- and p-polarized light. The antireflection properties of the silicon result from changes in the refractive index caused by variations in the height of the silicon nanotips, and can be simulated with models that have been used to explain the low reflection from moth eyes. The improved anti-reflection properties of the surfaces could have applications in renewable energy and electro-optical devices for the military.

  14. Fabrication of Silicon nanostructures by UHV-STM lithography in Self-Assembled Monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, M.; Brechling, A.; Rott, K.; Meyners, D.; Kleineberg, U.; Heinzmann, U.; Knueller, A.; Eck, W.; Goelzhueuser, A.; Grunze, M.

    2002-01-01

    Our approach utilizes UHV-STM writing in Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAM). SAMs form highly-ordered ultrathin (∼2-3 nm) monomolecular layers on top of pre-activated Si(100) or Si(111) surfaces. After patterning by UHV-STM writing in constant-current mode at different write parameters (gap voltage, electron dose) the modified Self-Assembled Monolayer serves as an etch mask for an anisotropic wet etch transfer (two-step etch process in aqueous solutions of 5 % HF and 1 M KOH), of the write structure into the silicon substrate. The corresponding silicon nano-structures have been analyzed afterwards by AFM or SEM to characterize the pattern accuracy. We have studied the suitability of three different types of SAMs on silicon single-crystals. Alkyl-chain-type SAMs like Octadecylsilane (ODS) monolayer have been formed by immersion of hydroxylated Si(100) in Octadecyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 (CH 27 SiCl 3 ) while SAMs with aromatic spacer groups such as Hydroxybiphenyl (HBP, (C 6 H 6 ) 2 OH) and Ethoxybiphenyl silane (EBP, (C 6 H 6 ) 2 O(CH 2 ) 3 Si(OCH 3 ) 3 ) are formed on Si(111). (Authors)

  15. Use of porous silicon to minimize oxidation induced stacking fault defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, S.Y.; Evans, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents methods for minimizing stacking fault defects, generated during oxidation of silicon, include damaging the back of the wafer or depositing poly-silicon on the back. In either case a highly defective structure is created and this is capable of gettering either self-interstitials or impurities which promote nucleation of stacking fault defects. A novel method of minimizing these defects is to form a patch of porous silicon on the back of the wafer by electrochemical etching. Annealing under inert gas prior to oxidation may then result in the necessary gettering. Experiments were carried out in which wafers were subjected to this treatment. Subsequent to oxidation, the wafers were etched to remove oxide and reveal defects. The regions of the wafer adjacent to the porous silicon patch were defect-free, whereas remote regions had defects. Deep level transient spectroscopy has been used to examine the gettering capability of porous silicon, and the paper discusses the mechanism by which the porous silicon getters

  16. Bi-template assisted synthesis of mesoporous manganese oxide nanostructures: Tuning properties for efficient CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mouni; Basak, Somjyoti; Naskar, Milan Kanti

    2016-02-21

    A simple soft bi-templating process was used for the synthesis of mesoporous manganese oxide nanostructures using KMnO4 as a precursor and polyethylene glycol and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as templates in the presence of benzaldehyde as an organic additive in alkaline media, followed by calcination at 400 °C. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic analysis of the calcined products confirmed the existence of stoichiometric (MnO2 and Mn5O8) and non-stoichiometric mixed phases (MnO2 + Mn5O8) of Mn oxides obtained by tuning the concentration of the additive and the synthesis time. The surface properties of the prepared Mn oxides were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mesoporosity of the samples was confirmed by N2 adsorption-desorption. Different synthetic conditions resulted in the formation of different morphologies of the Mn oxides (α-MnO2, Mn5O8, and α-MnO2 + Mn5O8), such as nanoparticles, nanorods, and nanowires. The synthesized mesoporous Mn oxide nanostructures were used for the catalytic oxidation of the harmful air pollutant carbon monoxide. The Mn5O8 nanoparticles with the highest Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area and the non-stoichiometric manganese oxide (α-MnO2 + Mn5O8) nanorods with a higher Mn(3+) concentration had the best catalytic efficiency.

  17. A general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures using plasma electrolytic oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Bing; Liu, Lusheng; Jiang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A general strategy for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructure has been developed based on plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology (up). Using this method, ZnWO 4 and NiWO 4 nanostructures with controllable morphologies and superior crystallinity can be easily obtained (down), showing obvious advantage in comparison with conventional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. - Highlights: • Plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) method has been used for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructures. • ZnWO 4 nanoplates have strong mechanical adhesion with porous TiO 2 film substrate. • The morphology and dimensional size of ZnWO 4 nanostructures can be selectively tailored by controlling the annealing temperature and growth time. • The PEO method can be widely applied to the growth of various metal oxides. - Abstract: A new method based on conventional plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology has been developed for the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures. Using this method, ZnWO 4 and NiWO 4 nanostructures with controllable morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets and microsheets) and superior crystallinity have been synthesized. It has been found that the morphology diversity of ZnWO 4 nanostructures can be selectively tailored through tuning the electrolyte concentration and annealing temperatures, showing obvious advantages in comparison to traditional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. Precise microscopy analyses on the cross section of the PEO coating and ZnWO 4 nanostructures confirmed that the precursors initially precipitated in the PEO coating and its surface during plasma discharge process are responsible for the nucleation and subsequent growth of metal tungstate nanostructures by thermal annealing. The method developed in this work represents a general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures and the formation mechanism of metal tungstate nanostructures fabricated by

  18. A general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures using plasma electrolytic oxidation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan, E-mail: baodanliu@imr.ac.cn; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Bing; Liu, Lusheng; Jiang, Xin, E-mail: xjiang@imr.ac.cn

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A general strategy for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructure has been developed based on plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology (up). Using this method, ZnWO{sub 4} and NiWO{sub 4} nanostructures with controllable morphologies and superior crystallinity can be easily obtained (down), showing obvious advantage in comparison with conventional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. - Highlights: • Plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) method has been used for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructures. • ZnWO{sub 4} nanoplates have strong mechanical adhesion with porous TiO{sub 2} film substrate. • The morphology and dimensional size of ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures can be selectively tailored by controlling the annealing temperature and growth time. • The PEO method can be widely applied to the growth of various metal oxides. - Abstract: A new method based on conventional plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology has been developed for the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures. Using this method, ZnWO{sub 4} and NiWO{sub 4} nanostructures with controllable morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets and microsheets) and superior crystallinity have been synthesized. It has been found that the morphology diversity of ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures can be selectively tailored through tuning the electrolyte concentration and annealing temperatures, showing obvious advantages in comparison to traditional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. Precise microscopy analyses on the cross section of the PEO coating and ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures confirmed that the precursors initially precipitated in the PEO coating and its surface during plasma discharge process are responsible for the nucleation and subsequent growth of metal tungstate nanostructures by thermal annealing. The method developed in this work represents a general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures and the formation mechanism of

  19. Waveguiding properties of Er-implanted silicon-rich oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliman, R.G.; Forcales, M.; Wilkinson, A.R.; Smith, N.J.

    2007-01-01

    The optical properties of erbium-doped silicon-rich silicon-oxide waveguides containing amorphous silicon nanoclusters and/or silicon nanocrystals are reported. Both amorphous nanoclusters and nanocrystals are shown to act as effective sensitizers for Er, with nanocrystals being more effective at low pump powers and nanoclusters being more effective at higher pump powers. All samples are shown to exhibit photo-induced absorption, as measured for a guided 1.5 μm probe beam while the waveguide was illuminated from above with a 477 nm pump beam. At a given pump power samples containing silicon nanocrystals exhibited greater attenuation than samples containing amorphous nanoclusters. The absorption is shown to be consistent with confined-carrier absorption due to photoexcited carriers in the nanocrystals and/or nanoclusters

  20. Carbon nanotube network-silicon oxide non-volatile switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Albert D; Araujo, Paulo T; Xu, Runjie; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-12-08

    The integration of carbon nanotubes with silicon is important for their incorporation into next-generation nano-electronics. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile switch that utilizes carbon nanotube networks to electrically contact a conductive nanocrystal silicon filament in silicon dioxide. We form this device by biasing a nanotube network until it physically breaks in vacuum, creating the conductive silicon filament connected across a small nano-gap. From Raman spectroscopy, we observe coalescence of nanotubes during breakdown, which stabilizes the system to form very small gaps in the network~15 nm. We report that carbon nanotubes themselves are involved in switching the device to a high resistive state. Calculations reveal that this switching event occurs at ~600 °C, the temperature associated with the oxidation of nanotubes. Therefore, we propose that, in switching to a resistive state, the nanotube oxidizes by extracting oxygen from the substrate.

  1. High Sensitivity and High Detection Specificity of Gold-Nanoparticle-Grafted Nanostructured Silicon Mass Spectrometry for Glucose Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Chia-Wen; Yang, Zhi-Jie

    2015-10-14

    Desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS) is a high-performance matrix-free mass spectrometry (MS) analysis method that involves using silicon nanostructures as a matrix for MS desorption/ionization. In this study, gold nanoparticles grafted onto a nanostructured silicon (AuNPs-nSi) surface were demonstrated as a DIOS-MS analysis approach with high sensitivity and high detection specificity for glucose detection. A glucose sample deposited on the AuNPs-nSi surface was directly catalyzed to negatively charged gluconic acid molecules on a single AuNPs-nSi chip for MS analysis. The AuNPs-nSi surface was fabricated using two electroless deposition steps and one electroless etching step. The effects of the electroless fabrication parameters on the glucose detection efficiency were evaluated. Practical application of AuNPs-nSi MS glucose analysis in urine samples was also demonstrated in this study.

  2. Oxidation under electron bombardment. A tool for studying the initial states of silicon oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriere, B.; Deville, J.P.; El Maachi, A.

    1987-06-01

    The exciting beam of an Auger electron spectrometer has been used to monitor the oxidation of silicon single crystals at room temperature and very low pressures of oxygen (approx. 10/sup -7/ Torr). This process allows us to build ultra-thin layers of silica on silicon (down to 30 A) but it is mostly used to investigate the mechanisms of the initial stages of oxidation. Auger spectra recorded continuously during the oxidation process provide information on (1) the nature of the silicon-oxygen chemical bonds which are interpreted through fine structure in the Auger peak, and (2) the kinetics of oxide formation which are deduced from curves of Auger signal versus time. An account is given of the contribution of these Auger studies to the description of the intermediate oxide layer during the reaction between silicon and oxygen and the influence of surface structural disorder, induced mainly by argon-ion bombardment, is discussed in terms of reactivity and oxide coverage.

  3. Study of optical and luminescence properties of silicon — semiconducting silicide — silicon multilayer nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, N.G.; Galkin, K.N.; Dotsenko, S.A.; Goroshko, D.L.; Shevlyagin, A.V.; Chusovitin, E.A.; Chernev, I.M.

    2017-01-01

    By method of in situ differential spectroscopy it was established that at the formation of monolayer Fe, Cr, Ca, Mg silicide and Mg stannide islands on the atomically clean silicon surface an appearance of loss peaks characteristic for these materials in the energy range of 1.1-2.6 eV is observed. An optimization of growth processes permit to grow monolithic double nanoheterostructures (DNHS) with embedded Fe, Cr and Ca nanocrystals, and also polycrystalline DNHS with NC of Mg silicide and Mg stannide and Ca disilicide. By methods of optical spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy it was shown that embedded NC form intensive peaks in the reflectance spectra at energies up to 2.5 eV and Raman peaks. In DNS with β-FeSi2 NC a photoluminescence and electroluminescence at room temperature were firstly observed.

  4. Oxidation of mullite-zirconia-alumina-silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, C.; Moya, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the isothermal oxidation of mullite-alumina-zirconia-silicon carbide composites obtained by reaction sintering studied in the temperature interval 800 degrees to 1400 degrees C. The kinetics of the oxidation process was related to the viscosity of the surface glassy layer as well as to the crystallization of the surface film. The oxidation kinetics was halted to T ≤ 1300 degrees C, presumably because of crystallization

  5. Oxidation kinetics of CVD silicon carbide and silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term oxidation behavior of pure, monolithic CVD SiC and Si3N4 is studied, and the isothermal oxidation kinetics of these two materials are obtained for the case of 100 hrs at 1200-1500 C in flowing oxygen. Estimates are made of lifetimes at the various temperatures investigated. Parabolic rate constants for SiC are within an order of magnitude of shorter exposure time values reported in the literature. The resulting silica scales are in the form of cristobalite, with cracks visible after exposure. The oxidation protection afforded by silica for these materials is adequate for long service times under isothermal conditions in 1-atm dry oxygen.

  6. Effect of rapid oxidation on optical and electrical properties of silicon nanowires obtained by chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyaoui, M.; Bardaoui, A.; Ben Rabha, M.; Harmand, J. C.; Amlouk, M.

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, we report the investigation of passivated silicon nanowires (SiNWs) having an average radius of 3.7 μm, obtained by chemical etching of p-type silicon (p-Si). The surface passivation of the SiNWs was performed through a rapid oxidation conducted under a controlled atmosphere at different temperatures and durations. The morphology of the SiNWs was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that revealed a wave-like structure of dense and vertically aligned one-dimensional silicon nanostructures. On the other hand, optical and electrical characterizations of the SiNWs were studied using a UV-Vis-NIR spectrometer, the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and I-V measurements. The reflectance of SiNWs has been dropped to approximately 2% in comparison to that of bare p-Si. This low reflectance slightly increased after carrying out the rapid thermal annealing. The observed behavior was attributed to the formation of a SiO2 layer, as confirmed by FTIR measurements. Finally, the electrical measurements have shown that the rapid oxidation, at certain conditions, contributes to the improvement of the electrical responses of the SiNWs, which can be of great interest for photovoltaic applications.

  7. Study of Silicon/silicon, Silicon/silicon Dioxide, and Metal-Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, To Chi

    A variable-energy positron beam is used to study Si/Si, Si/SiO_2, and metal-oxide -semiconductor (MOS) structures. The capability of depth resolution and the remarkable sensitivity to defects have made the positron annihilation technique a unique tool in detecting open-volume defects in the newly innovated low temperature (300^circC) molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) Si/Si. These two features of the positron beam have further shown its potential role in the study of the Si/SiO_2. Distinct annihilation characteristics has been observed at the interface and has been studied as a function of the sample growth conditions, annealing (in vacuum), and hydrogen exposure. The MOS structure provides an effective way to study the electrical properties of the Si/SiO_2 interface as a function of applied bias voltage. The annihilation characteristics show a large change as the device condition is changed from accumulation to inversion. The effect of forming gas (FG) anneal is studied using positron annihilation and the result is compared with capacitance-voltage (C -V) measurements. The reduction in the number of interface states is found correlated with the changes in the positron spectra. The present study shows the importance of the positron annihilation technique as a non-contact, non-destructive, and depth-sensitive characterization tool to study the Si-related systems, in particular, the Si/SiO_2 interface which is of crucial importance in semiconductor technology, and fundamental understanding of the defects responsible for degradation of the electrical properties.

  8. An Antireflective Nanostructure Array Fabricated by Nanosilver Colloidal Lithography on a Silicon Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong-Je

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An alternative method is presented for fabricating an antireflective nanostructure array using nanosilver colloidal lithography. Spin coating was used to produce the multilayered silver nanoparticles, which grew by self-assembly and were transformed into randomly distributed nanosilver islands through the thermodynamic action of dewetting and Oswald ripening. The average size and coverage rate of the islands increased with concentration in the range of 50–90 nm and 40–65%, respectively. The nanosilver islands were critically affected by concentration and spin speed. The effects of these two parameters were investigated, after etching and wet removal of nanosilver residues. The reflection nearly disappeared in the ultraviolet wavelength range and was 17% of the reflection of a bare silicon wafer in the visible range.

  9. Size-dependent Fano Interaction in the Laser-etched Silicon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPhoto-excitation and size-dependent Raman scattering studies on the silicon (Si nanostructures (NSs prepared by laser-induced etching are presented here. Asymmetric and red-shifted Raman line-shapes are observed due to photo-excited Fano interaction in the quantum confined nanoparticles. The Fano interaction is observed between photo-excited electronic transitions and discrete phonons in Si NSs. Photo-excited Fano studies on different Si NSs show that the Fano interaction is high for smaller size of Si NSs. Higher Fano interaction for smaller Si NSs is attributed to the enhanced interference between photo-excited electronic Raman scattering and phonon Raman scattering.

  10. Towards the Development of Electrical Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Manso, Miguel; Gallach, Darío; López-García, Juan; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.

    2010-01-01

    The typical large specific surface area and high reactivity of nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) make this material very suitable for the development of sensors. Moreover, its biocompatibility and biodegradability opens the way to the development of biosensors. As such, in this work the use of nanoPS in the field of electrical biosensing is explored. More specifically, nanoPS-based devices with Al/nanoPS/Al and Au-NiCr/nanoPS/Au-NiCr structures were fabricated for the electrical detection of glucose and Escherichia Coli bacteria at different concentrations. The experimental results show that the current-voltage characteristics of these symmetric metal/nanoPS/metal structures strongly depend on the presence/absence and concentration of species immobilized on the surface.

  11. Towards the Development of Electrical Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The typical large specific surface area and high reactivity of nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS make this material very suitable for the development of sensors. Moreover, its biocompatibility and biodegradability opens the way to the development of biosensors. As such, in this work the use of nanoPS in the field of electrical biosensing is explored. More specifically, nanoPS-based devices with Al/nanoPS/Al and Au-NiCr/nanoPS/Au-NiCr structures were fabricated for the electrical detection of glucose and Escherichia Coli bacteria at different concentrations. The experimental results show that the current-voltage characteristics of these symmetric metal/nanoPS/metal structures strongly depend on the presence/absence and concentration of species immobilized on the surface.

  12. The fabrication of silicon nanostructures by local gallium implantation and cryogenic deep reactive ion etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekurov, N; Grigoras, K; Franssila, S; Tittonen, I; Peltonen, A

    2009-01-01

    We show that gallium-ion-implanted silicon serves as an etch mask for fabrication of high aspect ratio nanostructures by cryogenic plasma etching (deep reactive ion etching). The speed of focused ion beam (FIB) patterning is greatly enhanced by the fact that only a thin approx. 30 nm surface layer needs to be modified to create a mask for the etching step. Etch selectivity between gallium-doped and undoped material is at least 1000:1, greatly decreasing the mask erosion problems. The resolution of the combined FIB-DRIE process is 20 lines μm -1 with the smallest masked feature size of 40 nm. The maximum achieved aspect ratio is 15:1 (e.g. 600 nm high pillars 40 nm in diameter).

  13. Silicon-ion-implanted PMMA with nanostructured ultrathin layers for plastic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjichristov, G. B.; Ivanov, Tz E.; Marinov, Y. G.

    2014-12-01

    Being of interest for plastic electronics, ion-beam produced nanostructure, namely silicon ion (Si+) implanted polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) with ultrathin nanostructured dielectric (NSD) top layer and nanocomposite (NC) buried layer, is examined by electric measurements. In the proposed field-effect organic nanomaterial structure produced within the PMMA network by ion implantation with low energy (50 keV) Si+ at the fluence of 3.2 × 1016 cm-2 the gate NSD is ion-nanotracks-modified low-conductive surface layer, and the channel NC consists of carbon nanoclusters. In the studied ion-modified PMMA field-effect configuration, the gate NSD and the buried NC are formed as planar layers both with a thickness of about 80 nm. The NC channel of nano-clustered amorphous carbon (that is an organic semiconductor) provides a huge increase in the electrical conduction of the material in the subsurface region, but also modulates the electric field distribution in the drift region. The field effect via the gate NSD is analyzed. The most important performance parameters, such as the charge carrier field-effect mobility and amplification of this particular type of PMMA- based transconductance device with NC n-type channel and gate NSD top layer, are determined.

  14. Electrochemical characteristics of nanostructured silicon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrova, E. V.; Li, G. V.; Rumyantsev, A. M.; Zhdanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    High-aspect periodic structures with thin vertical walls are studied as regards their applicability as negative electrodes of lithium-ion batteries. The nanostructures are fabricated from single-crystal silicon using photolithography, electrochemical anodization, and subsequent anisotropic shaping. The capacity per unit of the visible surface area of the electrode and the specific internal surface area are compared for structures of varied architecture: 1D (wires), 2D (zigzag walls), and 3D structures (walls forming a grid). Main attention is given to testing the endurance of anodes based on zigzag and grid structures, performed by galvanostatic cycling in half-cells with a lithium counter electrode. The influence exerted by the geometric parameters of the structures and by the testing mode on the degradation rate is determined. It is shown that the limiting factor of the lithiation and delithiation processes is diffusion. The endurance of an electrode dramatically increases when the charging capacity is limited to ∼1000 mA h/g. In this case, nanostructures with 300-nm-thick walls, which underwent cyclic testing at a rate of 0.36C, retain a constant discharge capacity and a Coulomb efficiency close to 100% for more than 1000 cycles.

  15. Electrochemical characteristics of nanostructured silicon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrova, E. V., E-mail: east@mail.ioffe.ru; Li, G. V.; Rumyantsev, A. M.; Zhdanov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    High-aspect periodic structures with thin vertical walls are studied as regards their applicability as negative electrodes of lithium-ion batteries. The nanostructures are fabricated from single-crystal silicon using photolithography, electrochemical anodization, and subsequent anisotropic shaping. The capacity per unit of the visible surface area of the electrode and the specific internal surface area are compared for structures of varied architecture: 1D (wires), 2D (zigzag walls), and 3D structures (walls forming a grid). Main attention is given to testing the endurance of anodes based on zigzag and grid structures, performed by galvanostatic cycling in half-cells with a lithium counter electrode. The influence exerted by the geometric parameters of the structures and by the testing mode on the degradation rate is determined. It is shown that the limiting factor of the lithiation and delithiation processes is diffusion. The endurance of an electrode dramatically increases when the charging capacity is limited to ∼1000 mA h/g. In this case, nanostructures with 300-nm-thick walls, which underwent cyclic testing at a rate of 0.36C, retain a constant discharge capacity and a Coulomb efficiency close to 100% for more than 1000 cycles.

  16. Electrochemical synthesis of magnetic nanostructures using anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie

    In this dissertation, template electrodeposition was employed to fabricate high quality magnetic nanostructures suited for the reliable investigation of novel spintronics phenomena such as CIMS, BMR, and CPP-GMR. Several critical aspects/steps relating to the synthesis process were investigated in this work. In order to obtain high quality magnetic nanostructures, free-standing and Si-supported anodic aluminum oxide templates with closely controlled pore diameters, lengths, as well as constriction sizes, were synthesized by anodization, followed by appropriate post-processing. The pore opening size on the barrier layer can be controlled down to 5 nm by ion beam etching. After optimization of the compositional, structural, and magnetic properties of homogeneous FeCoNiCu layers electrodeposited under different conditions, the pulsed deposition process of FeCoNI/Cu multilayers on n-Si was studied. The influence of Cu deposition potential and Fe2+ concentration on microstructure, chemical and electrochemical properties, magnetic properties, and hence magnetotransport properties were assessed. The dissolution of the FM layer during potential transition was minimized in order to control interface sharpness. Combined with the systematic sublayer thickness and FM layer composition optimization, unprecedented GMR sensitivity of 0.11%/Oe at 5-15 Oe was obtained. Growth of multilayer nanowires was performed, and contact to a single wire was attempted using an electrochemical technique. We succeeded in addressing a small number of nanowires and measured a CPP-GMR of 17%. Template electrodeposition thus provides a promising way to repeatably fabricate prototypes for spin dependent transport studies.

  17. Surface electronic and structural properties of nanostructured titanium oxide grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusi, M.; Maccallini, E.; Caruso, T.; Casari, C. S.; Bassi, A. Li; Bottani, C. E.; Rudolf, P.; Prince, K. C.; Agostino, R. G.

    Titanium oxide nanostructured thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were here characterized with a multi-technique approach to investigate the relation between surface electronic, structural and morphological properties. Depending on the growth parameters, these films present

  18. Hydroxylation of benzene to phenol over magnetic recyclable nanostructured CuFe mixed-oxide catalyst

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgwane, PR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A highly active and magnetically recyclable nanostructured copper–iron oxide (CuFe) catalyst has been synthesized for hydroxylation of benzene to phenol under mild reaction conditions. The obtained catalytic results were correlated with the catalyst...

  19. Synthesis of Pt–Pd Bimetallic Porous Nanostructures as Electrocatalysts for the Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pt-based bimetallic nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention due to their unique nanostructures and excellent catalytic properties. In this study, we prepared porous Pt–Pd nanoparticles using an efficient, one-pot co-reduction process without using any templates or toxic reactants. In this process, Pt–Pd nanoparticles with different nanostructures were obtained by adjusting the temperature and ratio of the two precursors; and their catalytic properties for the oxidation of methanol were studied. The porous Pt–Pd nanostructures showed better electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol with a higher current density (0.67 mA/cm2, compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.31 mA/cm2. This method provides one easy pathway to economically prepare different alloy nanostructures for various applications.

  20. Structural and photoluminescent properties of a composite tantalum oxide and silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Becerril, T.; Herrera, V.; Morales, C.; García-Salgado, G.; Rosendo, E.; Coyopol, A.; Galeazzi, R.; Romano, R.; Nieto-Caballero, F.G.; Sarmiento, J.

    2017-01-01

    Tantalum oxide crystals encrusted in a silicon oxide matrix were synthesized by using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition system (HFCVD). A solid source composed by a mixture in different percentages of Ta 2 O 5 and silicon (Si) powders were used as reactants. The films were grown at 800 °C and 1000 °C under hydrogen ambient. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. From the XPS results it was confirmed the formation of a mixture of Tantalum oxide, silicon oxide and Si nanoparticles (Ta 2 O 5- SiO 2 -Si(nc)) as seen from the Si (2p) and Ta (4f) lines corresponding to Si + and Ta + states respectively. Ta 2 O 5 and Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in the silicon oxide films were observed on HRTEM images which corroborate the XPS results. Finally the emission properties of the films exhibited a broad band from 400 to 850 nm caused by the independent PL properties of tantalum oxide and Si-NCs that compose the film. The intensity of the emissions was observed to be dependent on both temperature of deposition and the ratio Ta 2 O 5 /Si, used as initial reactants. Results from this work might supply useful data for the development of future light emitter devices.

  1. New Nanostructured Li 2 S/Silicon Rechargeable Battery with High Specific Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2010-04-14

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are important energy storage devices; however, the specific energy of existing lithium ion batteries is still insufficient for many applications due to the limited specific charge capacity of the electrode materials. The recent development of sulfur/mesoporous carbon nanocomposite cathodes represents a particularly exciting advance, but in full battery cells, sulfur-based cathodes have to be paired with metallic lithium anodes as the lithium source, which can result in serious safety issues. Here we report a novel lithium metal-free battery consisting of a Li 2S/mesoporous carbon composite cathode and a silicon nanowire anode. This new battery yields a theoretical specific energy of 1550 Wh kg ?1, which is four times that of the theoretical specific energy of existing lithium-ion batteries based on LiCoO2 cathodes and graphite anodes (∼410 Wh kg?1). The nanostructured design of both electrodes assists in overcoming the issues associated with using sulfur compounds and silicon in lithium-ion batteries, including poor electrical conductivity, significant structural changes, and volume expansion. We have experimentally realized an initial discharge specific energy of 630 Wh kg ?1 based on the mass of the active electrode materials. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir; El Demellawi, Jehad K.; Chaieb, Saharoui

    2014-01-01

    reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size

  3. On the Response of Nascent Soot Nanostructure and Oxidative Reactivity to Photoflash Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles are a kind of major pollutant from fuel combustion. To enrich the understanding of soot, this work focuses on investigating detailed influences of instantaneous external irradiation (conventional photoflash exposure on nanostructure as well as oxidation reactivity of nascent soot particles. By detailed soot characterizations flash can reduce the mass of soot and soot nanostructure can be reconstructed substantially without burning. After flash, the degree of soot crystallization increases while the soot reactive rate decreases and the activation energy increases. In addition, nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of soot in air and Ar after flash are different due to their different thermal conductivities.

  4. Experimental study of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of water on silicon oxide nanoparticle coated copper heating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sudev; Kumar, D.S.; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • EBPVD approach was employed for fabrication of well-ordered nanoparticle coated micro/nanostructure on metal surface. • Nucleate boiling heat transfer performance on nanoparticle coated micro/nanostructure surface was experimentally studied. • Stability of nanoparticle coated surface under boiling environment was systematically studied. • 58% enhancement of boiling heat transfer coefficient was found. • Present experimental results are validated with well known boiling correlations. - Abstract: Electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) coating approach was employed for fabrication of well-ordered of nanoparticle coated micronanostructures on metal surfaces. This paper reports the experimental study of augmentation of pool boiling heat transfer performance and stabilities of silicon oxide nanoparticle coated surfaces with water at atmospheric pressure. The surfaces were characterized with respect to dynamic contact angle, surface roughness, topography, and morphology. The results were found that there is a reduction of about 36% in the incipience superheat and 58% enhancement in heat transfer coefficient for silicon oxide coated surface over the untreated surface. This enhancement might be the reason of enhanced wettability, enhanced surface roughness and increased number of a small artificial cavity on a heating surface. The performance and stability of nanoparticle coated micro/nanostructure surfaces were examined and found that after three runs of experiment the heat transfer coefficient with heat flux almost remain constant.

  5. Plasmonic back contacts with non-ordered Ag nanostructures for light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetzold, Ulrich W., E-mail: u.paetzold@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Meier, Matthias, E-mail: ma.meier@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Moulin, Etienne, E-mail: e.moulin@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Smirnov, Vladimir, E-mail: v.smirnov@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Pieters, Bart E., E-mail: b.pieters@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Rau, Uwe, E-mail: u.rau@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Carius, Reinhard, E-mail: r.carius@fz-juelich.de [IEK5-Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    In this work, we investigate the light trapping of thin-film silicon solar cells which apply plasmonic Ag back contacts with non-ordered Ag nanostructures. The preparation, characterization and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulations of these back contacts with various distributions of non-ordered Ag nanostructures are presented. The measured reflectance spectra of the Ag back contacts with non-ordered nanostructures in air are well reproduced in reflectance spectra derived from the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulations of isolated nanostructures on Ag back contacts. The light–matter interaction of these nanostructures is given by localized surface plasmons and, thus, the measured diffuse reflectance of the back contacts is attributed to plasmon-induced light scattering. A significant plasmonic light-trapping effect in n-i-p substrate-type μc-Si:H thin-film solar cell prototypes which apply a Ag back contact with non-ordered nanostructures is identified when compared with flat reference solar cells.

  6. Plasmonic back contacts with non-ordered Ag nanostructures for light trapping in thin-film silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paetzold, Ulrich W.; Meier, Matthias; Moulin, Etienne; Smirnov, Vladimir; Pieters, Bart E.; Rau, Uwe; Carius, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the light trapping of thin-film silicon solar cells which apply plasmonic Ag back contacts with non-ordered Ag nanostructures. The preparation, characterization and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulations of these back contacts with various distributions of non-ordered Ag nanostructures are presented. The measured reflectance spectra of the Ag back contacts with non-ordered nanostructures in air are well reproduced in reflectance spectra derived from the three-dimensional electromagnetic simulations of isolated nanostructures on Ag back contacts. The light–matter interaction of these nanostructures is given by localized surface plasmons and, thus, the measured diffuse reflectance of the back contacts is attributed to plasmon-induced light scattering. A significant plasmonic light-trapping effect in n-i-p substrate-type μc-Si:H thin-film solar cell prototypes which apply a Ag back contact with non-ordered nanostructures is identified when compared with flat reference solar cells

  7. Effect of cationic/anionic organic surfactants on evaporation induced self assembled tin oxide nanostructured films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khun Khun, Kamalpreet; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Tin oxide nanostructures with well defined morphologies have been obtained through an evaporation induced self assembly process. The technique has been employed using an ultrasonic nebulizer for production of aersol and its subsequent deposition onto a heated glass substrate. The precursor used for aersol production was modified by introducing cationic and anionic surfactants namely cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate respectively. The effect of surfactants on the structural, electrical and optical properties of self assembled tin oxide nanostructures were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electroscope microscopy, two probe technique and photoluminiscence studies. The results reveal that high concentration of surfactants in the precursor solution leads to reduction in crystallite size with significant changes in the morphology of tin oxide nanostructures. Photoluminiscence studies of the nanostructures show emissions in the visible region which exhibit marked changes in the intensities upon variation of surfactants in the precursor solutions.

  8. Effect of cationic/anionic organic surfactants on evaporation induced self assembled tin oxide nanostructured films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khun Khun, Kamalpreet [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Mahajan, Aman, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Bedi, R.K. [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

    2011-01-15

    Tin oxide nanostructures with well defined morphologies have been obtained through an evaporation induced self assembly process. The technique has been employed using an ultrasonic nebulizer for production of aersol and its subsequent deposition onto a heated glass substrate. The precursor used for aersol production was modified by introducing cationic and anionic surfactants namely cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate respectively. The effect of surfactants on the structural, electrical and optical properties of self assembled tin oxide nanostructures were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electroscope microscopy, two probe technique and photoluminiscence studies. The results reveal that high concentration of surfactants in the precursor solution leads to reduction in crystallite size with significant changes in the morphology of tin oxide nanostructures. Photoluminiscence studies of the nanostructures show emissions in the visible region which exhibit marked changes in the intensities upon variation of surfactants in the precursor solutions.

  9. Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting film on oxidized silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.P.; Khokle, W.S.; Dubey, R.C.; Singhal, S.; Nagpal, K.C.; Rao, G.S.T.; Jain, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    We report thick superconducting films of Y-Ba-Cu-O on oxidized silicon substrates. The critical temperatures for onset and zero resistance are 96 and 77 K, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis predicts 1, 2, 3 composition and orthorhombic phase of the film

  10. Transparent conductive oxides for thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses,

  11. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattum, E.D. van

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology,

  12. Study of oxide facing at silicone detectors of ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopestansky, J.; Tykva, R.

    1999-01-01

    Formation of oxide facing on silicone in discrete phases of technological preparation of detectors and interaction of gold (aluminium) steamed with SiO x layer were studied. The homogeneity of Au and Si) x layers and interface Au-SiO x and SiO x -Si were examined. The methods SIMS, and partially XPS, AES and RBS were used

  13. Sea-urchin-like iron oxide nanostructures for water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Soon Chang; Lee, Young-Chul; Vrtnik, Stane; Kim, Changsoo; Lee, SangGap; Lee, Young Boo; Nam, Bora; Lee, Jae Won; Park, So Young; Lee, Sang Moon; Lee, Jouhahn

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The u-MFN were synthesized via a ultrasound irradiation and/or calcinations process. • The u-MFN exhibited excellent adsorption capacities. • The u-MFN also displayed excellent adsorption of organic polluent after recycling. • The u-MFN has the potential to be used as an efficient adsorbent material. -- Abstract: To obtain adsorbents with high capacities for removing heavy metals and organic pollutants capable of quick magnetic separation, we fabricated unique sea-urchin-like magnetic iron oxide (mixed γ-Fe 2 O 3 /Fe 3 O 4 phase) nanostructures (called u-MFN) with large surface areas (94.1 m 2 g −1 ) and strong magnetic properties (57.9 emu g −1 ) using a simple growth process and investigated their potential applications in water treatment. The u-MFN had excellent removal capabilities for the heavy metals As(V) (39.6 mg g −1 ) and Cr(VI) (35.0 mg g −1 ) and the organic pollutant Congo red (109.2 mg g −1 ). The u-MFN also displays excellent adsorption of Congo red after recycling. Because of its high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption rate, and quick magnetic separation from treated water, the u-MFN developed in the present study is expected to be an efficient magnetic adsorbent for heavy metals and organic pollutants in aqueous solutions

  14. Effect of backbond oxidation on silicon nanocrystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L.E.; Furthmueller, J.; Bechstedt, F.

    2004-01-01

    We employ density functional calculations to study properties of Si nanocrystals after backbond oxidation in comparison to the ones passivated with hydrogen or hydroxyl. Structural parameters, pair excitation energies, quasiparticle gaps, and electrostatic potentials vary significantly in dependence on degree of oxidation and surface passivation. The variations are discussed within a quantum confinement picture. Blueshifts and redshifts observed in photoluminescence are related to the size of the Si nanocrystallite cores and the oxygen incorporation via passivation with group OH or oxidation

  15. Copper and Zinc Oxide Composite Nanostructures for Solar Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei

    Solar energy is a clean and sustainable energy source to counter global environmental issues of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and depletion of natural resources. To extract useful work from solar energy, silicon-based photovoltaic devices are extensively used. The technological maturity and the high quality of silicon (Si) make it a material of choice. However limitations in Si exist, ranging from its indirect band gap to low light absorption coefficient and energy and capital intensive crystal growth schemes. Therefore, alternate materials that are earth-abundant, benign and simpler to process are needed for developing new platforms for solar energy harvesting applications. In this study, we explore oxides of copper (CuO and Cu2O) in a nanowire morphology as alternate energy harvesting materials. CuO has a bandgap of 1.2 eV whereas Cu2O has a bandgap of 2.1 eV making them ideally suited for absorbing solar radiation. First, we develop a method to synthesize vertical, single crystalline CuO and Cu2O nanowires of ~50 microm length and aspect ratios of ~200. CuO nanowire arrays are synthesized by thermal oxidation of Cu foils. Cu2O nanowire arrays are synthesized by thermal reduction of CuO nanowires. Next, surface engineering of these nanowires is achieved using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO. By depositing 1.4 nm of ZnO, a highly defective surface is produced on the CuO nanowires. These defects are capable of trapping charge as is evident through persistent photoconductivity measurements of ZnO coated CuO nanowires. The same nanowires serve as efficient photocatalysts reducing CO2 to CO with a yield of 1.98 mmol/g-cat/hr. Finally, to develop a robust platform for flexible solar cells, a protocol to transfer vertical CuO nanowires inside flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is demonstrated. Embedded CuO nanowires-ZnO pn junctions show a VOC of 0.4 V and a JSC of 10.4 microA/cm2 under white light illumination of 5.7 mW/cm2. Thus, this research provides broad

  16. A semi-local quasi-harmonic model to compute the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H; Aluru, N R

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-local quasi-harmonic model with local phonon density of states (LPDOS) to compute the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of silicon nanostructures at finite temperature. In contrast to an earlier approach (Tang and Aluru 2006 Phys. Rev. B 74 235441), where a quasi-harmonic model with LPDOS computed by a Green's function technique (QHMG) was developed considering many layers of atoms, the semi-local approach considers only two layers of atoms to compute the LPDOS. We show that the semi-local approach combines the accuracy of the QHMG approach and the computational efficiency of the local quasi-harmonic model. We present results for several silicon nanostructures to address the accuracy and efficiency of the semi-local approach

  17. Characterization of Ag-porous silicon nanostructured layer formed by an electrochemical etching of p-type silicon surface for bio-application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, M.; Al-Mariri, A.; Haj-Mhmoud, N.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured layers composed of silver-porous silicon (Ag-PS) have been formed by an electrochemical etching of p-type (1 1 1) silicon substrate in a AgNO3:HF:C2H5OH solution at different etching times (10 min-30 min). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results reveal that the produced layers consist of Ag dendrites and a silicon-rich porous structure. The nanostructuring nature of the layer has been confirmed by spatial micro-Raman scattering and x-ray diffraction techniques. The Ag dendrites exhibit a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum, while the porous structure shows a typical PS Raman spectrum. Upon increasing the etching time, the average size of silicon nanocrystallite in the PS network decreases, while the average size of Ag nanocrystals is slightly affected. In addition, the immobilization of prokaryote Salmonella typhimurium DNA via physical adsorption onto the Ag-PS layer has been performed to demonstrate its efficiency as a platform for detection of biological molecules using SERS.

  18. Surface nanostructuring in the carbon–silicon(100) system upon microwave plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yafarov, R. K., E-mail: pirpc@yandex.ru; Shanygin, V. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Saratov Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-15

    The study is concerned with the physical and chemical processes and the mechanisms of the effect of plasma preparation of a surface on the systematic features of condensation and surface phase transformations during the formation of Si–C mask domains on p-Si(100) crystals by the deposition of submonolayer C coatings in the microwave plasma of low-pressure ethanol vapors. It is shown that, at short durations of the deposition of carbon onto silicon wafers with a natural-oxide coating at a temperature of 100°C, the formation of domains is observed. The lateral dimensions of the domains lie in the range from 10–15 to 200 nm, and the heights of ridges produced by the plasma chemical etching of silicon through the mask domain coatings vary in the range from 40 to 80 nm.

  19. Development of an oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, II, Don Deewayne [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In order to realize a high-power microwave amplifier design known as a gigatron, a gated field emission array must be developed that can deliver a high-intensity electron beam at gigahertz frequencies. No existing field emission device meets the requirements for a gigatron cathode. In the present work, a porous silicon-based approach is evaluated. The use of porous silicon reduces the size of a single emitter to the nanometer scale, and a true two-dimensional array geometry can be approached. A wide number of applications for such a device exist in various disciplines. Oxidized porous silicon vacuum diodes were first developed in 1990. No systematic study had been done to characterize the performance of these devices as a function of the process parameters. The author has done the first such study, fabricating diodes from p<100>, p<111>, and n<100> silicon substrates. Anodization current densities from 11 mA/cm2 to 151 mA/cm2 were used, and Fowler-Nordheim behavior was observed in over 80% of the samples. In order to effectively adapt this technology to mainstream vacuum microelectronic applications, a means of creating a gated triodic structure must be found. No previous attempts had successfully yielded such a device. The author has succeeded in utilizing a novel metallization method to fabricate the first operational oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriodes, and results are encouraging.

  20. Temperature dependence of nickel oxide effect on the optoelectronic properties of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, R., E-mail: riahirim01@gmail.com [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Faculty of Sciences Tunis–El Manar University (Tunisia); Derbali, L. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Ouertani, B. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Higher Institute of Environment Science and Technology of Borj-Cedria (Tunisia); Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The treatment of porous silicon (PS) with nickel oxide (NiO) decreases the reflectivity significantly. • FTIR analysis showed a substitution of Si−H bonds to Si−O−Si and Si−O−Ni after the thermal annealing. • Annealing the treated NiO/PS at 400 °C leads to a noticeable improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity. • A blueshift was obtained in the PL spectra due to the decrease of silicon nanocrystallites size after exceeding 400 °C. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of Nickel oxide (NiO) on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PS). Our investigations showed an obvious improvement of porous silicon optoelectronique properties after coating the PS with NiO thin film as a passivating process. The as-prepared NiO/PS thin film was subjected to a thermal annealing to study the effect of temperature on the efficiency of this treatment. The deposition of NiO onto the porous silicon layer was performed using the spray pyrolysis method. The surface modification of the as-prepared NiO/PS samples was investigated after annealing at various temperatures, using an infrared furnace, ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. The X-ray Diffraction results showed that obtained films show cubic structure with preferred (200) plane orientation. We found an obvious dependence of the PS nanocrystallites size (nc-Si) to the annealing temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) is directly related to the electronic structure and transitions. The characteristic change of the band gap with decrease in size of the nanostructures can be pointed out by the observed blue shift in the photoluminescence spectra. Nickel oxide treatment of Porous silicon led to a significant increase of photoluminescence with a resulting blue-shift at higher annealing temperature. The surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the films. Moreover, the total

  1. Temperature dependence of nickel oxide effect on the optoelectronic properties of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riahi, R.; Derbali, L.; Ouertani, B.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The treatment of porous silicon (PS) with nickel oxide (NiO) decreases the reflectivity significantly. • FTIR analysis showed a substitution of Si−H bonds to Si−O−Si and Si−O−Ni after the thermal annealing. • Annealing the treated NiO/PS at 400 °C leads to a noticeable improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity. • A blueshift was obtained in the PL spectra due to the decrease of silicon nanocrystallites size after exceeding 400 °C. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of Nickel oxide (NiO) on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PS). Our investigations showed an obvious improvement of porous silicon optoelectronique properties after coating the PS with NiO thin film as a passivating process. The as-prepared NiO/PS thin film was subjected to a thermal annealing to study the effect of temperature on the efficiency of this treatment. The deposition of NiO onto the porous silicon layer was performed using the spray pyrolysis method. The surface modification of the as-prepared NiO/PS samples was investigated after annealing at various temperatures, using an infrared furnace, ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. The X-ray Diffraction results showed that obtained films show cubic structure with preferred (200) plane orientation. We found an obvious dependence of the PS nanocrystallites size (nc-Si) to the annealing temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) is directly related to the electronic structure and transitions. The characteristic change of the band gap with decrease in size of the nanostructures can be pointed out by the observed blue shift in the photoluminescence spectra. Nickel oxide treatment of Porous silicon led to a significant increase of photoluminescence with a resulting blue-shift at higher annealing temperature. The surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the films. Moreover, the total

  2. A Review on Anodic Aluminum Oxide Methods for Fabrication of Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jaroslaw; Cielecki, Pawel Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Implementation of nanostructures into the organic solar cell (OSC) architecture has great influence on the device performance. Nanostructuring the active layer increases the interfacial area between donor and acceptor, which enhances the probability of exciton dissociation. Introduction of nanost......Implementation of nanostructures into the organic solar cell (OSC) architecture has great influence on the device performance. Nanostructuring the active layer increases the interfacial area between donor and acceptor, which enhances the probability of exciton dissociation. Introduction......, low fabrication cost and easy control over its nano-scale morphology, make AAO patterning methods an intriguing candidate for nanopatterning. Hence, in this work, we present a review on the fabrication techniques and on nanostructures from Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) for OSC applications...

  3. Study of the phase composition of nanostructures produced by the local anodic oxidation of titanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, V. I.; Ageev, O. A.; Konoplev, B. G.; Smirnov, V. A.; Solodovnik, M. S.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the phase composition of oxide nanostructures formed by the local anodic oxidation of a titanium thin film are reported. The data of the phase analysis of titanium-oxide nanostructures are obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the ion profiling mode of measurements. It is established that the surface of titanium-oxide nanostructures 4.5 ± 0.2 nm in height possesses a binding energy of core levels characteristic of TiO_2 (458.4 eV). By analyzing the titanium-oxide nanostructures in depth by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the formation of phases with binding energies of core levels characteristic of Ti_2O_3 (456.6 eV) and TiO (454.8 eV) is established. The results can be used in developing the technological processes of the formation of a future electronic-component base for nanoelectronics on the basis of titanium-oxide nanostructures and probe nanotechnologies.

  4. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  5. Demonstration of slot-waveguide structures on silicon nitride / silicon oxide platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, C A; Sánchez, B; Gylfason, K B; Griol, A; Sohlström, H; Holgado, M; Casquel, R

    2007-05-28

    We report on the first demonstration of guiding light in vertical slot-waveguides on silicon nitride/silicon oxide material system. Integrated ring resonators and Fabry-Perot cavities have been fabricated and characterized in order to determine optical features of the slot-waveguides. Group index behavior evidences guiding and confinement in the low-index slot region at O-band (1260-1370nm) telecommunication wavelengths. Propagation losses of <20 dB/cm have been measured for the transverse-electric mode of the slot-waveguides.

  6. Organic nanostructures on silicon, created with semitransparent polystyrene spheres and 248 nm laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, Erhard W; Manke, Charles W; Piparia, Reema; Baird, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of nanostructures are made starting with a template of close-packed, polystyrene spheres on a silicon surface. The spheres are either 1.091 or 2.99 μm in diameter (d) and are of polystyrene (PS). They are irradiated with a pulse of either 308 or 248 nm light to which they are transparent and semitransparent, respectively. A transparent sphere with d = 1.091 μm diameter concentrates incident light onto a small substrate area. As has been previously reported, that creates silicon nanobumps that rise from circular craters. At 248 nm and d = 2.99 μm, the light energy is mainly absorbed, destroys the sphere, and leaves a shrunken mass (typically about 500 nm wide and 100 nm high) of organic material that is probably polystyrene and its thermal degradation products. At 248 nm and d = 1.091 μm, the residual organic structures are on the order of 300 nm wide and 100 nm high. A distinctive feature is that these organic structures are connected by filaments that are on the order of 50 nm wide and 10 nm high. Filaments form because the close-packed PS spheres expand into each other during the early part of the laser pulse, and then, as the main structures shrink, their viscoelasticity leads to threads between them. Our results with 248 nm and d = 1.091 μm differ from those described by Huang et al with 248 nm and d = 1.0 μm. Future studies might include the further effect of wavelength and fluence upon the process as well the use of other materials and the replacement of nanospheres by other focusing shapes, such as ellipsoids or rods

  7. Nanostructure sensitization of transition metal oxides for visible-light photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To better utilize the sunlight for efficient solar energy conversion, the research on visible-light active photocatalysts has recently attracted a lot of interest. The photosensitization of transition metal oxides is a promising approach for achieving effective visible-light photocatalysis. This review article primarily discusses the recent progress in the realm of a variety of nanostructured photosensitizers such as quantum dots, plasmonic metal nanostructures, and carbon nanostructures for coupling with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides to design better visible-light active photocatalysts. The underlying mechanisms of the composite photocatalysts, e.g., the light-induced charge separation and the subsequent visible-light photocatalytic reaction processes in environmental remediation and solar fuel generation fields, are also introduced. A brief outlook on the nanostructure photosensitization is also given.

  8. Field oxide radiation damage measurements in silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laakso, M [Particle Detector Group, Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Research Inst. for High Energy Physics (SEFT), Helsinki (Finland); Singh, P; Shepard, P F [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Surface radiation damage in planar processed silicon detectors is caused by radiation generated holes being trapped in the silicon dioxide layers on the detector wafer. We have studied charge trapping in thick (field) oxide layers on detector wafers by irradiating FOXFET biased strip detectors and MOS test capacitors. Special emphasis was put on studying how a negative bias voltage across the oxide during irradiation affects hole trapping. In addition to FOXFET biased detectors, negatively biased field oxide layers may exist on the n-side of double-sided strip detectors with field plate based n-strip separation. The results indicate that charge trapping occurred both close to the Si-SiO[sub 2] interface and in the bulk of the oxide. The charge trapped in the bulk was found to modify the electric field in the oxide in a way that leads to saturation in the amount of charge trapped in the bulk when the flatband/threshold voltage shift equals the voltage applied over the oxide during irradiation. After irradiation only charge trapped close to the interface is annealed by electrons tunneling to the oxide from the n-type bulk. (orig.).

  9. Oxidation and corrosion of silicon-based ceramics and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, N.S.; Fox, D.S.; Smialek, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Silica scales exhibit slow growth rates and a low activation energy. Thus silica-protected materials are attractive high temperature structural materials for their potentially excellent oxidation resistance and well-documented high temperature strength. This review focuses on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and composites of these materials. It is divided into four parts: (i) Fundamental oxidation mechanisms, (ii) Special properties of silica scales, (iii) Protective coatings, and (iv) Internal oxidation behavior of composites. While the fundamental oxidation mechanism of SiC is understood, there are still many questions regarding the oxidation mechanism of Si 3 N 4 . Silica scales exhibit many unique properties as compared to chromia and alumina. These include slower growth rates, SiO(g) formation, sensitivity to water vapor and impurities, and dissolution by basic molten salts. Protective coatings can limit the deleterious effects. The fourth area-internal oxidation of fibers and fiber coatings in composites-has limited the application of these novel materials. Strategies for understanding and limiting this internal oxidation are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Sea-urchin-like iron oxide nanostructures for water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Uk, E-mail: leeho@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soon Chang [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Chul [Department of Biological Engineering, College of Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Vrtnik, Stane; Kim, Changsoo; Lee, SangGap [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Boo; Nam, Bora [Jeonju Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Won [Department of Energy Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Young; Lee, Sang Moon [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jouhahn, E-mail: jouhahn@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The u-MFN were synthesized via a ultrasound irradiation and/or calcinations process. • The u-MFN exhibited excellent adsorption capacities. • The u-MFN also displayed excellent adsorption of organic polluent after recycling. • The u-MFN has the potential to be used as an efficient adsorbent material. -- Abstract: To obtain adsorbents with high capacities for removing heavy metals and organic pollutants capable of quick magnetic separation, we fabricated unique sea-urchin-like magnetic iron oxide (mixed γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase) nanostructures (called u-MFN) with large surface areas (94.1 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and strong magnetic properties (57.9 emu g{sup −1}) using a simple growth process and investigated their potential applications in water treatment. The u-MFN had excellent removal capabilities for the heavy metals As(V) (39.6 mg g{sup −1}) and Cr(VI) (35.0 mg g{sup −1}) and the organic pollutant Congo red (109.2 mg g{sup −1}). The u-MFN also displays excellent adsorption of Congo red after recycling. Because of its high adsorption capacity, fast adsorption rate, and quick magnetic separation from treated water, the u-MFN developed in the present study is expected to be an efficient magnetic adsorbent for heavy metals and organic pollutants in aqueous solutions.

  11. A Versatile Route for the Synthesis of Nickel Oxide Nanostructures Without Organics at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah MA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNickel oxide nanoparticles and nanoflowers have been synthesized by a soft reaction of nickel powder and water without organics at 100 °C. The mechanism for the formation of nanostructures is briefly described in accordance with decomposition of metal with water giving out hydrogen. The structure, morphology, and the crystalline phase of resulting nanostructures have been characterized by various techniques. Compared with other methods, the present method is simple, fast, economical, template-free, and without organics. In addition, the approach is nontoxic without producing hazardous waste and could be expanded to provide a general and convenient strategy for the synthesis of nanostructures to other functional nanomaterials.

  12. Influence of sample oxidation on the nature of optical luminescence from porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J. Jr.; Freeland, J. W.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.; Zhang, P.

    2000-01-01

    Site-selective luminescence experiments were performed upon porous-silicon samples exposed to varying degrees of oxidation. The source of different luminescence bands was determined to be due to either quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon or defective silicon oxide. Of particular interest is the defective silicon-oxide luminescence band found at 2.1 eV, which was found to frequently overlap with a luminescence band from nanocrystalline silicon. Some of the historical confusion and debate with regards to the source of luminescence from porous silicon can be attributed to this overlap. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  13. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS VIA BUILDING BLOCK SYNTHESES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig E. Barnes

    2013-03-05

    A broadly applicable methodology has been developed to prepare new single site catalysts on silica supports. This methodology requires of three critical components: a rigid building block that will be the main structural and compositional component of the support matrix; a family of linking reagents that will be used to insert active metals into the matrix as well as cross link building blocks into a three dimensional matrix; and a clean coupling reaction that will connect building blocks and linking agents together in a controlled fashion. The final piece of conceptual strategy at the center of this methodology involves dosing the building block with known amounts of linking agents so that the targeted connectivity of a linking center to surrounding building blocks is obtained. Achieving targeted connectivities around catalytically active metals in these building block matrices is a critical element of the strategy by which single site catalysts are obtained. This methodology has been demonstrated with a model system involving only silicon and then with two metal-containing systems (titanium and vanadium). The effect that connectivity has on the reactivity of atomically dispersed titanium sites in silica building block matrices has been investigated in the selective oxidation of phenols to benezoquinones. 2-connected titanium sites are found to be five times as active (i.e. initial turnover frequencies) than 4-connected titanium sites (i.e. framework titanium sites).

  14. Ultrathin Oxide Passivation Layer by Rapid Thermal Oxidation for the Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseok Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to deposit extremely thin a-Si:H layer in heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT solar cell due to thermal damage and tough process control. This study aims to understand oxide passivation mechanism of silicon surface using rapid thermal oxidation (RTO process by examining surface effective lifetime and surface recombination velocity. The presence of thin insulating a-Si:H layer is the key to get high Voc by lowering the leakage current (I0 which improves the efficiency of HIT solar cell. The ultrathin thermal passivation silicon oxide (SiO2 layer was deposited by RTO system in the temperature range 500–950°C for 2 to 6 minutes. The thickness of the silicon oxide layer was affected by RTO annealing temperature and treatment time. The best value of surface recombination velocity was recorded for the sample treated at a temperature of 850°C for 6 minutes at O2 flow rate of 3 Lpm. A surface recombination velocity below 25 cm/s was obtained for the silicon oxide layer of 4 nm thickness. This ultrathin SiO2 layer was employed for the fabrication of HIT solar cell structure instead of a-Si:H, (i layer and the passivation and tunneling effects of the silicon oxide layer were exploited. The photocurrent was decreased with the increase of illumination intensity and SiO2 thickness.

  15. Structural and photoluminescent properties of a composite tantalum oxide and silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Becerril, T., E-mail: tomas.diaz.be@gmail.com; Herrera, V.; Morales, C.; García-Salgado, G.; Rosendo, E.; Coyopol, A., E-mail: acoyopol@gmail.com; Galeazzi, R.; Romano, R.; Nieto-Caballero, F.G.; Sarmiento, J.

    2017-04-15

    Tantalum oxide crystals encrusted in a silicon oxide matrix were synthesized by using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition system (HFCVD). A solid source composed by a mixture in different percentages of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and silicon (Si) powders were used as reactants. The films were grown at 800 °C and 1000 °C under hydrogen ambient. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. From the XPS results it was confirmed the formation of a mixture of Tantalum oxide, silicon oxide and Si nanoparticles (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5-}SiO{sub 2}-Si(nc)) as seen from the Si (2p) and Ta (4f) lines corresponding to Si{sup +} and Ta{sup +} states respectively. Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in the silicon oxide films were observed on HRTEM images which corroborate the XPS results. Finally the emission properties of the films exhibited a broad band from 400 to 850 nm caused by the independent PL properties of tantalum oxide and Si-NCs that compose the film. The intensity of the emissions was observed to be dependent on both temperature of deposition and the ratio Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si, used as initial reactants. Results from this work might supply useful data for the development of future light emitter devices.

  16. Spatially resolved determination of lattice distortions in silicon nanostructures by means of electron-backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the submitted thesis, a novel combined approach of both focused ion beam (FIB) based target preparation and strain determination using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in semiconductor nanostructures is presented. In the first part, a powerful cross-correlation algorithm for detecting small feature shifts within EBSD patterns and, consequently, determining the strain, is presented. The corresponding strain sensitivity is demonstrated using dynamically simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, novel procedures for automated pattern analysis are introduced. Results of systematic studies concerning the influence of ion species, ion energy and dose density on the surface quality of silicon surfaces are presented in the second part. For that matter, the assessment of surface amorphization and rippling is based on high resolution microstructural diagnostics (TEM, AFM, Raman) and molecular dynamics simulation. The high application potential of combined FIB preparation and strain analysis using EBSD is exemplarily demonstrated for a 60 nm thick sSOI-sample. The good agreement with established techniques like Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction is also shown.

  17. Optical spectra of composite silver-porous silicon (Ag-pSi) nanostructure based periodical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedome Min-Dianey, Kossi Aniya; Zhang, Hao-Chun; Brohi, Ali Anwar; Yu, Haiyan; Xia, Xinlin

    2018-03-01

    Numerical finite differential time domain (FDTD) tools were used in this study for predicting the optical characteristics through the nanostructure of composite silver-porous silicon (Ag-pSi) based periodical lattice. This is aimed at providing an interpretation of the optical spectra at known porosity in improvement of the light manipulating efficiency through a proposed structure. With boundary conditions correctly chosen, the numerical simulation was achieved using FDTD Lumerical solutions. This was used to investigate the effect of porosity and the number of layers on the reflection, transmission and absorption characteristics through a proposed structure in a visible wavelength range of 400-750 nm. The results revealed that the higher the number of layers, the lower the reflection. Also, the reflection increases with porosity increase. The transmission characteristics were the inverse to those found in the case of reflection spectra and optimum transmission was attained at high number of layers. Also, increase in porosity results in reduced transmission. Increase in porosity as well as in the number of layers led to an increase in absorption. Therefore, absorption into such structure can be enhanced by elevating the number of layers and the degree of porosity.

  18. Enhanced photoconductivity and fine response tuning in nanostructured porous silicon microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urteaga, R; MarIn, O; Acquaroli, L N; Schmidt, J A; Koropecki, R R [INTEC-UNL-CONICET, Guemes 3450 - 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Comedi, D, E-mail: rkoro@intec.ceride.gov.a [CONICET y LAFISO, Departamento de Fisica, FACET, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    We used light confinement in optical microcavities to achieve a strong enhancement and a precise wavelength tunability of the electrical photoconductance of nanostructured porous silicon (PS). The devices consist of a periodic array of alternating PS layers, electrochemically etched to have high and low porosities - and therefore distinct dielectric functions. A central layer having a doubled thickness breaks up the symmetry of the one-dimensional photonic structure, producing a resonance in the photonic band gap that is clearly observed in the reflectance spectrum. The devices were transferred to a glass coated with a transparent SnO{sub 2} electrode, while an Al contact was evaporated on its back side. The electrical conductance was measured as a function of the photon energy. A strong enhancement of the conductance is obtained in a narrow (17nm FWHM) band peaking at the resonance. We present experimental results of the angular dependence of this photoconductance peak energy, and propose an explanation of the conductivity behaviour supported by calculations of the internal electromagnetic field. These devices are promising candidates for finely tuned photoresistors with potential application as chemical sensors and biosensors.

  19. Fabrication of antireflective nanostructures for crystalline silicon solar cells by reactive ion etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hsin-Han; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wang, Chi-Jen; Hong, Franklin Chau-Nan

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have fabricated large-area (15 × 15 cm 2 ) subwavelength antireflection structure on poly-Si substrates to reduce their solar reflectivity. A reactive ion etching system was used to fabricate nanostructures on the poly-silicon surface. Reactive gases, composed of chlorine (Cl 2 ), sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and oxygen (O 2 ), were activated to fabricate nanoscale pyramids by RF plasma. The poly-Si substrates were etched in various gas compositions for 6–10 min to form nano-pyramids. The sizes of pyramids were about 200–300 nm in heights and about 100 nm in width. Besides the nanoscale features, the high pyramid density on the poly-Si surface is another important factor to reduce the reflectivity. Low-reflectivity surface was fabricated with reflectivity significantly reduced down to < 2% for photons in a wavelength range of 500–900 nm. - Highlights: ► Large-area (15 × 15 cm 2 ) antireflection structures fabricated on poly-Si substrates ► Si nano-pyramids produced by utilizing self-masked reactive ion etching process ► High density of nanoscale pyramids was formed on the entire substrate surface. ► Surface reflectivity below 2% was achieved in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm

  20. Prolonged controlled delivery of nerve growth factor using porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilony, Neta; Rosenberg, Michal; Holtzman, Liran; Schori, Hadas; Shefi, Orit; Segal, Ester

    2017-07-10

    Although nerve growth factor (NGF) is beneficial for the treatment of numerous neurological and non-neurological diseases, its therapeutic administration represents a significant challenge, due to the difficulty to locally deliver relevant doses in a safe and non-invasive manner. In this work, we employ degradable nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) films as carriers for NGF, allowing its continuous and prolonged release, while retaining its bioactivity. The PSi carriers exhibit high loading efficacy (up to 90%) of NGF and a continuous release, with no burst, over a period of>26days. The released NGF bioactivity is compared to that of free NGF in both PC12 cells and dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We show that the NGF has retained its bioactivity and induces neurite outgrowth and profound differentiation (of >50% for PC12 cells) throughout the period of release within a single administration. Thus, this proof-of-concept study demonstrates the immense therapeutic potential of these tunable carriers as long-term implants of NGF reservoirs and paves the way for new localized treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid and label-free detection of protein a by aptamer-tethered porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urmann, Katharina; Reich, Peggy; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Beckmann, Dieter; Segal, Ester; Scheper, Thomas

    2017-09-10

    Protein A, which is secreted by and displayed on the cell membrane of Staphylococcus aureus is an important biomarker for S. aureus. Thus, its rapid and specific detection may facilitate the pathogen identification and initiation of proper treatment. Herein, we present a simple, label-free and rapid optical biosensor enabling specific detection of protein A. Protein A-binding aptamer serves as the capture probe and is immobilized onto a nanostructured porous silicon thin film, which serves as the optical transducer element. We demonstrate high sensitivity of the biosensor with a linear detection range between 8 and 23μM. The apparent dissociation constant was determined as 13.98μM and the LoD is 3.17μM. Harnessing the affinity between protein A and antibodies, a sandwich assay format was developed to amplify the optical signal associated with protein A capture by the aptamer. Using this approach, we increase the sensitivity of the biosensor, resulting in a three times lower LoD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Strong and reversible modulation of carbon nanotube-silicon heterojunction solar cells by an interfacial oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Cao, Anyuan; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Peixu; Gui, Xuchun; Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-06-21

    Deposition of nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes on Si wafers to make heterojunction structures is a promising route toward high efficiency solar cells with reduced cost. Here, we show a significant enhancement in the cell characteristics and power conversion efficiency by growing a silicon oxide layer at the interface between the nanotube film and Si substrate. The cell efficiency increases steadily from 0.5% without interfacial oxide to 8.8% with an optimal oxide thickness of about 1 nm. This systematic study reveals that formation of an oxide layer switches charge transport from thermionic emission to a mixture of thermionic emission and tunneling and improves overall diode properties, which are critical factors for tailoring the cell behavior. By controlled formation and removal of interfacial oxide, we demonstrate oscillation of the cell parameters between two extreme states, where the cell efficiency can be reversibly altered by a factor of 500. Our results suggest that the oxide layer plays an important role in Si-based photovoltaics, and it might be utilized to tune the cell performance in various nanostructure-Si heterojunction structures.

  3. Fabrication and Optical Characterization of Silicon Nanostructure Arrays by Laser Interference Lithography and Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Heydari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper metal-assisted chemical etching has been applied to pattern porous silicon regions and silicon nanohole arrays in submicron period simply by using positive photoresist as a mask layer. In order to define silicon nanostructures, Metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE was carried out with silver catalyst. Provided solution (or materiel in combination with laser interference lithography (LIL fabricated different reproducible pillars, holes and rhomboidal structures. As a result, Submicron patterning of porous areas and nanohole arrays on Si substrate with a minimum feature size of 600nm was achieved. Measured reflection spectra of the samples present different optical characteristics which is dependent on the shape, thickness of metal catalyst and periodicity of the structure. These structures can be designed to reach a photonic bandgap in special range or antireflection layer in energy harvesting applications. The resulted reflection spectra of applied method are comparable to conventional expensive and complicated dry etching techniques.

  4. Structural investigations of silicon nanostructures grown by self-organized island formation for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roczen, Maurizio; Malguth, Enno; Barthel, Thomas; Gref, Orman; Toefflinger, Jan A.; Schoepke, Andreas; Schmidt, Manfred; Ruske, Florian; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd [Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schade, Martin; Leipner, Hartmut S. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Halle (Germany); Callsen, Gordon; Hoffmann, Axel [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Berlin (Germany); Phillips, Matthew R. [University of Technology Sydney, Department of Physics and Advanced Materials, NSW (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    The self-organized growth of crystalline silicon nanodots and their structural characteristics are investigated. For the nanodot synthesis, thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers with different thicknesses have been deposited onto the ultrathin (2 nm) oxidized (111) surface of Si wafers by electron beam evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The solid phase crystallization of the initial layer is induced by a subsequent in situ annealing step at 700 C, which leads to the dewetting of the initial a-Si layer. This process results in the self-organized formation of highly crystalline Si nanodot islands. Scanning electron microscopy confirms that size, shape, and planar distribution of the nanodots depend on the thickness of the initial a-Si layer. Cross-sectional investigations reveal a single-crystalline structure of the nanodots. This characteristic is observed as long as the thickness of the initial a-Si layer remains under a certain threshold triggering coalescence. The underlying ultra-thin oxide is not structurally affected by the dewetting process. Furthermore, a method for the fabrication of close-packed stacks of nanodots is presented, in which each nanodot is covered by a 2 nm thick SiO{sub 2} shell. The chemical composition of these ensembles exhibits an abrupt Si/SiO{sub 2} interface with a low amount of suboxides. A minority charge carrier lifetime of 18 {mu}s inside of the nanodots is determined. (orig.)

  5. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  6. Silicon-doped hafnium oxide anti-ferroelectric thin films for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Faizan; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Dayu; Yang, Xirui; Xu, Jin; Schenk, Tony; Müller, Johannes; Schroeder, Uwe; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by the development of ultracompact electronic devices as miniaturized energy autonomous systems, great research efforts have been expended in recent years to develop various types of nano-structural energy storage components. The electrostatic capacitors characterized by high power density are competitive; however, their implementation in practical devices is limited by the low intrinsic energy storage density (ESD) of linear dielectrics like Al2O3. In this work, a detailed experimental investigation of energy storage properties is presented for 10 nm thick silicon-doped hafnium oxide anti-ferroelectric thin films. Owing to high field induced polarization and slim double hysteresis, an extremely large ESD value of 61.2 J/cm3 is achieved at 4.5 MV/cm with a high efficiency of ˜65%. In addition, the ESD and the efficiency exhibit robust thermal stability in 210-400 K temperature range and an excellent endurance up to 109 times of charge/discharge cycling at a very high electric field of 4.0 MV/cm. The superior energy storage performance together with mature technology of integration into 3-D arrays suggests great promise for this recently discovered anti-ferroelectric material to replace the currently adopted Al2O3 in fabrication of nano-structural supercapacitors.

  7. Hierarchical oxide-based composite nanostructures for energy, environmental, and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Shimpi, Paresh; Cai, Wenjie; Gao, Haiyong; Jian, Dunliang; Wrobel, Gregory

    2011-02-01

    Self-assembled composite nanostructures integrate various basic nano-elements such as nanoparticles, nanofilms and nanowires toward realizing multifunctional characteristics, which promises an important route with potentially high reward for the fast evolving nanoscience and nanotechnology. A broad array of hierarchical metal oxide based nanostructures have been designed and fabricated in our research group, involving semiconductor metal oxides, ternary functional oxides such as perovskites and spinels and quaternary dielectric hydroxyl metal oxides with diverse applications in efficient energy harvesting/saving/utilization, environmental protection/control, chemical sensing and thus impacting major grand challenges in the area of materials and nanotechnology. Two of our latest research activities have been highlighted specifically in semiconductor oxide alloy nanowires and metal oxide/perovskite composite nanowires, which could impact the application sectors in ultraviolet/blue lighting, visible solar absorption, vehicle and industry emission control, chemical sensing and control for vehicle combustors and power plants.

  8. Benzyl Alcohol-Mediated Versatile Method to Fabricate Nonstoichiometric Metal Oxide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Mohammad; Adam, Alaaldin; Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kim, Yong-Wah

    2017-11-22

    Nanostructured metal oxides with cationic or anionic deficiency find applications in a wide range of technological areas including the energy sector and environment. However, a facile route to prepare such materials in bulk with acceptable reproducibility is still lacking; many synthesis techniques are still only bench-top and cannot be easily scaled-up. Here, we report that the benzyl alcohol (BA)-mediated method is capable of producing a host of nanostructured metal oxides (MO x , where M = Ti, Zn, Ce, Sn, In, Ga, or Fe) with inherent nonstoichiometry. It employs multifunctional BA as a solvent, a reducing agent, and a structure-directing agent. Depending on the oxidation states of metal, elemental or nonstoichiometric oxide forms are obtained. Augmented photoelectrochemical oxidation of water under visible light by some of these nonstoichiometric oxides highlights the versatility of the BA-mediated synthesis protocol.

  9. Rapid synthesis of tin oxide nanostructures by microwave-assisted thermal oxidation for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadungdhitidhada, S.; Ruankham, P.; Gardchareon, A.; Wongratanaphisan, D.; Choopun, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the present work nanostructures of tin oxides were synthesized by a microwave-assisted thermal oxidation. Tin precursor powder was loaded into a cylindrical quartz tube and further radiated in a microwave oven. The as-synthesized products were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and x-ray diffractometer. The results showed that two different morphologies of SnO2 microwires (MWs) and nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained in one minute of microwave radiation under atmospheric ambient. A few tens of the SnO2 MWs with the length of 10-50 µm were found. Some parts of the MWs were decorated with the SnO2 NPs. However, most of the products were SnO2 NPs with the diameter ranging from 30-200 nm. Preparation under loosely closed system lead to mixed phase SnO-SnO2 NPs with diameter of 30-200 nm. The single-phase of SnO2 could be obtained by mixing the Sn precursor powders with CuO2. The products were mostly found to be SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and MWs. The diameter of SnO2 NWs was less than 50 nm. The SnO2 NPs, MWs, and NWs were in the cassiterite rutile structure phase. The SnO NPs was in the tetragonal structure phase. The growth direction of the SnO2 NWs was observed in (1 1 0) and (2 2 1) direction. The ethanol sensor performance of these tin oxide nanostructures showed that the SnO-SnO2 NPs exhibited extremely high sensitivity. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  10. Self-bridging of vertical silicon nanowires and a universal capacitive force model for spontaneous attraction in nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhelin; Wang, Deli; Xiang, Jie

    2014-11-25

    Spontaneous attractions between free-standing nanostructures have often caused adhesion or stiction that affects a wide range of nanoscale devices, particularly nano/microelectromechanical systems. Previous understandings of the attraction mechanisms have included capillary force, van der Waals/Casimir forces, and surface polar charges. However, none of these mechanisms universally applies to simple semiconductor structures such as silicon nanowire arrays that often exhibit bunching or adhesions. Here we propose a simple capacitive force model to quantitatively study the universal spontaneous attraction that often causes stiction among semiconductor or metallic nanostructures such as vertical nanowire arrays with inevitably nonuniform size variations due to fabrication. When nanostructures are uniform in size, they share the same substrate potential. The presence of slight size differences will break the symmetry in the capacitive network formed between the nanowires, substrate, and their environment, giving rise to electrostatic attraction forces due to the relative potential difference between neighboring wires. Our model is experimentally verified using arrays of vertical silicon nanowire pairs with varied spacing, diameter, and size differences. Threshold nanowire spacing, diameter, or size difference between the nearest neighbors has been identified beyond which the nanowires start to exhibit spontaneous attraction that leads to bridging when electrostatic forces overcome elastic restoration forces. This work illustrates a universal understanding of spontaneous attraction that will impact the design, fabrication, and reliable operation of nanoscale devices and systems.

  11. Sponge-like Si-SiO2 nanocomposite—Morphology studies of spinodally decomposed silicon-rich oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, D.; Schmidt, B.; Heinig, K. H.; Liedke, B.; Mücklich, A.; Hübner, R.; Wolf, D.; Kölling, S.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-09-01

    Sponge-like Si nanostructures embedded in SiO2 were fabricated by spinodal decomposition of sputter-deposited silicon-rich oxide with a stoichiometry close to that of silicon monoxide. After thermal treatment a mean feature size of about 3 nm was found in the phase-separated structure. The structure of the Si-SiO2 nanocomposite was investigated by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), EFTEM tomography, and atom probe tomography, which revealed a percolated Si morphology. It was shown that the percolation of the Si network in 3D can also be proven on the basis of 2D EFTEM images by comparison with 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Sponge-like Si-SiO2 nanocomposite—Morphology studies of spinodally decomposed silicon-rich oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, D.; Schmidt, B.; Heinig, K. H.; Liedke, B.; Mücklich, A.; Hübner, R.; Wolf, D.; Kölling, S.; Mikolajick, T.

    2013-01-01

    Sponge-like Si nanostructures embedded in SiO 2 were fabricated by spinodal decomposition of sputter-deposited silicon-rich oxide with a stoichiometry close to that of silicon monoxide. After thermal treatment a mean feature size of about 3 nm was found in the phase-separated structure. The structure of the Si-SiO 2 nanocomposite was investigated by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), EFTEM tomography, and atom probe tomography, which revealed a percolated Si morphology. It was shown that the percolation of the Si network in 3D can also be proven on the basis of 2D EFTEM images by comparison with 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

  13. Synthesis of cadmium oxide doped ZnO nanostructures using electrochemical deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Trilok; Pandya, D.K.; Singh, R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Ternary ZnCdO alloy semiconductor nanostructures were grown using electrochemical deposition. → X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the nanostructures were of wurtzite structure and possessed a compressive stress along the c-axis direction. → The cut-off wavelength shifted from blue to red on account of the Cd incorporation in the ZnO and the average transmittance decreased by ∼31%. → The bandgap tuning for 4-16 at% Cd in the initial solution was achieved in the range of 3.08-3.32 eV (up to 0.24 eV). - Abstract: Ternary ZnCdO alloy semiconductor nanostructures were grown using electrochemical deposition. Crystalline nanostructures/nanorods with cadmium concentration ranging from 4 to 16 at% in the initial solution were electrodeposited on tin doped indium oxide (ITO) conducting glass substrates at a constant cathodic potential -0.9 V and subsequently annealed in air at 300 deg. C. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the nanostructures were of wurtzite structure and possessed a compressive stress along the c-axis direction. The elemental composition of nanostructures was confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). ZnO nanostructures were found to be highly transparent and had an average transmittance of 85% in the visible range of the spectrum. After the incorporation of Cd content into ZnO the average transmittance decreased and the bandgap tuning was also achieved.

  14. Study Trapped Charge Distribution in P-Channel Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon Memory Device Using Dynamic Programming Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Hai; Chiu, Yung-Yueh; Lee, Yen-Hui; Chang, Ru-Wei; Yang, Bo-Jun; Sun, Wein-Town; Lee, Eric; Kuo, Chao-Wei; Shirota, Riichiro

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we precisely investigate the charge distribution in SiN layer by dynamic programming of channel hot hole induced hot electron injection (CHHIHE) in p-channel silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) memory device. In the dynamic programming scheme, gate voltage is increased as a staircase with fixed step amplitude, which can prohibits the injection of holes in SiN layer. Three-dimensional device simulation is calibrated and is compared with the measured programming characteristics. It is found, for the first time, that the hot electron injection point quickly traverses from drain to source side synchronizing to the expansion of charged area in SiN layer. As a result, the injected charges quickly spread over on the almost whole channel area uniformly during a short programming period, which will afford large tolerance against lateral trapped charge diffusion by baking.

  15. Nanostructured tungsten trioxide thin films synthesized for photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao; Chong, Meng Nan; Chan, Eng Seng

    2014-11-01

    The recent developments of nanostructured WO3 thin films synthesized through the electrochemical route of electrochemical anodization and cathodic electrodeposition for the application in photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting are reviewed. The key fundamental reaction mechanisms of electrochemical anodization and cathodic electrodeposition methods for synthesizing nanostructured WO3 thin films are explained. In addition, the effects of metal oxide precursors, electrode substrates, applied potentials and current densities, and annealing temperatures on size, composition, and thickness of the electrochemically synthesized nanostructured WO3 thin films are elucidated in detail. Finally, a summary is given for the general evaluation practices used to calculate the energy conversion efficiency of nanostructured WO3 thin films and a recommendation is provided to standardize the presentation of research results in the field to allow for easy comparison of reported PEC efficiencies in the near future. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fabrication of orderly nanostructured PLGA scaffolds using anodic aluminum oxide templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gou-Jen; Lin, Yan-Cheng; Li, Ching-Wen; Hsueh, Cheng-Chih; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Hung, Huey-Shan

    2009-08-01

    In this research, two simple fabrication methods to fabricate orderly nanostructured PLGA scaffolds using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template were conducted. In the vacuum air-extraction approach, the PLGA solution was cast on an AAO template first. The vacuum air-extraction process was then applied to suck the semi-congealed PLGA into the nanopores of the AAO template to form a bamboo sprouts array of PLGA. The surface roughness of the nanostructured scaffolds, ranging from 20 nm to 76 nm, can be controlled by the sucking time of the vacuum air-extraction process. In the replica molding approach, the PLGA solution was cast on the orderly scraggy barrier-layer surface of an AAO membrane to fabricate a PLGA scaffold of concave nanostructure. Cell culture experiments using the bovine endothelial cells (BEC) demonstrated that the nanostructured PLGA membrane can increase the cell growing rate, especially for the bamboo sprouts array scaffolds with smaller surface roughness.

  17. Optical characterization of nanocrystals in silicon rich oxide superlattices and porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agocs, E.; Petrik, P.; Milita, S.; Vanzetti, L.; Gardelis, S.; Nassiopoulou, A.G.; Pucker, G.; Balboni, R.; Fried, M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose to analyze ellipsometry data by using effective medium approximation (EMA) models. Thanks to EMA, having nanocrystalline reference dielectric functions and generalized critical point (GCP) model the physical parameters of two series of samples containing silicon nanocrystals, i.e. silicon rich oxide (SRO) superlattices and porous silicon layers (PSL), have been determined. The superlattices, consisting of ten SRO/SiO 2 layer pairs, have been prepared using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The porous silicon layers have been prepared using short monopulses of anodization current in the transition regime between porous silicon formation and electropolishing, in a mixture of hydrofluoric acid and ethanol. The optical modeling of both structures is similar. The effective dielectric function of the layer is calculated by EMA using nanocrystalline components (nc-Si and GCP) in a dielectric matrix (SRO) or voids (PSL). We discuss the two major problems occurring when modeling such structures: (1) the modeling of the vertically non-uniform layer structures (including the interface properties like nanoroughness at the layer boundaries) and (2) the parameterization of the dielectric function of nanocrystals. We used several techniques to reduce the large number of fit parameters of the GCP models. The obtained results are in good agreement with those obtained by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. We investigated the correlation of the broadening parameter and characteristic EMA components with the nanocrystal size and the sample preparation conditions, such as the annealing temperatures of the SRO superlattices and the anodization current density of the porous silicon samples. We found that the broadening parameter is a sensitive measure of the nanocrystallinity of the samples, even in cases, where the nanocrystals are too small to be visible for X-ray scattering. Major processes like sintering, phase separation, and intermixing have been

  18. Silicon heterojunction solar cells with novel fluorinated n-type nanocrystalline silicon oxide emitters on p-type crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Sukanta; Mandal, Sourav; Das, Gourab; Mukhopadhyay, Sumita; Pratim Ray, Partha; Banerjee, Chandan; Barua, Asok Kumar

    2015-08-01

    A novel fluorinated phosphorus doped silicon oxide based nanocrystalline material have been used to prepare heterojunction solar cells on flat p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) Czochralski (CZ) wafers. The n-type nc-SiO:F:H material were deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Deposited films were characterized in detail by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and optoelectronics properties have been studied using temperature dependent conductivity measurement, Ellipsometry, UV-vis spectrum analysis etc. It is observed that the cell fabricated with fluorinated silicon oxide emitter showing higher initial efficiency (η = 15.64%, Jsc = 32.10 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.630 V, FF = 0.77) for 1 cm2 cell area compare to conventional n-a-Si:H emitter (14.73%) on flat c-Si wafer. These results indicate that n type nc-SiO:F:H material is a promising candidate for heterojunction solar cell on p-type crystalline wafers. The high Jsc value is associated with excellent quantum efficiencies at short wavelengths (<500 nm).

  19. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  20. Nanostructured carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes for supercapacitors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Mingjia; Xiang, Chengcheng; Li, Jiangtian; Li, Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2013-01-07

    This paper presents a review of the research progress in the carbon-metal oxide composites for supercapacitor electrodes. In the past decade, various carbon-metal oxide composite electrodes have been developed by integrating metal oxides into different carbon nanostructures including zero-dimensional carbon nanoparticles, one-dimensional nanostructures (carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers), two-dimensional nanosheets (graphene and reduced graphene oxides) as well as three-dimensional porous carbon nano-architectures. This paper has described the constituent, the structure and the properties of the carbon-metal oxide composites. An emphasis is placed on the synergistic effects of the composite on the performance of supercapacitors in terms of specific capacitance, energy density, power density, rate capability and cyclic stability. This paper has also discussed the physico-chemical processes such as charge transport, ion diffusion and redox reactions involved in supercapacitors.

  1. Synthesis and electrochemical behavior of nanostructured cauliflower-shape Co-Ni/Co-Ni oxides composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Vinay; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Miura, Norio

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured Co-Ni/Co-Ni oxides were electrochemically deposited onto stainless steel electrode by electrochemical method and characterized for their structural and supercapacitive properties. The SEM images indicated that the obtained Co-Ni/Co-Ni oxides had cauliflower-type nanostructure. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed the formation of Co 3 O 4 , NiO, Co and Ni. The EDX elemental mapping images indicated that Ni, Co and O are distributed uniformly. The deposited Co-Ni/Co-Ni oxides showed good supercapacitive characteristics with a specific capacitance of 331 F/g at 1 mA/cm 2 current density in 1 M KOH electrolyte. A mechanism of the formation of cauliflower-shape Co-Ni/Co-Ni oxides was proposed. A variety of promising applications in the fields such as energy storage devices and sensors can be envisioned from Co-Ni/Co-Ni oxides

  2. A Generalizable Top-Down Nanostructuring Method of Bulk Oxides: Sequential Oxygen-Nitrogen Exchange Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lanlee; Kang, Byungwuk; Han, Suyoung; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Moo Dong; Bang, Jin Ho

    2018-05-27

    A thermal reaction route that induces grain fracture instead of grain growth is devised and developed as a top-down approach to prepare nanostructured oxides from bulk solids. This novel synthesis approach, referred to as the sequential oxygen-nitrogen exchange (SONE) reaction, exploits the reversible anion exchange between oxygen and nitrogen in oxides that is driven by a simple two-step thermal treatment in ammonia and air. Internal stress developed by significant structural rearrangement via the formation of (oxy)nitride and the creation of oxygen vacancies and their subsequent combination into nanopores transforms bulk solid oxides into nanostructured oxides. The SONE reaction can be applicable to most transition metal oxides, and when utilized in a lithium-ion battery, the produced nanostructured materials are superior to their bulk counterparts and even comparable to those produced by conventional bottom-up approaches. Given its simplicity and scalability, this synthesis method could open a new avenue to the development of high-performance nanostructured electrode materials that can meet the industrial demand of cost-effectiveness for mass production. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide multilayer anchored to nanostructured current collector as lithium-ion battery anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhengjiao; Guo, Pengqian; Liu, Boli; Xie, Wenhe; Liu, Dequan; He, Deyan, E-mail: hedy@lzu.edu.cn

    2017-02-28

    Silicon is the most promising anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and low intrinsic conductivity hamper its electrochemical performance. Here we report a well-designed LIB anode in which carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (Si/rGO) multilayer was anchored to nanostructured current collector with stable mechanical support and rapid electron conduction. Furthermore, we improved the integral stability of the electrode through introducing amorphous carbon. The designed anode exhibits superior cyclability, its specific capacity remains above 800 mAh g{sup −1} after 350 cycles at a current density of 2.0 A g{sup −1}. The excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to the fact that the Si/rGO multilayer is reinforced by the nanostructured current collector and the formed amorphous carbon, which can maintain the structural and electrical integrities of the electrode.

  4. A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach for synthesis of manganese oxide nanostructures with controlled oxidation states and morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, Manabu; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2010-12-21

    Manganese oxide nanostructures are synthesized by a route inspired by microbial mineralization in nature. The combination of organic molecules, which include antioxidizing and chelating agents, facilitates the parallel control of oxidation states and morphologies in an aqueous solution at room temperature. Divalent manganese hydroxide (Mn(OH){sub 2}) is selectively obtained as a stable dried powder by using a combination of ascorbic acid as an antioxidizing agent and other organic molecules with the ability to chelate to manganese ions. The topotactic oxidation of the resultant Mn(OH){sub 2} leads to the selective formation of trivalent manganese oxyhydroxide ({beta}-MnOOH) and trivalent/tetravalent sodium manganese oxide (birnessite, Na{sub 0.55}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}.1.5H{sub 2}O). For microbial mineralization in nature, similar synthetic routes via intermediates have been proposed in earlier works. Therefore, these synthetic routes, which include in the present study the parallel control over oxidation states and morphologies of manganese oxides, can be regarded as new biomimetic routes for synthesis of transition metal oxide nanostructures. As a potential application, it is demonstrated that the resultant {beta}-MnOOH nanostructures perform as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Direct comparison of the electrical properties in metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon and metal/aluminum oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon capacitors with equivalent oxide thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ho-Myoung; Seo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Hee Dong; Kim, Kyoung Chan; Kim, Jong-Guk [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Won-Ju; Koh, Jung-Hyuk [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Yun Mo [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.k [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-31

    We examine the electrical properties of metal/oxide/nitride/oxide/silicon (MONOS) capacitors with two different blocking oxides, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, under the influence of the same electric field. The thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer is set to 150 A, which is electrically equivalent to a thickness of the SiO{sub 2} layer of 65 A, in the MONOS structure for this purpose. The capacitor with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer shows a larger capacitance-voltage memory window of 8.6 V, lower program voltage of 7 V, faster program/erase speeds of 10 ms/1 {mu}s, lower leakage current of 100 pA and longer data retention than the one with the SiO{sub 2} blocking layer does. These improvements are attributed to the suppression of the carrier transport to the gate electrode afforded by the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking layer physically thicker than the SiO{sub 2} one, as well as the effective charge-trapping by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the deep energy levels in the nitride layer.

  6. Thermal processing and native oxidation of silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Brandon J.; Holm, Jason; Roberts, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to investigate in-air oxidation of silicon nanoparticles ca. 11 nm in diameter. Particle samples were prepared first by extracting them from an RF plasma synthesis reactor, and then heating them in an inert carrier gas stream. The resulting particles had varying surface hydrogen coverages and relative amounts of SiH x (x = 1, 2, and 3), depending on the temperature to which they had been heated. The particles were allowed to oxidize in-air for several weeks. FTIR, XPS, and EELS analyses that were performed during this period clearly establish that adsorbed hydrogen retards oxidation, although in complex ways. In particular, particles that have been heated to intermediate hydrogen coverages oxidize more slowly in air than do freshly generated particles that have a much higher hydrogen content. In addition, the loss of surface hydride species at high processing temperatures results in fast initial oxidation and the formation of a self-limiting oxide layer. Analogous measurements made on deuterium-covered particles show broadly similar behavior; i.e., that oxidation is the slowest at some intermediate coverage of adsorbed deuterium.

  7. Self-cleaning glass coating containing titanium oxide and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.O. de; Alves, A.K.; Berutti, F.A.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    Using the electro spinning technique nano fibers of titanium oxide doped with silicon were synthesized. As precursor materials, titanium propoxide, silicon tetra propoxide and a solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone were used. The non-tissue material obtained was characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine the phase and crystallite size, BET method to determine the surface and SEM to analyze the microstructure of the fibers. After ultrasound dispersion of this material in ethanol, the glass coatings were made by dip-coating methodology. The influence of the removal velocity, the solution composition and the glass surface preparation were evaluated. The film was characterized by the contact angle of a water droplet in its surface. (author)

  8. Ion beam analysis of PECVD silicon oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Lima, F.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Pedrero, E.; Fonseca Filho, H.D.; Llovera, A.; Riera, M.; Dominguez, C.; Behar, M.; Zawislak, F.C.

    2006-01-01

    A study of ion beam analysis techniques of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon oxide thin films (1 μm thick) obtained from silane (SiH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is reported. The film, elemental composition and surface morphology were determined as function of the reactant gas flow ratio, R = [N 2 O]/[SiH 4 ] in the 22-110 range using the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and atomic force microscopy techniques. The density of the films was determined by combining the RBS and thickness measurements. All the experiments were done at a deposition temperature of 300 deg. C. In all the cases almost stoichiometric oxides were obtained being the impurity content function of R. It was also observed that physical properties such as density, surface roughness and shape factor increase with R in the studied interval

  9. Size modulation of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in amorphous silicon oxide by Cat-CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Godavarthi, S.; Ortega, M.; Sanchez, V.; Velumani, S.; Mallick, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Different issues related to controlling size of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO x :H) deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) have been reported. Films were deposited using tantalum (Ta) and tungsten (W) filaments and it is observed that films deposited using tantalum filament resulted in good control on the properties. The parameters which can affect the size of nc-Si domains have been studied which include hydrogen flow rate, catalyst and substrate temperatures. The deposited samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction, HRTEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy, for determining the size of the deposited nc-Si. The crystallite formation starts for Ta-catalyst around the temperature of 1700 o C.

  10. Passivation mechanism in silicon heterojunction solar cells with intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Dimitrios; van Vliet, Jeroen; Vasudevan, Ravi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Zeman, Miro

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we use intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide layers (a-SiOx:H) with varying oxygen content (cO) but similar hydrogen content to passivate the crystalline silicon wafers. Using our deposition conditions, we obtain an effective lifetime (τeff) above 5 ms for cO ≤ 6 at. % for passivation layers with a thickness of 36 ± 2 nm. We subsequently reduce the thickness of the layers using an accurate wet etching method to ˜7 nm and deposit p- and n-type doped layers fabricating a device structure. After the deposition of the doped layers, τeff appears to be predominantly determined by the doped layers themselves and is less dependent on the cO of the a-SiOx:H layers. The results suggest that τeff is determined by the field-effect rather than by chemical passivation.

  11. Surface engineering of one-dimensional tin oxide nanostructures for chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured materials are promising candidates for chemical sensors due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Among various candidates, tin oxide (SnO 2 ) has been widely explored in gas sensing elements due to its excellent chemical stability, low cost, ease of fabrication and remarkable reproducibility. We are presenting an overview on recent investigations on 1-dimensional (1D) SnO 2 nanostructures for chemical sensing. In particular, we focus on the performance of devices based on surface engineered SnO 2 nanostructures, and on aspects of morphology, size, and functionality. The synthesis and sensing mechanism of highly selective, sensitive and stable 1D nanostructures for use in chemical sensing are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relationship between the surface properties of the SnO 2 layer and the sensor performance from a thermodynamic point of view. Then, the opportunities and recent progress of chemical sensors fabricated from 1D SnO 2 heterogeneous nanostructures are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges in terms of improving the performance of chemical (gas) sensors using such nanostructures and suggest potential applications. (author)

  12. Chemical degradation of trimethyl phosphate as surrogate for organo-phosporus pesticides on nanostructured metal oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Pérez, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 61, JAN (2015), s. 259-269 ISSN 0025-5408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1116 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Nanostructured oxides * Stoichiometric degradation * Trimethyl phosphate Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.435, year: 2015

  13. Nanostructures in a ferritic and an oxide dispersion strengthened steel induced by dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo

    fission and fusion reactors. In this study, two candidate steels for nuclear reactors, namely a ferritic/martensitic steel (modified 9Cr-1Mo steel) and an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (PM2000), were nanostructured by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD). The resulting microstructure...

  14. Life cycle assessment of facile microwave-assisted zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Papadaki, D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle assessment of several zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures, fabricated by a facile microwave technique, is presented. Key synthesis parameters such as annealing temperature, varied from 90 °C to 220 °C, and microwave power, varied from 110...

  15. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.

    2017-01-18

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  16. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.; Duanmu, J. J.; Zhu, Yihan; Yuan, Y. F.; Guo, S. Y.; Yang, J. L.; Ren, Z. H.; Han, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  17. Nanostructural evolution from nanosheets to one-dimensional nanoparticles for manganese oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Hongmei; Kong, Xingang; Wen, Puhong; Kitayama, Tomonori; Feng, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nanosheets were transformed to other one-dimensional nanoparticles. ► Nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoribbons, and nanobelts were obtained. ► Nanoparticle morphology can be controlled with organic amines. ► Organic amines act as morphology directing agent. -- Abstract: This paper introduces a novel hydrothermal soft chemical synthesis process for manganese oxide nanostructured particles using two-dimensional manganese oxide nanosheets as precursor. In this process, a birnessite-type manganese oxide with a layered structure was exfoliated into its elementary layer nanosheets, and then the nanosheets were hydrothermally treated to transform the two-dimensional morphology of the nanosheets to one-dimensional nanoparticles. The manganese oxide nanofibers, nanotubes, nanobelts, nanoribbons, and fabric-ribbon-like particles constructed from nanofibers or nanobelts were obtained using this hydrothermal soft chemical process. The nanostructural evolution from the two-dimensional nanosheets to the one-dimensional nanoparticles was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and TG-DTA analysis. The morphology and nanostructure of the products are strongly dependent on the molecular dimension of organic amine cations added in the reaction system. The organic amine cations act as a morphology directing agent in the nanostructural evolution process.

  18. Ternary oxide nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S [Stony Brook, NY; Park, Tae-Jin [Port Jefferson, NY

    2009-09-08

    A single crystalline ternary nanostructure having the formula A.sub.xB.sub.yO.sub.z, wherein x ranges from 0.25 to 24, and y ranges from 1.5 to 40, and wherein A and B are independently selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, F, Fe, Ga, Gd, Ge, Hf, Ho, I, In, Ir, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, Os, P, Pb, Pd, Pr, Pt, Rb, Re, Rh, Ru, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Tc, Te, Ti, Tl, Tm, U, V, W, Y, Yb, and Zn, wherein the nanostructure is at least 95% free of defects and/or dislocations.

  19. Metal oxide nanostructures: preparation, characterization and functional applications as chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Dario; Bertuna, Angela; Comini, Elisabetta; Kaur, Navpreet; Poli, Nicola; Sberveglieri, Veronica; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Preparation and characterization of different metal oxide (NiO, WO 3 , ZnO, SnO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 ) nanostructures for chemical sensing are presented. p-Type (NiO) and n-type (WO 3 , SnO 2 , ZnO and Nb 2 O 5 ) metal oxide nanostructures were grown on alumina substrates using evaporation-condensation, thermal oxidation and hydrothermal techniques. Surface morphologies and crystal structures were investigated through scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, different batches of sensors have been prepared, and their sensing performances towards carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide have been explored. Moreover, metal oxide nanowires have been integrated into an electronic nose and successfully applied to discriminate between drinking and contaminated water.

  20. Modification of implant material surface properties by means of oxide nano-structured coatings deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonov, Vladimir; Zykova, Anna; Smolik, Jerzy; Rogowska, Renata; Lukyanchenko, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Dmitrii

    2014-08-01

    The deposition of functional coatings on the metal surface of artificial joints is an effective way of enhancing joint tribological characteristics. It is well-known that nanostructured oxide coatings have specific properties advantageous for future implant applications. In the present study, we measured the high hardness parameters, the adhesion strength and the low friction coefficient of the oxide magnetron sputtered coatings. The corrosion test results show that the oxide coating deposition had improved the corrosion resistance by a factor of ten for both stainless steel and titanium alloy substrates. Moreover, the hydrophilic nature of coated surfaces in comparison with the metal ones was investigated in the tensiometric tests. The surfaces with nanostructured oxide coatings demonstrated improved biocompatibility for in vitro and in vivo tests, attributed to the high dielectric constants and the high values of the surface free energy parameters.

  1. Colloidosome-based synthesis of a multifunctional nanostructure of silver and hollow iron oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yue

    2010-03-16

    Nanoparticles that self-assemble on a liquid-liquid interface serve as the building block for making heterodimeric nanostructures. Specifically, hollow iron oxide nanoparticles within hexane form colloidosomes in the aqueous solution of silver nitrate, and iron oxide exposed to the aqueous phase catalyzes the reduction of silver ions to afford a heterodimer of silver and hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy, and SQUID were used to characterize the heterodimers. Interestingly, the formation of silver nanoparticles helps the removal of spinglass layer on the hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. This work demonstrates a powerful yet convenient strategy for producing sophisticated, multifunctional nanostructures. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  2. Molecular-mediated crystal growth of PbTiO3 nanostructure on silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Chunying; Ren Zhaohui; Liu Zhenya; Xiao Zhen; Xu Gang; Li Xiang; Wei Xiao; Shen Ge; Han Gaorong

    2011-01-01

    A simple approach based on an organically modified sol-gel process has been developed to fabricate PbTiO 3 (PT) nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrate, where the amorphous powder modified by acetylacetone (acac) was used as precursor. After dropping the amorphous powder precursor prepared by freeze-drying process, PT nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrate were obtained after heat treatment at 720 deg. C for 30 min in air. PT nanocrystals have been detected by XRD to be tetragonal perovskite structure. With the increase of acac/Pb molar ratio, the relative (1 0 0)/(0 0 1) diffraction peak intensity gradually increases, which probably suggested an oriented growth of PT nanocrystal along [1 0 0] on Si (1 0 0) substrates. In addition, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results indicated that the height and the average lateral size of PT nanocrystal increased and then decreased as the acac/Pb molar ratio increased. Piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM) results demonstrated that all the samples show obvious piezoelectric activity. These results implied that the acetylacetone molecular mediated the growth of PT nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrates possibly by the acac/Pb molar ratio. This simple method has been suggested to be attractive for tailoring an oriented growth of the nanostructures of perovskite oxide systems on Si substrates.

  3. Ultrathin Oxide Passivation Layer by Rapid Thermal Oxidation for the Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngseok; Oh, Woongkyo; Dao, Vinh Ai; Hussain, Shahzada Qamar; Yi, Junsin

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to deposit extremely thin a-Si:H layer in heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) solar cell due to thermal damage and tough process control. This study aims to understand oxide passivation mechanism of silicon surface using rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) process by examining surface effective lifetime and surface recombination velocity. The presence of thin insulating a-Si:H layer is the key to get high Voc by lowering the leakage current (I0) which improves the efficie...

  4. Wet-Chemical Preparation of Silicon Tunnel Oxides for Transparent Passivated Contacts in Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Malte; Pomaska, Manuel; Lentz, Florian; Finger, Friedhelm; Rau, Uwe; Ding, Kaining

    2018-05-02

    Transparent passivated contacts (TPCs) using a wide band gap microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H(n)), silicon tunnel oxide (SiO 2 ) stack are an alternative to amorphous silicon-based contacts for the front side of silicon heterojunction solar cells. In a systematic study of the μc-SiC:H(n)/SiO 2 /c-Si contact, we investigated selected wet-chemical oxidation methods for the formation of ultrathin SiO 2 , in order to passivate the silicon surface while ensuring a low contact resistivity. By tuning the SiO 2 properties, implied open-circuit voltages of 714 mV and contact resistivities of 32 mΩ cm 2 were achieved using μc-SiC:H(n)/SiO 2 /c-Si as transparent passivated contacts.

  5. Electrochemical synthesis of MoS2 quantum dots embedded nanostructured porous silicon with enhanced electroluminescence property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Megha; Kumari, Reeta; Parra, Mohammad Ramzan; Pandey, Padmini; Siddiqui, Hafsa; Haque, Fozia Z.

    2017-11-01

    In this report we present the successful enhancement in electroluminescence (EL) in nanostructured n-type porous silicon (PS) with an idea of embedding luminophorous Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) quantum dots (QD's). Electrochemical anodization technique was used for the formation of PS surface and MoS2 QD's were prepared using the electrochemical route. Spin coating technique was employed for the proper incorporation of MoS2 QD's within the PS nanostructures. The crystallographic analysis was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy techniques. However, surface morphology was determined using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The optical measurements were performed on photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometer; additionally for electroluminescence (EL) study special arrangement of instrumental setup was made at laboratory level which provides novelty to this work. A diode prototype was made comprising Ag/MoS2:PS/Silicon/Ag for EL study. The MoS2:PS shows a remarkable concentration dependent enhancement in PL as well as in EL intensities, which paves a way to better utilize this strategy in optoelectronic device applications.

  6. Nanostructured silicon via metal assisted catalyzed etch (MACE): chemistry fundamentals and pattern engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Fatima; Miller, Jeffrey B.; Davidson, Lauren M.; Nichols, Logan; Duan, Wenqi; Jura, Michael P.; Yim, Joanne; Forziati, Joanne; Black, Marcie R.

    2016-10-01

    There are a range of different methods to generate a nanostructured surface on silicon (Si) but the most cost effective and optically interesting is the metal assisted wet chemical etching (MACE) (Koynov et al 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 203107). MACE of Si is a controllable, room-temperature wet-chemical technique that uses a thin layer of metal to etch the surface of Si, leaving behind various nano- and micro-scale surface features or ‘black silicon’. MACE-fabricated nanowires (NWs) provide improved antireflection and light trapping functionality (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66) compared with the traditional ‘iso-texturing’ (Campbell and Green 1987 J. Appl. Phys. 62 243-9). The resulting lower reflection and improved light trapping can lead to higher short circuit currents in NW solar cells (Toor et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 103501). In addition, NW cells can have higher fill factors and voltages than traditionally processed cells, thus leading to increased solar cell efficiencies (Cabrera et al 2013 IEEE J. Photovolt. 3 102-7). MACE NW processing also has synergy with next generation Si solar cell designs, such as thin epitaxial-Si and passivated emitter rear contact (Toor et al 2016 Nanoscale 8 15448-66). While several companies have begun manufacturing black Si, and many more are researching these techniques, much of the work has not been published in traditional journals and is publicly available only through conference proceedings and patent publications, which makes learning the field challenging. There have been three specialized review articles published recently on certain aspects of MACE or black Si, but do not present a full review that would benefit the industry (Liu et al 2014 Energy Environ. Sci. 7 3223-63 Yusufoglu et al 2015 IEEE J. Photovolt. 5 320-8 Huang et al 2011 Adv. Mater. 23 285-308). In this feature article, we review the chemistry of MACE and explore how changing parameters in the wet etch process effects the resulting

  7. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  8. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Priyatha, E-mail: priyatha.premnath@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tavangar, Amirhossein, E-mail: atavanga@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tan, Bo, E-mail: tanbo@ryerson.ca [Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan, E-mail: venkat@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  9. Gold nanostructure-integrated silica-on-silicon waveguide for the detection of antibiotics in milk and milk products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhikandathil, Jayan; Badilescu, Simona; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics are extensively used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases. The use of antibiotics for the treatment of animals used for food production raised the concern of the public and a rapid screening method became necessary. A novel approach of detection of antibiotics in milk is reported in this work by using an immunoassay format and the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance property of gold. An antibiotic from the penicillin family that is, ampicillin is used for testing. Gold nanostructures deposited on a glass substrate by a novel convective assembly method were heat-treated to form a nanoisland morphology. The Au nanostructures were functionalized and the corresponding antibody was absorbed from a solution. Solutions with known concentrations of antigen (antibiotics) were subsequently added and the spectral changes were monitored step by step. The Au LSPR band corresponding to the nano-island structure was found to be suitable for the detection of the antibody antigen interaction. The detection of the ampicillin was successfully demonstrated with the gold nano-islands deposited on glass substrate. This process was subsequently adapted for the integration of gold nanostructures on the silica-on-silicon waveguide for the purpose of detecting antibiotics.

  10. Relationships among surface processing at the nanometer scale, nanostructure and optical properties of thin oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria

    2004-05-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to study the optical properties of nanostructured semiconductor oxide thin films. Various examples of models for the dielectric function, based on Lorentzian oscillators combined with the Drude model, are given based on the band structure of the analyzed oxide. With this approach, the optical properties of thin films are determined independent of the dielectric functions of the corresponding bulk materials, and correlation between the optical properties and nanostructure of thin films is investigated. In particular, in order to discuss the dependence of optical constants on grain size, CeO{sub 2} nanostructured films are considered and parameterized by two-Lorentzian oscillators or two-Tauc-Lorentz model depending on the nanostructure and oxygen deficiency. The correlation among anisotropy, crystalline fraction and optical properties parameterized by a four-Lorentz oscillator model is discussed for nanocrystalline V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films. Indium tin oxide thin films are discussed as an example of the presence of graded optical properties related to interfacial reactivity activated by processing conditions. Finally, the example of ZnO shows the potential of ellipsometry in discerning crystal and epitaxial film polarity through the analysis of spectra and the detection of surface reactivity of the two polar faces, i.e. Zn-polarity and O-polarity.

  11. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I.; Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 Ω cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550°C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  12. Functional zinc oxide nanostructures for electronic and energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Abhishek

    ZnO has proven to be a multifunctional material with important nanotechnological applications. ZnO nanostructures can be grown in various forms such as nanowires, nanorods, nanobelts, nanocombs etc. In this work, ZnO nanostructures are grown in a double quartz tube configuration thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) system. We focus on functionalized ZnO Nanostructures by controlling their structures and tuning their properties for various applications. The following topics have been investigated: (1) We have fabricated various ZnO nanostructures using a thermal CVD technique. The growth parameters were optimized and studied for different nanostructures. (2) We have studied the application of ZnO nanowires (ZnONWs) for field effect transistors (FETs). Unintentional n-type conductivity was observed in our FETs based on as-grown ZnO NWs. We have then shown for the first time that controlled incorporation of hydrogen into ZnO NWs can introduce p-type characters to the nanowires. We further found that the n-type behaviors remained, leading to the ambipolar behaviors of hydrogen incorporated ZnO NWs. Importantly, the detected p- and n- type behaviors are stable for longer than two years when devices were kept in ambient conditions. All these can be explained by an ab initio model of Zn vacancy-Hydrogen complexes, which can serve as the donor, acceptors, or green photoluminescence quencher, depend on the number of hydrogen atoms involved. (3) Next ZnONWs were tested for electron field emission. We focus on reducing the threshold field (Eth) of field emission from non-aligned ZnO NWs. As encouraged by our results on enhancing the conductivity of ZnO NWs by hydrogen annealing described in Chapter 3, we have studied the effect of hydrogen annealing for improving field emission behavior of our ZnO NWs. We found that optimally annealed ZnO NWs offered much lower threshold electric field and improved emission stability. We also studied field emission from ZnO NWs at moderate

  13. A model for the formation of lattice defects at silicon oxide precipitates in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, J.; Gryse, O. de; Clauws, P.

    2003-01-01

    The critical size of silicon oxide precipitates and the formation of lattice defects by the precipitates are discussed. An expression is derived allowing estimation of self-interstitial emission by spherical precipitates as well as strain build-up during precipitate growth. The predictions are compared with published experimental data. A model for stacking fault nucleation at oxide precipitates is developed based on strain and self-interstitial accumulation during the thermal history of the wafer. During a low-temperature treatment high levels of strain develop. During subsequent high-temperature treatment, excess strain energy in the precipitate is released by self-interstitial emission leading to favourable conditions for stacking fault nucleation

  14. Toward Annealing-Stable Molybdenum-Oxide-Based Hole-Selective Contacts For Silicon Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Essig, Stephanie; Dré on, Julie; Rucavado, Esteban; Mews, Mathias; Koida, Takashi; Boccard, Mathieu; Werner, Jé ré mie; Geissbü hler, Jonas; Lö per, Philipp; Morales-Masis, Monica; Korte, Lars; De Wolf, Stefaan; Balllif, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoOX) combines a high work function with broadband optical transparency. Sandwiched between a hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon passivation layer and a transparent conductive oxide, this material allows a highly efficient

  15. Topotactic reduction yielding black titanium oxide nanostructures as metallic electronic conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaka, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Detailed analyses of reduced, single crystal, rutile-type TiO(2) via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are reported which reveal that the reduction proceeds topotactically via interstitial diffusion of Ti ions at low temperature, around 350 °C. This important finding encouraged the production of various nanostructured reduced titanium oxides from TiO(2) precursors with morphology retention, and in the process, the synthesis of black titanium oxide nanorods using TiO(2) nanorods was demonstrated. Interestingly, as opposed to the semiconductive behavior of Ti(2)O(3) synthesized at high temperature, topotactically synthesized Ti(2)O(3) exhibits metallic electrical resistance, and the value at room temperature is quite low (topotactically synthesized Ti(2)O(3). This work shows that topotactically reduced titanium oxides can have fascinating properties as well as nanostructures.

  16. Gold nanoparticle arrays directly grown on nanostructured indium tin oxide electrodes: Characterization and electroanalytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingdong; Oyama, Munetaka

    2005-01-01

    This work describes an improved seed-mediated growth approach for the direct attachment and growth of mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles on nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces. It was demonstrated that, when the seeding procedure of our previously reported seed-mediated growth process on an ITO surface was modified, the density of gold nanospheres directly grown on the surface could be highly improved, while the emergence of nanorods was restrained. By field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and cyclic voltammetry, the growth of gold nanoparticles with increasing growth time on the defect sites of nanostructured ITO surface was monitored. Using a [Fe(China) 6 ] 3- /[Fe(China) 6 ] 4- redox probe, the increasingly facile heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics resulting from the deposition and growth of gold nanoparticle arrays was observed. The as-prepared gold nanoparticle arrays exhibited high catalytic activity toward the electrooxidation of nitric oxide, which could provide electroanalytical application for nitric oxide sensing

  17. Facile synthesis of nanostructured transition metal oxides as electrodes for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opra, Denis P.; Gnedenkov, Sergey V.; Sokolov, Alexander A.; Minaev, Alexander N.; Kuryavyi, Valery G.; Sinebryukhov, Sergey L.

    2017-09-01

    At all times, energy storage is one of the greatest scientific challenge. Recently, Li-ion batteries are under special attention due to high working voltage, long cycle life, low self-discharge, reliability, no-memory effect. However, commercial LIBs usage in medium- and large-scale energy storage are limited by the capacity of lithiated metal oxide cathode and unsafety of graphite anode at high-rate charge. In this way, new electrode materials with higher electrochemical performance should be designed to satisfy a requirement in both energy and power. As it known, nanostructured transition metal oxides are promising electrode materials because of their elevated specific capacity and high potential vs. Li/Li+. In this work, the perspective of an original facile technique of pulsed high-voltage plasma discharge in synthesis of nanostructured transition metal oxides as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries has been demonstrated.

  18. Ethanol gas sensing performance of high-dimensional fuzz metal oxide nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibano, Kenzo; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Sugahara, Tohru; Lee, Heun Tae; Ueda, Yoshio

    2018-04-01

    Gas sensing ability of the He plasma induced fiber-like nanostructure, so-called fuzz structure, was firstly examined. A thin Mo layer deposited on a quartz surface was irradiated by He plasma to form the fuzz structure and oxidized by annealing in a quartz furnace. Electric conductivity of the fuzz Mo oxide layer was then measured through the Au electrodes deposited on the layer. Changes in electric conductivity by C2H5OH gas flow were examined as a function of temperature from 200 to 400 °C. Improved sensitivities were observed for the specimens after a fuzz nanostructure formation. However, the sensor developed in this study showed lower sensitivities than previously reported MoO3 nano-rod sensor, further optimization of oxidation is needed to improve the sensitivity.

  19. Silicon nanostructures-induced photoelectrochemical solar water splitting for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadwal, U.; Singh, R. [Nanoscale Research Facility (NRF), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Ranjan, Neha [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We study the photoelectrochemical (PEC) solar water splitting assisted with synthesized nanostructures. Si nanowires decorated with silver dendrite nanostructures have been synthesized using metal assisted wet chemical etching of (100) Si wafer. Etching has been carried out in an aqueous solution consisting of 5M HF and 0.02M AgNO{sub 3}. Investigations showed that such type of semiconductor nanostructures act as efficient working electrodes for the splitting of normal water in PEC method. An enhancement in the photon-to-current conversion efficiency and solar-to-hydrogen evolution was observed for obtaining a practical source of clean and renewable fuel.

  20. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberbeck, Lars [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); TOTAL Marketing Services, New Energies, La Défense 10, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France); Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Schofield, Steven R. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Curson, Neil J., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  1. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberbeck, Lars; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Schofield, Steven R.; Curson, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  2. Effects of Silica Nanostructures in Poly(ethylene oxide)-Based Composite Polymer Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Anwar, Shahid; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-06-01

    The present work describes the synthesis of some poly(ethylene oxide)-based nanocomposite polymer electrolyte films using various silica nanostructures as the inorganic filler by simple solution mixing technique, in which the nature of the silica nanostructures play a vital role in modulating their electrochemical performances at room temperature. The silica nanostructures are prepared by ammonical hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate following the modified St6ber method. The resulting films are characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimeter to study their crystallinity. Room temperature AC impedance spectroscopy is utilized to determine the Li+ ion conductivity of the resulting films. The observed conductivity values of various NCPE films depend on the nature of silica filling as well as on their surface characteristics and also on the varying PEO-Li+ ratio, which is observed to be in the order of 10(-7)-10(-6) S cm(-1).

  3. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissbühler, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.geissbuehler@epfl.ch; Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain [CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Ballif, Christophe [Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Institute of Microengineering (IMT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); CSEM PV-Center, Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  4. Photoconductivity of oxidized nanostructured PbTe(In) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovolsky, A A; Ryabova, L I; Khokhlov, D R; Dashevsky, Z M; Kasiyan, V A

    2009-01-01

    Photoconductivity of as-grown and oxidized nanocrystalline PbTe(In) films has been studied in the dc and ac modes at temperatures 4.2–300 K. The electric transport in the films is defined by two mechanisms: conductivity through barriers at grain boundaries and transport along inversion channels at the grain surface. Modification of the transport mechanisms induced by oxidation is considered. Relatively weak oxidation results in an increase in the contribution of grain barriers to conductivity followed by an enhancement of the photoconductivity amplitude. Instead, this contribution drops in the case of deep oxidation resulting in a photoresponse reduction. It is shown that the main mechanism of charge transport in deeply oxidized films at low temperatures is hopping along inversion channels at the grain surface. It is demonstrated that the photoconductive response of nanocrystalline materials may be optimized by variation of the oxidation level, measurement frequency and temperature

  5. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    OpenAIRE

    Geissbühler Jonas; Werner Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas Silvia; Barraud Loris; Hessler-Wyser Aïcha; Despeisse Matthieu; Nicolay Sylvain; Tomasi Andrea; Niesen Bjoern; De Wolf Stefaan; Ballif Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article we evidence that annealing above 130?°C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited c...

  6. The role of oxide interlayers in back reflector configurations for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demontis, V.; Sanna, C.; Melskens, J.; Santbergen, R.; Smets, A.H.M.; Damiano, A.; Zeman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin oxide interlayers are commonly added to the back reflector of thin-film silicon solar cells to increase their current. To gain more insight in the enhancement mechanism, we tested different back reflector designs consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) and/or hydrogenated silicon

  7. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  8. Structural and optical properties of silicon-carbide nanowires produced by the high-temperature carbonization of silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlikov, A. V., E-mail: pavlikov@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Latukhina, N. V.; Chepurnov, V. I. [Samara National Researh University (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Silicon-carbide (SiC) nanowire structures 40–50 nm in diameter are produced by the high-temperature carbonization of porous silicon and silicon nanowires. The SiC nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The X-ray structural and Raman data suggest that the cubic 3C-SiC polytype is dominant in the samples under study. The shape of the infrared reflectance spectrum in the region of the reststrahlen band 800–900 cm{sup –1} is indicative of the presence of free charge carriers. The possibility of using SiC nanowires in microelectronic, photonic, and gas-sensing devices is discussed.

  9. Comparative ion insertion study into a nanostructured vanadium oxide in aqueous salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Q.; Ren, S. L.; Zukowski, J.; Pomeroy, M.; Soghomonian, V., E-mail: soghomon@vt.edu [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We present a comparative study for the electrochemical insertion of different cations into a nanostructured vanadium oxide material. The oxide is hydrothemally synthesized and electrically characterized by variable temperature measurements. The electrochemical reactions are performed in aqueous chloride solutions of lithium, sodium, potassium, and ammonium, and the electrochemical behavior of various cycles are correlated with visual changes in the vanadium oxide nanosheets as observed by scanning electron microscopy. We note an increase in the specific charge per cycle in the cases of sodium and ammonium ions only, correlated with minimal physical changes to the nanosheets. The differing behavior of the various ions has implications for their use in electrical energy storage applications.

  10. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana; Shutthanandan, V.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  11. Metal-like self-organization of periodic nanostructures on silicon and silicon carbide under femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Periodic structures were generated on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. Self-organized structures with spatial periodicity of approximately 600 nm appear on silicon and silicon carbide in the laser fluence range just above the ablation threshold and upon irradiation with a large number of pulses. As in the case of metals, the dependence of the spatial periodicity on laser fluence can be explained by the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. The results show that the proposed model might be universally applicable to any solid state material

  12. Separation followed by direct SERS detection of explosives on a novel black silicon multifunctional nanostructured surface prepared in a microfluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Hübner, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the multifunctionality of a novel black silicon (BS) nanostructured surface covered with a thin layer of noble metal prepared in the a microfluidic channel. It is focused on the separation properties of the BS substrate with direct detection of the separated analytes utilizing...

  13. Nanostructure-Directed Chemical Sensing: The IHSAB Principle and the Effect of Nitrogen and Sulfur Functionalization on Metal Oxide Decorated Interface Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Gole

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The response matrix, as metal oxide nanostructure decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are modified in situ through direct amination and through treatment with organic sulfides and thiols, is demonstrated. Nanostructured TiO2, SnOx, NiO and CuxO (x = 1,2, in order of decreasing Lewis acidity, are deposited to a porous silicon interface to direct a dominant electron transduction process for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of significant chemical bond formation. The metal oxide sensing sites can be modified to decrease their Lewis acidity in a process appearing to substitute nitrogen or sulfur, providing a weak interaction to form the oxynitrides and oxysulfides. Treatment with triethylamine and diethyl sulfide decreases the Lewis acidity of the metal oxide sites. Treatment with acidic ethane thiol modifies the sensor response in an opposite sense, suggesting that there are thiol (SH groups present on the surface that provide a Brønsted acidity to the surface. The in situ modification of the metal oxides deposited to the interface changes the reversible interaction with the analytes, NH3 and NO. The observed change for either the more basic oxynitrides or oxysulfides or the apparent Brønsted acid sites produced from the interaction of the thiols do not represent a simple increase in surface basicity or acidity, but appear to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained using the recently developed inverse hard and soft acids and bases (IHSAB model.

  14. A 1 V supercapacitor device with nanostructured graphene oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polyaniline and graphene oxide composite on activated carbon cum reduced graphene oxide-supported supercapacitor electrodes are fabricated and electrochemically characterized in a three-electrode cell assembly. Attractive supercapacitor performance, namely high-power capability and cycling stability for graphene ...

  15. Annealing induced structural evolution and electrochromic properties of nanostructured tungsten oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ching-Lin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chung-Kwei [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei City 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Chun-Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Sheng-Chang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University, Tainan 710, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Jow-Lay, E-mail: JLH888@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 81148, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-31

    The effect of microstructure on the optical and electrochemical properties of nanostructured tungsten oxide films was evaluated as a function of annealing temperature. The films using block copolymer as the template were prepared from peroxotungstic acid (PTA) by spin-coating onto the substrate and post-annealed at 250–400 °C to form tungsten oxide films with nanostructure. The microstructure of the films was measured by X-ray diffraction and surface electron microscopy. The films annealed at temperatures below 300 °C are characterized by amorphous or nanocrystalline structures with a pore size of less than 10 nm. The evaluated annealing temperature caused a triclinic crystalline structure and microcracks. Cyclic voltammetry measurements were performed in a LiClO{sub 4}-propylene carbonate electrolyte. The results showed that the ion inserted capacity were maximized for films annealed at 300 °C and decreased with the increasing of annealing temperature. The electrochromic properties of the nanostructured tungsten oxide films were evaluated simultaneously by potentiostat and UV–vis spectroscopy. The films annealed at 300 °C exhibit high transmission modulation (∆T ∼ 40%) at λ = 633 nm and good kinetic properties. As a result, the correlation between the microstructure and kinetic properties was established, and the electrochromic properties have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Surfactant-assisted WO{sub 3} films have been prepared by sol–gel method. • Nanostructure of porous WO{sub 3} film is retained after crystallization. • Kinetic properties of WO{sub 3} can be improved by nanostructure and crystallinity.

  16. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micić, Darko; Šljukić, Biljana; Zujovic, Zoran; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Ćirić-Marjanović, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO 2 − oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  17. Facile conversion of bulk metal surface to metal oxide single-crystalline nanostructures by microwave irradiation: Formation of pure or Cr-doped hematite nanostructure arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungho; Jeong, Haeyoon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2010-01-01

    We report a method for converting the surfaces of bulk metal substrates (pure iron or stainless steel) to metal oxide (hematite or Cr-doped hematite) nanostructures using microwave irradiation. When microwave radiation (2.45 GHz, single-mode) was applied to a metal substrate under the flow of a gas mixture containing O 2 and Ar, metal oxide nanostructures formed and entirely covered the substrate. The nanostructures were single crystalline, and the atomic ratios of the substrate metals were preserved in the nanostructures. When a pure iron sheet was used as a substrate, hematite nanowires (1000 W microwave radiation) or nanosheets (1800 W microwave radiation) formed on the surface of the substrate. When a SUS410 sheet was used as a substrate, slightly curved rod-like nanostructures were synthesized. The oxidation states of Fe and Cr in these nanorods were Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ . Quantitative analyses revealed an average Fe/Cr atomic ratio of 9.2, nearly identical to the ratio of the metals in the SUS410 substrate.

  18. Shrinking of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous silicon oxide matrix during rapid thermal annealing in a forming gas atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sebille, M.; Fusi, A.; Xie, L.; Ali, H.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Leifer, K.; Zeman, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen on the crystallization process of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon oxide matrix. We show that hydrogen gas during annealing leads to a lower sub-band gap absorption, indicating passivation of defects created during annealing. Samples annealed in pure nitrogen show expected trends according to crystallization theory. Samples annealed in forming gas, however, deviate from this trend. Their crystallinity decreases for increased annealing time. Furthermore, we observe a decrease in the mean nanocrystal size and the size distribution broadens, indicating that hydrogen causes a size reduction of the silicon nanocrystals.

  19. Strained silicon/silicon germanium heterojunction n-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Sarah H.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations into the performance of strained silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) have been carried out. Theoretical predictions suggest that use of a strained Si/SiGe material system with advanced material properties compared with conventional silicon allows enhanced MOSFET device performance. This study has therefore investigated the practical feasibility of obtaining superior electrical performance using a Si/SiGe material system. The MOSFET devices consisted of a strained Si surface channel and were fabricated on relaxed SiGe material using a reduced thermal budget process in order to preserve the strain. Two batches of strained Si/SiGe devices fabricated on material grown by differing methods have been analysed and both showed good transistor action. A correlation of electrical and physical device data established that the electrical device behaviour was closely related to the SiGe material quality, which differed depending on growth technique. The cross-wafer variation in the electrical performance of the strained Si/SiGe devices was found to be a function of material quality, thus the viability of Si/SiGe MOSFET technology for commercial applications has been addressed. Of particular importance was the finding that large-scale 'cross-hatching' roughness associated with relaxed SiGe alloys led to degradation in the small-scale roughness at the gate oxide interface, which affects electrical device performance. The fabrication of strained Si MOSFET devices on high quality SiGe material thus enabled significant performance gains to be realised compared with conventional Si control devices. In contrast, the performance of devices fabricated on material with severe cross-hatching roughness was found to be diminished by the nanoscale oxide interface roughness. The effect of device processing on SiGe material with differing as-grown roughness has been carried out and compared with the reactions

  20. Bipolar resistive switching in metal-insulator-semiconductor nanostructures based on silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryazhkina, M. N.; Tikhov, S. V.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Antonov, I. N.; Karzanov, V. V.; Gorshkov, O. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.; Karakolis, P.; Dimitrakis, P.

    2018-03-01

    Bipolar resistive switching in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor-like structures with an inert Au top electrode and a Si3N4 insulator nanolayer (6 nm thick) has been observed. The effect of a highly doped n +-Si substrate and a SiO2 interlayer (2 nm) is revealed in the changes in the semiconductor space charge region and small-signal parameters of parallel and serial equivalent circuit models measured in the high- and low-resistive capacitor states, as well as under laser illumination. The increase in conductivity of the semiconductor capacitor plate significantly reduces the charging and discharging times of capacitor-like structures.

  1. Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanostructures: The Polyethylenenemine (PEI) Role

    KAUST Repository

    Mozo, Sergio Lentijo; Zuddas, Efisio; Casu, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of anisotropic iron oxide nanoparticles is a challenge in the field of nanomaterial research that requires an extreme attention to detail. In particular, following up a previous work showcasing the synthesis of magnetite

  2. Sol-Gel Derived, Nanostructured Oxide Lubricant Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    In this program, we deposited oxide coatings of titanium and nickel by wet-chemical deposition methods, also referred to as sol-gel, which showed excellent tribological properties in previous investigations...

  3. Tunnel Oxides Formed by Field-Induced Anodisation for Passivated Contacts of Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingnan Tong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel silicon oxides form a critical component for passivated contacts for silicon solar cells. They need to be sufficiently thin to allow carriers to tunnel through and to be uniform both in thickness and stoichiometry across the silicon wafer surface, to ensure uniform and low recombination velocities if high conversion efficiencies are to be achieved. This paper reports on the formation of ultra-thin silicon oxide layers by field-induced anodisation (FIA, a process that ensures uniform oxide thickness by passing the anodisation current perpendicularly through the wafer to the silicon surface that is anodised. Spectroscopical analyses show that the FIA oxides contain a lower fraction of Si-rich sub-oxides compared to wet-chemical oxides, resulting in lower recombination velocities at the silicon and oxide interface. This property along with its low temperature formation highlights the potential for FIA to be used to form low-cost tunnel oxide layers for passivated contacts of silicon solar cells.

  4. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  5. Morphology evolution and nanostructure of chemical looping transition metal oxide materials upon redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Lang; Cheng, Zhuo; Guo, Mengqing; Fan, Jonathan A.; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal are heavily used in chemical looping technologies because of their high oxygen carrying capacity and high thermal reactivity. These oxygen activities result in the oxide formation and oxygen vacancy formation that affect the nanoscale crystal phase and morphology within these materials and their subsequent bulk chemical behavior. In this study, two selected earlier transition metals manganese and cobalt as well as two selected later transition metals copper and nickel that are important to chemical looping reactions are investigated when they undergo cyclic redox reactions. We found Co microparticles exhibited increased CoO impurity presence when oxidized to Co_3O_4 upon cyclic oxidation; CuO redox cycles prefer to be limited to a reduced form of Cu_2O and an oxidized form of CuO; Mn microparticles were oxidized to a mixed phases of MnO and Mn_3O_4, which causes delamination during oxidation. For Ni microparticles, a dense surface were observed during the redox reaction. The atomistic thermodynamics methods and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to elucidate the effect of oxygen dissociation and migration on the morphological evolution of nanostructures during the redox processes. Our results indicate that the earlier transition metals (Mn and Co) tend to have stronger interaction with O_2 than the later transition metals (Ni and Cu). Also, our modified Brønsted−Evans−Polanyi (BEP) relationship for reaction energies and total reaction barriers reveals that reactions of earlier transition metals are more exergonic and have lower oxygen dissociation barriers than those of later transition metals. In addition, it was found that for these transition metal oxides the oxygen vacancy formation energies increase with the depth. The oxide in the higher oxidation state of transition metal has lower vacancy formation energy, which can facilitate forming the defective nanostructures. The fundamental understanding of these metal

  6. Using reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy to characterize capped silver nanostructures grown on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, K.; Jacob, J.; McGilp, J.F. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Chandola, S. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Esser, N. [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Using the single domain Si(111)-3 x 1-Ag surface as a template, room temperature deposition of two or more monolayers of Ag leads to the formation of metallic nanostructures. Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) in the infrared (IR) spectral region is used to analyse the anisotropic conductivity of the structures. The anisotropy is found to be influenced by the offcut angle of the substrate, and hence the terrace width. The Ag nanostructures were capped with Si to form a near-IR transparent protecting layer. The samples are stable to exposure to ambient conditions for significant periods. The RAS spectra are compared to model calculations, which support the conclusion that the buried metallic Ag nanostructures survive the capping process. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. A New Hydrogen Sensor with Nanostructured Zinc Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma PRAKSHALE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano structured ZnMgO was synthesized by self combustion method using glycine as a fuel. The synthesized microstructure materials were investigated by TG-DTA, XRD, SEM, TEM, and E-DAX. Observed results shows the product, is the mixture of ZnMgO, its particle size is about 45-55 nm with loosely agglomerated shape. Electrical properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied by AC conductivity measurement. The gas sensing properties were studied towards reducing gases viz. ammonia, hydrogen, acetone, chlorine, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG, etc. and it was observed that the nano structured ZnMgO shows high response to hydrogen at 200 °C and no cross sensitivities to other reducing gases. These nanoparticles were good I-V characteristics with ohmic nature. The quick response ( ~10 s and fast recovery (~ 20 s are the main features of these sensors. The effects of nanostructure on the gas sensing performance were studied and discussed.

  8. Friction-induced nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Bingjun; Qian Linmao; Yu Jiaxin; Zhou Zhongrong; Dong Hanshan; Chen Yunfei

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of nanostructures has become a major concern as the scaling of device dimensions continues. In this paper, a friction-induced nanofabrication method is proposed to fabricate protrusive nanostructures on silicon. Without applying any voltage, the nanofabrication is completed by sliding an AFM diamond tip on a sample surface under a given normal load. Nanostructured patterns, such as linear nanostructures, nanodots or nanowords, can be fabricated on the target surface. The height of these nanostructures increases rapidly at first and then levels off with the increasing normal load or number of scratching cycles. TEM analyses suggest that the friction-induced hillock is composed of silicon oxide, amorphous silicon and deformed silicon structures. Compared to the tribochemical reaction, the amorphization and crystal defects induced by the mechanical interaction may have played a dominating role in the formation of the hillocks. Similar to other proximal probe methods, the proposed method enables fabrication at specified locations and facilitates measuring the dimensions of nanostructures with high precision. It is highlighted that the fabrication can also be realized on electrical insulators or oxide surfaces, such as quartz and glass. Therefore, the friction-induced method points out a new route in fabricating nanostructures on demand.

  9. Sensitivity, selectivity and stability of tin oxide nanostructures on large area arrays of microhotplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Cavicchi, Richard; Semancik, Steve; DeVoe, Don L.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the sensitivity, stability and selectivity of nanoparticle engineered tin oxide (SnO2) are reported, for microhotplate chemical sensing applications. 16 Å of metals such as nickel, cobalt, iron, copper and silver were selectively evaporated onto each column of the microhotplate array. Following evaporation, the microhotplates were heated to 500 °C and SnO2 was deposited on top of the microhotplates using a self-aligned chemical vapour deposition process. Scanning electron microscopy characterization revealed control of SnO2 nanostructures in the range of 20-121 nm. Gas sensing in seven different hydrocarbons revealed that metal nanoparticles that helped in producing faster nucleation of SnO2 resulted in smaller grain size and higher sensitivity. Sensitivity as a function of concentration and grain size is addressed for tin oxide nanostructures. Smaller grain sizes resulted in higher sensitivity of tin oxide nanostructures. Temperature programmed sensing of the devices yielded shape differences in the response between air and methanol, illustrating selectivity. Spiderweb plots were used to monitor the materials programmed selectivity. The shape differences between different gases in spiderweb plots illustrate materials selectivity as a powerful mapping approach for monitoring selectivity in various gases. Continuous monitoring in 80 ppm methanol yielded stable sensor response for more than 200 h. This comprehensive study illustrates the use of a nanoparticle engineering approach for sensitive, selective and stable gas sensing applications.

  10. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  11. Viscous properties of aluminum oxide nanotubes and aluminium oxide nanoparticles - silicone oil suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ram; French, Steven; Delgado, Adrian; Ramos, Carlos; Gutierrez, Jose; Chipara, Mircea; Lozano, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of γ-aluminum oxide nanotubes and γ-aluminum oxide nanoparticles dispersed within silicone oil were prepared. The relationship between shear stress and shear rate was measured and theoretically simulated by using an extended Bingham model for both the rheological and electrorheological features of these systems. Shear stress and viscosity showed a sharp increase for the aluminum oxide nanotubes suspensions subjected to applied electric fields whereas aluminum oxide nanoparticles suspensions showed a moderate change. It was found that the transition from liquid to solid state (mediated by the applied electric field) can be described by a power law and that for low applied voltages the relationship is almost linear.

  12. Study of an Amorphous Silicon Oxide Buffer Layer for p-Type Microcrystalline Silicon Oxide/n-Type Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells and Their Temperature Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweewat Krajangsang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (i-a-SiO:H films were used as front and rear buffer layers in crystalline silicon heterojunction (c-Si-HJ solar cells. The surface passivity and effective lifetime of these i-a-SiO:H films on an n-type silicon wafer were improved by increasing the CO2/SiH4 ratios in the films. Using i-a-SiO:H as the front and rear buffer layers in c-Si-HJ solar cells was investigated. The front i-a-SiO:H buffer layer thickness and the CO2/SiH4 ratio influenced the open-circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and temperature coefficient (TC of the c-Si-HJ solar cells. The highest total area efficiency obtained was 18.5% (Voc=700 mV, Jsc=33.5 mA/cm2, and FF=0.79. The TC normalized for this c-Si-HJ solar cell efficiency was −0.301%/°C.

  13. Nanostructured Metal Oxides for Stoichiometric Degradation of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Henych, Jiří; Janos, P.; Skoumal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 236, č. 2016 (2016), s. 239-258 ISSN 0179-5953 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/1116 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : chemical warfare agent * metal nanoparticle * unique surface- chemistry * mesoporous manganese oxide Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.930, year: 2016

  14. A 1 V supercapacitor device with nanostructured graphene oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Attractive supercapacitor performance, namely high-power capability and cycling stability for graphene ... performance tested. A comparative study has also been conducted for polyaniline and graphene oxide/polyaniline composite-based 1 V supercapacitors for comprehending ..... Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers).

  15. Study of nano-structured ceria for catalytic CO oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valechha, D.; Lokhande, S.; Klementová, Mariana; Šubrt, Jan; Rayalu, S.; Labhsetwar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 11 (2011), s. 3718-3725 ISSN 0959-9428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : mesoporous CeO2 * titania * alumina * oxides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.968, year: 2011

  16. Electrical Transport Ability of Nanostructured Potassium-Doped Titanium Oxide Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Yoon; Matsuno, Ryosuke; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takai, Madoka

    2011-02-01

    Potassium-doped nanostructured titanium oxide films were fabricated using a wet corrosion process with various KOH solutions. The doped condition of potassium in TiO2 was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Nanotubular were synthesized at a dopant concentration of 0.27%, these structures disappeared. To investigate the electrical properties of K-doped TiO2, pseudo metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) samples were fabricated. The samples exhibited a distinct electrical behavior and p-type characteristics. The electrical behavior was governed by the volume of the dopant when the dopant concentration was 0.18%.

  17. Growth and optical properties of silver nanostructures obtained on connected anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, G.; Durante, C.; Pilot, R.; Garoli, D.; Bozio, R.; Romanato, F.; Gennaro, A.; Rizzi, G. A.; Granozzi, G.

    2012-08-01

    Ag nanostructures are grown by AC electrodeposition on anodic alumina oxide (AAO) connected membranes acting as templates. Depending on the thickness of the template and on the voltage applied during the growth process, different Ag nanostructures with different optical properties are obtained. When AAO membranes about 1 μm thick are used, the Ag nanostructures consist in Ag nanorods, at the bottom of the pores, and Ag nanotubes departing from the nanorods and filling the pores almost for the whole length. When AAO membranes about 3 μm thick are used, the nanostructures are Ag spheroids, at the bottom of the pores, and Ag nanowires that do not reach the upper part of the alumina pores. The samples are characterized by angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis and Raman spectroscopies. A simple NaOH etching procedure, followed by sonication in ethanol, allows one to obtain an exposed ordered array of Ag nanorods, suitable for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, while in the other case (3 μm thick AAO membranes) the sample can be used in localized surface plasmon resonance sensing.

  18. Growth and optical properties of silver nanostructures obtained on connected anodic aluminum oxide templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giallongo, G; Durante, C; Pilot, R; Bozio, R; Gennaro, A; Rizzi, G A; Granozzi, G; Garoli, D; Romanato, F

    2012-01-01

    Ag nanostructures are grown by AC electrodeposition on anodic alumina oxide (AAO) connected membranes acting as templates. Depending on the thickness of the template and on the voltage applied during the growth process, different Ag nanostructures with different optical properties are obtained. When AAO membranes about 1 μm thick are used, the Ag nanostructures consist in Ag nanorods, at the bottom of the pores, and Ag nanotubes departing from the nanorods and filling the pores almost for the whole length. When AAO membranes about 3 μm thick are used, the nanostructures are Ag spheroids, at the bottom of the pores, and Ag nanowires that do not reach the upper part of the alumina pores. The samples are characterized by angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and UV–vis and Raman spectroscopies. A simple NaOH etching procedure, followed by sonication in ethanol, allows one to obtain an exposed ordered array of Ag nanorods, suitable for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, while in the other case (3 μm thick AAO membranes) the sample can be used in localized surface plasmon resonance sensing. (paper)

  19. Effect of porous silicon layer on the performance of Si/oxide photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, Waheed A.

    2008-01-01

    Photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical systems were prepared by the formation of a thin porous film on silicon. The porous silicon layer was formed on the top of a clean oxide free silicon wafer surface by anodic etching in HF/H 2 O/C 2 H 5 OH mixture (2:1:1). The silicon was then covered by an oxide film (tin oxide, ITO or titanium oxide). The oxide films were prepared by the spray/pyrolysis technique which enables doping of the oxide film by different atoms like In, Ru or Sb during the spray process. Doping of SnO 2 or TiO 2 films with Ru atoms improves the surface characteristics of the oxide film which improves the solar conversion efficiency. The prepared solar cells are stable against environmental attack due to the presence of the stable oxide film. It gives relatively high short circuit currents (I sc ), due to the presence of the porous silicon layer, which leads to the recorded high conversion efficiency. Although the open-circuit potential (V oc ) and fill factor (FF) were not affected by the thickness of the porous silicon film, the short circuit current was found to be sensitive to this thickness. An optimum thickness of the porous film and also the oxide layer is required to optimize the solar cell efficiency. The results represent a promising system for the application of porous silicon layers in solar energy converters. The use of porous silicon instead of silicon single crystals in solar cell fabrication and the optimization of the solar conversion efficiency will lead to the reduction of the cost as an important factor and also the increase of the solar cell efficiency making use of the large area of the porous structures

  20. Formation of silicon carbide by laser ablation in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone suspension on silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleh, Babak; Ghasemi, Samaneh; Torkamany, Mohammad Javad; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Maleki, Farahnaz

    2018-01-01

    Laser ablation of a silicon wafer in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (GO-NMP) suspension was carried out with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (pulse duration = 250 ns, wavelength = 1064 nm). The surface of silicon wafer before and after laser ablation was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results showed that the ablation of silicon surface in liquid by pulsed laser was done by the process of melt expulsion under the influence of the confined plasma-induced pressure or shock wave trapped between the silicon wafer and the liquid. The X-ray diffraction‌ (XRD) pattern of Si wafer after laser ablation showed that 4H-SiC layer is formed on its surface. The formation of the above layer was also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy‌ (XPS), as well as EDX was utilized. The reflectance of samples decreased with increasing pulse energy. Therefore, the morphological alteration and the formation of SiC layer at high energy increase absorption intensity in the UV‌-vis regions. Theoretical calculations confirm that the formation of silicon carbide from graphene oxide and silicon wafer is considerably endothermic. Development of new methods for increasing the reflectance without causing harmful effects is still an important issue for crystalline Si solar cells. By using the method described in this paper, the optical properties of solar cells can be improved.

  1. Preparation of the Nanostructured Radioisotope Metallic Oxide by Neutron Irradiation for Use as Radiotracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ei Seo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metallic oxides manganese dioxide (MnO2, samarium oxide (Sm2O3, and dysprosium oxide (Dy2O3 with nanorod-like structures were synthesized by the hydrothermal synthesis method, respectively. Subsequently, the nanostructured radioisotopes MnO2 with Mn-56, Sm2O3 with Sm-153, and Dy2O3 with Dy-165 were prepared by neutron irradiation from the HANARO research reactor, respectively. The three different elements, Mn, Sm, and Dy, were selected as radiotracers because these elements can be easily gamma-activated from neutrons (activation limits: 1 picogram (Dy, 1–10 picogram (Mn, 10–100 picogram (Sm. Furthermore, the synthesized radioisotopes can be used as radiotracers in Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis as the rare earth metals Dy and Sm were not present in the Korean environment. The successful synthesis of the radioisotope metallic oxides was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, and gamma spectroscopy analysis. The synthesized nanostructured radioisotope metallic oxides may be used as radiotracers in scientific, environmental, engineering, and industrial fields.

  2. Hierarchical Assembly of Multifunctional Oxide-based Composite Nanostructures for Energy and Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jan Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite nanoarchitectures represent a class of nanostructured entities that integrates various dissimilar nanoscale building blocks including nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanofilms toward realizing multifunctional characteristics. A broad array of composite nanoarchitectures can be designed and fabricated, involving generic materials such as metal, ceramics, and polymers in nanoscale form. In this review, we will highlight the latest progress on composite nanostructures in our research group, particularly on various metal oxides including binary semiconductors, ABO3-type perovskites, A2BO4 spinels and quaternary dielectric hydroxyl metal oxides (AB(OH6 with diverse application potential. Through a generic template strategy in conjunction with various synthetic approaches—such as hydrothermal decomposition, colloidal deposition, physical sputtering, thermal decomposition and thermal oxidation, semiconductor oxide alloy nanowires, metal oxide/perovskite (spinel composite nanowires, stannate based nanocompostes, as well as semiconductor heterojunction—arrays and networks have been self-assembled in large scale and are being developed as promising classes of composite nanoarchitectures, which may open a new array of advanced nanotechnologies in solid state lighting, solar absorption, photocatalysis and battery, auto-emission control, and chemical sensing.

  3. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni

    2017-10-12

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  4. Scalable high-affinity stabilization of magnetic iron oxide nanostructures by a biocompatible antifouling homopolymer

    KAUST Repository

    Luongo, Giovanni; Campagnolo, Paola; Perez, Jose E.; Kosel, Jü rgen; Georgiou, Theoni K.; Regoutz, Anna; Payne, David J; Stevens, Molly M.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E; Dunlop, Iain E

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanostructures have been widely developed for biomedical applications, due to their magnetic properties and biocompatibility. In clinical application, the stabilization of these nanostructures against aggregation and non-specific interactions is typically achieved using weakly anchored polysaccharides, with better-defined and more strongly anchored synthetic polymers not commercially adopted due to complexity of synthesis and use. Here, we show for the first time stabilization and biocompatibilization of iron oxide nanoparticles by a synthetic homopolymer with strong surface anchoring and a history of clinical use in other applications, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethy phosphorylcholine) (poly(MPC)). For the commercially important case of spherical particles, binding of poly(MPC) to iron oxide surfaces and highly effective individualization of magnetite nanoparticles (20 nm) are demonstrated. Next-generation high-aspect ratio nanowires (both magnetite/maghemite and core-shell iron/iron oxide) are furthermore stabilized by poly(MPC)-coating, with nanowire cytotoxicity at large concentrations significantly reduced. The synthesis approach is exploited to incorporate functionality into the poly(MPC) chain is demonstrated by random copolymerization with an alkyne-containing monomer for click-chemistry. Taking these results together, poly(MPC) homopolymers and random copolymers offer a significant improvement over current iron oxide nanoformulations, combining straightforward synthesis, strong surface-anchoring and well-defined molecular weight.

  5. Tailoring Charge Recombination in Photoelectrodes Using Oxide Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iandolo, Beniamino; Wickman, Björn; Svensson, Elin

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing semiconductor devices for solar energy conversion requires an explicit control of the recombination of photogenerated electron−hole pairs. Here we show how the recombination of charge carriers can be controlled in semiconductor thin films by surface patterning with oxide nanodisks....... The control mechanism relies on the formation of dipole-like electric fields at the interface that, depending on the field direction, attract or repel minority carriers from underneath the disks. The charge recombination rate can be controlled through the choice of oxide material and the surface coverage...... of nanodisks. We provide proof-of-principle demonstration of this approach by patterning the surface of Fe2O3, one of the most studied semiconductors for light-driven water splitting, with TiO2 and Cu2O nanodisks. We expect this method to be generally applicable to a range of semiconductor-based solar energy...

  6. Functionalization of 2D macroporous silicon under the high-pressure oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachevtseva, L.; Kartel, M.; Kladko, V.; Gudymenko, O.; Bo, Wang; Bratus, V.; Lytvynenko, O.; Onyshchenko, V.; Stronska, O.

    2018-03-01

    Addition functionalization after high-pressure oxidation of 2D macroporous silicon structures is evaluated. X-ray diffractometry indicates formation of orthorhombic SiO2 phase on macroporous silicon at oxide thickness of 800-1200 nm due to cylindrical symmetry of macropores and high thermal expansion coefficient of SiO2. Pb center concentration grows with the splitting energy of LO- and TO-phonons and SiO2 thickness in oxidized macroporous silicon structures. This increase EPR signal amplitude and GHz radiation absorption and is promising for development of high-frequency devices and electronically controlled elements.

  7. A parametric study of laser induced ablation-oxidation on porous silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; Nigro, M Arcangela; Della Corte, Francesco G; Rendina, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the laser induced ablation-oxidation process on porous silicon layers having different porosities and thicknesses by non-destructive optical techniques. In particular, the interaction between a low power blue light laser and the porous silicon surfaces has been characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The oxidation profiles etched on the porous samples can be tuned as functions of the layer porosity and laser fluence. Oxide stripes of width less than 2 μm and with thicknesses between 100 nm and 5 μm have been produced, depending on the porosity of the porous silicon, by using a 40 x focusing objective

  8. Metal Oxide Nanostructured Materials for Optical and Energy Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Michael Christopher

    2013-01-01

    With a rapidly growing population, dwindling resources, and increasing environmental pressures, the need for sustainable technological solutions becomes more urgent. Metal oxides make up much of the earth's crust and are typically inexpensive materials, but poor electrical and optical properties prevent them from being useful for most semiconductor applications. Recent breakthroughs in chemistry and materials science allow for the growth of high-quality materials with nanometer-scale features...

  9. Nanostructured magnesium oxide as cure activator for polychloroprene rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sritama; Bhowmick, Anil K

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this research was to synthesize magnesium oxide nanoparticles and to use them as cure activator for polychloroprene rubber (CR). The effects of counterions of magnesium salts on the homogeneous phase precipitation reaction to control size, monodispersity, crystallinity, and morphology of Mg(OH)2 nanoparticles were also investigated. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by optimizing the calcination temperature of Mg(OH)2 nanoparticles. Finally, the MgO nanoparticles were dispersed in polychloroprene rubber (CR) solution along with zinc oxide (ZnO) powder. The influence of MgO nanoparticles on the mechanical, dynamic mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting nanocomposites was quantified. The modulus and strength of ZnO-cured polychloroprene rubber with 4% MgO nanoparticles appeared to be superior to those with ZnO particles or ZnO with rubber grade MgO particles. These composites were further characterized by transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy in order to understand the morphology of the resulting system and the load transfer mechanism.

  10. The effect of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure in catalytic activity for benzene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingtao; Li, Yuanzhi; Mao, Mingyang; Zhao, Xiujian; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-11-01

    The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel and facile strategy of synthesizing these unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework by hydrothermal redox reaction between Ce(NO3)3 and KMnO4 with KMnO4/Ce(NO3)3 at a molar ratio of 3 : 1 at 120 °C. Compared to pure OMS-2, the produced catalyst of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 ultrathin nanorods exhibits an enormous enhancement in the catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, which is evidenced by a significant decrease (ΔT50 = 100 °C, ΔT90 = 129 °C) in the reaction temperature of T50 and T90 (corresponding to the benzene conversion = 50% and 90%), which is considerably more efficient than the expensive supported noble metal catalyst (Pt/Al2O3). We combine both theoretical and experimental evidence to provide a new physical insight into the significant effect due to the defects induced by the Ce ion substitution on the catalytic activity of OMS-2. The formation of unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework leads to a significant enhancement of the lattice oxygen activity, thus tremendously increasing the catalytic activity.The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel

  11. Nanostructured high valence silver oxide produced by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D.; Facibeni, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Russo, V.; Conti, C.; Ducati, C.; Casari, C.S.; Li Bassi, A.; Bottani, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Among silver oxides, Ag 4 O 4 , i.e. high valence Ag(I)Ag(III) oxide, is interesting for applications in high energy batteries and for the development of antimicrobial coatings. We here show that ns UV pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in an oxygen containing atmosphere allows the synthesis of pure Ag 4 O 4 nanocrystalline thin films, permitting at the same time to control the morphology of the material at the sub-micrometer scale. Ag 4 O 4 films with a crystalline domain size of the order of tens of nm can be deposited provided the deposition pressure is above a threshold (roughly 4 Pa pure O 2 or 20 Pa synthetic air). The formation of this particular high valence silver oxide is explained in terms of the reactions occurring during the expansion of the ablated species in the reactive atmosphere. In particular, expansion of the PLD plasma plume is accompanied by formation of low stability Ag-O dimers and atomic oxygen, providing reactive species at the substrate where the film grows. Evidence of reactive collisions in the expanding ablation plume is obtained by analysis of the plume visible shape in inert and reactive atmospheres. In addition, we show how the dimensionless deposition parameter L, relating the target-to-substrate distance to the ablation plume maximum expansion length, can be used to classify different growth regimes. It is thus possible to vary the stoichiometry and the morphology of the films, from compact and columnar to foam-like, by controlling both the gas pressure and the target-to-substrate distance

  12. Designing deoxidation inhibiting encapsulation of metal oxide nanostructures for fluidic and biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Moumita, E-mail: ghoshiisc@gmail.com [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Centre for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); IV. Institute of Physics, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Ghosh, Siddharth [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Seibt, Michael [IV. Institute of Physics, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schaap, Iwan A.T. [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Institute of Biological Chemistry, Biophysics and Bioengineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Christoph F. [III. Institute of Physics – Biophysics and Complex Systems, Georg-August-Universität-Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Mohan Rao, G. [Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: To retain atomic structure and morphology of ZnO nanostructures (caused by deoxidation of ZnO) in water/bio-fluids, we propose and demonstrate a robust and inexpensive encapsulation technique using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant. - Highlights: • Aqueous solutions of ZnO nanorods with and without surfactant are prepared. • With time ZnO nanorods show structural deterioration in different aqueous solutions. • Crystallinity of ZnO nanorods in absence of aqueous solution remain unaffected. • Encapsulation of bio-compatible surfactant in alchohol avoid ZnO deoxidation. • Crystallinity and structure of ZnO nanorods after encapsulation remain unaffected. - Abstract: Due to their photoluminescence, metal oxide nanostructures such as ZnO nanostructures are promising candidates in biomedical imaging, drug delivery and bio-sensing. To apply them as label for bio-imaging, it is important to study their structural stability in a bio-fluidic environment. We have explored the effect of water, the main constituent of biological solutions, on ZnO nanostructures with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) studies which show ZnO nanorod degeneration in water. In addition, we propose and investigate a robust and inexpensive method to encapsulate these nanostructures (without structural degradation) using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant in non-aqueous medium, which was not reported earlier. This new finding is an immediate interest to the broad audience of researchers working in biophysics, sensing and actuation, drug delivery, food and cosmetics technology, etc.

  13. The suitability of silicon carbide for photocatalytic water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Qamar, M. T.; Ahmed, Ikram; Rehman, Ateeq Ur; Ali, Shahid; Ismail, I. M. I.; Hameed, Abdul

    2018-04-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), owing to its extraordinary chemical stability and refractory properties, is widely used in the manufacturing industry. Despite the semiconducting nature and morphology-tuned band gap, its efficacy as photocatalysts has not been thoroughly investigated. The current study reports the synthesis, characterization and the evaluation of the capability of silicon carbide for hydrogen generation from water splitting. The optical characterization of the as-synthesized powder exposed the formation of multi-wavelength absorbing entities in synthetic process. The structural analysis by XRD and the fine microstructure analysis by HRTEM revealed the cubic 3C-SiC (β-SiC) and hexagonal α-polymorphs (2H-SiC and 6H-SiC) as major and minor phases, respectively. The Mott-Schottky analysis verified the n-type nature of the material with the flat band potential of - 0.7 V. In the electrochemical evaluation, the sharp increase in the peak currents in various potential ranges, under illumination, revealed the plausible potential of the material for the oxidation of water and generation of hydrogen. The generation of hydrogen and oxygen, as a consequence of water splitting in the actual photocatalytic experiments, was observed and measured. A significant increase in the yield of hydrogen was noticed in the presence of methanol as h + scavenger, whereas a retarding effect was offered by the Fe3+ entities that served as e - scavengers. The combined effect of both methanol and Fe3+ ions in the photocatalytic process was also investigated. Besides hydrogen gas, the other evolved gasses such as methane and carbon monoxide were also measured to estimate the mechanism of the process.

  14. New transport phenomena probed by dielectric spectroscopy of oxidized and non-oxidized porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, B.; Axelrod, E.; Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2007-05-15

    Dielectric spectroscopy accompanied by infrared (IR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been utilized to reveal the correlation between transport, optical and structural properties of oxidized porous silicon (PS). Three relaxation processes at low-, mid- and high-temperatures were observed, including dc-conductivity at high-temperatures. Both the low-T relaxation and the dc conductivity were found to be thermally activated processes that involve tunneling and hopping in between the nanocrystals in oxidized PS. We have found that the dc-conductivity is limited by geometrical constrictions along the transport channels, which are not effected by the oxidation process and are characterized by activation energies of about {proportional_to}0.85 eV. The low-T relaxation process involves thermal activation followed by tunneling in between neighbor nanocrystals, with somewhat lower activation energies. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Exploring the deposition of oxides on silicon for photovoltaic cells by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; de Moor, Hugo H.C.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, David H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Since most commercially available solar cells are still made from silicon, we are exploring the introduction of passivating qualities in oxides, with the potential to serve as an antireflection coating. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit TiO2 and SrTiO3 coatings on silicon substrates.

  16. Laser direct writing of oxide structures on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen; Grey, Francois

    1996-01-01

    on amorphous and crystalline silicon surfaces in order to determine the depassivation mechanism. The minimum linewidth achieved is about 450 nm using writing speeds of up to 100 mm/s. The process is fully compatible with local oxidation of silicon by scanning probe lithography. Wafer-scale patterns can...

  17. High performance nanostructured Silicon heterojunction for water splitting on large scales

    KAUST Repository

    Bonifazi, Marcella

    2017-11-02

    In past years the global demand for energy has been increasing steeply, as well as the awareness that new sources of clean energy are essential. Photo-electrochemical devices (PEC) for water splitting applications have stirred great interest, and different approach has been explored to improve the efficiency of these devices and to avoid optical losses at the interfaces with water. These include engineering materials and nanostructuring the device\\'s surfaces [1]-[2]. Despite the promising initial results, there are still many drawbacks that needs to be overcome to reach large scale production with optimized performances [3]. We present a new device that relies on the optimization of the nanostructuring process that exploits suitably disordered surfaces. Additionally, this device could harvest light on both sides to efficiently gain and store the energy to keep the photocatalytic reaction active.

  18. High performance nanostructured Silicon heterojunction for water splitting on large scales

    KAUST Repository

    Bonifazi, Marcella; Fu, Hui-chun; He, Jr-Hau; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In past years the global demand for energy has been increasing steeply, as well as the awareness that new sources of clean energy are essential. Photo-electrochemical devices (PEC) for water splitting applications have stirred great interest, and different approach has been explored to improve the efficiency of these devices and to avoid optical losses at the interfaces with water. These include engineering materials and nanostructuring the device's surfaces [1]-[2]. Despite the promising initial results, there are still many drawbacks that needs to be overcome to reach large scale production with optimized performances [3]. We present a new device that relies on the optimization of the nanostructuring process that exploits suitably disordered surfaces. Additionally, this device could harvest light on both sides to efficiently gain and store the energy to keep the photocatalytic reaction active.

  19. Synthesis of nanostructured catalysts based on Mn oxide for n-hexane elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picasso, Gino; Salazar, Ivonne; Lopez, Alcides

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured Mn oxide based catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel method and corresponding bulk samples were prepared by precipitation procedure. In addition, some nanostructured samples based on Mn oxide supported on bentonite (montmorillonite) were prepared by incipient impregnation. Prior to calcination, the system was submitted by TEM analysis in order to study the peptization effect of acetic acid. The micrographs revealed that the sample prepared from nitrate precursor (0,06 M) achieved the highest monodispersion. After calcination of nanoparticles, TEM analysis has been performed in order to evaluate how extent the peptization agent is able to disperse. TEM micrographs of samples prepared from nitrate precursor revealed that the peptization effect increased with the concentration of acetic acid. XRD difractograms of Mn oxide samples showed characteristic well-defined diffraction peaks associated to Mn species as Mn 2 O 3 , Mn 3 O 4 and MnO 2 with more relative intensive signals in Mn 2 O 3 and Mn 3 O 4 spinel. Finally, synthesized manganese oxide nanoparticles were incorpored into layered structure of purified bentonite (montmorillonite) by incipient impregnation. Some essays with the unsupported and supported samples were performed for n-hexane combustion in a fixed bed reactor. Activity of bentonite supported sample was lower than its unsupported bulk sample counterpart; however the performance was higher than the corresponding to the support without active component probably due to more suitable structure position of nanoparticles into layered framework of starting bentonite. (author).

  20. Stable Organic Monolayers on Oxide-Free Silicon/Germanium in a Supercritical Medium: A New Route to Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniredd, Sreenivasa Reddy; Jayaraman, Sundaramurthy; Yeong, Sai Hooi; Troadec, Cedric; Srinivasan, M P

    2013-05-02

    Oxide-free Si and Ge surfaces have been passivated and modified with organic molecules by forming covalent bonds between the surfaces and reactive end groups of linear alkanes and aromatic species using single-step deposition in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2). The process is suitable for large-scale manufacturing due to short processing times, simplicity, and high resistance to oxidation. It also allows the formation of monolayers with varying reactive terminal groups, thus enabling formation of nanostructures engineered at the molecular level. Ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) spectra performed on the organic monolayer on oxide-free silicon capped by a thin gold layer reveals for the first time an increase in transmission of the ballistic current through the interface of up to three times compared to a control device, in contrast to similar studies reported in the literature suggestive of oxide-free passivation in SCCO2. The SCCO2 process combined with the preliminary BEEM results opens up new avenues for interface engineering, leading to molecular electronic devices.

  1. Gold Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, Prepared by Electrodeposition in Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio H. Ogata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of gold into porous silicon was investigated. In the present study, porous silicon with ~100 nm in pore diameter, so-called medium-sized pores, was used as template electrode for gold electrodeposition. The growth behavior of gold deposits was studied by scanning electron microscope observation of the gold deposited porous silicon. Gold nanorod arrays with different rod lengths were prepared, and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties were investigated. We found that the absorption peak due to the surface plasmon resonance can be tuned by changing the length of the nanorods. The optimum length of the gold nanorods was ~600 nm for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a He-Ne laser. The reason why the optimum length of the gold nanorods was 600 nm was discussed by considering the relationship between the absorption peak of surface plasmon resonance and the wavelength of the incident laser for Raman scattering.

  2. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on nanostructured zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conradt, Jonas; Maier-Flaig, Florian; Sartor, Janos; Fallert, Johannes [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Szmytkowski, Jedrzej; Kalt, Heinz [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe (Germany); Reinhard, Manuel; Colsmann, Alexander [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Lichttechnisches Institut, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lemmer, Uli [Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Lichttechnisches Institut, Karlsruhe (Germany); Balaban, Teodor Silviu [Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid solar cells represent a promising (cost-efficient) alternative to pure inorganic solar cells. We present dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) which are based on a zinc oxide (ZnO) electrode covered with a ruthenium dye. Our work focuses on the morphology of the ZnO electrode and its impact on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cell. Nanocrystalline ZnO powder layers and arrays of nanorods are incorporated into the DSSCs. The ZnO nanorods are grown by vapor transport deposition. The morphology and doping concentration of the rods can be controlled by the choice of substrate material, growth condition and catalytic metal layers. The nanorod arrays are expected to fasten the electron transport towards the anode and thereby improve the solar cell efficiency. In addition, novel self-assembling (porphyrin) dyes are tested as sensitizer within a DSSC.

  3. Nanostructured Scrolls from Graphene Oxide for Microjet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kun; Manjare, Manoj; Barrett, Christopher A; Yang, Bo; Salguero, Tina T; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-08-16

    Layered heterostructures containing graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and 20-35 nm bimetal coatings can detach easily from a Si substrate upon sonication-spontaneously forming freestanding, micrometer-sized scrolls with GO on the outside-due to a combination of material stresses and weak bonding between GO layers. Simple procedures can tune the scroll diameters by varying the thicknesses of the metal films, and these results are confirmed by both experiment and modeling. The selection of materials determines the stresses that control the rolling behavior, as well as the functionality of the structures. In the GO/Ti/Pt system, the Pt is located within the interior of the scrolls, which can become self-propelled microjet engines through O2 bubbling when suspended in aqueous H2O2.

  4. Self-cleaning glasses containing nanostructured titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, A.; Alves, A.K.; Berutti, F.A.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Using the electrospinning technique nanofibers of titanium oxide were synthesized. As precursor materials, titanium propoxide and a solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone were used. After the electrospinning process, the non-tissue material obtained was heat treated and characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine the phase crystallinity, and SEM to analyze the microstructure of the fibers. After ultrasound dispersion of this material in isopropyl alcohol, the glass coatings were made by dip-coating methodology. The removal velocity was kept constant, but the solution composition was varied to obtain a transparent and photo active film. The film was characterized by the contact angle of a water droplet in its surface (hydrophilicity), the transparency was evaluated using a spectrophotometer and the photocatalytic activity of the film was also evaluated. (author)

  5. High temperature oxidation behaviour of nanostructured cermet coatings in a mixed CO2 - O2 environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhzad, M. A.; Khan, T. I.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ceramic-metallic (cermet) coatings composed of nanosized ceramic particles (α-Al2O3 and TiO2) dispersed in a nickel matrix were co-electrodeposited and then oxidized at 500°C, 600°C and 700°C in a mixed gas using a Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA) apparatus. The mixed gas was composed of 15% CO2, 10% O2 and 75% N2. This research investigates the effects of CO2 and O2 partial pressures on time-depended oxidation rates for coatings and compared them to the results from atmospheric oxidation under similar temperatures. The increase in partial pressure of oxygen due to the presence of CO2 at each tested temperature was calculated and correlated to the oxidation rate of the coatings. The results showed that the presence of CO2 in the system increased the oxidation rate of cermet coatings when compared to atmospheric oxidation at the same temperature. It was also shown that the increase in the oxidation rate is not the result of CO2 acting as the primary oxidant but as a secondary oxidant which results in an increase of the total partial pressure of oxygen and consequently higher oxidation rates. The WDS and XRD analyses results showed that the presence of nanosized TiO2 particles in a nickel matrix can improve oxidation behaviour of the coatings by formation of Ni-Ti compounds on oxidizing surface of the coating which was found beneficiary in reducing the oxidation rates for cermet coatings.

  6. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  7. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors

  8. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-07-21

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

  9. Nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of vitrectomized eyes with silicon oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Escarião

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the nitric oxide levels in the anterior chamber of eyes who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with silicone oil. METHODS: Patients who underwent PPV with silicon oil injection, from february 2005 to august 2007, were selected. Nine patients (nine eyes participated in the study (five women and four men. Nitric oxide concentration was quantified after the aspiration of aqueous humor samples during the procedure of silicon oil removal. Data such as: oil emulsification; presence of oil in the anterior chamber; intraocular pressure and time with silicone oil were evaluated. Values of p <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: A positive correlation between nitric oxide concentration and time with silicon oil in the vitreous cavity (r=0.799 was observed. The nitric oxide concentration was significantly higher (p=0.02 in patients with silicon oil more than 24 months (0.90µmol/ml ± 0.59, n=3 in the vitreous cavity comparing to patients with less than 24 months (0.19µmol/ml ± 0.10, n=6. CONCLUSION: A positive correlation linking silicone oil time in the vitreous cavity with the nitric oxide concentration in the anterior chamber was observed.

  10. Surface properties of nanostructured NiO undergoing electrochemical oxidation in 3-methoxy-propionitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Matteo; Marrani, Andrea Giacomo; Novelli, Vittoria; Awais, Muhammad; Dowling, Denis P.; Vos, Johannes G.; Dini, Danilo

    2017-05-01

    Nanostructured nickel oxide (NiO) was deposited in the configuration of thin film (thickness, l = 2-6 μm) onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates via plasma-assisted rapid discharge sintering (RDS). Electrochemical cycling of RDS NiO in 3-methoxy-propionitrile (3-MPN) revealed two characteristic peaks of NiO oxidation which were associated to the surface-confined redox processes Ni(II) → Ni(III) and Ni(III) → Ni(IV). Grazing angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted ex-situ on NiO electrodes in both pristine and oxidized states. Oxidized NiO samples for XPS experiments were obtained in the potentiostatic mode through the polarization of NiO at its two characteristic potentials of oxidation. The XPS analysis allowed to ascertain the electronic structure of the nanoporous NiO framework, and verify the adsorption of perchlorate and chloride anions onto NiO surface due to the compensation of the charge stored in oxidized NiO. XPS also revealed that the spectrum within the region characteristic of Ni 2p ionization does not vary considerably with the state of charge of the nickel centres. This finding is in evident contrast to what has been observed for the same system when it undergoes electrochemical oxidation in aqueous electrolyte.

  11. Role of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide as oxidation barrier for silicon based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.fiorentino@tudelft.nl; Morana, Bruno [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT Delft (Netherlands); Forte, Salvatore [Department of Electronic, University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Tecchio, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sarro, Pasqualina Maria [Department of Microelectronic, Delft University of Technology, Feldmannweg 17, 2628 CT, Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, the authors study the protective effect against oxidation of a thin layer of atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Nitrogen doped silicon carbide (poly-SiC:N) based microheaters coated with ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are used as test structure to investigate the barrier effect of the alumina layers to oxygen and water vapor at very high temperature (up to 1000 °C). Different device sets have been fabricated changing the doping levels, to evaluate possible interaction between the dopants and the alumina layer. The as-deposited alumina layer morphology has been evaluated by means of AFM analysis and compared to an annealed sample (8 h at 1000 °C) to estimate the change in the grain structure and the film density. The coated microheaters are subjected to very long oxidation time in dry and wet environment (up to 8 h at 900 and 1000 °C). By evaluating the electrical resistance variation between uncoated reference devices and the ALD coated devices, the oxide growth on the SiC is estimated. The results show that the ALD alumina coating completely prevents the oxidation of the SiC up to 900 °C in wet environment, while an oxide thickness reduction of 50% is observed at 1000 °C compared to uncoated devices.

  12. Etched ion tracks in silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride as charge injection or extraction channels for novel electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Petrov, A.V.; Hoppe, K.; Fahrner, W.R.; Papaleo, R.M.; Berdinsky, A.S.; Chandra, A.; Chemseddine, A.; Zrineh, A.; Biswas, A.; Faupel, F.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of swift heavy ions onto silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride on silicon creates etchable tracks in these insulators. After their etching and filling-up with highly resistive matter, these nanometric pores can be used as charge extraction or injection paths towards the conducting channel in the underlying silicon. In this way, a novel family of electronic structures has been realized. The basic characteristics of these 'TEMPOS' (=tunable electronic material with pores in oxide on silicon) structures are summarized. Their functionality is determined by the type of insulator, the etch track diameters and lengths, their areal densities, the type of conducting matter embedded therein, and of course by the underlying semiconductor and the contact geometry. Depending on the TEMPOS preparation recipe and working point, the structures may resemble gatable resistors, condensors, diodes, transistors, photocells, or sensors, and they are therefore rather universally applicable in electronics. TEMPOS structures are often sensitive to temperature, light, humidity and organic gases. Also light-emitting TEMPOS structures have been produced. About 37 TEMPOS-based circuits such as thermosensors, photosensors, humidity and alcohol sensors, amplifiers, frequency multipliers, amplitude modulators, oscillators, flip-flops and many others have already been designed and successfully tested. Sometimes TEMPOS-based circuits are more compact than conventional electronics

  13. Electrical properties improvement of multicrystalline silicon solar cells using a combination of porous silicon and vanadium oxide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbali, L.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will report the enhancement of the conversion efficiency of multicrystalline silicon solar cells after coating the front surface with a porous silicon layer treated with vanadium oxide. The incorporation of vanadium oxide into the porous silicon (PS) structure, followed by a thermal treatment under oxygen ambient, leads to an important decrease of the surface reflectivity, a significant enhancement of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ) and a significant enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) of the PS structure. We Obtained a noticeable increase of (τ eff ) from 3.11 μs to 134.74 μs and the surface recombination velocity (S eff ) have decreased from 8441 cm s −1 to 195 cm s −1 . The reflectivity spectra of obtained films, performed in the 300–1200 nm wavelength range, show an important decrease of the average reflectivity from 40% to 5%. We notice a significant improvement of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) in the used multicrystalline silicon substrates. Results are analyzed and compared to those carried out on a reference (untreated) sample. The electrical properties of the treated silicon solar cells were improved noticeably as regard to the reference (untreated) sample.

  14. Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanostructures: The Polyethylenenemine (PEI) Role

    KAUST Repository

    Mozo, Sergio Lentijo

    2017-01-12

    Controlled synthesis of anisotropic iron oxide nanoparticles is a challenge in the field of nanomaterial research that requires an extreme attention to detail. In particular, following up a previous work showcasing the synthesis of magnetite nanorods (NRs) using a two-step approach that made use of polyethylenenemine (PEI) as a capping ligand to synthesize intermediate β-FeOOH NRs, we studied the effect and influence of the capping ligand on the formation of β-FeOOH NRs. By comparing the results reported in the literature with those we obtained from syntheses performed (1) in the absence of PEI or (2) by using PEIs with different molecular weight, we showed how the choice of different PEIs determines the aspect ratio and the structural stability of the β-FeOOH NRs and how this affects the final products. For this purpose, a combination of XRD, HRTEM, and direct current superconducting quantum interference device (DC SQUID) magnetometry was used to identify the phases formed in the final products and study their morphostructural features and related magnetic behavior.

  15. Electrospray-printed nanostructured graphene oxide gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anthony P.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-12-01

    We report low-cost conductometric gas sensors that use an ultrathin film made of graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes as transducing element. The devices were fabricated by lift-off metallization and near-room temperature, atmospheric pressure electrospray printing using a shadow mask. The sensors are sensitive to reactive gases at room temperature without requiring any post heat treatment, harsh chemical reduction, or doping with metal nanoparticles. The sensors’ response to humidity at atmospheric pressure tracks that of a commercial sensor, and is linear with changes in humidity in the 10%-60% relative humidity range while consuming recipes yielded nearly identical response characteristics, suggesting that intrinsic properties of the film control the sensing mechanism. The gas sensors successfully detected ammonia at concentrations down to 500 ppm (absolute partial pressure of ˜5 × 10-4 T) at ˜1 T pressure, room temperature conditions. The sensor technology can be used in a great variety of applications including air conditioning and sensing of reactive gas species in vacuum lines and abatement systems.

  16. Electrospray-printed nanostructured graphene oxide gas sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Anthony P; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    We report low-cost conductometric gas sensors that use an ultrathin film made of graphene oxide (GO) nanoflakes as transducing element. The devices were fabricated by lift-off metallization and near-room temperature, atmospheric pressure electrospray printing using a shadow mask. The sensors are sensitive to reactive gases at room temperature without requiring any post heat treatment, harsh chemical reduction, or doping with metal nanoparticles. The sensors’ response to humidity at atmospheric pressure tracks that of a commercial sensor, and is linear with changes in humidity in the 10%–60% relative humidity range while consuming <6 μW. Devices with GO layers printed by different deposition recipes yielded nearly identical response characteristics, suggesting that intrinsic properties of the film control the sensing mechanism. The gas sensors successfully detected ammonia at concentrations down to 500 ppm (absolute partial pressure of ∼5 × 10"−"4 T) at ∼1 T pressure, room temperature conditions. The sensor technology can be used in a great variety of applications including air conditioning and sensing of reactive gas species in vacuum lines and abatement systems. (paper)

  17. Feasibility study on the sol-gel deposition of nanostructured materials based on oxides and fluorides for coatings on solar collector glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, A.; Chambrier, E. De

    2005-10-15

    This illustrated annual report reviews work done at the Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland, on the architectural integration of thermal solar collectors into buildings. This is often limited by their black colour and the visibility of the tubes and corrugations of the absorber sheets. Although a certain freedom in the choice of colour would be desirable, the coloured appearance should not cause excessive performance degradation. Multi-layered thin film interference filters on the collector glazing can produce a coloured reflection while transmitting the non-reflected radiation entirely to the absorber. The paper describes suitable optical interference filters which have been designed and optimised by numerical simulation and that will be manufactured by the sol-gel dip-coating process. Light scattering has to be avoided, which implies a need for particle sizes much smaller than the wavelengths of the incoming light. The paper proposes that corresponding thin films should therefore consist of nano-structured materials. The sol-gel deposition of all proposed materials has been demonstrated successfully. The paper presents the results of the work using various materials including titanium-silicon mixed oxides, gold-silicon dioxide, porous silicon dioxide, magnesium fluoride and quaternary films.

  18. Generation of silicon nanostructures by atmospheric microplasma jet: the role of hydrogen admixture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barwe, B.; Stein, A.; Cibulka, Ondřej; Pelant, Ivan; Ghanbaja, J.; Belmonte, T.; Benedikt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2015), s. 132-140 ISSN 1612-8850 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : atmospheric pressure plasmas * HRTEM * microplasmas * photoluminescence * silicon nanocrystals Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.713, year: 2015

  19. Spin-on nanostructured silicon-silica film displaying room-temperature nanosecond lifetime photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Y.; Hatton, B.; Miguez, H.; Coombs, N.; Fournier-Bidoz, S.; Ozin, G.A. [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Grey, J.K.; Beaulac, R.; Reber, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2003-04-17

    A yellow transparent mesoporous silica film has been achieved by the incorporation of silicon nanoclusters into its channels. The resulting nanocomposite - fabricated using a combination of evaporation induced self- assembly and chemical vapor deposition - emits light brightly at visible wavelengths and has nanosecond radiative lifetimes at room temperature when excited by ultraviolet light (see Figure). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Modal analysis of silicon nanostructured waveguide with holey cladding in 2-D isosceles triangular lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Vos, Willem L.

    2009-01-01

    Silicon photonics, either in the form of integrated optical chips or fiber, has attracted much interest due to their small foot-print, high refractive-index, high thermal conductivity, high non-linear-optical coefficient, and compatibility with CMOS and fiber-drawing process technology. Recently,

  1. Ultrathin silicon solar cells with enhanced photocurrents assisted by plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Stassen, Erik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film photovoltaics offers the potential for a significant cost reduction compared to traditional photovoltaics. However, the performance of thin-film solar cells is limited by poor light absorption. We have devised an ultra-thin-film silicon solar cell configuration assisted by plasmonic nan...

  2. Detection of gain enhancement in laser-induced fluorescence of rhodamine B lasing dye by silicon dioxide nanostructures-coated cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tameemi, Mohammed N. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, nanostructured silicon dioxide films are deposited by closed-field unbalanced direct-current (DC) reactive magnetron sputtering technique on two sides of quartz cells containing rhodamine B dye dissolved in ethanol with 10‒5 M concentration as a random gain medium. The preparation conditions are optimized to prepare highly pure SiO2 nanostructures with a minimum particle size of about 20 nm. The effect of SiO2 films as external cavity for the random gain medium is determined by the laser-induced fluorescence of this medium, and an increase of about 200% in intensity is observed after the deposition of nanostructured SiO2 thin films on two sides of the dye cell.

  3. Alternative method for steam generation for thermal oxidation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, Jeffrey J.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of silicon is an important process step in MEMS device fabrication. Thicker oxide layers are often used as structural components and can take days or weeks to grow, causing high gas costs, maintenance issues, and a process bottleneck. Pyrolytic steam, which is generated from hydrogen and oxygen combustion, was the default process, but has serious drawbacks: cost, safety, particles, permitting, reduced growth rate, rapid hydrogen consumption, component breakdown and limited steam flow rates. Results from data collected over a 24 month period by a MEMS manufacturer supports replacement of pyrolytic torches with RASIRC Steamer technology to reduce process cycle time and enable expansion previously limited by local hydrogen permitting. Data was gathered to determine whether Steamers can meet or exceed pyrolytic torch performance. The RASIRC Steamer uses de-ionized water as its steam source, eliminating dependence on hydrogen and oxygen. A non-porous hydrophilic membrane selectively allows water vapor to pass. All other molecules are greatly restricted, so contaminants in water such as dissolved gases, ions, total organic compounds (TOC), particles, and metals can be removed in the steam phase. The MEMS manufacturer improved growth rate by 7% over the growth range from 1μm to 3.5μm. Over a four month period, wafer uniformity, refractive index, wafer stress, and etch rate were tracked with no significant difference found. The elimination of hydrogen generated a four-month return on investment (ROI). Mean time between failure (MTBF) was increased from 3 weeks to 32 weeks based on three Steamers operating over eight months.

  4. An Electrochemical Sensor Based on Nanostructured Hollandite-type Manganese Oxide for Detection of Potassium Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S. Lima

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The participation of cations in redox reactions of manganese oxides provides an opportunity for development of chemical sensors for non-electroactive ions. A sensor based on a nanostructured hollandite-type manganese oxide was investigated for voltammetric detection of potassium ions. The detection is based on the measurement of anodic current generated by oxidation of Mn(III to Mn(IV at the surface of the electrode and the subsequent extraction of the potassium ions into the hollandite structure. In this work, an amperometric procedure at an operating potential of 0.80 V (versus SCE is exploited for amperometric monitoring. The current signals are linearly proportional to potassium ion concentration in the range 4.97 × 10−5 to 9.05 × 10−4 mol L−1, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997.

  5. Nafion/Silicon Oxide Composite Membrane for High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membranes were produced via in situ sol-gel reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) in Nafion membranes. The physicochemical properties of the membranes were studied by FT-IR, TG-DSC and tensile strength. The results show that the silicon oxide is compatible with the Nafion membrane and the thermo stability of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is higher than that of Nafion membrane. Furthermore, the tensile strength of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is similar to that of the Nafion membrane. The proton conductivity of Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane is higher than that of Nafion membrane. When the Nafion/Silicon oxide composite membrane was employed as an electrolyte in H2/O2 PEMFC, a higher current density value (1 000 mA/cm2 at 0.38 V) than that of the Nafion 1135 membrane (100 mA/cm2 at 0.04 V) was obtained at 110 ℃.

  6. Laser desorption/ionization from nanostructured surfaces: nanowires, nanoparticle films and silicon microcolumn arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yong; Luo Guanghong; Diao Jiajie; Chornoguz, Olesya; Reeves, Mark; Vertes, Akos

    2007-01-01

    Due to their optical properties and morphology, thin films formed of nanoparticles are potentially new platforms for soft laser desorption/ionization (SLDI) mass spectrometry. Thin films of gold nanoparticles (with 12±1 nm particle size) were prepared by evaporation-driven vertical colloidal deposition and used to analyze a series of directly deposited polypeptide samples. In this new SLDI method, the required laser fluence for ion detection was equal or less than what was needed for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) but the resulting spectra were free of matrix interferences. A silicon microcolumn array-based substrate (a.k.a. black silicon) was developed as a new matrix-free laser desorption ionization surface. When low-resistivity silicon wafers were processed with a 22 ps pulse length 3xω Nd:YAG laser in air, SF 6 or water environment, regularly arranged conical spikes emerged. The radii of the spike tips varied with the processing environment, ranging from approximately 500 nm in water, to ∼2 μm in SF 6 gas and to ∼5 μm in air. Peptide mass spectra directly induced by a nitrogen laser showed the formation of protonated ions of angiotensin I and II, substance P, bradykinin fragment 1-7, synthetic peptide, pro14-arg, and insulin from the processed silicon surfaces but not from the unprocessed areas. Threshold fluences for desorption/ionization were similar to those used in MALDI. Although compared to silicon nanowires the threshold laser pulse energy for ionization is significantly (∼10x) higher, the ease of production and robustness of microcolumn arrays offer complementary benefits

  7. Zinc Oxide Nanostructures: From Chestnut Husk-Like Structures to Hollow Nanocages, Synthesis and Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Scarano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tailor-made nanostructured ZnO cages have been catalytically grown on Au and Pt films covering silicon substrates, by a controlled evaporation process, which means an accurate choice of temperatures, times, gas flows (He in the heating, He/air during the synthesis, and Au/Pt film thickness. The effect of the process parameters affecting the morphology and the structure of the obtained materials has been investigated by XRD analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM microscopies, and FTIR spectroscopies. In particular, the role of the synthesis temperature in affecting the size and shape of the obtained ZnO cages has been highlighted. It will be shown that by adopting higher temperatures, the protruding nanowhiskers several microns in length, covering the cages and exhibiting both basal and prismatic faces, change into very thin and narrow structures, with extended prismatic faces, prevailing with respect to the basal ones. At an even higher process temperature, the building up of Au particles aggregates inside and/or anchored to the walls of the hollow cages, without any evidence of elongated ZnO nanostructures will be highlighted. From FTIR spectra information on lattice modes of the investigated ZnO, materials have been obtained.

  8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle attachment on array of micro test tubes and microbeakers formed on p-type silicon substrate for biosensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Sufi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A uniformly distributed array of micro test tubes and microbeakers is formed on a p-type silicon substrate with tunable cross-section and distance of separation by anodic etching of the silicon wafer in N, N-dimethylformamide and hydrofluoric acid, which essentially leads to the formation of macroporous silicon templates. A reasonable control over the dimensions of the structures could be achieved by tailoring the formation parameters, primarily the wafer resistivity. For a micro test tube, the cross-section (i.e., the pore size as well as the distance of separation between two adjacent test tubes (i.e., inter-pore distance is typically approximately 1 μm, whereas, for a microbeaker the pore size exceeds 1.5 μm and the inter-pore distance could be less than 100 nm. We successfully synthesized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, with average particle size approximately 20 nm and attached them on the porous silicon chip surface as well as on the pore walls. Such SPION-coated arrays of micro test tubes and microbeakers are potential candidates for biosensors because of the biocompatibility of both silicon and SPIONs. As acquisition of data via microarray is an essential attribute of high throughput bio-sensing, the proposed nanostructured array may be a promising step in this direction.

  9. Modelling of the hydrogen effects on the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulin, Q.

    2006-01-01

    This work pursues the goal of understanding mechanisms related to the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor through modeling techniques. Current technologies are first reviewed with an aim to understand the purpose behind their development. Then follows a summary of the possible studies which are useful in this particular context. The various techniques which make it possible to simulate the trajectories of atoms by molecular dynamics are discussed. The quantum methods of calculation of the interaction potential between chemical species are then developed, reaching the conclusion that only semi-empirical quantum methods are sufficiently fast to be able to implement an algorithm of quantum molecular dynamics on a reasonable timescale. From the tools introduced, a reflection on the nature of molecular metastable energetic states is presented for the theoretical case of the self-organized growth of a linear chain of atoms. This model - which consists of propagating the growth of a chain by the successive addition of the atom which least increases the electronic energy of the chain - shows that the Fermi level is a parameter essential to self organization during growth. This model also shows that the structure formed is not necessarily a total minimum energy structure. From all these numerical tools, the molecular growth of clusters can be simulated by using parameters from magnetohydrodynamic calculation results of plasma reactor modeling (concentrations of the species, interval between chemical reactions, energy of impact of the reagents...). The formation of silicon-hydrogen clusters is thus simulated by the successive capture of silane molecules. The structures formed in simulation at the operating temperatures of the plasma reactor predict the formation of spherical clusters constituting an amorphous silicon core covered by hydrogen. These structures are thus not in a state of minimum energy, contrary to certain experimental

  10. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of ZnO nanostructures by electrochemical hybridization with graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, A.; Wu, Z.; Zapien, J. A.; Li, Y. Y.; Ruotolo, A.

    2018-05-01

    Synthesis of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures is reported by electrochemical deposition from an aqueous electrolyte in presence of graphene oxide (GO) with varying oxidation degree. The properties of hybrids were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, Fourier-Transform Infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques and photocatalytic measurements. The results indicated the electrodeposition of ZnO in presence of GO with increased oxygen content led to marked differences in the morphology while Raman measurements indicated an increased defect level both in the ZnO and the electrochemically reduced GO (ErGO) within the hybrids. The decrease in C/O atomic ratio of GO (from 0.79 to 0.71) employed for the electrodeposition of ZnO resulted in an increase in photocatalytic efficiency for methylene blue degradation under UV irradiation from 4-folds to 10-folds with respect to non-hybridized ZnO. The observed synergetic effect of cathodic deposition potential and oxygen content in GO towards improving the photocatalytic activity of immobilized ZnO is expected to contribute to further development of more effective deposition approaches for the preparation of high performance hybrid nanostructures.

  11. Promotion of Water-mediated Carbon Removal by Nanostructured Barium Oxide/nickel Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Yang; Y Choi; W Qin; H Chen; K Blinn; M Liu; P Liu; J Bai; T Tyson; M Liu

    2011-12-31

    The existing Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) perform poorly in carbon-containing fuels because of coking and deactivation at desired operating temperatures. Here we report a new anode with nanostructured barium oxide/nickel (BaO/Ni) interfaces for low-cost SOFCs, demonstrating high power density and stability in C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, CO and gasified carbon fuels at 750 C. Synchrotron-based X-ray analyses and microscopy reveal that nanosized BaO islands grow on the Ni surface, creating numerous nanostructured BaO/Ni interfaces that readily adsorb water and facilitate water-mediated carbon removal reactions. Density functional theory calculations predict that the dissociated OH from H2O on BaO reacts with C on Ni near the BaO/Ni interface to produce CO and H species, which are then electrochemically oxidized at the triple-phase boundaries of the anode. This anode offers potential for ushering in a new generation of SOFCs for efficient, low-emission conversion of readily available fuels to electricity.

  12. Studies on the optoelectronic properties of the thermally evaporated tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ko-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Liang-Da [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Li-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shih, Han C., E-mail: hcshih@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-05-15

    Indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanorods, nanotowers and tin-doped (Sn:In = 1:100) indium oxide (ITO) nanorods have been fabricated by thermal evaporation. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of these three nanoproducts are characterized by FE-SEM, HRTEM and XPS. To further investigate the optoelectronic properties, the I–V curves and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra are measured. The electrical resistivity of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods, nanotowers and ITO nanorods are 1.32 kΩ, 0.65 kΩ and 0.063 kΩ, respectively. CL spectra of these three nanoproducts clearly indicate that tin-doped (Sn:In = 1:100) indium oxide (ITO) nanorods cause a blue shift. No doubt ITO nanorods obtain the highest performance among these three nanoproducts, and this also means that Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures would be the best way to enhance the optoelectronic properties. Additionally, the growing mechanism and the optoelectronic properties of these three nanostructures are discussed. This study is beneficial to the applications of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods, nanotowers and ITO nanorods in optoelectronic nanodevices.

  13. Solid-state Water-mediated Transport Reduction of Nanostructured Iron Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Vladimir M.; Povarov, Vladimir G.; Voronkov, Gennadii P.; Semenov, Valentin G.; Murin, Igor' V.; Gittsovich, Viktor N.; Sinel'nikov, Boris M.

    2001-01-01

    The Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ratio in two-dimensional iron oxide nanosructures (nanolayers with a thickness of 0.3-1.5 nm on silica surface) may be precisely controlled using the transport reduction (TR) technique. The species ≡-O-Fe(OH) 2 and (≡Si-O-) 2 -FeOH forming the surface monolayer are not reduced at 400-600 deg. C because of their covalent bonding to the silica surface, as demonstrated by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Iron oxide microparticles (microstructures) obtained by the impregnation technique, being chemically unbound to silica, are subjected to reduction at T ≥ 500 deg. C with formation of metallic iron in the form of α-Fe. Transport reduction of supported nanostructures (consisting of 1 or 4 monolayers) at T ≥ 600 deg. C produces bulk iron(II) silicate and metallic iron phases. The structural-chemical transformations occurring in transport reduction of supported iron oxide nanolayers are proved to be governed by specific phase processes in the nanostructures themselves

  14. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  15. Role of masking oxide on silicon in processes of defect generation at formation of SIMOX structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Miloglyadova, L V

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into Si-SiO sub 2 structures formed by implantation of oxygen ions into silicon (SIMOX-technology) by means of techniques based on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics and by means of electroluminescence. One determined existence of electrically active centres and of luminescence centres in the formed oxide layer near boundary with silicon. One clarified the role SiO sub 2 masking layer in silicon in defect generation under formation of the masked oxide layer. One established dependence of concentration of electrically active and luminescence centres on thickness of masking layer

  16. Mechanistic Understanding of Tungsten Oxide In-Plane Nanostructure Growth via Sequential Infiltration Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Jin; Suh, Hyo Seon; Zhou, Chun; Mane, Anil U.; Lee, Byeongdu; Kim, Soojeong; Emery, Jonathan D.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Nealey, Paul F.; Fenter, Paul; Fister, Timothy T.

    2018-02-21

    Tungsten oxide (WO3-x) nanostructures with hexagonal in-plane arrangements were fabricated by sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS), using the selective interaction of gas phase precursors with functional groups in one domain of a block copolymer (BCP) self-assembled template. Such structures are highly desirable for various practical applications and as model systems for fundamental studies. The nanostructures were characterized by cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, grazing-incidence small/wide-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements at each stage during the SIS process and subsequent thermal treatments, to provide a comprehensive picture of their evolution in morphology, crystallography and electronic structure. In particular, we discuss the critical role of SIS Al2O3 seeds toward modifying the chemical affinity and free volume in a polymer for subsequent infiltration of gas phase precursors. The insights into SIS growth obtained from this study are valuable to the design and fabrication of a wide range of targeted nanostructures.

  17. Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructure on Noble Metal Islands Based on Anodized Aluminum Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Young Sic; Kim, Seong Kyu; Lee, Hae Seong

    2004-01-01

    We have developed the methodology to produce nanoscale gold rods using an AAO template. Each gold rod was generated in every AAO pore. This nanoislands array of gold formed over the AAO pores can be used as corner stones for building nanostructures. We demonstrated this by forming a nanostructure on the Au/AAO by binding a self-assembly class of molecules onto the metal islands. Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) has been considered an attractive template for simple fabrication of highly-ordered nanostructures. It provides a 2-dimensional array of hexagonal cells with pores of uniform diameter and inter-pore distance that are adjustable in the range of a few tens to hundreds of nanometers. It can be easily grown on an aluminum sheet with high purity by a sequence of several electrochemical steps; electro-polishing, the 1st anodization, etching, and the 2nd anodization. The pores are grown vertically with respect to the AAO surface. The regularity of the pore structure is usually limited by the inherent grain domain in the aluminum sheet to a few micrometers, but can be improved to cover many millimeters of monodomain by pre-indenting the aluminum sheet with SiC 7 or Si 3 N 4 molds. Although fabrication of such molds requires elaborate and costly processes with e-beam nanolithography, such potentially superb regularity can be practically applied to fabrication of nanoscale devices in electronics, optics, biosensors, etc

  18. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  19. Oxide nanostructures on a Nb surface and related systems: experiments and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Mikhail V; Razinkin, A S; Ivanovskii, Alexander L

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the state of the art in two related research areas: the surfaces of niobium and of its related group IV-VI transition metals, and surface (primarily oxide) nanostructures that form on niobium (and group IV-VI d-metals) due to gas adsorption or impurity diffusion from the bulk. Experimental (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoelectron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy) and theoretical (ab initio simulation) results on d-metal surfaces are summarized and reviewed. (reviews of topical problems)

  20. Effect of additive gases and injection methods on chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F2 remote plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y. B.; Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of various additive gases and different injection methods on the chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F 2 remote plasmas. N 2 and N 2 +O 2 gases in the F 2 /Ar/N 2 and F 2 /Ar/N 2 /O 2 remote plasmas effectively increased the etch rate of the layers. The addition of direct-injected NO gas increased the etch rates most significantly. NO radicals generated by the addition of N 2 and N 2 +O 2 or direct-injected NO molecules contributed to the effective removal of nitrogen and oxygen in the silicon nitride and oxide layers, by forming N 2 O and NO 2 by-products, respectively, and thereby enhancing SiF 4 formation. As a result of the effective removal of the oxygen, nitrogen, and silicon atoms in the layers, the chemical dry etch rates were enhanced significantly. The process regime for the etch rate enhancement of the layers was extended at elevated temperature

  1. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Ulrich; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Benel, Cahit; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Goncalves, Manuel; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Ziemann, Paul; Marek, Peter; Hahn, Horst

    2013-01-01

    One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL) and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE) ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu(3+), since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The experiments are

  2. Metal oxide core shell nanostructures as building blocks for efficient light emission (SISGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jane P [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dorman, James [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cheung, Cyrus [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this research is to synthesize core-shell nano-structured metal oxide materials and investigate their structural, electronic and optical properties to understand the microscopic pathways governing the energy conversion process, thereby controlling and improving their efficiency. Specifically, the goal is to use a single metal oxide core-shell nanostructure and a single excitation source to generate photons with long emission lifetime over the entire visible spectrum and when controlled at the right ratio, generating white light. In order to achieve this goal, we need to control the energy transfer between light emitting elements, which dictates the control of their interatomic spacing and spatial distribution. We developed an economical wet chemical process to form the nanostructured core and to control the thickness and composition of the shell layers. With the help from using DOE funded synchrotron radiation facility, we delineated the growth mechanism of the nano-structured core and the shell layers, thereby enhancing our understanding of structure-property relation in these materials. Using the upconversion luminescence and the lifetime measurements as effective feedback to materials sysnthes is and integration, we demonstrated improved luminescence lifetimes of the core-shell nano-structures and quantified the optimal core-multi-shell structure with optimum shell thickness and composition. We developed a rare-earths co-doped LaPO4 core-multishell structure in order to produce a single white light source. It was decided that the mutli-shell method would produce the largest increase in luminescence efficiency while limiting any energy transfer that may occur between the dopant ions. All samples resulted in emission spectra within the accepted range of white light generation based on the converted CIE color coordinates. The white light obtained varied between warm and cool white depending on the layering architecture, allowing for the

  3. Nano-structure and tribological properties of B+ and Ti+ co-implanted silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Noda, Katsutoshi; Yamauchi, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics have been co-implanted with boron and titanium ions at a fluence of 2 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 and an energy of 200 keV. TEM results indicated that the boron and titanium-implanted layers were amorphized separately and titanium nitride nano-crystallites were formed in the titanium-implanted layer. XPS results indicated that the implantation profile varied a little depending on the ion implantation sequence of boron and titanium ions, with the boron implantation peak shifting to a shallower position when implanted after Ti + -implantation. Wear tests of these ion-implanted materials were carried out using a block-on-ring wear tester under non-lubricated conditions against commercially available silicon nitride materials. The specific wear rate was reduced by ion implantation and showed that the specific wear rate of Ti + -implanted sample was the lowest, followed by B + , Ti + co-implanted and B + -implanted samples

  4. UV Laser Deposition of Nanostructured Si/C/O/N/H Precursor to Silicon Oxycarbonitride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Josef; Galíková, Anna; Bastl, Zdeněk; Šubrt, Jan; Vacek, Karel; Brus, Jiří; Ouchi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 10 (2006), s. 648-655 ISSN 0268-2605 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 684 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : laser photolysis * silicon oxycarbonitride * chemical vapor deposition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2006

  5. The effect of oxidation on the efficiency and spectrum of photoluminescence of porous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulakh, B. M.; Korsunska, N. E.; Khomenkova, L. Yu.; Staraya, T. R.; Sheinkman, M. K.

    2006-01-01

    The photoluminescence spectra of porous silicon and their temperature dependences and transformations on aging are studied. It is shown that the infrared band prevailing in the spectra of as-prepared samples is due to exciton recombination in silicon crystallites. On aging, a well-pronounced additional band is observed at shorter wavelengths of the spectra. It is assumed that this band is due to the recombination of carriers that are excited in silicon crystallites and recombine via some centers located in oxide. It is shown that the broad band commonly observable in oxidized porous silicon is a superposition of the above two bands. The dependences of the peak positions and integrated intensities of the bands on time and temperature are studied. The data on the distribution of oxide centers with depth in the porous layer are obtained

  6. Growth of High-Density Zinc Oxide Nanorods on Porous Silicon by Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Izni Rusli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of high-density zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods on porous silicon (PS substrates at growth temperatures of 600–1000 °C by a simple thermal evaporation of zinc (Zn powder in the presence of oxygen (O2 gas was systematically investigated. The high-density growth of ZnO nanorods with (0002 orientation over a large area was attributed to the rough surface of PS, which provides appropriate planes to promote deposition of Zn or ZnOx seeds as nucleation sites for the subsequent growth of ZnO nanorods. The geometrical morphologies of ZnO nanorods are determined by the ZnOx seed structures, i.e., cluster or layer structures. The flower-like hexagonal-faceted ZnO nanorods grown at 600 °C seem to be generated from the sparsely distributed ZnOx nanoclusters. Vertically aligned hexagonal-faceted ZnO nanorods grown at 800 °C may be inferred from the formation of dense arrays of ZnOx clusters. The formation of disordered ZnO nanorods formed at 1000 °C may due to the formation of a ZnOx seed layer. The growth mechanism involved has been described by a combination of self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS and vapor-solid (VS mechanism. The results suggest that for a more precise study on the growth of ZnO nanostructures involving the introduction of seeds, the initial seed structures must be taken into account given their significant effects.

  7. Dielectrophoretic trapping of multilayer DNA origami nanostructures and DNA origami-induced local destruction of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Boxuan; Linko, Veikko; Dietz, Hendrik; Toppari, J Jussi

    2015-01-01

    DNA origami is a widely used method for fabrication of custom-shaped nanostructures. However, to utilize such structures, one needs to controllably position them on nanoscale. Here we demonstrate how different types of 3D scaffolded multilayer origamis can be accurately anchored to lithographically fabricated nanoelectrodes on a silicon dioxide substrate by DEP. Straight brick-like origami structures, constructed both in square (SQL) and honeycomb lattices, as well as curved "C"-shaped and angular "L"-shaped origamis were trapped with nanoscale precision and single-structure accuracy. We show that the positioning and immobilization of all these structures can be realized with or without thiol-linkers. In general, structural deformations of the origami during the DEP trapping are highly dependent on the shape and the construction of the structure. The SQL brick turned out to be the most robust structure under the high DEP forces, and accordingly, its single-structure trapping yield was also highest. In addition, the electrical conductivity of single immobilized plain brick-like structures was characterized. The electrical measurements revealed that the conductivity is negligible (insulating behavior). However, we observed that the trapping process of the SQL brick equipped with thiol-linkers tended to induce an etched "nanocanyon" in the silicon dioxide substrate. The nanocanyon was formed exactly between the electrodes, that is, at the location of the DEP-trapped origami. The results show that the demonstrated DEP-trapping technique can be readily exploited in assembling and arranging complex multilayered origami geometries. In addition, DNA origamis could be utilized in DEP-assisted deformation of the substrates onto which they are attached. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. 18O isotopic tracer studies of silicon oxidation in dry oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon in dry oxygen has been an important process in the integrated circuit industry for making gate insulators on metal-oxide-semiconductory (MOS) devices. This work examines this process using isotopic tracers of oxygen to determine the transport mechanisms of oxygen through silicon dioxide. Oxides were grown sequentially using mass-16 and mass-18 oxygen gas sources to label the oxygen molecules from each step. The resulting oxides are analyzed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The results of these analyses suggest two oxidant species are present during the oxidation, each diffuses and oxidizes separately during the process. A model from this finding using a sum of two linear-parabolic growth rates, each representing the growth rate from one of the oxidants, describes the reported oxidation kinetics in the literature closely. A fit of this relationship reveals excellent fits to the data for oxide thicknesses ranging from 30 A to 1 μm and for temperatures ranging from 800 to 1200 0 C. The mass-18 oxygen tracers also enable a direct observation of the oxygen solubility in the silicon dioxide during a dry oxidation process. The SIMS profiles establish a maximum solubility for interstitial oxygen at 1000 0 C at 2 x 10 20 cm -3 . Furthermore, the mass-18 oxygen profiles show negligible network diffusion during an 1000 0 C oxidation

  9. Building Composite Fe-Mn Oxide Flower-Like Nanostructures: A Detailed Magnetic Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zuddas, Efisio; Lentijo Mozo, Sergio; Casu, Alberto; Deiana, Davide; Falqui, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Here we show that it’s possible to produce different magnetic core-multiple shells heterostructures from monodispersed iron oxide spherical magnetic seeds by finely controlling the amount of a manganese precursor and using in a smart and simple way a cation exchange synthetic approach. In particular, by increasing the amount of precursor we were able to produce nanostructures ranging from Fe3O4/Mn-ferrite core/single shell nanospheres to larger, flower-like Fe3O4/Mn-ferrite/Mn3O4 core-double shell nanoparticles. We first demonstrate how the formation of the initial thin manganese-ferrite shell determines a dramatic reduction of the superficial disorder in the starting iron oxide, bringing to nanomagnets with lower hardness. Then, the growth of the second and most external manganese oxide shell causes the magnetical hardening of the heterostructures, while its magnetic exchange coupling with the rest of the heterostructure can be antiferromagentic or ferromagnetic, depending on the strength of the applied external magnetic field. This response is similar to that of an iron oxide-manganese oxide core-shell system but differs from what observed in multiple-shell heterostructures. Finally, we report as the most external shell becomes magnetically irrelevant above the ferrimagnetic-paramagnetic transition of the manganese oxide and the resulting magnetic behavior of the flower-like structures is then studied in-depth.

  10. Building Composite Fe-Mn Oxide Flower-Like Nanostructures: A Detailed Magnetic Study

    KAUST Repository

    Zuddas, Efisio

    2017-07-21

    Here we show that it’s possible to produce different magnetic core-multiple shells heterostructures from monodispersed iron oxide spherical magnetic seeds by finely controlling the amount of a manganese precursor and using in a smart and simple way a cation exchange synthetic approach. In particular, by increasing the amount of precursor we were able to produce nanostructures ranging from Fe3O4/Mn-ferrite core/single shell nanospheres to larger, flower-like Fe3O4/Mn-ferrite/Mn3O4 core-double shell nanoparticles. We first demonstrate how the formation of the initial thin manganese-ferrite shell determines a dramatic reduction of the superficial disorder in the starting iron oxide, bringing to nanomagnets with lower hardness. Then, the growth of the second and most external manganese oxide shell causes the magnetical hardening of the heterostructures, while its magnetic exchange coupling with the rest of the heterostructure can be antiferromagentic or ferromagnetic, depending on the strength of the applied external magnetic field. This response is similar to that of an iron oxide-manganese oxide core-shell system but differs from what observed in multiple-shell heterostructures. Finally, we report as the most external shell becomes magnetically irrelevant above the ferrimagnetic-paramagnetic transition of the manganese oxide and the resulting magnetic behavior of the flower-like structures is then studied in-depth.

  11. Distribution of impurity elements in slag-silicon equilibria for oxidative refining of metallurgical silicon for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, M.D.; Barati, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    The possibility of refining metallurgical grade silicon to a high-purity product for solar cell applications by the slagging of impurity elements was investigated. Distribution coefficients were determined for B, Ca, Mg, Fe, K and P between magnesia or alumina saturated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO-MgO-SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-BaO-SiO{sub 2} slags and silicon at 1500 C. The partitioning of the impurity elements between molten silicon and slag was examined in terms of basicity and oxygen potential of the slag, with particular focus on the behaviour of boron and phosphorus. The experimental results showed that both of these aspects of slag chemistry have a significant influence on the distribution coefficient of B and P. Increasing the oxygen potential by additions of silica was found to increase the distribution coefficients for both B and P. Increasing the basicity of the slag was not always effective in achieving high removal of these elements from silicon as excess amounts of basic oxides lower the activity of silica and consequently the oxygen potential. The extent of this effect is such that increasing basicity can lead to a decrease in distribution coefficient. Increasing lime in the slag increased distribution coefficients for B and P, but this counterbalancing effect was such that distributions were the lowest in barium-containing slags, despite barium oxide being the most basic of the fluxes used in this study. The highest removal efficiencies achieved were of the order of 80% and 90% for B and P, respectively. It was demonstrated that for the removal of B and P from metallurgical-grade silicon to solar-grade levels, a slag mass about 5 times the mass of silicon would be required. (author)

  12. Nanostructured cerium oxide catalyst support: Effects of morphology on the electro activity of gold toward oxidative sensing of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougis, Maxime; Tabet-Aoul, Amel; Ma, Dongling; Mohamedi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of nanostructured CeO 2 -gold electrodes by means of laser ablation. The synthetic conditions were varied in order to obtain different morphologies of CeO 2 . The physical and chemical properties of the samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of the morphology of CeO 2 on the electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square-wave voltammetry. Among the various electrodes fabricated, the CeO 2 coating produced under 10 mTorr of oxygen showed the best supporting catalytic properties for gold by displaying 44 μA cm −2 mM −1 sensitivity for glucose oxidation at near neutral pH values. The detection limit is as low as 10 μM. This electrochemical activity makes the optimized nanostructured electrode potentially useful for non-enzymatic sensing of glucose. (author)

  13. Fabrication of a silicon oxide stamp by edge lithography reinforced with silicon nitride for nanoimprint lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Yiping; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication of a stamp reinforced with silicon nitride is presented for its use in nanoimprint lithography. The fabrication process is based on edge lithography using conventional optical lithography and wet anisotropic etching of 110 silicon wafers. SiO2 nano-ridges of 20 nm in width were

  14. Fabrication of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene Nanostructures with Anodic Alumina Oxide Templates, Characterization and Biofilm Development Test for Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Desrousseaux

    Full Text Available Medical devices can be contaminated by microbial biofilm which causes nosocomial infections. One of the strategies for the prevention of such microbial adhesion is to modify the biomaterials by creating micro or nanofeatures on their surface. This study aimed (1 to nanostructure acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS, a polymer composing connectors in perfusion devices, using Anodic Alumina Oxide templates, and to control the reproducibility of this process; (2 to characterize the physico-chemical properties of the nanostructured surfaces such as wettability using captive-bubble contact angle measurement technique; (3 to test the impact of nanostructures on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm development. Fabrication of Anodic Alumina Oxide molds was realized by double anodization in oxalic acid. This process was reproducible. The obtained molds present hexagonally arranged 50 nm diameter pores, with a 100 nm interpore distance and a length of 100 nm. Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene nanostructures were successfully prepared using a polymer solution and two melt wetting methods. For all methods, the nanopicots were obtained but inside each sample their length was different. One method was selected essentially for industrial purposes and for better reproducibility results. The flat ABS surface presents a slightly hydrophilic character, which remains roughly unchanged after nanostructuration, the increasing apparent wettability observed in that case being explained by roughness effects. Also, the nanostructuration of the polymer surface does not induce any significant effect on Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion.

  15. Silicon-carbon fullerenelike nanostructures: An ab initio study on the stability of Si60C2n (n=1, 2) clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, A.; Huda, M. N.; Ray, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Fullerenelike nanostructures of silicon with two and four carbon atoms substituted on the surface of Si 60 cages, as well as inside the cage at various symmetry orientations, have been studied within the generalized-gradient approximation to density-functional theory. Full geometry optimizations have been performed without any symmetry constraints using the GAUSSIAN 03 suite of programs and the Los Alamos National Laboratory 2 double-ζ basis set. For the silicon atom, the Hay-Wadt pseudopotential with the associated basis set are used for the core electrons and the valence electrons, respectively. For the carbon atom, the Dunning-Huzinaga double-ζ basis set is employed. Electronic and geometric properties of the nanostructures are presented and discussed in detail. It was found that optimized silicon-carbon fullerenelike cages have increased stability compared to the bare Si 60 cage and the stability depends on the number and orientation of carbon atoms, as well as on the nature of bonding between silicon and carbon atoms

  16. Nanostructured hydrophobic DC sputtered inorganic oxide coating for outdoor glass insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Gupta, H.O. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Chandra, R., E-mail: ramesfic@gmail.com [Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Deposition of contamination on outdoor glass insulators and its physical and economical consequences were discussed. • Synthesis of nanostructured hydrophobic HfO{sub 2} film on glass as a remedial measure by varying DC sputtering power. • Investigated and correlated structural, optical, electrical and hydrophobic properties of HfO{sub 2} films with respect to power. • Optimum results were obtained at a 50 W DC sputtering power. - Abstract: We report the structural, optical and electrical properties of nanostructured hydrophobic inorganic hafnium oxide coating for outdoor glass insulator using DC sputtering technique to combat contamination problem. The properties were studied as a function of DC power. The characterization of the films was done using X-ray diffraction, EDS, surface profilometer, AFM, impedance analyser and water contact angle measurement system. The DC power was varied from 30 to 60 W and found to have a great impact on the properties of hafnium oxide. All the deposited samples were polycrystalline with nanostructured hydrophobic surfaces. The intensity of crystallinity of the film was found to be dependent on sputtering power and hydrophobicity was correlated to the nanoscale roughness of the films. The optical property reveals 80% average transmission for all the samples. The refractive index was found in the range of 1.85–1.92, near to the bulk value. The band gap calculated from transmission data was >5.3 eV for all deposited samples ensuring dielectric nature of the films. Surface energy calculated by two methods was found minimum for the film deposited at 50 W sputtering power. The resistivity was also high enough (∼10{sup 4} Ω cm) to hinder the flow of leakage current through the film. The dielectric constant (ε) was found to be thickness dependent and also high enough (ε{sub max} = 23.12) to bear the large electric field of outdoor insulators.

  17. Nanostructure of propylammonium nitrate in the presence of poly(ethylene oxide) and halide salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Ryan; Webber, Grant B.; Page, Alister J.

    2018-05-01

    Nanoscale structure of protic ionic liquids is critical to their utility as molecular electrochemical solvents since it determines the capacity to dissolve salts and polymers such as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Here we use quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the impact of dissolved halide anions on the nanostructure of an archetypal nanostructured protic ionic liquid, propylammonium nitrate (PAN), and how this impacts the solvation of a model PEO polymer. At the molecular level, PAN is nanostructured, consisting of charged/polar and uncharged/nonpolar domains. The charged domain consists of the cation/anion charge groups, and is formed by their electrostatic interaction. This domain solvophobically excludes the propyl chains on the cation, which form a distinct, self-assembled nonpolar domain within the liquid. Our simulations demonstrate that the addition of Cl- and Br- anions to PAN disrupts the structure within the PAN charged domain due to competition between nitrate and halide anions for the ammonium charge centre. This disruption increases with halide concentration (up to 10 mol. %). However, at these concentrations, halide addition has little effect on the structure of the PAN nonpolar domain. Addition of PEO to pure PAN also disrupts the structure within the charged domain of the liquid due to hydrogen bonding between the charge groups and the terminal PEO hydroxyl groups. There is little other association between the PEO structure and the surrounding ionic liquid solvent, with strong PEO self-interaction yielding a compact, coiled polymer morphology. Halide addition results in greater association between the ionic liquid charge centres and the ethylene oxide components of the PEO structure, resulting in reduced conformational flexibility, compared to that observed in pure PAN. Similarly, PEO self-interactions increase in the presence of Cl- and Br- anions, compared to PAN, indicating that the addition of halide salts to PAN

  18. Supported 3-D Pt nanostructures: the straightforward synthesis and enhanced electrochemical performance for methanol oxidation in an acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zesheng; Ji, Shan; Pollet, Bruno G.; Shen, Pei Kang

    2013-01-01

    Noble metal nanostructures with branched morphologies [i.e., 3-D Pt nanoflowers (NFs)] by tri-dimensionally integrating onto conductive carbon materials are proved to be an efficient and durable electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation. The well-supported 3-D Pt NFs are readily achieved by an efficient cobalt-induced/carbon-mediated galvanic reaction approach. Due to the favorable nanostructures (3-D Pt configuration allowing a facile mass transfer) and supporting effects (including framework stabilization, spatially separate feature, and improved charge transport effects), these 3-D Pt NFs manifest much higher electrocatalytic activity and stability toward methanol oxidation than that of the commercial Pt/C and Pt-based electrocatalysts

  19. Supported 3-D Pt nanostructures: the straightforward synthesis and enhanced electrochemical performance for methanol oxidation in an acidic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zesheng [Sun Yat-sen University, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, and Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation, School of Physics and Engineering (China); Ji, Shan; Pollet, Bruno G. [University of the Western Cape, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry (SAIAMC) (South Africa); Shen, Pei Kang, E-mail: stsspk@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, and Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation, School of Physics and Engineering (China)

    2013-10-15

    Noble metal nanostructures with branched morphologies [i.e., 3-D Pt nanoflowers (NFs)] by tri-dimensionally integrating onto conductive carbon materials are proved to be an efficient and durable electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation. The well-supported 3-D Pt NFs are readily achieved by an efficient cobalt-induced/carbon-mediated galvanic reaction approach. Due to the favorable nanostructures (3-D Pt configuration allowing a facile mass transfer) and supporting effects (including framework stabilization, spatially separate feature, and improved charge transport effects), these 3-D Pt NFs manifest much higher electrocatalytic activity and stability toward methanol oxidation than that of the commercial Pt/C and Pt-based electrocatalysts.

  20. Microstructure and oxidative degradation behavior of silicon carbide fiber Hi-Nicalon type S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, M.; Urano, A.; Sakamoto, J.; Imai, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Polycarbosilane-derived SiC fibers, Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon type S were exposed for 1 to 100 h at 1273-1773 K in air. Oxide layer growth and tensile strength change of these fibers were examined after the oxidation test. As a result, three types of SiC fibers decreased their strength as oxide layer thickness increased. Fracture origins were determined at near the oxide layer-fiber interface. Adhered fibers arised from softening of silicon oxide at high temperature were also observed. In this study, Hi-Nicalon type S showed better oxidation resistance than other polycarbosilane-derived SiC fibers after 1673 K or higher temperature exposure in air for 10 h. This result was explained by the poreless silicon oxide layer structure of Hi-Nicalon type S. (orig.)

  1. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  2. Synthesis of biphasic calcium phosphate containing nanostructured films by micro arc oxidation on magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyfoori, A., E-mail: klm.1985@yahoo.com [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Cell Bank, Pasteur Institute of Iran, 13164 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirdamadi, Sh.; Seyedraoufi, Z.S.; Khavandi, A. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aliofkhazraei, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, 14115-143 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    The present research reports the synthesis of an innovative nanostructured composite film containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) by the micro arc oxidation (MAO) method on AZ31 magnesium alloy. Nanometric structure of the used hydroxyapatite powder and the coatings were characterized by means of transmission and field-emission scanning electron microscope, respectively. Electrochemical behaviors of the pure MAO and nanocomposite films were also evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) environment. The results showed higher corrosion resistance of nanocomposite film compared to pure MAO coating, which was related to the blocking feature of the nanoparticles from the diffusing of the corrosive medium through the substrate. In addition, by immersing the specimens in simulated body fluid, greater apatite forming ability of the nanocomposite coating was proved. - Highlights: • Synthesis of innovative biphasic calcium phosphate containing nanostructured films via micro arc oxidation. • Nanocomposite film has lower degradation rate than pure MAO film. • Greater apatite forming ability for nanocomposite coating compared with pure MAO film is obtained.

  3. Stabilizing nanostructured solid oxide fuel cell cathode with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yunhui; Palacio, Diego; Song, Xueyan; Patel, Rajankumar L; Liang, Xinhua; Zhao, Xuan; Goodenough, John B; Huang, Kevin

    2013-09-11

    We demonstrate that the highly active but unstable nanostructured intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode, La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ (LSCo), can retain its high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with exceptional stability for 4000 h at 700 °C by overcoating its surfaces with a conformal layer of nanoscale ZrO2 films through atomic layer deposition (ALD). The benefits from the presence of the nanoscale ALD-ZrO2 overcoats are remarkable: a factor of 19 and 18 reduction in polarization area-specific resistance and degradation rate over the pristine sample, respectively. The unique multifunctionality of the ALD-derived nanoscaled ZrO2 overcoats, that is, possessing porosity for O2 access to LSCo, conducting both electrons and oxide-ions, confining thermal growth of LSCo nanoparticles, and suppressing surface Sr-segregation is deemed the key enabler for the observed stable and active nanostructured cathode.

  4. Synthesis of biphasic calcium phosphate containing nanostructured films by micro arc oxidation on magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfoori, A.; Mirdamadi, Sh.; Seyedraoufi, Z.S.; Khavandi, A.; Aliofkhazraei, M.

    2013-01-01

    The present research reports the synthesis of an innovative nanostructured composite film containing biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) by the micro arc oxidation (MAO) method on AZ31 magnesium alloy. Nanometric structure of the used hydroxyapatite powder and the coatings were characterized by means of transmission and field-emission scanning electron microscope, respectively. Electrochemical behaviors of the pure MAO and nanocomposite films were also evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) environment. The results showed higher corrosion resistance of nanocomposite film compared to pure MAO coating, which was related to the blocking feature of the nanoparticles from the diffusing of the corrosive medium through the substrate. In addition, by immersing the specimens in simulated body fluid, greater apatite forming ability of the nanocomposite coating was proved. - Highlights: • Synthesis of innovative biphasic calcium phosphate containing nanostructured films via micro arc oxidation. • Nanocomposite film has lower degradation rate than pure MAO film. • Greater apatite forming ability for nanocomposite coating compared with pure MAO film is obtained

  5. Inherent health and environmental risk assessment of nanostructured metal oxide production processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabifard, Mina; Arjmandi, Reza; Rashidi, Alimorad; Nouri, Jafar; Mohammadfam, Iraj

    2018-01-10

    The health and environmental effects of chemical processes can be assessed during the initial stage of their production. In this paper, the Chemical Screening Tool for Exposure and Environmental Release (ChemSTEER) software was used to compare the health and environmental risks of spray pyrolysis and wet chemical techniques for the fabrication of nanostructured metal oxide on a semi-industrial scale with a capacity of 300 kg/day in Iran. The pollution sources identified in each production process were pairwise compared in Expert Choice software using indicators including respiratory damage, skin damage, and environmental damages including air, water, and soil pollution. The synthesis of nanostructured zinc oxide using the wet chemical technique (with 0.523 wt%) leads to lower health and environmental risks compared to when spray pyrolysis is used (with 0.477 wt%). The health and environmental risk assessment of nanomaterial production processes can help select safer processes, modify the operation conditions, and select or modify raw materials that can help eliminate the risks.

  6. The role of pH variation on the growth of zinc oxide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Ansari, S.G.; Kim, Young Soon; Song, Minwu; Shin, Hyung-Shik

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study on the morphological variation of ZnO nanostructure by varying the pH of precursor solution via solution method. Zinc acetate dihydrate and sodium hydroxide were used as a precursor, which was refluxed at 90 deg. C for an hour. The pH of the precursor solution (zinc acetate di hydrate) was increased from 6 to 12 by the controlled addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Morphology of ZnO nanorods markedly varies from sheet-like (at pH 6) to rod-like structure of zinc oxide (pH 10-12). Diffraction patterns match well with standard ZnO at all pH values. Crystallinity and nanostructures were confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, which indicates structure grew along [0 0 0 1] direction with an ideal lattice fringes distance 0.52 nm. FTIR spectroscopic measurement showed a standard peak of zinc oxide at 464 cm -1 . Amount of H + and OH - ions are found key to the structure control of studied material, as discussed in the growth mechanism.

  7. Participation of the Third Order Optical Nonlinearities in Nanostructured Silver Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Solid Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Torres-Torres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the transmittance modulation of optical signals in a nanocomposite integrated by two different silver doped zinc oxide thin solid films. An ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach was employed for the preparation of the samples. Measurements of the third-order nonlinear optical response at a nonresonant 532 nm wavelength of excitation were performed using a vectorial two-wave mixing. It seems that the separated contribution of the optical nonlinearity associated with each film noticeable differs in the resulting nonlinear effects with respect to the additive response exhibited by the bilayer system. An enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity is predicted for prime number arrays of the studied nanoclusters in a two-wave interaction. We consider that the nanostructured morphology of the thin solid films originates a strong modification of the third-order optical phenomena exhibited by multilayer films based on zinc oxide.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on novel black silicon-based nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Orinak, A.

    2009-01-01

    , effects of Ti and Ti/Pt adhesion layers underneath the gold layers on the analytical signal enhancement were tested. An enhancement factor of 7.6 x 10(7) with the excitation laser 785 nm was achieved for the tested analyte, Rhodamine 6G, and non-resonance SER spectra were recorded in a 5 s acquisition...... mode. Such an enhancement enables to achieve a detection limit down to 2.4 pg of Rhodamine 6G on a black silicon-based nanosurface coated with a 400-nm-thin layer of gold....

  9. Influence of irradiation dose on laser-induced surface nanostructures on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlamova, Olga [Brandenburgische Technische Universität BTU Cottbus, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Cottbus JointLab, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Bounhalli, Mourad [Brandenburgische Technische Universität BTU Cottbus, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université St. Etienne, Bâtiment F 18 Rue du Professeur Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Reif, Juergen, E-mail: REIF@TU-COTTBUS.DE [Brandenburgische Technische Universität BTU Cottbus, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Cottbus JointLab, Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    We report on the dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on an increase of incident pulse number. On silicon, the patterns evolve from linear, parallel sub-wavelength ripples, grossly perpendicular to the laser polarization, via coalesced wider features parallel to the polarization, to a crater with periodically structured, pillar-like walls. Closer inspection of the patterns indicates that the different features always continue to exhibit reminiscence to the preceding lower-dose patterns, suggesting that, indeed, all patterns can be created by ONE single GENERAL formation process, as in self-organized structure formation, and the different structures/feature sizes are NOT due to DIFFERENT mechanisms.

  10. Influence of irradiation dose on laser-induced surface nanostructures on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Bounhalli, Mourad; Reif, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    We report on the dependence of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on an increase of incident pulse number. On silicon, the patterns evolve from linear, parallel sub-wavelength ripples, grossly perpendicular to the laser polarization, via coalesced wider features parallel to the polarization, to a crater with periodically structured, pillar-like walls. Closer inspection of the patterns indicates that the different features always continue to exhibit reminiscence to the preceding lower-dose patterns, suggesting that, indeed, all patterns can be created by ONE single GENERAL formation process, as in self-organized structure formation, and the different structures/feature sizes are NOT due to DIFFERENT mechanisms.

  11. On the oxidation mechanism of microcrystalline silicon thin films studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronneberg, A. C.; Smets, A. H. M.; Creatore, M.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2011-01-01

    Insight into the oxidation mechanism of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been obtained by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The films were deposited by using the expanding thermal plasma and their oxidation upon air exposure was followed in time. Transmission spectra were

  12. Effect of poly(ethylene oxide) homopolymer and two different poly(ethylene oxide-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymers on morphological, optical, and mechanical properties of nanostructured unsaturated polyester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Builes, Daniel H; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; Corcuera, Ma Angeles; Mondragon, Iñaki; Tercjak, Agnieszka

    2014-01-22

    Novel nanostructured unsaturated polyester resin-based thermosets, modified with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), and two poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymers (BCP), were developed and analyzed. The effects of molecular weights, blocks ratio, and curing temperatures on the final morphological, optical, and mechanical properties were reported. The block influence on the BCP miscibility was studied through uncured and cured mixtures of unsaturated polyester (UP) resins with PEO and PPO homopolymers having molecular weights similar to molecular weights of the blocks of BCP. The final morphology of the nanostructured thermosetting systems, containing BCP or homopolymers, was investigated, and multiple mechanisms of nanostructuration were listed and explained. By considering the miscibility of each block before and after curing, it was determined that the formation of the nanostructured matrices followed a self-assembly mechanism or a polymerization-induced phase separation mechanism. The miscibility between PEO or PPO blocks with one of two phases of UP matrix was highlighted due to its importance in the final thermoset properties. Relationships between the final morphology and thermoset optical and mechanical properties were examined. The mechanisms and physics behind the morphologies lead toward the design of highly transparent, nanostructured, and toughened thermosetting UP systems.

  13. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm −2 at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  14. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose, E-mail: jgarciaa@iqn.upv.es

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm{sup −2} at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  15. Super-oxidation of silicon nanoclusters: magnetism and reactive oxygen species at the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeshkin, Sergey; Baturin, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Evgeny; Matsko, Nikita; Uspenskii, Yurii; Naumova, Anastasia; Feya, Oleg; Schoonen, Martin A.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon nanoclusters depending on the temperature and oxygen pressure is explored from first principles using the evolutionary algorithm, and structural and thermodynamic analysis. From our calculations of 90 SinOm clusters we found that under normal conditions oxidation does not stop at the stoichiometric SiO2 composition, as it does in bulk silicon, but goes further placing extra oxygen atoms on the cluster surface. These extra atoms are responsible for light emission, relevant to reactive oxygen species and many of them are magnetic. We argue that the super-oxidation effect is size-independent and discuss its relevance to nanotechnology and miscellaneous applications, including biomedical ones.

  16. As(III) oxidation by MnO{sub 2} coated PEEK-WC nanostructured capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscuoli, Alessandra, E-mail: a.criscuoli@itm.cnr.it [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Majumdar, Swachchha [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Rd., 700032 Kolkata (India); Figoli, Alberto, E-mail: a.figoli@itm.cnr.it [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Sahoo, Ganesh C. [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Rd., 700032 Kolkata (India); Bafaro, Patrizia [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci Cubo 42/A, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Bandyopadhyay, Sibdas [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Rd., 700032 Kolkata (India); Drioli, Enrico [Institute on Membrane Technology, ITM-CNR, Via P. Bucci Cubo 17/C, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci Cubo 42/A, 87030 Rende (CS) (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful preparation of PEEK-WC nanostructured capsules coated by MnO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preliminary tests of As(III) oxidation carried out in batch. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complete oxidation obtained for feed concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 ppm. - Abstract: PEEK-WC nanostructured capsules were prepared by the phase inversion technique and used as support for the coating of a manganese dioxide layer. The coating was done by a chemical treatment of the capsules followed by a thermal one. The presence of the MnO{sub 2} layer was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), back scattering electron (BSE), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The produced capsules were, then, tested for As(III) oxidation in batch. The experiments consisted in treating 165 ml of As(III) solution with 1 g of coated capsules at fixed temperature (15 Degree-Sign C) and pH (5.7-5.8). In particular, the efficiency of the system was investigated for different As(III) concentrations (0.1, 0.3, 0.7 and 1 ppm). For feeds at lower As(III) content (0.1-0.3 ppm), tests lasted for 8 h, while prolonged runs (up to 48 h) were carried out on more concentrated solutions (0.7 and 1 ppm). The produced capsules were able to oxidize As(III) into As(V) leading to complete conversion after 3 and 4 h for feed concentrations of 0.1 and 0.3 ppm, respectively.

  17. New roots to formation of nanostructures on glass surface through anodic oxidation of sputtered aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Inoue, Song-Zhu Chu, Kenji Wada, Di Li and Hajime Haneda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New processes for the preparation of nanostructure on glass surfaces have been developed through anodic oxidation of sputtered aluminum. Aluminum thin film sputtered on a tin doped indium oxide (ITO thin film on a glass surface was converted into alumina by anodic oxidation. The anodic alumina gave nanometer size pore array standing vertically on the glass surface. Kinds of acids used in the anodic oxidation changed the pore size drastically. The employment of phosphoric acid solution gave several tens nanometer size pores. Oxalic acid cases produced a few tens nanometer size pores and sulfuric acid solution provided a few nanometer size pores. The number of pores in a unit area could be changed with varying the applied voltage in the anodization and the pore sizes could be increased by phosphoric acid etching. The specimen consisting of a glass substrate with the alumina nanostructures on the surface could transmit UV and visible light. An etched specimen was dipped in a TiO2 sol solution, resulting in the impregnation of TiO2 sol into the pores of alumina layer. The TiO2 sol was heated at ~400 °C for 2 h, converting into anatase phase TiO2. The specimens possessing TiO2 film on the pore wall were transparent to the light in UV–Visible region. The electro deposition technique was applied to the introduction of Ni metal into pores, giving Ni nanorod array on the glass surface. The removal of the barrier layer alumina at the bottom of the pores was necessary to attain smooth electro deposition of Ni. The photo catalytic function of the specimens possessing TiO2 nanotube array was investigated in the decomposition of acetaldehyde gas under the irradiation of UV light, showing that the rate of the decomposition was quite large.

  18. Fabrication of amorphous silicon nanoribbons by atomic force microscope tip-induced local oxidation for thin film device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, L; Rogel, R; Demami, F

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of induced local oxidation of amorphous silicon by atomic force microscopy. The resulting local oxide is used as a mask for the elaboration of a thin film silicon resistor. A thin amorphous silicon layer deposited on a glass substrate is locally oxidized following narrow continuous lines. The corresponding oxide line is then used as a mask during plasma etching of the amorphous layer leading to the formation of a nanoribbon. Such an amorphous silicon nanoribbon is used for the fabrication of the resistor

  19. Impact of structure and morphology of nanostructured ceria coating on AISI 304 oxidation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadhavan, R.; Suresh Babu, K.

    2017-07-01

    Nanostructured ceria-based coatings are shown to be protective against high-temperature oxidation of AISI 304 due to the dynamics of oxidation state and associated defects. However, the processing parameters of deposition have a strong influence in determining the structural and morphological aspects of ceria. The present work focuses on the effect of variation in substrate temperature (50-300 °C) and deposition rate (0.1-50 Å/s) of ceria in electron beam physical vapour evaporation method and correlates the changes in structure and morphology to high-temperature oxidation protection. Unlike deposition rate, substrate temperature exhibited a profound influence on crystallite size (7-18 nm) and oxygen vacancy concentration. Upon isothermal oxidation at 1243 K for 24 h, bare AISI 304 exhibited a linear mass gain with a rate constant of 3.0 ± 0.03 × 10-3 kg2 m-4 s-1 while ceria coating lowered the kinetics by 3-4 orders. Though the thickness of the coating was kept constant at 2 μm, higher deposition rate offered one order lower protection due to the porous nature of the coating. Variation in the substrate temperature modulated the porosity as well as oxygen vacancy concentration and displayed the best protection for coatings deposited at moderate substrate temperature. The present work demonstrates the significance of selecting appropriate processing parameters to obtain the required morphology for efficient high-temperature oxidation protection.

  20. Effect of yttrium on the oxide scale adherence of pre-oxidized silicon-containing heat-resistant alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jingbo; Gao Yimin; Shen Yudi; Yang Fang; Yi Dawei; Ye Zhaozhong; Liang Long; Du Yingqian

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → AE experiment shows yttrium has a beneficial effect on the pre-oxidized HP40 alloy. → Yttrium facilitates the formation of internal oxide after 10 h of oxidation. → Internal oxide changes the rupture behaviour of the oxide scale. → Twins form in the internal oxide and improve the binding strength of the scale. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of the rare earth element yttrium on the rupture behaviour of the oxide scale on the silicon-containing heat-resistant alloy during cooling. After 10 h of oxidation, yttrium is found to facilitate the formation of internal oxides (silica) at the scale-matrix interface. Due to the twinning observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in silica, the critical strain value for the scale failure can be dramatically improved, and the formation of cracks at the scale-matrix interface is inhibited.

  1. Porous Silicon Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-01-01

    In this minreview, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures — single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion battery, gas sensor and drug delivery. PMID:21869999

  2. Surface properties of nanostructured NiO undergoing electrochemical oxidation in 3-methoxy-propionitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomo, Matteo [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Marrani, Andrea Giacomo, E-mail: andrea.marrani@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Novelli, Vittoria [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Awais, Muhammad [Department of Industrial Engineering, “King Abdulaziz” University, Rabigh (Saudi Arabia); Solar Energy Conversion Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Dowling, Denis P. [Solar Energy Conversion Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Vos, Johannes G. [School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University (DCU), Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Dini, Danilo [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Solar Energy Conversion Strategic Research Cluster, University College Dublin (UCD), Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • NiO porous thin films were prepared via RDS technique. • NiO electrodes were characterized in a nitrile based electrochemical cell. • NiO electrodes were studied by means of XPS. • The XP spectra excluded the formation of phases other than NiO. • The presence of ClO{sub 4}{sup −} as charge balancing species was evidenced. - Abstract: Nanostructured nickel oxide (NiO) was deposited in the configuration of thin film (thickness, l = 2–6 μm) onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates via plasma-assisted rapid discharge sintering (RDS). Electrochemical cycling of RDS NiO in 3-methoxy-propionitrile (3-MPN) revealed two characteristic peaks of NiO oxidation which were associated to the surface-confined redox processes Ni(II) → Ni(III) and Ni(III) → Ni(IV). Grazing angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted ex-situ on NiO electrodes in both pristine and oxidized states. Oxidized NiO samples for XPS experiments were obtained in the potentiostatic mode through the polarization of NiO at its two characteristic potentials of oxidation. The XPS analysis allowed to ascertain the electronic structure of the nanoporous NiO framework, and verify the adsorption of perchlorate and chloride anions onto NiO surface due to the compensation of the charge stored in oxidized NiO. XPS also revealed that the spectrum within the region characteristic of Ni 2p ionization does not vary considerably with the state of charge of the nickel centres. This finding is in evident contrast to what has been observed for the same system when it undergoes electrochemical oxidation in aqueous electrolyte.

  3. Surface properties of nanostructured NiO undergoing electrochemical oxidation in 3-methoxy-propionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Matteo; Marrani, Andrea Giacomo; Novelli, Vittoria; Awais, Muhammad; Dowling, Denis P.; Vos, Johannes G.; Dini, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • NiO porous thin films were prepared via RDS technique. • NiO electrodes were characterized in a nitrile based electrochemical cell. • NiO electrodes were studied by means of XPS. • The XP spectra excluded the formation of phases other than NiO. • The presence of ClO 4 − as charge balancing species was evidenced. - Abstract: Nanostructured nickel oxide (NiO) was deposited in the configuration of thin film (thickness, l = 2–6 μm) onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates via plasma-assisted rapid discharge sintering (RDS). Electrochemical cycling of RDS NiO in 3-methoxy-propionitrile (3-MPN) revealed two characteristic peaks of NiO oxidation which were associated to the surface-confined redox processes Ni(II) → Ni(III) and Ni(III) → Ni(IV). Grazing angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted ex-situ on NiO electrodes in both pristine and oxidized states. Oxidized NiO samples for XPS experiments were obtained in the potentiostatic mode through the polarization of NiO at its two characteristic potentials of oxidation. The XPS analysis allowed to ascertain the electronic structure of the nanoporous NiO framework, and verify the adsorption of perchlorate and chloride anions onto NiO surface due to the compensation of the charge stored in oxidized NiO. XPS also revealed that the spectrum within the region characteristic of Ni 2p ionization does not vary considerably with the state of charge of the nickel centres. This finding is in evident contrast to what has been observed for the same system when it undergoes electrochemical oxidation in aqueous electrolyte.

  4. Effect of trichloroethylene enhancement on deposition rate of low-temperature silicon oxide films by silicone oil and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Susumu; Jain, Puneet

    2017-08-01

    A low-temperature silcon oxide film was deposited at 160 to 220 °C using an atmospheric pressure CVD system with silicone oil vapor and ozone gases. It was found that the deposition rate is markedly increased by adding trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor, which is generated by bubbling TCE solution with N2 gas flow. The increase is more than 3 times that observed without TCE, and any contamination due to TCE is hardly observed in the deposited Si oxide films from Fourier transform infrared spectra.

  5. The oxidation of titanium nitride- and silicon nitride-coated stainless steel in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.; Stott, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been undertaken into the effects of thin titanium nitride and silicon nitride coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition and chemical vapour deposition processes, on the oxidation resistance of 321 stainless steel in a simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor carbon dioxide environment for long periods at 550 o C and 700 o C under thermal-cycling conditions. The uncoated steel contains sufficient chromium to develop a slow-growing chromium-rich oxide layer at these temperatures, particularly if the surfaces have been machine-abraded. Failure of this layer in service allows formation of less protective iron oxide-rich scales. The presence of a thin (3-4 μm) titanium nitride coating is not very effective in increasing the oxidation resistance since the ensuing titanium oxide scale is not a good barrier to diffusion. Even at 550 o C, iron oxide-rich nodules are able to develop following relatively rapid oxidation and breakdown of the coating. At 700 o C, the coated specimens oxidize at relatively similar rates to the uncoated steel. A thin silicon nitride coating gives improved oxidation resistance, with both the coating and its slow-growing oxide being relatively electrically insulating. The particular silicon nitride coating studied here was susceptible to spallation on thermal cycling, due to an inherently weak coating/substrate interface. (Author)

  6. Preparation of highly aligned silicon oxide nanowires with stable intensive photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M.; Mansurov, Z.A.; Tokmolden, S.; Beall, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report the successful formation of highly aligned vertical silicon oxide nanowires. The source of silicon was from the substrate itself without any additional source of silicon. X-ray measurement demonstrated that our nanowires are amorphous. Photoluminescence measurements were conducted through 18 months and indicated that there is a very good intensive emission peaks near the violet regions. The FTIR measurements indicated the existence of peaks at 463, 604, 795 and a wide peak at 1111 cm -1 and this can be attributed to Si-O-Si and Si-O stretching vibrations. We also report the formation of the octopus-like silicon oxide nanowires and the growth mechanism of these structures was discussed.

  7. Preparation of highly aligned silicon oxide nanowires with stable intensive photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M., E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.co [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Mansurov, Z.A. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Tokmolden, S. [Institute of Physics and Technology, 11 Ibragimov Street, 050032 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Beall, Gary W. [Texas State University-San Marcos, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, TX 78666 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In this work we report the successful formation of highly aligned vertical silicon oxide nanowires. The source of silicon was from the substrate itself without any additional source of silicon. X-ray measurement demonstrated that our nanowires are amorphous. Photoluminescence measurements were conducted through 18 months and indicated that there is a very good intensive emission peaks near the violet regions. The FTIR measurements indicated the existence of peaks at 463, 604, 795 and a wide peak at 1111 cm{sup -1} and this can be attributed to Si-O-Si and Si-O stretching vibrations. We also report the formation of the octopus-like silicon oxide nanowires and the growth mechanism of these structures was discussed.

  8. Sponge-like reduced graphene oxide/silicon/carbon nanotube composites for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Menglu; Wang, Zhao; Chen, Xiaojun; Guan, Shiyou

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional sponge-like reduced graphene oxide/silicon/carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by one-step hydrothermal self-assembly using silicon nanoparticles, graphene oxide and amino modified carbon nanotubes to develop high-performance anode materials of lithium ion batteries. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images show the structure of composites that Silicon nanoparticles are coated with reduced graphene oxide while amino modified carbon nanotubes wrap around the reduced graphene oxide in the composites. When applied to lithium ion battery, these composites exhibit high initial specific capacity of 2552 mA h/g at a current density of 0.05 A/g. In addition, reduced graphene oxide/silicon/carbon nanotube composites also have better cycle stability than bare Silicon nanoparticles electrode with the specific capacity of 1215 mA h/g after 100 cycles. The three-dimension sponge-like structure not only ensures the electrical conductivity but also buffers the huge volume change, which has broad potential application in the field of battery.

  9. Covalent Surface Modification of Silicon Oxides with Alcohols in Polar Aprotic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2017-09-05

    Alcohol-based monolayers were successfully formed on the surfaces of silicon oxides through reactions performed in polar aprotic solvents. Monolayers prepared from alcohol-based reagents have been previously introduced as an alternative approach to covalently modify the surfaces of silicon oxides. These reagents are readily available, widely distributed, and are minimally susceptible to side reactions with ambient moisture. A limitation of using alcohol-based compounds is that previous reactions required relatively high temperatures in neat solutions, which can degrade some alcohol compounds or could lead to other unwanted side reactions during the formation of the monolayers. To overcome these challenges, we investigate the condensation reaction of alcohols on silicon oxides carried out in polar aprotic solvents. In particular, propylene carbonate has been identified as a polar aprotic solvent that is relatively nontoxic, readily accessible, and can facilitate the formation of alcohol-based monolayers. We have successfully demonstrated this approach for tuning the surface chemistry of silicon oxide surfaces with a variety of alcohol containing compounds. The strategy introduced in this research can be utilized to create silicon oxide surfaces with hydrophobic, oleophobic, or charged functionalities.

  10. Plasmonic Nanostructure for Enhanced Light Absorption in Ultrathin Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinna He

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performances of thin film solar cells are considerably limited by the low light absorption. Plasmonic nanostructures have been introduced in the thin film solar cells as a possible solution around this issue in recent years. Here, we propose a solar cell design, in which an ultrathin Si film covered by a periodic array of Ag strips is placed on a metallic nanograting substrate. The simulation results demonstrate that the designed structure gives rise to 170% light absorption enhancement over the full solar spectrum with respect to the bared Si thin film. The excited multiple resonant modes, including optical waveguide modes within the Si layer, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR of Ag stripes, and surface plasmon polaritons (SPP arising from the bottom grating, and the coupling effect between LSPR and SPP modes through an optimization of the array periods are considered to contribute to the significant absorption enhancement. This plasmonic solar cell design paves a promising way to increase light absorption for thin film solar cell applications.

  11. Adsorption of small NaCl clusters on surfaces of silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Alireza Ghasemi, S; Goedecker, Stefan; Neelov, Alexey; Genovese, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    We have studied possible adsorption geometries of neutral NaCl clusters on the disordered surface of a large silicon model tip used in non-contact atomic force microscopy. The minima hopping method was used to determine low energy model tip configurations as well as ground state geometries of isolated NaCl clusters. The combined system was treated with density functional theory. Alkali halides have proven to be strong structure seekers and tend to form highly stable ground state configurations whenever possible. The favored adsorption geometry for four Na and four Cl atoms was found to be an adsorption of four NaCl dimers due to the formation of Cl-Si bonds. However, for larger NaCl clusters, the increasing energy required to dissociate the cluster into NaCl dimers suggests that adsorption of whole clusters in their isolated ground state configuration is preferred.

  12. Recovery of indium-tin-oxide/silicon heterojunction solar cells by thermal annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Vilches, Ana Belén; Voz Sánchez, Cristóbal; Colina Brito, Mónica Alejandra; López Rodríguez, Gema; Martín García, Isidro; Ortega Villasclaras, Pablo Rafael; Orpella García, Alberto; Alcubilla González, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    The emitter of silicon heterojunction solar cells consists of very thin hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers deposited at low temperature. The high sheet resistance of this type of emitter requires a transparent conductive oxide layer, which also acts as an effective antireflection coating. The deposition of this front electrode, typically by Sputtering, involves a relatively high energy ion bombardment at the surface that could degrade the emitter quality. The work function of the tra...

  13. Stressing effects on the charge trapping of silicon oxynitride prepared by thermal oxidation of LPCVD Si-rich silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H.Y.; Wong, H.; Filip, V.; Sen, B.; Kok, C.W.; Chan, M.; Poon, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently found that the silicon oxynitride prepared by oxidation of silicon-rich silicon nitride (SRN) has several important features. The high nitrogen and extremely low hydrogen content of this material allows it to have a high dielectric constant and a low trap density. The present work investigates in further detail the electrical reliability of this kind of gate dielectric films by studying the charge trapping and interface state generation induced by constant current stressing. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate that for oxidation temperatures of 850 and 950 deg. C, the interface trap generation is minimal because of the high nitrogen content at the interface. At a higher oxidation temperature of 1050 deg. C, a large flatband shift is found for constant current stressing. This observation can be explained by the significant reduction of the nitrogen content and the phase separation effect at this temperature as found by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study. In addition to the high nitrogen content, the Si atoms at the interface exist in the form of random bonding to oxygen and nitrogen atoms for samples oxidized at 850 and 950 deg. C. This structure reduces the interface bonding constraint and results in the low interface trap density. For heavily oxidized samples the trace amount of interface nitrogen atoms exist in the form of a highly constraint SiN 4 phase and the interface oxynitride layer is a random mixture of SiO 4 and SiN 4 phases, which consequently reduces the reliability against high energy electron stressing

  14. Nano-structured Ni(II)-curcumin modified glassy carbon electrode for electrocatalytic oxidation of fructose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, M. Yousef; Mousavi, M.F.; Ghasemi, S.

    2008-01-01

    A nano-structured Ni(II)-curcumin (curcumin: 1,7-bis[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) film is electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The morphology of polyNi(II)-curcumin (NC) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM results show NC has a nano-globular structure in the range 20-50 nm. Using cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, chronoamperometry, steady-state polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the nano-structure NC film acts as an efficient material for the electrocatalytic oxidation of fructose. According to the voltammetric studies, the increase in the anodic peak current and subsequent decrease in the corresponding cathodic current, fructose was oxidized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. The EIS results show that the charge-transfer resistance has as a function of fructose concentration, time interval and applied potential. The increase in the fructose concentration and time interval in fructose solution results in enhanced charge transfer resistance in Nyquist plots. The EIS results indicate that fructose electrooxidation at various potentials shows different impedance behaviors. At lower potentials, a semicircle is observed in the first quadrant of impedance plot. With further increase of the potential, a transition of the semicircle from the first to the second quadrant occurs. Also, the results obtained show that the rate of fructose electrooxidation depends on concentration of OH - . Electron transfer coefficient, diffusion coefficient and rate constant of the electrocatalytic oxidation reaction are obtained. The modified electrode was used as a sensor for determination of fructose with a good dynamic range and a low detection limit

  15. Interactive Physics and Characteristics of Photons and Photoelectrons in Hyperbranched Zinc Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torix, Garrett

    As is commonly known, the world is full of technological wonders, where a multitude of electronic devices and instruments continuously help push the boundaries of scientific knowledge and discovery. These new devices and instruments of science must be utilized at peak efficiency in order to benefit humanity with the most advanced scientific knowledge. In order to attain this level of efficiency, the materials which make up these electronics, or possibly more important, the fundamental characteristics of these materials, must be fully understood. The following research attempted to uncover the properties and characteristics of a selected family of materials. Herein, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterials were investigated and subjected to various, systematical tests, with the aim of discovering new and useful properties. The various nanostructures were grown on a quartz substrate, between a pair of gold electrodes, and subjected to an electrical bias which produced a measurable photocurrent under sufficient lighting conditions. This design formed a novel photodetector device, which, when combined with a simple solar cell and a methodical set of experimental trials, allowed several unique phenomena to be studied. Under various conditions, the device photocurrent as a function of applied voltage, as well as transmitted light, were measured and compared between devices of different ZnO morphologies. Zinc oxide is an absorber of ultraviolet (UV) light. UV absorbing materials and devices have uses in solar cells, long range communications, and astronomical observational equipment, hence, a better understanding of zinc oxide nanostructures and their properties can lead to more efficient utilization of UV light, improved solar cell technology, and a better understanding of the basic science in photon-to-electricity conversion.

  16. Impact of structure and morphology of nanostructured ceria coating on AISI 304 oxidation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aadhavan, R.; Suresh Babu, K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ceria coating reduced the oxidation kinetics of AISI304 by 3–4 orders. • Lower deposition rate (0.1 Å/s) resulted in dense and uniform coating. • Substrate temperature of 100 °C provided coating with smaller crystallite size. • Surface morphology of the coating has strong influence in oxidation protection. - Abstract: Nanostructured ceria-based coatings are shown to be protective against high-temperature oxidation of AISI 304 due to the dynamics of oxidation state and associated defects. However, the processing parameters of deposition have a strong influence in determining the structural and morphological aspects of ceria. The present work focuses on the effect of variation in substrate temperature (50–300 °C) and deposition rate (0.1–50 Å/s) of ceria in electron beam physical vapour evaporation method and correlates the changes in structure and morphology to high-temperature oxidation protection. Unlike deposition rate, substrate temperature exhibited a profound influence on crystallite size (7–18 nm) and oxygen vacancy concentration. Upon isothermal oxidation at 1243 K for 24 h, bare AISI 304 exhibited a linear mass gain with a rate constant of 3.0 ± 0.03 × 10"−"3 kg"2 m"−"4 s"−"1 while ceria coating lowered the kinetics by 3–4 orders. Though the thickness of the coating was kept constant at 2 μm, higher deposition rate offered one order lower protection due to the porous nature of the coating. Variation in the substrate temperature modulated the porosity as well as oxygen vacancy concentration and displayed the best protection for coatings deposited at moderate substrate temperature. The present work demonstrates the significance of selecting appropriate processing parameters to obtain the required morphology for efficient high-temperature oxidation protection.

  17. Impact of structure and morphology of nanostructured ceria coating on AISI 304 oxidation kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aadhavan, R.; Suresh Babu, K., E-mail: sureshbabu.nst@pondiuni.edu.in

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • Ceria coating reduced the oxidation kinetics of AISI304 by 3–4 orders. • Lower deposition rate (0.1 Å/s) resulted in dense and uniform coating. • Substrate temperature of 100 °C provided coating with smaller crystallite size. • Surface morphology of the coating has strong influence in oxidation protection. - Abstract: Nanostructured ceria-based coatings are shown to be protective against high-temperature oxidation of AISI 304 due to the dynamics of oxidation state and associated defects. However, the processing parameters of deposition have a strong influence in determining the structural and morphological aspects of ceria. The present work focuses on the effect of variation in substrate temperature (50–300 °C) and deposition rate (0.1–50 Å/s) of ceria in electron beam physical vapour evaporation method and correlates the changes in structure and morphology to high-temperature oxidation protection. Unlike deposition rate, substrate temperature exhibited a profound influence on crystallite size (7–18 nm) and oxygen vacancy concentration. Upon isothermal oxidation at 1243 K for 24 h, bare AISI 304 exhibited a linear mass gain with a rate constant of 3.0 ± 0.03 × 10{sup −3} kg{sup 2} m{sup −4} s{sup −1} while ceria coating lowered the kinetics by 3–4 orders. Though the thickness of the coating was kept constant at 2 μm, higher deposition rate offered one order lower protection due to the porous nature of the coating. Variation in the substrate temperature modulated the porosity as well as oxygen vacancy concentration and displayed the best protection for coatings deposited at moderate substrate temperature. The present work demonstrates the significance of selecting appropriate processing parameters to obtain the required morphology for efficient high-temperature oxidation protection.

  18. Enhanced electrochemical performance of sandwich-structured polyaniline-wrapped silicon oxide/carbon nanotubes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zou, Yongjin; Huang, Liyan; Yin, Hao; Xi, Chengqiao; Chen, Xin; Shentu, Hongwei; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jingjing; Lv, ChunJu; Fan, Meiqiang

    2018-06-01

    Sandwich-structured carbon nanotubes, silicon oxide, and polyaniline (hereafter denoted as CNTs/SiOx/PANI) were prepared by combining a sol-gel method, magnesiothermic reduction at 250 °C, and chemical oxidative polymerization. The CNTs, SiOx and PANI in the composite was 16 wt%, 51 wt% and 33 wt%, respectively. The CNTs/SiOx/PANI electrodes exhibited excellent cycle and high-rate performance as anodes in Li-ion batteries, including charge/discharge capacities of 1156/1178 mAh g-1 after 60 cycles at 0.2 A g-1 current density and 728/725 mAh g-1 at 8 A g-1 current density. The improvement was due to the synergy between CNTs and PANI. The SiOx scattered on the CNTs core and coated by PANI improved its conductivity and accommodated the volume change during repeated lithiation/delithiation cycles. This simple synthesis provided a scalable route for the large-scale production of CNTs/SiOx/PANI nanostructures, with various applications such as in Li-ion batteries.

  19. High aspect ratio silicon nanomoulds for UV embossing fabricated by directional thermal oxidation using an oxidation mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L Q; Chan-Park, Mary B; Yan, Y H; Zhang Qing; Li, C M; Zhang Jun

    2007-01-01

    Nanomoulding is simple and economical but moulds with nanoscale features are usually prohibitively expensive to fabricate because nanolithographic techniques are mostly serial and time-consuming for large-area patterning. This paper describes a novel, simple and inexpensive parallel technique for fabricating nanoscale pattern moulds by silicon etching followed by thermal oxidation. The mask pattern can be made by direct photolithography or photolithography followed by metal overetching for submicron- and nanoscale features, respectively. To successfully make nanoscale channels having a post-oxidation cross-sectional shape similar to that of the original channel, an oxidation mask to promote unidirectional (specifically horizontal) oxide growth is found to be essential. A silicon nitride or metal mask layer prevents vertical oxidation of the Si directly beneath it. Without this mask, rectangular channels become smaller but are V-shaped after oxidation. By controlling the silicon etch depth and oxidation time, moulds with high aspect ratio channels having widths ranging from 500 to 50 nm and smaller can be obtained. The nanomould, when passivated with a Teflon-like layer, can be used for first-generation replication using ultraviolet (UV) nanoembossing and second-generation replication in other materials, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS stamp, which was subsequently coated with Au, was used for transfer printing of Au electrodes with a 600 nm gap which will find applications in plastics nanoelectronics

  20. Designing high performance precursors for atomic layer deposition of silicon oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallikarjunan, Anupama, E-mail: mallika@airproducts.com; Chandra, Haripin; Xiao, Manchao; Lei, Xinjian; Pearlstein, Ronald M.; Bowen, Heather R.; O' Neill, Mark L. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 1969 Palomar Oaks Way, Carlsbad, California 92011 (United States); Derecskei-Kovacs, Agnes [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 7201 Hamilton Blvd., Allentown, Pennsylvania 18195 (United States); Han, Bing [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., 2 Dongsanhuan North Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100027 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Conformal and continuous silicon oxide films produced by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are enabling novel processing schemes and integrated device structures. The increasing drive toward lower temperature processing requires new precursors with even higher reactivity. The aminosilane family of precursors has advantages due to their reactive nature and relative ease of use. In this paper, the authors present the experimental results that reveal the uniqueness of the monoaminosilane structure [(R{sub 2}N)SiH{sub 3}] in providing ultralow temperature silicon oxide depositions. Disubstituted aminosilanes with primary amines such as in bis(t-butylamino)silane and with secondary amines such as in bis(diethylamino)silane were compared with a representative monoaminosilane: di-sec-butylaminosilane (DSBAS). DSBAS showed the highest growth per cycle in both thermal and plasma enhanced ALD. These findings show the importance of the arrangement of the precursor's organic groups in an ALD silicon oxide process.