WorldWideScience

Sample records for significant temperature drop

  1. Thermodynamic Temperatures of High-Temperature Fixed Points: Uncertainties Due to Temperature Drop and Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P.; Machin, G.; Bloembergen, P.; Lowe, D.; Whittam, A.

    2014-07-01

    This study forms part of the European Metrology Research Programme project implementing the New Kelvin to assign thermodynamic temperatures to a selected set of high-temperature fixed points (HTFPs), Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. A realistic thermal model of these HTFPs, developed in finite volume software ANSYS FLUENT, was constructed to quantify the uncertainty associated with the temperature drop across the back wall of the cell. In addition, the widely applied software package, STEEP3 was used to investigate the influence of cell emissivity. The temperature drop, , relates to the temperature difference due to the net loss of heat from the aperture of the cavity between the back wall of the cavity, viewed by the thermometer, defining the radiance temperature, and the solid-liquid interface of the alloy, defining the transition temperature of the HTFP. The actual value of can be used either as a correction (with associated uncertainty) to thermodynamic temperature evaluations of HTFPs, or as an uncertainty contribution to the overall estimated uncertainty. In addition, the effect of a range of furnace temperature profiles on the temperature drop was calculated and found to be negligible for Cu, Co-C, and Pt-C and small only for Re-C. The effective isothermal emissivity is calculated over the wavelength range from 450 nm to 850 nm for different assumed values of surface emissivity. Even when furnace temperature profiles are taken into account, the estimated emissivities change only slightly from the effective isothermal emissivity of the bare cell. These emissivity calculations are used to estimate the uncertainty in the temperature assignment due to the uncertainty in the emissivity of the blackbody.

  2. Effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on interfacial temperature during early stages of drop evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukatani, Yuki; Orejon, Daniel; Kita, Yutaku; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-04-01

    Understanding drop evaporation mechanisms is important for many industrial, biological, and other applications. Drops of organic solvents undergoing evaporation have been found to display distinct thermal patterns, which in turn depend on the physical properties of the liquid, the substrate, and ambient conditions. These patterns have been reported previously to be bulk patterns from the solid-liquid to the liquid-gas drop interface. In the present work the effect of ambient temperature and humidity during the first stage of evaporation, i.e., pinned contact line, is studied paying special attention to the thermal information retrieved at the liquid-gas interface through IR thermography. This is coupled with drop profile monitoring to experimentally investigate the effect of ambient temperature and relative humidity on the drop interfacial thermal patterns and the evaporation rate. Results indicate that self-generated thermal patterns are enhanced by an increase in ambient temperature and/or a decrease in humidity. The more active thermal patterns observed at high ambient temperatures are explained in light of a greater temperature difference generated between the apex and the edge of the drop due to greater evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the presence of water humidity in the atmosphere is found to decrease the temperature difference along the drop interface due to the heat of adsorption, absorption and/or that of condensation of water onto the ethanol drops. The control, i.e., enhancement or suppression, of these thermal patterns at the drop interface by means of ambient temperature and relative humidity is quantified and reported.

  3. Pressure-Drop Considerations in the Characterization of Dew-Point Transfer Standards at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, H.; Böse, N.; Benyon, R.; Vicente, T.

    2012-09-01

    During calibration of precision optical dew-point hygrometers (DPHs), it is usually necessary to take into account the pressure drop induced by the gas flow between the "point of reference" and the "point of use" (mirror or measuring head of the DPH) either as a correction of the reference dew-point temperature or as part of the uncertainty estimation. At dew-point temperatures in the range of ambient temperature and below, it is sufficient to determine the pressure drop for the required gas flow, and to keep the volumetric flow constant during the measurements. In this case, it is feasible to keep the dry-gas flow into the dew-point generator constant or to measure the flow downstream the DPH at ambient temperature. In normal operation, at least one DPH in addition to the monitoring DPH are used, and this operation has to be applied to each instrument. The situation is different at high dew-point temperatures up to 95 °C, the currently achievable upper limit reported in this paper. With increasing dew-point temperatures, the reference gas contains increasing amounts of water vapour and a constant dry-gas flow will lead to a significant enhanced volume flow at the conditions at the point of use, and therefore, to a significantly varying pressure drop depending on the applied dew-point temperature. At dew-point temperatures above ambient temperature, it is also necessary to heat the reference gas and the mirror head of the DPH sufficiently to avoid condensation which will additionally increase the volume flow and the pressure drop. In this paper, a method is provided to calculate the dry-gas flow rate needed to maintain a known wet-gas flow rate through a chilled mirror for a range of temperature and pressures.

  4. Temperature Effect on Power Drop of Different Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Talib Hahsim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solar module operating temperature is the second major factor affects the performance of solar photovoltaic panels after the amount of solar radiation. This paper presents a performance comparison of mono-crystalline Silicon (mc-Si, poly-crystalline Silicon (pc-Si, amorphous Silicon (a-Si and Cupper Indium Gallium di-selenide (CIGS photovoltaic technologies under Climate Conditions of Baghdad city. Temperature influence on the solar modules electric output parameters was investigated experimentally and their temperature coefficients was calculated. These temperature coefficients are important for all systems design and sizing. The experimental results revealed that the pc-Si module showed a decrease in open circuit voltage by -0.0912V/ºC while mc-Si and a-Si had nearly -0.07V/ºC and the CIGS has -0.0123V/ºC. The results showed a slightly increase in short circuit current with temperature increasing about 0.3mA/ºC ,4.4mA/ºC and 0.9mA/ºC for mc-Si , pc-Si and both a-Si and CIGS. The mc-Si had the largest drop in output power about -0.1353W/ºC while -0.0915, -0.0114 and -0.0276 W/ºC for pc-Si, a-Si and CIGS respectively. The amorphous silicon is the more suitable module for high operation temperature but it has the lowest conversion efficiency between the tested modules.

  5. Effect of flow rate and temperature on transmembrane blood pressure drop in an extracorporeal artificial lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M; Costa, E L V; Maciel, A T; Barbosa, E V S; Hirota, A S; Schettino, G de P; Azevedo, L C P

    2014-11-01

    Transmembrane pressure drop reflects the resistance of an artificial lung system to blood transit. Decreased resistance (low transmembrane pressure drop) enhances blood flow through the oxygenator, thereby, enhancing gas exchange efficiency. This study is part of a previous one where we observed the behaviour and the modulation of blood pressure drop during the passage of blood through artificial lung membranes. Before and after the induction of multi-organ dysfunction, the animals were instrumented and analysed for venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, using a pre-defined sequence of blood flows. Blood flow and revolutions per minute (RPM) of the centrifugal pump varied in a linear fashion. At a blood flow of 5.5 L/min, pre- and post-pump blood pressures reached -120 and 450 mmHg, respectively. Transmembrane pressures showed a significant spread, particularly at blood flows above 2 L/min; over the entire range of blood flow rates, there was a positive association of pressure drop with blood flow (0.005 mmHg/mL/minute of blood flow) and a negative association of pressure drop with temperature (-4.828 mmHg/(°Celsius). These associations were similar when blood flows of below and above 2000 mL/minute were examined. During its passage through the extracorporeal system, blood is exposed to pressure variations from -120 to 450 mmHg. At high blood flows (above 2 L/min), the drop in transmembrane pressure becomes unpredictable and highly variable. Over the entire range of blood flows investigated (0-5500 mL/min), the drop in transmembrane pressure was positively associated with blood flow and negatively associated with body temperature. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Applications of a high temperature sessile drop device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, B; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C [Vienna University of Technology, Insitute of Solid State Physics E-138, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Worbs, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Materialforschung, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernhard.schwarz@ifp.tuwien.ac.at

    2008-03-01

    The wettability of a liquid metal on a solid surface is of great technological interest for the industry (soldering, brazing, infiltration) as well as for fundamental research (diffusion, chemical reaction, intermetallic phases). The characterization of wetting is done by measuring the contact angle at the triple line of the liquid on the solid. A High Temperature Sessile Drop Device (HTSDD) was constructed and several applications were tested: (i) a wettability study of a copper-based brazing alloy (Cu-ABA) on TiN{sub x} coatings with different stoichiometries. The data derived from the HTSDD show that the reduction of the nitrogen content in the TiN coating reduces the time for reaching the final contact angle. Also for substoichiometric TiC a similar behaviour is predicted in literature. (ii) The liquid surface energy of molten metals can be estimated from the curvature of flattened droplets due to the influence of gravity. Two models were used for the calculation of the liquid surface energy of different liquid metals. (iii) From the droplet radius vs. time curves it is possible to distinguish between two different reactive wetting regimes - the diffusion and the reaction controlled reactive wetting. The beginning of this research topic will be discussed.

  7. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  8. Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of a high-temperature printed circuit heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Minghui; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Skavdahl, Isaac; Utgikar, Vivek; Sabharwall, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of a high-temperature printed circuit heat exchanger have been obtained. • Comparisons of experimental data and available correlations have been performed. • New Fanning friction factor and heat transfer correlations for the test PCHE are developed. - Abstract: Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) is one of the leading intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) candidates to be employed in the very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) due to its capability for high-temperature, high-pressure applications. In the current study, a reduced-scale zigzag-channel PCHE was fabricated using Alloy 617 plates for the heat exchanger core and Alloy 800H pipes for the headers. The pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of the PCHE were investigated experimentally in a high-temperature helium test facility (HTHF) at The Ohio State University. The PCHE helium inlet temperatures and pressures were varied up to 464 °C/2.7 MPa for the cold side and 802 °C/2.7 MPa for the hot side, respectively, while the maximum helium mass flow rates on both sides of the PCHE reached 39 kg/h. The corresponding maximum channel Reynolds number was approximately 3558, covering the laminar flow and laminar-to-turbulent flow transition regimes. New pressure drop and heat transfer correlations for the current zigzag channels with rounded bends were developed based on the experimental data. Comparisons between the experimental data and the results obtained from the available PCHE and straight circular pipe correlations were conducted. Compared to the heat transfer performance in straight circular pipes, the zigzag channels provided little advantage in the laminar flow regime but significant advantage near the transition flow regime.

  9. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K. [Hokkaido Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  10. Fragmentation of molten metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inukai, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Nishimura, S.; Kinoshita, I.

    2001-01-01

    The consequence of the core disruptive accidents in metallic-fueled Na-cooled reactors is strongly affected by the feedback reactivity originating in the boiling of Na and the dispersion of molten fuel due to fuel-coolant interactions. The design of the core configuration to promote the dispersion of molten fuel is therefore very important for social acceptance. It has been recognized in this context that metallic fuel has a potentiality to make liquefied fuel with fuel pin tube even in the temperature range below the boiling point of Na. If the liquefied fuel solidified without fuel-coolant interactions in the core region, this event leads the core condition to a pessimistic scenario of re-criticality. As a basic study related to this problem, the present experimental study investigates the possibility of fragmentation of metal drop with instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na (883 C). The molten Al drop, which has a melting point of 660 C above the operational temperature range of core, was selected as a simulant of liquefied fuel in the present study. Al particles of 5 g or 0.56 g were heated up to the initial temperature ranging from 850 C to 1113 C in a crucible by using an electric heater. The molten Al drop was dropped into a sodium pool adjusted the temperature from 280 C to 499 C. The Al drop at initial temperature sufficiently higher that the boiling point of Na was observed to fragment into pieces under the condition of instantaneous contact temperature below the boiling point of Na. It is confirmed that the fragmentation is caused due to the thermal interactions between the molten Al and the Na entrapped into the drop. (author)

  11. Polysaccharide peptide induces a tumor necrosis factor-α-dependent drop of body temperature in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejewski, Tomasz; Piotrowski, Jakub; Wrotek, Sylwia; Kozak, Wieslaw

    2014-08-01

    Polysaccharide peptide (PSP) extracted from the Coriolus versicolor mushroom is frequently suggested as an adjunct to the chemo- or radiotherapy in cancer patients. It improves quality of the patients' life by decreasing pain, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. However, the effect of PSP on body temperature has not thus far been studied, although it is well known that treatment with other polysaccharide adjuvants, such as lipopolysaccharides, may induce fever. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to investigate the influence of PSP on temperature regulation in rats. We report that intraperitoneal injection of PSP provoked a dose-dependent decrease of temperature in male Wistar rats equipped with biotelemetry devices to monitor deep body temperature (Tb). The response was rapid (i.e., with latency of 15-20min), transient (lasting up to 5h post-injection), and accompanied by a significant elevation of the blood tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level. Pretreatment of the rats with anti-TNF-α antibody prevented the PSP-induced drop in Tb. Based on these data, we conclude that rats may develop an anapyrexia-like response to the injection of peptidopolysaccharide rather than fever, and the response was TNF-α-dependent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feedback circuit application for multiple fluid temperature rise or drop; Visestruko dizanje i spustanje temperature fluida povratnom spregom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Tehnoloski fakultet Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Blagojevic, B [MaSinski fakultet, Nis (Yugoslavia); Stoiljkovic, S [Tehnoloski fakultet, Leskovac (Yugoslavia)

    1995-07-01

    Multiplication of temperature rise or drop is proposed and explained by Feedback method. Application of this method is proposed for different elementary processes of temperature variation (non isothermal processes). The paper points to possibilities of increasing performance of existing apparatuses and new ways for performing heating or cooling. (author)

  13. Feedback circuit application for multiple fluid temperature rise or drop; Visestruko dizanje i spustanje temperature fluida povratnom spregom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Tehnoloski fakultet Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Blagojevic, B [MaSinski fakultet, Nis (Yugoslavia); Stoiljkovic, S [Tehnoloski fakultet, Leskovac (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    Multiplication of temperature rise or drop is proposed and explained by Feedback method. Application of this method is proposed for different elementary processes of temperature variation (non isothermal processes). The paper points to possibilities of increasing performance of existing apparatuses and new ways for performing heating or cooling. (author.) 2 refs. 3 figs. 1 tabs.

  14. Anomalous interfacial tension temperature dependence of condensed phase drops in magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Aleksey S.

    2018-05-01

    Interfacial tension temperature dependence σ(T) of the condensed phase (drop-like aggregates) in magnetic fluids undergoing field induced phase transition of the "gas-liquid" type was studied experimentally. Numerical analysis of the experimental data has revealed the anomalous (if compared to ordinary one-component fluids) behavior of the σ(T) function for all tested magnetic colloid samples: the condensed phase drops at high T ≈ 75 C exhibit higher σ(T) than the drops condensed at low T ≈ 20 C. The σ(T) behavior is explained by the polydispersity of magnetic colloids: at high T, only the largest colloidal particles are able to take part in the field induced condensation; thus, the increase of T causes the growth of the average particle diameters inside the drop-like aggregates, what in its turn results in the growth of σ(T). The result is confirmed by qualitative theoretical estimations and qualitative experimental observation of the condensed phase "evaporation" process after the applied magnetic field is removed: the drops that are formed due to capillary instability of the drop-like aggregates retract by one order of magnitude faster at high T, and the evaporation of the drops slows down at high T.

  15. Mass transfer intensification of nanofluid single drops with effect of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saien, Javad; Zardoshti, Mahdi [Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The hydrodynamics and mass transfer of organic nanofluid single drops in liquid-liquid extraction process were investigated within temperature range of 20 to 40 .deg. C. Nanofluid drops of toluene+acetic acid, containing surface modified magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) with concentration within the range of (0.0005-0.005) wt%, were conducted in aqueous continuous phase. The rate of solute mass transfer was generally enhanced with NPs until about 0.002wt%, and small drops benefited more. The enhancement reached 184.1% with 0.002 wt% of NPs at 40 .deg. C; however, adding more NPs led to the mass transfer to either remain constant or face a reduction, depending on the applied temperature. The mass transfer coefficient was nicely reproduced using a developed correlation for enhancement factor of molecular diffusivity as a function of Reynolds and Schmidt numbers.

  16. Small-amplitude vibrations at a finite temperature in the liquid drop model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Providencia, J. da Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The ground state of a hot nucleus is studied in the classical limit. The equations of motion and boundary conditions of the liquid drop model are derived from the variational principle. The effect of the surface tension is taken into account. The temperature dependence of small-amplitude vibrations in the liquid drop model is investigated. It is shown that the breathing mode suffers a 6.3% decrease in energy when the temperature increases from 0 to 5 MeV. The present model allows for a description of surface modes with an A -1/2 dependence of the energy. It is also found that the surface modes will show an appreciable temperature dependence if a reasonable temperature dependence of the surface tension is postulated. It is shown that the model satisfies the energy-weighted sum rule and the inverse energy-weighted sum rule. (orig.)D

  17. Significance of personality disorders in the face of drop-outs from psychiatric hospitalizations. The case of selected psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biała, Maja; Kiejna, Andrzej

    2017-06-18

    The World Health Organization's estimations indicate that about 50% of patients in well-developed countries may not adhere to long-term therapies. In the field of psychiatry, drop-outs from psychiatric treatment are particularly important. Personality disorders are a significant part of this sphere. The aim of this research was to empirically verify the hypothesis regarding the relation between comorbid personality disorders and drop-outs from treatment among patients of psychiatric wards. This study was a prospective cohort study. 110 patients, hospitalized in 3 different psychiatric wards, were included. Personality disorders were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview For DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II). The research was financed by the Polish National Science Center (DEC-2011/01/N/NZ5/05364). The response rate was 89.1%. 72.56% of patients suffered from personality disorders (SCID-II) (among them the most prevalent were: personality disorder - not otherwise specified - 40.7% and borderline personality disorder - 12.38%; 22.95% of patients dropped out from treatment). However, occurrence of personality disorders was not relevant for those drop-outs. On the other hand, relationships at the level of certain criteria of borderline personality disorders and passive-aggressive personality have been revealed. These relationships became stronger when considered from the perspective of differences in the organization of treatment at individual wards. Some personality disorders may play an important role in drop-outs from psychiatric treatment. Presented results require further research.

  18. The Temperature of the Dimethylhydrazine Drops Moving in the Atmosphere after Depressurization of the Fuel Tank Rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulba Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work includes the results of the numerical modeling of temperature changes process of the dimethylhydrazine (DMH drops, taking into account the radial temperature gradient in the air after the depressurization of the fuel compartments rockets at high altitude. There is formulated a mathematical model describing the process of DMH drops thermal state modifying when it's moving to the Earth's surface. There is the evaluation of the influence of the characteristic size of heptyl drops on the temperature distribution. It's established that the temperatures of the small size droplets practically completely coincide with the distribution of temperature in the atmosphere at altitudes of up to 40 kilometers.

  19. A neutron spectrometer based on temperature variations in superheated drop compositions

    CERN Document Server

    Apfel, R E

    2002-01-01

    The response of superheated drop detectors (SDDs) to neutron radiation varies in a self-consistent manner with variations in temperature and pressure, making such compositions suitable for neutron spectrometry. The advantage of this approach is that the response functions of candidate materials versus energy as the temperature or pressure is varied are nested and have distinct thresholds, with no thermal neutron response. These characteristics permit unfolding without the uncertainties associated with other spectrometry techniques, where multiple solutions are possible, thus requiring an initial guess of the spectrum. A spectrometer was developed based on the well-established technology for acoustic sensing of bubble events interfaced with a proportional-integral-derivative temperature controller. The active monitor for neutrons, called REMbrandt sup T sup M , was used as the platform for controlling temperature on a SDD probe and for data acquisition, thereby automating the process of measuring the neutron e...

  20. Potential drop crack growth monitoring in high temperature biaxial fatigue tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, B.P.; Krempl, E.

    1993-01-01

    The present work describes a procedure for monitoring crack growth in high temperature, biaxial, low cycle fatigue tests. The reversing DC potential drop equipment monitors smooth, tubular type 304 stainless steel specimens during fatigue testing. Electrical interference from an induction heater is filtered out by an analog filter and by using a long integration time. A Fourier smoothing algorithm and two spline interpolations process the large data set. The experimentally determined electrical potential drop is compared with the theoretical electrostatic potential that is found by solving Laplace's equation for an elliptical crack in a semi-infinite conducting medium. Since agreement between theory and experiment is good, the method can be used to measure crack growth to failure from the threshold of detectability

  1. Pressure drop in packed beds of spherical particles at ambient and elevated air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Radojica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the experimental investigation of the particle friction factor for air flow through packed bed of particles at ambient and elevated temperatures. The experiments were performed by measuring the pressure drop across the packed bed, heated to the desired temperature by hot air. Glass spherical particles of seven different diameters were used. The temperature range of the air flowing through the packed bed was from 20ºC to 350ºC and the bed voidages were from 0.3574 to 0.4303. The obtained results were correlated using a number of available literature correlations. The overall best fit of all of the experimental data was obtained using Ergun [1] equation, with mean absolute deviation of 10.90%. Ergun`s equation gave somewhat better results in correlating the data at ambient temperature with mean absolute deviation of 9.77%, while correlation of the data at elevated temperatures gave mean absolute deviation of 12.38%. The vast majority of the correlations used gave better results when applied to ambient temperature data than to the data at elevated temperatures. Based on the results obtained, Ergun [1] equation is proposed for friction factor calculation both at ambient and at elevated temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON172022

  2. Faraday forcing of high-temperature levitated liquid metal drops for the measurement of surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Nevin; Ward, Kevin; Matsumoto, Satoshi; SanSoucie, Michael; Narayanan, Ranga

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a method for the measurement of surface tension using continuous periodic forcing is presented. To reduce gravitational effects, samples are electrostatically levitated prior to forcing. The method, called Faraday forcing, is particularly well suited for fluids that require high temperature measurements such as liquid metals where conventional surface tension measurement methods are not possible. It offers distinct advantages over the conventional pulse-decay analysis method when the sample viscosity is high or the levitation feedback control system is noisy. In the current method, levitated drops are continuously translated about a mean position at a small, constant forcing amplitude over a range of frequencies. At a particular frequency in this range, the drop suddenly enters a state of resonance, which is confirmed by large executions of prolate/oblate deformations about the mean spherical shape. The arrival at this resonant condition is a signature that the parametric forcing frequency is equal to the drop's natural frequency, the latter being a known function of surface tension. A description of the experimental procedure is presented. A proof of concept is given using pure Zr and a Ti 39.5 Zr 39.5 Ni 21 alloy as examples. The results compare favorably with accepted literature values obtained using the pulse-decay method.

  3. Non-Contact Temperature Requirements (NCTM) for drop and bubble physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    Many of the materials research experiments to be conducted in the Space Processing program require a non-contaminating method of manipulating and controlling weightless molten materials. In these experiments, the melt is positioned and formed within a container without physically contacting the container's wall. An acoustic method, which was developed by Professor Taylor G. Wang before coming to Vanderbilt University from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has demonstrated the capability of positioning and manipulating room temperature samples. This was accomplished in an earth-based laboratory with a zero-gravity environment of short duration. However, many important facets of high temperature containerless processing technology have not been established yet, nor can they be established from the room temperature studies, because the details of the interaction between an acoustic field an a molten sample are largely unknown. Drop dynamics, bubble dynamics, coalescence behavior of drops and bubbles, electromagnetic and acoustic levitation methods applied to molten metals, and thermal streaming are among the topics discussed.

  4. Predicting temperature drop rate of mass concrete during an initial cooling period using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Santosh; Zhou, Yihong; Zhao, Chunju; Zhou, Huawei

    2018-02-01

    Thermal cracking on concrete dams depends upon the rate at which the concrete is cooled (temperature drop rate per day) within an initial cooling period during the construction phase. Thus, in order to control the thermal cracking of such structure, temperature development due to heat of hydration of cement should be dropped at suitable rate. In this study, an attempt have been made to formulate the relation between cooling rate of mass concrete with passage of time (age of concrete) and water cooling parameters: flow rate and inlet temperature of cooling water. Data measured at summer season (April-August from 2009 to 2012) from recently constructed high concrete dam were used to derive a prediction model with the help of Genetic Programming (GP) software “Eureqa”. Coefficient of Determination (R) and Mean Square Error (MSE) were used to evaluate the performance of the model. The value of R and MSE is 0.8855 and 0.002961 respectively. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the relative impact on the target parameter due to input parameters. Further, testing the proposed model with an independent dataset those not included during analysis, results obtained from the proposed GP model are close enough to the real field data.

  5. SCEPTIC, Pressure Drop, Flow Rate, Heat Transfer, Temperature in Reactor Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattchee, N.; Reynolds, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: SCEPTIC is a program for calculating pressure drop, flow rates, heat transfer rates, and temperature in heat exchangers such as fuel elements of typical gas or liquid cooled nuclear reactors. The effects of turbulent and heat interchange between flow passages are considered. 2 - Method of solution: The computation procedure amounts to a nodal of lumped parameter type of calculation. The axial mesh size is automatically selected to assure that a prescribed accuracy of results is obtained. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maximum number of subchannels is 25, maximum number of heated surfaces is 46

  6. Drop Hammer Tests with Three Oleo Strut Models and Three Different Shock Strut Oils at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, M

    1954-01-01

    Drop hammer tests with different shock strut models and shock strut oils were performed at temperatures ranging to -40 C. The various shock strut models do not differ essentially regarding their springing and damping properties at low temperatures; however, the influence of the different shock strut oils on the springing properties at low temperatures varies greatly.

  7. Expression responses of five cold tolerant related genes to two temperature dropping treatments in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengze; Chang, Yaqing; Pang, Zhenguo; Ding, Jun; Ji, Nanjing

    2015-03-01

    Environmental conditions, including ambient temperature, play important roles in survival, growth development, and reproduction of the Japanese sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus. Low temperatures result in slowed growth and skin ulceration disease. In a previous study, we investigated the effect of low temperature on gene expression profiles in A. japonicus by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Genes encoding Ferritin, Lysozyme, Hsp70, gp96, and AjToll were selected from a subtracted cDNA library of A. japonicus under acute cold stress. The transcriptional expression profiles of these genes were investigated in different tissues (coelomocyte, respiratory tree, intestine, longitudinal muscle) after exposure to acute and mild temperature dropping treatments. The results show that (1) the five cold-tolerance-related genes were found in all four tissues and the highest mRNA levels were observed in coelomocyte and respiratory tree; (2) under the temperature dropping treatments, three types of transcriptional regulation patterns were observed: primary suppression followed by up-regulation at -2°C, suppressed expression throughout the two treatments, and more rarely an initial stimulation followed by suppression; and (3) gene expression suppression was more severe under acute temperature dropping than under mild temperature dropping treatment. The five cold-tolerance-related genes that were distributed mainly in coelomocyte and respiratory tissues were generally down-regulated by low temperature stress but an inverse up-regulation event was found at the extreme temperature (-2°C).

  8. High temperature drop calorimetric studies on La6UO12 and Nd6UO12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, R.; Senapati, A.; Rao, G.J.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Ananthasivan, K.; Nagarajan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Rare earth elements produced in the reactor during irradiation can interact with the fuel. Under transient conditions, compounds of formula, RE 6 UO 12 with rhombohedral crystal structure are expected to be formed. Hence, thermodynamic properties of these compounds are useful in interpreting the behaviour of fuels during irradiation. Thermal expansion and heat capacities by DSC have been reported for La 6 UO 12 and Nd 6 UO 12 . There are no experimentally measured values of enthalpy. Hence, measurements on enthalpy increments of La 6 UO 12 and Nd 6 UO 12 were carried out for the first time by inverse drop calorimetry in the temperature range 534-1738 K and computed the thermodynamic functions

  9. Peripheral temperature drop in response to anticipation and consumption of a signaled palatable reward in laying hens (Gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Randi Oppermann; Stubsjøen, Solveig Marie; Bohlin, Jon; Flø, Andreas; Bakken, Morten

    2012-06-25

    The present study describes effects of anticipation and consumption of a palatable reward on comb surface temperature. The purpose was to investigate temperature responses as a potential physiological indicator of positive emotional states in laying hens. A rise in body temperature in response to stimuli predictive of or during exposure to unpleasant events has been interpreted as evidence of emotions in mammals and avians. However, this phenomenon has so far only been studied during anticipation of or exposure to negative events; i.e., emotions of a negative valence. Infrared thermography was used to record potential alterations in comb surface temperature to a conditioned cue signaling a reward (mealworms) and during reward delivery. On average, comb temperature dropped 1.5 °C (95% CI: +/-1.2 °C) after exposure to CS and consumption of reward (p~0.0014) when initial comb temperature was above 30 °C. Such temperature drop indicates a peripheral vasoconstriction and has clear resemblances to emotional fever as seen during negative emotional states. Thus, we propose that a drop in peripheral temperature reflects emotional arousal more than emotional valence. Substantial temperature responses due to diet-induced thermogenesis were found, further emphasizing a cautious interpretation of altered comb temperature in studies of animal welfare. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  11. Ceramic Composite Intermediate Temperature Stress-Rupture Properties Improved Significantly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Hurst, Janet B.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) composites are considered to be potential materials for future aircraft engine parts such as combustor liners. It is envisioned that on the hot side (inner surface) of the combustor liner, composites will have to withstand temperatures in excess of 1200 C for thousands of hours in oxidizing environments. This is a severe condition; however, an equally severe, if not more detrimental, condition exists on the cold side (outer surface) of the combustor liner. Here, the temperatures are expected to be on the order of 800 to 1000 C under high tensile stress because of thermal gradients and attachment of the combustor liner to the engine frame (the hot side will be under compressive stress, a less severe stress-state for ceramics). Since these composites are not oxides, they oxidize. The worst form of oxidation for strength reduction occurs at these intermediate temperatures, where the boron nitride (BN) interphase oxidizes first, which causes the formation of a glass layer that strongly bonds the fibers to the matrix. When the fibers strongly bond to the matrix or to one another, the composite loses toughness and strength and becomes brittle. To increase the intermediate temperature stress-rupture properties, researchers must modify the BN interphase. With the support of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, significant improvements were made as state-of-the-art SiC/SiC composites were developed during the Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program. Three approaches were found to improve the intermediate-temperature stress-rupture properties: fiber-spreading, high-temperature silicon- (Si) doped boron nitride (BN), and outside-debonding BN.

  12. Significance and influence of the ambient temperature as a rate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    , undoubtedly is dependent even on the level of the ambient temperature. Therefore, the ambient temperature seems to be an important factor of the corrosion rate and the durability of the reinforced concrete structures in aggressive ...

  13. The Effect of Significant International Sports Events on Qualified Detoxification Treatment Outcome - Do Drop-Out Rates Change during UEFA European Championship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Sofin

    Full Text Available No previous studies have evaluated the influence of significant international sports events on qualified detoxification treatment outcome. This prospective study examines the impact of the 2012 UEFA European Football Championship on inpatient treatment outcome of alcohol dependent patients. Hospital admission and premature drop-out rates of consecutively admitted alcohol dependent patients were determined before, during and immediately after the UEFA Championship in the year 2012. The admission rate of male patients increased significantly after the European Football Championship had ended whereas for female patients, no change in admission rate was found. Daily average discharge rate was calculated. No statistically relevant differences between the treatment days before, during and after the UEFA Championship was found for the discharges. During the tournament, exclusively male patients dropped out. Our results are consistent with an interpretation of an association between European Football Championship and detoxification treatment outcome. Further research to replicate and extend our findings is necessary.

  14. APPLICATION OF SOFT COMPUTING TECHNIQUES FOR PREDICTING COOLING TIME REQUIRED DROPPING INITIAL TEMPERATURE OF MASS CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Bhattarai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Minimizing the thermal cracks in mass concrete at an early age can be achieved by removing the hydration heat as quickly as possible within initial cooling period before the next lift is placed. Recognizing the time needed to remove hydration heat within initial cooling period helps to take an effective and efficient decision on temperature control plan in advance. Thermal properties of concrete, water cooling parameters and construction parameter are the most influencing factors involved in the process and the relationship between these parameters are non-linear in a pattern, complicated and not understood well. Some attempts had been made to understand and formulate the relationship taking account of thermal properties of concrete and cooling water parameters. Thus, in this study, an effort have been made to formulate the relationship for the same taking account of thermal properties of concrete, water cooling parameters and construction parameter, with the help of two soft computing techniques namely: Genetic programming (GP software “Eureqa” and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. Relationships were developed from the data available from recently constructed high concrete double curvature arch dam. The value of R for the relationship between the predicted and real cooling time from GP and ANN model is 0.8822 and 0.9146 respectively. Relative impact on target parameter due to input parameters was evaluated through sensitivity analysis and the results reveal that, construction parameter influence the target parameter significantly. Furthermore, during the testing phase of proposed models with an independent set of data, the absolute and relative errors were significantly low, which indicates the prediction power of the employed soft computing techniques deemed satisfactory as compared to the measured data.

  15. Presence and significance of temperature gradients among different ovarian tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ronald Henry Fraser; Einer-Jensen, Niels; Greve, Torben

    2006-01-01

    also be involved. Temperature gradients would be maintained locally by counter-current heat exchange mechanisms and, in this context, the microvasculature and lymphatic flow of individual follicles were found to be appropriate. Observations on the temperature of preovulatory follicles appear relevant......, and cow, and generally fell in the range of 1.3-1.7 degrees C: follicles were always cooler than stroma. Measurements were made principally by means of a thermo-sensing camera at midventral laparotomy, but also using microelectrodes or thermistor probes sited in the follicular antrum of rabbits and pigs...

  16. Fouling deposition characteristic by variation of coal particle size and deposition temperature in DTF (Drop Tube Furnace)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Hueon; Jeon, Youngshin; Kim, Hyungtaek [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Energy Systems Research; Xu, Li-hua [IAE, Suwon (Korea, Republic of). Plant Engineering Center

    2013-07-01

    One of the major operation obstacles in gasification process is ash deposition phenomenon. In this investigation, experiment was carried out to examine coal fouling characteristics using a laminar DTF (Drop Tube Furnace) with variation of operating condition such as different coal size, and probe surface temperature. Four different samples of pulverized coal were injected into DTF under various conditions. The ash particles are deposited on probe by impacting and agglomerating action. Fouling grains are made of eutectic compound, which is made by reacting with acid minerals and alkali minerals, in EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analysis). And agglomeration area of fouling at top layer is wide more than it of middle and bottom layer. The major mineral factors of fouling phenomenon are Fe, Ca, and Mg. The deposition quantity of fouling increases with increasing particle size, high alkali mineral (Fe, Ca, and Mg) contents, and ash deposition temperature.

  17. Analysis of pressure drop accidents in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameoka, Toshiyuki

    1980-01-01

    Research and development are carried out on various problems in order to realize a multi-purpose, high temperature gas-cooled experimental reactor by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and others. In the experimental reactor in consideration at present, it is planned to flow helium at 1000 deg C and 40 atm. For the purpose, high temperature heat insulation structures are designed and developed, which insulate heat on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels and pipings. Consideration must be given to these internal heat insulation structures about the various characteristics in the working environmental temperature and pressure conditions, the measures for preventing the by-pass flow due to the formation of gaps and the abnormal leak of heat through the natural convection in the heat insulators and others. In this paper, the experimental results on the rapid pressure reduction characteristics of ceramic fiber heat insulation structures are reported. The ceramic fiber heat insulation structures have the features such as the application to uneven surfaces and penetration parts, the prevention of by-pass flow, and very low permeability. The problem is the restoring force after the high temperature compression. The experiment on rapid pressure reduction due to the accidental release of gas and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Penetration of gas into concrete during a leakage rate test of reactor containments and its significance for the drop in pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson L.-O.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the project described in the paper was to develop a simulation model that describes transient air pressure distribution in concrete in order to see if the leakage rates obtained from the Containment Integrated Leakage Rate Tests can be explained by the transient air pressurization of concrete pores inside the steel liner. A partial differential equation was derived which describes transient air pressure distribution in concrete pores. The model was validated against experimental results. The simulation model shows that there are significant air fluxes into the concrete structures that can explain the pressure drop during a leakage test.

  19. Standard test method for conducting drop-weight test to determine nil-ductility transition temperature of ferritic steels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the nil-ductility transition (NDT) temperature of ferritic steels, 5/8 in. (15.9 mm) and thicker. 1.2 This test method may be used whenever the inquiry, contract, order, or specification states that the steels are subject to fracture toughness requirements as determined by the drop-weight test. 1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Room-Temperature H2 Gas Sensing Characterization of Graphene-Doped Porous Silicon via a Facile Solution Dropping Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nu Si A. Eom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a graphene-doped porous silicon (G-doped/p-Si substrate for low ppm H2 gas detection by an inexpensive synthesis route was proposed as a potential noble graphene-based gas sensor material, and to understand the sensing mechanism. The G-doped/p-Si gas sensor was synthesized by a simple capillary force-assisted solution dropping method on p-Si substrates, whose porosity was generated through an electrochemical etching process. G-doped/p-Si was fabricated with various graphene concentrations and exploited as a H2 sensor that was operated at room temperature. The sensing mechanism of the sensor with/without graphene decoration on p-Si was proposed to elucidate the synergetic gas sensing effect that is generated from the interface between the graphene and p-type silicon.

  1. Detecting Significant Stress Drop Variations in Large Micro-Earthquake Datasets: A Comparison Between a Convergent Step-Over in the San Andreas Fault and the Ventura Thrust Fault System, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A key parameter in engineering seismology and earthquake physics is seismic stress drop, which describes the relative amount of high-frequency energy radiation at the source. To identify regions with potentially significant stress drop variations, we perform a comparative analysis of source parameters in the greater San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) and Ventura basin (VB) in southern California. The identification of physical stress drop variations is complicated by large data scatter as a result of attenuation, limited recording bandwidth and imprecise modeling assumptions. In light of the inherently high uncertainties in single stress drop measurements, we follow the strategy of stacking large numbers of source spectra thereby enhancing the resolution of our method. We analyze more than 6000 high-quality waveforms between 2000 and 2014, and compute seismic moments, corner frequencies and stress drops. Significant variations in stress drop estimates exist within the SGP area. Moreover, the SGP also exhibits systematically higher stress drops than VB and shows more scatter. We demonstrate that the higher scatter in SGP is not a generic artifact of our method but an expression of differences in underlying source processes. Our results suggest that higher differential stresses, which can be deduced from larger focal depth and more thrust faulting, may only be of secondary importance for stress drop variations. Instead, the general degree of stress field heterogeneity and strain localization may influence stress drops more strongly, so that more localized faulting and homogeneous stress fields favor lower stress drops. In addition, higher loading rates, for example, across the VB potentially result in stress drop reduction whereas slow loading rates on local fault segments within the SGP region result in anomalously high stress drop estimates. Our results show that crustal and fault properties systematically influence earthquake stress drops of small and large events and should

  2. Preservation of Biological Activity of Plasma and Platelet-Derived Eye Drops After Their Different Time and Temperature Conditions of Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; de la Fuente, María; Riestra, Ana; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Muruzábal, Francisco; Orive, Gorka

    2015-09-01

    To analyze whether plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) eye drops preserve their biological characteristics and activity after storage for 3 and 6 months at -20°C, at 4°C, and at room temperature for 72 hours, compared with fresh samples (t0). Blood from 6 healthy donors was harvested and centrifuged to obtain PRGF free of leukocytes. Resulting PRGF eye drops were stored for 3 and 6 months at -20°C. At each time, 2 aliquots were maintained at room temperature or at 4°C for 72 hours. Platelet-derived growth factor-AB, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, angiopoietin-1, and thrombospondin-1 were quantified at each time and temperature of storage. Also, the effect of PRGF eye drops on proliferation of primary human keratocytes was evaluated. All the analyzed growth factor levels remained constant at each time and storage condition. No differences were observed in the proliferative activity of keratocytes after treatment with PRGF eye drops at any studied time or temperature. Finally, there was no microbial contamination in any of the PRGF eye drops. The preservation of the PRGF eye drops at -20°C for up to 3 and 6 months does not mean reduction of the main growth factors and proteins implicated in ocular surface wound healing. Eye drop characteristics and in vitro biological activity were not affected by their usage and conservation for 72 hours at 4°C or at room temperature.

  3. Excess mortality among patients with multiple sclerosis in Denmark has dropped significantly over the past six decades: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Laursen, Bjarne; Stenager, Egon; Magyari, Melinda

    2017-08-01

    Lifetime expectancy in multiple sclerosis (MS) is reduced. Few studies have had sufficient follow-up or sufficient number of patients to assess if survival has improved with time. However, a recent meta-analysis found no time-dependent change in MS excess mortality across studies over recent decades. To investigate whether short-term all-cause excess mortality in patients with MS in the total Danish population has changed over the last six decades. We included all patients with MS recorded in the nationwide Danish MS Registry with definite or probable MS and onset from 1950 through 1999. The Danish Civil Registration System provided date of death for all deceased patients with follow-up in 2015, and Statistics Denmark supplied specific population mortality. We calculated excess number of death per 1000 person-years (EDR) and standardised mortality ratio (SMR). We included 18 847 patients among whom 6102 had died as opposed to 2492 expected deaths. EDR was 10.63 (95% CI 10.19 to 11.09) and a SMR was 2.45 (95% CI 2.39 to 2.51). The 15-year EDR dropped gradually from 11.29 (95% CI 9.95 to 12.73) in the 1950-1959 onset cohort to 2.56 (95% CI 1.98 to 3.18) in the 1990-1999 onset cohort, and SMR dropped from 4.48 (95% CI 4.06 to 4.92) to 1.80 (95% CI 1.62 to 1.99). The decline in short-term excess mortality in MS started decades before disease-modifying treatment of MS became available, before use of MRI became widespread, and before the McDonald diagnostic criteria were introduced. A change in the MS cohorts with fewer malignant cases may be a significant contributor. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. A direct current potential drop method for evaluating oxide film thickness formed in high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Ishibashi, Ryo; Saka, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    To establish an evaluation technique for oxide film thickness in-situ, the applicability of a four-point-probe direct current potential drop method is discussed in this study. Several samples of JIS SUS316L stainless steel with different oxide film thickness were prepared after immersing them in oxygenated pure water at 288°C for different periods. The oxide film thickness was measured by cross sectional observation using a transmission electron microscope. Potential drop on the oxide surface was measured every second during an acquisition period of about 20 s while a constant current was being injected into the sample simultaneously. This kind of measurement was repeatedly carried out at several arbitrary contact positions on the surface of the same sample. The measurement results showed that the potential drop slightly changed during the acquisition period and the tendency varied at the different contact positions. Multiple measurements at different contact positions revealed that the tendency could be categorized into two general types: the decreasing potential drop and the increasing potential drop, defined by the overall trend of the potential drop during the acquisition time. It was found that the ratio of contact positions with a decreasing potential drop tendency to all the contact positions of measurement tended to increase as applied current increased. This tendency depended on the oxide film thickness. The threshold value of applied current was found to correlate well with the oxide film thickness when the occurrence rate of decreasing potential drop ranged from 70 to 90% showing the best correlation at 70%. (author)

  5. Measurement of Bitumen Viscosity in a Room-Temperature Drop Experiment: Student Education, Public Outreach and Modern Science in One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdicombe, A. T.; Ravindrarajah, P.; Sapelkin, A.; Phillips, A. E.; Dunstan, D.; Dove, M. T.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-01-01

    The slow flow of a viscous liquid is a thought-provoking experiment that challenges students, academics and the public to think about some fundamental questions in modern science. In the Queensland demonstration--the world's longest-running experiment, which has earned the Ig Nobel prize--one drop of pitch takes about ten years to fall, leading to…

  6. Access to warm drinking water prevents rumen temperature drop without affecting in situ NDF disappearance in grazing winter range cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingestion of large quantities of cold water or frozen forage may result in changes in temperature of ruminal contents. Rumen microorganisms may be sensitive to temperature changes in the ruminal environment. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the variability in ruminal temperature and e...

  7. Drop trampoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelot, Pierre; Coux, Martin; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2017-11-01

    Superhydrophobic substrates inspired from the lotus leaf have the ability to reflect impacting water drops. They do so very efficiently and contact lasts typically 10 ms for millimetric droplets. Yet unlike a lotus leaf most synthetic substrates are rigid. Focusing on the interplay between substrate flexibility and liquid repellency might allow us to understand the dynamic properties of natural surfaces. We perform liquid marbles impacts at velocity V onto thin ( 0.01 mm) stretched circular PDMS membranes. We obtain contact time reductions of up to 70%. The bouncing mechanism is drastically modified compared to that on a rigid substrate: the marble leaves the substrate while it is still spread in a disk shape as it is kicked upwards by the membrane. We show that the bouncing is controlled by an interplay between the dynamics of the drop and the membrane.

  8. The significance level and repeatability for isotope-temperature coefficient of precipitation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongsheng; Wang Jinglan

    2003-01-01

    The good linear relationship with significance level α = 0.01 exists between isotope in precipitation and surface air temperature with multi-year average in 32 stations of China, and the yearly δD-temperature coefficient = 3.1‰/1℃ and the yearly δ 18 O-temperature coefficient = 0.36‰/1℃, and its determination coefficient R 2 = 0.67 and 0.64 respectively. So the isotope-temperature coefficient with yearly average can serve as the temperature yearly measure. But the monthly average isotope-temperature coefficient in each station is variable according to both of space and time, and its repeatability is determined by the meteorological regimes. According to the monthly isotope-temperature coefficient (B) and the coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and its α, all of China can be zoned the following three belts: (1) In the North Belt, B>O, R 2 ≈ 0.3-0.65, α = 0.01, the relation between monthly isotope in precipitation and surface air temperature (RMIT) belongs to a direct correlation and is closer in 99% probability; (2) In the South Belt, Btemperature coefficient with both of yearly average and monthly average and its statistical attribution is site-specific, it may be used to reconstruct past surface air temperatures or to diagnose regional climate models. (authors)

  9. Electricity generation by nuclear fission reactor and closed cycle gas turbines, with core automatically shut down by coolant flow failure and dropped out of plant for sealing if temperature is excessive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reactor system is described in which if there is a failure of coolant flow the core automatically drops down to its control rods, so that criticality is reduced, but if the temperature of the core still stays dangerously high the core is allowed to drop down a deep shaft. Concrete blocks automatically come together after the ejected reactor core has moved past them to prevent the escape of radiation or radioactive material, until such time that the core temperature has dropped to a level that it can, with safety, be returned to its normal position in the plant. (U.K.)

  10. Prognostic significance of clinical seizures after cardiac arrest and target temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Anna; Friberg, Hans; Aneman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Clinical seizures are common after cardiac arrest and predictive of a poor neurological outcome. Seizures may be myoclonic, tonic-clonic or a combination of seizure types. This study reports the incidence and prognostic significance of clinical seizures in the target temperature management (...

  11. Analysis of Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop for a Gas Flowing Through a set of Multiple Parallel Flat Plates at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Thomas H.

    1961-01-01

    Equations were derived representing heat transfer and pressure drop for a gas flowing in the passages of a heater composed of a series of parallel flat plates. The plates generated heat which was transferred to the flowing gas by convection. The relatively high temperature level of this system necessitated the consideration of heat transfer between the plates by radiation. The equations were solved on an IBM 704 computer, and results were obtained for hydrogen as the working fluid for a series of cases with a gas inlet temperature of 200 R, an exit temperature of 5000 0 R, and exit Mach numbers ranging from 0.2 to O.8. The length of the heater composed of the plates ranged from 2 to 4 feet, and the spacing between the plates was varied from 0.003 to 0.01 foot. Most of the results were for a five- plate heater, but results are also given for nine plates to show the effect of increasing the number of plates. The heat generation was assumed to be identical for each plate but was varied along the length of the plates. The axial variation of power used to obtain the results presented is the so-called "2/3-cosine variation." The boundaries surrounding the set of plates, and parallel to it, were assumed adiabatic, so that all the power generated in the plates went into heating the gas. The results are presented in plots of maximum plate and maximum adiabatic wall temperatures as functions of parameters proportional to f(L/D), for the case of both laminar and turbulent flow. Here f is the Fanning friction factor and (L/D) is the length to equivalent diameter ratio of the passages in the heater. The pressure drop through the heater is presented as a function of these same parameters, the exit Mach number, and the pressure at the exit of the heater.

  12. Dropped Ceiling

    OpenAIRE

    Tabet, Rayyane

    2012-01-01

    On December 2nd 1950 the first drop of Saudi oil arrived to Lebanon via the newly constructed Trans-Arabian Pipeline, the world's longest pipeline and the largest American private investment in a foreign land. The 30inch wide structure which spanned 1213 kilometers passing through Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Syria to end in Lebanon had required 3 years of planning and surveying, 2 years of installation, the fabrication of 256,000 tons of steel tubes, the employment of 30,000 workers, the ratifi...

  13. The Significance of Acid Alteration in the Los Humeros High-Temperature Geothermal Field, Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Izquierdo, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Los Humeros geothermal field is a high-enthalpy hydrothermal system with more than 40 drilled deep wells, mostly producing high steam fractions at > 300oC. However, although it has a large resource potential, low permeability and corrosive acid fluids have hampered development so that it currently has an installed electrical generating capacity of only 40 MWe. The widespread production of low pH fluids from the reservoir is inconsistent with the marked absence in the reservoir rocks of hydrothermal minerals typical of acid alteration. Instead the hydrothermal alteration observed is typical of that due to neutral to alkaline pH waters reacting with the volcanic rocks of the production zones. Thus it appears that since the reservoir has recently suffered a marked drop in fluid pressure and is in process of transitioning from being water-dominated to being vapor-dominated. However sparse examples of acid leaching are observed locally at depths of about 2 km in the form of bleached, intensely silicified zones, in low permeability and very hot (>350oC) parts of reservoir. Although these leached rocks retain their primary volcanic and pyroclastic textures, they are altered almost entirely to microcrystalline quartz, with some relict pseudomorphs of plagioclase phenocrysts and traces of earlier-formed hydrothermal chlorite and pyrite. These acid-altered zones are usually only some tens of meters thick and deeper rocks lack such silicification. The acid fluids responsible for their formation could either be magmatic volatiles, or could be formed during production (e.g. reaction of water and salts forming hydrogen chloride by hydrolysis at high temperatures). The very high boron content of the fluids produced by the Los Humeros wells suggests that their ultimate source is most likely magmatic gases. However, these acid gases did not react widely with the rocks. We suggest that the silicified zones are forming locally where colder descending waters are encountering

  14. THE DAMAGING EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL: CHRONIC AND PATTERN ALCOHOL USE EXPLAIN WHY SEXUAL ASSAULT FIGURES HAVE NOT SIGNIFICANTLY DROPPED IN THE UNITED STATES MILITARY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    could be diagnosed with an antisocial personality disorder or another personality disorder cluster, but the cause of the behaviors is white matter...were significantly associated with alcohol use disorders , with antisocial personality disorder being the most severe presentation”.45 If an...done determines the different issues and deficits in behavior. The association between alcoholism and Antisocial Personality Disorder has been known

  15. Warm weather brings about significant drop in CO{sub 2} emissions in Germany in 2014. Sign of a new trend?; Dank warmer Witterung starker Rueckgang der CO{sub 2}-Emissionen in Deutschland im Jahr 2014. Ist das schon die Wende?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziesing, Hans-Joachim

    2015-05-15

    In 2014 total CO{sub 2} emissions in Germany showed their first ever significant drop. In absolute terms they were as much as 5% lower than in the previous year, while corrected for temperature the decrease was still around 2%. Total greenhouse gas emissions are estimated to have decreased by 4.6% in absolute terms and by 1.7% when corrected for temperature. Judged on the basis of the temperature corrected values the results for 2014 do not yet signify a return to the target course running up to the year 2020 however. To this end greenhouse gas emissions would have had to decrease by at least around 3% in 2014. The need for political action to the protect our climate thus remains urgent.

  16. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 1: temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2018-04-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as "field" or "global" significance. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Monthly temperature climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. In winter and in most regions in summer, the downscaled distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones. A systematic cold summer bias occurs in deep river valleys due to overestimated elevations, in coastal areas due probably to enhanced sea breeze circulation, and over large lakes due to the interpolation of water temperatures. Urban areas in concave topography forms have a warm summer bias due to the strong heat islands, not reflected in the observations. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate fine-scale features in the monthly temperature field over regions of complex topography, but over spatially homogeneous areas even small biases can lead to significant deteriorations relative to the driving reanalysis. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the

  17. The evaporation of the charged and uncharged water drops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Drop evaporation; ventilation coefficient; evaporation-effect of electrical forces. ... to study the effect of ventilation on the rate of evaporation of the millimeter sized ... a ventilated drop to reach its equilibrium temperature increases with the drop ...

  18. A selective and sensitive optical sensor for dissolved ammonia detection via agglomeration of fluorescent Ag nanoclusters and temperature gradient headspace single drop microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Gao, Zhong Feng; Zhang, Ying; Li, Bang Lin; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2017-05-15

    In this paper, a simple sensor platform is presented for highly selective and sensitive detection of dissolved ammonia in aqueous solutions without pretreatment based on temperature gradient headspace single drop microextraction (HS-SDME) technique, and fluorescence and UV-vis spectrophotometry are utilized with the Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) functioned by citrate and glutathione as the probe. The sensing mechanism is based on the volatility of ammonia gas and the active response of Ag NCs to pH change caused by the introduction of ammonia. High pH can make the Ag NCs agglomerate and lead to the obvious decrease of fluorescence intensity and absorbance of Ag NCs solution. Moreover, the presented method exhibits a remarkably high selectivity toward dissolved ammonia over most of inorganic ions and amino acid, and shows a good linear range of 10-350μM (0.14-4.9mgNL -1 ) with a low detection limit of 336nM (4.70μgNL -1 ) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. In addition, the practical applications of the sensor have been successfully demonstrated by detecting dissolved ammonia in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Constrained parameterisation of photosynthetic capacity causes significant increase of modelled tropical vegetation surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattge, J.; Knorr, W.; Raddatz, T.; Wirth, C.

    2009-04-01

    Photosynthetic capacity is one of the most sensitive parameters of terrestrial biosphere models whose representation in global scale simulations has been severely hampered by a lack of systematic analyses using a sufficiently broad database. Due to its coupling to stomatal conductance changes in the parameterisation of photosynthetic capacity may potentially influence transpiration rates and vegetation surface temperature. Here, we provide a constrained parameterisation of photosynthetic capacity for different plant functional types in the context of the photosynthesis model proposed by Farquhar et al. (1980), based on a comprehensive compilation of leaf photosynthesis rates and leaf nitrogen content. Mean values of photosynthetic capacity were implemented into the coupled climate-vegetation model ECHAM5/JSBACH and modelled gross primary production (GPP) is compared to a compilation of independent observations on stand scale. Compared to the current standard parameterisation the root-mean-squared difference between modelled and observed GPP is substantially reduced for almost all PFTs by the new parameterisation of photosynthetic capacity. We find a systematic depression of NUE (photosynthetic capacity divided by leaf nitrogen content) on certain tropical soils that are known to be deficient in phosphorus. Photosynthetic capacity of tropical trees derived by this study is substantially lower than standard estimates currently used in terrestrial biosphere models. This causes a decrease of modelled GPP while it significantly increases modelled tropical vegetation surface temperatures, up to 0.8°C. These results emphasise the importance of a constrained parameterisation of photosynthetic capacity not only for the carbon cycle, but also for the climate system.

  20. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  1. On exergy analysis of industrial plants and significance of ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rian, Berit

    2011-07-01

    The exergy analysis has been a relatively mature theory for more than 30 years. However, it is not that developed in terms of procedures for optimizing systems, which partly explains why it is not that common. Misconceptions and prejudices, even among scientists, are also partly to blame.The main objective of this work was to contribute to the development of an understanding and methodology of the exergy analysis. The thesis was mainly based on three papers, two of which provided very different examples from existing industrial systems in Norway, thus showing the societal perspective in terms of resource utilization and thermodynamics. The last paper and the following investigation were limited to certain aspects of ambient conditions. Two Norwegian operational plants have been studied, one operative for close to 30 years (Kaarstoe steam production and distribution system), while the other has just started its expected 30 years of production (Snoehvit LNG plant). In addition to mapping the current operational status of these plants, the study of the Kaarstoe steam production and distribution system concluded that the potential for increasing the thermodynamic performance by rather cautious actions was significant, whereas the study of the Snoehvit LNG plant showed the considerable profit which the Arctic location provided in terms of reduced fuel consumption. The significance of the ambient temperature led to the study of systems with two ambient bodies (i.e. ambient water and ambient air) of different temperatures, here three different systems were investigated: A regenerative steam injection gas turbine (RSTIG), a simple Linde air liquefaction plant (Air Liq) and an air-source heat pump water heater (HPWH). In particular, the effect of the chosen environment on exergy analysis was negligible for RSTIG, modest for Air Liq and critical for HPWH. It was found that the amount of exergy received from the alternative ambient body, compared to the main exergy flow of

  2. Significant room-temperature ferromagnetism in porous ZnO films: The role of oxygen vacancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xue; Liu, Huiyuan [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Films of Hebei Province, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Sun, Huiyuan, E-mail: huiyuansun@126.com [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Films of Hebei Province, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Liu, Lihu; Jia, Xiaoxuan [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Films of Hebei Province, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous ZnO films were deposited on porous anodic alumina substrates. • Significant ferromagnetism (FM) has been observed in porous ZnO films (110 emu/cm{sup 3}). • The strong magnetic anisotropy was observed in the porous ZnO films. • The origin of FM is attributed to the oxygen vacancy with a local magnetic moment. - Abstract: Pure porous ZnO films were prepared by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering on porous anodic alumina substrates. Remarkably large room-temperature ferromagnetism was observed in the films. The highest saturation moment along the out-of-plane direction was about 110 emu/cm{sup 3}. Experimental and theoretical results suggested that the oxygen vacancies and the unique porous structure of the films are responsible for the large ferromagnetism. There are two modes of coupling between oxygen vacancies in the porous ZnO films: (i) exchange interactions directly between the oxygen vacancies and (ii) with the mediation of conduction electrons. In addition, it was found that the magnetic moment of ZnO films can be changed by tuning the concentration of oxygen vacancies. These observations may be useful in the development of ZnO-based spintronics devices.

  3. A new method to detect significant basal body temperature changes during a woman's menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundl, Günter; Frank-Herrmann, Petra; Brown, Simon; Blackwell, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    To compare the results of a computer programme based on the Trigg's tracking system (TTS) identification of the basal body temperature (BBT) shift day from daily records of BBT values (TTS transition day), with the BBT shift day identified from the same records using the Sensiplan(®) symptothermal method of natural family planning. A computer programme was written to display the daily BBT readings for 364 menstrual cycles from 51 women aged 24 to 35 years, obtained from the German Natural Family Planning (NFP) database. The TTS transition day so identified from each record was then compared with the BBT shift day estimated from the same record by the Sensiplan(®) method. Total agreement between the methods was obtained for 81% (294/364) of the cycles and 18% (67) cycles differed by ± 1 day. For the 364 pairs of values distributed among 51 women the medians of the differences between the TTS transition day and Sensiplan(®) initial day of the BBT rise (shift day) were not significantly different (χ(2) = 65.28, df = 50, p = 0.07205). The advantages of the tracking signal algorithm are that in many cases it was possible to identify the BBT shift day on that very day - rather than only some days later - and to estimate the probability that a transition had occurred from the different values of the tracking signal.

  4. Neutron-gamma discrimination by pulse analysis with superheated drop detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Mala; Seth, S.; Saha, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharjee, P.

    2010-01-01

    Superheated drop detector (SDD) consisting of drops of superheated liquid of halocarbon is irradiated to neutrons and gamma-rays from 252 Cf fission neutron source and 137 Cs gamma source, respectively, separately. Analysis of pulse height of signals at the neutron and gamma-ray sensitive temperature provides significant information on the identification of neutron and gamma-ray induced events.

  5. The dynamics of Leidenfrost drops

    OpenAIRE

    van Limbeek, Michiel Antonius Jacobus

    2017-01-01

    Temperature control is omnipresent in today’s life: from keeping your fridge cold, maintaining a room at a pleasant temperature or preventing your computer from overheating. Efficient ways of heat transfer are often based on phase change, making use of the high latent heat of evaporation. In the context of spray cooling, liquid drops are impacting a hot plate to ensure a rapid cooling. At some temperature however, no contact occurs between the liquid and the plate, and the heat transfer rate ...

  6. Significant modulation of the hepatic proteome induced by exposure to low temperature in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Nagasawa

    2013-08-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is an ectothermic vertebrate that can survive at low environmental temperatures. To gain insight into the molecular events induced by low body temperature, liver proteins were evaluated at the standard laboratory rearing temperature (22°C, control and a low environmental temperature (5°C, cold exposure. Using nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 58 proteins that differed in abundance. A subsequent Gene Ontology analysis revealed that the tyrosine and phenylalanine catabolic processes were modulated by cold exposure, which resulted in decreases in hepatic tyrosine and phenylalanine, respectively. Similarly, levels of pyruvate kinase and enolase, which are involved in glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, were also decreased, whereas levels of glycogen phosphorylase, which participates in glycogenolysis, were increased. Therefore, we measured metabolites in the respective pathways and found that levels of hepatic glycogen and glucose were decreased. Although the liver was under oxidative stress because of iron accumulation caused by hepatic erythrocyte destruction, the hepatic NADPH/NADP ratio was not changed. Thus, glycogen is probably utilized mainly for NADPH supply rather than for energy or glucose production. In conclusion, X. laevis responds to low body temperature by modulating its hepatic proteome, which results in altered carbohydrate metabolism.

  7. Relative frequencies and significance of faecal coliforms as indicators related to water temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auban, E G; Ripolles, A A; Domarco, M J

    1983-01-01

    The faecal coliforms at different sites of a hypereutrophic lake near Valencia (Albufera) were identified and their relative amounts established along an annual cycle. Using lauryl tryptose broth at 35 degrees C, followed by incubation at 44.4 degrees C in 2% brilliant green bile, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are practically the only coliforms present. A positive correlation was found between the water temperature and the relative amount of these two coliforms: K. pneumoniae predominates at high water temperatures, whereas E. coli shows preponderance during the cold period. The role of K. pneumoniae as the only faecal indicator under the circumstances described in the work is emphasized and discussed.

  8. Thermocapillary reorientation of Janus drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rodolfo; Saenz, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    Janus drops, named after the Ancient Roman two-faced god, are liquid drops formed from two immiscible fluids. Experimental observations indicate that a Janus drop may re-orientate in response to an applied external thermal gradient due to the Marangoni effect. Depending on the angle between the interior interface and the direction of the temperature gradient, disparities in the physical properties of the constituent liquids may lead to asymmetries in the thermocapillary flow. As a result, the drop will move along a curved path until a torque-free configuration is achieved, point after which it will continue on a straight trajectory. Here, we present the results of a theoretical investigation of this realignment phenomenon in the Stokes regime and in the limit of non-deformable interfaces. A 3D semi-analytical method in terms of polar spherical harmonics is developed to characterize and rationalize the hydrodynamic response (forces and torques), flow (velocity and temperature distribution) and trajectory of a Janus drop moving during the temperature-driven reorientation process. Furthermore, we discuss how this phenomenon may be exploited to develop dynamically reconfigurable micro-lenses. This work was partially supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants DMS-1614043 and DMS-1719637.

  9. The significance of temperature dependence on the piezoelectric energy harvesting by using a phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Nagaty, Ahmed; Khalifa, Zaki; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2018-05-01

    In this study, an acoustic energy harvester based on a two-dimensional phononic crystal has been constructed. The present structure consists of silicon cylinders in the air background with a polyvinylidene fluoride cylinder as a defect to confine the acoustic energy. The presented energy harvester depends on the piezoelectric effect (using the piezoelectric material polyvinylidene fluoride) that converts the confined acoustic energy to electric energy. The maximum output voltage obtained equals 170 mV. Moreover, the results revealed that the output voltage can be increased with increasing temperature. In addition, the effects of the load resistance and the geometry of the piezoelectric material on the output voltage have been studied theoretically. Based on these results, all previous studies about energy harvesting in phononic structures must take temperature effects into account.

  10. Significant enhancement of room temperature ferromagnetism in surfactant coated polycrystalline Mn doped ZnO particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, O.D. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gopalakrishnan, I.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: ikgopal@barc.gov.in; Sudakar, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Kadam, R.M. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kulshreshtha, S.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2007-07-12

    We report a surfactant assisted synthesis of Mn doped ZnO polycrystalline samples showing robust room temperature ferromagnetism as characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance and DC magnetization measurements. This surfactant assisted synthesis method, developed by us, is found to be highly reproducible. Further, it can also be extended to the synthesis of other transition metal doped ZnO.

  11. Seed Hydropriming and Smoke Water Significantly Improve Low-Temperature Germination of Lupinus angustifolius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Płażek

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Seed imbibition under cold temperature is dangerous when dry seeds have relatively low water content. The aim of this study was to investigate germination of 20 lines/cultivars of narrow-leaf lupine at 7 °C (cold and 13 °C (control under the influence of smoke water and following seed hydropriming for 3 h at 20 °C. The efficacy of individual treatments was examined with regard to seed protection during low-temperature germination. Based on seed germination, vigour at cold was evaluated four days after sowing by means of hypocotyl length, the studied lines/cultivars were divided into three groups with low, high and very high germination rates. Germination vigour correlated with cell membrane permeability, dehydrogenase activity and abscisic acid (ABA content and was analysed in the seeds one day after sowing. Gibberellin content did not correlate with germination vigour. The seeds of weakly germinating lines/cultivars had the highest cell permeability and ABA content as well as the lowest amylolytic activity at both studied temperatures. Additionally, the vigour of weakly germinating seeds at 7 °C correlated with dehydrogenase activity. Three-hour hydropriming was the most effective for seed germination under cold due to reduced cell membrane permeability and ABA level. Stimulating effects of smoke water on germination under cold could be explained by enhanced dehydrogenase activity.

  12. On the significance of a subsequent ageing after cold working of Incoloy 800 at operational temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, G.; Krompholz, K.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of cold working and subsequent ageing at operational temperatures on the long-term and short-term mechanical properties of components made from the iron-nickel-chromium base alloy Incoloy 800 are discussed. Long-term properties are time-to-rupture strengths, which are included in the design code, over a lifetime of 300,000 hours. For LWR operating temperatures of 350 o C, this is of minor importance. An operating temperature of 550 o C is possible for Incoloy 800 with up to 25% cold working and a subsequent solution annealing at 950 o C, without loss of time-to-rupture strength compared with the 'as received' state. The short-term mechanical properties are strongly influenced by cold working, in the form of increasing yield strength and rupture strength, and decreasing ductility and consequently loss in impact energies. A subsequent ageing at 550 o C leads to a decrease of the yield strength and rupture strength, and an increase of ductility as well as the impact energies. The environmental influence are discussed. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  13. Significant influences of global mean temperature and ENSO on extreme rainfall over Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Marcelino, II; Matsumoto, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing concerns on the consequences of global warming, and the accumulating records of disaster related to heavy rainfall events in Southeast Asia, this study investigates whether a direct link can be detected between the rising global mean temperature, as well as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and extreme rainfall over the region. The maximum likelihood modeling that allows incorporating covariates on the location parameter of the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is employed. The GEV model is fitted to annual and seasonal rainfall extremes, which were taken from a high-resolution gauge-based gridded daily precipitation data covering a span of 57 years (1951-2007). Nonstationarities in extreme rainfall are detected over the central parts of Indochina Peninsula, eastern coasts of central Vietnam, northwest of the Sumatra Island, inland portions of Borneo Island, and on the northeastern and southwestern coasts of the Philippines. These nonstationarities in extreme rainfall are directly linked to near-surface global mean temperature and ENSO. In particular, the study reveals that a kelvin increase in global mean temperature anomaly can lead to an increase of 30% to even greater than 45% in annual maximum 1-day rainfall, which were observed pronouncedly over central Vietnam, southern coast of Myanmar, northwestern sections of Thailand, northwestern tip of Sumatra, central portions of Malaysia, and the Visayas island in central Philippines. Furthermore, a pronounced ENSO influence manifested on the seasonal maximum 1-day rainfall; a northward progression of 10%-15% drier condition over Southeast Asia as the El Niño develops from summer to winter is revealed. It is important therefore, to consider the results obtained here for water resources management as well as for adaptation planning to minimize the potential adverse impact of global warming, particularly on extreme rainfall and its associated flood risk over the region

  14. High performance ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs) fabricated by combining co-pressing with drop-coating

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Jie; Bi, Lei; Qian, Jing; Zhu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O2-δ-Er0.4Bi1.6O3 bilayer structure film, which showed an encouraging performance in LT-SOFCs, was successfully fabricated by a simple low cost technique combining one-step co-pressing with drop-coating.

  15. High performance ceria-bismuth bilayer electrolyte low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LT-SOFCs) fabricated by combining co-pressing with drop-coating

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Jie

    2015-03-24

    The Sm0.075Nd0.075Ce0.85O2-δ-Er0.4Bi1.6O3 bilayer structure film, which showed an encouraging performance in LT-SOFCs, was successfully fabricated by a simple low cost technique combining one-step co-pressing with drop-coating.

  16. Dynamics of deforming drops

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwhuis, W.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops play a dominant role in numerous industrial applications, such as spray coating, spray painting, inkjet printing, lithography processes, and spraying/sprinkling in agriculture or gardening. In all of these examples, the generation, flight, impact, and spreading of drops are separate stages of the corresponding industrial processes, which are all thoroughly studied for many years. This thesis focuses on drop dynamics, impact phenomena, Leidenfrost drops, and pouring flows. Based o...

  17. Thermodynamic study of three pharmacologically significant drugs: Density, viscosity, and refractive index measurements at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Chaudhry, Mansoora Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of density, viscosity, and refractive index of three pharmacologically significant drugs, i.e. diclofenac sodium, cetrizine, and doxycycline have been carried in aqueous medium at T = (293.15 to 313.15) K. An automated vibrating-tube densimeter, viscometer, and refractometer are used in a concentration range from (7.5) . 10 -3 to 25 . 10 -3 ) mol . kg -1 . The precise density results are used to evaluate the apparent molar volume, partial molar volume, thermal expansion coefficient, partial molar expansivity, and the Hepler's constant. Viscosity results are used to calculate the Jones-Dole viscosity B-coefficient, free energy of activation of the solute and solvent, activation enthalpy, and activation entropy. The molar refractive indices of the drug solutions can be employed to calculate molar refraction. It is inferred from these results that the above mentioned drugs act as structure-making compounds due to hydrophobic hydration of the molecules in the drugs

  18. Thermodynamic study of three pharmacologically significant drugs: Density, viscosity, and refractive index measurements at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com; Chaudhry, Mansoora Ahmed [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of density, viscosity, and refractive index of three pharmacologically significant drugs, i.e. diclofenac sodium, cetrizine, and doxycycline have been carried in aqueous medium at T = (293.15 to 313.15) K. An automated vibrating-tube densimeter, viscometer, and refractometer are used in a concentration range from (7.5) . 10{sup -3} to 25 . 10{sup -3}) mol . kg{sup -1}. The precise density results are used to evaluate the apparent molar volume, partial molar volume, thermal expansion coefficient, partial molar expansivity, and the Hepler's constant. Viscosity results are used to calculate the Jones-Dole viscosity B-coefficient, free energy of activation of the solute and solvent, activation enthalpy, and activation entropy. The molar refractive indices of the drug solutions can be employed to calculate molar refraction. It is inferred from these results that the above mentioned drugs act as structure-making compounds due to hydrophobic hydration of the molecules in the drugs.

  19. Scanning drop sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  20. Scanning drop sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Shinde, Aniketa A.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Jones, Ryan J.; Marcin, Martin R.; Mitrovic, Slobodan

    2017-05-09

    Electrochemical or electrochemical and photochemical experiments are performed on a collection of samples by suspending a drop of electrolyte solution between an electrochemical experiment probe and one of the samples that serves as a test sample. During the electrochemical experiment, the electrolyte solution is added to the drop and an output solution is removed from the drop. The probe and collection of samples can be moved relative to one another so the probe can be scanned across the samples.

  1. Development of local heat transfer and pressure drop models for pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor cores - HTR2008-58296

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, B.; Worsley, M.; Stainsby, R.; Grief, A.; Dennier, A.; Macintosh, S.; Van Heerden, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient predictions for a typical coolant flow within the core of a pebble bed reactor (PBR) by examining a representative group of pebbles remote from the reflector region. The three- dimensional steady state flow and heat transfer predictions utilized in this work are obtained from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model created in the commercial software ANSYS FLUENT TM . This work utilizes three RANS turbulence models and the Chilton-Colburn analogy for heat transfer. A methodology is included in this paper for creating a quality unstructured mesh with prismatic surface layers on a random arrangement of touching pebbles. The results of the model are validated by comparing them with the correlations of the German KTA rules for a PBR. (authors)

  2. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  3. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study

  4. Drop Tower Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  5. Dynamics of deforming drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwhuis, W.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops play a dominant role in numerous industrial applications, such as spray coating, spray painting, inkjet printing, lithography processes, and spraying/sprinkling in agriculture or gardening. In all of these examples, the generation, flight, impact, and spreading of drops are separate

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the vaporization of an ionic drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N

    2010-09-28

    The melting of a microcrystal in vacuum and subsequent vaporization of a drop of NaCl were studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi rigid-ion effective potential. The vaporization was studied for a single isochor at increasing temperatures until the drop completely vaporized, and gaseous NaCl formed. Examination of the vapor composition shows that the vapor of the ionic drop and gaseous NaCl are composed of neutral species, the most abundant of which, ranging from simple NaCl monomers (ion pairs) to nonlinear polymers, (Na(n)Cl(n))(n=2-4). The enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and dissociation of the different vapor species are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The decrease of the enthalpy of vaporization of the vapor species, with the radius of the drop decrease, accounts for a larger fraction of trimers and tetramers than that inferred from experiments. Further, the rhombic dimer is significantly more abundant than its linear isomer although the latter increases with the temperature. The present results suggest that both trimers and linear dimers may be important to explain the vapor pressure of molten NaCl at temperatures above 1500 K.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of the vaporization of an ionic drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.

    2010-09-01

    The melting of a microcrystal in vacuum and subsequent vaporization of a drop of NaCl were studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi rigid-ion effective potential. The vaporization was studied for a single isochor at increasing temperatures until the drop completely vaporized, and gaseous NaCl formed. Examination of the vapor composition shows that the vapor of the ionic drop and gaseous NaCl are composed of neutral species, the most abundant of which, ranging from simple NaCl monomers (ion pairs) to nonlinear polymers, (NanCln)n=2-4. The enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and dissociation of the different vapor species are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The decrease of the enthalpy of vaporization of the vapor species, with the radius of the drop decrease, accounts for a larger fraction of trimers and tetramers than that inferred from experiments. Further, the rhombic dimer is significantly more abundant than its linear isomer although the latter increases with the temperature. The present results suggest that both trimers and linear dimers may be important to explain the vapor pressure of molten NaCl at temperatures above 1500 K.

  8. Temperature induces significant changes in both glycolytic reserve and mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity in colorectal cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitov, Mihail I., E-mail: m.mitov@uky.edu [Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Harris, Jennifer W. [Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Alstott, Michael C.; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y. [Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Butterfield, D. Allan [Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Thermotherapy, as a method of treating cancer, has recently attracted considerable attention from basic and clinical investigators. A number of studies and clinical trials have shown that thermotherapy can be successfully used as a therapeutic approach for various cancers. However, the effects of temperature on cancer bioenergetics have not been studied in detail with a real time, microplate based, label-free detection approach. This study investigates how changes in temperature affect the bioenergetics characteristics (mitochondrial function and glycolysis) of three colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines utilizing the Seahorse XF96 technology. Experiments were performed at 32 °C, 37 °C and 42 °C using assay medium conditions and equipment settings adjusted to produce equal oxygen and pH levels ubiquitously at the beginning of all experiments. The results suggest that temperature significantly changes multiple components of glycolytic and mitochondrial function of all cell lines tested. Under hypothermia conditions (32 °C), the extracellular acidification rates (ECAR) of CRC cells were significantly lower compared to the same basal ECAR levels measured at 37 °C. Mitochondrial stress test for SW480 cells at 37 °C vs 42 °C demonstrated increased proton leak while all other OCR components remained unchanged (similar results were detected also for the patient-derived xenograft cells Pt.93). Interestingly, the FCCP dose response at 37 °C vs 42 °C show significant shifts in profiles, suggesting that single dose FCCP experiments might not be sufficient to characterize the mitochondrial metabolic potential when comparing groups, conditions or treatments. These findings provide valuable insights for the metabolic and bioenergetic changes of CRC cells under hypo- and hyperthermia conditions that could potentially lead to development of better targeted and personalized strategies for patients undergoing combined thermotherapy with chemotherapy.

  9. Temperature induces significant changes in both glycolytic reserve and mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity in colorectal cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitov, Mihail I.; Harris, Jennifer W.; Alstott, Michael C.; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y.; Evers, B. Mark; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Thermotherapy, as a method of treating cancer, has recently attracted considerable attention from basic and clinical investigators. A number of studies and clinical trials have shown that thermotherapy can be successfully used as a therapeutic approach for various cancers. However, the effects of temperature on cancer bioenergetics have not been studied in detail with a real time, microplate based, label-free detection approach. This study investigates how changes in temperature affect the bioenergetics characteristics (mitochondrial function and glycolysis) of three colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines utilizing the Seahorse XF96 technology. Experiments were performed at 32 °C, 37 °C and 42 °C using assay medium conditions and equipment settings adjusted to produce equal oxygen and pH levels ubiquitously at the beginning of all experiments. The results suggest that temperature significantly changes multiple components of glycolytic and mitochondrial function of all cell lines tested. Under hypothermia conditions (32 °C), the extracellular acidification rates (ECAR) of CRC cells were significantly lower compared to the same basal ECAR levels measured at 37 °C. Mitochondrial stress test for SW480 cells at 37 °C vs 42 °C demonstrated increased proton leak while all other OCR components remained unchanged (similar results were detected also for the patient-derived xenograft cells Pt.93). Interestingly, the FCCP dose response at 37 °C vs 42 °C show significant shifts in profiles, suggesting that single dose FCCP experiments might not be sufficient to characterize the mitochondrial metabolic potential when comparing groups, conditions or treatments. These findings provide valuable insights for the metabolic and bioenergetic changes of CRC cells under hypo- and hyperthermia conditions that could potentially lead to development of better targeted and personalized strategies for patients undergoing combined thermotherapy with chemotherapy.

  10. Significantly enhanced piezoelectricity in low-temperature sintered Aurivillius-type ceramics with ultrahigh Curie temperature of 800 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Kai; Huang, Chengcheng; Guo, Dong

    2017-01-01

    We report an Aurivillius-type piezoelectric ceramic (Ca 1−2x (LiCe) x Bi 4 Ti 3.99 Zn 0.01 O 15 ) that has an ultrahigh Curie temperature (T c ) around 800 °C and a significantly enhanced piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ), comparable to that of textured ceramics fabricated using the complicated templating method. Surprisingly, the highest d 33 of 26 pC/N was achieved at an unexpectedly low sintering temperature (T s ) of only 920 °C (∼200 °C lower than usual) despite the non-ideal density. Study of different synthesized samples indicates that a relatively low T s is crucial for suppressing Bi evaporation and abnormal grain growth, which are indispensable for high resistivity and effective poling due to decreased carrier density and restricted anisotropic conduction. Because the layered structure is sensitive to lattice defects, controlled Bi loss is considered to be crucial for maintaining structural order and spontaneous polarization. This low-T s system is very promising for practical applications due to its high piezoelectricity, low cost and high reproducibility. Contrary to our usual understanding, the results reveal that a delicate balance of density, Bi loss and grain morphology achieved by adjusting the sintering temperature is crucial for the enhancing performance in Aurivillius-type high- T c ceramics. (paper)

  11. Preparation and characterisation of superheated drop detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, P.

    1989-01-01

    Basic mechanism of bubble nucleation in superheated drops with respect to minimum energy of radiation and temperature is discussed. Experimental details and techniques for the preparation of Superheated Drop Detectors (SDDs) is explained. For the sample preparation, homogeneous composition of polymer (Morarfloc) and glycerine was used as the host medium and three different refrigerants Mafron-21, Mafron-12 and Mafron-11/12 (50:50) were chosen as the sensitive liquids. A pressure reactor developed at Health and Safety Laboratory is used for dispersing the sensitive liquid drops in the homogeneous composition under pressure. Some of the imporatant detector characteristics were studied. (author). 26 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  12. Investigation of the fragmentation of molten metals dropped into cold water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, G.S.

    1976-11-01

    The physical mechanism by which small quantities of molten metal fragment extensively when dropped into a pool of cold water was investigated. Since this subject has been the focus of considerable research in the past, some of the more prominent theories are briefly discussed. Experiments were conducted dropping small solid spheres at a high temperature instead of molten metal drops, and indicate a significant difference from the latter. Several hypotheses were proposed based on the hydrodynamics of the molten drop and tested analytically. The theory that the drop fragmentation is caused by the violent release of dissolved gas from within the drop was investigated experimentally and lead to the conclusion that tin fragmentation probably does not occur in this way. It is felt that a calculation of the dynamics of the vapor film that would be expected to surround the hot drop is needed. This calculation was not performed but several suggestions and estimates have been made. It would seem that the possibility of metal fragmentation by rapid vaporization of water entrapped within the metal drop is well worth investigating

  13. Monitoring of crack growth and crack mouth opening displacement in compact tension specimens at high temperatures : Development and implementation of the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method

    OpenAIRE

    Malmqvist, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical engineering department at the University of Idaho is conducting a project with the purpose of developing a complete system for investigating creep-, creep-fatigue- and fatigue properties of metallic materials at elevated temperatures up to 650 ˚C with Compact Tension (CT) specimens. Considerable efforts have been made to study and understand these phenomena, although numerous problems still exist. It is important to explore more extensively the complicated phenomena of creep, f...

  14. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  15. Impact of granular drops

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.; Mansoor, Mohammad M.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)1/2. The speeds of the grains ejected during the “splash” are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed.

  16. Measuring significant inhomogeneity and anisotropy in indoor convective air turbulence in the presence of 2D temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razi, E Mohammady; Rasouli, Saifollah

    2014-01-01

    Using a novel set up, experimental study of the statistical properties of a light beam propagating horizontally through indoor convective air turbulence in the presence of a 2D temperature gradient (TG) is presented. A laser beam enters a telescope from its back focal point by virtue of an optical fiber and is expanded and recollimated by it and then passes through the turbulent area. Then the beam enters another telescope’s aperture. A mask consisting of four similar widely separated small subapertures was installed in front of the second telescope’s aperture. The subapertures were equidistant from the optical axis of the telescope and located at the corners of a square. A flat plane heater is used to produce a vertical TG in the medium. Due to the limited width of the heater, a horizontal component for the TG appeared. Near the focal plane of the second telescope, four distinct images of the source are formed and recorded by a CCD camera. Due to the turbulence all the images (spots) in the successive frames fluctuate. Using the four spot displacements we have calculated the fluctuations of the angle of arrival (AA) over the subapertures. The statistical properties of the optical turbulence are investigated using variance analysis of the AA component fluctuations at horizontal and vertical directions over the subapertures for different temperatures of the heater at different heights of the beam path from the heater. Experimental results show that when the heater is turned off, the variances of horizontal and vertical components of the AA fluctuations are approximately equal to zero over all the subapertures. When it is turned on, the variance of the horizontal component of the AA fluctuations over all of the subapertures are larger than those from the vertical one. In addition, in this case, we find a significant dependence of the variance of the AA components on the height from the heater. (paper)

  17. Two secondary drops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Figure shows formation of two secondary drops of unequal size and their merger. The process is same as the earlier process until t= 0.039 Tc with necking occurring at two places, one at the bottom of the column and the other at the middle. The necking at the middle of the liquid column is due to Raleigh instability.

  18. Lambda-dropping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    1997-01-01

    Lambda-lifting a functional program transforms it into a set of recursive equations. We present the symmetric transformation: lambda-dropping. Lambda-dropping a set of recursive equations restores block structure and lexical scope.For lack of scope, recursive equations must carry around all...... the parameters that any of their callees might possibly need. Both lambda-lifting and lambda-dropping thus require one to compute a transitive closure over the call graph:• for lambda-lifting: to establish the Def/Use path of each free variable (these free variables are then added as parameters to each...... of the functions in the call path);• for lambda-dropping: to establish the Def/Use path of each parameter (parameters whose use occurs in the same scope as their definition do not need to be passed along in the call path).Without free variables, a program is scope-insensitive. Its blocks are then free...

  19. Marangoni Flow Induced Evaporation Enhancement on Binary Sessile Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin; Harmand, Souad; Ouenzerfi, Safouene; Schiffler, Jesse

    2017-06-15

    The evaporation processes of pure water, pure 1-butanol, and 5% 1-butanol aqueous solution drops on heated hydrophobic substrates are investigated to determine the effect of temperature on the drop evaporation behavior. The evolution of the parameters (contact angle, diameter, and volume) during evaporation measured using a drop shape analyzer and the infrared thermal mapping of the drop surface recorded by an infrared camera were used in investigating the evaporation process. The pure 1-butanol drop does not show any thermal instability at different substrate temperatures, while the convection cells created by the thermal Marangoni effect appear on the surface of the pure water drop from 50 °C. Because 1-butanol and water have different surface tensions, the infrared video of the 5% 1-butanol aqueous solution drop shows that the convection cells are generated by the solutal Marangoni effect at any substrate temperature. Furthermore, when the substrate temperature exceeds 50 °C, coexistence of the thermal and solutal Marangoni flows is observed. By analyzing the relation between the ratio of the evaporation rate of pure water and 1-butanol aqueous solution drops and the Marangoni number, a series of empirical equations for predicting the evaporation rates of pure water and 1-butanol aqueous solution drops at the initial time as well as the equations for the evaporation rate of 1-butanol aqueous solution drop before the depletion of alcohol are derived. The results of these equations correspond fairly well to the experimental data.

  20. The use of the acute Pd/Pa drop after intracoronary nitroglycerin infusion to rule out significant FFR: CANICA (Can intracoronary nitroglycerin predict fractional flow reserve without adenosine?) multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Reyes, R; de la Torre Hernandez, J M; Franco-Pelaez, J; Lopez-Palop, R; Telleria Arrieta, M; Amat Santos, I J; Carrillo Saez, P; Sanchez-Recalde, A; Sanmartin Pena, J C; Garcia Camarero, T; Brugaletta, S; Gimeno de Carlos, F; Pinero, A; Sorto Sanchez, D C; Frutos, A; Lasa Larraya, G; Navarro, F; Farre, J

    2016-02-01

    Functional assessment of coronary artery stenosis is performed by measuring the fractional flow reserve (FFR) under hyperemic conditions (Adenosine). However, the use of adenosine portends limitations. We sought to investigate the relationship and correlation between FFR and the Pd/Pa value obtained just after the intracoronary infusion (acute drop) of nitroglycerin (Pd/Pa-NTG) and if this parameter enhances diagnostic accuracy for FFR prediction compared to the resting baseline Pd/Pa. We conducted a multicenter study including prospectively patients presenting intermediate coronary artery stenosis (30-70%) evaluated with pressure wire. Resting baseline Pd/Pa, Pd/Pa-NTG and FFR were measured. 283 patients (335 lesions) were included. Resting baseline Pd/Pa value was 0.72 to 1.0 (0.93 ± 0.04), Pd/Pa-NTG was 0.60 to 1.0 (0.87 ± 0.07) and FFR 0.55 to 1.0 (0.83 ± 0.08). The ROC curves for resting baseline Pd/Pa and for Pd/Pa-NTG, using a FFR ≤ 0.80 showed an AUC of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84-0.92, P values of resting baseline Pd/Pa and Pd/Pa-NTG for an FFR > 0.80, were >0.96 and >0.88, respectively. These values were present in a 29.8% (n = 100) and a 47.1% (n = 158), of the total lesions. Scatter plots showed a better correlation and agreement points with Pd/Pa-NTG than resting baseline Pd/Pa. The cutoff value of Pd/Pa-NTG > 0.88 showed an excellent NPV (96.2% for FFR > 0.8 and 100% for FFR > 0.75) and sensitivity (95% for FFR > 0.8 and 100% for FFR > 0.75) which were consistently high across all the subgroups analysis. The cutoff value of acute Pd/Pa-NTG > 0.88 has a high NPV meaning adenosine-FFR can be avoided in almost half of lesions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Are Simulated and Observed Twentieth Century Tropical Pacific Sea Surface Temperature Trends Significant Relative to Internal Variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, S.; Karnauskas, K. B.

    2017-10-01

    Historical trends in the tropical Pacific zonal sea surface temperature gradient (SST gradient) are analyzed herein using 41 climate models (83 simulations) and 5 observational data sets. A linear inverse model is trained on each simulation and observational data set to assess if trends in the SST gradient are significant relative to the stationary statistics of internal variability, as would suggest an important role for external forcings such as anthropogenic greenhouse gasses. None of the 83 simulations have a positive trend in the SST gradient, a strengthening of the climatological SST gradient with more warming in the western than eastern tropical Pacific, as large as the mean trend across the five observational data sets. If the observed trends are anthropogenically forced, this discrepancy suggests that state-of-the-art climate models are not capturing the observed response of the tropical Pacific to anthropogenic forcing, with serious implications for confidence in future climate projections. There are caveats to this interpretation, however, as some climate models have a significant strengthening of the SST gradient between 1900 and 2013 Common Era, though smaller in magnitude than the observational data sets, and the strengthening in three out of five observational data sets is insignificant. When combined with observational uncertainties and the possibility of centennial time scale internal variability not sampled by the linear inverse model, this suggests that confident validation of anthropogenic SST gradient trends in climate models will require further emergence of anthropogenic trends. Regardless, the differences in SST gradient trends between climate models and observational data sets are concerning and motivate the need for process-level validation of the atmosphere-ocean dynamics relevant to climate change in the tropical Pacific.

  2. Model for determining vapor equilibrium rates in the hanging drop method for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented. Results are applied to 18 drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory. The chemical nature of the salt, drop size and shape, drop concentration, well size, well concentration, and temperature are taken into account. The rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation in this model possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  3. Experimental evidence of significant temperature fluctuations in the plasma EDGE region of the TJ-I Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C; Balbin, R; Pedrosa, M A; Garcia-Cortes, I; Ochando, M A

    1993-07-01

    Density and temperature fluctuations have been measured in the plasma bulk side of the velocity shear location of the TJ-I tokamak using a feast swept Langmuir probe technique. Evidence of substantial temperature fluctuations which are in phase close to opposition with the corresponding density fluctuations has been found. This result suggests the possible role of radiation in determining edge fluctuation levels and call into question the determination of the density and potential fluctuations from the Langmuir current-probe and floating potential fluctuations. (Author) 16 refs.

  4. Experimental evidence of significant temperature fluctuations in the plasma edge region of the TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Balbin, R.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Ochando, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Density and temperature fluctuations have been measured in the plasma bulk side of the velocity shear location of the TJ-I tokamak using a foast swept Langmuir probe technique. Evidence of sustantial temperature fluctuations which are in phase close to opposition with the corresponding density fluctuations has been found. This result suggests the possible role of radiation in determining edge fluctuation levels and call into question the determination of the density and potential fluctuations from the Langmuir current-probe and floating potential fluctuations. (Author)

  5. Experimental evidence of significant temperature fluctuations in the plasma EDGE region of the TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C.; Balbin, R.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Ochando, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Density and temperature fluctuations have been measured in the plasma bulk side of the velocity shear location of the TJ-I tokamak using a feast swept Langmuir probe technique. Evidence of substantial temperature fluctuations which are in phase close to opposition with the corresponding density fluctuations has been found. This result suggests the possible role of radiation in determining edge fluctuation levels and call into question the determination of the density and potential fluctuations from the Langmuir current-probe and floating potential fluctuations. (Author) 16 refs

  6. Variable temperature ion trap studies of CH4+ + H2, HD and D2: negative temperature dependence and significant isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asvany, O.; Savic, I.; Schlemmer, S.; Gerlich, D.

    2004-01-01

    Reactions of methane cations, CH 4 + , with H 2 , HD and D 2 have been studied in a variable temperature 22-pole ion trap from room temperature down to 15 K. The formation of CH 5 + in collisions with H 2 is slow at 300 K, but it becomes faster by at least one order of magnitude when the temperature is lowered to 15 K. This behavior is tentatively explained with a longer complex lifetime at low temperatures. However, since tunneling is most probably not responsible for product formation, other dynamical or statistical restrictions must be responsible for the negative temperature dependence. In collisions of CH 4 + with HD, the CH 5 + product ion (68% at 15 K) prevails over CH 4 D + (32%). Reaction of CH 4 + with D 2 is found to be much slower than with H 2 or HD. The rate coefficient for converting CH 4 + into CH 3 D + by H-D exchange has been determined to be smaller than 10 -12 cm 3 /s, indicating that scrambling in the CH 6 + complex is very unlikely

  7. Variable temperature ion trap studies of CH{sub 4}{sup +} + H{sub 2}, HD and D{sub 2}: negative temperature dependence and significant isotope effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asvany, O.; Savic, I.; Schlemmer, S.; Gerlich, D

    2004-03-08

    Reactions of methane cations, CH{sub 4}{sup +}, with H{sub 2}, HD and D{sub 2} have been studied in a variable temperature 22-pole ion trap from room temperature down to 15 K. The formation of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in collisions with H{sub 2} is slow at 300 K, but it becomes faster by at least one order of magnitude when the temperature is lowered to 15 K. This behavior is tentatively explained with a longer complex lifetime at low temperatures. However, since tunneling is most probably not responsible for product formation, other dynamical or statistical restrictions must be responsible for the negative temperature dependence. In collisions of CH{sub 4}{sup +} with HD, the CH{sub 5}{sup +} product ion (68% at 15 K) prevails over CH{sub 4}D{sup +} (32%). Reaction of CH{sub 4}{sup +} with D{sub 2} is found to be much slower than with H{sub 2} or HD. The rate coefficient for converting CH{sub 4}{sup +} into CH{sub 3}D{sup +} by H-D exchange has been determined to be smaller than 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3}/s, indicating that scrambling in the CH{sub 6}{sup +} complex is very unlikely.

  8. Electromagnetic Drop Scale Scattering Modelling for Dynamic Statistical Rain Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Hipp, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    This work simulates the scattering of electromagnetic waves by a rain field. The calculations are performed for the individual drops and accumulate to a time signal dependent on the dynamic properties of the rain field. The simulations are based on the analytical Mie scattering model for spherical rain drops and the simulation software considers the rain characteristics drop size (including their distribution in rain), motion, and frequency and temperature dependent permittivity. The performe...

  9. Significant effect of substrate temperature on the phase structure, optical and electrical properties of RF sputtered CIGS films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhou; Yan Yong; Li Shasha; Zhang Yanxia; Yan Chuanpeng; Liu Lian; Zhang Yong [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity and New energy R and D Center (SNERDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhao Yong, E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity and New energy R and D Center (SNERDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary phase exist in the RF sputtered CIGS films as it deposited at 150 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CIGS films deposited beyond 350 Degree-Sign C show (1 1 2) prefer orientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E{sub g} of the CIGS films increased with the increase of substrate temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conductivity of the films is affected by 'variable range hopping' mechanism. - Abstract: This work studied the effect of substrate temperature on the phase structure, optical and electrical properties of the one-step radio frequency sputtered Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that all the deposited CIGS films are chalcopyrite phase with polycrystalline structure. The films deposited beyond the substrate temperature of 350 Degree-Sign C show (1 1 2) prefer orientation. Raman spectra reveal that the 150 Degree-Sign C deposited CIGS film coexists with Cu{sub 2-x}Se phase and the 500 Degree-Sign C deposited film contains ordered defect compound (ODC) phase. With the increase of substrate temperature, energy band gap of the CIGS film increase from 0.99 to 1.27 eV. Films deposited at higher temperature exhibit larger electrical conductivity. Conductivity of the CIGS films is dominated by 'variable range hopping' mechanism. The disorder in our CIGS the films is associated with the formation of intrinsic defects such as V{sub Se} and In{sub Cu} for their low formation energy.

  10. On the impedance of galvanic cells XXV. The double-layer capacitance of the dropping mercury electrode in 1 M HCl, 7.5 M HCl and 5.2 M HClO4 and the kinetic parameters of the hydrogen electrode reaction as a function of temperature in these solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, B.G.; Sluyters-Rehbach, M.; Sluyters, J.H.

    The impedance of the dropping mercury electrode in aqueous solutions in 1 M HCl, 7.5 M HCl and 5.2 M HClO4, saturated with hydrogen at one atmosphere was measured at temperatures between −39° and +72° both in and outside the potential region where the electrode reaction, e+H+ H2,

  11. Insulating and sheathing materials of electric and optical cables - Common test methods - Part 5-1: Methods specific to filling compounds - Drop-point - Separation of oil - Lower temperature brittleness - Total acid number - Absence of corrosive components - Permittivity at 23 °C - DC resistivity at 23 °C and 100 °C

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Specifies the test methods for filling compounds of electric cables used with telecommunication equipment. Gives the methods for drop-point, separation of oil, lower temperature brittleness, total acid number, absence of corrosive components, permittivity at 23 °C, d.c. resistivity at 23°C and 100°C.

  12. Dropping out of school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teneva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The modern technological society needs educated people who, through their high professionalism, are called upon to create its progress. In this aspect, a serious problem stands out – the dropout from school of a large number of children, adolescents and young people. The object of the research is the premature interruption of training for a large number of Bulgarian students. The subject of the study is the causes that provoke the students’ dropping out of school. The aim is to differentiate the negative factors leading to dropping out of school, and to identify the motivating factors that encourage the individual to return to the educational environment. In order to realize the so set target, a specially designed test-questionnaire has been used. The survey was conducted among students attending evening courses who have left their education for various reasons and are currently back to the school institution. The contingent of the study includes 120 students from the evening schools. The results indicate that the reasons which prompted the students to leave school early differentiate into four groups: family, social, economic, educational, personal. The motivation to return to school has been dictated in the highest degree by the need for realization of the person on the labor market, followed by the possibility for full social functioning.

  13. Drop jumping. II. The influence of dropping height on the biomechanics of drop jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    In the literature, athletes preparing for explosive activities are recommended to include drop jumping in their training programs. For the execution of drop jumps, different techniques and different dropping heights can be used. This study was designed to investigate for the performance of bounce

  14. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation.

  15. Cavity optomechanics in a levitated helium drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, L.; Schmidt, M. P.; Kashkanova, A. D.; Brown, C. D.; Harris, G. I.; Aiello, A.; Marquardt, F.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a proposal for a type of optomechanical system based on a drop of liquid helium that is magnetically levitated in vacuum. In the proposed device, the drop would serve three roles: its optical whispering-gallery modes would provide the optical cavity, its surface vibrations would constitute the mechanical element, and evaporation of He atoms from its surface would provide continuous refrigeration. We analyze the feasibility of such a system in light of previous experimental demonstrations of its essential components: magnetic levitation of mm-scale and cm-scale drops of liquid He , evaporative cooling of He droplets in vacuum, and coupling to high-quality optical whispering-gallery modes in a wide range of liquids. We find that the combination of these features could result in a device that approaches the single-photon strong-coupling regime, due to the high optical quality factors attainable at low temperatures. Moreover, the system offers a unique opportunity to use optical techniques to study the motion of a superfluid that is freely levitating in vacuum (in the case of 4He). Alternatively, for a normal fluid drop of 3He, we propose to exploit the coupling between the drop's rotations and vibrations to perform quantum nondemolition measurements of angular momentum.

  16. Pt-decorated GaN nanowires with significant improvement in H2 gas-sensing performance at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Q N; Yam, F K; Hassan, Z; Bououdina, M

    2015-12-15

    Superior sensitivity towards H2 gas was successfully achieved with Pt-decorated GaN nanowires (NWs) gas sensor. GaN NWs were fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) route. Morphology (field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) and crystal structure (high resolution X-ray diffraction) characterizations of the as-synthesized nanostructures demonstrated the formation of GaN NWs having a wurtzite structure, zigzaged shape and an average diameter of 30-166nm. The Pt-decorated GaN NWs sensor shows a high response of 250-2650% upon exposure to H2 gas concentration from 7 to 1000ppm respectively at room temperature (RT), and then increases to about 650-4100% when increasing the operating temperature up to 75°C. The gas-sensing measurements indicated that the Pt-decorated GaN NWs based sensor exhibited efficient detection of H2 at low concentration with excellent sensitivity, repeatability, and free hysteresis phenomena over a period of time of 100min. The large surface-to-volume ratio of GaN NWs and the catalytic activity of Pt metal are the most influential factors leading to the enhancement of H2 gas-sensing performances through the improvement of the interaction between the target molecules (H2) and the sensing NWs surface. The attractive low-cost, low power consumption and high-performance of the resultant decorated GaN NWs gas sensor assure their uppermost potential for H2 gas sensor working at low operating temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. First drop dissimilarity in drop-on-demand inkjet devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Famili, Amin; Palkar, Saurabh A.; Baldy, William J. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    As inkjet printing technology is increasingly applied in a broader array of applications, careful characterization of its method of use is critical due to its inherent sensitivity. A common operational mode in inkjet technology known as drop-on-demand ejection is used as a way to deliver a controlled quantity of material to a precise location on a target. This method of operation allows ejection of individual or a sequence (burst) of drops based on a timed trigger event. This work presents an examination of sequences of drops as they are ejected, indicating a number of phenomena that must be considered when designing a drop-on-demand inkjet system. These phenomena appear to be driven by differences between the first ejected drop in a burst and those that follow it and result in a break-down of the linear relationship expected between driving amplitude and drop mass. This first drop, as quantified by high-speed videography and subsequent image analysis, can be different in morphology, trajectory, velocity, and volume from subsequent drops within a burst. These findings were confirmed orthogonally by both volume and mass measurement techniques which allowed quantitation down to single drops.

  18. Heat exchange and pressure drop of herring-bone fin surfaces. Experimental cell results at constant wall temperature; Echange de chaleur et perte de charge de surfaces a ailettes en chevrons. Resultats experimentaux en cellule a temperature de paroi constante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-07-01

    The increase in the specific power of nuclear reactors of the gas-graphite type has necessitated the use of high performance exchange surfaces for canning the fuel (natural uranium). For this, experiments were carried out on cans fitted with herring-bone fins, at constant wall temperature; a flow of water at 100 deg. C passes inside the can which is cooled externally by a flow of CO{sub 2} at 15 bars pressure. This experimental set-up makes it possible to compare the aero-thermal performances of the different cans with an accuracy of 5 per cent. This report presents the results obtained in the form of a friction coefficient f{sub 0} and mean Margoulis number m{sub 0} as a function of the Reynolds number Re{sub 0}, this latter varying from 3 x 10{sup 5} to 9 x 10{sup 5}. (authors) [French] L'augmentation de la puissance specifique des reacteurs nucleaires de la filiere graphite-gaz a necessite l'utilisation de surfaces d'echange a hautes performances pour gainer le combustible (uranium naturel). Dans cette optique, des gaines munies d'ailettes disposees en chevron ont ete experimentees a temperature de paroi constante: un courant d'eau a 100 deg. C circule a l'interieur de la gaine qui est refroidie exterieurement par un ecoulement de CO{sub 2} sous une pression de 15 bars. Cette methode experimentale permet de situer les performances aerothermiques des gaines les unes par rapport aux autres a 5 pour cent pres. Ce rapport presente les resultats obtenus sous la forme d'un coefficient de frottement f{sub 0} et d'un nombre de Margoulis moyen m{sub 0} en fonction du nombre de Reynolds Re{sub 0}, ce dernier pouvant varier de 3. 10{sup 5} a 9. 10{sup 5}. (auteurs)

  19. Initial assessment of the mechanisms and significance of low-temperature embrittlement of cast stainless steels in LWR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Sather, A.

    1990-08-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Metallurgical characterization and mechanical property data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests are presented for several experimental and commercial heats, as well as for reactor-aged CF-3, CF-8, and CF-8M cast stainless steels. The effects of material variables on the embrittlement of cast stainless steels are evaluated. Chemical composition and ferrite morphology strongly affect the extent and kinetics of embrittlement. In general, the low-carbon CF-3 stainless steels are the most resistant and the molybdenum-containing high-carbon CF-8M stainless steels are most susceptible to embrittlement. The microstructural and mechanical-property data are analyzed to establish the mechanisms of embrittlement. The procedure and correlations for predicting the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast components during reactor service are described. The lower bound values of impact strength and fracture toughness for low-temperature-aged cast stainless steel are defined. 39 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Liquid drop parameters for hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guet, C.; Strumberger, E.; Brack, M.

    1988-01-01

    Using the semiclassical extended Thomas-FERMI (ETF) density variational method, we derived selfconsistently the liquid drop model (LDM) coefficients for the free energy of hot nuclear systems from a realistic effective interaction (Skyrme SkM*). We expand the temperature (T) dependence of these coefficients up to the second order in T and test their application to the calculation of the fission barriers of the nuclei 208 Pb and 240 Pu

  1. STUDY ON SOFTENING AND DROPPING PROPERTIES OF METALIZED BURDEN INSIDE BLAST FURNACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-yang Tuo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The inferences of burden metallization rate on softening-melting dropping properties were investigated through softening-melting dropping test of three kinds of metalized burden pressure drop. The results indicated that the softeningmelting temperature interval of pre-reduction mixed burden is bigger than primeval mixed burden, the melting interval narrow with the rise of metallization rate of ferric burden as well as dropping temperature interval. The average pressure drop, maximum pressure drop and softening-melting dropping properties eigenvalue decrease with the rise of metallization rate of ferric burden. Besides, the dropping temperature of burden reduces with the rise of carbon content of molten iron. The combination high metalized burden and higher carbon content of molten iron is benefit to decreasing thickness of cohesive zone and improve permeability of cohesive zone.

  2. Pressure drops in low pressure local boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, Michel; Schleisiek, Karl

    1969-01-01

    For prediction of flow reduction in nuclear research reactors, it was necessary to establish a correlation giving the pressure drop in subcooled boiling for rectangular channels. Measurements of pressure drop on rectangular channel 60 and 90 cm long and with a coolant gap of 1,8 and 3,6 mm were performed in the following range of parameters. -) 3 < pressure at the outlet < 11 bars abs; -) 25 < inlet temperature < 70 deg. C; -) 200 < heat flux < 700 W/cm 2 . It appeared that the usual parameter, relative length in subcooled boiling, was not sufficient to correlate experimental pressure losses on the subcooled boiling length and that there was a supplementary influence of pressure, heat flux and subcooling. With an a dimensional parameter including these terms a correlation was established with an error band of ±10%. With a computer code it was possible to derive the relation giving the overall pressure drop along the channel and to determine the local gradients of pressure drop. These local gradients were then correlated with the above parameter calculated in local conditions. 95 % of the experimental points were computed with an accuracy of ±10% with this correlation of gradients which can be used for non-uniform heated channels. (authors) [fr

  3. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  4. Does the correlation between solar cycle lengths and Northern Hemisphere land temperatures rule out any significant global warming from greenhouse gases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laut, Peter; Gundermann, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    Since the discovery of a striking correlation between solar cycle lengths and Northern Hemisphere land temperatures there have been widespread speculations as to whether these findings would rule out any significant contributions to global warming from the enhanced concentrations of greenhouse...... gases. The present analysis shows that a similar degree of correlation is obtained when testing the solar data against a couple of fictitious temperature series representing different global warming trends. Therefore, the correlation cannot be used to estimate the magnitude of a possible contribution...... to global warming from human activities, nor to rule out a sizable contribution from that source....

  5. Drop evaporation and triple line dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Brutin, David; Gavillet, Jerome; Université de Provence Team; Cea Liten Team

    2011-03-01

    Sessile drop evaporation is a phenomenon commonly came across in nature or in industry with cooling, paintings or DNA mapping. However, the evaporation of a drop deposited on a substrate is not completely understood due to the complexity of the problem. Here we investigate, with several nano-coating of the substrate (PTFE, SiOx, SiOc and CF), the influence of the dynamic of the triple line on the evaporation process. The experiment consists in analyzing simultaneously the motion of the triple line, the kinetics of evaporation, the internal thermal motion and the heat and mass transfer. Measurements of temperature, heat-flux and visualizations with visible and infrared cameras are performed. The dynamics of the evaporative heat flux appears clearly different depending of the motion of the triple line

  6. Drop formation of black liquor spraying; Mustalipeaen pisaroituminen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelholm, C J; Kankkunen, A; Nieminen, K; Laine, J; Miikkulainen, P [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland): Lab. of Energy Technology and Environmental Protection

    1997-10-01

    Black liquor is a spent liquor of the pulp and paper industry. It is burned in kraft recovery boilers for chemical and energy recovery. The high dry solids content and viscosity of black liquor require a high spraying temperature. This affects the performance of the boiler. Kraft recovery boiler deposit formation, emissions and chemical recovery are strongly affected by the drop size and the velocity of the black liquor spray formed by a splashplate nozzle. The sheet breakup mechanism is studied with a system based on a video and image-analysis. The drop size of mill-scale nozzles was measured also with an image-analysis-system. Measurements were carried out in a spray test chamber. The sheet breakup mechanism and drop size tests were carried out both below and over the boiling point of black liquor. Special attention was paid to the effect of flashing on drop formation. Temperature increase normally decreases drop size. In the temperature where the wavy-sheet disintegration changes to perforated-sheet disintegration the drop size increases. Spray velocity rises when the temperature is increased above the boiling point. (orig.)

  7. The significance of climate change in the Netherlands. An analysis of historical and future trends (1901-2020) in weather conditions, weather extremes and temperature-related impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, H.

    2005-07-01

    A rigorous statistical analysis reveals changes in Dutch climate that are statistically significant over the last century. Annually averaged temperatures have increased by 1.5 about 0.5 degrees Centigrade; the number of summer days has roughly doubled from 14 about 5 to 27 about 9 days; annual precipitation has increased by 120 about 100 mm; and the number of extremely wet days has increased by about 40%, from 19 about 3 to 26 about 3 days. Several other changes in Dutch climate, such as spring temperatures rising more rapidly than winter temperatures, the increase of the coldest temperature in each year by 0.9 degrees Centigrade and the annual maximum day sum of precipitation, turn out to be not (yet) statistically significant. The changes in Dutch climate have already led to several statistically significant impacts. The length of the growing season has increased by nearly a month, and the number of heating-degree days, a measure for the energy needed for the heating of houses and buildings, has decreased by 14 about 5%. Projections of future temperature increase in 2020 based on the statistical analysis closely resemble projections based on climate models: temperatures continue to increase from 10.4 about 0.4 degrees Centigrade in 2003 to 10.7 about 0.6 degrees Centigrade in 2010 and 11.1 about 1.0 degrees Centigrade in 2020. The energy needed for heating of houses and buildings is expected to decrease further. This warming effect is expected to lower projections of future Dutch greenhouse-gas emissions by 3.5 Mton CO2 equivalents, which is relevant in the context of commitments under the Kyoto Protocol. Finally, over the course of the 20th century the chance on an 'Elfstedentocht', an outdoor skating event in the Netherlands, has decreased from once every five years to once every ten years. Even though this impact change is not yet statistically significant, it resides 'on the edge' of significance: within a few years more evidence may

  8. Thermal imaging of levitated fresh and salt water drops during laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Cody; Biggs, Harrison

    2017-11-01

    Simulation of high energy laser propagation and scattering in the maritime environment is problematic, due to the high likelihood of turbulence, fog, and rain or sea spray within the beam path. Considering large water drops (diameters of approximately 1-mm), such as those found in a light rain, an incident high energy laser will lead to rapid evaporation of the water drop as it traverses the beam path. In this work we present surface temperature measurements of a water drop obtained using a FLIR IR camera. The drop is acoustically levitated, and subject to a continuous wave laser with a wavelength of 1070-nm and a mean irradiance of approximately 800 W/cm2. These measurements show that the steady-state surface temperature of the drop is well below the saturation temperature, and for pure substances the equilibrium temperature decreases with decreasing drop volume similar to observations with smaller aqueous aerosols. Temperature non-uniformity within the drop is also assessed from statistics of the surface temperature fluctuations. Preliminary results from irradiated salt water drops show notably different behavior from fresh water drops, including temperature spikes as the drop volume decreases and occasional nucleate boiling. Acknowledge support from ONR #N00014-17-WX-00031.

  9. 45-FOOT HIGH DROP TOWER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Drop Tower is used to simulate and measure the impact shocks that are exerted on parachute loads when they hit the ground. It is also used for HSL static lift to...

  10. The origin of star-shaped oscillations of Leidenfrost drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Burton, Justin C.

    We experimentally investigate the oscillations of Leidenfrost drops of water, liquid nitrogen, ethanol, methanol, acetone and isopropyl alcohol. The drops levitate on a cushion of evaporated vapor over a hot, curved surface which keeps the drops stationary. We observe star-shaped modes along the periphery of the drop, with mode numbers n = 2 to 13. The number of observed modes is sensitive to the properties of the liquid. The pressure oscillation frequency in the vapor layer under the drop is approximately twice that of the drop frequency, which is consistent with a parametric forcing mechanism. However, the Rayleigh and thermal Marangoni numbers are of order 10,000, indicating that convection should play a dominating role as well. Surprisingly, we find that the wavelength and frequency of the oscillations only depend on the thickness of the liquid, which is twice the capillary length, and do not depend on the mode number, substrate temperature, or the substrate curvature. This robust behavior suggests that the wavelength for the oscillations is set by thermal convection inside the drop, and is less dependent on the flow in the vapor layer under the drop

  11. Self-excited hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiane, K.; Moffat, J. R.; Matar, O. K.; Craster, R. V.

    2008-08-01

    Pattern formation driven by the spontaneous evaporation of sessile drops of methanol, ethanol, and FC-72 using infrared thermography is observed and, in certain cases, interpreted in terms of hydrothermal waves. Both methanol and ethanol drops exhibit thermal wave trains, whose wave number depends strongly on the liquid volatililty and substrate thermal conductivity. The FC-72 drops develop cellular structures whose size is proportional to the local thickness. Prior to this work, hydrothermal waves have been observed in the absence of evaporation in shallow liquid layers subjected to an imposed temperature gradient. In contrast, here both the temperature gradients and the drop thickness vary spatially and temporally and are a natural consequence of the evaporation process.

  12. Theory of magnetostriction of electron-hole drops in Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    A large mass of electron-hole liquid (γ drop) formed in a strain-induced potential well in Ge is known to distort its shape significantly in a magnetic field B > or approx. = 1 kG. It is shown in this paper that the shape change can be understood in detail as due to a ''recombination current'' of electron-hole pairs needed to replace those pairs which recombine in the drop volume. The Lorentz force deflects this current and produces a macroscopic dipole current loop inside the drop. The drop then changes shape to minimize its total energy, including magnetic, strain, and surface energies. While the drop usually flattens along the field direction, both para- and diamagnetic effects (elongated drops) are found to be possible, depending on excitation conditions, in accord with experiment. Similar effects are predicted to occur in small drops in unstrained Ge. This paper presents a magnetohydrodynamic theory of the magnetostriction which takes into account density variations which occur in the strain well and in high magnetic fields. A simpler theory is given for the special case in which the drop may be considered incompressible (small drops and moderate fields). Effects of carrier mass anisotropy and fluid viscosity are taken into consideration

  13. Ground Motion Prediction Equations Empowered by Stress Drop Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, H.; Oth, A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant variation of stress drop is a crucial issue for ground motion prediction equations and probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, since only a few ground motion prediction equations take into account stress drop. In addition to average and sigma studies of stress drop and ground motion prediction equations (e.g., Cotton et al., 2013; Baltay and Hanks, 2014), we explore 1-to-1 relationship for each earthquake between stress drop and between-event residual of a ground motion prediction equation. We used the stress drop dataset of Oth (2013) for Japanese crustal earthquakes ranging 0.1 to 100 MPa and K-NET/KiK-net ground motion dataset against for several ground motion prediction equations with volcanic front treatment. Between-event residuals for ground accelerations and velocities are generally coincident with stress drop, as investigated by seismic intensity measures of Oth et al. (2015). Moreover, we found faster attenuation of ground acceleration and velocities for large stress drop events for the similar fault distance range and focal depth. It may suggest an alternative parameterization of stress drop to control attenuation distance rate for ground motion prediction equations. We also investigate 1-to-1 relationship and sigma for regional/national-scale stress drop variation and current national-scale ground motion equations.

  14. Soft drop jet mass measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Jennifer Kathryn; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Calculations of jet substructure observables that are accurate beyond leading-logarithm accuracy have recently become available. Such observables are significant not only for probing the collinear regime of QCD that is largely unexplored at a hadron collider, but also for improving the understanding of jet substructure properties that are used in many studies at the Large Hadron Collider. This poster documents a measurement of the first jet substructure quantity at a hadron collider to be calculated at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithm accuracy. The normalized, differential cross-section is measured as a function of log( ρ^2), where ρ is the ratio of the soft-drop mass to the ungroomed jet transverse momentum. This quantity is measured in dijet events from 32.9 ifb of sqrt(s) = 13 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The data are unfolded to correct for detector effects and compared to precise QCD calculations and leading-logarithm particle-level Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Leidenfrost drops cooling surfaces: theory and interferometric measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexey; Sun, Chao; Colinet, Pierre; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid drop is placed on a highly superheated surface, it can be levitated by its own vapour. This remarkable phenomenon is referred to as the Leidenfrost effect. The thermally insulating vapour film results in a severe reduction of the heat transfer rate compared to experiments at lower surface temperatures, where the drop is in direct contact with the solid surface. A commonly made assumption is that this solid surface is isothermal, which is at least questionable for materials of lo...

  16. The effects of wind and temperature on cuticular transpiration of Picea abies and Pinus cembra and their significance in dessication damage at the alpine treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, M N; Tranquillini, W

    1980-01-01

    The importance of high winter winds and plant temperatures as causes of winter desiccation damage at the alpine treeline were studied in the Austrian Alps. Samples of 1- and 2-year twigs of Picea abies and Pinus cembra were collected from the valley bottom (1,000 m a.s.l.), forestline (1,940 m a.s.l.), kampfzone (2.090 m a.s.l.), wind-protected treeline (2,140 m a.s.l.), and wind-exposed treeline (2,140 m a.s.l.). Cuticular transpiration was measured at three different levels of wind speed (4, 10, and 15 ms -1 ) and temperature (15°, 20°, and 25° C). At elevated wind speeds slight increases in water loss were observed, whereas at higher temperatures much greater increases occurred. Studies on winter water relations show a significant decline in the actual moisture content and osmotic potentials of twigs, especially in the kampfzone and at treeline. The roles of high winds and temperatures in depleting the winter water economy and causing desiccation damage in the alpine treeline environment are discussed.

  17. Drop Spreading with Random Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Airway mucus acts as a barrier to protect the lung. However as a biological material, its physical properties are known imperfectly and can be spatially heterogeneous. In this study we assess the impact of these uncertainties on the rate of spreading of a drop (representing an inhaled aerosol) over a mucus film. We model the film as Newtonian, having a viscosity that depends linearly on the concentration of a passive solute (a crude proxy for mucin proteins). Given an initial random solute (and hence viscosity) distribution, described as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure, we seek to quantify the uncertainties in outcomes as the drop spreads. Using lubrication theory, we describe the spreading of the drop in terms of a system of coupled nonlinear PDEs governing the evolution of film height and the vertically-averaged solute concentration. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to predict the variability in the drop centre location and width (1D) or area (2D). We show how simulation results are well described (at much lower computational cost) by a low-order model using a weak disorder expansion. Our results show for example how variability in the drop location is a non-monotonic function of the solute correlation length increases. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  18. Significantly enhanced critical current density in nano-MgB2 grains rapidly formed at low temperature with homogeneous carbon doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yongchang; Lan, Feng; Ma, Zongqing; Chen, Ning; Li, Huijun; Barua, Shaon; Patel, Dipak; Shahriar, M; Hossain, Al; Kim, Jung Ho; Dou, Shi Xue; Acar, S

    2015-01-01

    High performance MgB 2 bulks using carbon-coated amorphous boron as a boron precursor were fabricated by Cu-activated sintering at low temperature (600 °C, below the Mg melting point). Dense nano-MgB 2 grains with a high level of homogeneous carbon doping were formed in these MgB 2 samples. This type of microstructure can provide a stronger flux pinning force, together with depressed volatility and oxidation of Mg owing to the low-temperature Cu-activated sintering, leading to a significant improvement of critical current density (J c ) in the as-prepared samples. In particular, the value of J c for the carbon-coated (Mg 1.1 B 2 )Cu 0.05 sample prepared here is even above 1 × 10 5 A cm −2 at 20 K, 2 T. The results herein suggest that the combination of low-temperature Cu-activated sintering and employment of carbon-coated amorphous boron as a precursor could be a promising technique for the industrial production of practical MgB 2 bulks or wires with excellent J c , as the carbon-coated amorphous boron powder can be produced commercially at low cost, while the addition of Cu is very convenient and inexpensive. (paper)

  19. Significantly enhanced critical current density in nano-MgB2 grains rapidly formed at low temperature with homogeneous carbon doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchang; Lan, Feng; Ma, Zongqing; Chen, Ning; Li, Huijun; Barua, Shaon; Patel, Dipak; Shahriar, M.; Hossain, Al; Acar, S.; Kim, Jung Ho; Xue Dou, Shi

    2015-05-01

    High performance MgB2 bulks using carbon-coated amorphous boron as a boron precursor were fabricated by Cu-activated sintering at low temperature (600 °C, below the Mg melting point). Dense nano-MgB2 grains with a high level of homogeneous carbon doping were formed in these MgB2 samples. This type of microstructure can provide a stronger flux pinning force, together with depressed volatility and oxidation of Mg owing to the low-temperature Cu-activated sintering, leading to a significant improvement of critical current density (Jc) in the as-prepared samples. In particular, the value of Jc for the carbon-coated (Mg1.1B2)Cu0.05 sample prepared here is even above 1 × 105 A cm-2 at 20 K, 2 T. The results herein suggest that the combination of low-temperature Cu-activated sintering and employment of carbon-coated amorphous boron as a precursor could be a promising technique for the industrial production of practical MgB2 bulks or wires with excellent Jc, as the carbon-coated amorphous boron powder can be produced commercially at low cost, while the addition of Cu is very convenient and inexpensive.

  20. Solid-solid phase transformation via internal stress-induced virtual melting, significantly below the melting temperature. Application to HMX energetic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Valery I; Henson, Bryan F; Smilowitz, Laura B; Asay, Blaine W

    2006-05-25

    We theoretically predict a new phenomenon, namely, that a solid-solid phase transformation (PT) with a large transformation strain can occur via internal stress-induced virtual melting along the interface at temperatures significantly (more than 100 K) below the melting temperature. We show that the energy of elastic stresses, induced by transformation strain, increases the driving force for melting and reduces the melting temperature. Immediately after melting, stresses relax and the unstable melt solidifies. Fast solidification in a thin layer leads to nanoscale cracking which does not affect the thermodynamics or kinetics of the solid-solid transformation. Thus, virtual melting represents a new mechanism of solid-solid PT, stress relaxation, and loss of coherence at a moving solid-solid interface. It also removes the athermal interface friction and deletes the thermomechanical memory of preceding cycles of the direct-reverse transformation. It is also found that nonhydrostatic compressive internal stresses promote melting in contrast to hydrostatic pressure. Sixteen theoretical predictions are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments conducted on the PTs in the energetic crystal HMX. In particular, (a) the energy of internal stresses is sufficient to reduce the melting temperature from 551 to 430 K for the delta phase during the beta --> delta PT and from 520 to 400 K for the beta phase during the delta --> beta PT; (b) predicted activation energies for direct and reverse PTs coincide with corresponding melting energies of the beta and delta phases and with the experimental values; (c) the temperature dependence of the rate constant is determined by the heat of fusion, for both direct and reverse PTs; results b and c are obtained both for overall kinetics and for interface propagation; (d) considerable nanocracking, homogeneously distributed in the transformed material, accompanies the PT, as predicted by theory; (e) the nanocracking does not

  1. Inverse Leidenfrost effect: self-propelling drops on a bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anais; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef; Physics of Fluids Team

    2017-11-01

    When deposited on very hot solid, volatile drops can levitate over a cushion of vapor, in the so-called Leidenfrost state. This phenomenon can also be observed on a hot bath and similarly to the solid case, drops are very mobile due to the absence of contact with the substrate that sustains them. We discuss here a situation of ``inverse Leidenfrost effect'' where room-temperature drops levitate on a liquid nitrogen pool - the vapor is generated here by the bath sustaining the relatively hot drop. We show that the drop's movement is not random: the liquid goes across the bath in straight lines, a pattern only disrupted by elastic bouncing on the edges. In addition, the drops are initially self-propelled; first at rest, they accelerate for a few seconds and reach velocities of the order of a few cm/s, before slowing down. We investigate experimentally the parameters that affect their successive acceleration and deceleration, such as the size and nature of the drops and we discuss the origin of this pattern.

  2. Generic versus brand-name North American topical glaucoma drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammo, Zaid N; Flanagan, John G; James, David F; Trope, Graham E

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether brand-name glaucoma drops differ from generic equivalents in bottle design, viscosity, surface tension, and volume in North America. Experimental study. We studied 5 bottles each of 11 kinds of glaucoma drops. Density-based calculations of drop volume were assessed using 0.1 mg analytic balance. Viscosity was measured using rotational rheometery. Bottle tip diameter was measured using 0.05 mm Vernier calipers. Surface tension was measured using a Fisher Scientific (Ottawa, ON) tensiometer. For the American brand-name Timoptic XE, the average drop volume was 38 ± 3.1 μL versus 24 ± 1.5 μL of Timolol GFS (p brand-name Timoptic XE, the average drop volume was 42 ± 4.0 μL versus 25 ± 2 μL of timolol maleate EX (p brand-name Timoptic drop volume was 28 ± 1.4 μL versus 35 ± 1.9 μL Apo-Timop (p brand-name Timoptic delivered significantly smaller drop volumes than generic Apo-Timop. Careful consideration should be given to drop viscosity and bottle design when generic ophthalmic products are evaluated for interchangeability and market entry. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  4. Fluid flow in drying drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2013-01-01

    When a suspension drop evaporates, it leaves behind a drying stain. Examples of these drying stains encountered in daily life are coffee or tea stains on a table top, mineral rings on glassware that comes out of the dishwasher, or the salt deposits on the streets in winter. Drying stains are also

  5. Pressure drop in contraction flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) page 178. DPL gives an equation for the pressure drop in a tapered (and circular) contraction, valid only at low angles. Here the general definition of contraction flow (the Bagley correction) and a more general method to find...

  6. Air-drop blood supply in the French Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaudin, Olivier; Baillon, A; Varin, N; Martinaud, C; Pouget, T; Civadier, C; Clavier, B; Sailliol, A

    2018-02-12

    Haemorrhagic shock remains the leading cause of preventable death in overseas and austere settings. Transfusion of blood components is critical in the management of this kind of injury. For French naval and ground military units, this supply often takes too long considering the short shelf-life of red blood cell concentrates (RBCs) and the limited duration of transport in cooling containers (five to six days). Air-drop supply could be an alternative to overcome these difficulties on the condition that air-drop does not cause damage to blood units. After a period of study and technical development of packaging, four air-drops at medium and high altitudes were performed with an aircraft of the French Air Force. After this, one air-drop was carried out at medium altitude with 10 RBCs and 10 French lyophilised plasma (FLYP). A second air-drop was performed with a soldier carrying one FLYP unit at 12 000 feet. For these air-drops real blood products were used, and quality control testing and temperature monitoring were performed. The temperatures inside the containers were within the normal ranges. Visual inspection indicated that transfusion packaging and dumped products did not undergo deterioration. The quality control data on RBCs and FLYP, including haemostasis, suggested no difference before and after air-drop. The operational implementation of the air-drop of blood products seems to be one of the solutions for the supply of blood products in military austere settings or far forward on battlefield, allowing safe and early transfusion. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. On the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers used as desorbers in absorption chillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Hernando, N.; Almendros-Ibanez, J.A.; Ruiz, G.; Vega, M. de

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers (PHE) in the boiling temperature of LiBr-H 2 O and NH 3 -H 2 O solutions is studied. For the NH 3 -H 2 O solution, the pressure drop-temperature saturation relationship estates that high pressure drops can be allowed in the solution with negligible changes in the saturation temperature, and in the PHE performance. Besides, in the case of the LiBr-H 2 O solution, as the working pressure is usually very low, the analysis of the pressure drop must be taken as a main limiting parameter for the use of Plate Heat Exchangers as vapour generators. In this case, the pressure drop may considerably change the boiling temperature of the solution entering the heat exchanger and therefore a higher heating fluid temperature may be required. A guideline to design these systems is proposed.

  8. On the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers used as desorbers in absorption chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Hernando, N.; de Vega, M. [Energy System Engineering (ISE), Departamento de Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Almendros-Ibanez, J.A. [Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Departamento de Mecanica Aplicada e Ingenieria de Proyectos, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Renewable Energy Research Institute, c/de la Investigacion s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz, G. [Energy Efficiency and Renewables Department, Tecnicas Reunidas S.A., C/Arapiles No. 13, 10a, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    The influence of the pressure drop in Plate Heat Exchangers (PHE) in the boiling temperature of LiBr-H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O solutions is studied. For the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O solution, the pressure drop-temperature saturation relationship estates that high pressure drops can be allowed in the solution with negligible changes in the saturation temperature, and in the PHE performance. Besides, in the case of the LiBr-H{sub 2}O solution, as the working pressure is usually very low, the analysis of the pressure drop must be taken as a main limiting parameter for the use of Plate Heat Exchangers as vapour generators. In this case, the pressure drop may considerably change the boiling temperature of the solution entering the heat exchanger and therefore a higher heating fluid temperature may be required. A guideline to design these systems is proposed. (author)

  9. From drop impact physics to spray cooling models: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenbach, Jan; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2018-03-01

    Spray-wall interaction is an important process encountered in a large number of existing and emerging technologies and is the underlying phenomenon associated with spray cooling. Spray cooling is a very efficient technology, surpassing all other conventional cooling methods, especially those not involving phase change and not exploiting the latent heat of vaporization. However, the effectiveness of spray cooling is dependent on a large number of parameters, including spray characteristics like drop size, velocity and number density, the surface morphology, but also on the temperature range and thermal properties of the materials involved. Indeed, the temperature of the substrate can have significant influence on the hydrodynamics of drop and spray impact, an aspect which is seldom considered in model formulation. This process is extremely complex, thus most design rules to date are highly empirical in nature. On the other hand, significant theoretical progress has been made in recent years about the interaction of single drops with heated walls and improvements to the fundamentals of spray cooling can now be anticipated. The present review has the objective of summarizing some of these recent advances and to establish a framework for future development of more reliable and universal physics-based correlations to describe quantities involved in spray cooling.

  10. Technical Note: VUV photodesorption rates from water ice in the 120–150 K temperature range – significance for Noctilucent Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kulikov

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies have been carried out with the aim to improve our understanding of physicochemical processes which take place at the water ice/air interface initiated by solar irradiation with a wavelength of 121.6 nm. It was intended to mimic the processes of ice particles characteristic of Noctilucent Clouds (NLCs. The experimental set-up used includes a high-vacuum chamber, a gas handling system, a cryostat with temperature controller, an FTIR spectrometer, a vacuum ultraviolet hydrogen lamp, and a microwave generator. We report the first results of measurements of the absolute photodesorption rate (loss of substance due to the escape of photoproducts into gas phase from thin (20–100 nm water ice samples kept in the temperature range of 120–150 K. The obtained results show that a flow of photoproducts into the gas phase is considerably lower than presumed in the recent study by Murray and Plane (2005. The experiments indicate that almost all photoproducts remain in the solid phase, and the principal chemical reaction between them is the recombination reaction H + OH → H2O which is evidently very fast. This means that direct photolysis of mesospheric ice particles seems to have no significant impact on the gas phase chemistry of the upper mesosphere.

  11. Drop-out rate and drop-out reasons among promising Norwegian track and field athletes: a 25 year study

    OpenAIRE

    Enoksen, Eystein

    2011-01-01

    © Eystein Enoksen, 2011 The aim of the present study was to identify the total drop-out rate and drop-out reasons for a group of promising track and field athletes. 202 males and 98 females, aged 16 ±2 years, took part in this study. Questionnaires were administrated in 1975, 1983, and 1989. In-depth interviews were conducted in 1989 and in 2000. A chi-square test was administrated to test the difference between males and females dropping out and to test the most significant reasons influe...

  12. From nuclei to liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Huidobro, F.; Michaelian, K.; Perez, A.; Rodriguez, V. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Carjan, N. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Gradignan (France). Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires

    1995-12-31

    Collisions of symmetric mercury-drop pairs have been studied experimentally as a function of impact parameter, in a relative-velocity range going from a coalescence-dominated region to interactions yielding several residues. The experiments are compared with predictions of a dynamical model used in nuclear physics. The time evolution of the shapes is well reproduced by the simulation. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Device for making liquid drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masao; Fukuda, Fumito; Nishikawa, Masana; Ishii, Takeshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a device for producing liquid drops in the form of liquefied gases indispensable to make deuterium and tritium ice pellets used as a fusion fuel in a tokamak type fusion reactor. Structure: First, pressure P 1 at the upper surface of liquefied gas in a container and outlet pressure P 2 of a nozzle disposed at the lower part of the container are adjusted into the state of P 1 >= P 2 , and it is preset so that even under such conditions, the liquefied gas from the nozzle is not naturally flown out. Next, a vibration plate disposed within the container is rapidly downwardly advanced toward the nozzle through a predetermined distance. As a result, pressure of the liquefied gas within a depression under the vibration plate rises instantaneously or in a pulse fashion to dissatisfy the aforesaid set condition whereby the liquefied gas may be flown out from the nozzle in the form of liquid drops. In accordance with the present device, it is possible to produce a suitable number of drops at a suitable point. (Yoshihara, H.)

  14. Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Suter, Jonathan D.

    2012-09-01

    Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

  15. Vortex flow in acoustically levitated drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Z.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-08-29

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops is investigated experimentally. This study reveals a kind of vortex flow which rotates in the meridional plane of the levitated drop. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of a levitated drop until the maximum value of about 80 mm/s. A transition of streamline shapes from concentric circles to ellipses takes place at the distance of about 1.2 mm from the drop center. The fluid velocity distribution is plotted as a function of polar angle for seven characteristic streamlines. -- Highlights: → We experimentally observe the internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops. → We present a fascinating structure of vortex flow inside the levitated water drop. → This vortex flow rotates around the drop center in the meridional plane. → Velocity distribution information of this vortex flow is quantitatively analyzed.

  16. Vortex flow in acoustically levitated drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Z.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2011-01-01

    The internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops is investigated experimentally. This study reveals a kind of vortex flow which rotates in the meridional plane of the levitated drop. The magnitude of fluid velocity is nearly vanishing at the drop center, whereas it increases toward the free surface of a levitated drop until the maximum value of about 80 mm/s. A transition of streamline shapes from concentric circles to ellipses takes place at the distance of about 1.2 mm from the drop center. The fluid velocity distribution is plotted as a function of polar angle for seven characteristic streamlines. -- Highlights: → We experimentally observe the internal flow of acoustically levitated water drops. → We present a fascinating structure of vortex flow inside the levitated water drop. → This vortex flow rotates around the drop center in the meridional plane. → Velocity distribution information of this vortex flow is quantitatively analyzed.

  17. Drag and drop display & builder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  18. Medium carbon vanadium micro alloyed steels for drop forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeszensky, Gabor; Plaut, Ronald Lesley

    1992-01-01

    Growing competitiveness of alternative manufacturing routes requires cost minimization in the production of drop forged components. The authors analyse the potential of medium carbon, vanadium microalloyed steels for drop forging. Laboratory and industrial experiments have been carried out emphasizing deformation and temperature cycles, strain rates and dwell times showing a typical processing path, associated mechanical properties and corresponding microstructures. The steels the required levels of mechanical properties on cooling after forging, eliminating subsequent heat treatment. The machinability of V-microalloyed steels is also improved when compared with plain medium carbon steels. (author)

  19. CANFLEX fuel bundle junction pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. J.; Chung, C. H.; Jun, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the junction pressure drop test results which are to used to determine the alignment angle between bundles to achieve the most probable fuel string pressure drop for randomly aligned bundles for use in the fuel string total pressure drop test. (author). 4 tabs., 17 figs

  20. CANFLEX fuel bundle junction pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. J.; Chung, C. H.; Jun, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the junction pressure drop test results which are to used to determine the alignment angle between bundles to achieve the most probable fuel string pressure drop for randomly aligned bundles for use in the fuel string total pressure drop test. (author). 4 tabs., 17 figs.

  1. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... used for the hydrostatic pressure or stacking test. Exceptions for the number of steel and aluminum..., non-resilient, flat and horizontal surface. (e) Drop height. Drop heights, measured as the vertical... than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point of...

  2. Rain drop size densities over land and over sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumke, Karl

    2010-05-01

    A detailed knowledge of rain drop size densities is an essential presumption with respect to remote sensing of precipitation. Since maritime and continental aerosol is significantly different yielding to differences in cloud drop size densities, maritime and continental rain drop size densities may be different, too. In fact only a little is known about differences in rain drop size densities between land and sea due to a lack of suitable data over the sea. To fill in this gap measurements were performed during the recent 10 years at different locations in Germany and on board of research vessels over the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean. Measurements were done by using an optical disdrometer (ODM 470, Großklaus et al., 1998), which is designed especially to perform precipitation measurements on moving ships and under high wind speeds. Temporal resolution of measurements is generally 1 minute, total number of time series is about 220000. To investigate differences in drop size densities over land and over sea measurements have been divided into four classes on the basis of prevailing continental or maritime influence: land measurements, coastal measurements, measurements in areas of semi-enclosed seas, and open sea measurements. In general differences in drop size densities are small between different areas. A Kolmogoroff Smirnoff test does not give any significant difference between drop size densities over land, coastal areas, semi-enclosed, and open seas at an error rate of 5%. Thus, it can be concluded that there are no systematic differences between maritime and continental drop size densities. The best fit of drop size densities is an exponential decay curve, N(D ) = 6510m -3mm -1mm0.14h- 0.14×R-0.14×exp(- 4.4mm0.25h-0.25×R- 0.25×D mm -1), it is estimated by using the method of least squares. N(D) is the drop size density normalized by the resolution of the optical disdrometer, D the diameter of rain drops in mm, and R the

  3. The effect of dropping impact on bruising pomegranate fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohammad Shafie

    2016-04-01

    on upper part of the piezoelectric force sensor was the dropping impact surface of the device. After dropping impact, the sample was caught by hand to prevent a second impact due to sample rebound. After impact, the samples were stored at room temperature for 48h, during which time bruise tissues and arils turned brown. The bruise area and bruise volume of each sample were calculated according to equations (1 and 2. Results and Discussion: Dropping impact acceleration versus time curves for the typical samples at ten drop heights are shown in figure 5. Drop height notably affected the impact acceleration. The peak force increased while contact times decreased with increasing drop height, which resulted in an increase of peak acceleration. Figure 6 shows the dropping impact velocity change during contact by theoretical calculation. The results showed that the velocities at the beginning of contact and the rebound velocities of the samples increased with increasing the drop height. Critical drop height of pomegranate in certain bruise area was determined and linear relationship between drop height and bruise volume for ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ pomegranates were obtained. It is clear that there were obvious differences between dropping bruise boundaries of pomegranates and the conventional damage boundary of products (as shown in figure 9. For the conventional damage boundary, the vertical line, critical velocity (Vc, represents the velocity change below which no damage occurs, regardless of the peak pulse acceleration. The horizontal line, critical acceleration (AC, represents the acceleration at which the product will be damaged if velocity exceeds VC. At the same time, for a conventional product, there is only one damage boundary at one shock condition. However, for fruit, a change in drop height (velocity will lead to a change in bruise ratio. A series of bruise boundaries can be determined for different bruise ratios. Moreover, even if the velocity approaches zero, the

  4. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganguia, H; Young, Y-N; Layton, A T; Lai, M-C; Hu, W-F

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number Ca_{E}. Below the critical Ca_{E}, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed Ca_{E}, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical Ca_{E}, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations.

  5. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Dániel

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R ⊕ ) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters

  6. Steam explosion studies with single drops of molten refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    Laser heating, levitation melting, and metal combustion were used to prepare individual drops of molten refractory materials which simulate LWR fuel melt products. Drop temperatures ranged from approx. = 1500 to > 3000K. These drops, several millimeters in diameter, were injected into water and subjected to pressure transients (approx. = 1MPa peak pressures) generated by a submerged exploding bridgewire. Molten oxides of Fe, Al and Zr could be induced to explode with bridgewire initiation. High speed films showed the explosions with exceptional clarity, and pressure transducer records could be correlated with individual frames in the films. Pressure spikes one or two MPa high were generated whenever an explosion occurred. Debris particles were mostly spheroidal, with diameters in the range 10 to 1000 μm

  7. Superheated drop, open-quotes Bubbleclose quotes, dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, M.J.; Lindler, K.W.; Nelson, M.E.; Johnson, T.L.; Jones, C.R.; Rabovsky, J.L.; Rao, N.; Kerschner, H.F.; Reil, G.K.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Superheated Drop Dosimeters (SDD) offer a sensitive, immediate measure of the neutron dose equivalent, but their dynamic range is limited and their response varies with temperature, pressure, and vibration. They contain thousands of superheated liquid drops in a stabilizing matrix. High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation triggers vaporization of the drops into visible bubbles. If the matrix is a liquid, the bubbles slowly rise, and the number present indicates the dose rate. Dose may be measured by displacement of the matrix, or by counting the sounds of vaporization. If the matrix is a gel, the bubbles are fixed, and their number is proportional to the dose equivalent. Our research has focused on modeling and elimination of the environmental response, extension of the dynamic range, and tests and evaluations of prototype devices

  8. Capillary Thinning of Particle-laden Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Jahns, Matt; Doshi, Pankaj; Basaran, Osman

    2015-11-01

    Drop formation is central in many applications such as ink-jet printing, microfluidic devices, and atomization. During drop formation, a thinning filament is created between the about-to-form drop and the fluid hanging from the nozzle. Therefore, the physics of capillary thinning of filaments is key to understanding drop formation and has been thoroughly studied for pure Newtonian fluids. The thinning dynamics is, however, altered completely when the fluid contains particles, the physics of which is not well understood. In this work, we explore the impact of solid particles on filament thinning and drop formation by using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations.

  9. Vibration-Induced Climbing of Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, P.; Eggers, J.; Deegan, R. D.

    2007-10-01

    We report an experimental study of liquid drops moving against gravity, when placed on a vertically vibrating inclined plate, which is partially wetted by the drop. The frequency of vibrations ranges from 30 to 200 Hz, and, above a threshold in vibration acceleration, drops experience an upward motion. We attribute this surprising motion to the deformations of the drop, as a consequence of an up or down symmetry breaking induced by the presence of the substrate. We relate the direction of motion to contact angle measurements. This phenomenon can be used to move a drop along an arbitrary path in a plane, without special surface treatments or localized forcing.

  10. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.; Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  11. Vortex-Induced Vapor Explosion during Drop Impact on a Superheated Pool

    KAUST Repository

    Alchalabi, M.A.

    2017-04-18

    Ultra high-speed imaging is used to investigate the vapor explosion when a drop impacts onto a high-temperature pool. The two liquids are immiscible, a low boiling-temperature perfluorohexane drop, at room temperature, which impacts a high boiling-temperature soybean-oil pool, which is heated well above the boiling temperature of the drop. We observe different regimes: weak and strong nucleate boiling, film boiling or Leidenfrost regime and entrainment followed by vapor explosion. The vapor explosions were seen to depend on the formation of a rotational flow at the edge of the impact crater, near the pool surface, which resembles a vortex ring. This rotational motion entrains a thin sheet of the drop liquid, to become surrounded by the oil. In that region, the vapor explosion starts at a point after which it propagates azimuthally along the entire periphery at high speed.

  12. Research on combustion of black-liquor drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, A.

    1999-01-01

    Black liquor, the major by-product of the kraft process for production of pulp, is one of the most important industrial fuels. It is burned in recovery boilers in the form of large spray drops (mm), with the objective of simultaneous recovery of heat and chemicals (sodium and sulfur). Even though black-liquor combustion in boilers has been practised for over half a century, research efforts toward improvement of combustion efficiency and abatement of environmental emissions are much more recent. The present paper addresses a specific aspect of that research, namely, elucidation of processes which occur during combustion of black-liquor drops in boiler-gas streams. The paper (a) gives a brief description of the kraft process, (b) reviews the experimental and theoretical (modeling) research advances on combustion of kraft-liquor drops during the 1980s and 1990s, (c) re-examines the results of an earlier combustion study in which black-liquor drops were observed in free flight at temperatures near those in recovery boilers, and (d) recommends input for the modeling of in-flight combustion of kraft-liquor drops in recovery boilers. (author)

  13. Temperature-dependent structural properties of P3HT films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorian, S; Joshi, S; Pietsch, U, E-mail: grigorian@physik.uni-siegen.de [Institute of Physics, University Siegen, Walter Flex Strasse 3, D-57068, Siegen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Structural investigations of spin coated and drop cast poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT films have been performed under x-ray grazing incidence geometry. Drop cast films revealed to be highly oriented and crystalline and only slightly modify with the temperature. In contrast, spin coated films provided random orientational distribution of nanocrystallites and undergo significant morphological and structural changes during annealing. Interestingly, spin coated films of low and high molecular weight fractions behavior differently as a function of temperature. Crystalline domains of the low molecular weight fractions have been decreased, and, in contrast, we found an improvement of crystallinity of high molecular weight fraction with increase of the temperature.

  14. Temperature-dependent structural properties of P3HT films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorian, S; Joshi, S; Pietsch, U

    2010-01-01

    Structural investigations of spin coated and drop cast poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT films have been performed under x-ray grazing incidence geometry. Drop cast films revealed to be highly oriented and crystalline and only slightly modify with the temperature. In contrast, spin coated films provided random orientational distribution of nanocrystallites and undergo significant morphological and structural changes during annealing. Interestingly, spin coated films of low and high molecular weight fractions behavior differently as a function of temperature. Crystalline domains of the low molecular weight fractions have been decreased, and, in contrast, we found an improvement of crystallinity of high molecular weight fraction with increase of the temperature.

  15. The millennium water vapour drop in chemistry–climate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brinkop

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the abrupt and severe water vapour decline in the stratosphere beginning in the year 2000 (the "millennium water vapour drop" and other similarly strong stratospheric water vapour reductions by means of various simulations with the state-of-the-art Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model. The model simulations differ with respect to the prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs and whether nudging is applied or not. The CCM EMAC is able to most closely reproduce the signature and pattern of the water vapour drop in agreement with those derived from satellite observations if the model is nudged. Model results confirm that this extraordinary water vapour decline is particularly obvious in the tropical lower stratosphere and is related to a large decrease in cold point temperature. The drop signal propagates under dilution to the higher stratosphere and to the poles via the Brewer–Dobson circulation (BDC. We found that the driving forces for this significant decline in water vapour mixing ratios are tropical sea surface temperature (SST changes due to a coincidence with a preceding strong El Niño–Southern Oscillation event (1997/1998 followed by a strong La Niña event (1999/2000 and supported by the change of the westerly to the easterly phase of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO in 2000. Correct (observed SSTs are important for triggering the strong decline in water vapour. There are indications that, at least partly, SSTs contribute to the long period of low water vapour values from 2001 to 2006. For this period, the specific dynamical state of the atmosphere (overall atmospheric large-scale wind and temperature distribution is important as well, as it causes the observed persistent low cold point temperatures. These are induced by a period of increased upwelling, which, however, has no corresponding pronounced signature in SSTs anomalies in the tropics

  16. Who is dropping your course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrs, Alex; Ghent, C.; Labattaglia, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of pre and post instruction instruments in a basic astronomy course. This analysis is built on the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI, Bardar et al. 2007). In addition to assessing our student's gain in knowledge of this fundamental topic, we have added some demographic questions. While the primary purpose is to compare the gain in knowledge during a semester of instruction to changes in instruction, we also look at the demographics of students who take the pretest but not the posttest. These students are usually excluded from this type of analysis. We look for trends in the demographic information among students who drop the course, and suggest ways to make the course more palatable. References: Bardar et al., 2007: "Development and Validation of the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory", Astr. Ed. Rev. 5(2), 103-113

  17. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  18. Evaporation of a sessile water drop and a drop of aqueous salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S Y

    2017-11-07

    The influence of various factors on the evaporation of drops of water and aqueous salt solution has been experimentally studied. Typically, in the studies of drop evaporation, only the diffusive vapor transfer, radiation and the molecular heat conduction are taken into account. However, vapor-gas convection plays an important role at droplet evaporation. In the absence of droplet boiling, the influence of gas convection turns out to be the prevailing factor. At nucleate boiling, a prevailing role is played by bubbles generation and vapor jet discharge at a bubble collapse. The gas convection behavior for water and aqueous salt solution is substantially different. With a growth of salt concentration over time, the influence of the convective component first increases, reaches an extremum and then significantly decreases. At nucleate boiling in a salt solution it is incorrect to simulate the droplet evaporation and the heat transfer in quasi-stationary approximation. The evaporation at nucleate boiling in a liquid drop is divided into several characteristic time intervals. Each of these intervals is characterized by a noticeable change in both the evaporation rate and the convection role.

  19. The dynamics of Leidenfrost drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Limbeek, Michiel Antonius Jacobus

    2017-01-01

    Temperature control is omnipresent in today’s life: from keeping your fridge cold, maintaining a room at a pleasant temperature or preventing your computer from overheating. Efficient ways of heat transfer are often based on phase change, making use of the high latent heat of evaporation. In the

  20. Effect of Bilineaster Drop on Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ameli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperbilirubinemia is considered one of the most prevalent problems in newborns. Phototherapy, exchange transfusion, and herbal medicine are common therapeutic approaches for preventing any neurologic damage in infants with neonatal jaundice. However, herbal medicine is less commonly used. Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect of bilineaster drop on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Method: This study was a randomized clinical trial conducted on 98 term neonates (aged 2-14 days with neonatal jaundice admitted to Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad, Iran, during 2015. These newborns were randomly assigned into intervention (phototherapy and bilineaster drop and control (only phototherapy groups. Total and direct serum bilirubin levels were measured at the time of admission and then 12, 24, 36, and 48 h after treatment. Data were analyzed using independent t-test and repeated measures ANOVA through Stata software (Version 12. Results: The mean ages of the newborns at the time of admission were 6.2 ±2.5 and 6.04 ±2.4 days in the intervention and control groups, respectively. The intervention group showed higher reduction in mean duration of hospital stay, readmission rate, and bilirubin levels 12 and 24 h after the intervention, compared to the control group (P>0.001. However, the two groups demonstrated no statistically significant difference 36 h and 48 h after the intervention (P=0.06, P=0.22, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated that the intervention had no significant effect on the reduction trend of bilirubin levels (P=0.10 [total], P=0.06 [indirect] in both groups. Nonetheless, bilirubin levels significantly diminished in both groups over time (P

  1. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  2. Different cellular effects of four anti-inflammatory eye drops on human corneal epithelial cells: independent in active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingli; Wang, Yao; Yang, Lingling; Zhou, Qingjun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the cellular effects of four commercially available anti-inflammatory eye drops and their active components on human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. The cellular effects of four eye drops (Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, and Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops) and their corresponding active components were evaluated in an HCEC line with five in vitro assays. Cell proliferation and migration were measured using 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay and transwell migration assay. Cell damage was determined with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Cell viability and median lethal time (LT₅₀) were measured by 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) staining and flow cytometry analysis. Cellular effects after exposure of HCECs to the four anti-inflammatory eye drops were concentration dependent. The differences of cellular toxicity on cell proliferation became significant at lower concentrations (Eye Drops showed significant increasing effects on cell damage and viability when compared with the other three solutions. Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops inhibited the migration of HCECs significantly. Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops showed the quickest effect on cell viability: the LT₅₀ was 3.28, 9.23, 10.38, and 23.80 min for Tobramycin & Dex Eye Drops, Diclofenac Sodium Eye Drops, Pranoprofen Eye Drops, and Bromfenac Sodium Hydrate Eye Drops, respectively. However, the comparisons of cellular toxicity revealed significant differences between the eye drops and their active components under the same concentration. The corneal epithelial toxicity differences among the active components of the four eye drops became significant as higher concentration (>0.020%). The four anti-inflammatory eye drops showed different cellular effects on HCECs, and the toxicity was not related with their active components, which provides new reference for the clinical application and drug

  3. [Studies on preparation and dissolution test in vitro of sustained-release dropping pills of curcumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yu; Xiang, Bai; Pan, Zhen-Hua; Cao, De-Ying

    2010-01-01

    To study the prescription and technique of sustained-release dropping pills of curcumin and inspect their release property in vitro. The orthogonal test was used to screen the prescription and technique which were definited with the colligation evaluation of release and formation of dropping pills. The optimization of prescription and technique were as follows: stearic acid 70 mg, glycery monostearate 25 mg, solutol 6 mg, viscosity of cooling liquid was 100 mm2/s; the temperature of material liquid was 80 degrees C; the cooling temperature was 30 - 0 degrees C; the dropping speed was (21 +/- 2) dripping/min. The release behavior of sustained-release dropping pills of curcumin coincidented with Higuchi equation well and the character of sustained-release was transparent. The sustained-release dropping pills of curcumin have good property of sustained-release in vitro and their release behavior in vivo need to be inspected.

  4. Sepsis from dropped clips at laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Sarwat

    2001-01-01

    We report seven patients in whom five dropped surgical clips and two gallstones were visualized in the peritoneal cavity, on radiological studies. In two, subphrenic abscesses and empyemas developed as a result of dropped clips into the peritoneal cavity during or following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In one of these two, a clip was removed surgically from the site of an abscess. In two other patients dropped gallstones, and in three, dropped clips led to no complications. These were seen incidentally on studies done for other indications. Abdominal abscess secondary to dropped gallstones is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). We conclude that even though dropped surgical clips usually do not cause problems, they should be considered as a risk additional to other well-known causes of post-LC abdominal sepsis

  5. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  6. Analysis of voltage-drop near cold-electrodes of a combustion MHD generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyamurthy, P.; Venkatramani, N.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper turbulent compressible boundary layer equations for mass, momentum and energy are solved near the cold electrode wall of a combustion MHD generator. Arcs are simulated by freezing the electron temperature (and hence electrical conductivity) to a temperature called Tsub(arc) when gas temperature is less than Tsub(arc). Theoretical near electrode drop for various current densities along the flow direction is analysed for various Tsub(arc) temperatures and compared with experimentally obtained near electrode drop. It is found that the Tsub(arc) temperature increases as a square root along the flow direction and has linear dependency on current density. (author)

  7. Hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops

    OpenAIRE

    Brutin, D.; Rigollet, F.; Niliot, C. Le

    2009-01-01

    Drop evaporation is a simple phenomena but still unclear concerning the mechanisms of evaporation. A common agreement of the scientific community based on experimental and numerical work evidences that most of the evaporation occurs at the triple line. However, the rate of evaporation is still empirically predicted due to the lack of knowledge on the convection cells which develop inside the drop under evaporation. The evaporation of sessile drop is more complicated than it appears due to the...

  8. Ciliary-propelling mechanism, effect of temperature and viscosity on swimming speed, and adaptive significance of ‘jumping’ in the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2009-01-01

    , hence increasing viscosity, from 9.6 +/- 0.3 mm/s at 21C to 5.2 +/- 0.7 mm/s at 9.8C for seawater, and down to 3.7 +/- 0.5 mm/s at a temperature equivalent Te = 5.8C for PVP-manipulated viscosity, and further, the swimming velocity was found to decrease with increasing viscosity according to the power...

  9. Time-temperature-burial significance of Devonian anthracite implies former great (approx.6.5 km) depth of burial of Catskill Mountains, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, G.M.; Sanders, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of coalified plant debris in Tully-correlative strata of the Gilboa Formation (uppermost Middle Devonian) within the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York State have been converted to anthracite having a vitrinite reflectance of 2.5%. This implies a level of organic metamorphism (LOM) of 16. The specimens are about 350 m.y. old; if 200 m.y. is taken as the duration of the time of exposure to the maximum geothermal temperature, then the LOM of 16 and other thermal indicators imply a maximum temperature of 190 0 C. Using a geothermal gradient of 26 0 C.km -1 (17 0 F.1,000 ft -1 ), a former depth of burial of 6.5 km is implied. Such former deep burial is not usually inferred for the Catskills, but it is consistent with the idea that the thick (about 6.4 km or 21,000 ft) Carboniferous strata of northeastern Pennsylvania formerly extended northeast far enough to bury the Catskills. The lack of metamorphism of the Paleozoic strata lying about 4.5 km beneath the Tully-correlative rocks and exposed in the adjacent Hudson Valley places low limits on the former geothermal gradient; this supports the concept of great depth of former burial of the Catskills. For example, 6.5 km of former burial and a geothermal gradient of 26 0 C.km -1 imply a temperature of 307 0 C for the base of the Paleozoic. By contrast, only 1 km of former burial requires a geothermal gradient of 170 0 C.km -1 , which would have subjected the base of the Paleozoic to a temperature of 955 0 GAMMA, which is far higher than the 600 to 650 0 C recently inferred for the Acadian-age metamorphism of the Taconic allochthon in southwestern Massachusetts and adjoining areas

  10. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  11. Parametric resonance in acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J. [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-05-10

    Liquid drops can be suspended in air with acoustic levitation method. When the sound pressure is periodically modulated, the levitated drop is usually forced into an axisymmetric oscillation. However, a transition from axisymmetric oscillation into sectorial oscillation occurs when the modulation frequency approaches some specific values. The frequency of the sectorial oscillation is almost exactly half of the modulation frequency. It is demonstrated that this transition is induced by the parametric resonance of levitated drop. The natural frequency of sectorial oscillation is found to decrease with the increase of drop distortion extent.

  12. Nonlinear oscillations of inviscid free drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzek, T. W.; Benner, R. E., Jr.; Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    The present analysis of free liquid drops' inviscid oscillations proceeds through solution of Bernoulli's equation to obtain the free surface shape and of Laplace's equation for the velocity potential field. Results thus obtained encompass drop-shape sequences, pressure distributions, particle paths, and the temporal evolution of kinetic and surface energies; accuracy is verified by the near-constant drop volume and total energy, as well as the diminutiveness of mass and momentum fluxes across drop surfaces. Further insight into the nature of oscillations is provided by Fourier power spectrum analyses of mode interactions and frequency shifts.

  13. Drop "impact" on an airfoil surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong

    2018-05-17

    Drop impact on an airfoil surface takes place in drop-laden two-phase flow conditions such as rain and icing, which are encountered by wind turbines or airplanes. This phenomenon is characterized by complex nonlinear interactions that manifest rich flow physics and pose unique modeling challenges. In this article, the state of the art of the research about drop impact on airfoil surface in the natural drop-laden two-phase flow environment is presented. The potential flow physics, hazards, characteristic parameters, droplet trajectory calculation, drop impact dynamics and effects are discussed. The most key points in establishing the governing equations for a drop-laden flow lie in the modeling of raindrop splash and water film. The various factors affecting the drop impact dynamics and the effects of drop impact on airfoil aerodynamic performance are summarized. Finally, the principle challenges and future research directions in the field as well as some promising measures to deal with the adverse effects of drop-laden flows on airfoil performance are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Significance and development of the utilization of brown coal high temperature coke in the economy of the GDR for the period 1964 to 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, E.; Heschel, W.

    1979-01-01

    Brown coal high temperature coke production in GDR in the years since 1964 is described. In 1969 the second large brown coal high temperature coking plant, Schwarze Pumpe, went into operation, increasing the total brown coal high temperature coke production to 2 million tons annually. Utilization of the coke size classes in mm from 0-3.15, 3.15-20, 20-31.5, 31.5-45 and greater than 45 mm in the metallurgical, chemical, and energy industries as well as for household heating is shown with figures from 1964, 1970 and 1974. The increasing use of coke in households partly as briquet substitution is also shown (in 1970 42% of the coke was used in households). The substitution of black coal coke by brown coal coke in additional fields of industrial production was also further advanced. Coke production at the Schwarze Pumpe plant is scheduled to increase to 1.6 million tons by 1985 by means of the application of improved coking technologies. Investigations for future industrial solutions to the following coking problems are being conducted: processing coke fines (which make up 10 to 12% of the total produced coke) by briquetting with binders into formed coke, firing coke fines in blast furnaces and power plants, mixed briquetting of coke fines with limestone for carbide production and mixed briquetting of coke and ore fines for metallurgical purposes. (8 refs.) (In German)

  15. Drop Impact Dynamics with Sessile Drops and Geometries: Spreading, Jetting, and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilger, Christopher F.

    The tendency of surface tension to cause small parcels of fluid to form into drops allows convenient packaging, transport, dispersal of liquid phase matter. Liquid drop impacts with solids, liquids, and other drops have realized and additional future applications in biological, manufacturing, heat transfer, and combustion systems. Experiments were conducted to investigate the dynamics of multiple drop collisions, rather than the most-studied phenomenon of single drop impacts. Additional drop impacts were performed on rigid hemispheres representing sessile drops, angled substrates, and into the vertex of two tilted surfaces arranged into a vee shape. A qualitative inspection of drop-sessile drop impacts shows distinct post-impact shapes depending on the offset distance between the drops. At intermediate offset distances, distinct jets issue from the overlap region between the two drops projected areas. These jets are observed to reach their maximum extent at a critical offset distance ratio, epsilon epsilon ˜ 0.75-0.80, with substrate contact angle and W e having a lesser effect. Capillary waves that traverse the sessile drop after collision cause a lower aspect ratio liquid column to emanate from the sessile drop opposite the impact. In order to better understand the jetting phenomenon seen in the offset drop-sessile drop impacts, simpler solid geometries are investigated that elicit a similar behavior. Solid hemispheres do not show the singular jetting observed in the fluidic case, however, a simple vee formed by two intersection planar substrates do jet in a similar fashion to the fluidic case. A geometric model with partnered experiments is developed to describe the bisymmetric spread of an impacting drop on an angled substrate. This geometric model is used to guide a time of arrival based model for various features of the drop impact, which is used to predict jetting in various vee channel experiments.

  16. Hanging drop cultures of human testis and testis cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Young, J; Nielsen, J E

    2014-01-01

    cultured in 'hanging drops' and effects of activin A and follistatin treatment were investigated in seminoma cultures. RESULTS: Testis fragments with normal spermatogenesis or CIS cells were cultured for 14 days with sustained proliferation of germ cells and CIS cells and without increased apoptosis....... Seminoma cultures survived 7 days, with proliferating cells detectable during the first 5 days. Activin A treatment significantly reduced KIT transcript and protein levels in seminoma cultures, thereby demonstrating a specific treatment response. CONCLUSIONS: Hanging drop cultures of human testis...

  17. Many Drops Make a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya S. Mudgal

    2014-03-01

    greater knowledge, better skills and disseminate this knowledge through this journal to influence as many physicians and their patients as possible. They have taken the knowledge of their teachers, recognized their giants and are now poised to see further than ever before. My grandmother often used to quote to me a proverb from India, which when translated literally means “Many drops make a lake”. I cannot help but be amazed by the striking similarities between the words of Newton and this Indian saying. Therefore, while it may seem intuitive, I think it must be stated that it is vital for the betterment of all our patients that we recognize our own personal lakes to put our drops of knowledge into. More important is that we recognize that it is incumbent upon each and every one of us to contribute to our collective lakes of knowledge such as ABJS. And finally and perhaps most importantly we need to be utterly cognizant of never letting such lakes of knowledge run dry.... ever.

  18. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struzik Artur

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs and bounce drop jumps (BDJs. The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p < 0.05 between RSI values for CDJs and BDJs were recorded for jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than the values recorded for BDJs. Times of contact, amortization and take-off during BDJs were significantly shorter (p < 0.05 than the respective values obtained for CDJs. Therefore, the use of the RSI to monitor plyometric training should be based on the drop jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  19. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  20. Neuromuscular function during drop jumps in young and elderly males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Jarmo M; Linnamo, Vesa; Sippola, Niina; Avela, Janne

    2012-12-01

    The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex), indicating alpha-motoneuron pool activity, has been shown to be task - and in resting conditions - age dependent. How aging affects H-reflex activity during explosive movements is not clear at present. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of aging on H-reflexes during drop jumps, and its possible role in drop jump performance. Ten young (26.8 ± 2.7 years) and twenty elderly (64.2 ± 2.7 years) subjects participated in the study. Maximal drop jump performance and soleus H-reflex response (H/M jump) 20 ms after ground contact were measured in a sledge ergometer. Maximal H-reflex, maximal M-wave, Hmax/Mmax-ratio and H-reflex excitability curves were measured during standing rest. Although in young the H-reflex response (Hmax/Mmax) was 6.5% higher during relaxed standing and 19.7% higher during drop jumps (H jump/M jump) than in the elderly group, these differences were not statistically significant. In drop jumps, the elderly subjects had lower jumping height (30.4%, p push-off force (18.0%, p push-off time (31.0% p push-off force (r = 0.833, p push-off time (r = -0.857, p < 0.01) in young but not in the elderly. Correlations between H-reflex response and jumping parameters in young may indicate different jumping and activation strategies in drop jumps. However, it does not fully explain age related differences in jumping performance, since age related differences in H-reflex activity were non-significant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Drop test facility available to private industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Box, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    In 1978, a virtually unyielding drop test impact pad was constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) for the testing of heavy shipping containers designed for transporting radioactive materials. Because of the facility's unique capability for drop-testing large, massive shipping packages, it has been identified as a facility which can be made available for non-DOE users

  2. University Drop-Out: An Italian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloc, Filippo; Maruotti, Antonello; Petrella, Lea

    2010-01-01

    University students' drop-out is a crucial issue for the universities' efficiency evaluation and funding. In this paper, we analyze the drop-out rate of the Economics and Business faculty of Sapienza University of Rome. We use administrative data on 9,725 undergraduates students enrolled in three-years bachelor programs from 2001 to 2007 and…

  3. Total Site Heat Integration Considering Pressure Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kew Hong Chew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop is an important consideration in Total Site Heat Integration (TSHI. This is due to the typically large distances between the different plants and the flow across plant elevations and equipment, including heat exchangers. Failure to consider pressure drop during utility targeting and heat exchanger network (HEN synthesis may, at best, lead to optimistic energy targets, and at worst, an inoperable system if the pumps or compressors cannot overcome the actual pressure drop. Most studies have addressed the pressure drop factor in terms of pumping cost, forbidden matches or allowable pressure drop constraints in the optimisation of HEN. This study looks at the implication of pressure drop in the context of a Total Site. The graphical Pinch-based TSHI methodology is extended to consider the pressure drop factor during the minimum energy requirement (MER targeting stage. The improved methodology provides a more realistic estimation of the MER targets and valuable insights for the implementation of the TSHI design. In the case study, when pressure drop in the steam distribution networks is considered, the heating and cooling duties increase by 14.5% and 4.5%.

  4. Why Do Students Drop Advanced Mathematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Ilana

    2004-01-01

    Students, especially black, Latino and Native American youth and students of low socio-economic status drop out of advanced mathematics. Teachers must coordinate their expectations, their knowledge of students and their teaching practices in order to stop struggling students from dropping out of advanced math classes.

  5. Wetting and evaporation of binary mixture drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiane, Khellil; David, Samuel; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2008-09-11

    Experimental results on the wetting behavior of water, methanol, and binary mixture sessile drops on a smooth, polymer-coated substrate are reported. The wetting behavior of evaporating water/methanol drops was also studied in a water-saturated environment. Drop parameters (contact angle, shape, and volume) were monitored in time. The effects of the initial relative concentrations on subsequent evaporation and wetting dynamics were investigated. Physical mechanisms responsible for the various types of wetting behavior during different stages are proposed and discussed. Competition between evaporation and hydrodynamic flow are evoked. Using an environment saturated with water vapor allowed further exploration of the controlling mechanisms and underlying processes. Wetting stages attributed to differential evaporation of methanol were identified. Methanol, the more volatile component, evaporates predominantly in the initial stage. The data, however, suggest that a small proportion of methanol remained in the drop after the first stage of evaporation. This residual methanol within the drop seems to influence subsequent wetting behavior strongly.

  6. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  7. Pressure drop in ET-RR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of pressure drop through a bundle comprising 16 rods and their lower arrangement grid as well as orifices similar to those of ET-RR-1 core have been done. Experiments are carried out under adiabatic turbulent flow conditions at about 35 degree C. Bundle Reynolds number range is 4 x 10 -2 x 10. Orifices of diameters 4.5, 3.25 or 2.5 cm. are mounted underneath the bundle. The bundle and lower grid pressure drop coefficients are 3.75 and 1.8 respectively. Orifices pressure drop coefficients are 2.65, 19.67 and 53.55 respectively. The ratio of bundle pressure drop to that of 4.5 cm. Orifice diameter is 1.415. The pressure drop coefficients are utilizer to calculate flow through bundles. The flow rate per bundle is 39.1, 20.4 or 13.1 m 3 /hr. Depending on orifice diameter

  8. Significant mobility improvement of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors annealed in a low temperature wet ambient environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallorina, Michael Paul A.; Bermundo, Juan Paolo S.; Fujii, Mami N.; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2018-05-01

    Transparent amorphous oxide semiconducting materials such as amorphous InGaZnO used in thin film transistors (TFTs) are typically annealed at temperatures higher than 250 °C to remove any defects present and improve the electrical characteristics of the device. Previous research has shown that low cost and low temperature methods improve the electrical characteristics of the TFT. With the aid of surface and bulk characterization techniques in comparison to the device characteristics, this work aims to elucidate further on the improvement mechanisms of wet and dry annealing ambients that affect the electrical characteristics of the device. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry results show that despite outward diffusion of -H and -OH species, humid annealing ambients counteract outward diffusion of these species, leading to defect sites which can be passivated by the wet ambient. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy results show that for devices annealed for only 30 min in a wet annealing environment, the concentration of metal-oxide bonds increased by as much as 21.8% and defects such as oxygen vacancies were reduced by as much as 18.2% compared to an unannealed device. Our work shows that due to the oxidizing power of water vapor, defects are reduced, and overall electrical characteristics are improved as evidenced with the 150 °C wet O2, 30 min annealed sample which exhibited the highest mobility of 5.00 cm2/V s, compared to 2.36 cm2/V s for a sample that was annealed at 150 °C in a dry ambient atmospheric environment for 2 h.

  9. Fast pyrolysis of hardwood residues using a fixed bed drop-type pyrolyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlan, Mohammad Amir Firdaus; Uemura, Yoshimitsu; Osman, Noridah B.; Yusup, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of rubber and Meranti wood was conducted by using a drop-type pyrolyzer. • As temperature increase, char yield decrease, but bio-oil and gas yield increase. • Maximum pyrolysis temperature for pyrolysis of RWS is 550 °C and 600 °C for MWS. • Calorific value of bio-char is very high and potential to be used as a solid fuel. • CO and CO 2 are the major gas components in the non-condensable gases by-product. - Abstract: In this research, rubber wood sawdust (RWS) and Meranti wood sawdust (MWS) were pyrolyzed in a fixed bed drop-type pyrolyzer under an inert condition. The first part of the study is to determine the influence of pyrolysis temperature (450, 500, 550, 600, 650 °C) on the yield of pyrolysis products. Pyrolysis of these different residues generate an almost identical maximum amount of bio-oil close to 33 wt.%, but at different maximum temperature (550 °C for pyrolysis of RWS and 600 °C for pyrolysis of MWS). To evaluate the effect of biomass type on the composition and characterization of pyrolysis products, the second part involves the analyses of pyrolysis products from the maximum pyrolysis temperature. Acetic acid, tetrahydrofuran, and benzene were the main bio-oil components. The bio-oil contained high percentage of oxygen and hydrogen, indicating high water content in the bio-oil. High amount of water in bio-oil significantly reduced its calorific value. Under extensive heating, particle size of the bio-char from SEM images decreased due to breakage and shrinkage mechanisms. The major components of non-condensable gases were CO and CO 2

  10. A comprehensive analysis of the evaporation of a liquid spherical drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, B; Talbot, P; Haut, B; Rednikov, A; Colinet, P

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, a new comprehensive analysis of a suspended drop of a pure liquid evaporating into air is presented. Based on mass and energy conservation equations, a quasi-steady model is developed including diffusive and convective transports, and considering the non-isothermia of the gas phase. The main original feature of this simple analytical model lies in the consideration of the local dependence of the physico-chemical properties of the gas on the gas temperature, which has a significant influence on the evaporation process at high temperatures. The influence of the atmospheric conditions on the interfacial evaporation flux, molar fraction and temperature is investigated. Simplified versions of the model are developed to highlight the key mechanisms governing the evaporation process. For the conditions considered in this work, the convective transport appears to be opposed to the evaporation process leading to a decrease of the evaporation flux. However, this effect is relatively limited, the Péclet numbers happening to be small. In addition, the gas isothermia assumption never appears to be valid here, even at room temperature, due to the large temperature gradient that develops in the gas phase. These two conclusions are explained by the fact that heat transfer from the gas to the liquid appears to be the step limiting the evaporation process. Regardless of the complexity of the developed model, yet excluding extremely small droplets, the square of the drop radius decreases linearly over time (R(2) law). The assumptions of the model are rigorously discussed and general criteria are established, independently of the liquid-gas couple considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid determination of caffeine in one drop of beverages and foods using drop-to-drop solvent microextraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2007-11-02

    A simple and rapid sample cleanup and preconcentration method for the quantitative determination of caffeine in one drop of beverages and foods by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been proposed using drop-to-drop solvent microextraction (DDSME). The best optimum experimental conditions for DDSME were: chloroform as the extraction solvent, 5 min extraction time, 0.5 microL exposure volume of the extraction phase and no salt addition at room temperature. The optimized methodology exhibited good linearity between 0.05 and 5.0 microg/mL with correlation coefficient of 0.980. The relative standard deviation (RSD) and limits of detection (LOD) of the DDSME/GC/MS method were 4.4% and 4.0 ng/mL, respectively. Relative recovery of caffeine in beverages and foods were found to be 96.6-101%, which showing good reliability of this method. This DDSME excludes the major disadvantages of conventional method of caffeine extraction, like large amount of organic solvent and sample consumption and long sample pre-treatment process. So, this approach proves that the DDSME/GC/MS technique can be applied as a simple, fast and feasible diagnosis tool for environmental, food and biological application for extremely small amount of real sample analysis.

  12. Contact angle of sessile drops in Lennard-Jones systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefan; Urbassek, Herbert M; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2014-11-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used for studying the contact angle of nanoscale sessile drops on a planar solid wall in a system interacting via the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones potential. The entire range between total wetting and dewetting is investigated by varying the solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy. The temperature is varied between the triple point and the critical temperature. A correlation is obtained for the contact angle in dependence of the temperature and the dispersive interaction energy. Size effects are studied by varying the number of fluid particles at otherwise constant conditions, using up to 150,000 particles. For particle numbers below 10,000, a decrease of the contact angle is found. This is attributed to a dependence of the solid-liquid surface tension on the droplet size. A convergence to a constant contact angle is observed for larger system sizes. The influence of the wall model is studied by varying the density of the wall. The effective solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy at a contact angle of θ = 90° is found to be independent of temperature and to decrease linearly with the solid density. A correlation is developed that describes the contact angle as a function of the dispersive interaction, the temperature, and the solid density. The density profile of the sessile drop and the surrounding vapor phase is described by a correlation combining a sigmoidal function and an oscillation term.

  13. Determination of deuterium concentration by falling drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi; Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Niwa, Takeo; Fujii, Takashi.

    1976-01-01

    Falling drop method for determination of deuterium concentration in water sample was studied. The principle is the same as that developed by Kirshenbaum, I. in 1932. One drop of water sample falls down through a column filled with o-fluorotoluene at temperature of nearly 25 0 C. The falling time is, instead of using a stop-watch, measured with two light pulses led to a photomultiplier with mirrors, which make two pulse marks on moving chart paper. Distance between the two pulse marks is proportional to falling time. Instead of water filled double chambers of constant temperature equipped with heaters, thermostats and propellers for stirring, the column is dipped in circulating water supplied from a ''Thermoelectric'' made by ''Sharp'' company, which can circulate constant temperature water cooled or heated with thermoelements. Variation of the temperature is about 0.01 0 C. The range of deuterium concentration in our case was 20 -- 60D%. Sensitivity increased as the medium temperature decreased and as deuterium concentration of water sample increased. (auth.)

  14. Drop impact splashing and air entrapment

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2013-03-01

    Drop impact is a canonical problem in fluid mechanics, with numerous applications in industrial as well as natural phenomena. The extremely simple initial configuration of the experiment can produce a very large variety of fast and complex dynamics. Scientific progress was made in parallel with major improvements in imaging and computational technologies. Most recently, high-speed imaging video cameras have opened the exploration of new phenomena occurring at the micro-second scale, and parallel computing allowed realistic direct numerical simulations of drop impacts. We combine these tools to bring a new understanding of two fundamental aspects of drop impacts: splashing and air entrapment. The early dynamics of a drop impacting on a liquid pool at high velocity produces an ejecta sheet, emerging horizontally in the neck between the drop and the pool. We show how the interaction of this thin liquid sheet with the air, the drop or the pool, can produce micro-droplets and bubble rings. Then we detail how the breakup of the air film stretched between the drop and the pool for lower impact velocities can produce a myriad of micro-bubbles.

  15. Drop size measurements in Venturi scrubbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Alonso, D.; Azzopardi, B.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Goncalves, J.A.S.; Coury, J.R. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2001-07-01

    Venturi scrubbers are high efficiency gas cleaners in which suspended particles are removed from gas streams by drops formed by liquid atomisation, usually in the Venturi throat. The size of the drops formed are of fundamental importance to the performance of the equipment, both in terms of pressure drop and dust removal efficiency. In this study, drop sizes in a cylindrical laboratory-scale Venturi scrubber were measured using a laser diffraction technique. Gas velocity and liquid to gas ratios varied from 50 to 90 m/s and 0.5 to 2.0 1/m{sup 3}, respectively. Water was injected using two different arrangements: either as jets in the throat or as a film just upstream of the convergence. Drop size measurements were performed at three positions in the case of jet injection: two located along the throat, and the last one at the end of the diffuser. The present data shows that the Sauter mean diameter of the spray can be well correlated by the equation of Boll et al. (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 24 (1974) 932). Drop size distributions are satisfactorily represented by a Rosin-Rammler function. This paper also provides a simple method for calculating the parameters of the Rosin-Rammler function. As a result of this work, drop sizes in Venturi scrubbers can be estimated with much higher accuracy. (Author)

  16. Evidence of fast non-linear feedback in EBR-II rod-drop measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-06-01

    Feedback reactivities determine the time dependence of a reactor during and after a transient initiating event. Recent analysis of control-rod drops in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Reactor has indicated that some relatively fast feedback may exist which cannot be accounted for by the linear feedback mechanisms. The linear and deduced non-linear feedback reactivities from a control-rod drop in EBR-II run 93A using detailed temperature coefficients of reactivity in the EROS kinetics code have been reported. The transient analyses have now been examined in more detail for times close to the drop to ascertain if additional positive reactivity is being built-in early in the drop which could be gradually released later in the drop

  17. "Self-Shaping" of Multicomponent Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholakova, Diana; Valkova, Zhulieta; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Smoukov, Stoyan K

    2017-06-13

    In our recent study we showed that single-component emulsion drops, stabilized by proper surfactants, can spontaneously break symmetry and transform into various polygonal shapes during cooling [ Denkov Nature 2015 , 528 , 392 - 395 ]. This process involves the formation of a plastic rotator phase of self-assembled oil molecules beneath the drop surface. The plastic phase spontaneously forms a frame of plastic rods at the oil drop perimeter which supports the polygonal shapes. However, most of the common substances used in industry appear as mixtures of molecules rather than pure substances. Here we present a systematic study of the ability of multicomponent emulsion drops to deform upon cooling. The observed trends can be summarized as follows: (1) The general drop-shape evolution for multicomponent drops during cooling is the same as with single-component drops; however, some additional shapes are observed. (2) Preservation of the particle shape upon freezing is possible for alkane mixtures with chain length difference Δn ≤ 4; for greater Δn, phase separation within the droplet is observed. (3) Multicomponent particles prepared from alkanes with Δn ≤ 4 plastify upon cooling due to the formation of a bulk rotator phase within the particles. (4) If a compound, which cannot induce self-shaping when pure, is mixed with a certain amount of a compound which induces self-shaping, then drops prepared from this mixture can also self-shape upon cooling. (5) Self-emulsification phenomena are also observed for multicomponent drops. In addition to the three recently reported mechanisms of self-emulsification [ Tcholakova Nat. Commun. 2017 , ( 8 ), 15012 ], a new (fourth) mechanism is observed upon freezing for alkane mixtures with Δn > 4. It involves disintegration of the particles due to a phase separation of alkanes upon freezing.

  18. Thyrotoxicosis Presenting as Unilateral Drop Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenju; Miyata, Hajime; Motegi, Takahide; Shibano, Ken; Ishiguro, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders associated with hyperthyroidism have several variations in their clinical phenotype, such as ophthalmopathy, periodic paralysis, and thyrotoxic myopathy. We herein report an unusual case of thyrotoxic myopathy presenting as unilateral drop foot. Histopathological examinations of the left tibialis anterior muscle showed marked variation in the fiber size, mild inflammatory cell infiltration, and necrotic and regenerated muscle fibers with predominantly type 1 fiber atrophy. Medical treatment with propylthiouracil resulted in complete improvement of the left drop foot. This case expands the phenotype of thyrotoxicosis and suggests that thyrotoxicosis be considered as a possible cause of unilateral drop foot.

  19. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharugoji

    2012-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Micro-splashing by drop impacts

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2012-07-18

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to observe directly the earliest onset of prompt splashing when a drop impacts onto a smooth solid surface. We capture the start of the ejecta sheet travelling along the solid substrate and show how it breaks up immediately upon emergence from the underneath the drop. The resulting micro-droplets are much smaller and faster than previously reported and may have gone unobserved owing to their very small size and rapid ejection velocities, which approach 100 m s-1, for typical impact conditions of large rain drops. We propose a phenomenological mechanism which predicts the velocity and size distribution of the resulting microdroplets. We also observe azimuthal undulations which may help promote the earliest breakup of the ejecta. This instability occurs in the cusp in the free surface where the drop surface meets the radially ejected liquid sheet. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  1. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolchenko Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam-air mixture becomes nonflammable. As a result of solve of a heat balance equation it was made the following conclusion: water drops which size is equal to 100 μm will completely evaporate in a zone of combustion with extent of 1 m if the flying speed of drops is even 16 mps (acc. to Stokes v = 3 mps; whereas drops of larger size will evaporate only partially.

  2. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pressure drop in flashing flow through obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinle, M.E.; Johnston, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment was designed to investigate the pressure drop for flashing flow across obstructions of different geometries at various flow rates. Tests were run using two different orifices to determine if the two-phase pressure drop could be characterized by the single phase loss coefficient and the general behavior of the two-phase multiplier. For the geometries studied, it was possible to correlate the multiplier in a geometry-independent fashion

  4. Pressure drop in T's in concentric ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock, R.A.W.

    1983-02-01

    A set of experiments has been carried out to measure the pressure drop characteristics of single-phase flow in dividing and joining right-angled T's in a concentric ducting system. These have been compared with measured pressure drops in a simple round tube system. In most tests with the concentric system the number of velocity heads lost is either similar to, or more than, the value for the round tubes. (author)

  5. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Smith, Robbie E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus (10) is constructed having a cylindrical enclosure (16) within which a disc-shaped wicking element (18) is positioned. A well or recess (22) is cut into an upper side (24) of this wicking element, and a glass cover plate or slip (28) having a protein drop disposed thereon is sealably positioned on the wicking element (18), with drop (12) being positioned over well or recess (22). A flow of control fluid is generated by a programmable gradient former (16), with this control fluid having a vapor pressure that is selectively variable. This flow of control fluid is coupled to the wicking element (18) where control fluid vapor diffusing from walls (26) of the recess (22) is exposed to the drop (12), forming a vapor pressure gradient between the drop (12) and the control fluid vapor. Initially, this gradient is adjusted to draw solvent from the drop (12) at a relatively high rate, and as the critical supersaturation point is approached (the point at which crystal nucleation occurs), the gradient is reduced to more slowly draw solvent from the drop (12). This allows discrete protein molecules more time to orient themselves into an ordered crystalline lattice, producing protein crystals which, when processed by X-ray crystallography, possess a high degree of resolution.

  6. Free drop impact analysis of shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Kennedy, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The WHAMS-2D and WHAMS-3D codes were used to analyze the dynamic response of the RAS/TREAT shielded shipping cask subjected to transient leadings for the purpose of assessing potential damage to the various components that comprise the the cask. The paper describes how these codes can be used to provide and intermediate level of detail between full three-dimensional finite element calculations and hand calculations which are cost effective for design purposes. Three free drops were adressed: (1) a thirty foot axial drop on either end; (2) a thirty foot oblique angle drop with the cask having several different orientations from the vertical with impact on the cask corner; and (3) a thirty foot side drop with simultaneous impact on the lifting trunnion and the bottom end. Results are presented for two models of the side and oblique angle drops; one model includes only the mass of the lapped sleeves of depleted uranium (DU) while the other includes the mass and stiffness of the DU. The results of the end drop analyses are given for models with and without imperfections in the cask. Comparison of the analysis to hand calculations and simplified analyses are given. (orig.)

  7. Drop Performance Test of CRDMs for JRTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Chung, Jong-Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun [POSCO Plandtec Co. Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan-Hee [RIST, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The drop test results of CRDMs with AC-type electromagnet show that the initial delay times are not satisfied with the requirement, 0.15 seconds. After the replacement of the electromagnet from AC-type to DCtype, the drop times of CARs and accelerations due to the impact of moving parts are satisfied with all requirements. As a result, it is found that four CRDMs to be installed at site have a good drop performance, and meet all performance requirements. A control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) is a device to control the position of a control absorber rod (CAR) in the core by using a stepping motor which is commanded by the reactor regulating system (RRS) to control the reactivity during the normal operation of the reactor. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the performances such as the stepping, drop, endurance, vibration, seismic and structural integrity for active components. Especially, the CAR drop curves are important data for the safety analysis. This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performances of a prototype and 4 CRDMs to be installed at site. The tests are carried out at a test rig simulating the actual reactor's conditions.

  8. Epileptic negative drop attacks in atypical benign partial epilepsy: a neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a computer-assisted polygraphic analysis of drop attacks in a child with atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE) to investigate neurophysiological characteristics. The patient was a six-year two-month-old girl, who had started to have focal motor seizures, later combined with daily epileptic negative myoclonus (ENM) and drop attacks, causing multiple injuries. We studied episodes of ENM and drop attacks using video-polygraphic and computer-assisted back-averaging analysis. A total of 12 ENM episodes, seven involving the left arm (ENMlt) and five involving both arms (ENMbil), and five drop attacks were captured for analysis. All episodes were time-locked to spike-and-wave complexes (SWC) arising from both centro-temporo-parietal (CTP) areas. The latency between the onset of SWC and ENMlt, ENMbil, and drop attacks reached 68 ms, 42 ms, and 8 ms, respectively. The height of the spike as well as the slow-wave component of SWC for drop attacks were significantly larger than that for both ENMlt and ENMbil (p negative myoclonus involving not only upper proximal but also axial muscles, causing the body to fall. Thus, drop attacks in ABPE are considered to be epileptic negative drop attacks arising from bilateral CTP foci and differ from drop attacks of a generalized origin seen in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and myoclonic-astatic epilepsy.

  9. Asymmetric ratchet effect for directional transport of fog drops on static and dynamic butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Ju, Jie; Zheng, Yongmei; Jiang, Lei

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by novel creatures, researchers have developed varieties of fog drop transport systems and made significant contributions to the fields of heat transferring, water collecting, antifogging, and so on. Up to now, most of the efforts in directional fog drop transport have been focused on static surfaces. Considering it is not practical to keep surfaces still all the time in reality, conducting investigations on surfaces that can transport fog drops in both static and dynamic states has become more and more important. Here we report the wings of Morpho deidamia butterflies can directionally transport fog drops in both static and dynamic states. This directional drop transport ability results from the micro/nano ratchet-like structure of butterfly wings: the surface of butterfly wings is composed of overlapped scales, and the scales are covered with porous asymmetric ridges. Influenced by this special structure, fog drops on static wings are transported directionally as a result of the fog drops' asymmetric growth and coalescence. Fog drops on vibrating wings are propelled directionally due to the fog drops' asymmetric dewetting from the wings.

  10. Predictors of postoperative hemoglobin drop after laparoscopic myomectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrowski, Rafał; Jäger, Christoph; Forster, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic myomectomy (LM) can be associated with significant bleeding. To identify factors influencing the postoperative hemoglobin (Hb) drop after LM. This is a retrospective, single-center study. We evaluated data of 150 consecutive patients undergoing LM due to intramural myomas between 2010 and 2015. The median age of the patients was 37 (23-53) years. The mean diameter of the largest myoma was 5.7 ±2.3 (1.5-12) cm. The mean surgical time was 83 ±38 (35-299) min. The median number of sutures was 3 (1-11). The mean postoperative Hb drop was 1.6 ±1.2 (0-6) g/dl, and the mean estimated blood loss was 261 ±159 (50-1700) ml. In the univariate analysis, the postoperative Hb drop correlated with the duration of surgery (p < 0.001), diameter of the largest myoma (p < 0.001), cumulative myoma weight (p < 0.001), and number of sutures (p < 0.001), but not with patients' age or number of intramural myomas. In the multivariable analysis, the surgical time ( β = 0.395, p < 0.001), diameter of the largest myoma ( β = 0.292, p = 0.03) and preoperative Hb concentration ( β = 0.299, p < 0.001) predicted the postoperative Hb change. Surgical time and dominant myoma diameter are independent predictors of the postoperative Hb drop after LM.

  11. ITER FW cooling by a flat channel, adapted to low flow rate and high pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, I.B.; Bondarchuk, D.E.; Gervash, A.A.; Glazunov, D.A.; Komarov, A.O.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Mazul, I.V.; Rulev, R.V.; Yablokov, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► ITER FW cooling: pressure drop quotation must be assigned according to thermal load. ► Flat channel solutions with wide range (1:500) of hydraulic resistivity are presented. ► Simulations in Ansys CFX were carried out for presented designs. ► Usage of pressure drop quotation significantly reduces surface temperature. ► Experiments in TSEFEY-M facility confirm simulations. - Abstract: Application of hypervapotron (HV) to cool in-vessel components of ITER – divertor and first wall (FW) – is characterized by the same design load (5 MW/m 2 ) but water flow rate for FW is 8–9 times (almost by order!) less for parallel feeding elements so it seems it would be better to use other design. Several variants of a flat channel design different from HV are suggested that enable to adapt a channel to pressure quota up to 1 MPa and higher. A main feature of the suggested variants is a spiral or multi-spiral stream (flat multi spiral––FMS) that improves heat rejection and can be obtained both by exciting of such mode and forced by channel geometry. Comparison of the variants was carried out in simulations (Ansys CFX) as well as in experiments on the TSEFEY-M facility with electron-beam gun. It is shown that excitation of a spiral stream in a channel significantly reduces a temperature of a loaded surface of a channel. Miniature thermocouples were used to measure temperature near the surface.

  12. The Evaporation of Liquid Micro-Drops on the Heated Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation of a heated sessile water micro-drop was studied experimentally at the substrate temperature and surrounding atmosphere from 30 to 50 °C. The studies were performed on the float glass substrate with aluminum nanocoating of optical quality. The research has shown that the specific rate of evaporation (mass loss per unit of the drop surface area increases with the decrease in droplet volume and at the last stage several times exceeds the initial value.

  13. Effect of rb-bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops on tear film stability and dry eye symptoms after age-related cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare and analyze the effect of recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGFeye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops on the tear film stability and dry eye symptoms after age-related cataract surgery. METHODS: A total of 115 patients(115 affected eyeswith dry eyes after age-related cataract surgery were divided into the bFGF group, the hydroxyl indican group and the blank control group by the random number table method. The blank control group was only given routine anti-inflammatory treatment, and on the basis, the bFGF group and the hydroxyl indican group were treated with bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops respectively. The clinical efficacy, adverse reactions, changes in scores of dry eye symptoms, Schirmer test(SⅠt, tear film break-up time(BUTand corneal fluorescein staining(CFSscores at different time points were compared among the three groups. RESULTS: The total markedly effective rates in the bFGF group(89.5%was higher than that in the hydroxyl indican group(70.3%or the blank control group(47.5%(PPPCONCLUSION: The tear film is unstable in early stage after age-related cataract surgery, and there are dry eye symptoms. The intervention with bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops can effectively restore the tear film stability and significantly relieve dry eye symptoms, and the effect of bFGF eye drops is more significant.

  14. The study of the effects of sea-spray drops on the marine atmospheric boundary layer by direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2018-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of turbulent exchange processes occurring in the atmospheric marine boundary layer are of primary importance for their correct parameterization in large-scale prognostic models. These processes are complicated, especially at sufficiently strong wind forcing conditions, by the presence of sea-spray drops which are torn off the crests of sufficiently steep surface waves by the wind gusts. Natural observations indicate that mass fraction of sea-spray drops increases with wind speed and their impact on the dynamics of the air in the vicinity of the sea surface can become quite significant. Field experiments, however, are limited by insufficient accuracy of the acquired data and are in general costly and difficult. Laboratory modeling presents another route to investigate the spray-mediated exchange processes in much more detail as compared to the natural experiments. However, laboratory measurements, contact as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) methods, also suffer from inability to resolve the dynamics of the near-surface air-flow, especially in the surface wave troughs. In this report, we present a first attempt to use Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as tool for investigation of the drops-mediated momentum, heat and moisture transfer in a turbulent, droplet-laden air flow over a wavy water surface. DNS is capable of resolving the details of the transfer processes and do not involve any closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (LES and RANS) simulations. Thus DNS provides a basis for improving parameterizations in LES and RANS closure models and further development of large-scale prognostic models. In particular, we discuss numerical results showing the details of the modification of the air flow velocity, temperature and relative humidity fields by multidisperse, evaporating drops. We use Eulerian-Lagrangian approach where the equations for the air-flow fields are solved in a Eulerian frame whereas

  15. Spreading Dynamics of an Ellipsoidal Drop Impacting on a Heated Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Sungchan [Korea Nat’l. Univ. of Transportation, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Unlike spherical drop impact, ellipsoidal drop impact can control the bouncing height on a heated surface by significantly altering impact behavior. To scrutinize the effect of the aspect ratio (AR) of the drop on the bounce suppression, in this study, non-axisymmetric spreading behaviors are observed from two side views and characterized based on the spreading width of the drop for horizontal principal axes. In addition, the maximum spreading width is investigated for various ARs. The results show that as the AR increases, the maximum spreading width of the minor axis increases, whereas that of the major axis shows no significant variation. In the regime of high AR and high impact velocity, liquid fragmentations by three parts are observed during bouncing. These fragmentations are discussed in this work. The hydrodynamic features of ellipsoidal drop impact will help understand bouncing control on non-wetting surfaces for several applications, such as self-cleaning and spray cooling.

  16. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  17. [Optimize dropping process of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills by using design space approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Chen; Wang, Qing-Qing; Chen, An; Pan, Fang-Lai; Gong, Xing-Chu; Qu, Hai-Bin

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a design space approach was applied to optimize the dropping process of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills. Firstly, potential critical process parameters and potential process critical quality attributes were determined through literature research and pre-experiments. Secondly, experiments were carried out according to Box-Behnken design. Then the critical process parameters and critical quality attributes were determined based on the experimental results. Thirdly, second-order polynomial models were used to describe the quantitative relationships between critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Finally, a probability-based design space was calculated and verified. The verification results showed that efficient production of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills can be guaranteed by operating within the design space parameters. The recommended operation ranges for the critical dropping process parameters of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills were as follows: dropping distance of 5.5-6.7 cm, and dropping speed of 59-60 drops per minute, providing a reference for industrial production of Ginkgo biloba dropping pills. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  18. Modifying Char Dustcake Pressure Drop Using Particulate Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landham, C.; Dahlin, R.S.; Martin, R.A.; Guan, X.

    2002-09-19

    Coal gasification produces residual particles of coal char, coal ash, and sorbent that are suspended in the fuel gas stream exiting the gasifier. In most cases, these particles (referred to, hereafter, simply as char) must be removed from the stream prior to sending the gas to a turbine, fuel cell, or other downstream device. Currently, the most common approach to cleaning the gas stream at high temperature and pressure is by filtering the particulate with a porous ceramic or metal filter. However, because these dusts frequently have small size distributions, irregular morphology, and high specific surface areas, they can have very high gas flow resistance resulting in hot-gas filter system operating problems. Typical of gasification chars, the hot-gas filter dustcakes produced at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) during recent coal gasification tests have had very high flow resistance (Martin et al, 2002). The filter system has been able to successfully operate, but pressure drops have been high and filter cleaning must occur very frequently. In anticipation of this problem, a study was conducted to investigate ways of reducing dustcake pressure drop. This paper will discuss the efficacy of adding low-flow-resistance particulate matter to the high-flow-resistance char dustcake to reduce dustcake pressure drop. The study had two parts: a laboratory screening study and confirming field measurements at the PSDF.

  19. Prediction of aliphatic and aromatic oil-water interfacial tension at temperatures >100 °C using COSMO-RS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Eckert, F.; Reinisch, J.

    2017-01-01

    As a contribution to the 9th Industrial Fluid Property Simulation Challenge on predicting interfacial tension between water and a set of non-polar oils at temperatures up to 170 °C we have used our first-principles based model, which is based on density functional theory and uses COSMO-RS implicit...... solvent model thermodynamics. Our calculations predict that the oil-water interfacial tension starts to drop significantly for alkanes at temperatures above ∼100 °C, and the oil-water interfacial tension drops significantly with increased temperature already above ∼25 °C for aromatic oils. In the range...

  20. Thermostatic tissue platform for intravital microscopy: 'the hanging drop' model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Dragan; Frieling, Helge; Lauer, Kai-Stephan; Bac, Vo Hoai; Richter, Joern; Wendt, Michael; Lehmann, Christian; Usichenko, Taras; Meissner, Konrad; Gruendling, Matthias

    2006-11-01

    Intravital microscopy imposes the particular problem of the combined control of the body temperature of the animal and the local temperature of the observed organ or tissues. We constructed and tested, in the rat ileum microcirculation preparation, a new organ-support platform. The platform consisted of an organ bath filled with physiological solution, and contained a suction tube, a superfusion tube, an intestine-support hand that was attached to a micromanipulator and a thermometer probe. To cover the intestine we used a cover glass plate with a plastic ring glued on its upper surface. After a routine procedure (anaesthesia, monitoring and surgery), the intestine segment (2-3 cm long) was gently exteriorized and placed on the 'hand' of the organ support. A small part of the intestine formed a small 'island' in the bath that was filled with physiological salt solution. The cover glass was secured in place. The physiological salt solution from the superfusion tube, which was pointed to the lower surface of the cover glass, formed a 'hanging drop'. The objective of the microscope was then immersed into distilled water that was formed by the cover glass plastic ring. The 'hanging drop' technique prevented any tissue quenching, ensured undisturbed microcirculation, provided for stable temperature and humidity, and permitted a clear visual field.

  1. Vertical Drop Of 21-PWR Waste Package On Unyielding Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic; A. Scheider; S.M. Bennett

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) Waste Package (WP) subjected to the 2-m vertical drop on an unyielding surface at three different temperatures. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities in two different WP components. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only

  2. Thermal interaction for molten tin dropped into water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakeri, V.H.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Plesset, M.S.

    1978-03-01

    Multiflash photography with extremely short duration exposure times per flash was used to observe the interaction of molten tin dropped into a water bath. Detailed photographic evidence is presented which demonstrates that transition, or nucleate boiling, is a possible triggering mechanism for vapor explosions. It was also found that the thermal constraints required to produce vapor explosions could be relaxed by introducing a stable thermal stratification within the coolant. In the present work, the threshold value of the initial tin temperature required for vapor explosion was reduced from about 500 to 343/sup 0/C.

  3. Thermal interaction for molten tin dropped into water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakeri, V.H.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Plesset, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    Multiflash photography with extremely short duration exposure times per flash has been used to observe the interaction of molten tin dropped into a water bath. Detailed photographic evidence is presented which demonstrates that transition, or nucleate boiling, is a possible triggering mechanism for vapour explosions. It was also found that the thermal constraints required to produce vapour explosions could be relaxed by introducing a stable thermal stratification within the coolant. In the present work, the threshold value of the initial tin temperature required for vapour explosion was reduced from about 500 to 343 0 C. (author)

  4. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Leal, L. Gary; Thomas, D. A.; Crouch, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Free drops and bubbles are weakly nonlinear mechanical systems that are relatively simple to characterize experimentally in 1-G as well as in microgravity. The understanding of the details of their motion contributes to the fundamental study of nonlinear phenomena and to the measurement of the thermophysical properties of freely levitated melts. The goal of this Glovebox-based experimental investigation is the low-gravity assessment of the capabilities of a modular apparatus based on ultrasonic resonators and on the pseudo- extinction optical method. The required experimental task is the accurate measurements of the large-amplitude dynamics of free drops and bubbles in the absence of large biasing influences such as gravity and levitation fields. A single-axis levitator used for the positioning of drops in air, and an ultrasonic water-filled resonator for the trapping of air bubbles have been evaluated in low-gravity and in 1-G. The basic feasibility of drop positioning and shape oscillations measurements has been verified by using a laptop-interfaced automated data acquisition and the optical extinction technique. The major purpose of the investigation was to identify the salient technical issues associated with the development of a full-scale Microgravity experiment on single drop and bubble dynamics.

  5. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.

    2013-04-29

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 108, 2012, article 264506). These dynamics mainly occur within 50 -s after the first contact, requiring imaging at 1 million f.p.s. For a water drop impacting on a thin layer of water, the entrapment of isolated bubbles starts through azimuthal instability, which forms at low impact velocities, in the neck connecting the drop and pool. For Reynolds number Re above -12 000, up to 10 partial bubble rings have been observed at the base of the ejecta, starting when the contact is -20% of the drop size. More regular bubble rings are observed for a pool of ethanol or methanol. The video imaging shows rotation around some of these air cylinders, which can temporarily delay their breakup into micro-bubbles. The different refractive index in the pool liquid reveals the destabilization of the vortices and the formation of streamwise vortices and intricate vortex tangles. Fine-scale axisymmetry is thereby destroyed. We show also that the shape of the drop has a strong influence on these dynamics. 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  6. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Spencer D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  7. Effect of drop jump technique on the reactive strength index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Artur; Juras, Grzegorz; Pietraszewski, Bogdan; Rokita, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The basic drill of plyometric training aimed at improving lower limb power and jump height is a drop jump. This exercise can be performed using different techniques, which substantially affects jump variables. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the values of the reactive strength index (RSI) for countermovement drop jumps (CDJs) and bounce drop jumps (BDJs). The study was carried out in a group of 8 male youth basketball players. The tests were conducted using the AMTI BP600900 force plate to measure ground reaction forces and the Noraxon MyoMotion system to record kinematic data. Each player performed two CDJs and two BDJs from the height of 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm. The RSI was calculated as a ratio of jump height and contact time. Moreover, the RSI was determined for the amortization and take-off phases separately. Significant differences (p jumps from 30, 45 and 60 cm. Differences in RSI values for jumps from 15 cm were not significant. Furthermore, CDJ height values were significantly higher (p jump technique that is commonly performed by basketball players.

  8. Millisecond-Period Meltdown Experiments on Prompt - Burst Effects and Molten-Tin-Water Dropping Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Coats, R.L.; Schmidt, T.R.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program of confirmatory research for the safety assessment of LMFBR plants. In the sodium-fuel interactions area, this research includes a series of real-time in-pile experiments on the pressure and work potential of prompt-burst excursions as well as laboratory dropping experiments with molten tin and water. The in-pile experiments are performed by Sandia Laboratories in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR), which has a minimum period of 1.3 milliseconds. These single-pin experiments are performed in a piston-loaded, stagnant-sodium autoclave, that is conceptually similar to the one used in the S-11 TREAT test. Unlike the S-11 test, however, realistic radial temperature profiles are obtained in the fuel, the cladding, and the sodium by pre-pulsing the reactor about 1/2 second before the main pulse. A series of preparatory runs have been made with helium-filled capsules and at low energy with sodium-filled capsules. The first significant fuel-coolant interaction run is scheduled for late March 1976. This will be a double-pulsed run at 2700 j/gm UO 2 . A continuing series of experiments is planned with oxide and advanced fuels in both fresh and irradiated form. In molten-tin-water dropping experiments at UCLA, microsecond duration multi-flash photography has been used for event diagnostics. Transition or nucleate boiling was found to trigger energetic interactions or vapor explosions. Temperature stratification in the water was found to reduce the threshold tin temperature necessary to produce vapor explosions below that the predicted by the coolant homogeneous nucleation hypothesis. Interaction zone growth times of a few msec were measured

  9. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  10. Clinical observation of Qiming granule combined with Dextran and Hypromellose eye drops for dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lan Wan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of Qiming granule combined with Dextran and Hypromellose eye drops in treatment of dry eye.METHODS: A randomized, parallel-control approach was adopted, 100 cases of dry eye patients were divided into treatment group and control group equally, observation on the treatment of 3 months. The treatment group was applied Dextran and Hypromellose eye drops combined with oral Qiming granule, simply Dextran and Hypromellose eye drops for control group. Before and after treatment, tear secretion volume, break-up time, corneal fluorescein staining and symptom were observed.RESULTS: After treatment, there was statistical significance for the break-up time, SⅠt and corneal fluorescein staining in both groups when compared with before treatment(PPCONCLUSION: The combined Dextran and Hypromellose eye drops and Qiming granule perform better than Dextran and Hypromellose eye drops only in treatment of dry eye.

  11. Estimating the demand for drop-off recycling sites: a random utility travel cost approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidique, Shaufique F; Lupi, Frank; Joshi, Satish V

    2013-09-30

    Drop-off recycling is one of the most widely adopted recycling programs in the United States. Despite its wide implementation, relatively little literature addresses the demand for drop-off recycling. This study examines the demand for drop-off recycling sites as a function of travel costs and various site characteristics using the random utility model (RUM). The findings of this study indicate that increased travel costs significantly reduce the frequency of visits to drop-off sites implying that the usage pattern of a site is influenced by its location relative to where people live. This study also demonstrates that site specific characteristics such as hours of operation, the number of recyclables accepted, acceptance of commingled recyclables, and acceptance of yard-waste affect the frequency of visits to drop-off sites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The yield drop at or below 423 K in Zr single crystals and in Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, A.; Malik, L.M.; Dickson, J.I.

    1979-01-01

    Yield drops were obtained in interrupted tensile and compression tests performed on zirconium single crystals between 262 and 362 K. Near 295 K, where most tests were performed, a minimum yield drop was obtained for an aging performed near the internal stress. For positive stress relaxations and a constant aging time, this yield drop increased linearly with the stress relaxed during aging. This result indicates a significant portion of the yield drop is caused by dislocations gliding to pinning points, which are most probably forest dislocations. A similar behaviour was observed for polycrystalline titanium at 423 K. The yield drops observed in the single crystals at 295 K, after aging at zero stress, increased linearly with the logarithm of the aging time in contrast to the time-independent Haasen-Kelly effect observed in polycrystalline material. (auth)

  13. Liquid toroidal drop under uniform electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarankin, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The problem of a stationary liquid toroidal drop freely suspended in another fluid and subjected to an electric field uniform at infinity is addressed analytically. Taylor's discriminating function implies that, when the phases have equal viscosities and are assumed to be slightly conducting (leaky dielectrics), a spherical drop is stationary when Q=(2R2+3R+2)/(7R2), where R and Q are ratios of the phases' electric conductivities and dielectric constants, respectively. This condition holds for any electric capillary number, CaE, that defines the ratio of electric stress to surface tension. Pairam and Fernández-Nieves showed experimentally that, in the absence of external forces (CaE=0), a toroidal drop shrinks towards its centre, and, consequently, the drop can be stationary only for some CaE>0. This work finds Q and CaE such that, under the presence of an electric field and with equal viscosities of the phases, a toroidal drop having major radius ρ and volume 4π/3 is qualitatively stationary-the normal velocity of the drop's interface is minute and the interface coincides visually with a streamline. The found Q and CaE depend on R and ρ, and for large ρ, e.g. ρ≥3, they have simple approximations: Q˜(R2+R+1)/(3R2) and CaE∼3 √{3 π ρ / 2 } (6 ln ⁡ρ +2 ln ⁡[96 π ]-9 )/ (12 ln ⁡ρ +4 ln ⁡[96 π ]-17 ) (R+1 ) 2/ (R-1 ) 2.

  14. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-01-01

    The structural and interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops are assessed by means of mechanical, thermodynamical, and statistical mechanical approaches that are discussed in detail, including original developments at both the macroscopic level and the microscopic level of density functional theory (DFT). With a novel analysis we show that a purely macroscopic (static) mechanical treatment can lead to a qualitatively reasonable description of the surface tension and the Tolman length of a liquid drop; the latter parameter, which characterizes the curvature dependence of the tension, is found to be negative and has a magnitude of about a half of the molecular dimension. A mechanical slant cannot, however, be considered satisfactory for small finite-size systems where fluctuation effects are significant. From the opposite perspective, a curvature expansion of the macroscopic thermodynamic properties (density and chemical potential) is then used to demonstrate that a purely thermodynamic approach of this type cannot in itself correctly account for the curvature correction of the surface tension of liquid drops. We emphasize that any approach, e.g., classical nucleation theory, which is based on a purely macroscopic viewpoint, does not lead to a reliable representation when the radius of the drop becomes microscopic. The description of the enhanced inhomogeneity exhibited by small drops (particularly in the dense interior) necessitates a treatment at the molecular level to account for finite-size and surface effects correctly. The so-called mechanical route, which corresponds to a molecular-level extension of the macroscopic theory of elasticity and is particularly popular in molecular dynamics simulation, also appears to be unreliable due to the inherent ambiguity in the definition of the microscopic pressure tensor, an observation which has been known for decades but is frequently ignored. The union of the theory of capillarity (developed in the nineteenth

  15. Total sleep time severely drops during adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Leger

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Restricted sleep duration among young adults and adolescents has been shown to increase the risk of morbidities such as obesity, diabetes or accidents. However there are few epidemiological studies on normal total sleep time (TST in representative groups of teen-agers which allow to get normative data. PURPOSE: To explore perceived total sleep time on schooldays (TSTS and non schooldays (TSTN and the prevalence of sleep initiating insomnia among a nationally representative sample of teenagers. METHODS: Data from 9,251 children aged 11 to 15 years-old, 50.7% of which were boys, as part of the cross-national study 2011 HBSC were analyzed. Self-completion questionnaires were administered in classrooms. An estimate of TSTS and TSTN (week-ends and vacations was calculated based on specifically designed sleep habits report. Sleep deprivation was estimated by a TSTN - TSTS difference >2 hours. Sleep initiating nsomnia was assessed according to International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD 2. Children who reported sleeping 7 hours or less per night were considered as short sleepers. RESULTS: A serious drop of TST was observed between 11 yo and 15 yo, both during the schooldays (9 hours 26 minutes vs. 7 h 55 min.; p<0.001 and at a lesser extent during week-ends (10 h 17 min. vs. 9 h 44 min.; p<0.001. Sleep deprivation concerned 16.0% of chidren aged of 11 yo vs. 40.5% of those of 15 yo (p<0.001. Too short sleep was reported by 2.6% of the 11 yo vs. 24.6% of the 15 yo (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Despite the obvious need for sleep in adolescence, TST drastically decreases with age among children from 11 to 15 yo which creates significant sleep debt increasing with age.

  16. 3D Imaging of Water-Drop Condensation on Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Lubricant-Impregnated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiya, Tadashi; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Condensation of water from the atmosphere on a solid surface is an ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and has diverse technological applications, e.g. in heat and mass transfer. We investigated the condensation kinetics of water drops on a lubricant-impregnated surface, i.e., a micropillar array impregnated with a non-volatile ionic liquid. Growing and coalescing drops were imaged in 3D using a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with a temperature and humidity control. Different stages of condensation can be discriminated. On a lubricant-impregnated hydrophobic micropillar array these are: (1) Nucleation on the lubricant surface. (2) Regular alignment of water drops between micropillars and formation of a three-phase contact line on a bottom of the substrate. (3) Deformation and bridging by coalescence which eventually leads to a detachment of the drops from the bottom substrate. The drop-substrate contact does not result in breakdown of the slippery behaviour. Contrary, on a lubricant-impregnated hydrophilic micropillar array, the condensed water drops replace the lubricant. Consequently, the surface loses its slippery property. Our results demonstrate that a Wenzel-like to Cassie transition, required to maintain the facile removal of condensed water drops, can be induced by well-chosen surface hydrophobicity.

  17. The new Drop Tower catapult system

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kampen, Peter; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Rath, Hans J.

    2006-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of the "Drop Tower" began. Since then, the eye-catching tower with a height of 146 m and its characteristic glass roof has become the emblem of the technology centre in Bremen. The Drop Tower Bremen provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness. Items are considered weightless, when they are in "free fall", i.e. moving without propulsion within the gravity field of the earth. The height of the tower limits the simple "free fall" experiment period to max. 4.74 s. With the inauguration of the catapult system in December 2004, the ZARM is entering a new dimension. This world novelty will meet scientists' demands of extending the experiment period up to 9.5 s. Since turning the first sod on May 3rd, 1988, the later installation of the catapult system has been taken into account by building the necessary chamber under the tower. The catapult system is located in a chamber 10 m below the base of the tower. This chamber is almost completely occupied by 12 huge pressure tanks. These tanks are placed around the elongation of the vacuum chamber of the drop tube. In its centre there is the pneumatic piston that accelerates the drop capsule by the pressure difference between the vacuum inside the drop tube and the pressure inside the tanks. The acceleration level is adjusted by means of a servo hydraulic breaking system controlling the piston velocity. After only a quarter of a second the drop capsule achieves its lift-off speed of 175 km/h. With this exact speed, the capsule will rise up to the top of the tower and afterwards fall down again into the deceleration unit which has been moved under the drop tube in the meantime. The scientific advantages of the doubled experiment time are obvious: during almost 10 s of high

  18. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  19. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  20. Transformation and fragmentation behavior of molten metal drop in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Izumi; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Sugiyama, Ken-ichiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to clarify the fragmentation mechanism of a metallic alloy (U-Pu-Zr) fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions (liquefaction temperature =650degC), which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents for metallic fuel fast reactors, a series of experiments was carried out using molten aluminum (m.p.=660degC) and sodium mainly under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur. When the instantaneous contact interface temperature (T i ) between molten aluminum drop and sodium is lower than the boiling point of sodium (T c,bp ), the molten aluminum drop can be fragmented and the mass median diameter (D m ) of aluminum fragments becomes small with increasing T i . When T i is roughly equivalent to or higher than T c,bp , the fragmentation of aluminum drop is promoted by thermal interaction caused by the boiling of sodium on the surface of the drop. Furthermore, even under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur and the solid crust is formed on the surface of the drop, it is found from an analytical evaluation that the thermal fragmentation of molten aluminum drop with solid crust is caused by the transient pressurization within the melt confined by the crust. These results indicate the possibility that the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by the metallurgical reactions can be fragmented without occurring the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt. (author)

  1. Transformation and fragmentation behavior of molten metal drop in sodium pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Zhang Zhigang; Sugiyama, Ken-Ichiro; Kinoshita, Izumi

    2007-01-01

    In order to clarify the fragmentation mechanism of a metallic alloy (U-Pu-Zr) fuel on liquid phase formed by metallurgical reactions (liquefaction temperature = 650 deg. C), which is important in evaluating the sequence of core disruptive accidents for metallic fuel fast reactors, a series of experiments was carried out using molten aluminum (melting point 660 deg. C) and sodium mainly under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur. When the instantaneous contact interface temperature (T i ) between molten aluminum drop and sodium is lower than the boiling point of sodium (T c,bp ), the molten aluminum drop can be fragmented and the mass median diameter (D m ) of aluminum fragments becomes small with increasing T i . When T i is roughly equivalent to or higher than T c,bp , the fragmentation of aluminum drop is promoted by thermal interaction caused by the boiling of sodium on the surface of the drop. Furthermore, even under the condition that the boiling of sodium does not occur and the solid crust is formed on the surface of the drop, it is confirmed from an analytical evaluation that the thermal fragmentation of molten aluminum drop with solid crust has a potential to be caused by the transient pressurization within the melt confined by the crust. These results indicate the possibility that the metallic alloy fuel on liquid phase formed by the metallurgical reactions can be fragmented without occurring the boiling of sodium on the surface of the melt

  2. Gender, Success, and Drop-Out during a Resistance Exercise Program in Community Dwelling Old Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Geirsdottir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Resistance exercise training can be effective against sarcopenia. We identified predictors of drop-out and compared physical outcomes between men and women after such training. Methods. Subjects (N=236, 73.7±5.7 years participated in a 12-week resistance exercise program. Outcome variables were measured at baseline and endpoint. Results. Drop-out was 11.9% and not significantly different between genders. Drop-outs were significantly older and had poorer strength and physical function in comparison to completers. Anthropometrics, QoL, and cognitive function were not related to drop-out. According to multivariate analysis, gait speed and physical activity were the strongest predictors of drop-out. After the training, gains in lean mass or appendicular muscle were significantly higher in men than women; however relative gains in appendicular muscle as well as absolute improvements in strength and function were similar in men and women, respectively. Conclusions. Participants who drop out are older, have poorer physical function, and are less physically active. Old women do not drop out more frequently than men and show meaningful improvements in relevant outcomes similar to men after such a training program. The trial is registered at the US National Library of Medicine (NCT01074879.

  3. Extension of the M-D model for treating stress drops in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; DeVries, K.L.; Fossum, A.F.; Callahan, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    Development of the multimechanism deformation (M-D) constitutive model for steady state creep, which incorporates irreversible workhardening and recovery transient strains, was motivated by the need to predict very long term closures in underground rooms for radioactive waste repositories in salt. The multimechanism deformation model for the creep deformation of salt is extended to treat the response of salt to imposed stress drops. Stress drop tests produce a very distinctive behavior where both reversible elastic strain and reversible time dependent strain occur. These transient strains are negative compared to the positive transient strains produced by the normal creep workhardening and recovery processes. A simple micromechanical evolutionary process is defined to account for the accumulation of these reversible strains, and their subsequent release with decreases in stress. A number of experimental stress drop tests for various stress drop magnitudes and temperatures are adequately simulated with the model

  4. Efficacy of atropine and anisodamine eye drops for adolescent pseudomyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect and local influence of atropine and anisodamine eye drops on adolescent pseudomyopia. METHODS:Totally 110 cases of juvenile pseudomyopia were randomly divided into two groups, the control group was given 10g/L atropine sulfate eye gel, and the observation group was treated with 5g/L raceanisodamine eye drops. The efficacy of two methods, the changes of axial length and intraocular pressure before and after treatment, and the incidence of adverse reactions were compared. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in cure rate between the two groups(χ2=0.533, P=0.465, but the effective rate of observation group was significantly better than the control group(χ2=3.907, P=0.048. Compared with the same group before treatment, the length of the axial length of the two groups increased in different degrees,and the increase value of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group, the difference was statistically significant(PP>0.05. The intraocular pressure of the two groups was significantly lower than that of the same group before treatment, and the difference between the two groups after treatments was not statistically significant(P >0.05. The incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group(χ2=18.939, PCONCLUSION: Anisodamine eye drops in the treatment of juvenile pseudomyopia has obvious curative effect, its efficacy and safety are better than atropine eye gel.

  5. Potential drop technique for monitoring stress corrosion cracking growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Celia F.C.; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.; Moreira, Pedro A.L.D.P.L.P.

    2002-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of most severe damage mechanisms influencing the lifetime of components in the operation of nuclear power plants. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth as the main parameters coming to residual lifetime determination, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment which is close to the real operation conditions of assessed component. Under cooperation of CDTN/CNEN and International Atomic Energy Agency a testing system has been developed by Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, that will be used for the environmentally assisted cracking testing at CDTN/CNEN. The facility allows high temperature autoclave corrosion mechanical testing in well-defined LWR water chemistry using constant load, slow strain rate and rising displacement techniques. The facility consists of autoclave and refreshing water loop enabling testing at temperatures up to 330 deg C. Active loading system allows the maximum load on a specimen as high as 60 kN. The potential drop measurement is used to determine the instant crack length and its growth rate. The paper presents the facility and describes the potential drop technique, that is one of the most used techniques to monitor crack growth in specimens under corrosive environments. (author)

  6. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  7. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Large Packaging design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.955(e) of this subpart. (b... § 178.960(d). (d) Test method. (1) Samples of all Large Packaging design types must be dropped onto a... be restored to the upright position for observation. (2) Large Packaging design types with a capacity...

  8. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  9. Modeling merging behavior at lane drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    In work-zone configurations where lane drops are present, merging of traffic at the taper presents an operational concern. In : addition, as flow through the work zone is reduced, the relative traffic safety of the work zone is also reduced. Improvin...

  10. Predicting students drop out : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, G.W.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Vleeshouwers, J.M.; Barnes, T.; Desmarais, M.; Romero, C.; Ventura, S.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their

  11. Potential drop sensors for sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaraj, R.

    1978-11-01

    Potential drop sensors to detect the presence or the absence of sodium in pipe lines are described. These are very handy during loop charging and dumping operations. Their suitability to detect level surges and to monitor continuous level of liquid metals in certain applications is discussed. (author)

  12. The liquid drop nature of nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John F

    2012-03-01

    Nucleoli are prominent subnuclear organelles, and are known to be hubs of ribosome synthesis. A recent study of Brangwynne et al. reports that the nucleoli of Xenopus oocytes display "liquid drop" behavior, suggesting that nucleolar structure may be driven by rather simple physical principles.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of drop and countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M. F.; Mackay, M.T.; Schinkelshoek, D.; Huijing, P. A.; van Ingen Schenau, G. J.

    For 13 subjects the performance of drop jumps from a height of 40 cm (DJ) and of countermovement jumps (CMJ) was analysed and compared. From force plate and cine data biomechanical variables including forces, moments, power output and amount of work done were calculated for hip, knee and ankle

  14. The stability of cylindrical pendant drops

    CERN Document Server

    McCuan, John

    2018-01-01

    The author considers the stability of certain liquid drops in a gravity field satisfying a mixed boundary condition. He also considers as special cases portions of cylinders that model either the zero gravity case or soap films with the same kind of boundary behavior.

  15. Scaling the drop size in coflow experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro-Hernandez, E; Gordillo, J M; Gundabala, V; Fernandez-Nieves, A

    2009-01-01

    We perform extensive experiments with coflowing liquids in microfluidic devices and provide a closed expression for the drop size as a function of measurable parameters in the jetting regime that accounts for the experimental observations; this expression works irrespective of how the jets are produced, providing a powerful design tool for this type of experiments.

  16. Scaling the drop size in coflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Hernandez, E; Gordillo, J M [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Gundabala, V; Fernandez-Nieves, A [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)], E-mail: jgordill@us.es

    2009-07-15

    We perform extensive experiments with coflowing liquids in microfluidic devices and provide a closed expression for the drop size as a function of measurable parameters in the jetting regime that accounts for the experimental observations; this expression works irrespective of how the jets are produced, providing a powerful design tool for this type of experiments.

  17. Goose droppings as food for reindeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, R; Loonen, MJJE

    Feeding conditions for Svalbard reindeer, Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus, on Spitsbergen are generally poor, owing to low availability of forage. We report on coprophagy: the use of goose faeces as an alternative food source for reindeer. Fresh droppings from Barnacle Geese, Branta leucopsis,

  18. Drop impact entrapment of bubble rings

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, M.-J.; Takehara, K.; Etoh, T.G.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-01-01

    We use ultra-high-speed video imaging to look at the initial contact of a drop impacting on a liquid layer. We observe experimentally the vortex street and the bubble-ring entrapments predicted numerically, for high impact velocities, by Thoraval et

  19. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  20. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor, molten liquid may be introduced into a volatile coolant, which, under certain conditions, results in explosive interactions. Such fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) are characterised by an initial pre-mixing phase during which the molten liquid, metallic or oxidic in nature, undergoes a breakup (fragmentation) process which significantly increase the area available for melt-coolant contact, and thus energy transfer. Although substantial progress in the understanding of phenomenology of the FCI events has been achieved in recent years, there remain uncertainties in describing the primary and secondary breakup processes. The focus of this work is on the melt jet and drop breakup during the premixing phase of FCI. The objectives are to gain insight into the premixing phase of the FCI phenomena, to determine what fraction of the melt fragments and determine the size distribution. The approach is to perform experiments with various simulant materials, at different scales, different conditions and with variation of controlling parameters affecting jet and drop breakup processes. The analysis approach is to investigate processes at different level of detail and complexity to understand the physics, to rationalise experimental results and to develop and validate models. In the first chapter a brief introduction and review of the status of the FCI phenomena is performed. A review of previous and current experimental projects is performed. The status of the experimental projects and major findings are outlined. The first part of the second chapter deals with experimental investigation of jet breakup. Two series of experiments were performed with low and high temperature jets. The low temperature experiments employed cerrobend-70 as jet liquid. A systematic investigation of thermal hydraulic conditions and melt physical properties on the jet fragmentation and particle debris characteristics was

  1. An algorithm for selecting the most accurate protocol for contact angle measurement by drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z N

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an error analysis is performed to study real water drop images and the corresponding numerically generated water drop profiles for three widely used static contact angle algorithms: the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms and the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) algorithm. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the numerically generated drop profiles based on the Laplace equation. A significant number of water drop profiles with different volumes, contact angles, and noise levels are generated, and the influences of the three factors on the accuracies of the three algorithms are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the above-mentioned three algorithms are complementary. In fact, the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms show low errors and are highly resistant to noise for water drops with small/medium volumes and contact angles, while for water drop with large volumes and contact angles just the ADSA-P algorithm can meet accuracy requirement. However, this algorithm introduces significant errors in the case of small volumes and contact angles because of its high sensitivity to noise. The critical water drop volumes of the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms corresponding to a certain contact angle error are obtained through a significant amount of computation. To improve the precision of the static contact angle measurement, a more accurate algorithm based on a combination of the three algorithms is proposed. Following a systematic investigation, the algorithm selection rule is described in detail, while maintaining the advantages of the three algorithms and overcoming their deficiencies. In general, static contact angles over the entire hydrophobicity range can be accurately evaluated using the proposed algorithm. The ease of erroneous judgment in static contact angle measurements is avoided. The proposed algorithm is validated by a static contact angle evaluation of real and numerically generated water drop

  2. Drop weld thermal injuries to the middle ear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, I J

    2009-01-01

    Drop weld injuries to the tympanic membrane and middle ear caused by hot sparks or molten slag are a rare but significant injury. Steel workers and welders who are regularly exposed to flying sparks and molten metal slag are predisposed. This type of transtympanic thermal injury occurs when the slag literally drops into the external auditory canal and burns through the tympanic membrane. A spectrum of severity of injury occurs which includes chronic tympanic membrane perforation, chronic otorrhoea, facial nerve injury and deafness. Chronic tympanic membrane perforation is the most common sequelae and is perhaps one of the most challenging of all perforations to repair The combination of direct thermal injury and foreign body reaction results in continuing or recurrent suppuration. The foreign body reaction is due to the embedding of metal slag in the promontorial mucosa. We present a case of drop weld injury to the left tympanic membrane, resulting in chronic middle ear inflammation, otorrhoea and tympanic perforation. CAT scan clearly demonstrated a metallic promontorial foreign body with localised bone erosion. We emphasise the importance of removing these foreign bodies and recommend a cartilage reinforced underlay tympanoplasty technique to repair these perforations. Transtympanic thermal trauma is a preventable occupational injury, which is best, avoided by earplugs and increased awareness.

  3. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the {open_quotes}sources{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  4. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the [open quotes]sources[close quotes] and [open quotes]targets[close quotes] requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources.

  5. Seismic II over I Drop Test Program results and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.

    1993-03-01

    The consequences of non-seismically qualified (Category 2) objects falling and striking essential seismically qualified (Category 1) objects has always been a significant, yet analytically difficult problem, particularly in evaluating the potential damage to equipment that may result from earthquakes. Analytical solutions for impact problems are conservative and available for mostly simple configurations. In a nuclear facility, the open-quotes sourcesclose quotes and open-quotes targetsclose quotes requiring evaluation are frequently irregular in shape and configuration, making calculations and computer modeling difficult. Few industry or regulatory rules are available on this topic even though it is a source of considerable construction upgrade costs. A drop test program was recently conducted to develop a more accurate understanding of the consequences of seismic interactions. The resulting data can be used as a means to improve the judgment of seismic qualification engineers performing interaction evaluations and to develop realistic design criteria for seismic interactions. Impact tests on various combinations of sources and targets commonly found in one Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear facility were performed by dropping the sources from various heights onto the targets. This report summarizes results of the Drop Test Program. Force and acceleration time history data are presented as well as general observations on the overall ruggedness of various targets when subjected to impacts from different types of sources

  6. The smallest jet drops produced by bursting bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasz, Frederik; Bartlett, Casey; Walls, Peter; Flynn, Elena; Bird, James

    2017-11-01

    Aerosol droplets are produced from the breakup of jets formed when small air bubbles burst at an air-liquid interface. These jet drops transfer sea salt and organic matter from the oceans to the atmosphere, where they act as cloud condensation nuclei and can spread pathogens. The smallest aerosols persist the longest in the air and advect the furthest from their source, but because they are too small to be observed directly, little is known about what size ocean bubbles create them or how their formation depends on seawater properties. We show, both experimentally and numerically, that the minimum size of primary jet drops is set by the interplay between viscous and inertial-capillary forces and is significantly smaller than previous estimates. We find that viscous stresses modify both the shape of the collapsing bubble and the breakup of the resulting jet, leading to a non-monotonic size relationship between the bubble and primary jet drop. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1351466.

  7. A drop penetration method to measure powder blend wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Liu, Zhanjie; Muzzio, Fernando; Drazer, German; Callegari, Gerardo

    2018-03-01

    Water wettability of pharmaceutical blends affects important quality attributes of final products. We investigate the wetting properties of a pharmaceutical blend lubricated with Magnesium Stearate (MgSt) as a function of the mechanical shear strain applied to the blend. We measure the penetration dynamics of sessile drops deposited on slightly compressed powder beds. We consider a blend composed of 9% Acetaminophen 90% Lactose and 1% MgSt by weight. Comparing the penetration time of water and a reference liquid Polydimethylsiloxane (silicon oil) we obtain an effective cosine of the contact angle with water, based on a recently developed drop penetration method. We repeat the experiments for blends exposed to increasing levels of shear strain and demonstrate a significant decrease in water wettability (decrease in the cosine of the contact angle). The results are consistent with the development of a hydrophobic film coating the powder particles as a result of the increased shear strain. Finally, we show that, as expected dissolution times increase with the level of shear strain. Therefore, the proposed drop penetration method could be used to directly assess the state of lubrication of a pharmaceutical blend and act as a quality control on powder blend attributes before the blend is tableted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Blood drop size in passive dripping from weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabaliuk, N; Jermy, M C; Morison, K; Stotesbury, T; Taylor, M C; Williams, E

    2013-05-10

    Passive dripping, the slow dripping of blood under gravity, is responsible for some bloodstains found at crime scenes, particularly drip trails left by a person moving through the scene. Previous work by other authors has established relationships, under ideal conditions, between the size of the stain, the number of spines and satellite stains, the roughness of the surface, the size of the blood droplet and the height from which it falls. To apply these relationships to infer the height of fall requires independent knowledge of the size of the droplet. This work aims to measure the size of droplets falling from objects representative of hand-held weapons. Pig blood was used, with density, surface tension and viscosity controlled to fall within the normal range for human blood. Distilled water was also tested as a reference. Drips were formed from stainless steel objects with different roughnesses including cylinders of diameter between 10 and 100 mm, and flat plates. Small radius objects including a knife and a wrench were also tested. High speed images of the falling drops were captured. The primary blood drop size ranged from 4.15±0.11 mm up to 6.15±0.15 mm (depending on the object), with the smaller values from sharper objects. The primary drop size correlated only weakly with surface roughness, over the roughness range studied. The number of accompanying droplets increased with the object size, but no significant correlation with surface texture was observed. Dripping of blood produced slightly smaller drops, with more accompanying droplets, than dripping water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaporation of a liquid drop on a hot liquid surface, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yoshihiro; Takashima, Takeo

    1980-01-01

    As for the phenomena occurring when two kinds of liquid at different temperature come in contact, the clarification of the basic, general matters of the phenomena has not been made yet. Such situation has been caused by the facts that the detailed observation of the aspect in liquid-liquid contact becomes impossible as the disturbance on the interface becomes violent, and it is difficult to obtain the quantitative data and to change temperature difference largely in practice. In this study, liquid drops were dropped on the free surface of another liquid at the temperature higher than the saturation temperature of the dropping liquid, and it was attempted to obtain the basic knowledge concerning the general behavior at the time of liquid-liquid contact by determining the aspect of evaporation and its change and evaporation time. For this experiment, the silicone oil with four different kinematic viscosity was used as the high temperature liquid, and n-pentane and dichloromethane soluble in the mother liquid, and acetone and methyl alcohol insoluble in the mother liquid were used as the liquid drops. The experimental apparatuses and method and the results are reported. The evaporation time curves presented lying S-shape basically, similarly to the evaporation on solid surfaces. The point of maximum evaporation time and the point of maximum heat transfer rate existed. (J.P.N.)

  10. Enhanced Oral Bioavailability of Pueraria Flavones by a Novel Solid Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery System (SMEDDS) Dropping Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qingxiang; Zhang, Guangyuan; Sun, Shilin; Fan, Hongbo; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Shaoyuan

    2016-05-01

    To improve bioavailability of pueraria flavones (PF), a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) dropping pills composed of PF, Crodamol GTCC, Maisine 35-1, Cremophor RH 40, 1,2-propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000) was developed. Particle size, zeta potential, morphology and in vitro drug release were investigated, respectively. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills and commercial Yufengningxin dropping pills were also evaluated and compared in rats. Puerarin treated as the representative component of PF was analyzed. Dynamic light scattering showed the ability of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills to form a nanoemulsion droplet size in aqueous media. The type of media showed no significant effects on the release rate of PF. PF-SMEDDS dropping pills were able to improve the in vitro release rate of PF, and the in vitro release of these dropping pills was significantly faster than that of Yufengningxin dropping pills. There was a dramatic difference between the mean value of t1/2, peak concentration (Cmax), the area of concentration-time curve from 0 to 6 h (AUC0-6 h) of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills and that of commercial Yufengningxin dropping pills. A pharmacokinetic study showed that the bioavailability of PF was greatly enhanced by PF-SMEDDS dropping pills. The value of Cmax and relative bioavailability of PF-SMEDDS dropping pills were dramatically improved by an average of 1.69- and 2.36-fold compared with that of Yufengningxin dropping pills after gavage administration, respectively. It was concluded that bioavailability of PF was greatly improved and that PF-SMEDDS dropping pills might be an encouraging strategy to enhance the oral bioavailability of PF.

  11. Thermodynamics of adsorption of dithiocarbamates at the hanging mercury drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, Evangelos; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2007-02-27

    Two dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDTC) pesticides, thiram and ziram, are adsorbed onto a Hg drop via an entropically driven process. The adsorption isotherms are described by the Frumkin equation. For both molecules, the adsorption is characterized by a nonlinear pseudosigmoid temperature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. For the temperature range of 273-313 K, DeltaGADS varies between -43.4 and -56.71 kJ/mol for thiram and -42.60 and -55.67 kJ/mol for ziram. This variation of DeltaGADS reveals that the adsorption strength is increased at higher temperatures. During the adsorption of either molecule, strong lateral interactions are developed between neighboring adsorbates, which are severely weakened as the temperature increases. A unified reaction scheme is suggested for both ziram and thiram that predicts the formation and adsorption of a surface complex, (DMDTC)2Hg. In the case of thiram, two DMDTC molecules are formed by the cleavage of the disulfide S-S bond near the Hg electrode. The thermodynamic and structural parameters reveal that there are two limiting thermodynamic regimes for the adsorbed (DMDTC)2Hg species that originate from two limiting adsorption conformations of the adsorbates on the Hg surface. A transition occurs between these two conformations at temperatures in the region of 285-295 K. This transition is accompanied by large entropic and enthalpic changes.

  12. Growth directions of C8-BTBT thin films during drop-casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Naoki; Zanka, Tomohiko; Onishi, Yosuke; Fujieda, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Because charge transport in a single crystal is anisotropic, control of its orientation is important for enhancing electrical characteristics and reducing variations among devices. For growing an organic thin film, a solution process such as inkjet printing offers advantages in throughput. We have proposed to apply an external temperature gradient during drop-casting and to control the direction of solvent evaporation. In experiment, a temperature gradient was generated in a bare Si substrate by placing it on a Si plate bridging two heat stages. When a solution containing 2,7-dioctyl [1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) was dropped on the substrate, evaporation started at the hotter side of the droplet and proceeded toward the colder side. The front line of the liquid was not pinned and the solution extended toward the colder region. As a result, a thin film was formed in a 7mm-long region. The peripheral region of the film was significantly thicker due to the coffee ring effect. The surface of the rest of the film was mostly smooth and terrace structures with 2.6nm steps were observed. The step roughly corresponds to the length of the C8-BTBT molecule. The film thickness varied from 20nm to 50nm over the distance of 3mm. Another film was grown on a glass substrate under a similar condition. Observation of the film with a polarizing microscope revealed that fan-shaped domains were formed in the film and that their optical axes were mostly along the directions of the solvent evaporation.

  13. Coalescence collision of liquid drops I: Off-center collisions of equal-size drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method (SPH is used here to model off-center collisions of equal-size liquid drops in a three-dimensional space. In this study the Weber number is calculated for several conditions of the droplets dynamics and the velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown. For the permanent coalescence the evolution of the kinetic and internal energy is shown and also the approaching to equilibrium of the resulting drop. Depending of the Weber number three possible outcomes for the collision of droplets is obtained: permanent coalescence, flocculation and fragmentation. The fragmentation phenomena are modeled and the formation of small satellite drops can be seen. The ligament that is formed follows the “end pinching” mechanism and it is transformed into a flat structure.

  14. How drops start sliding over solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nan; Geyer, Florian; Pilat, Dominik W.; Wooh, Sanghyuk; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Berger, Rüdiger

    2018-02-01

    It has been known for more than 200 years that the maximum static friction force between two solid surfaces is usually greater than the kinetic friction force--the force that is required to maintain the relative motion of the surfaces once the static force has been overcome. But the forces that impede the lateral motion of a drop of liquid on a solid surface are not as well characterized, and there is a lack of understanding about liquid-solid friction in general. Here, we report that the lateral adhesion force between a liquid drop and a solid can also be divided into a static and a kinetic regime. This striking analogy with solid-solid friction is a generic phenomenon that holds for liquids of different polarities and surface tensions on smooth, rough and structured surfaces.

  15. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  16. Coupling slots without shunt impedance drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balleyguier, P.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that coupling slots between adjacent cells in a π-mode structure reduce shunt impedance per unit length with respect to single cell cavities. To design optimized coupling slots, one has to answer the following question: for a given coupling factor, what shape, dimension, position and number of slots lead to the lowest shunt impedance drop? A numerical study using the 3D code MAFIA has been carried out. The aim was to design the 352 MHz cavities for the high intensity proton accelerator of the TRISPAL project. The result is an unexpected set of four 'petal' slots. Such slots should lead to a quasi-negligible drop in shunt impedance: about -1% on average, for particle velocity from 0.4 c to 0.8 c. (author)

  17. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  18. Hospital executive compensation act dropped from ballot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hospital Executive Compensation Act did not qualify for the November 8, 2016 ballot in Arizona as a state statute (1. The Service Employees International Union (SEIU dropped the initiative just before arguments were to begin in a lawsuit that challenged the legality of signature gatherers who failed to register with the state. The measure would have limited total pay for executives, administrators and managers of healthcare facilities and entities to the annual salary of the President of the United States. A similar measure in California was also dropped by the SEIU in 2014. Supporters of the proposal said it would decrease escalating healthcare costs. Opponents of the measure, including the Arizona Chamber of Commerce who filed the suit challenging the proposition, alleged that it would lead to poorer healthcare. However, a survey conducted by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care showed that most supported the measure and felt that it would not lead to poorer healthcare (2.

  19. Semisupervised Community Detection by Voltage Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications show that semisupervised community detection is one of the important topics and has attracted considerable attention in the study of complex network. In this paper, based on notion of voltage drops and discrete potential theory, a simple and fast semisupervised community detection algorithm is proposed. The label propagation through discrete potential transmission is accomplished by using voltage drops. The complexity of the proposal is OV+E for the sparse network with V vertices and E edges. The obtained voltage value of a vertex can be reflected clearly in the relationship between the vertex and community. The experimental results on four real networks and three benchmarks indicate that the proposed algorithm is effective and flexible. Furthermore, this algorithm is easily applied to graph-based machine learning methods.

  20. Sessile Drop Evaporation and Leidenfrost Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    A. K. Mozumder; M. R. Ullah; A. Hossain; M. A. Islam

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Quenching and cooling are important process in manufacturing industry for controlling the mechanical properties of materials, where evaporation is a vital mode of heat transfer. Approach: This study experimentally investigated the evaporation of sessile drop for four different heated surfaces of Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Mild steel with a combination of four different liquids as Methanol, Ethanol, Water and NaCl solution. The time of evaporation for the droplet on the hot...

  1. Impact of water drops on small targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  2. The jet mass distribution after Soft Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzani, Simone; Schunk, Lais; Soyez, Gregory

    2018-02-01

    We present a first-principle computation of the mass distribution of jets which have undergone the grooming procedure known as Soft Drop. This calculation includes the resummation of the large logarithms of the jet mass over its transverse momentum, up to next-to-logarithmic accuracy, matched to exact fixed-order results at next-to-leading order. We also include non-perturbative corrections obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations and discuss analytic expressions for hadronisation and Underlying Event effects.

  3. Sporadic frame dropping impact on quality perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana-Vidal, Ricardo R.; Gicquel, Jean Charles; Colomes, Catherine; Cherifi, Hocine

    2004-06-01

    Over the past few years there has been an increasing interest in real time video services over packet networks. When considering quality, it is essential to quantify user perception of the received sequence. Severe motion discontinuities are one of the most common degradations in video streaming. The end-user perceives a jerky motion when the discontinuities are uniformly distributed over time and an instantaneous fluidity break is perceived when the motion loss is isolated or irregularly distributed. Bit rate adaptation techniques, transmission errors in the packet networks or restitution strategy could be the origin of this perceived jerkiness. In this paper we present a psychovisual experiment performed to quantify the effect of sporadically dropped pictures on the overall perceived quality. First, the perceptual detection thresholds of generated temporal discontinuities were measured. Then, the quality function was estimated in relation to a single frame dropping for different durations. Finally, a set of tests was performed to quantify the effect of several impairments distributed over time. We have found that the detection thresholds are content, duration and motion dependent. The assessment results show how quality is impaired by a single burst of dropped frames in a 10 sec sequence. The effect of several bursts of discarded frames, irregularly distributed over the time is also discussed.

  4. High-Speed Interferometry Under Impacting Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth R.; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade the rapid advances in high-speed video technology, have opened up to study many multi-phase fluid phenomena, which tend to occur most rapidly on the smallest length-scales. One of these is the entrapment of a small bubble under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. Here we have gone from simply observing the presence of the bubble to detailed imaging of the formation of a lubricating air-disc under the drop center and its subsequent contraction into the bubble. Imaging the full shape-evolution of the air-disc has required μm and sub-μs space and time resolutions. Time-resolved 200 ns interferometry with monochromatic light, has allowed us to follow individual fringes to obtain absolute air-layer thicknesses, based on the eventual contact with the solid. We can follow the evolution of the dimple shape as well as the compression of the gas. The improved imaging has also revealed new levels of detail, like the nature of the first contact which produces a ring of micro-bubbles, highlighting the influence of nanometric surface roughness. Finally, for impacts of ultra-viscous drops we see gliding on ~100 nm thick rarified gas layers, followed by extreme wetting at numerous random spots.

  5. High-Speed Interferometry Under Impacting Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth R.

    2017-08-31

    Over the last decade the rapid advances in high-speed video technology, have opened up to study many multi-phase fluid phenomena, which tend to occur most rapidly on the smallest length-scales. One of these is the entrapment of a small bubble under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. Here we have gone from simply observing the presence of the bubble to detailed imaging of the formation of a lubricating air-disc under the drop center and its subsequent contraction into the bubble. Imaging the full shape-evolution of the air-disc has required μm and sub-μs space and time resolutions. Time-resolved 200 ns interferometry with monochromatic light, has allowed us to follow individual fringes to obtain absolute air-layer thicknesses, based on the eventual contact with the solid. We can follow the evolution of the dimple shape as well as the compression of the gas. The improved imaging has also revealed new levels of detail, like the nature of the first contact which produces a ring of micro-bubbles, highlighting the influence of nanometric surface roughness. Finally, for impacts of ultra-viscous drops we see gliding on ~100 nm thick rarified gas layers, followed by extreme wetting at numerous random spots.

  6. Eye-Drops for Activation of DREADDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T. Keenan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs are an important tool for modulating and understanding neural circuits. Depending on the DREADD system used, DREADD-targeted neurons can be activated or repressed in vivo following a dose of the DREADD agonist clozapine-N-oxide (CNO. Because DREADD experiments often involve behavioral assays, the method of CNO delivery is important. Currently, the most common delivery method is intraperitoneal (IP injection. IP injection is both a fast and reliable technique, but it is painful and stressful particularly when many injections are required. We sought an alternative CNO delivery paradigm, which would retain the speed and reliability of IP injections without being as invasive. Here, we show that CNO can be effectively delivered topically via eye-drops. Eye-drops robustly activated DREADD-expressing neurons in the brain and peripheral tissues and does so at the same dosages as IP injection. Eye-drops provide an easier, less invasive and less stressful method for activating DREADDs in vivo.

  7. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, D.N.

    1998-04-14

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids is disclosed. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities. 5 figs.

  8. The effects of the bologna process on college enrollment and drop-out rates

    OpenAIRE

    Horstschräer, Julia; Sprietsma, Maresa

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the short-term effects of the introduction of the Bachelor degree in the framework of the Bologna Process on college enrollment and drop-out rates. We use variation in the timing of the Bachelor implementation at the department level to identify the effect of the reform based on longitudinal administrative student data from Germany. We find no significant effects on college enrollment or drop-out rates for most subjects.

  9. Comparison of novel lipid-based eye drops with aqueous eye drops for dry eye: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons PA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Peter A Simmons, Cindy Carlisle-Wilcox, Joseph G Vehige Ophthalmology Research and Development, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA Background: Dry eye may be caused or exacerbated by deficient lipid secretion. Recently, lipid-containing artificial tears have been developed to alleviate this deficiency. Our study compared the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of lipid-containing eye drops with that of aqueous eye drops.Methods: A non-inferiority, randomized, parallel-group, investigator-masked multicenter trial was conducted. Subjects with signs and symptoms of dry eye were randomized to use one of two lipid-containing artificial tears, or one of two aqueous artificial tears. Subjects instilled assigned drops in each eye at least twice daily for 30 days. The primary efficacy analysis tested non-inferiority of a preservative-free lipid tear formulation (LT UD to a preservative-free aqueous tear formulation (AqT UD for change in Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI score from baseline at day 30. Secondary measures included OSDI at day 7, tear break-up time (TBUT, corneal and conjunctival staining, Schirmer’s test, acceptability and usage questionnaires, and safety assessments.Results: A total of 315 subjects were randomized and included in the analyses. Subjects reported instilling a median of three doses of study eye drops per day in all groups. At days 7 and 30, all groups showed statistically significant improvements from baseline in OSDI (P<0.001 and TBUT (P≤0.005. LT UD was non-inferior to AqT UD for mean change from baseline in OSDI score at day 30. No consistent or clinically relevant differences for the other efficacy variables were observed. Acceptability was generally similar across the groups and there was a low incidence of adverse events.Conclusion: In this heterogeneous population of dry eye subjects, there were no clinically significant differences in safety, effectiveness, and acceptability between lipid-containing artificial tears

  10. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models

  11. Drop evaporation on superhydrophobic PTFE surfaces driven by contact line dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S M M; Dias, J F; Canut, B

    2015-02-15

    In the present study, we experimentally study the evaporation modes and kinetics of sessile drops of water on highly hydrophobic surfaces (contact angle ∼160°), heated to temperatures ranging between 40° and 70 °C. These surfaces were initially constructed by means of controlled tailoring of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrates. The evaporation of droplets was observed to occur in three distinct phases, which were the same for the different substrate temperatures. The drops started to evaporate in the constant contact radius (CCR) mode, then switched to a more complex mode characterized by a set of stick-slip events accompanied by a decrease in contact angle, and finally shifted to a mixed mode in which the contact radius and contact angle decreased simultaneously until the drops had completely evaporated. It is shown that in the case of superhydrophobic surfaces, the energy barriers (per unit length) associated with the stick-slip motion of a drop ranges in the nJ m(-1) scale. Furthermore, analysis of the evaporation rates, determined from experimental data show that, even in the CCR mode, a linear relationship between V(2/3) and the evaporation time is verified. The values of the evaporation rate constants are found to be higher in the pinned contact line regime (the CCR mode) than in the moving contact line regime. This behavior is attributed to the drop's higher surface to volume ratio in the CCR mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Description of the heating and expansion process of a water drop enclosed in a hot melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, G.; Berg, E. von.

    1985-11-01

    In the present study a simple model for the description of the heating- and expansion-process of a water drop enclosed in hot melt is developed. The model is valid between the first contact of melt and water up to the beginning of evaporation. A possible superheating by retardation of ebullition is disregarded. The balance equations for energy, mass and momentum as well as the equation of state are integrated over the radial space coordinate in both media using appropriate profiles of temperature, pressure and velocity. Thereby a system of coupled ordinary differential equations is formed for the variables of the model which are now time dependent only. The equations are solved numerically by means of a FORTRAN-program. The influence of parameters (melt-temperature, heat-transfer-coefficient between melt and water as well as drop radius) are studied. It is shown that always very rapidly a vapor-layer forms around the water drop, while the inner part of the drop did not yet 'notice' anything of the heating process. An approximation formula for the time-transfer-coefficients between melt and water. Due to this approximation, the time up to incipience of evaporation grows proportional to the drop radius, which means that in the frame of the present model even small droplets won't evaporate as a whole instantaneously. (orig.) [de

  13. On the relation of earthquake stress drop and ground motion variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oth, Adrien; Miyake, Hiroe; Bindi, Dino

    2017-07-01

    One of the key parameters for earthquake source physics is stress drop since it can be directly linked to the spectral level of ground motion. Stress drop estimates from moment corner frequency analysis have been shown to be extremely variable, and this to a much larger degree than expected from the between-event ground motion variability. This discrepancy raises the question whether classically determined stress drop variability is too large, which would have significant consequences for seismic hazard analysis. We use a large high-quality data set from Japan with well-studied stress drop data to address this issue. Nonparametric and parametric reference ground motion models are derived, and the relation of between-event residuals for Japan Meteorological Agency equivalent seismic intensity and peak ground acceleration with stress drop is analyzed for crustal earthquakes. We find a clear correlation of the between-event residuals with stress drops estimates; however, while the island of Kyushu is characterized by substantially larger stress drops than Honshu, the between-event residuals do not reflect this observation, leading to the appearance of two event families with different stress drop levels yet similar range of between-event residuals. Both the within-family and between-family stress drop variations are larger than expected from the ground motion between-event variability. A systematic common analysis of these parameters holds the potential to provide important constraints on the relative robustness of different groups of data in the different parameter spaces and to improve our understanding on how much of the observed source parameter variability is likely to be true source physics variability.

  14. Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells over a Broad Temperature Window : The Role of the Charge Carrier Extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, Shuyan; Liu, Jian; Fang, Hong-Hua; Qiu, Li; ten Brink, Gert H.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism behind the temperature dependence of the device performance in hybrid perovskite solar cells (HPSCs) is investigated systematically. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the reference cell using [60] PCBM as electron extraction layer (EEL) drops significantly from 11.9% at 295 K to

  15. Density Measurement of Liquid Ni-Ta Alloys by a Modified Sessile Drop Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XIAO Feng; TAO Zainan; Kusuhiro Mukai

    2005-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Ta alloys was measured by using a modified sessile drop method. It is found that the density of the liquid Ni-Ta alloys decreases with the increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of tantalum concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Ta binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tantalum concentration.

  16. Comparative randomised active drug controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop in computer vision syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Pranab Kr; Bairagi, Debasis; Roy, Sudipta; Majumder, Nilay Kr; Paul, Ratish Ch; Bagchi, Sunil Ch

    2005-07-01

    A comparative double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop (itone) was conducted to find out its efficacy and safety in 120 patients with computer vision syndrome. Patients using computers for more than 3 hours continuously per day having symptoms of watering, redness, asthenia, irritation, foreign body sensation and signs of conjunctival hyperaemia, corneal filaments and mucus were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were randomly given either placebo, tears substitute (tears plus) or itone in identical vials with specific code number and were instructed to put one drop four times daily for 6 weeks. Subjective and objective assessments were done at bi-weekly intervals. In computer vision syndrome both subjective and objective improvements were noticed with itone drops. Itone drop was found significantly better than placebo (pcomputer vision syndrome.

  17. Fission product removal by containment spray - influence of the distance between the drops on the aerosol collection efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauchet, N.

    2000-01-01

    This work is within the framework of the studies that are conducted at the IPSN concerning the loss of coolant in a nuclear reactor. During this kind of accident, a spray system in the reactor containment induces the scrubbing of fission products in the atmosphere, and allows the decrease of their concentration in the containment. Our objective is to study the influence of the distance between the drops of their aerosol collection efficiency. This is not taken into account in the existing models. We stimulate the various aerosol collection mechanisms with one free falling drop using computational fluid dynamics codes. The mechanisms are: deposition by brownian diffusion, impaction and interception of the particles by the drop, and collection of particles in the presence of steam condensation at the surface of the drop. These phenomena are studied for drops ranging in diameter from 100 to 700 micrometers, falling in a saturated air-steam mixture whose temperature varies between 20 and 140 degrees Celsius, and total pressure varies between 1 and 5 bars. We validate these models with results available in the literature and with experimental results CARAIDAS. Then we apply these models to the case of three aligned drops, which constitutes a case for which the proximity of the drops has a strong influence on the collection of aerosols. While varying the distance between the drop from 5 to 25 drop diameters, we can highlight the modification of the collection efficiency of each mechanism related to the disturbance of the velocity and concentration fields in the vicinity of the drops. We note that the strongest variations of efficiency observed are in the field of impaction, and that the steam condensation at the surface of the drops limits the decrease. (authors)

  18. An acoustical bubble counter for superheated drop detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.; Montvila, D.; Flynn, D.; Brennan, C.; D'Errico, F.

    2006-01-01

    A new bubble counter has been developed based on the well-established approach of detecting vaporization events acoustically in superheated drop detectors (SDDs). This counter is called the Framework Scientific ABC 1260, and it represents a major improvement over prior versions of this technology. By utilizing advanced acoustic pattern recognition software, the bubble formation event can be differentiated from ambient background noise, as well as from other acoustic signatures. Additional structural design enhancements include a relocation of the electronic components to the bottom of the device; thus allowing for greater stability, easier access to vial SDDs without exposure to system electronics. Upgrades in the electronics permit an increase in the speed of bubble detection by almost 50%, compared with earlier versions of the counters. By positioning the vial on top of the device, temperature and sound insulation can be accommodated for extreme environments. Lead shells can also be utilized for an enhanced response to high-energy neutrons. (authors)

  19. An acoustical bubble counter for superheated drop detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Chris; Montvila, Darius; Flynn, David; Brennan, Christopher; d'Errico, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    A new bubble counter has been developed based on the well-established approach of detecting vaporization events acoustically in superheated drop detectors (SDDs). This counter is called the Framework Scientific ABC 1260, and it represents a major improvement over prior versions of this technology. By utilizing advanced acoustic pattern recognition software, the bubble formation event can be differentiated from ambient background noise, as well as from other acoustic signatures. Additional structural design enhancements include a relocation of the electronic components to the bottom of the device; thus allowing for greater stability, easier access to vial SDDs without exposure to system electronics. Upgrades in the electronics permit an increase in the speed of bubble detection by almost 50%, compared with earlier versions of the counters. By positioning the vial on top of the device, temperature and sound insulation can be accommodated for extreme environments. Lead shells can also be utilized for an enhanced response to high-energy neutrons.

  20. Critical look at South Africa’s Green Drop Programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntombela, Cebile

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available (WSAs) in the controversial wastewater services sector. In particular, we focus on DWS’s incentive-based mechanism, the National Green Drop Certification Programme (Green Drop Programme), and evaluate the achievements and challenges associated with its...

  1. X-38 Drop Model: Landing Sequence Collage from Cessna Drop Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This sequence of photographs shows a 4-foot-long model of NASA's X-38 gliding to earth after being dropped from a Cessna aircraft in late 1995. The model was used to test the ram-air parafoil landing system, which could allow for accurate and controlled landings of an emergency Crew Return Vehicle spacecraft returning to earth. The X-38 Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) research project is designed to develop the technology for a prototype emergency crew return vehicle, or lifeboat, for the International Space Station. The project is also intended to develop a crew return vehicle design that could be modified for other uses, such as a joint U.S. and international human spacecraft that could be launched on the French Ariane-5 Booster. The X-38 project is using available technology and off-the-shelf equipment to significantly decrease development costs. Original estimates to develop a capsule-type crew return vehicle were estimated at more than $2 billion. X-38 project officials have estimated that development costs for the X-38 concept will be approximately one quarter of the original estimate. Off-the-shelf technology is not necessarily 'old' technology. Many of the technologies being used in the X-38 project have never before been applied to a human-flight spacecraft. For example, the X-38 flight computer is commercial equipment currently used in aircraft and the flight software operating system is a commercial system already in use in many aerospace applications. The video equipment for the X-38 is existing equipment, some of which has already flown on the space shuttle for previous NASA experiments. The X-38's primary navigational equipment, the Inertial Navigation System/Global Positioning System, is a unit already in use on Navy fighters. The X-38 electromechanical actuators come from previous joint NASA, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Navy research and development projects. Finally, an existing special coating developed by NASA will be used on the X-38 thermal tiles to

  2. Continuous monitoring of back wall stress corrosion cracking growth in sensitized type 304 stainless steel weldment by means of potential drop techniques

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, Y; ATSUMI, T; SHOJI, T

    2007-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on welded specimens of sensitized type 304SS with a thickness of 20 mm were performed in sodium thiosulphate solution at room temperature, with continuous monitoring of the SCC growth, using the techniques of modified induced current potential drop (MICPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC, which initiates from a fatigue pre-c...

  3. Usage of drip drops as stimuli in an auditory P300 BCI paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minqiang; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Dewen; Wang, Xingyu

    2018-02-01

    Recently, many auditory BCIs are using beeps as auditory stimuli, while beeps sound unnatural and unpleasant for some people. It is proved that natural sounds make people feel comfortable, decrease fatigue, and improve the performance of auditory BCI systems. Drip drop is a kind of natural sounds that makes humans feel relaxed and comfortable. In this work, three kinds of drip drops were used as stimuli in an auditory-based BCI system to improve the user-friendness of the system. This study explored whether drip drops could be used as stimuli in the auditory BCI system. The auditory BCI paradigm with drip-drop stimuli, which was called the drip-drop paradigm (DP), was compared with the auditory paradigm with beep stimuli, also known as the beep paradigm (BP), in items of event-related potential amplitudes, online accuracies and scores on the likability and difficulty to demonstrate the advantages of DP. DP obtained significantly higher online accuracy and information transfer rate than the BP ( p  < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed test; p  < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed test). Besides, DP obtained higher scores on the likability with no significant difference on the difficulty ( p  < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed test). The results showed that the drip drops were reliable acoustic materials as stimuli in an auditory BCI system.

  4. The jet mass distribution after Soft Drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzani, Simone [Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Genova (Italy); Schunk, Lais [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Soyez, Gregory [IPhT, CEA Saclay, CNRS UMR 3681, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2018-02-15

    We present a first-principle computation of the mass distribution of jets which have undergone the grooming procedure known as Soft Drop. This calculation includes the resummation of the large logarithms of the jet mass over its transverse momentum, up to next-to-logarithmic accuracy, matched to exact fixed-order results at next-to-leading order. We also include non-perturbative corrections obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations and discuss analytic expressions for hadronisation and Underlying Event effects. (orig.)

  5. Drop Calibration of Accelerometers for Shock Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    important that the screen is clear, the records displayed are crisp and values are easily read. The current DSO, used within the Division, in the...Capacitor ≤ ± 0.01% ξc Tolerance of capacitor Drop Mass Reading ≤ ± 0.083 %  dm 0.1g over 120g (typically) Reference Mass Reading ≤ ± 0.1 % rm...Therefore m has uncertainty components due to rm ,  dm and ξrme. The random component is  222 dmrmm  (6.8) and once again  dsodc

  6. Drops on hydrophobic surfaces & vibrated fluid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein

    in the literature. Furthermore, we quantify the energy associated with center of mass translation and internal fluid motion. The model predicts trajectories for tracer particles deposited inside the drop, and satisfactorily describes the sliding motion of steadily accelerating droplets. The model can be used...... numerically, and the results are compared to experiments. We provide, again, the most detailed regime diagram of the possible orbits depending on the forcing and the rotation rate of the fluid bath. We highlight each class of orbit, and analyze in depth the wobbling state, precessing orbits, wobble...

  7. Partial coalescence from bubbles to drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2015-10-07

    The coalescence of drops is a fundamental process in the coarsening of emulsions. However, counter-intuitively, this coalescence process can produce a satellite, approximately half the size of the original drop, which is detrimental to the overall coarsening. This also occurs during the coalescence of bubbles, while the resulting satellite is much smaller, approximately 10 %. To understand this difference, we have conducted a set of coalescence experiments using xenon bubbles inside a pressure chamber, where we can continuously raise the pressure from 1 up to 85 atm and thereby vary the density ratio between the inner and outer fluid, from 0.005 up to unity. Using high-speed video imaging, we observe a continuous increase in satellite size as the inner density is varied from the bubble to emulsion-droplet conditions, with the most rapid changes occurring as the bubble density grows up to 15 % of that of the surrounding liquid. We propose a model that successfully relates the satellite size to the capillary wave mode responsible for its pinch-off and the overall deformations from the drainage. The wavelength of the primary wave changes during its travel to the apex, with the instantaneous speed adjusting to the local wavelength. By estimating the travel time of this wave mode on the bubble surface, we also show that the model is consistent with the experiments. This wavenumber is determined by both the global drainage as well as the interface shapes during the rapid coalescence in the neck connecting the two drops or bubbles. The rate of drainage is shown to scale with the density of the inner fluid. Empirically, we find that the pinch-off occurs when 60 % of the bubble fluid has drained from it. Numerical simulations using the volume-of-fluid method with dynamic adaptive grid refinement can reproduce these dynamics, as well as show the associated vortical structure and stirring of the coalescing fluid masses. Enhanced stirring is observed for cases with second

  8. Spume Drops: Their Potential Role in Air-Sea Gas Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Edward C.; Staniec, Allison; Vlahos, Penny

    2017-12-01

    After summarizing the time scales defining the change of the physical properties of spume and other droplets cast up from the sea surface, the time scales governing drop-atmosphere gas exchange are compared. Following a broad review of the spume drop production functions described in the literature, a subset of these functions is selected via objective criteria, to represent typical, upper bound, and lower bound production functions. Three complementary mechanisms driving spume-atmosphere gas exchange are described, and one is then used to estimate the relative importance, over a broad range of wind speeds, of this spume drop mechanism compared to the conventional, diffusional, sea surface mechanism in air-sea gas exchange. While remaining uncertainties in the wind dependence of the spume drop production flux, and in the immediate sea surface gas flux, preclude a definitive conclusion, the findings of this study strongly suggest that, at high wind speeds (>20 m s-1 for dimethyl sulfide and >30 m s-1 for gases such a carbon dioxide), spume drops do make a significant contribution to air-sea gas exchange.Plain Language SummaryThis paper evaluates the existing spume drop generation functions available to date and selects a reasonable upper, lower and mid range function that are reasonable for use in air sea exchange models. Based on these the contribution of spume drops to overall air sea gas exchange at different wind speeds is then evaluated to determine the % contribution of spume. Generally below 20ms-1 spume drops contribute <1% of gas exchange but may account for a significant amount of gas exchange at higher wind speeds.

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Bounding Drop Support Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHENAULT, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    This report evaluates different drop heights, concrete and other impact media to which the transport package and/or the MCO is dropped. A prediction method is derived for estimating the resultant impact factor for determining the bounding drop case for the SNF Project

  10. Underwater sound produced by individual drop impacts and rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Crum, L. A.; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of the underwater sound produced by water drop impacts on the surface is described. It is found that sound may be produced in two ways: first when the drop strikes the surface and, second, when a bubble is created in the water. The first process occurs for every drop...

  11. Drop test of reinforced concrete slab onto storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Y.; Hattori, S.; Ito, C.; Sirai, K.; Ozaki, S.; Kato, O.

    1993-01-01

    In this research, drop tests onto full-scale casks considering the specifications of a falling object (weight, construction, drop height, etc.) demonstrate and evaluate the integrity of casks in case a heavy object drops into the storage facilities. (J.P.N.)

  12. Football helmet drop tests on different fields using an instrumented Hybrid III head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viano, David C; Withnall, Chris; Wonnacott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    An instrumented Hybrid III head was placed in a Schutt ION 4D football helmet and dropped on different turfs to study field types and temperature on head responses. The head was dropped 0.91 and 1.83 m giving impacts of 4.2 and 6.0 m/s on nine different football fields (natural, Astroplay, Fieldturf, or Gameday turfs) at turf temperatures of -2.7 to 23.9 °C. Six repeat tests were conducted for each surface at 0.3 m (1') intervals. The Hybrid III was instrumented with triaxial accelerometers to determine head responses for the different playing surfaces. For the 0.91-m drops, peak head acceleration varied from 63.3 to 117.1 g and HIC(15) from 195 to 478 with the different playing surfaces. The lowest response was with Astroplay, followed by the engineered natural turf. Gameday and Fieldturf involved higher responses. The differences between surfaces decreased in the 1.83 m tests. The cold weather testing involved higher accelerations, HIC(15) and delta V for each surface. The helmet drop test used in this study provides a simple and convenient means of evaluating the compliance and energy absorption of football playing surfaces. The type and temperature of the playing surface influence head responses.

  13. Effect of rb-bFGF eye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops on tear film stability and dry eye symptoms after age-related cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ling

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effect of recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor(rb-bFGFeye drops and hydroxyl indican eye drops on tear film stability and dry eye symptoms after age-related cataract surgery. METHODS: Totally 80 patients with 80 affected eyes undergoing age-related cataract surgery in our hospital from January 2015 to October 2016 were selected as study subjects, and they were randomly divided into control group and experimental group with 40 patients(40 affected eyesin each group. The two groups were treated with hydroxyl indican eye drops and rb-bFGF eye drops, respectively. The clinical curative effect, inflammation related factors \\〖interleukin 6(IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α(TNF-α\\〗, Schirmer test(SⅠt, break-up time(BUTof tear film, corneal sodium fluorescein staining(FLand scores of dry eye symptoms in the two groups were observed. RESULTS: The total treatment effective rate of experimental group after treatment was significantly higher than that of the control group(90.0% vs 72.5%; χ2=4.021, PP>0.05. After treatment, IL-6, TNF-α, SⅠt, FL score and scores of dry eye symptoms in two groups significantly decreased while BUT significantly increased(PPCONCLUSION: In the treatment of patients after age-related cataract after surgery, rb-bFGF eye drops has more advantages over hydroxyl indican eye drops in regulating the expression of inflammatory factors, improving the tear film stability and relieving dry eye symptoms.

  14. Fission dynamics of excited nuclei within the liquid-drop model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionov, S.V.; Ivanyuk, F.A.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Magner, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature T scis at the scission point and the saddle-to-scission time τ scis for the fission of heated nuclei is evaluated. The classical Lagrange-like equations of motion within the liquid-drop model are used. The nuclear surface is parametrized by the two-parametric family of the Lawrence shapes. Conservative forces are defined through the free energy of the nucleus at finite temperatures. The friction tensor derived from the Navier-Stokes momentum flux tensor taking into account the boundary conditions on the nuclear surface is used. The scission line is determined from the instability condition of the nuclear shape with respect to the variations of the neck radius. The numerical solution of the dynamical equations is performed for the nucleus 236 U. The viscosity coefficient μ was obtained from the comparison of the experimental data for the kinetic energy for the fission fragments with the computed one. A significant deviation of μ, obtained by used approach, from μ of the standard hydrodynamical model is found [ru

  15. Fission dynamics of excited nuclei within the liquid-drop model

    CERN Document Server

    Radionov, S V; Kolomietz, V M; Magner, A G

    2002-01-01

    The temperature T sub s sub c sub i sub s at the scission point and the saddle-to-scission time tau sub s sub c sub i sub s for the fission of heated nuclei is evaluated. The classical Lagrange-like equations of motion within the liquid-drop model are used. The nuclear surface is parametrized by the two-parametric family of the Lawrence shapes. Conservative forces are defined through the free energy of the nucleus at finite temperatures. The friction tensor derived from the Navier-Stokes momentum flux tensor taking into account the boundary conditions on the nuclear surface is used. The scission line is determined from the instability condition of the nuclear shape with respect to the variations of the neck radius. The numerical solution of the dynamical equations is performed for the nucleus sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U. The viscosity coefficient mu was obtained from the comparison of the experimental data for the kinetic energy for the fission fragments with the computed one. A significant deviation of mu, obtained ...

  16. Heat transfer and pressure drop amidst frost layer presence for the full geometry of fin-tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Jool; Choi, Ho Jin; Ha, Man Yeong; Kim, Seok Ro; Bang, Seon Wook

    2010-01-01

    The present study numerically solves the flow and thermal fields in the full geometry of heat exchanger modeling with frost layer presence on the heat exchanger surface. The effects of air inlet velocity, air inlet temperature, frost layer thickness, fin pitch, fin thickness, and heat exchanger shape on the thermo-hydraulic performance of a fin-tube heat exchanger are investigated. Heat transfer rate rises with increasing air inlet velocity and temperature, and decreasing frost layer thickness and fin pitch. Pressure drop rises with increasing air inlet velocity and frost layer thickness, and decreasing fin pitch. The effect of fin thickness on heat transfer and pressure drop is negligible. Based on the present results, we derived the correlations, which express pressure drop and temperature difference between air inlet and outlet as a function of air inlet velocity and temperature, as well as frost layer thickness

  17. Model of an Evaporating Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    A computational model of an experimental procedure to measure vapor distributions surrounding sessile drops is developed to evaluate the uncertainty in the experimental results. Methanol, which is expected to have predominantly diffusive vapor transport, is chosen as a validation test for our model. The experimental process first uses a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to measure the absorbance along lines passing through the vapor cloud. Since the measurement contains some errors, our model allows adding random noises to the computational integrated absorbance to mimic this. Then the resulting data are interpolated before passing through a computed tomography routine to generate the vapor distribution. Next, the gradients of the vapor distribution are computed along a given control volume surrounding the drop so that the diffusive flux can be evaluated as the net rate of diffusion out of the control volume. Our model of methanol evaporation shows that the accumulated errors of the whole experimental procedure affect the diffusive fluxes at different control volumes and are sensitive to how the noisy data of integrated absorbance are interpolated. This indicates the importance of investigating a variety of data fitting methods to choose which is best to present the data. Trinity University Mach Fellowship.

  18. Vlasov simulations of parallel potential drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gunell

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available An auroral flux tube is modelled from the magnetospheric equator to the ionosphere using Vlasov simulations. Starting from an initial state, the evolution of the plasma on the flux tube is followed in time. It is found that when applying a voltage between the ends of the flux tube, about two thirds of the potential drop is concentrated in a thin double layer at approximately one Earth radius altitude. The remaining part is situated in an extended region 1–2 Earth radii above the double layer. Waves on the ion timescale develop above the double layer, and they move toward higher altitude at approximately the ion acoustic speed. These waves are seen both in the electric field and as perturbations of the ion and electron distributions, indicative of an instability. Electrons of magnetospheric origin become trapped between the magnetic mirror and the double layer during its formation. At low altitude, waves on electron timescales appear and are seen to be non-uniformly distributed in space. The temporal evolution of the potential profile and the total voltage affect the double layer altitude, which decreases with an increasing field aligned potential drop. A current–voltage relationship is found by running several simulations with different voltages over the system, and it agrees with the Knight relation reasonably well.

  19. Measurement of the high-field Q-drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; gurevich, alex

    2007-06-01

    The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio > 200) niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop”) of the cavity quality factor Q0(Bp) as the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100 – 140 C) “in-situ” baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 K and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm2) grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere and baking in air up to 180 °C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20 – 30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not re-appear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120 °C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180 °C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180 °C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a post-purification treatment at 1250 °C. A statistic of the position of the “hot-spots” on the

  20. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in a high-purity large-grain niobium cavity for different oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciovati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The most challenging issue for understanding the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (rf cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio >200 niobium is due to a sharp degradation (“Q-drop” of the cavity quality factor Q_{0}(B_{p} as the peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} exceeds about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. In addition, a low-temperature (100–140°C in situ baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q-drop. In this contribution, we present the results from a series of rf tests at 1.7 and 2.0 K on a single-cell cavity made of high-purity large (with area of the order of few cm^{2} grain niobium which underwent various oxidation processes, after initial buffered chemical polishing, such as anodization, baking in pure oxygen atmosphere, and baking in air up to 180°C, with the objective of clearly identifying the role of oxygen and the oxide layer on the Q-drop. During each rf test a temperature mapping system allows measuring the local temperature rise of the cavity outer surface due to rf losses, which gives information about the losses location, their field dependence, and space distribution. The results confirmed that the depth affected by baking is about 20–30 nm from the surface and showed that the Q-drop did not reappear in a previously baked cavity by further baking at 120°C in pure oxygen atmosphere or in air up to 180°C. These treatments increased the oxide thickness and oxygen concentration, measured on niobium samples which were processed with the cavity and were analyzed with transmission electron microscope and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the performance of the cavity after air baking at 180°C degraded significantly and the temperature maps showed high losses, uniformly distributed on the surface, which could be completely recovered only by a postpurification treatment at 1250°C. A statistic of the position of the “hot spots” on the

  1. Effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in horizontal circular tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novianto, S.; Pamitran, A. S.; Nasruddin, Alhamid, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    Due to its friendly effect on the environment, natural refrigerants could be the best alternative refrigerant to replace conventional refrigerants. The present study was devoted to the effect of superficial velocity on vaporization pressure drop with propane in a horizontal circular tube with an inner diameter of 7.6 mm. The experiments were conditioned with 4 to 10 °C for saturation temperature, 9 to 20 kW/m2 for heat flux, and 250 to 380 kg/m2s for mass flux. It is shown here that increased heat flux may result in increasing vapor superficial velocity, and then increasing pressure drop. The present experimental results were evaluated with some existing correlations of pressure drop. The best prediction was evaluated by Lockhart-Martinelli (1949) with MARD 25.7%. In order to observe the experimental flow pattern, the present results were also mapped on the Wang flow pattern map.

  2. An AMOLED AC-Biased Pixel Design Compensating the Threshold Voltage and I-R Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Fan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel pixel design and an AC bias driving method for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AM-OLED displays using low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs. The proposed threshold voltage and I-R drop compensation circuit, which comprised three transistors and one capacitor, have been verified to supply uniform output current by simulation work using the Automatic Integrated Circuit Modeling Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (AIM-SPICE simulator. The simulated results demonstrate excellent properties such as low error rate of OLED anode voltage variation (<0.7% and low voltage drop of VDD power line. The proposed pixel circuit effectively enables threshold-voltage-deviation correction of driving TFT and compensates for the voltage drop of VDD power line using AC bias on OLED cathode.

  3. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  4. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  5. Deformed liquid marbles: Freezing drop oscillations with powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Y.; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show that when a liquid drop impacts onto a fine-grained hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. In all cases, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we find that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a near-complete coverage of powder, which then freezes the drop oscillations during rebound. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Deformed liquid marbles: Freezing drop oscillations with powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2012-09-01

    In this work we show that when a liquid drop impacts onto a fine-grained hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. In all cases, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we find that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a near-complete coverage of powder, which then freezes the drop oscillations during rebound. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. A Double Blind Clinical Trial on the Efficacy of Honey Drop in Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salehi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of topical honey eye drops in patients with diagnosed VKC. Methods. This clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with diagnosed VKC. The patients were selected and randomly allocated between two groups of 30. Patients in two groups received honey eye drop (60% in artificial tear or placebo, other than cromolyn and fluorometholone 1% eye drops, to be used topically in each eye, four times per day. The patients were examined with slit lamp and torch at baseline and the follow-up visits on the 1st, 3rd, and 6th months of the study for redness, limbal papillae, and intraocular pressure. Results. Out of 60 patients who completed the study, 19 patients (31.7% were female. There was significant increase in eye pressure and reduction in redness as well as limbal papillae, following the consumption of the honey drop in honey group compared to placebo control group (P<0.05. At the end of trial, one patient in honey group and 7 ones in placebo group had limbal papillae (P<0.05. Conclusion. Topical honey eye drops, when used along with Cromolyn and Fluorometholone eye drops, might be beneficial for the treatment of VKC.

  8. A Case-Control Study on the Oxidative Balance of 50% Autologous Serum Eye Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ioschpe Gus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. Autologous serum (AS eye drops are recommended for severe dry eye in patients with ocular surface disease. No description of the antioxidant balance of AS eye drops has been reported in the literature. Objective. This study sought to evaluate the total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP and concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS in samples of 50% AS eye drops and their correlations with the demographic characteristics and lifestyle habits of patients with ocular surface disease and healthy controls. Design. This was a case-control study with a 3-month follow-up period. Participants. 16 patients with severe dry eye disease of different etiologies and 17 healthy controls matched by age, gender, and race were included. Results. TRAP and ROS were detected at all evaluated times. There were no differences in the mean ROS (p=0.429 or TRAP (p=0.475 levels between cases and controls. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations of ROS or TRAPs were found at 0, 15, or 30 days (p for ROS = 0.087 and p for TRAP = 0.93. Neither the demographic characteristics nor the lifestyle habits were correlated with the oxidative balance of the 50% AS eye drops. Conclusions and Relevance. Both fresh and frozen 50% AS eye drops present antioxidant capacities and ROS in an apparently stable balance. Moreover, patients with ocular surface disease and normal controls produce equivalent AS eye drops in terms of oxidative properties.

  9. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Shidhore, Tanmay C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2018-04-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from soft materials causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate--pressure drop relation. For a given pressure drop, in channels with narrow rectangular cross-section, the flow rate varies as the cube of the channel height, so deformation can produce significant quantitative effects, including nonlinear dependence on the pressure drop [{Gervais, T., El-Ali, J., G\\"unther, A. \\& Jensen, K.\\ F.}\\ 2006 Flow-induced deformation of shallow microfluidic channels.\\ \\textit{Lab Chip} \\textbf{6}, 500--507]. Gervais et. al. proposed a successful model of the deformation-induced change in the flow rate by heuristically coupling a Hookean elastic response with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbation approach for the flow rate--pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using the theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and the Stokes equations under a lubrication approximation (specifically, the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's height to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et. al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. The derived flow rate--pressure drop relation compares favorably with experimental measurements.

  10. Effects of drop freezing on microphysics of an ascending cloud parcel under biomass burning conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, K.; Simmel, M.; Wurzler, S.

    There is some evidence that the initiation of warm rain is suppressed in clouds over regions with vegetation fires. Thus, the ice phase becomes important as another possibility to initiate precipitation. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate heterogeneous drop freezing for a biomass-burning situation. An air parcel model with a sectional two-dimensional description of the cloud microphysics was employed with parameterizations for immersion and contact freezing which consider the different ice nucleating efficiencies of various ice nuclei. Three scenarios were simulated resulting to mixed-phase or completely glaciated clouds. According to the high insoluble fraction of the biomass-burning particles drop freezing via immersion and contact modes was very efficient. The preferential freezing of large drops followed by riming (i.e. the deposition of liquid drops on ice particles) and the evaporation of the liquid drops (Bergeron-Findeisen process) caused a further decrease of the liquid drops' effective radius in higher altitudes. In turn ice particle sizes increased so that they could serve as germs for graupel or hailstone formation. The effects of ice initiation on the vertical cloud dynamics were fairly significant leading to a development of the cloud to much higher altitudes than in a warm cloud without ice formation.

  11. Drop dynamics on a stretched viscoelastic filament: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    Capillary pressure can destabilize a thin liquid filament during breakup into a succession of drops. Besides, the addition of a linear, high molecular weight, flexible and soluble polymer is enough to modify the morphology of this instability. In the time period preceding the breakup, the development of beads-on-a-string structures where drops are connected by thin threads is monitored. The drops dynamics involve drop formation, drop migration and drop coalescence. Experiments using a high-speed camera on stretched bridges of viscoelastic polymeric solutions were conducted for a range of viscosities and polymer concentrations. The rheological properties of the solutions are also quantified through conventional shear rheology and normal stress difference. The overall goal of this experimental investigation is to gain more insight into the formation and time evolution of the drops. The project BIOENGINE is co-financed by the European Union with the European regional development fund and by the Normandie Regional Council.

  12. Liquid-gas mass transfer at drop structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matias, Natércia; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Vollertsen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    -water mass transfer, little is known about hydrogen sulfide emission under highly turbulent conditions (e.g., drop structures, hydraulic jumps). In this study, experimental work was carried out to analyze the influence of characteristics of drops on reaeration. Physical models were built, mimicking typical...... sewer drop structures and allowing different types of drops, drop heights, tailwater depths and flow rates. In total, 125 tests were performed. Based on their results, empirical expressions translating the relationship between the mass transfer of oxygen and physical parameters of drop structures were...... established. Then, by applying the two-film theory with two-reference substances, the relation to hydrogen sulfide release was defined. The experiments confirmed that the choice of the type of drop structure is critical to determine the uptake/emission rates. By quantifying the air-water mass transfer rates...

  13. Calculation of drop course of control rod assembly in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaojia; Mao Fei; Min Peng; Lin Shaoxuan

    2013-01-01

    The validation of control rod drop performance is an important part of safety analysis of nuclear power plant. Development of computer code for calculating control rod drop course will be useful for validating and improving the design of control rod drive line. Based on structural features of the drive line, the driving force on moving assembly was analyzed and decomposed, the transient value of each component of the driving force was calculated by choosing either theoretical method or numerical method, and the simulation code for calculating rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) drop course by time step increase was achieved. The analysis results of control rod assembly drop course calculated by theoretical model and numerical method were validated by comparing with RCCA drop test data of Qinshan Phase Ⅱ 600 MW PWR. It is shown that the developed RCCA drop course calculation code is suitable for RCCA in PWR and can correctly simulate the drop course and the stress of RCCA. (authors)

  14. Males that drop a sexually selected weapon grow larger testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Paul N; Emberts, Zachary; Sasson, Daniel A; Miller, Christine W

    2018-01-01

    Costly sexually selected weapons are predicted to trade off with postcopulatory traits, such as testes. Although weapons can be important for achieving access to females, individuals of some species can permanently drop (i.e. autotomize) their weapons, without regeneration, to escape danger. We capitalized on this natural behavior to experimentally address whether the loss of a sexually selected weapon leads to increased testes investment in the leaf-footed cactus bug, Narnia femorata Stål (Hemiptera: Coreidae). In a second experiment, we measured offspring production for males that lost a weapon during development. As predicted, males that dropped a hind limb during development grew significantly larger testes than the control treatments. Hind-limb autotomy did not result in the enlargement of other nearby traits. Our results are the first to experimentally demonstrate that males compensate for natural weapon loss by investing more in testes. In a second experiment we found that females paired with males that lost a hind limb had 40% lower egg hatching success than females paired with intact males, perhaps because of lower mating receptivity to males with a lost limb. Importantly, in those cases where viable offspring were produced, males missing a hind limb produced 42% more offspring than males with intact limbs. These results suggest that the loss of a hind-limb weapon can, in some cases, lead to greater fertilization success. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Pendent_Drop: An ImageJ Plugin to Measure the Surface Tension from an Image of a Pendent Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Daerr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pendent drop method for surface tension measurement consists in analysing the shape of an axisymmetric drop hanging from a capillary tube. This software is an add-on for the public domain image processing software ImageJ which matches a theoretical profile to the contour of a pendent drop, either interactively or by automatically minimising the mismatch. It provides an estimate of the surface tension, drop volume and surface area from the best matching parameters. It can be used in a headless setup. It is hosted on http://fiji.sc/List_of_update_sites with the source code on https://github.com/adaerr/pendent-drop

  16. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1293 x 1460 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300163.html.

  17. Load drop evaluation for TWRS FSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julyk, L.J.; Ralston, G.L.

    1996-09-30

    Operational or remediation activities associated with existing underground high-level waste storage tank structures at the Hanford Site often require the installation/removal of various equipment items. To gain tank access for installation or removal of this equipment, large concrete cover blocks must be removed and reinstalled in existing concrete pits above the tanks. An accidental drop of the equipment or cover blocks while being moved over the tanks that results in the release of contaminants to the air poses a potential risk to onsite workers or to the offsite public. To minimize this potential risk, the use of critical lift hoisting and rigging procedures and restrictions on lift height are being considered during development of the new tank farm Basis for Interim Operation and Final Safety Analysis Report. The analysis contained herein provides information for selecting the appropriate lift height restrictions for these activities.

  18. Drop Impact on a Solid Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Josserand, C.

    2015-09-22

    © Copyright 2016 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved. A drop hitting a solid surface can deposit, bounce, or splash. Splashing arises from the breakup of a fine liquid sheet that is ejected radially along the substrate. Bouncing and deposition depend crucially on the wetting properties of the substrate. In this review, we focus on recent experimental and theoretical studies, which aim at unraveling the underlying physics, characterized by the delicate interplay of not only liquid inertia, viscosity, and surface tension, but also the surrounding gas. The gas cushions the initial contact; it is entrapped in a central microbubble on the substrate; and it promotes the so-called corona splash, by lifting the lamella away from the solid. Particular attention is paid to the influence of surface roughness, natural or engineered to enhance repellency, relevant in many applications.

  19. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  20. Analytical model based on cohesive energy to indicate the edge and corner effects on melting temperature of metallic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidpour, Reza; Hamid, Delavari H.; Vossoughi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The effect of edge and corner atoms of nanoparticle (solid line) cause melting temperature drops more compared to considering them as same as only surface atoms (dash line). This reduction is significant especially when the size of nanoparticle is below 10 nm. - Abstract: An analytical model based on cohesive energy has been conducted to study the effects of edge, corner, and inward surface relaxation as varying parameters on melting temperature of nanoparticles. It is shown that taking into account the edge and corner (EC) atoms of nanoparticle, causes to drop melting temperature more, when compared to consider them the same as only surface atoms. This reduction is significant especially when the size of nanoparticle is below 10 nm. The results are supported by available experimental results of tin, lead and gold melting temperature (T m ). Finally, it is shown that inward relaxation increases melting temperature slightly.

  1. Interactions between drops of a molten aluminum-lithium alloy and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.

    1994-01-01

    In certain hypothesized nuclear reactor accident scenarios, 1- to 10-g drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys might contact liquid water. Because vigorous steam explosions have occurred when large amounts of molten aluminum-lithium alloys were released into water or other coolants, it becomes important to know whether there will be explosions if smaller amounts of these molten alloys similarly come into contact with water. Therefore, the authors released drops of molten Al-3.1 wt pct Li alloy into deionized water at room temperature. The experiments were performed at local atmospheric pressure (0.085 MPa) without pressure transient triggers applied to the water. The absence of these triggers allowed them to (a) investigate whether spontaneous initiation of steam explosions would occur with these drops and (b) study the alloy-water chemical reactions. The drop sizes and melt temperatures were chosen to simulate melt globules that might form during the hypothesized melting of the aluminum-lithium alloy components

  2. Millisecond-period meltdown experiments on prompt-burst effects and molten-tin-water dropping experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Coats, R.L.; Schmidt, T.R.; Arakeri, V.H.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program of confirmatory research for the safety assessment of LMFBR plants. In the sodium-fuel interactions area, this research includes a series of real-time in-pile experiments on the pressure and work potential of prompt-burst excursions as well as laboratory dropping experiments with molten tin and water. The in-pile experiments are performed by Sandia Laboratories in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR), which has a minimum period of 1.3 milliseconds. These single-pin experiments are performed in a piston-loaded, stagnent-sodium autoclave, that is conceptually similar to the one used in the S-11 TREAT test. Unlike the S-11 test, however, realistic radial temperature profiles are obtained in the fuel, the cladding, and the sodium by pre-pulsing the reactor about 1/2 second before the main pulse. A series of preparatory runs have been made with helium-filled capsules and at low energy with sodium-filled capsules. The first significant fuel-coolant interaction run is scheduled for late March 1976. This will be a double-pulsed run at 2700 j/gm UO 2 . A continuing series of experiments is planned with oxide and advanced fuels in both fresh and irradiated form. In molten-tin-water dropping experiments at UCLA, microsecond duration multi-flash photography has been used for event diagnostics. Transition or nucleate boiling was found to trigger energetic interactions or vapor explosions. Temperature stratification in the water was found to reduce the threshold tin temperature necessary to produce vapor explosions below that the predicted by the coolant homogeneous nucleation hypothesis. Interaction zone growth times of a few msec. were measured. (auth.)

  3. Potential risk factors associated with risk for drop-out and relapse during and following withdrawal of opioid prescription medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiwe, Susanne; Lönnquist, Ingeborg; Källmén, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    Withdrawal of opioid medication in patients with chronic pain has a drop-out and relapse problem. To evaluate if depressive symptoms, anxiety and pain intensity are potential risk factors for drop-out or relapse during the withdrawal process. Further, to assess internal consistency of scales for assessment of these potential risk factors. Twenty-nine patients were included. After 2 years 28 of these were followed-up. Those with depressive symptoms at baseline had a significant risk for drop-out from the withdrawal program (odds ratio 1.37) and relapse into use of opioids at follow-up (odds ratio 1.44). Drop-outs rated depressive symptoms significantly higher before detoxification. Those who relapsed rated significantly higher for pain intensity, depressive symptoms and abstinence prior to withdrawal. All scales had high reliability. To avoid drop-out and relapse clinical practice need to screen for depressive symptoms, pain intensity, and abstinence. This article presents significant reliability of scales useful within dependency centers. They can be used to identify these risk factors for drop-out and relapse, respectively, when initiating the withdrawal process. Taking these risk factors into consideration could improve the outcome of the withdrawal process by preventing drop-out and relapse. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain calcium - Role in temperature regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanegan, J. L.; Williams, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Perfusion of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus with excess calcium ion in ground squirrels produces a drop in core temperature. The magnitude of the drop is directly dependent on ambient temperature. Respiration, heart rate, and oxygen consumption are also reduced during perfusion of calcium ion. It is concluded that the depression of body temperature during calcium ion perfusion is due to generalized depression of the neurons of the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus.

  5. Drop performance test of conceptually designed control rod assembly for prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Lee, Jae Han; Kim, Hoe Woong; KIm, Sung Kyun; Kim, Jong Bum [Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor NSSS Design Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The control rod assembly controls reactor power by adjusting its position during normal operation and shuts down chain reactions by its free drop under scram conditions. Therefore, the drop performance of the control rod assembly is important for the safety of a nuclear reactor. In this study, the drop performance of the conceptually designed control rod assembly for the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor that is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a next-generation nuclear reactor was experimentally investigated. For the performance test, the test facility and test procedure were established first, and several free drop performance tests of the control rod assembly under different flow rate conditions were then carried out. Moreover, performance tests under several types and magnitudes of seismic loading conditions were also conducted to investigate the effects of seismic loading on the drop performance of the control rod assembly. The drop time of the conceptually designed control rod assembly for 0% of the tentatively designed flow rate was measured to be 1.527 seconds, and this agrees well with the analytically calculated drop time. It was also observed that the effect of seismic loading on the drop time was not significant.

  6. Application of hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops in the mydriasis test and optometry for children with hyperopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ping Yin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe and study the comprehensive application effect of hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops in the mydriasis test and optometry for children with hyperopia.METHODS:Eighty-four children with hyperopia who were intervened with mydriasis test and optometry in our hospital from February 2014 to March 2015 were selected as the research object,and they were intervened with mydriasis test and optometry by tropicamide or hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops. The diopter, pupil diameter and residual regulation before administration and at different time after administration of the two methods were compared,and the detected results of the two groups with different severity degree were compared too.RESULTS:The diopter, pupil diameter and residual regulation before administration of the two eye drops had no significant differences(all P>0.05,while the residual regulation after using hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops at 20, 40, 60min and 24h were all smaller than those after using tropicamide(all PP>0.05. The pupil diameter of the two groups at 48h after administration both had no significant differences to those before administration(all P>0.05.CONCLUSION:The comprehensive application effect of hydrochloric cyclopentolate eye drops in the mydriasis test and optometry of children with hyperopia is better,and its paralysis effect for ciliaris is obvious.

  7. Measurements of the purge helium pressure drop across pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Sena, Ali, E-mail: ali.abou-sena@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Schlindwein, Georg

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The objective is to measure the purge helium pressure drop across various HCPB-relevant pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles. • The purge helium pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter from one run to another. • At the same superficial velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the helium inlet pressure. • The Ergun's equation can successfully model the purge helium pressure drop for the HCPB-relevant pebble beds. • The measured values of the purge helium pressure drop for the lithium orthosilicate pebble bed will support the design of the purge gas system for the HCPB breeder units. - Abstract: The lithium orthosilicate pebble beds of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket are purged by helium to transport the produced tritium to the tritium extraction system. The pressure drop of the purge helium has a direct impact on the required pumping power and is a limiting factor for the purge mass flow. Therefore, the objective of this study is to measure the helium pressure drop across various HCPB-relevant pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles. The pebble bed was formed by packing the pebbles into a stainless steel cylinder (ID = 30 mm and L = 120 mm); then it was integrated into a gas loop that has four variable-speed side-channel compressors to regulate the helium mass flow. The static pressure was measured at two locations (100 mm apart) along the pebble bed and at inlet and outlet of the pebble bed. The results demonstrated that: (i) the pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter, (ii) for the same superficial velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the inlet pressure, and (iii) predictions of Ergun's equation agree well with the experimental results. The measured pressure drop for the lithium orthosilicate pebble bed will support the design of the purge gas system for the HCPB.

  8. DROpS: an object of learning in computer simulation of discrete events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Alves Silva Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the “Realistic Dynamics Of Simulated Operations” (DROpS, the name given to the dynamics using the “dropper” device as an object of teaching and learning. The objective is to present alternatives for professors teaching content related to simulation of discrete events to graduate students in production engineering. The aim is to enable students to develop skills related to data collection, modeling, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results. This dynamic has been developed and applied to the students by placing them in a situation analogous to a real industry, where various concepts related to computer simulation were discussed, allowing the students to put these concepts into practice in an interactive manner, thus facilitating learning

  9. Drop Test Results of CRDM under Seismic Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Kim, Gyeong-Ho; Sun, Jong-Oh; Huh, Hyung

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performance of CRDM under seismic loads. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the drop performance under seismic loads such as operating basis earthquake (OBE) and safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). Especially, the CAR drop times are important data for the safety analysis. confirm the drop performance under seismic loads. The delay of drop time at Rig no. 2 due to seismic loads is greater than that at Rig no. 3. The total pure drop times under seismic loads are estimated as 1.169 and 1.855, respectively

  10. Ballistic Jumping Drops on Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Electrostatic Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Wu, Lei; Yu, Cunlong; Dai, Haoyu; Wang, Ting; Dong, Zhichao; Jiang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    The ballistic ejection of liquid drops by electrostatic manipulating has both fundamental and practical implications, from raindrops in thunderclouds to self-cleaning, anti-icing, condensation, and heat transfer enhancements. In this paper, the ballistic jumping behavior of liquid drops from a superhydrophobic surface is investigated. Powered by the repulsion of the same kind of charges, water drops can jump from the surface. The electrostatic acting time for the jumping of a microliter supercooled drop only takes several milliseconds, even shorter than the time for icing. In addition, one can control the ballistic jumping direction precisely by the relative position above the electrostatic field. The approach offers a facile method that can be used to manipulate the ballistic drop jumping via an electrostatic field, opening the possibility of energy efficient drop detaching techniques in various applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Drop Impact on Textile Material: Effect of Fabric Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romdhani Zouhaier

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of impact of water drop on a surface in a spreading regime with no splashing. Three surfaces were studied: virgin glass, coating film and woven cotton fabric at different construction parameters. All experiments were carried out using water drop with the same free fall high. Digidrop with high-resolution camera is used to measure the different parameters characterising this phenomenon. Results show an important effect of the height of the free fall on the drop profile and the spreading behaviour. An important drop deformation at the surface impact was observed. Then, fabric construction as the weft count deeply affects the drop impact. For plain weave, an increase of weft count causes a decrease in penetration and increase in the spreading rate. The same result was obtained for coated fabric. Therefore, the impact energy was modified and the drop shape was affected, which directly influenced the spreading rate.

  12. Drop Test Results of CRDM under Seismic Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Kim, Gyeong-Ho; Sun, Jong-Oh; Huh, Hyung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper describes the test results to demonstrate the drop performance of CRDM under seismic loads. The top-mounted CRDM driven by the stepping motor for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) has been developed in KAERI. The CRDM for JRTR has been optimized by the design improvement based on that of the HANARO. It is necessary to verify the drop performance under seismic loads such as operating basis earthquake (OBE) and safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). Especially, the CAR drop times are important data for the safety analysis. confirm the drop performance under seismic loads. The delay of drop time at Rig no. 2 due to seismic loads is greater than that at Rig no. 3. The total pure drop times under seismic loads are estimated as 1.169 and 1.855, respectively.

  13. Experimental Setup For Study of Drop Deformation In Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basalaev Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study for study of deformation of drops in air flow is considered. Experimental setup includes a module for obtaining the drops, an air flow system and measuring system. Module for formation of drops is in the form of vertically arranged dropper with capillary with the possibility of formation of fixed drops. Air flow supply system comprises an air pump coupled conduit through a regulating valve with a cylindrical pipe, installed coaxially with dropper. The measuring system includes the video camera located with possibility of visualization of drop and the Pitot gage for measurement of flow rate of air located in the output section of branch pipe. This experimental setup allows to provide reliable and informative results of the investigation of deformation of drops in the air flow.

  14. Levitation of a drop over a film flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivas, K. R.; de, P. K.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1999-02-01

    A vertical jet of water impinging on a horizontal surface produces a radial film flow followed by a circular hydraulic jump. We report a phenomenon where fairly large (1 ml) drops of liquid levitate just upstream of the jump on a thin air layer between the drop and the film flow. We explain the phenomenon using lubrication theory. Bearing action both in the air film and the water film seems to be necessary to support large drops. Horizontal support is given to the drop by the hydraulic jump. A variety of drop shapes is observed depending on the volume of the drop and liquid properties. We show that interaction of the forces due to gravity, surface tension, viscosity and inertia produces these various shapes.

  15. A study of fungi on droppings of certain birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Singh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Droppings of fowl, owl, parrot, pigeon and sparrow were asepticaly collected in sterilized bottles from different places at Gorakhpur, 54 fungi were isolated. The number of fungi was more in the pigeon showing considerable decrease in the fowl and the sparrow. In the parrot and the owl, however. the fungi were egual in number. The number of Phycomycetes was almost the same on droppings of all birds, from parrot only one species could be isolated. A larger number of Ascomyteces was recorded from fowl, less from pigeon and owl and the least (two each on sparrow and parrot droppings. The Basidiomycetes, represented by two species only, were recorded on owl and pigeon droppings. Pigeon droppings yielded the largest number of Deuteromycetes. They were egual in numbers on owl and parrot while on fowl and sparrow their number was comparatively less. Mycelia sterilia, though poor in their numbers, were recorded on all the bird droppings excepting owl.

  16. Surface wettability and triple line behavior controlled by nano-coatings: effects on the sessile drop evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Brutin, David; Gavillet, Jerôme

    2010-11-01

    Sessile drop evaporation is a phenomenon commonly came across in nature or in industry with cooling, paintings or DNA mapping. However, the evaporation of a drop posed on a substrate is not completely understood due to the complexity of the problem. Here we investigate, with several nano-coating of the substrate (SiOx, SiOc and CF), the wettability and the triple line dynamic of a sessile drop under natural phase change. The experiment consists in analyzing simultaneously the kinetics of evaporation, internal thermal motion and heat and mass transfer. Measurements of temperature, heat-flux and visualizations with visible and infrared cameras are performed. The dynamic of the evaporative heat flux appears clearly different for a drop evaporating in pinned mode than in receding mode. Moreover, the kinetics of evaporation, the internal flow structure and the evaporative heat flux are drastically influenced by the wettability the substrate.

  17. Development status of the experimental and numerical load analysis of package units CASTOR registered under drop test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelzer, Walter; Schaefer, Marc; Rumanus, Erkan; Liedtke, Ralph; Brehmer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of package units CASTOR registered for a 9-m drop test under accident conditions has to be demonstrated according the requirements of IAEA among others. For reduction of the loads the containers have to be equipped with shock absorbers on the bottom and top sides. The determination of loads under drop test conditions can be performed with experimental or numerical methods. Due to the complexity of the load state and the verification of results both methods are usually used for integrity demonstration. The numerical codes have to model the short-term dynamic behavior of the whole container for different drop orientations and temperatures, local stress states have to be quantifiable for assessment. One of the problems is the modeling of the material behavior of wood that is used in the shock absorbers. The so far used energetic calculation approach will be replaced by a dynamic approach, the numerical models will have to be verified by experimental drop tests.

  18. Studying the field induced breakup of acoustically levitated drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschat, C.; Riedel, J.

    2017-10-01

    Coulomb fission of charged droplets (The terms drop and droplet are often used synonymous. Throughout this manuscript, to avoid confusion, the terms drop and droplet will be used for liquid spheres with radii in the millimeter range and the micrometer range, respectively. In our experiments, the first correspond to the parent drop while the latter describes the ejected progeny droplets.) is a well-studied natural phenomenon. Controlled droplet fission is already successfully employed in several technological applications. Still, since the occurring surface rupture relies on the exact understanding and description of the liquid gas boundary, some details are still under debate. Most empirical systematic studies observe falling micrometer droplets passing through the electric field inside a plate capacitor. This approach, although easily applicable and reliable, limits the experimental degrees of freedom regarding the observable time and the maximum size of the drops and can only be performed in consecutive individual observations of different subsequent drops. Here we present a novel setup to study the field induced breakup of acoustically levitated drops. The design does not bear any restrictions towards the temporal window of observation, and allows handling of drops of a tunable radius ranging from 10 μm to several millimeters and a real-time monitoring of one single drop. Our comprehensive study includes a time resolved visual inspection, laser shadowgraphy, laser induced fluorescence imaging, and ambient mass spectrometric interrogation of the nascent Taylor cone. The results shown for a millimeter sized drop, previously inaccessible for Coulomb fission experiments, are mostly comparable with previous results for smaller drops. The major difference is the time scale and the threshold potential of the drop rupture. Both values, however, resemble theoretically extrapolations to the larger radius. The technique allows for a systematic study of breakup behavior of

  19. Self-excited hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops

    OpenAIRE

    Sefiane K.; Moffat J.R.; Matar O.K.; Craster R.V.

    2008-01-01

    Pattern formation driven by the spontaneous evaporation of sessile drops of methanol, ethanol, and FC-72 using infrared thermography is observed and, in certain cases, interpreted in terms of hydrothermal waves. Both methanol and ethanol drops exhibit thermal wave trains, whose wave number depends strongly on the liquid volatililty and substrate thermal conductivity. The FC- 72 drops develop cellular structures whose size is proportional to the local thickness. Prior to this work, hydrotherma...

  20. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy.

  1. Analysis of DCI cask drop test onto reinforced concrete pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, C.; Kato, Y.; Hattori, S.; Shirai, K.; Misumi, M.; Ozaki, S.

    1993-01-01

    In a cask-storage facility, a cask may be subjected to an impact load as a result of a free drop onto the floor because of cask mishandling. We performed drop tests of casks onto a reinforced concrete (RC) slab representing the floor of a facility as well as simulation analysis [Kato et al]. This paper describes the details of the FEM analysis and calculated results and compares them with the drop test results. (J.P.N.)

  2. Reducing Variability in Stress Drop with Root-Mean Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crempien, J.; Archuleta, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Stress drop is a fundamental property of the earthquake source. For a given tectonic region stress drop is assumed to be constant allowing for the scaling of earthquake spectra. However, the variability of the stress drop, either for worldwide catalogs or regional catalogs, is quite large. The variability around the median value is on the order of 1.5 in log10 units. One question that continues to pervade the analysis of stress drop is whether this variability is an inherent characteristic of the Earth or is an artifact of the determination of stress drop via the use of the spectral analysis. It is simple to see that the stress drop determined by seismic moment times corner frequency cubed that errors in the corner frequency will strongly influence the variability in the stress drop. To avoid this strong dependence on corner frequency cubed, we have examined the determination of stress drop based on the approach proposed by Hanks (1979), namely using the root-mean-square acceleration. The stress drop determined using rms acceleration may be advantageous because the stress drop is only affected by the square root of the corner frequency. To test this approach we have determined stress drops for the 2000 Tottori earthquake and its aftershocks. We use both the classic method of fitting to a spectrum as well as using rms acceleration. For a preliminary analysis of eight aftershocks and the mainshock we find that the variability in stress drop is reduced by about a factor of two. This approach needs more careful analysis of more events, which will be shown at the meeting.

  3. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor, molten liquid may be introduced into a volatile coolant, which, under certain conditions, results in explosive interactions. Such fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) are characterised by an initial pre-mixing phase during which the molten liquid, metallic or oxidic in nature, undergoes a breakup (fragmentation) process which significantly increase the area available for melt-coolant contact, and thus energy transfer. Although substantial progress in the understanding of phenomenology of the FCI events has been achieved in recent years, there remain uncertainties in describing the primary and secondary breakup processes. The focus of this work is on the melt jet and drop breakup during the premixing phase of FCI. The objectives are to gain insight into the premixing phase of the FCI phenomena, to determine what fraction of the melt fragments and determine the size distribution. The approach is to perform experiments with various simulant materials, at different scales, different conditions and with variation of controlling parameters affecting jet and drop breakup processes. The analysis approach is to investigate processes at different level of detail and complexity to understand the physics, to rationalise experimental results and to develop and validate models. In the first chapter a brief introduction and review of the status of the FCI phenomena is performed. A review of previous and current experimental projects is performed. The status of the experimental projects and major findings are outlined. The first part of the second chapter deals with experimental investigation of jet breakup. Two series of experiments were performed with low and high temperature jets. The low temperature experiments employed cerrobend-70 as jet liquid. A systematic investigation of thermal hydraulic conditions and melt physical properties on the jet fragmentation and particle debris characteristics was

  4. [Pharmacodynamics Study on Gualou Xiebai Dropping Pills and Its Medicinal Ingredients in Prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-yan; Zou, Chun-cai; Wei, Mei-ling; Gao, Zheng-zheng; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    To study the pharmacodynamics of Gualou Xiebai Dropping Pills and its medicinal ingredients in prescription on anti-myocardial ischemia. SPF Rats were divided randomly into eleven groups with ten rats in each group and half male and half female, the rats were respectively given the physiological saline(blank group and model group), Gualou, Xiebai, Gualou Xiebai Baijiutang (all equivalent to the crude herb of 22. 5 g/kg), Gualou Xiebai. Dropping Pills in the doses of 3. 75,11. 25,22. 5,33. 75 and 45 g/kg and Compound Danshen Drop Pills of 0. 085 g/kg by gavage one time a day for seven days. Except blank group, other rats were given by intraperitoneal injection of isoproterenol to establish myocardial ischemia models, changes of ST segments in ECG were observed in all groups, and the levels of SOD, NO, HDL-C, MDA, CAT, LDH and CK in blood plasma were detected, and the pathological changes of myocardial tissues were observed under light microscope by HE staining. Compared with model group, ST segments in ECG dropped markedly at different time point which included 10,11 and 12 (P Pills groups of 22. 5, 33. 75 and 45 g/kg, time points were more than those of other groups. Gualou Xiebai Dropping Pills groups of 22. 5 and 33. 75 g/kg improved the levels of SOD, MDA, CAT, NO, HDL-C, LDH and CK in blood plasma in model rats significantly (P Pills improved the pathological changes of myocardial tissues at all dosages. Gualou Xiebai Drop Pills can effectively restrain the acute myocardial ischemia induced by isoproterenol in rats, compared with Gualou, Xiebai or Gualou Xiebai Baijiutang, Gualou Xiebai Drop Pills obtains a favourable effect.

  5. TN-68 Spent Fuel Transport Cask Analytical Evaluation for Drop Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.J.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing commercial spent nuclear fuel transported in casks certified by NRC under the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Title 10, Part 71 (1). Both the International Atomic Energy Agency regulations for transporting radioactive materials (2, paragraph 727), and 10 CFR 71.73 require casks to be evaluated for hypothetical accident conditions, which includes a 9-meter (m) (30-ft) drop-impact event onto a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface, in the most damaging orientation. This paper examines the behavior of one of the NRC certified transportation casks, the TN-68 (3), for drop-impact events. The specific area examined is the behavior of the bolted connections in the cask body and the closure lid, which are significantly loaded during the hypothetical drop-impact event. Analytical work to evaluate the NRC-certified TN-68 spent fuel transport cask (3) for a 9-m (30-ft) drop-impact event on a flat, unyielding, horizontal surface, was performed using the ANSYS (4) and LS DYNA (5) finite-element analysis codes. The models were sufficiently detailed, in the areas of bolt closure interfaces and containment boundaries, to evaluate the structural integrity of the bolted connections under 9-m (30-ft) free-drop hypothetical accident conditions, as specified in 10 CFR 71.73. Evaluation of the cask for puncture, caused by a free drop through a distance of 1-m (40-in.) onto a mild steel bar mounted on a flat, essentially unyielding, horizontal surface, required by 10 CFR 71.73, was not included in the current work, and will have to be addressed in the future. Based on the analyses performed to date, it is concluded that, even though brief separation of the flange and the lid surfaces may occur under some conditions, the seals would close at the end of the drop events, because the materials remain elastic during the duration of the event

  6. Dorsiflexion capacity affects achilles tendon loading during drop landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitting, John W; Steele, Julie R; McGhee, Deirdre E; Munro, Bridget J

    2011-04-01

    Evidence suggests a link between decreased dorsiflexion range of motion (DROM) and injury risk during landings. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of weight-bearing DROM on ankle mechanics during drop landings. Forty-eight men (mean ± SD = 22.5 ± 4.7 yr) were measured for DROM. Participants performed drop landings onto a force platform at two vertical descent velocities (2.25 ± 0.15 and 3.21 ± 0.17 m·s(-1)), while EMG activity of four shank muscles and three-dimensional ankle joint kinematics were recorded. Participants were classified into low (37.7° ± 2.5°) and high (48.4° ± 2.5°) DROM groups. Ground reaction force, EMG, dorsiflexion angle, plantarflexion moment, and Achilles tendon force outcome variables were all equivalent for the two DROM groups during each landing condition. However, the low DROM group performed each landing condition at a significantly greater percentage of their DROM and displayed significantly more ankle eversion throughout most of the movement. The low and high DROM groups displayed DROM percentages of 27 ± 11 and 10 ± 11 (P = 0.013), 32 ± 9 and 23 ± 9 (P = 0.056), 60 ± 13 and 46 ± 13 (P = 0.004), and 66 ± 16 and 54 ± 9 (P = 0.003) when they encountered the peak plantarflexion moments, Achilles tendon force, eversion angles, and dorsiflexion angles, respectively. Participants with a low DROM absorbed the landing impact forces with their plantarflexor muscle-tendon units in a more lengthened and everted position. Athletes with a low DROM may be more likely to regularly overload their plantarflexor muscle-tendon units, thereby potentially exposing themselves to a higher likelihood of incurring injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy.

  7. How ants drop out: ant abundance on tropical mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longino, John T; Branstetter, Michael G; Colwell, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    In tropical wet forests, ants are a large proportion of the animal biomass, but the factors determining abundance are not well understood. We characterized ant abundance in the litter layer of 41 mature wet forest sites spread throughout Central America (Chiapas, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica) and examined the impact of elevation (as a proxy for temperature) and community species richness. Sites were intentionally chosen to minimize variation in precipitation and seasonality. From sea level to 1500 m ant abundance very gradually declined, community richness declined more rapidly than abundance, and the local frequency of the locally most common species increased. These results suggest that within this elevational zone, density compensation is acting, maintaining high ant abundance as richness declines. In contrast, in sites above 1500 m, ant abundance dropped abruptly to much lower levels. Among these high montane sites, community richness explained much more of the variation in abundance than elevation, and there was no evidence of density compensation. The relative stability of abundance below 1500 m may be caused by opposing effects of temperature on productivity and metabolism. Lower temperatures may decrease productivity and thus the amount of food available for consumers, but slower metabolisms of consumers may allow maintenance of higher biomass at lower resource supply rates. Ant communities at these lower elevations may be highly interactive, the result of continuous habitat presence over geological time. High montane sites may be ephemeral in geological time, resulting in non-interactive communities dominated by historical and stochastic processes. Abundance in these sites may be determined by the number of species that manage to colonize and/or avoid extinction on mountaintops.

  8. How ants drop out: ant abundance on tropical mountains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Longino

    Full Text Available In tropical wet forests, ants are a large proportion of the animal biomass, but the factors determining abundance are not well understood. We characterized ant abundance in the litter layer of 41 mature wet forest sites spread throughout Central America (Chiapas, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica and examined the impact of elevation (as a proxy for temperature and community species richness. Sites were intentionally chosen to minimize variation in precipitation and seasonality. From sea level to 1500 m ant abundance very gradually declined, community richness declined more rapidly than abundance, and the local frequency of the locally most common species increased. These results suggest that within this elevational zone, density compensation is acting, maintaining high ant abundance as richness declines. In contrast, in sites above 1500 m, ant abundance dropped abruptly to much lower levels. Among these high montane sites, community richness explained much more of the variation in abundance than elevation, and there was no evidence of density compensation. The relative stability of abundance below 1500 m may be caused by opposing effects of temperature on productivity and metabolism. Lower temperatures may decrease productivity and thus the amount of food available for consumers, but slower metabolisms of consumers may allow maintenance of higher biomass at lower resource supply rates. Ant communities at these lower elevations may be highly interactive, the result of continuous habitat presence over geological time. High montane sites may be ephemeral in geological time, resulting in non-interactive communities dominated by historical and stochastic processes. Abundance in these sites may be determined by the number of species that manage to colonize and/or avoid extinction on mountaintops.

  9. [Stability of physical state on compound hawthorn dropping pills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Lan

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the stability of physical state with accelerate test and dropping in process before and after on compound hawthorn dropping pills. Scanning electron microscope, TG-DTA, FT-IR and XRD were used. The active components presented amorphous, tiny crystal and molecular state in dropping pills, and it had no obvious reaction between PEG 4000 and active components. With time prolonging, a little of active components changed from amorphous state to tiny crystal or molecular state. Solid dispersion improved the stability and dissolution of compound hawthorn dropping pills.

  10. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic drop-out...... is occurring. With this discussion, we hope to improve the drop-out model, so that it can be used for practical forensic genetics and stimulate further discussions. We discuss how to estimate drop-out probabilities when using a varying number of PCR cycles and other experimental conditions....

  11. Motion of a drop driven by substrate vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, P.; Eggers, J.; Deegan, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    We report an experimental study of liquid drops moving against gravity, when placed on a vertically vibrating inclined plate, which is partially wet by the drop. Frequency of vibrations ranges from 30 to 200 Hz, and above a threshold in vibration acceleration, drops experience an upward motion. We attribute this surprising motion to the deformations of the drop, as a consequence of an up/down symmetry-breaking induced by the presence of the substrate. We relate the direction of motion to contact angle measurements.

  12. Career drop outs of young elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Fišer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of the study was to examine the characteristics of sports career drop outs of young elite sportswomen and their adaptation to the post-sport life. The sample included 20 ex-young elite sportswomen, who had brought their successful sport careers to an end before the age of 19. We used a modified interview about sports career termination (Cecić Erpič, 1998 for the investigation of the characteristics of their sports careers. To examine the caracteristics of sport careers we used frequency analysis and cluster analysis. The results showed that the participants mostly stated more than one reason for the termination of their career. The most common reasons for career termination were: lack of motivation, bad relations with trainers or co-competitors and dedication to school or education. After the end of a sports career most of the young sportswomen stayed actively in touch with sport, either as trainers, judges, or they remained engaged in sports for recreation.

  13. The viruses of wild pigeon droppings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Gia Phan

    Full Text Available Birds are frequent sources of emerging human infectious diseases. Viral particles were enriched from the feces of 51 wild urban pigeons (Columba livia from Hong Kong and Hungary, their nucleic acids randomly amplified and then sequenced. We identified sequences from known and novel species from the viral families Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, Picornaviridae, Reoviridae, Adenovirus, Astroviridae, and Caliciviridae (listed in decreasing number of reads, as well as plant and insect viruses likely originating from consumed food. The near full genome of a new species of a proposed parvovirus genus provisionally called Aviparvovirus contained an unusually long middle ORF showing weak similarity to an ORF of unknown function from a fowl adenovirus. Picornaviruses found in both Asia and Europe that are distantly related to the turkey megrivirus and contained a highly divergent 2A1 region were named mesiviruses. All eleven segments of a novel rotavirus subgroup related to a chicken rotavirus in group G were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. This study provides an initial assessment of the enteric virome in the droppings of pigeons, a feral urban species with frequent human contact.

  14. GENDER, DEBT, AND DROPPING OUT OF COLLEGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Rachel E; Hodson, Randy; McLoud, Laura

    2013-02-01

    For many young Americans, access to credit has become critical to completing a college education and embarking on a successful career path. Young people increasingly face the trade-off of taking on debt to complete college or foregoing college and taking their chances in the labor market without a college degree. These trade-offs are gendered by differences in college preparation and support and by the different labor market opportunities women and men face that affect the value of a college degree and future difficulties they may face in repaying college debt. We examine these new realities by studying gender differences in the role of debt in the pivotal event of graduating from college using the 1997 cohort of the national longitudinal Survey of youth. In this article, we find that women and men both experience slowing and even diminishing probabilities of graduating when carrying high levels of debt, but that men drop out at lower levels of debt than do women. We conclude by theorizing that high levels of debt are one of the mechanisms that sort women and men into different positions in the social stratification system.

  15. That's one small drop for Mankind...

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    In August, the members of an ISOLDE project called LOI88 successfully employed a new technique to study the interaction of metal ions in a liquid. It’s the first time that specific ions have been studied in a liquid medium - a technical achievement that opens promising doors for biochemistry.   In the heart of the LOI88 experiment: this is the point where the metal ions (from the left) enter the drop.  “More than half of the proteins in the human body contain metal ions such as magnesium, zinc and copper,” explains Monika Stachura, a biophysicist at the University of Copenhagen and the LOI88 project leader. “We know that these elements are crucial to a protein’s structure and function but their behaviour and interactions are not known in detail.” Detecting these ions directly in  a body-like environment is problematic as their closed atomic shells make them invisible to most spectroscopic techniques. However, using ...

  16. Insights from the pollination drop proteome and the ovule transcriptome of Cephalotaxus at the time of pollination drop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone-Davies, Cary; Prior, Natalie; von Aderkas, Patrick; Smith, Derek; Hardie, Darryl; Friedman, William E; Mathews, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Many gymnosperms produce an ovular secretion, the pollination drop, during reproduction. The drops serve as a landing site for pollen, but also contain a suite of ions and organic compounds, including proteins, that suggests diverse roles for the drop during pollination. Proteins in the drops of species of Chamaecyparis, Juniperus, Taxus, Pseudotsuga, Ephedra and Welwitschia are thought to function in the conversion of sugars, defence against pathogens, and pollen growth and development. To better understand gymnosperm pollination biology, the pollination drop proteomes of pollination drops from two species of Cephalotaxus have been characterized and an ovular transcriptome for C. sinensis has been assembled. Mass spectrometry was used to identify proteins in the pollination drops of Cephalotaxus sinensis and C. koreana RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) was employed to assemble a transcriptome and identify transcripts present in the ovules of C. sinensis at the time of pollination drop production. About 30 proteins were detected in the pollination drops of both species. Many of these have been detected in the drops of other gymnosperms and probably function in defence, polysaccharide metabolism and pollen tube growth. Other proteins appear to be unique to Cephalotaxus, and their putative functions include starch and callose degradation, among others. Together, the proteins appear either to have been secreted into the drop or to occur there due to breakdown of ovular cells during drop production. Ovular transcripts represent a wide range of gene ontology categories, and some may be involved in drop formation, ovule development and pollen-ovule interactions. The proteome of Cephalotaxus pollination drops shares a number of components with those of other conifers and gnetophytes, including proteins for defence such as chitinases and for carbohydrate modification such as β-galactosidase. Proteins likely to be of intracellular origin, however, form a larger component of drops

  17. Sandia National Laboratories cask drop test programme: a demonstration of fracture mechanics principles for the prevention of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories recently completed a cask drop test programme. The aims of the programme were (1) to demonstrate the applicability of a fracture mechanics-based methodology for ensuring cask integrity, and (2) to assess the viability of using a ferritic materials for cask containment. The programme consisted of four phases: (i) materials characterisation; (ii) non-destructive examination of the cask; (iii) finite element analyses of the drop events; and (iv) a series of drop tests of a ductile iron cask. The first three phases of the programme provided information for fracture mechanics analyses and predictions for the drop test phase. The drop tests were nominally based upon the IAEA 9 m drop height hypothetical accident scenario although one drop test was from 18 m. All tests were performed in the side drop orientation at a temperature of -29 o C. A circumferential, mid-axis flaw was introduced into the cask body for each drop test. Flaw depth ranged from 19 to 76 mm. Steel saddles were welded to the side wall of the cask to enhance the stresses imposed upon the cask in the region of the introduced flaw. The programme demonstrated the applicability of a fracture mechanics methodology for predicting the conditions under which brittle fracture may occur and thereby the utility of fracture mechanics design for ensuring cask structural integrity by ensuring an appropriate margin of safety. Positive assessments of ductile iron for cask containment and the quality of the casting process for producing ductile iron casks were made. The results of this programme have provided data to support IAEA efforts to develop brittle fracture acceptance criteria for cask containment. (author)

  18. Validation of Pressure Drop Models for PHWR-type Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasnarof Daniel; Daverio, H.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work an one-dimensional pressure drop analytical model and the COBRA code, are validated with experimental data of CANDU and Atucha fuel bundles in low and high pressure experimental test loops.Models have very good agreement with the experimental data, having less than 5 % of discrepancy. The analytical model results were compared with COBRA code results, having small difference between them in a wide range of pressure, temperature and mass flow

  19. Improved point-kinetics model for the BWR control rod drop accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neogy, P.; Wakabayashi, T.; Carew, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A simple prescription to account for spatial feedback weighting effects in RDA (rod drop accident) point-kinetics analyses has been derived and tested. The point-kinetics feedback model is linear in the core peaking factor, F/sub Q/, and in the core average void fraction and fuel temperature. Comparison with detailed spatial kinetics analyses indicates that the improved point-kinetics model provides an accurate description of the BWR RDA

  20. Chemoembolization Decreases Drop-Off Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients on the Liver Transplant List

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangakis, Constantine; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Kim, Daniel; Chen, Yong; Koteish, Ayman; Hong, Kelvin; Liapi, Eleni; Georgiades, Christos S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The drop-off risk for patients awaiting liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is 22%. Transplant liver availability is expected to worsen, resulting in longer waiting times and increased drop-off rates. Our aim was to determine whether chemoembolization can decrease this risk. Patients and Methods: Eighty-seven consecutive HCC patients listed for liver transplant (Milan criteria) underwent statistical comparability adjustments using the propensity score (Wilcoxon, Fisher’s, and chi-square tests). Forty-three nonchemoembolization patients and 22 chemoembolization patients were comparable for Child-Pugh and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores, tumor size and number, alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels, and cause of cirrhosis. We calculated the risk of dropping off the transplant list by assigning a transplant time to those who dropped off (equal probability with patients who were on the list longer than the patient in question). The significance level was obtained by calculating the simulation distribution of the difference compared with the permutations of chemoembolization versus nonchemoembolization assignment of the patients. Kaplan–Meier estimators (log-rank test) were used to determine survival rates. Results: Median follow-up was 187 ± 110 weeks (range 38 to 435, date of diagnosis). The chemoembolization group had an 80% drop-off risk decrease (15% nonchemoembolization versus 3% chemoembolization, p = 0.04). Although survival was better for the chemoembolization group, it did not reach statistical significance. Two-year survival for the nonchemoembolization and chemoembolization group was 57.3% ± 7.1% and 76.0% ± 7.9%, respectively (p = 0.078). Conclusions: Chemoembolization appears to result in a significant decrease in the risk of dropping off liver transplant list for patients with HCC and results in a tendency toward longer survival.

  1. Drop Calculations of HLW Canister and Pu Can-in-Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (Pu) (''can-in-canister'' [CIC] throughout this document) subjected to drop DBEs (design basis events) during the handling operation. The evaluated DBE in the former case is 7-m (23-ft) vertical (flat-bottom) drop. In the latter case, two 2-ft (0.61-m) corner (oblique) drops are evaluated in addition to the 7-m vertical drop. These Pu CIC calculations are performed at three different temperatures: room temperature (RT) (20 C), T = 200 F = 93.3 C , and T = 400 F = 204 C ; in addition to these the calculation characterized by the highest maximum stress intensity is performed at T = 750 F = 399 C as well. The scope of the HLW canister calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of: stress intensity and effective plastic strain in the canister, directional residual strains at the canister outer surface, and change of canister dimensions. The scope of Pu CIC calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity, and effective plastic strain in the canister. The information provided by the sketches from Reference 26 (Attachments 5.3,5.5,5.8, and 5.9) is that of the potential CIC design considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the Plutonium Immobilization Project and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. It should be noted that the 9-m vertical drop DBE, included in Reference 24, is not included in the objective of this calculation since it did not become a waste acceptance requirement. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  2. Estimations of temperature deviations in chromatographic columns using isenthalpic plots. I. Theory for isocratic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Abhijit; Iraneta, Pamela; Guiochon, Georges; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Poe, Donald P

    2014-10-31

    We propose to use constant enthalpy or isenthalpic diagrams as a tool to estimate the extent of the temperature variations caused by the mobile phase pressure drop along a chromatographic column, e.g. of its cooling in supercritical fluid and its heating in ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Temperature strongly affects chromatographic phenomena. Any of its variations inside the column, whether intended or not, can lead to significant changes in separation performance. Although instruments use column ovens in order to keep constant the column temperature, operating conditions leading to a high pressure drop may cause significant variations of the column temperature, both in the axial and the radial directions, from the set value. Different ways of measuring these temperature variations are available but they are too inconvenient to be employed in many practical situations. In contrast, the thermodynamic plot-based method that we describe here can easily be used with only a ruler and a pencil. They should be helpful in developing methods or in analyzing results in analytical laboratories. Although the most effective application area for this approach should be SFC (supercritical fluid chromatography), it can be applied to any chromatographic conditions in which temperature variations take place along the column due to the pressure drop, e.g. in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC). The method proposed here is applicable to isocractic conditions only. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the quality of stored red blood cells after simulated air drop in the maritime environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, Athinoula; Hancock, Vicky; Doughty, Heidi; Smedley, Steve; Cardigan, Rebecca; Wiltshire, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Maritime medical capability may be compromised by blood resupply. Air-dropped red blood cells (RBCs) is a possible mitigation factor. This study set out to evaluate RBC storage variables after a simulated parachute air drop into the sea, as limited data exist. The air load construction for the air drop of blood was subject to static drop assessment to simulate a worst-case parachute drop scenario. One control and two test Golden Hour shipping containers were each packaged with 10 RBC units. The control box was not dropped; Test Boxes 1 and 2 were further reinforced with waterproof boxes and underwent a simulated air drop on Day 7 or Day 8 postdonation, respectively. One day after the drop and once a week thereafter until Day 43 of storage, RBCs from each box were sampled and tested for full blood counts, hemolysis, adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, pH, extracellular potassium, glucose, lactate, deformability, and RBC microvesicles. The packaging configuration completed the air drop with no water ingress or physical damage. All units met UK specifications for volume, hemoglobin, and hemolysis. There were no significant differences for any of the variables studied between RBCs in the control box compared to RBCs in Test Boxes 1 and 2 combined over storage. The test proved that the packaging solution and the impact of a maritime air drop as performed in this study, on Day 7 or Day 8 postdonation, did not affect the in vitro quality of RBCs in SAGM over storage for 35 days. © 2017 AABB.

  4. Comparison of atomization characteristics of drop-in and conventional jet fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza; Micro Scale Thermo-Fluids Lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Surge in energy demand and stringent emission norms have been driving the interest on alternative drop-in fuels in aviation industry. The gas-to-liquid (GTL), synthetic paraffinic kerosene fuel derived from natural gas, has drawn significant attention as drop-in fuel due to its cleaner combustion characteristics when compared to other alternative fuels derived from various feedstocks. The fuel specifications such as chemical and physical properties of drop-in fuels are different from those of the conventional jet fuels, which can affect their atomization characteristics and in turn the combustion performance. The near nozzle liquid sheet dynamics of the drop-in fuel, GTL, is studied at different nozzle operating conditions and compared with that of the conventional Jet A-1 fuel. The statistical analysis of the near nozzle sheet dynamics shows that the drop-in fuel atomization characteristics are comparable to those of the conventional fuel. Furthermore, the microscopic spray characteristics measured using phase Doppler anemometry at downstream locations are slightly different between the fuels. Authors acknowledge the support by National Priorities Research Program (NPRP) of Qatar National Research Fund through the Grant NPRP-7-1449-2-523.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul, Latif; Abdul, Razique; Sukul, R R; Nazish, Siddiqui

    2010-01-01

    The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and antiallergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  7. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer OZER

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process. Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an “Application Form” on the demographic information and the “Brief Symptom Inventory” was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process

  8. Anti-inflammatory and Antihistaminic Study of a Unani Eye Drop Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Abdul

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Unani eye drop is an ophthalmic formulation prepared for its beneficial effects in the inflammatory and allergic conditions of the eyes. In the present study, the Unani eye drop formulation was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity, using in vivo and in vitro experimental models respectively. The Unani eye drop formulation exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in turpentine liniment-induced ocular inflammation in rabbits. The preparation also showed antihistaminic activity in isolated guinea-pig ileum. The anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity of eye drop may be due to presence of active ingredients in the formulation. Although there are many drugs in Unani repository which are mentioned in classical books or used in Unani clinical practice effectively in treatment of eye diseases by various Unani physicians. Inspite of the availability of vast literature, there is a dearth of commercial Unani ocular preparations. So, keeping this in mind, the eye drop formulation was prepared and its anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic activity was carried out in animal models. Thus, in view of the importance of alternative anti-inflammatory and anti- allergic drugs, it becomes imperative to bring these indigenous drugs to the front foot and evaluate their activities.

  9. Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop Characteristics in Straight Microchannel of Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Won Seo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance tests were carried out for a microchannel printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE, which was fabricated with micro photo-etching and diffusion bonding technologies. The microchannel PCHE was tested for Reynolds numbers in the range of 100‒850 varying the hot-side inlet temperature between 40 °C–50 °C while keeping the cold-side temperature fixed at 20 °C. It was found that the average heat transfer rate and heat transfer performance of the countercurrrent configuration were 6.8% and 10%‒15% higher, respectively, than those of the parallel flow. The average heat transfer rate, heat transfer performance and pressure drop increased with increasing Reynolds number in all experiments. Increasing inlet temperature did not affect the heat transfer performance while it slightly decreased the pressure drop in the experimental range considered. Empirical correlations have been developed for the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop factor as functions of the Reynolds number.

  10. von Kármán Vortex Street within an Impacting Drop

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2012-06-29

    The splashing of a drop impacting onto a liquid pool produces a range of different sized microdroplets. At high impact velocities, the most significant source of these droplets is a thin liquid jet emerging at the start of the impact from the neck that connects the drop to the pool. We use ultrahigh-speed video imaging in combination with high-resolution numerical simulations to show how this ejecta gives way to irregular splashing. At higher Reynolds numbers, its base becomes unstable, shedding vortex rings into the liquid from the free surface in an axisymmetric von Kármán vortex street, thus breaking the ejecta sheet as it forms.

  11. von Kármán Vortex Street within an Impacting Drop

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharu Goji; Popinet, Sté phane; Ray, Pascal; Josserand, Christophe; Zaleski, Sté phane; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-01-01

    The splashing of a drop impacting onto a liquid pool produces a range of different sized microdroplets. At high impact velocities, the most significant source of these droplets is a thin liquid jet emerging at the start of the impact from the neck that connects the drop to the pool. We use ultrahigh-speed video imaging in combination with high-resolution numerical simulations to show how this ejecta gives way to irregular splashing. At higher Reynolds numbers, its base becomes unstable, shedding vortex rings into the liquid from the free surface in an axisymmetric von Kármán vortex street, thus breaking the ejecta sheet as it forms.

  12. Stress drops of induced and tectonic earthquakes in the central United States are indistinguishable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yihe; Ellsworth, William L; Beroza, Gregory C

    2017-08-01

    Induced earthquakes currently pose a significant hazard in the central United States, but there is considerable uncertainty about the severity of their ground motions. We measure stress drops of 39 moderate-magnitude induced and tectonic earthquakes in the central United States and eastern North America. Induced earthquakes, more than half of which are shallower than 5 km, show a comparable median stress drop to tectonic earthquakes in the central United States that are dominantly strike-slip but a lower median stress drop than that of tectonic earthquakes in the eastern North America that are dominantly reverse-faulting. This suggests that ground motion prediction equations developed for tectonic earthquakes can be applied to induced earthquakes if the effects of depth and faulting style are properly considered. Our observation leads to the notion that, similar to tectonic earthquakes, induced earthquakes are driven by tectonic stresses.

  13. Changes of Corneal Wavefront Aberrations in Dry Eye Patients after Treatment with Artificial Lubricant Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the corneal aberration changes in dry eye patients after treatment with artificial eye drops. Methods. Thirty mild to moderate dry eye patients treated with artificial eye drops and twenty comparable dry eye patients were recruited as controls. Anterior corneal aberrations over 3 mm and 5 mm analytical zones including total, 3rd to 5th high order aberrations (HOAs, spherical aberration (SA, and vertical (V-coma and horizontal coma (H-coma obtained from corneal topography data at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment were evaluated. Results. For 3 mm zone, trefoils, V-coma, H-coma terms, and 3rd and 5th HOAs were significantly decreased (p0.05. Conclusions. Treatment with artificial eye drops can effectively improve the corneal optical quality of dry eye patients by ameliorating the HOAs of anterior corneal surface.

  14. Clinical assessment of diclofenac sodium eye drops in toric intraocular lens implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Luo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the application of diclofenac sodium eye drops in toric intraocular lens implantation. METHODS: From January 2011 to February 2012, 38 eyes of 37 patients, who underwent toric intraocular lens implantation in this hospital, were randomly divided into diclofenac sodium eye drops group(trial groupand control group. Patient's degree of cooperation during surgery and inflammation postoperation after 1 day, 3,7, days, 1 month and 3 months were evaluated. RESULTS: Patient's degree of cooperation during surgery in the trial group(1.53±0.62was significantly better than in the control group(2.40±0.88, P<0.05. Inflammation reaction was gentle in the trial group 1 day postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Diclofenac sodium eye drops used during toric intraocular lens implantation can obviously alleviate eye irritation, and increase the cooperation of patients.

  15. Pre-harvest fruit drop, bunch weight and fruit quality of 'Rothana' and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl2

    2012-10-09

    Oct 9, 2012 ... Pre-harvest fruit drop is a serious problem of some date palm cultivars. During 2010 ... important subsistence crop in most of the hot arid regions. (Botes and .... diluted 10-fold with distilled water) and allowed to stand for 5 min before the ... made by F-test and the least significant differences (LSD) at P = 5%.

  16. Experimental and visual study on flow patterns and pressure drops in U-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Lima, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    In single- and two-phase flow heat exchangers (in particular 'coils'), besides the straight tubes there are also many singularities, in particular the 180° return bends (also called return bends or U-bends). However, contrary to the literature concerning pressure drops and heat transfer in straight tubes, where many experimental data and predicting methods are available, only a limited number of studies concerning U-bends can be found. Neither reliable experimental data nor proven prediction methods are available. Indeed, flow structure, pressure drop and heat transfer in U-bends are an old unresolved design problem in the heat transfer industry. Thus, the present study aims at providing further insight on two-phase pressure drops and flows patterns in U-bends. Based on a new type of U-bend test section, an extensive experimental study was conducted. The experimental campaign covered five test sections with three internal diameters (7.8, 10.8 and 13.4 mm), five bend diameters (24.8, 31.7, 38.1, 54.8 and 66.1 mm), tested for three orientations (horizontal, vertical upflow and vertical downflow), two fluids (R134a and R410A), two saturation temperatures (5 and 10 °C) and mass velocities ranging from 150 to 1000 kg s -1 m -2 . The flow pattern observations identified were stratified-wavy, slug-stratified-wavy, intermittent, annular, dryout and mist flows. The effects of the U-bend on the flow patterns were also observed. A total of 5655 pressure drop data were measured at seven different locations in the test section ( straight tubes and U-bend) providing a total of almost 40,000 data points. The straight tube data were first used to improve the actual two-phase straight tube model of Moreno-Quibén and Thome. This updated model was then used to developed a two-phase U-bend pressure drop model. Based on a comparison between experimental and predicted values, it is concluded that the new two-phase frictional pressure drop model for U-bends successfully

  17. On the calculation of leakage rates from vessels filled with high density gaseous CO2 using pressure drop data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.F.

    1987-09-01

    This paper considers calculation methods to estimate leakage rates from pressure drop data from vessels filled with high pressure (40 bar) low temperature (25 0 C) CO 2 . It is essential to consider the non-ideality of CO 2 under these conditions if accurate results are to be obtained. There are two main areas where this is relevant: the first is the use of temperature measurements to adjust the measured pressure readings so that the effect of temperature fluctuations is eliminated. The second is in the conversion of the pressure drop data to volumetric leak rate. An example test is described in which it is shown that the CO 2 based temperature correction method improves the accuracy of the pressure drop estimate by about a factor of ten over using a perfect gas assumption and a factor of about 25 over not attempting to adjust the pressure at all. Also the flow rate obtained from assuming the gas was perfect was almost a factor of two too low. A method for scaling leakage rates to other temperature pressures and gases is also given brief consideration in this report. It is observed that the results of scaling are strongly dependent on the flow regime assumed and it is not possible to determine the flow regime from the pressure drop data. Consequently only upper and lower bounds to the scaled estimate can be quoted. (U.K.)

  18. Variation of rain intensity and drop size distribution with General Weather Patterns (GWL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghada, Wael; Buras, Allan; Lüpke, Marvin; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Short-duration rainfall extremes may cause flash floods in certain catchments (e.g. cities or fast responding watersheds) and pose a great risk to affected communities. In order to predict their occurrence under future climate change scenarios, their link to atmospheric circulation patterns needs to be well understood. We used a comprehensive data set of meteorological data (temperature, rain gauge precipitation) and precipitation spectra measured by a disdrometer (OTT PARSIVEL) between October 2008 and June 2010 at Freising, southern Germany. For the 21 months of the study period, we integrated the disdrometer spectra over intervals of 10 minutes to correspond to the temporal resolution of the weather station data and discarded measurements with air temperatures below 0°C. Daily General Weather Patterns ("Großwetterlagen", GWL) were downloaded from the website of the German Meteorological Service. Out of the 29 GWL, 14 were included in the analysis for which we had at least 12 rain events during our study period. For the definition of a rain event, we tested different lengths of minimum inter-event times and chose 30 min as a good compromise between number and length of resulting events; rain events started when more than 0.001 mm/h (sensitivity of the disdrometer) were recorded. The length of the rain events ranged between 10 min and 28 h (median 130 min) with the maximum rain intensity recorded being 134 mm/h on 24-07-2009. Seasonal differences were identified for rain event average intensities and maximum intensities per event. The influence of GWL on rain properties such as rain intensity and drop size distribution per time step and per event was investigated based on the above mentioned rain event definition. Pairwise Wilcoxon-tests revealed that higher rain intensity and larger drops were associated with the GWL "Low over the British Isles" (TB), whereas low rain intensities and less drops per interval were associated with the GWL "High over Central Europe

  19. Continuous monitoring of back-wall stress corrosion cracking propagation by means of potential drop techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Atsumi, Takeo; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the potential drop techniques to the continuous monitoring of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation, SCC tests were performed in a sodium thiosulfate solution at room temperature using plate specimens with weldments. The SCC propagation was monitored using the techniques of direct current potential drop (DCPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and modified induced current potential drop (MICPD) on the reverse side that on which the SCC existed and effectiveness of each technique for the continuous monitoring from the reverse side of SCC was compared from the viewpoints of sensitivity to the crack propagation and measurement stability. The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back-wall SCC propagation, which initiates from a fatigue pre-crack at a depth of about 4 mm, from which it propagates through more than 80% of the specimen thickness. The MICPD technique can decrease the effect of the current flowing in the direction of the crack length by focusing the induced current into the local area of measurement using induction coils, so that the sensitivity of the continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC propagation is higher than that of the DCPD and ACPD techniques. (author)

  20. Heat transfer and pressure drop of condensation of hydrocarbons in tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Simon; Skusa, Severin; Luke, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are investigated for propane. Two different mild steel plain tubes and saturation pressures are considered for varying mass flux and vapour quality. The pressure drop is compared to the Friedel-Correlation with two different approaches to determine the friction factor. The first is calculation as proposed by Friedel and the second is through single phase pressure drop investigations. For lower vapour qualities the experimental results are in better agreement with the approach of the calculated friction factor. For higher vapour qualities the experimental friction factor is more precise. The pressure drop increases for a decreasing tube diameter and saturation pressure. The circumferential temperature profile and heat transfer coefficients are shown for a constant vapour quality at varying mass fluxes. The subcooling is highest for the bottom of the tube and lowest for the top. The average subcooling as well as the circumferential deviation decreases for rising mass fluxes. The averaged heat transfer coefficients are compared to the model proposed by Thome and Cavallini. The experimental results are in good agreement with both correlations, however the trend is better described with the correlation from Thome. The experimental heat transfer coefficients are under predicted by Thome and over predicted by Cavallini.

  1. Low pressure drop filtration of airborne molecular organic contaminants using open-channel networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Andrew J.; Joriman, Jon; Ding, Lefei; Weineck, Gerald; Seguin, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) continues to play a very decisive role in the performance of many microelectronic devices and manufacturing processes. Besides airborne acids and bases, airborne organic contaminants such as 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), perfluoroalkylamines and condensables are of primary concern in these applications. Currently, the state of the filtration industry is such that optimum filter life and removal efficiency for organics is offered by granular carbon filter beds. However, the attributes that make packed beds of activated carbon extremely efficient also impart issues related to elevated filter weight and pressure drop. Most of the lower pressure drop AMC filters currently offered are quite expensive and are simply pleated combinations of various adsorptive and reactive media. On the other hand, low pressure drop filters, such as those designed as open-channel networks (OCN's), offer good filter life and removal efficiency with the additional benefits of significant reductions in overall filter weight and pressure drop. Equally important for many applications, the OCN filters can reconstruct the airflow so as to enhance the operation of a tool or process. For tool mount assemblies and fan filter units (FFUs) this can result in reduced fan and blower speeds, which subsequently can provide reduced vibration and energy costs. Additionally, these low pressure drop designs can provide a cost effective way of effectively removing AMC in full fab (or HVAC) filtration applications without significantly affecting air-handling requirements. Herein, we will present a new generation of low pressure drop OCN filters designed for the removal of airborne organics in a wide range of applications.

  2. In-Situ Creep Monitoring Using the Potential Drop Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, E.; Sposito, G.; Davies, C. M.; Cawley, P.; Nagy, P. B.

    2011-06-01

    A directional low-frequency Alternating Current Potential Drop (ACPD) sensor was developed for in-situ monitoring of creep in metals. The sensor relies on a modified ACPD technique that measures simultaneously both values of resistance in the axial and lateral directions using a square electrode configuration. As compared to the more commonly used in-line electrode configuration, the square arrangement used in this sensor is much more directional and thus allows the detection of creep-induced anisotropy and texture. The technique monitors the variation in the ratio of the measured axial and lateral resistances, therefore can efficiently separate the mostly isotropic common part of the resistivity variation caused by reversible temperature variations from the mostly anisotropic differential part caused by direct geometrical and indirect material effects of creep. Initially, this ratio is roughly proportional to the axial creep strain, while at later stages, the resistance ratio increases even faster with creep strain because of the formation of directional discontinuities such as preferentially oriented grain boundary cavities and multiple-site microcracks in the material.

  3. Evaluation of Sodium Sulphacetamide drops in the Treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sodium sulphacetamide eye drops had been used successfully in the past in the treatment of ophthalmia neonatorium (ON) but its use has decreased remarkably in recent time. The efficacy of 10 percent sodium sulphacetamide eye drops in the treatment of ON was prospectively evaluated in 68 neonates seen in our ...

  4. Summary of Skoda JS rod drop measurements analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svarny, J.; Krysl, V.

    1999-01-01

    A summary is presented of the Skoda JS rod drop reactivity measurements analysis provided during last two years based on control rod worth measurements by the outer ion chambers. Standard analysis based on comparisons of dynamics macrocode MOBY-DICK-SK and experimental data is extended to the 8-th group delayed neutron structure and new features of rod drop process are investigated. (author)

  5. Fabrication and Operation of Microfluidic Hanging-Drop Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misun, Patrick M; Birchler, Axel K; Lang, Moritz; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    The hanging-drop network (HDN) is a technology platform based on a completely open microfluidic network at the bottom of an inverted, surface-patterned substrate. The platform is predominantly used for the formation, culturing, and interaction of self-assembled spherical microtissues (spheroids) under precisely controlled flow conditions. Here, we describe design, fabrication, and operation of microfluidic hanging-drop networks.

  6. Why Did They Not Drop Out? Narratives from Resilient Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Anne; Fortin, Laurier; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Pierre; Royer, Egide

    2009-01-01

    There is much to be learned from students who were at-risk for dropping out of school but persevered and graduated. The purpose of the study on which this article is based, was to describe how students who were at-risk for dropping out of school persevered and graduated. The voices of two students are introduced, highlighting the challenges they…

  7. Pressure Drop of Chamfer on Spacer Grid Strap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Euijae; Kim, Kanghoon; Kim, Kyounghong; Nahm, Keeyil [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A swirl flow and cross flow are generated by the spacer grid with mixing vane that enhances the thermal performance and critical heat flux (CHF). The additional pressure drop makes it difficult to meet acceptance criteria for overall pressure drop in fuel assembly depending upon the pump capacity. The chamfer on the end of spacer grid strap is one solution to reduce additional pressure drop without any adverse effect on flow fields. In this research, the pressure drop tests for spacer grid with and without chamfer were carried out at the hydraulic test facility. The result can be applied to develop high performance nuclear fuel assemblies for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. The pressure drop tests for 5x5 spacer grid with and without chamfer as well as 6x6 spacer grid with and without chamfer were carried out at the INFINIT test facility. The Reynolds number ranged about from 16000 to 75000. The sweep-up and sweep-down test showed that the direction of sweep did not affect the pressure drop. The chamfer on spacer grid strap reduced the pressure drop due to the decreased in ratio of inlet area to outlet area. The pressure loss coefficient for spacer grid with chamfer was by up to 13.8 % lower than that for spacer grid without chamfer. Hence, the chamfer on spacer grid strap was one of effective ways to reduce the pressure drop.

  8. Delayed frost growth on jumping-drop superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Collier, C Patrick

    2013-02-26

    Self-propelled jumping drops are continuously removed from a condensing superhydrophobic surface to enable a micrometric steady-state drop size. Here, we report that subcooled condensate on a chilled superhydrophobic surface are able to repeatedly jump off the surface before heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs. Frost still forms on the superhydrophobic surface due to ice nucleation at neighboring edge defects, which eventually spreads over the entire surface via an interdrop frost wave. The growth of this interdrop frost front is shown to be up to 3 times slower on the superhydrophobic surface compared to a control hydrophobic surface, due to the jumping-drop effect dynamically minimizing the average drop size and surface coverage of the condensate. A simple scaling model is developed to relate the success and speed of interdrop ice bridging to the drop size distribution. While other reports of condensation frosting on superhydrophobic surfaces have focused exclusively on liquid-solid ice nucleation for isolated drops, these findings reveal that the growth of frost is an interdrop phenomenon that is strongly coupled to the wettability and drop size distribution of the surface. A jumping-drop superhydrophobic condenser minimized frost formation relative to a conventional dropwise condenser in two respects: preventing heterogeneous ice nucleation by continuously removing subcooled condensate, and delaying frost growth by limiting the success of interdrop ice bridge formation.

  9. From nuclear reactions to liquid-drop collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menchaca R, A.; Huidobro, F.; Martinez D, A.; Michaelian, K.; Perez, A.; Rodriguez, V.; Carjan, N.

    1997-01-01

    A review of the experimental and theoretical situation in coalescence and fragmentation studies of binary liquid-drop collisions is given, putting in perspective our own contributions, which include experiments with mercury and oil drops and the application of a nuclear reaction model, specifically modified by us for the macroscopic case. (Author)

  10. Student Drop-Out from German Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    28% of students of any one year currently give up their studies in bachelor degree programmes at German higher education institutions. Drop-out is to be understood as the definite termination in the higher education system without obtaining an academic degree. The drop-out rate is thereby calculated with the help of statistical estimation…

  11. Fundamentals and applications of fast micro-drop impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C.W.

    2014-01-01

    3D-printing, biofabrication, diesel engines, and spray cleaning all depend on controlled drop impact. However, surprisingly, these drops have received scarce attention so far. This is mainly due to their small size and high impact velocity, which makes visualizing the impact a challenge. This thesis

  12. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complex cooling water systems optimization with pressure drop consideration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gololo, KV

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pressure drop consideration has shown to be an essential requirement for the synthesis of a cooling water network where reuse/recycle philosophy is employed. This is due to an increased network pressure drop associated with additional reuse...

  14. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  15. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests confirmed the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. This report presents the data generated and the results obtained from a series of four drop tests that included two drops with the test assembly in the vertical position and two drops with the assembly in the horizontal position

  16. Building micro-soccer-balls with evaporating colloidal fakir drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Hanneke; Marín, Álvaro G.; Susarrey-Arce, Arturo; van Housselt, Arie; Lefferts, Leon; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-11-01

    Drop evaporation can be used to self-assemble particles into three-dimensional microstructures on a scale where direct manipulation is impossible. We present a unique method to create highly-ordered colloidal microstructures in which we can control the amount of particles and their packing fraction. To this end, we evaporate colloidal dispersion drops from a special type of superhydrophobic microstructured surface, on which the drop remains in Cassie-Baxter state during the entire evaporative process. The remainders of the drop consist of a massive spherical cluster of the microspheres, with diameters ranging from a few tens up to several hundreds of microns. We present scaling arguments to show how the final particle packing fraction of these balls depends on the drop evaporation dynamics, particle size, and number of particles in the system.

  17. Boiling-up of a liquid in a large volume at fast pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, O.A.; Pavlov, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiment results on sharp pressure drop in overheated water and carbon dioxide are presented. Pressure fields are investigated upon seal failure of the tube for various initial temperatures varying in the 0.57-0.97 interval on critical temperature. The depth of the liOuid inlet into the metastable region can be compared with maximum permissible superheating of a pure liquid. The applicability of fluctuation embrion formation for pressure calculation in the initial phase of explosive boiling-up at seal failure of the system is considered. The nature of boiling centers origin is discussed

  18. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Korolchenko Dmitriy; Voevoda Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL) surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam...

  19. Clinical outcomes of psychotherapy dropouts: does dropping out of psychotherapy necessarily mean failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo T. Lopes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A large proportion of psychotherapy patients remain untreated, mostly because they drop out. This study compares the short- and long-term outcomes of patients who dropped out of psychotherapy to those of therapy completers. Methods: The sample included 63 patients (23 dropouts and 40 completers from a controlled clinical trial, which compared narrative therapy vs. cognitive-behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder. Patients were assessed at the eighth session, post-treatment, and at 31-month follow-up. Results: Dropouts improved less than completers by the last session attended, but continued to improve significantly more than completers during the follow-up period. Some dropout patients improved with a small dose of therapy (17% achieved a clinically significant change before abandoning treatment, while others only achieved clinically significant change after a longer period (62% at 31-month follow-up. Conclusion: These results emphasize the importance of dealing effectively with patients at risk of dropping out of therapy.Patients who dropped out also reported improvement of depressive symptoms without therapy, but took much longer to improve than did patients who completed therapy. This might be attributable to natural remission of depression. Further research should use a larger patient database, ideally gathered by meta-analysis.

  20. Curative effect of Sodium hyaluronate and bFGF eye drops after corneal rust foreign body removal operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xia Li1

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the combined effect of Sodium hyaluronate eye drops and recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGFeye drops on cornea epithelial repair after corneal rust foreign body extraction. METHODS: Alinety-eight cases(98 eyesof corneal rust foreign body patients were randomly distributed to combined treatment group(49 cases, 49 eyesand control group(49 cases, 49 eyes. Hyaluronate eye drops, recombinant bFGF eye drops and levofloxacin hydrochloride were applied in combined treatment group after corneal foreign body extraction. Recombinant bFGF eye drops and levofloxacin hydrochloride were applied in control group. Corneal fluorescein stain, cornea epithelial repair and local symptoms were examined thrice weekly for 2 weeks. RESULTS: General effective rate of treatment in combined group reach 96%, significantly higher than that in control group(88%, PCONCLUSION: Combined application of sodium hyaluronate eye drops and recombinant bFGF eye drops can prominently improve cornea epithelial repair after corneal lesion with proven effectiveness and safety.

  1. Electrowetting-on-dielectrics for manipulation of oil drops and gas bubbles in aqueous-shell compound drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Yixuan; Chen, Haosheng; Wan, Jiandi

    2014-11-21

    We present the manipulation of oil, organic and gaseous chemicals by electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology using aqueous-shell compound drops. We demonstrate that the transport and coalescence of viscous oil drops, the reaction of bromine with styrene in benzene solution, and the reaction of red blood cells with carbon monoxide bubbles can be accomplished using this method.

  2. Development of ultrasonically levitated drops as microreactors for study of enzyme kinetics and potential as a universal portable analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeline, A.; Pierre, Z.; Field, C. R.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2009-05-01

    Development of microfluidics has focused on carrying out chemical synthesis and analysis in ever-smaller volumes of solution. In most cases, flow systems are made of either quartz, glass, or an easily moldable polymer such as polydimethylsiloxane (Whitesides 2006). As the system shrinks, the ratio of surface area to volume increases. For studies of either free radical chemistry or protein chemistry, this is undesirable. Proteins stick to surfaces, biofilms grow on surfaces, and radicals annihilate on walls (Lewis et al. 2006). Thus, under those circumstances where small amounts of reactants must be employed, typical microfluidic systems are incompatible with the chemistry one wishes to study. We have developed an alternative approach. We use ultrasonically levitated microliter drops as well mixed microreactors. Depending on whether capillaries (to form the drop) and electrochemical sensors are in contact with the drop or whether there are no contacting solids, the ratio of solid surface area to volume is low or zero. The only interface seen by reactants is a liquid/air interface (or, more generally, liquid/gas, as any gas may be used to support the drop). While drop levitation has been reported since at least the 1940's, we are the second group to carry out enzyme reactions in levitated drops, (Weis; Nardozzi 2005) and have fabricated the lowest power levitator in the literature (Field; Scheeline 2007). The low consumption aspects of ordinary microfluidics combine with a contact-free determination cell (the levitated drop) that ensures against cross-contamination, minimizes the likelihood of biofilm formation, and is robust to changes in temperature and humidity (Lide 1992). We report kinetics measurements in levitated drops and explain how outgrowths of these accomplishments will lead to portable chemistry/biology laboratories well suited to detection of a wide range of chemical and biological agents in the asymmetric battlefield environment.

  3. The pressure drop factor - a powerful monitoring tool for hydrotreaters; Der Druckverlustfaktor - ein leistungsstarkes Monitoringwerzeug fuer Entschwefelungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riebel, A.; Kuczera, M. [MiRO Mineraloelraffinerie Oberrhein GmbH und Co. KG, Karlsruhe (Germany); Skyum, L. [Haldor Topsoe, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2004-08-01

    In order to reduce traffic air pollution the sulphur content in gasoline and diesel of 50 ppm was appointed Europe-wide for 2005 according to the auto oil programme (aop.) The Mineraloelraffinerie Oberrhein (MiRO-refinery) in Karlsruhe delivers gasoline and diesel with sulphur content below 10 ppm since the 1{sup st} of November 2001. For the deep desulphurisation process temperatures in the reactors had to be raised. Because the catalyst volume was partly considerably increased in order to compensate the thereby caused higher deactivation, now the maximum allowable pressure drop in fixed bed reactors limits the run time for hydrotreaters. Because the pressure drop increases as a first approximation with the squared volume flow, it is hard to distinguish between pressure drop caused by blockades of coke, polymerisation and corrosion products in the catalyst bed and the influence of changing volume flow due to different process conditions. However this necessary to predict the development of pressure drop in the future in order take the right action. The aim of this work is to calculate the loss of void space in the catalyst bed caused due to particulate matter by adequate pressure drop calculation in order to give recommendation and prepare counteractive measures. Using the existing works a model for calculating the pressure drop in hydro treating reactors was developed, which can determine the reduction of void space caused by coke, polymers or corrosion products. In order to verify the validity of the equations from pure gas phase to the trickle bed reactor a gasoline hydrotreater (100% gas phase), a hydrotreater for kerosene (98% gas phase) and a vacuum gas oil hydrotreater (83% gas phase) were regarded. Measured and calculated data match satisfyingly. The presented pressure drop factor takes into account the grown importance of pressure drop in hydrotreaters. The effects of operational changes or feed impurities can be identified in good time and counteractive

  4. Low stress drops observed for aftershocks of the 2011 Mw 5.7 Prague, Oklahoma, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, Danielle F.; Neighbors, Corrie J.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Keranen, Katie M.

    2017-01-01

    In November 2011, three Mw ≥ 4.8 earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks occurred along the structurally complex Wilzetta fault system near Prague, Oklahoma. Previous studies suggest that wastewater injection induced a Mw 4.8 foreshock, which subsequently triggered a Mw 5.7 mainshock. We examine source properties of aftershocks with a standard Brune-type spectral model and jointly solve for seismic moment (M0), corner frequency (f0), and kappa (κ) with an iterative Gauss-Newton global downhill optimization method. We examine 934 earthquakes with initial moment magnitudes (Mw) between 0.33 and 4.99 based on the pseudospectral acceleration and recover reasonable M0, f0, and κ for 87 earthquakes with Mw 1.83–3.51 determined by spectral fit. We use M0 and f0 to estimate the Brune-type stress drop, assuming a circular fault and shear-wave velocity at the hypocentral depth of the event. Our observations suggest that stress drops range between 0.005 and 4.8 MPa with a median of 0.2 MPa (0.03–26.4 MPa with a median of 1.1 MPa for Madariaga-type), which is significantly lower than typical eastern United States intraplate events (>10 MPa). We find that stress drops correlate weakly with hypocentral depth and magnitude. Additionally, we find the stress drops increase with time after the mainshock, although temporal variation in stress drop is difficult to separate from spatial heterogeneity and changing event locations. The overall low median stress drop suggests that the fault segments may have been primed to fail as a result of high pore fluid pressures, likely related to nearby wastewater injection.

  5. On angled bounce-off impact of a drop impinging on a flowing soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Saikat; Yawar, Ali; Concha, Andres; Bandi, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    Small drops impinging obliquely on thin flowing soap films frequently demonstrate the rare emergence of bulk elastic effects working in-tandem with the more commonplace hydrodynamic interactions. Three collision regimes are observable: (a) drop piercing through the film, (b) it coalescing with the flow, and (c) it bouncing off the film surface. During impact, the drop deforms along with a bulk elastic deformation of the film. For impacts that are close-to-tangential, the bounce-off regime predominates. We outline a reduced order analytical framework assuming a deformable drop and a deformable three-dimensional film, and the idealization invokes a phase-based parametric study. Angular inclination of the film and the ratio of post and pre-impact drop sizes entail the phase parameters. We also perform experiments with vertically descending droplets (constituted from deionized water) impacting against an inclined soap film, flowing under constant pressure head. Model-predicted phase domain for bounce-off compares well to our experimental findings. Additionally, the experiments exhibit momentum transfer to the film in the form of shed vortex dipoles, along with propagation of free surface waves. On consulting prior published work, we note that for locomotion of water-walking insects using an impulsive action, the momentum distribution to the shed vortices and waves are both significant, taking up respectively 2/3 and 1/3 of the imparted streamwise momentum. Considering the visually similar impulse actions, this theory, despite its assumption of a quiescent liquid bath of infinite depth, is applied to the drop bounce-off experiments, and the resultant shed vortex dipole momenta are compared to the momenta of the coherent vortex structures computed from particle imaging velocimetry data. The magnitudes reveal identical order (10-7 N s), suggesting that notwithstanding the disparities, the bounce-off regime may be tapped as a toy analog for impulse-based interfacial

  6. Spatial and Temporal Stress Drop Variations of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake sequence consists of foreshocks, mainshock, aftershocks, and repeating earthquakes. To quantify spatial and temporal stress drop variations is important for understanding M9-class megathrust earthquakes. Variability and spatial and temporal pattern of stress drop is a basic information for rupture dynamics as well as useful to source modeling. As pointed in the ground motion prediction equations by Campbell and Bozorgnia [2008, Earthquake Spectra], mainshock-aftershock pairs often provide significant decrease of stress drop. We here focus strong motion records before and after the Tohoku earthquake, and analyze source spectral ratios considering azimuth- and distance dependency [Miyake et al., 2001, GRL]. Due to the limitation of station locations on land, spatial and temporal stress drop variations are estimated by adjusting shifts from the omega-squared source spectral model. The adjustment is based on the stochastic Green's function simulations of source spectra considering azimuth- and distance dependency. We assumed the same Green's functions for event pairs for each station, both the propagation path and site amplification effects are cancelled out. Precise studies of spatial and temporal stress drop variations have been performed [e.g., Allmann and Shearer, 2007, JGR], this study targets the relations between stress drop vs. progression of slow slip prior to the Tohoku earthquake by Kato et al. [2012, Science] and plate structures. Acknowledgement: This study is partly supported by ERI Joint Research (2013-B-05). We used the JMA unified earthquake catalogue and K-NET, KiK-net, and F-net data provided by NIED.

  7. An experimental study on single phase convection heat transfer and pressure drop in two brazed plate heat exchangers with different chevron shapes and hydraulic diameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Bae; Park, Chang Yong [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    An experimental study on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics was performed at single phase flow in two Brazed plate heat exchangers (BPHEs) with different geometries. The corrugation density of one of the BPHE (Type II) was two times as high as that of the other BPHE (Type I). The hydraulic diameter of the type II BPHE was 2.13 mm, which was 38 % smaller than that of the type I BPHE. Also, the cross section shape of the flow channels for the type II BPHE was different from that for conventional BPHEs due to the unusual corrugation patterns and brazing points. The experimental conditions for temperatures were varied from 4.6 °C to 49.1 °C, and for mass flow rates were changed from 0.07 kg/s to 1.24 kg/s. The measured results showed that pressure drop in the type II BPHE was about 110 % higher than that in the type I BPHE. Nu of the type II was higher than that of the type I BPHE and the enhancement became larger with the increase of Re at the ranges above 800. New correlations for fF and Nu were proposed by this study and their prediction accuracy could be improved by considering the surface enlargement factor in the correlations. The performance evaluation of the two BPHEs was performed by (j/f{sub F}1{sup /3}) which represented the ratio of heat transfer and pressure drop performance. Also, a new parameter, the capacity compactness of PHE, was proposed and it presented the PHE capacity per unit volume and unit log mean temperature difference. The comparison showed that the two BPHEs had similar values of the (j/f{sub F}1{sup /3}), whereas they had significantly different values of the capacity compactness. The capacity compactness of the type II BPHE was 1.5 times higher than that for the type I BPHE.

  8. An experimental study on single phase convection heat transfer and pressure drop in two brazed plate heat exchangers with different chevron shapes and hydraulic diameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Bae; Park, Chang Yong

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics was performed at single phase flow in two Brazed plate heat exchangers (BPHEs) with different geometries. The corrugation density of one of the BPHE (Type II) was two times as high as that of the other BPHE (Type I). The hydraulic diameter of the type II BPHE was 2.13 mm, which was 38 % smaller than that of the type I BPHE. Also, the cross section shape of the flow channels for the type II BPHE was different from that for conventional BPHEs due to the unusual corrugation patterns and brazing points. The experimental conditions for temperatures were varied from 4.6 °C to 49.1 °C, and for mass flow rates were changed from 0.07 kg/s to 1.24 kg/s. The measured results showed that pressure drop in the type II BPHE was about 110 % higher than that in the type I BPHE. Nu of the type II was higher than that of the type I BPHE and the enhancement became larger with the increase of Re at the ranges above 800. New correlations for fF and Nu were proposed by this study and their prediction accuracy could be improved by considering the surface enlargement factor in the correlations. The performance evaluation of the two BPHEs was performed by (j/f F 1 /3 ) which represented the ratio of heat transfer and pressure drop performance. Also, a new parameter, the capacity compactness of PHE, was proposed and it presented the PHE capacity per unit volume and unit log mean temperature difference. The comparison showed that the two BPHEs had similar values of the (j/f F 1 /3 ), whereas they had significantly different values of the capacity compactness. The capacity compactness of the type II BPHE was 1.5 times higher than that for the type I BPHE.

  9. Drop size distribution evolution after continuous or intermittent injection of butane or propane in a confined air flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knubben, G.; Geld, van der C.W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Drop size distributions and velocities have been measured of n-butane and propane sprays, rapidly evaporating in air flowing at constant velocity, 15 m/s typically. The inlet air temperature has been found to be of main importance in the evaporation process. After a period of the order of the

  10. Understanding evaporation characteristics of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) chemical agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H., E-mail: junghs@add.re.kr; Lee, H.W.

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Evaporation rates of HD are obtained from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. • The rates increase with temperature and are linearly proportional to drop size. • HD evaporation from stainless steel follows only constant contact area mechanism. • HD evaporation from aluminum proceeds by a combined mechanism. - Abstract: We report herein the evaporation rates and mechanism of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. For systematic analysis, we used a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, thermal desorption (TD) connected to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and drop shape analysis (DSA). We found that the evaporation rates of HD from stainless steel and aluminum increased with temperature. The rates were also linearly proportional to drop size. The time-dependent contact angle measurement showed that the evaporation of the drop of HD proceeded only by constant contact area mechanism from stainless steel surface. On the other hand, the evaporation of HD from aluminum proceeded by a combined mechanism of constant contact area mode and constant contact angle mode. Our experimental data sets and analysis could be used to predict vapor and contact hazard persistence of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the air and on exterior surfaces with chemical releases, which assists the military decision influencing personnel safety and decontamination of the site upon a chemical attack event.

  11. Understanding evaporation characteristics of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) chemical agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, H.; Lee, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaporation rates of HD are obtained from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. • The rates increase with temperature and are linearly proportional to drop size. • HD evaporation from stainless steel follows only constant contact area mechanism. • HD evaporation from aluminum proceeds by a combined mechanism. - Abstract: We report herein the evaporation rates and mechanism of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. For systematic analysis, we used a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, thermal desorption (TD) connected to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and drop shape analysis (DSA). We found that the evaporation rates of HD from stainless steel and aluminum increased with temperature. The rates were also linearly proportional to drop size. The time-dependent contact angle measurement showed that the evaporation of the drop of HD proceeded only by constant contact area mechanism from stainless steel surface. On the other hand, the evaporation of HD from aluminum proceeded by a combined mechanism of constant contact area mode and constant contact angle mode. Our experimental data sets and analysis could be used to predict vapor and contact hazard persistence of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the air and on exterior surfaces with chemical releases, which assists the military decision influencing personnel safety and decontamination of the site upon a chemical attack event

  12. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO 2 ). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 μ M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 μm AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a open-quotes turn-tableclose quotes generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS'publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced

  13. Electric generation and ratcheted transport of contact-charged drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Charles A.; Graybill, Jason R.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.

    2017-10-01

    We describe a simple microfluidic system that enables the steady generation and efficient transport of aqueous drops using only a constant voltage input. Drop generation is achieved through an electrohydrodynamic dripping mechanism by which conductive drops grow and detach from a grounded nozzle in response to an electric field. The now-charged drops are transported down a ratcheted channel by contact charge electrophoresis powered by the same voltage input used for drop generation. We investigate how the drop size, generation frequency, and transport velocity depend on system parameters such as the liquid viscosity, interfacial tension, applied voltage, and channel dimensions. The observed trends are well explained by a series of scaling analyses that provide insight into the dominant physical mechanisms underlying drop generation and ratcheted transport. We identify the conditions necessary for achieving reliable operation and discuss the various modes of failure that can arise when these conditions are violated. Our results demonstrate that simple electric inputs can power increasingly complex droplet operations with potential opportunities for inexpensive and portable microfluidic systems.

  14. Measurement of an Evaporating Drop on a Reflective Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2004-01-01

    A figure depicts an apparatus that simultaneously records magnified ordinary top-view video images and laser shadowgraph video images of a sessile drop on a flat, horizontal substrate that can be opaque or translucent and is at least partially specularly reflective. The diameter, contact angle, and rate of evaporation of the drop as functions of time can be calculated from the apparent diameters of the drop in sequences of the images acquired at known time intervals, and the shadowgrams that contain flow patterns indicative of thermocapillary convection (if any) within the drop. These time-dependent parameters and flow patterns are important for understanding the physical processes involved in the spreading and evaporation of drops. The apparatus includes a source of white light and a laser (both omitted from the figure), which are used to form the ordinary image and the shadowgram, respectively. Charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera 1 (with zoom) acquires the ordinary video images, while CCD camera 2 acquires the shadowgrams. With respect to the portion of laser light specularly reflected from the substrate, the drop acts as a plano-convex lens, focusing the laser beam to a shadowgram on the projection screen in front of CCD camera 2. The equations for calculating the diameter, contact angle, and rate of evaporation of the drop are readily derived on the basis of Snell s law of refraction and the geometry of the optics.

  15. Effect of humidity on the filter pressure drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Letourneau, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    The effects of humidity on the filter pressure drop have been reported in some previous studies in which it is difficult to draw definite conclusions. These studies show contradictory effects of humidity on the pressure drop probably due to differences in the hygroscopicity of the test aerosols. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results on the evolution of the filter pressure drop versus mass loading, for different test aerosols and relative humidities. Present results are compared to those found in various publication. An experimental device has been designed to measure filter pressure drop as the function of the areal density for relative humidity varying in the range of 9 % to 85 %. Experiments have been conducted with hygroscopic: (CsOH) and nonhygroscopic aerosols (TiO{sub 2}). Cesium hydroxyde (CsOH) of size of 2 {mu} M AMMD has been generated by an ultrasonic generator and the 0.7 {mu}m AMMD titanium oxyde has been dispersed by a {open_quotes}turn-table{close_quotes} generator. As it is noted in the BISWAS`publication [3], present results show, in the case of nonhygroscopic aerosols, a linear relationship of pressure drop to mass loading. For hygroscopic aerosols two cases must be considered: for relative humidity below the deliquescent point of the aerosol, the relationship of pressure drop to mass loading remains linear; above the deliquescent point, the results show a sudden increase in the pressure drop and the mass capacity of the filter is drastically reduced.

  16. Application of Proteomics to the Study of Pollination Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Prior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Pollination drops are a formative component in gymnosperm pollen-ovule interactions. Proteomics offers a direct method for the discovery of proteins associated with this early stage of sexual reproduction. Methods: Pollination drops were sampled from eight gymnosperm species: Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Port Orford cedar, Ephedra monosperma, Ginkgo biloba, Juniperus oxycedrus (prickly juniper, Larix ×marschlinsii, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir, Taxus ×media, and Welwitschia mirabilis. Drops were collected by micropipette using techniques focused on preventing sample contamination. Drop proteins were separated using both gel and gel-free methods. Tandem mass spectrometric methods were used including a triple quadrupole and an Orbitrap. Results: Proteins are present in all pollination drops. Consistency in the protein complement over time was shown in L. ×marschlinsii. Representative mass spectra from W. mirabilis chitinase peptide and E. monosperma serine carboxypeptidase peptide demonstrated high quality results. We provide a summary of gymnosperm pollination drop proteins that have been discovered to date via proteomics. Discussion: Using proteomic methods, a dozen classes of proteins have been identified to date. Proteomics presents a way forward in deepening our understanding of the biological function of pollination drops.

  17. Heat transfer and pressure drop during hydrocarbon refrigerant condensation inside a brazed plate heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Giovanni A. [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering, Str.lla S.Nicola 3, I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop measured during HC-600a, HC-290 and HC-1270 saturated vapour condensation inside a brazed plate heat exchanger: the effects of refrigerant mass flux, saturation temperature (pressure) and fluid properties are investigated. The heat transfer coefficients show weak sensitivity to saturation temperature (pressure) and great sensitivity to refrigerant mass flux and fluid properties. A transition point between gravity controlled and forced convection condensation has been found for a refrigerant mass flux around 15-18 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In the forced convection condensation region the heat transfer coefficients show a 35-40% enhancement for a 60% increase of the refrigerant mass flux. The frictional pressure drop shows a linear dependence on the kinetic energy per unit volume of the refrigerant flow. HC-1270 shows heat transfer coefficients 5% higher than HC-600a and 10-15% higher than HC-290, together with frictional pressure drop 20-25% lower than HC-290 and 50-66% lower than HC-600a. (author)

  18. Drop Characteristics of non-Newtonian Impinging Jets at High Generalized Bird-Carreau Jet Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Paul E.; Rodrigues, Neil S.

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the drop characteristics of three Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) sprays produced by the impingement of two liquid jets. The three water-based solutions used in this work (0.5 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, and 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF) exhibited strong shear-thinning, non-Newtonian behavior - characterized by the Bird-Carreau rheological model. A generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number was used as the primary parameter to characterize the drop size and the drop velocity, which were measured using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). PDA optical configuration enabled a drop size measurement range of approximately 2.3 to 116.2 μm. 50,000 drops were measured at each test condition to ensure statistical significance. The arithmetic mean diameter (D10) , Sauter mean diameter (D32) , and mass median diameter (MMD) were used as representative diameters to characterize drop size. The mean axial drop velocity Uz -mean along with its root-mean square Uz -rms were used to characterize drop velocity. Incredibly, measurements for all three CMC liquids and reference DI water sprays seemed to follow a single curve for D32 and MMD drop diameters in the high generalized Bird-Carreau jet Reynolds number range considered in this work (9.21E +03

  19. Significant increase of Curie temperature and large piezoelectric coefficient in Ba(Ti0.80Zr0.20)O3-0.5(Ba0.70Ca0.30)TiO3 nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bi; Yang, Yaodong; Gao, Kun; Wang, Yaping

    2015-07-01

    Ba(Ti0.80Zr0.20)O3-0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (abbreviated as BTZ-0.5BCT) is a piezoelectric ceramic with a high piezoelectric coefficient d33 (˜620 pC N-1) and has been regarded as one of the most promising candidates to replace PZT-based materials (200-710 pC N-1). However, its Curie temperature TC is relatively low (93 °C) limiting its application. In this letter, we found a temperature dependent Raman spectrum in BTZ-0.5BCT nanofibers (NFs), demonstrating a diffused tetragonal-to-cubic phase transition at 300 °C. This means that the TC of the NFs is nearly 207 °C higher than that of the normal bulk material. The increased TC is considered to be associated with the size effect of BTZ-0.5BCT nanoceramic subunits and the nanoporous nature of the fiber, resulting in discontinuous physical properties. The variation of the ferro/piezoelectricity over the fiber surface is attributed to the polycrystalline structure. The d33 (173.32 pm V-1) is improved in terms of the decreased Q factor result in an increase in d33 of 236.54 pm V-1 after polarization. With a high TC and a very large d33, BTZ-0.5BCT NFs are capable of providing electromechanical behavior used in moderate temperatures.

  20. An analysis of pipe degradation shape using potential drop method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegal, S.; Lee, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Potential Drop (PD) method, one of NDE (Non-Destructive Evaluation) method is used to analyze the thickness distribution of pipes degraded by FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion). A DCPD (Direct Current Potential Drop) system which can measure PD for direct current was made, and the specimens with line defects and cylinder type defects have been used for experiments to prove the theory of Potential Drop method and to find out the effects of each factors. The experiment to find out defect distributions has been performed and it is found that PD method can analyze almost correct position of defects

  1. Ready-made allogeneic ABO-specific serum eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Nielsen, Connie; Ullum, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    serum treatment. CONCLUSION: Ready-made ABO-identical allogeneic serum eye drops were straightforwardly produced, quality-assured and registered as a safe standard blood product for the treatment of certain cases of severe dry eye disease. Therapeutic efficacy was comparable to previous reports......PURPOSE: To overcome problems and delays of the preparation of autologous serum eye drops, a production line of ABO-specific allogeneic serum eye drops from male blood donors was set up in a blood bank. Feasibility, clinical routine, safety and efficacy were evaluated in a cohort of patients...

  2. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  3. Analysis of an Electrostatic MEMS Squeeze-film Drop Ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P. Furlani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of an electrostatic drop-on-demand MEMS fluid ejector. The ejector consists of a microfluidic chamber with a piston that is suspended a few microns beneath a nozzle plate. A drop is ejected when a voltage is applied between the orifice plate and the piston. This produces an electrostatic force that moves the piston towards the nozzle. The moving piston generates a squeeze-film pressure distribution that causes drop ejection. We discuss the operating physics of the ejector and present a lumped-element model for predicting its performance. We calibrate the model using coupled structural-fluidic CFD analysis.

  4. Internal flow of acoustically levitated drops undergoing sectorial oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, C.L.; Xie, W.J.; Yan, Z.L.; Wei, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the experimental observation and theoretical analysis of fluid flow in acoustically levitated water drop undergoing sectorial oscillations. The fluid always flows between the extended sections and the compressed sections. The magnitude of fluid velocity decreases from the equatorial fringe to the centre of levitated drop. The maximum fluid velocity is 60-160 mm/s and the Reynolds number of the oscillations is estimated to be 137-367. The internal flow of the drop is analyzed as potential flow, and the fluid velocity is found to be horizontal. In the equatorial plane, the calculated stream lines and velocity profiles agree well with the experimental observations.

  5. Ultrasonic defect sizing using decibel drop methods. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, C.; Goszczynski, J.; Mitchell, A.B.

    1988-03-01

    An earlier study on the use of ultrasonic decibel drop sizing methods for determining the length and vertical extent of flaws in welded steel sections was based on the scanning of machined flaws and fabrication flaws. The present study utilized the techniques developed to perform a similar study of the type of flaws expected to develop during service (e.g. fatigue cracks). The general findings are that: a) the use of decibel drops of less than 14 dB generally undersize the length of fatigue cracks; and b) the use of decibel drop methods to determine vertical extent is questionable

  6. Discovery of a Significant Acetone•Hydroperoxy Adduct Chaperone Effect and Its Impact on the Determination of Room Temperature Rate Constants for Acetonylperoxy/Hydroperoxy Self-Reactions and Cross Reaction Via Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieman, F. J.; Hui, A. O.; Okumura, M.; Sander, S. P.

    2017-12-01

    In order to model the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere in regions containing acetone properly, the kinetics of the acetonylperoxy/hydroperoxy self-reactions and cross reaction have been studied over a wide temperature range using Infrared Kinetic Spectroscopy. We report here the determination of different rate constants for the acetonylperoxy chemistry that we obtained at 298 K compared to currently accepted values. A considerable increase in the observed HO2 self-reaction rate constant due to rate enhancement via the chaperone effect from the reaction between HO2 and the (CH3)2CO•HO2 hydrogen-bonded adduct, even at room temperature, was discovered that was previously ignored. Correct determination of the acetonylperoxy and hydroperoxy kinetics must include this dependence of the HO2 self-reaction rate on acetone concentration. Via excimer laser flash photolysis to create the radical reactants, HO2 absorption was monitored in the infrared by diode laser wavelength modulation detection simultaneously with CH3C(O)CH2O2absorption monitored in the ultraviolet at 300 nm as a function of time. Resulting decay curves were fit concurrently first over a short time scale to obtain the rate constants minimizing subsequent product reactions. Modeling/fitting with a complete reaction scheme was then performed to refine the rate constants and test their veracity. Experiments were carried out over a variety of concentrations of acetone and methanol. Although no effect due to methanol concentration was found at room temperature, the rate constant for the hydroperoxy self-reaction was found to increase linearly with acetone concentration which is interpreted as the adduct being formed and resulting in a chaperone mechanism that enhances the self-reaction rate: (CH3)2CO·HO2 + HO2 → H2O2 + O2 + (CH3)2CO Including this effect, the resulting room temperature rate constants for the cross reaction and the acetonylperoxy self-reaction were found to be 2-3 times smaller than

  7. Air temperature gradient in large industrial hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Michał; Pełech, Aleksander; Przydróżny, Edward; Walaszczyk, Juliusz; Szczęśniak, Sylwia

    2017-11-01

    In the rooms with dominant sensible heat load, volume airflow depends on many factors incl. pre-established temperature difference between exhaust and supply airflow. As the temperature difference is getting higher, airflow volume drops down, consequently, the cost of AHU is reduced. In high industrial halls with air exhaust grids located under the ceiling additional temperature gradient above working zone should be taken into consideration. In this regard, experimental research of the vertical air temperature gradient in high industrial halls were carried out for the case of mixing ventilation system The paper presents the results of air temperature distribution measurements in high technological hall (mechanically ventilated) under significant sensible heat load conditions. The supply airflow was delivered to the hall with the help of the swirl diffusers while exhaust grids were located under the hall ceiling. Basing on the air temperature distribution measurements performed on the seven pre-established levels, air temperature gradient in the area between 2.0 and 7.0 m above the floor was calculated and analysed.

  8. On-state voltage drop based power limit detection of IGBT inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trintis, Ionut; Ghimire, Pramod; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Power density is a key performance factor in order to reduce the cost and size of a power converter. Because of the unknown junction temperature, today’s design margins are relatively high to ensure safe and a reliable operation. In this paper, the on-state voltage drop is measured online for all...... insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) in the inverter, using advanced gate driver. The die temperature is estimated and monitored on each device during power converter operation. Based on the monitored temperature in real time, the maximum power capability is detected. The output power is increased...... until a safe operating temperature of power modules. This enable a power density is increased by 11.16 kW/litre to 19.13 kW/litre in a low voltage power stack which is typically used in wind power converters. Experiment results are shown for safe operation of converter at around 1.2 MW, which is built...

  9. Calculation of pressure drop and flow redistribution in the LMFBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, O.J.

    1984-01-01

    The flow redistribution through fuel assemblies of LMFBRs: for the correct calculation of mass flow rates and pressure drop, are studied. Using a quasi-static formulation of conservation equations of mass and energy, a computer program was developed to simulate any arbitrary number of flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore f flow channels, operating at different linear power levels. Therefore, it was possible to perform thermal transient calculations for the Clinch River reactor core. The results of the calculations agree with the data found in the literature and supply accurate information about flow redistribution, average temperature, and pressure drop in the core, when the reactor is operated at conditions from the designed flow conditions, as is always the case in a load changing operation, or during transients. (Autor) [pt

  10. Comparative randomised controlled clinical trial of a herbal eye drop with artificial tear and placebo in computer vision syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, N R; Nainiwal, S K; Das, G K; Langan, U; Dadeya, S C; Mongre, P K; Ravi, A K; Baidya, P

    2003-03-01

    A comparative randomised double masked multicentric clinical trial has been conducted to find out the efficacy and safety of a herbal eye drop preparation, itone eye drops with artificial tear and placebo in 120 patients with computer vision syndrome. Patients using computer for at least 2 hours continuosly per day having symptoms of irritation, foreign body sensation, watering, redness, headache, eyeache and signs of conjunctival congestion, mucous/debris, corneal filaments, corneal staining or lacrimal lake were included in this study. Every patient was instructed to put two drops of either herbal drugs or placebo or artificial tear in the eyes regularly four times for 6 weeks. Objective and subjective findings were recorded at bi-weekly intervals up to six weeks. Side-effects, if any, were also noted. In computer vision syndrome the herbal eye drop preparation was found significantly better than artificial tear (p computer vision syndrome.

  11. Steam explosions of single drops of pure and alloyed molten aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.

    1995-01-01

    Studies of steam explosion phenomena have been performed related to the hypothetical meltdown of the core and other components of aluminum alloy-fueled production reactors. Our objectives were to characterise the triggers, if any, required to initiate these explosions and to determine the energetics and chemical processes associated with these events. Three basic studies have been carried out with 1-10 g single drops of molten aluminum or aluminum-based alloys: untriggered experiments in which drops of melt were released into water; triggered experiments in which thermal-type steam explosions occurred; and one triggered experiment in which an ignition-type steam explosion occurred. In untriggered experiments, spontaneous steam explosions never occurred during the free fall through water of single drops of pure Al or of the alloys studied here. Moreover, spontaneous explosions never occurred upon or during contact of the globules with several underwater surfaces. When Li was present in the alloy, H 2 was generated as a stream of bubbles as the globules fell through the water, and also as they froze on the bottom surface of the chamber. The triggered experiments were performed with pure Al and the 6061 alloy. Bare bridgewire discharges and those focused with cylindrical reflectors produced a small first bubble that collapsed and was followed by a larger second bubble. When the bridgewire was discharged at one focus of an ellipsoidal reflector, a melt drop at the other focus triggered only very mildly in spite of a 30-fold increase in peak pressure above that of the bridgewire discharge without the reflector. Experiments were also performed with globules of high purity Al in which the melt release temperature was progressively increased. Moderate thermal-type explosions were produced over the temperature range 1273-1673 K. At about 1773 K, however, one experiment produced a brilliant flash of light and bubble growth about an order of magnitude faster than normal; it

  12. Liquid drops attract or repel by the inverted Cheerios effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Pandey, Anupam; Lubbers, Luuk A; Weijs, Joost H; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2016-07-05

    Solid particles floating at a liquid interface exhibit a long-ranged attraction mediated by surface tension. In the absence of bulk elasticity, this is the dominant lateral interaction of mechanical origin. Here, we show that an analogous long-range interaction occurs between adjacent droplets on solid substrates, which crucially relies on a combination of capillarity and bulk elasticity. We experimentally observe the interaction between droplets on soft gels and provide a theoretical framework that quantitatively predicts the interaction force between the droplets. Remarkably, we find that, although on thick substrates the interaction is purely attractive and leads to drop-drop coalescence, for relatively thin substrates a short-range repulsion occurs, which prevents the two drops from coming into direct contact. This versatile interaction is the liquid-on-solid analog of the "Cheerios effect." The effect will strongly influence the condensation and coarsening of drops on soft polymer films, and has potential implications for colloidal assembly and mechanobiology.

  13. Non-isothermal spreading of liquid drops on horizontal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhard, P.; Davis, S.H.

    1990-05-01

    A viscous-liquid drop spreads on a smooth horizontal surface, which is uniformly heated or cooled. Lubrication theory is used to study thin drops subject to capillary, thermocapillary and gravity forces, and a variety of contact-angle-versus-speed conditions. It is found for isothermal drops that gravity is very important at large times and determines the power law for unlimited spreading. Predictions compare well with the experimental data on isothermal spreading for both two-dimensional and axisymmetric configurations. It is found that heating (cooling) retards (augments) the spreading process. When the advancing contact angle is zero, heating will cause the drop to spread only finitely far. For positive advancing contact angles, sufficient cooling will cause unlimited spreading. Thus, the heat transfer serves as a sentitive control on the spreading. (orig.) [de

  14. Satellite Formation during Coalescence of Unequal Size Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.

    2009-03-12

    The coalescence of a drop with a flat liquid surface pinches off a satellite from its top, in the well-known coalescence cascade, whereas the coalescence of two equally sized drops does not appear to leave such a satellite. Herein we perform experiments to identify the critical diameter ratio of two drops, above which a satellite is produced during their coalescence. We find that the critical parent ratio is as small as 1.55, but grows monotonically with the Ohnesorge number. The daughter size is typically about 50% of the mother drop. However, we have identified novel pinch-off dynamics close to the critical size ratio, where the satellite does not fully separate, but rather goes directly into a second stage of the coalescence cascade, thus generating a much smaller satellite droplet.

  15. Modeling merging behavior at lane drops : [tech transfer summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A better understanding of the merging behavior of drivers will lead : to the development of better lane-drop traffic-control plans and : strategies, which will provide better guidance to drivers for safer : merging.

  16. Determination of the viscosity by spherical drop using nuclear tecniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.V. da; Qassim, R.Y.; Souza, Roberto de; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1983-01-01

    The measurements of the drop limit velocity of a Sphere in a fluid using a radiotracer method are analyzed. The dynamic process involved was observed, identifying the density and viscosity of the fluid. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Drop performance test and evaluation for HANARO shutoff units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y. H.; Cho, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Woo, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    The function of the shutoff units of the HANARO is to rapidly insert the shutoff rod into the reactor core for safe shutdown of reactor. This paper describes drop performance test and evaluation for a shutoff unit for the technical verification of lifetime extension and localization of the HANARO shutoff units. We have performed preliminary drop performance tests for a shutoff unit at 1/2-core test loop and analyzed through the comparison with the test results performed during design verification test and the results of the periodic performance test in HANARO. It shows that the results of the local fabrication, installation and alignment for the shutoff unit meet the basic performance requirements, Furthermore, the performance evaluation method of the periodic drop test of the HANARO shutoff units is a conservative method comparing with the real drop time

  18. Electrostatic charging and levitation of helium II drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Liquid Helium II drops, of diameter 1 mm or less, are charged with positive helium ions and subsequently levitated by static electric fields. Stable levitation was achieved for drops of order 100-150 micrometers in diameter. The suspended drops could be translated to arbitrary positions within the levitator using additional superimposed DC electric fields, and also could be made to oscillate stably about their average positions by means of an applied time-varying electric field. A weak corona discharge was used to produce the necessary ions for levitation. A novel superfluid film flow device, developed for the controlled deployment of large charged drops, is described. Also discussed is an adjustable electric fountain that requires only a field emission tip operating at modest potentials, and works in both Helium I and Helium II

  19. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.

  20. Sludge pipe flow pressure drop prediction using composite power ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sludge pipe flow pressure drop prediction using composite power-law friction ... Water SA. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ... When predicting pressure gradients for the flow of sludges in pipes, the ...

  1. Dropped fuel damage prediction techniques and the DROPFU code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottershead, K.J.; Beardsmore, D.W.; Money, G.

    1995-01-01

    During refuelling, and fuel handling, at UK Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) stations it is recognised that the accidental dropping of fuel is a possibility. This can result in dropping individual fuel elements, a complete fuel stringer, or a whole assembly. The techniques for assessing potential damage have been developed over a number of years. This paper describes how damage prediction techniques have subsequently evolved to meet changing needs. These have been due to later fuel designs and the need to consider drops in facilities outside the reactor. The paper begins by briefly describing AGR fuel and possible dropped fuel scenarios. This is followed by a brief summary of the damage mechanisms and the assessment procedure as it was first developed. The paper then describes the additional test work carried out, followed by the detailed numerical modelling. Finally, the paper describes the extensions to the practical assessment methods. (author)

  2. Bird nesting and droppings control on highway structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This report provides a comprehensive literature survey of permanent and temporary deterrents to nesting and roosting, a : discussion of risks to human health and safety from exposure to bird nests and droppings and recommended protective measures, : ...

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop in a quickly changing magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.Y.; Chen, J.M.; Qian, J.P.; Jiang, W.H.; Pan, C.J.; Li, W.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop of 22 Na 78 K flow in a circular duct was measured under a quickly changing magnetic field. The MHD pressure drop reduced with time as the magnetic field strength decreased. However, the dimensionless pressure drop gradient varied with the interaction parameter and had a higher value in the middle of the range of values of the interaction parameter. Therefore, a quickly changing magnetic field is harmful to the structural material in a liquid metal self-cooled blanket of a fusion reactor, since the greater pressure drop gradient may cause a larger stress in the blanket. This is even more harmful if the magnetic field strength decreases very quickly or its distribution in space is greatly non-uniform. (orig.)

  4. Satellite Formation during Coalescence of Unequal Size Drops

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, F. H.; Li, E. Q.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2009-01-01

    The coalescence of a drop with a flat liquid surface pinches off a satellite from its top, in the well-known coalescence cascade, whereas the coalescence of two equally sized drops does not appear to leave such a satellite. Herein we perform experiments to identify the critical diameter ratio of two drops, above which a satellite is produced during their coalescence. We find that the critical parent ratio is as small as 1.55, but grows monotonically with the Ohnesorge number. The daughter size is typically about 50% of the mother drop. However, we have identified novel pinch-off dynamics close to the critical size ratio, where the satellite does not fully separate, but rather goes directly into a second stage of the coalescence cascade, thus generating a much smaller satellite droplet.

  5. Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Maternal Immunization Resources Related Links Vaccines & Immunizations Rotavirus and the Vaccine (Drops) to Prevent It Language: ... the vaccine. Why should my child get the rotavirus vaccine? The rotavirus vaccine: Protects your child from ...

  6. 24 hydrocarbon degradation in poultry droppings and cassava peels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE AKINNAGBE

    2009-01-01

    Jan 1, 2009 ... This greenhouse study was aimed at determining the potentials of poultry droppings (PD) and cassava peels ... shift in the composition of bacterial community to ..... Oil and Gas Journal. pp. ... Prentice-Hall of India Private Ltd.

  7. Nonthermal ice nucleation observed at distorted contact lines of supercooled water drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Cruikshank, Owen; He, Weilue; Kostinski, Alex; Shaw, Raymond A

    2018-02-01

    Ice nucleation is the crucial step for ice formation in atmospheric clouds and therefore underlies climatologically relevant precipitation and radiative properties. Progress has been made in understanding the roles of temperature, supersaturation, and material properties, but an explanation for the efficient ice nucleation occurring when a particle contacts a supercooled water drop has been elusive for over half a century. Here, we explore ice nucleation initiated at constant temperature and observe that mechanical agitation induces freezing of supercooled water drops at distorted contact lines. Results show that symmetric motion of supercooled water on a vertically oscillating substrate does not freeze, no matter how we agitate it. However, when the moving contact line is distorted with the help of trace amounts of oil or inhomogeneous pinning on the substrate, freezing can occur at temperatures much higher than in a static droplet, equivalent to ∼10^{10} increase in nucleation rate. Several possible mechanisms are proposed to explain the observations. One plausible explanation among them, decreased pressure due to interface curvature, is explored theoretically and compared with the observational results quasiquantitatively. Indeed, the observed freezing-temperature increase scales with contact line speed in a manner consistent with the pressure hypothesis. Whatever the mechanism, the experiments demonstrate a strong preference for ice nucleation at three-phase contact lines compared to the two-phase interface, and they also show that movement and distortion of the contact line are necessary contributions to stimulating the nucleation process.

  8. Enthalpy measurement of lithium meta-titanate by drop calorimetry and its derived heat capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishioka, Rika; Mukai, Keisuke; Terai, Takayuki; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Li 2 TiO 3 was synthesized by a neutralizing method. • Enthalpy of Li 2 TiO 3 was measured by a drop calorimeter. • Heat capacity of Li 2 TiO 3 was derived as a function of temperature. -- Abstract: Enthalpy of Li 2 TiO 3 , which was synthesized by a neutralizing method and its Li/Ti ratio was determined to be Li/Ti ratio (mol/mol) = 1.97, was measured by a drop calorimeter, and its heat capacity was derived as a function of temperature. XRD (X-ray diffraction) analysis of the sample before and after the enthalpy measurement indicated no phase change during the measurement and a single phase of Li 2 TiO 3 was observed. The enthalpy data were expressed as H(T) − H(323.17) (J/g) = 2.2 × 10 −5 ·T 2 + 1.4·T + 2.7 × 10 4 /T − 5.6 × 10 2 (373–1273 K), where T is temperature in K. The heat capacity was calculated as C p (J/g K) = 2.2 × 2 × 10 −5 ·T + 1.4–2.7 × 10 4 /T 2 by differentiating the equation by temperature. These equations have accuracy of 3%

  9. Impact of ultra-viscous drops: air-film gliding and extreme wetting

    KAUST Repository

    Langley, Kenneth; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    water drop, the viscous-dominated flow in the thin air layer counteracts the inertia of the drop liquid. For highly viscous drops the viscous stresses within the liquid also affect the interplay between the drop and the gas. Here the drop also forms a

  10. Analysis of the rod drop accident for Angra-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.; Atayde, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a rod drop accident analysis for the third cycle of the Angra-1 nuclear power plant operating in the automatic control mode. In this analysis all possible configurations for dropped rods caused by a single failure in the controller circuits have been considered. The dropped rod worths, power distributions and excore detector tilts were determined by using the Siemens/KWU neutronic code system, in particular the MEDIUM2, PINPOW and DETILT codes. The transient behaviour of the plant during the rod drop event was simulated with the SACI2/MOD0 code, developed at CDTN. Determinations related to the DNBR design limit were conducted by utilizing the CDTN PANTERA-1P subchannel code. The transient analysis indicated that for dropped rod worths greater than about 425 pcm reactor trip from negative neutron flux rate will take place independently of core conditions. In the range from 0 to 425 pcm large power overshoots may occur as a consequence of the automatic control system action. The magnitude of the maximum power peaking during the event increases with the dropped rod worth, as far as the control bank is able to compensate the initial reactivity decrease. Thermal-hydraulic evaluations carried out with the PANTERA-1P code show that for all the relevant dropped rod worths the minimum DNBR will remain above a limit value of 1.365. Even if this conservative limit is met, the calculated nuclear power peaking factors, F N AH , will be at least 6% higher than the allowable F N AH -values. Therefore, the DNBR design margin will be preserved at the event of rod drop. (author)

  11. Refrigeration. Two-Phase Flow. Flow Regimes and Pressure Drop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans-Jørgen Høgaard

    2002-01-01

    The note gives the basic definitions used in two-phase flow. Flow regimes and flow regimes map are introduced. The different contributions to the pressure drop are stated together with an imperical correlation from the litterature.......The note gives the basic definitions used in two-phase flow. Flow regimes and flow regimes map are introduced. The different contributions to the pressure drop are stated together with an imperical correlation from the litterature....

  12. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    OpenAIRE

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Fossum, Jon Otto

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-fieldassisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a...

  13. Nectar and pollination drops: how different are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepi, Massimo; von Aderkas, Patrick; Wagner, Rebecca; Mugnaini, Serena; Coulter, Andrea; Pacini, Ettore

    2009-08-01

    Pollination drops and nectars (floral nectars) are secretions related to plant reproduction. The pollination drop is the landing site for the majority of gymnosperm pollen, whereas nectar of angiosperm flowers represents a common nutritional resource for a large variety of pollinators. Extrafloral nectars also are known from all vascular plants, although among the gymnosperms they are restricted to the Gnetales. Extrafloral nectars are not generally involved in reproduction but serve as 'reward' for ants defending plants against herbivores (indirect defence). Although very different in their task, nectars and pollination drops share some features, e.g. basic chemical composition and eventual consumption by animals. This has led some authors to call these secretions collectively nectar. Modern techniques that permit chemical analysis and protein characterization have very recently added important information about these sugary secretions that appear to be much more than a 'reward' for pollinating (floral nectar) and defending animals (extrafloral nectar) or a landing site for pollen (pollination drop). Nectar and pollination drops contain sugars as the main components, but the total concentration and the relative proportions are different. They also contain amino acids, of which proline is frequently the most abundant. Proteomic studies have revealed the presence of common functional classes of proteins such as invertases and defence-related proteins in nectar (floral and extrafloral) and pollination drops. Invertases allow for dynamic rearrangement of sugar composition following secretion. Defence-related proteins provide protection from invasion by fungi and bacteria. Currently, only few species have been studied in any depth. The chemical composition of the pollination drop must be investigated in a larger number of species if eventual phylogenetic relationships are to be revealed. Much more information can be provided from further proteomic studies of both

  14. Pressure Drop Hysteresis of Hydrodynamic States in Packed Tower for Foaming Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Sodhi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out to determine the effects of gas and liquid flow velocities and surface tension on the two-phase phase pressure drop a in a downflow trickle bed reactor. Water and non- Newtonian foaming solutions were employed as liquid phase. More than 240 experimental points for the trickle flow (GCF and foaming pulsing flow (PF/FPF regime were obtained for present study. Hydrodynamic characteristics involving two-phase pressure drop significantly influenced by gas and liquid flow rates. For 15 and 30 ppm air-aqueous surfactant solutions, two-phase pressure drop increases with higher liquid and gas flow velocities in trickle flow and foaming/pulsing flow regimes. With decrease in surface tension i.e. for 45 and 60 ppm air-aqueous surfactant systems, two-phase pressure drop increases very sharply during change in regime transition at significantly low liquid and gas velocities. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 14th March 2011, Revised: 29th June 2011; Accepted: 4th July 2011[How to Cite: V. Sodhi, and R. Gupta. (2011. Pressure Drop Hysteresis of Hydrodynamic States in Packed Tower for Foaming Systems. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(2: 115-122. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.828.115-122][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.828.115-122 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/828 ] | View in 

  15. Effects of heat-treatment on plasma rich in growth factors-derived autologous eye drop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, E; Muruzabal, F; De la Fuente, M; Merayo-Lloves, J; Orive, G

    2014-02-01

    We have developed and characterized a new type of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) derived eye-drop therapy for patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. To determine the concentration of several growth factors, proteins, immunoglobulins and complement activity of the heat-inactivated eye-drop and to study its biological effects on cell proliferation and migration of different ocular surface cells, blood from healthy donors was collected, centrifuged and PRGF was prepared avoiding the buffy coat. The half volume of the obtained plasma supernatant from each donor was heat-inactivated at 56 °C for 1 h (heat-inactivated PRGF). The concentration of several proteins involved on corneal wound healing, immunoglubolins G, M and E and functional integrity of the complement system assayed by CH50 test were determined. The proliferative and migratory potential of inactivated and non-inactivated PRGF eye drops were assayed on corneal epithelial cells (HCE), keratocytes (HK) and conjunctival fibroblasts (HConF). Heat-inactivated PRGF preserves the content of most of the proteins and morphogens involved in its wound healing effects while reduces drastically the content of IgE and complement activity. Heat-inactivated PRGF eye drops increased proliferation and migration potential of ocular surface cells with regard to PRGF showing significant differences on proliferation and migration rate of HCE and HConF respectively. In summary, heat-inactivation of PRGF eye drops completely reduced complement activity and deceased significantly the presence of IgE, maintaining the biological activity of PRGF on ocular surface cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nile damming as plausible cause of extinction and drop in abundance of deep-sea shrimp in the western Mediterranean over broad spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartes, J. E.; Maynou, F.; Fanelli, E.

    2011-11-01

    Greatly increased retention of flow in Nile River reservoirs was initiated in 1964, after completion of the Aswan High Dam, which induced important oceanographic changes in the Mediterranean Sea, including deep waters (below a depth of 150 m). Based on an analysis of data series starting in the 1940s/1950s, the giant red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea has become locally extinct off of the Catalonian coasts (and elsewhere in the northwestern Mediterranean) at depths of 400-900 m, with a simultaneous and significant drop in the catches of red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus, in the second half of the 1960s. The extinction and sharp decline of deep-shrimp populations off Catalonian coast (at ca. 3200 km westwards from Nile Delta) followed the 1964 drop in Nile discharge with a delay of ca. 3-5 yrs (breakpoint analysis applied to data series). The breakpoints detected in the second half of 1960s both in Nile runoff and shrimps’ abundance were independent of climatic events in the study area (e.g. changes in NAO) and occurred before the increase in fishing effort off Catalonian coasts (breakpoint in 1973-1974). The Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW), inhabited by A. foliacea in the western Basin, had significant temperature (T) and salinity (S) increases in the 1950-1970 period, and Nile damming has contributed about 45% of the total S increase of Western Mediterranean deep-water masses from the 1960s to the late 1990s (Skliris and Lascaratos, 2004). This had to increase, for instance, LIW salinity at its formation site in the eastern Mediterranean. Nile damming was probably a triggering factor for the extinction/drop in abundance of deep-sea shrimp off Catalonian coasts.

  17. Drop detachment and motion on fuel cell electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Eric; Hellstern, Thomas; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Benziger, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Liquid water is pushed through flow channels of fuel cells, where one surface is a porous carbon electrode made up of carbon fibers. Water drops grow on the fibrous carbon surface in the gas flow channel. The drops adhere to the superficial fiber surfaces but exhibit little penetration into the voids between the fibers. The fibrous surfaces are hydrophobic, but there is a substantial threshold force necessary to initiate water drop motion. Once the water drops begin to move, however, the adhesive force decreases and drops move with minimal friction, similar to motion on superhydrophobic materials. We report here studies of water wetting and water drop motion on typical porous carbon materials (carbon paper and carbon cloth) employed in fuel cells. The static coefficient of friction on these textured surfaces is comparable to that for smooth Teflon. But the dynamic coefficient of friction is several orders of magnitude smaller on the textured surfaces than on smooth Teflon. Carbon cloth displays a much smaller static contact angle hysteresis than carbon paper due to its two-scale roughness. The dynamic contact angle hysteresis for carbon paper is greatly reduced compared to the static contact angle hysteresis. Enhanced dynamic hydrophobicity is suggested to result from the extent to which a dynamic contact line can track topological heterogeneities of the liquid/solid interface.

  18. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Shappert, L.B.; Childress, P.C.; Quinn, G.J.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-09-01

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report

  19. Filter aids influence on pressure drop across a filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, S.; Rashid, M.; Nurnadia, A.; Ammar, M. R.; Hasfalina, C. M.

    2017-06-01

    Filter aids is commonly used to reduce pressure drop across air filtration system as it helps to increase the efficiency of filtration of accumulated filter cake. Filtration velocity is one of the main parameters that affect the performance of filter aids material. In this study, a formulated filter aids consisting of PreKot™ and activated carbon mixture (designated as PrekotAC) was tested on PTFE filter media under various filtration velocities of 5, 6, and 8 m/min at a constant material loading of 0.2 mg/mm2. Results showed that pressure drop is highly influenced by filtration velocity where higher filtration velocity leads to a higher pressure drop across the filter cake. It was found that PrekotAC performed better in terms of reducing the pressure drop across the filter cake even at the highest filtration velocity. The diversity in different particle size distribution of non-uniform particle size in the formulated PrekotAC mixture presents a higher permeability causes a lower pressure drop across the accumulated filter cake. The finding suggests that PrekotAC is a promising filter aids material that helps reducing the pressure drop across fabric filtration system.

  20. Vortex-ring-induced large bubble entrainment during drop impact

    KAUST Repository

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean

    2016-03-29

    For a limited set of impact conditions, a drop impacting onto a pool can entrap an air bubble as large as its own size. The subsequent rise and rupture of this large bubble plays an important role in aerosol formation and gas transport at the air-sea interface. The large bubble is formed when the impact crater closes up near the pool surface and is known to occur only for drops that are prolate at impact. Herein we use experiments and numerical simulations to show that a concentrated vortex ring, produced in the neck between the drop and the pool, controls the crater deformations and pinchoff. However, it is not the strongest vortex rings that are responsible for the large bubbles, as they interact too strongly with the pool surface and self-destruct. Rather, it is somewhat weaker vortices that can deform the deeper craters, which manage to pinch off the large bubbles. These observations also explain why the strongest and most penetrating vortex rings emerging from drop impacts are not produced by oblate drops but by more prolate drop shapes, as had been observed in previous experiments.