WorldWideScience

Sample records for significant performance penalty

  1. 45 CFR 305.40 - Penalty performance measures and levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAM PERFORMANCE MEASURES, STANDARDS, FINANCIAL INCENTIVES, AND PENALTIES § 305.40 Penalty performance measures and levels. (a) There are three performance measures for which States must... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalty performance measures and levels. 305.40...

  2. Chance constrained problems: penalty reformulation and performance of sample approximation technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Branda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2012), s. 105-122 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : chance constrained problems * penalty functions * asymptotic equivalence * sample approximation technique * investment problem Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.619, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/E/branda-chance constrained problems penalty reformulation and performance of sample approximation technique.pdf

  3. Replacing penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.24The subject. The article deals with the problem of the use of "substitute" penalties.The purpose of the article is to identify criminal and legal criteria for: selecting the replacement punishment; proportionality replacement leave punishment to others (the formalization of replacement; actually increasing the punishment (worsening of legal situation of the convicted.Methodology.The author uses the method of analysis and synthesis, formal legal method.Results. Replacing the punishment more severe as a result of malicious evasion from serving accused designated penalty requires the optimization of the following areas: 1 the selection of a substitute punishment; 2 replacement of proportionality is serving a sentence other (formalization of replacement; 3 ensuring the actual toughening penalties (deterioration of the legal status of the convict. It is important that the first two requirements pro-vide savings of repression in the implementation of the replacement of one form of punishment to others.Replacement of punishment on their own do not have any specifics. However, it is necessary to compare them with the contents of the punishment, which the convict from serving maliciously evaded. First, substitute the punishment should assume a more significant range of restrictions and deprivation of certain rights of the convict. Second, the perfor-mance characteristics of order substitute the punishment should assume guarantee imple-mentation of the new measures.With regard to replacing all forms of punishment are set significant limitations in the application that, in some cases, eliminates the possibility of replacement of the sentence, from serving where there has been willful evasion, a stricter measure of state coercion. It is important in the context of the topic and the possibility of a sentence of imprisonment as a substitute punishment in cases where the original purpose of the strict measures excluded. It is noteworthy that the

  4. Performance and economic penalties of some LEU [low enriched uranium] conversion options for the Australian Reactor HIFAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Robinson, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Performance calculations for the conversion of HIFAR to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel have been extended to a wide range of 235 U loadings per fuel element. Using a simple approximate algorithm for the likely costs of LEU compared with highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements, the increases in annual fuelling costs for LEU compared with HEU fuel are examined for a range of conversion options involving different performance penalties. No significant operational/safety problems were found for any of the options canvassed. (Author)

  5. The Real World Significance of Performance Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Wang, Qing Yang; Trivedi, Shubhendu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the educational data mining and user modeling communities have been aggressively introducing models for predicting student performance on external measures such as standardized tests as well as within-tutor performance. While these models have brought statistically reliable improvement to performance prediction, the real world…

  6. Motion database of disguised and non-disguised team handball penalty throws by novice and expert performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Helm

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the motion database for a large sample (n = 2400 of 7-m penalty throws in team handball that includes 1600 disguised throws. Throws were performed by both novice (n = 5 and expert (n = 5 penalty takers. The article reports the methods and materials used to capture the motion data. The database itself is accessible for download via JLU Web Server and provides all raw files in a three-dimensional motion data format (.c3d. Additional information is given on the marker placement of the penalty taker, goalkeeper, and ball together with details on the skill level and/or playing history of the expert group. The database was first used by Helm et al. (2017 [1] to investigate the kinematic patterns of disguised movements. Results of this analysis are reported and discussed in their article “Kinematic patterns underlying disguised movements: Spatial and temporal dissimilarity compared to genuine movement patterns” (doi:10.1016/j.humov.2017.05.010 [1]. Keywords: Motion capture data, Disguise, Expertise

  7. Parading (Tashhir Penalty in Old Ottoman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet KILINÇ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this essay is to determine which crimes were punished with tasshir, how its procedure was, how it changed and which type of penalty it was, in Old Ottoman. In principle, parading penalty (tashhir is a ta’zir punishment that means discretionary, corrective punishment. In addition this punishment was carried out as a complementary (tekmili penalty, additional (tebei penalty and psychological (nefsi penalty in old Ottoman . In principle, this punishment was legal and it was executed to everyone in public. In Ottoman State, twelve crimes were punished with parading penalty. These are being false witness, being a pander, beating, behaving immorally, rebeling, making environme ntal pollution, waylaying, and stealing, damaging national monopoly, not performing religious duties, drunkenness and not performing army duties.

  8. Sinogram restoration in computed tomography with an edge-preserving penalty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Kevin J., E-mail: little@uchicago.edu; La Rivière, Patrick J. [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    to the contrast across the edge. This presents some disadvantages of this method relative to image-domain edge-preserving methods, although the computational burden of the sinogram-domain approach is much lower. For a helical cone-beam geometry, we found applying sinogram restoration in 3D was reasonable and that pitch did not make a significant difference in the general effect of sinogram restoration. The application of Huber-penalty sinogram restoration to clinical data resulted in a reconstruction with less noise while retaining resolution. Conclusions: Sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty is able to provide better resolution-noise performance than restoration with a quadratic penalty. Additionally, sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty is feasible for helical cone-beam CT and can be applied to clinical data.

  9. 45 CFR 305.42 - Penalty phase-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAM PERFORMANCE MEASURES, STANDARDS, FINANCIAL INCENTIVES, AND PENALTIES § 305.42 Penalty phase-in. States are subject to the performance penalties described in § 305.40 based on data reported for FY 2001. Data reported for FY 2000 will be used as a base year to determine improvements in performance during...

  10. Leukoaraiosis significantly worsens driving performance of ordinary older drivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiko Nakano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukoaraiosis is defined as extracellular space caused mainly by atherosclerotic or demyelinated changes in the brain tissue and is commonly found in the brains of healthy older people. A significant association between leukoaraiosis and traffic crashes was reported in our previous study; however, the reason for this is still unclear. METHOD: This paper presents a comprehensive evaluation of driving performance in ordinary older drivers with leukoaraiosis. First, the degree of leukoaraiosis was examined in 33 participants, who underwent an actual-vehicle driving examination on a standard driving course, and a driver skill rating was also collected while the driver carried out a paced auditory serial addition test, which is a calculating task given verbally. At the same time, a steering entropy method was used to estimate steering operation performance. RESULTS: The experimental results indicated that a normal older driver with leukoaraiosis was readily affected by external disturbances and made more operation errors and steered less smoothly than one without leukoaraiosis during driving; at the same time, their steering skill significantly deteriorated. CONCLUSIONS: Leukoaraiosis worsens the driving performance of older drivers because of their increased vulnerability to distraction.

  11. Penalties in traffic.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    Traffic offenders are penalized in various ways: fines, (temporary) driving licence suspensions, confiscation of their vehicles, penalty points, mandatory participation in rehabilitation programmes, prison sentences or community service. The aim of penalties is to punish offenders, to protect

  12. Penalty parameter of the penalty function method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, Cheng Yong; Lan, Tian; Hu, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    The penalty parameter of penalty function method is systematically analyzed and discussed. For the problem that Deb's feasibility-based rule doesnot give the detailed instruction as how to rank two solutions when they have the same constraint violation, an improved Deb's feasibility-based rule is...

  13. NREL Research Yields Significant Thermoelectric Performance | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Materials Science and Technology center, said the introduction of SWCNT into fabrics could from an exemplary SWNCT thin film improved thermoelectric properties. The newest paper revealed that that the same SWCNT thin film achieved identical performance when doped with either positive or

  14. Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a large share of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty. However, the lower part-time pay penalty is also related to lower wage returns to reading and writing which are performed more intensively b...

  15. Vegetation composition and structure significantly influence green roof performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunnett, N.; Nagase, A.; Booth, R.; Grime, P. [Sheffield Univ., Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Landscape Architecture

    2005-07-01

    The majority of published literature on green roofs contains little specific information on the contribution of plants to the various functions and properties of green roofs. This paper reviewed previously published material in an attempt to shed light on the role of vegetation composition in green roof systems, with specific reference to hydrology and biodiversity support. Two ongoing experiments at the University of Sheffield were then considered: (1) a comparison of quality and quantity of runoff from different types of vegetation; and (2) a comparison of flowering seasons and biodiversity support of different vegetation. Results of the studies showed that there was no general pattern of variation in runoff that could be related to vegetation complexity or taxonomic composition of the communities. During the winter months, high precipitation quickly saturated the soil and percolate losses were similar for all treatments. In the summer, throughflow losses differed between treatments in relation to the structure of the plant canopy. Differing mechanisms resulted in variations in the volume of percolate that was collected. Lower volumes of percolate were observed in herb-only monocultures of Leontdon hispidus, a species with a high water content. Tap-rooted species were seen to more effectively absorb soil moisture. The biodiversity support study focused on the study of Sedum species and Labiatae species, which suggested that mixed vegetation containing these species had a far greater likelihood of attracting wild bees to support pollination. Results of the studies indicated that green roof vegetation with greater structural and species diversity may provide different benefits than sedum-dominated roots. Further studies are needed to investigate the trade-offs between vegetation types, and green roof functions and performance in order to justify calls for a wider diversity of green roof types. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  16. Performance evaluation recommendations of nuclear power plants outdoor significant civil structures earthquake resistance. Performance evaluation examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The Japan Society of Civil Engineers has updated performance evaluation recommendations of nuclear power plants outdoor significant civil structures earthquake resistance in June 2005. Based on experimental and analytical considerations, analytical seismic models of soils for underground structures, effects of vertical motions on time-history dynamic analysis and shear fracture of reinforced concretes by cyclic loadings have been incorporated in new recommendations. This document shows outdoor civil structures earthquake resistance and endurance performance evaluation examples based on revised recommendations. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Using Harm-Based Weights for the AHRQ Patient Safety for Selected Indicators Composite (PSI-90): Does It Affect Assessment of Hospital Performance and Financial Penalties in Veterans Health Administration Hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Rosen, Amy K; Borzecki, Ann; Shwartz, Michael

    2016-12-01

    To assess whether hospital profiles for public reporting and pay-for-performance, measured by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety for Selected Indicators (PSI-90) composite measure, were affected by using the recently developed harm-based weights. Retrospective analysis of 2012-2014 data from the Veterans Health Administration (VA). The AHRQ PSI software (v5.0) was applied to obtain the original volume-based PSI-90 scores for 132 acute-care hospitals. We constructed a modified PSI-90 using the harm-based weights developed by AHRQ. We compared hospital profiles for public reporting and pay-for-performance between these two PSI-90s and assessed patterns in these changes. The volume-based and the harm-based PSI-90s were strongly correlated (r = 0.67, p hospitals changed categorization), but it had a much larger impact on pay-for-performance (e.g., 15 percent of hospitals would have faced different financial penalties under the Medicare Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program). Because of changes in weights of specific PSIs, hospital profile changes occurred systematically. Use of the harm-based weights in PSI-90 has the potential to significantly change payments under pay-for-performance programs. Policy makers should carefully develop transition plans for guiding hospitals through changes in any quality metrics used for pay-for-performance. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value.

  19. Teaching about the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Paul; Eden, John Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the reasons for the death penalty, the reasons why the death penalty attracts so much attention, whether the death penalty is applied consistently, and the evidence that the application of the death penalty may be racially biased. Provides an accompanying article on "Teaching Ideas" by Ronald A. Banaszak. (CMK)

  20. Eighth Amendment & Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Joseph M.; Merrill, Denise W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a lesson on capital punishment for juveniles based on three hypothetical cases. The goal of the lesson is to have students understand the complexities of decisions regarding the death penalty for juveniles. (JDH)

  1. Explicit versus implicit motivations: Clarifying how experiences affect turkey hunter satisfaction using revised importance-performance, importance grid, and penalty-reward-contrast analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Susan A.; Cornicelli, Louis; Fulton, David C.; Merchant, Steven S.

    2018-01-01

    Although research has advanced methods for clarifying factors that relate to customer satisfaction, they have not been embraced by leisure researchers. Using results from a survey of wild turkey hunters, we applied traditional and revised importance-performance (IPA/RIPA), importance-grid analysis (IGA), and penalty-reward-contrast analysis (PRCA) to examine how activity-specific factors influenced satisfaction. Results suggested differences between the explicit and implicit importance of factors related to turkey hunting. Opportunities to kill turkeys were explicitly rated as less important than seeing, hearing, or calling in turkeys, but opportunities for harvest had relatively higher levels of implicit importance. PRCA identified “calling turkeys in” and “hearing gobbling” as minimum requirements that cause dissatisfaction if not fulfilled, but do not provide satisfaction, whereas “seeing turkeys” and an “opportunity to kill a turkey” related to both satisfaction and dissatisfaction. RIPA, IGA, and PRCA could provide valuable insights about factors that may improve satisfaction for leisure participants.

  2. 77 FR 55175 - Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2012-0131; Notice 1] RIN 2127-AL16 Civil Penalties AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... proposes to increase the maximum civil penalty amounts for violations of motor vehicle safety requirements... and consumer information provisions. Specifically, this proposes increases in maximum civil penalty...

  3. 75 FR 79978 - Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2010-0114; Notice 2] RIN 2127-AK78 Civil Penalties AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... civil penalty amounts for related series of violations of the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety... Federal Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection...

  4. 75 FR 5244 - Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0066; Notice 2] RIN 2127-AK40 Civil Penalties AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... civil penalty amounts for violations of motor vehicle safety requirements involving school buses, bumper... theft protection requirements. This action is taken pursuant to the Federal Civil Monetary Penalty...

  5. 77 FR 70710 - Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2012-0131; Notice 2] RIN 2127-AL16 Civil Penalties AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... civil penalty amounts for violations of motor vehicle safety requirements for the National Traffic and... provisions. Specifically, this increases the maximum civil penalty amounts for single violations of motor...

  6. 75 FR 49879 - Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... [Docket No. NHTSA-2010-0114; Notice 1] RIN 2127-AK78 Civil Penalties AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... proposes to increase the maximum civil penalty amounts for violations covering a related series of... action would be taken pursuant to the Federal Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as...

  7. Death Penalty in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Amie L.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the legal and moral issues, controversies, and unique trial procedures involved with the death penalty. Discusses the 1972 landmark Supreme Court decision that resulted in many states abolishing this punishment, only to reintroduce it later with different provisions. Reviews the controversial case of Sam Sheppard. (MJP)

  8. The Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan on the Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and the imposition of the death penalty. Focuses on the controversy concerning capital punishment and stimulates critical thinking in an analysis and discussion of eight hypothetical situations. Includes suggestions for readings, videotapes, and writing assignments. (NL)

  9. Securities regulation and implicit penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghua Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The extant literature offers extensive support for the significant role played by institutions in financial markets, but implicit regulation and monitoring have yet to be examined. This study fills this void in the literature by employing unique Chinese datasets to explore the implicit regulation and penalties imposed by the Chinese government in regulating the initial public offering (IPO market. Of particular interest are the economic consequences of underwriting IPO deals for client firms that violate regulatory rules in China’s capital market. We provide evidence to show that the associated underwriters’ reputations are impaired and their market share declines. We further explore whether such negative consequences result from a market disciplinary mechanism or a penalty imposed by the government. To analyze the possibility of a market disciplinary mechanism at work, we investigate (1 the market reaction to other client firms whose IPO deals were underwritten by underwriters associated with a violation at the time the violation was publicly disclosed and (2 the under-pricing of IPO deals undertaken by these underwriters after such disclosure. To analyze whether the government imposes an implicit penalty, we examine the application processing time for future IPO deals underwritten by the associated underwriters and find it to be significantly longer than for IPO deals underwritten by other underwriters. Overall, there is little evidence to suggest that the market penalizes underwriters for the rule-violating behavior of their client firms in China. Instead, the Chinese government implicitly penalizes them by imposing more stringent criteria on and lengthening the processing time of the IPO deals they subsequently underwrite.

  10. Six Significant Questions About Performance and Performance Courses in the Major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Hal A.; Pugh, D. Lionel

    James Bryant Conant's book, "The Education of America" (1963), triggered a major change in physical education curricula. Formerly a (sports) skills and applied techniques oriented discipline, physical education has expanded to areas such as kinesiology and sports sociology. However, performance and performance courses are still an important aspect…

  11. METHAPHYSICS OF DEATH PENALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Gromov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper studies the problem of death penalty justifiableness in terms of democratic society from the metaphysical viewpoint. Philosophical argumentation to justify death penalty is proposed as opposed to the common idea of inhuman and uncivilized nature of court practice of sentencing to death. The essence of the study is not to rehabilitate law-based murder but to explain dialectic relation of the degrees of moral responsibility of criminals and society nourishing evildoers. The author believes that refusal from death penalty under the pretence of rule of humanism is just a liberal façade, plausible excuse for defective moral state of the society which, rejecting its own guiltiness share as for current disregards of the law, does not grow but downgrades proper human dignity. Methodology. The author applies an approach of dialectic reflection being guided by the perception of unity, relativeness and complementarity of evil and good striving to determine efficient way of resolving their contradictions in the context of moral progress of the society. Originality. Proposing philosophic approach to a death penalty problem instead of legal one, the author is not going to discuss the role of horrification, control or cruelty of the measure of restraint; moreover, he does not consider the issue of its efficiency or inefficiency. The author also does not concern vexation of mind of a criminal sentenced to life imprisonment for “humanitarian” reasons. The purpose of the author is to demonstrate that aim of the punishment is to achieve justice which becomes spiritual challenge and moral recompense not only for the criminal but for the whole society. Conclusions. Crime is first of all a problem of a society; thus, criminal behaviour of certain individuals should only be considered through a prism of moral state of the whole community. Attitude to a death penalty is the problem of spirituality and its dramatic sophistication. The author

  12. The Effects of Shoulder- Girdle Muscles Fatigue on Ground Reaction Force, Elbow and Shoulder Joint Angle, and Accuracy of the Athletic Performance in Handball Penalty Throws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Shiravand

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: As the subjects were professional, muscle fatigue did not have a significant effect on postural control, angles and angular velocity; but did affect the reaction force and accuracy of the throws before and after fatigue, which could ultimately affect the performance of athletes and competition results.

  13. 30 CFR 947.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 947.845 Section 947.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  14. 30 CFR 941.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 941.845 Section 941.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  15. 30 CFR 912.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 912.845 Section 912.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for violations...

  16. 30 CFR 921.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 921.845 Section 921.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  17. 30 CFR 939.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 939.845 Section 939.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  18. 30 CFR 937.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 937.845 Section 937.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for violations...

  19. 30 CFR 942.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 942.845 Section 942.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  20. 30 CFR 903.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 903.845 Section 903.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, applies to the assessment of civil penalties for violations...

  1. 30 CFR 910.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 910.845 Section 910.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for violations...

  2. 30 CFR 922.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 922.845 Section 922.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for violations...

  3. 30 CFR 933.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 933.845 Section 933.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chaper, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  4. 30 CFR 905.845 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 905.845 Section 905.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  5. 76 FR 71431 - Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Civil Penalty Calculation... is currently evaluating its civil penalty methodology. Part of this evaluation includes a forthcoming... civil penalties. UFA takes into account the statutory penalty factors under 49 U.S.C. 521(b)(2)(D). The...

  6. 33 CFR 401.102 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalty. 401.102 Section... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Penalties-Violations of Seaway Regulations § 401.102 Civil penalty. (a) A person, as described in § 401.101(b), who violates a regulation is liable to a civil penalty of...

  7. 8 CFR 270.3 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalties. 270.3 Section 270.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PENALTIES FOR DOCUMENT FRAUD § 270.3 Penalties. (a) Criminal penalties. Nothing in section 274C of the Act shall be construed to diminish or...

  8. 12 CFR 411.405 - Penalty procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalty procedures. 411.405 Section 411.405 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Penalties and Enforcement § 411.405 Penalty procedures. Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the...

  9. The Imposition of the Death Penalty on Mexican Nationals in the United States and the Cultural, Legal and Political Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Michael Olivero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews death penalty perspectives from the United States, Mexico and international law. The United States practices the death penalty on not only its citizens, but those of other nations who commit capital crimes. Mexico is a death penalty abolitionist state that takes significant issue with the United States over executing Mexican nationals. The paper analyzes the cultural, legal and political conflict between the two countries surrounding the application of the death penalty on Mexican nationals.

  10. Use of reward-penalty structures in human experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A. C.; Allen, R. W.; Schwartz, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The use of motivational techniques in human performance research is reviewed and an example study employing a reward-penalty structure to simulate the motivations inherent in a real-world situation is presented. Driver behavior in a decision-making driving scenario was studied. The task involved control of an instrumented car on a cooperative test course. Subjects were penalized monetarily for tickets and accidents and rewarded for saving driving time. Two groups were assigned different ticket penalties. The group with the highest penalties tended to drive more conservatively. However, the average total payoff to each group was the same, as the conservative drivers traded off slower driving times with lower ticket penalties.

  11. 42 CFR 488.440 - Civil money penalties: Effective date and duration of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Effective date and duration... Civil money penalties: Effective date and duration of penalty. (a)(1) The per day civil money penalty... by CMS or the State. (2) A civil money penalty for each instance of noncompliance is imposed in a...

  12. 42 CFR 488.430 - Civil money penalties: Basis for imposing penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Basis for imposing penalty... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.430 Civil money penalties: Basis for imposing penalty. (a) CMS or the State may impose a civil money penalty for either the...

  13. 42 CFR 488.436 - Civil money penalties: Waiver of hearing, reduction of penalty amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Waiver of hearing, reduction... Civil money penalties: Waiver of hearing, reduction of penalty amount. (a) Waiver of a hearing. The... the civil money penalty. (b) Reduction of penalty amount. (1) If the facility waives its right to a...

  14. The baseline serum value of α-amylase is a significant predictor of distance running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Tarperi, Cantor; La Torre, Antonio; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2015-02-01

    This study was planned to investigate whether serum α-amylase concentration may be associated with running performance, physiological characteristics and other clinical chemistry analytes in a large sample of recreational athletes undergoing distance running. Forty-three amateur runners successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75%-85% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Blood was drawn during warm up and 15 min after conclusion of the run. After correction for body weight change, significant post-run increases were observed for serum values of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, creatine kinase (CK), iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), triglycerides, urea and uric acid, whereas the values of body weight, glomerular filtration rate, total and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol were significantly decreased. The concentration of serum α-amylase was unchanged. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running performance were found for gender, VO2max, training regimen and pre-run serum values of α-amylase, CK, glucose, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, LDH, urea and uric acid. In multivariate analysis, only VO2max (p=0.042) and baseline α-amylase (p=0.021) remained significant predictors of running performance. The combination of these two variables predicted 71% of variance in running performance. The baseline concentration of serum α-amylase was positively correlated with variation of serum glucose during the trial (r=0.345; p=0.025) and negatively with capillary blood lactate at the end of the run (r=-0.352; p=0.021). We showed that the baseline serum α-amylase concentration significantly and independently predicts distance running performance in recreational runners.

  15. Asymmetric predictability and cognitive competition in football penalty shootouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misirlisoy, Erman; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-08-18

    Sports provide powerful demonstrations of cognitive strategies underlying competitive behavior. Penalty shootouts in football (soccer) involve direct competition between elite players and absorb the attention of millions. The penalty shootout between Germany and England in the 1990 World Cup semifinal was viewed by an estimated 46.49% of the UK population. In a penalty shootout, a goalkeeper must defend their goal without teammate assistance while an opposing series of kickers aim to kick the ball past them into the net. As in many sports, the ball during a penalty kick often approaches too quickly for the goalkeeper to react to its direction of motion; instead, the goalkeeper must guess the likely direction of the kick, and dive in anticipation, if they are to have a chance of saving the shot. We examined all 361 kicks from the 37 penalty shootouts that occurred in World Cup and Euro Cup matches over a 36-year period from 1976 to 2012 and show that goalkeepers displayed a clear sequential bias. Following repeated kicks in the same direction, goalkeepers became increasingly likely to dive in the opposite direction on the next kick. Surprisingly, kickers failed to exploit these goalkeeper biases. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring and predicting sequential behavior in real-world competition. Penalty shootouts pit one goalkeeper against several kickers in rapid succession. Asymmetries in the cognitive capacities of an individual versus a group could produce significant advantages over opponents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 25 CFR 226.43 - Penalties for violation of certain operating regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Penalties § 226.43 Penalties for violation of....36 regarding valve or other approved controlling device, $100. (f) For failure to notify... thereafter performed by or through the Superintendent, the actual cost of performance thereof, plus 25...

  17. Performance evaluation recommendations and manuals of nuclear power plants outdoor significant civil structures earthquake resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    Performance evaluation recommendations and manuals of nuclear power plants outdoor significant civil structures earthquake resistance have been updated in June 2005 by the Japan Society of Civil Engineers. Based on experimental and analytical considerations on the recommendations of May 2002, analytical seismic models of soils for underground structures, effects of vertical motions on time-history dynamic analysis and shear fracture of reinforced concretes by cyclic loadings have been evaluated and incorporated in new recommendations. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Performance evaluation recommendations of nuclear power plants outdoor significant civil structures earthquake resistance. Technical documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The Japan Society of Civil Engineers has updated performance evaluation recommendations of nuclear power plants outdoor significant civil structures earthquake resistance in June 2005. Experimental and analytical considerations on the seismic effects evaluation criteria, such as analytical seismic models of soils for underground structures, effects of vertical motions on time-history dynamic analysis and shear fracture of reinforced concretes by cyclic loadings, were shown in this document and incorporated in new recommendations. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Performance monitoring and error significance in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrass, Tanja; Schuermann, Beate; Kaufmann, Christan; Spielberg, Rüdiger; Kniesche, Rainer; Kathmann, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    Performance monitoring has been consistently found to be overactive in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The present study examines whether performance monitoring in OCD is adjusted with error significance. Therefore, errors in a flanker task were followed by neutral (standard condition) or punishment feedbacks (punishment condition). In the standard condition patients had significantly larger error-related negativity (ERN) and correct-related negativity (CRN) ampliudes than controls. But, in the punishment condition groups did not differ in ERN and CRN amplitudes. While healthy controls showed an amplitude enhancement between standard and punishment condition, OCD patients showed no variation. In contrast, group differences were not found for the error positivity (Pe): both groups had larger Pe amplitudes in the punishment condition. Results confirm earlier findings of overactive error monitoring in OCD. The absence of a variation with error significance might indicate that OCD patients are unable to down-regulate their monitoring activity according to external requirements. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Significantly enhanced robustness and electrochemical performance of flexible carbon nanotube-based supercapacitors by electrodepositing polypyrrole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanli; Du, Lianhuan; Yang, Peihua; Sun, Peng; Yu, Xiang; Mai, Wenjie

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report robust, flexible CNT-based supercapacitor (SC) electrodes fabricated by electrodepositing polypyrrole (PPy) on freestanding vacuum-filtered CNT film. These electrodes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical properties (with the ultimate tensile strength of 16 MPa), and greatly enhanced electrochemical performance (5.6 times larger areal capacitance). The major drawback of conductive polymer electrodes is the fast capacitance decay caused by structural breakdown, which decreases cycling stability but this is not observed in our case. All-solid-state SCs assembled with the robust CNT/PPy electrodes exhibit excellent flexibility, long lifetime (95% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles) and high electrochemical performance (a total device volumetric capacitance of 4.9 F/cm3). Moreover, a flexible SC pack is demonstrated to light up 53 LEDs or drive a digital watch, indicating the broad potential application of our SCs for portable/wearable electronics.

  1. EVALUATION OF PENALTY FUNCTIONS FOR SEMI-GLOBAL MATCHING COST AGGREGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Banz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The stereo matching method semi-global matching (SGM relies on consistency constraints during the cost aggregation which are enforced by so-called penalty terms. This paper proposes new and evaluates four penalty functions for SGM. Due to mutual dependencies, two types of matching cost calculation, census and rank transform, are considered. Performance is measured using original and degenerated images exhibiting radiometric changes and noise from the Middlebury benchmark. The two best performing penalty functions are inversely proportional and negatively linear to the intensity gradient and perform equally with 6.05% and 5.91% average error, respectively. The experiments also show that adaptive penalty terms are mandatory when dealing with difficult imaging conditions. Consequently, for highest algorithmic performance in real-world systems, selection of a suitable penalty function and thorough parametrization with respect to the expected image quality is essential.

  2. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 2: precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2018-04-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as `field' or `global' significance. The block length for the local resampling tests is precisely determined to adequately account for the time series structure. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Daily precipitation climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. While the downscaled precipitation distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones in most regions in summer, the biases of some distribution characteristics are significant over large areas in winter. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate stationary fine-scale climate features in the daily precipitation field over regions of complex topography in both seasons and appropriate transient fine-scale features almost everywhere in summer. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the clear additional value of dynamical downscaling over global climate simulations. The evaluation methodology has a broad spectrum of applicability as it is

  3. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbir, Kamil K

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance.

  4. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: a Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Konrad Imbir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop (EST and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance.

  5. Optimized distributed systems achieve significant performance improvement on sorted merging of massive VCF files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaobo; Gao, Jingjing; Jin, Peng; Eng, Celeste; Burchard, Esteban G; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen; Wang, Fusheng; Qin, Zhaohui S

    2018-06-01

    Sorted merging of genomic data is a common data operation necessary in many sequencing-based studies. It involves sorting and merging genomic data from different subjects by their genomic locations. In particular, merging a large number of variant call format (VCF) files is frequently required in large-scale whole-genome sequencing or whole-exome sequencing projects. Traditional single-machine based methods become increasingly inefficient when processing large numbers of files due to the excessive computation time and Input/Output bottleneck. Distributed systems and more recent cloud-based systems offer an attractive solution. However, carefully designed and optimized workflow patterns and execution plans (schemas) are required to take full advantage of the increased computing power while overcoming bottlenecks to achieve high performance. In this study, we custom-design optimized schemas for three Apache big data platforms, Hadoop (MapReduce), HBase, and Spark, to perform sorted merging of a large number of VCF files. These schemas all adopt the divide-and-conquer strategy to split the merging job into sequential phases/stages consisting of subtasks that are conquered in an ordered, parallel, and bottleneck-free way. In two illustrating examples, we test the performance of our schemas on merging multiple VCF files into either a single TPED or a single VCF file, which are benchmarked with the traditional single/parallel multiway-merge methods, message passing interface (MPI)-based high-performance computing (HPC) implementation, and the popular VCFTools. Our experiments suggest all three schemas either deliver a significant improvement in efficiency or render much better strong and weak scalabilities over traditional methods. Our findings provide generalized scalable schemas for performing sorted merging on genetics and genomics data using these Apache distributed systems.

  6. Focused R&D For Electrochromic Smart Windowsa: Significant Performance and Yield Enhancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

    2003-01-31

    There is a need to improve the energy efficiency of building envelopes as they are the primary factor governing the heating, cooling, lighting and ventilation requirements of buildings--influencing 53% of building energy use. In particular, windows contribute significantly to the overall energy performance of building envelopes, thus there is a need to develop advanced energy efficient window and glazing systems. Electrochromic (EC) windows represent the next generation of advanced glazing technology that will (1) reduce the energy consumed in buildings, (2) improve the overall comfort of the building occupants, and (3) improve the thermal performance of the building envelope. ''Switchable'' EC windows provide, on demand, dynamic control of visible light, solar heat gain, and glare without blocking the view. As exterior light levels change, the window's performance can be electronically adjusted to suit conditions. A schematic illustrating how SageGlass{reg_sign} electrochromic windows work is shown in Figure I.1. SageGlass{reg_sign} EC glazings offer the potential to save cooling and lighting costs, with the added benefit of improving thermal and visual comfort. Control over solar heat gain will also result in the use of smaller HVAC equipment. If a step change in the energy efficiency and performance of buildings is to be achieved, there is a clear need to bring EC technology to the marketplace. This project addresses accelerating the widespread introduction of EC windows in buildings and thus maximizing total energy savings in the U.S. and worldwide. We report on R&D activities to improve the optical performance needed to broadly penetrate the full range of architectural markets. Also, processing enhancements have been implemented to reduce manufacturing costs. Finally, tests are being conducted to demonstrate the durability of the EC device and the dual pane insulating glass unit (IGU) to be at least equal to that of conventional

  7. 76 FR 60017 - Technical Conference on Penalty Guidelines; Notice of Technical Conference on Penalty Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Conference on Penalty Guidelines; Notice of Technical Conference on Penalty Guidelines The staff of the... the Penalty Guidelines, which the Commission issued on September 17, 2010.\\1\\ The conference will be... impact of the Penalty Guidelines on compliance and enforcement matters. More information on the topics to...

  8. 42 CFR 488.438 - Civil money penalties: Amount of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Amount of penalty. 488.438... Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.438 Civil money penalties... review authority) finds that the basis for imposing a civil money penalty exists, as specified in § 488...

  9. A Meta-analysis for the Diagnostic Performance of Transient Elastography for Clinically Significant Portal Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Myung-Won; Kim, Kyung Won; Pyo, Junhee; Huh, Jimi; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the correlation between liver stiffness measurement using transient elastography (TE-LSM) and hepatic venous pressure gradient and the diagnostic performance of TE-LSM in assessing clinically significant portal hypertension through meta-analysis. Eleven studies were included from thorough literature research and selection processes. The summary correlation coefficient was 0.783 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.737-0.823). Summary sensitivity, specificity and area under the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were 87.5% (95% CI, 75.8-93.9%), 85.3 % (95% CI, 76.9-90.9%) and 0.9, respectively. The subgroup with low cut-off values of 13.6-18 kPa had better summary estimates (sensitivity 91.2%, specificity 81.3% and partial AUC 0.921) than the subgroup with high cut-off values of 21-25 kPa (sensitivity 71.2%, specificity 90.9% and partial AUC 0.769). In summary, TE-LSM correlated well with hepatic venous pressure gradient and represented good diagnostic performance in diagnosing clinically significant portal hypertension. For use as a sensitive screening tool, we propose using low cut-off values of 13.6-18 kPa in TE-LSM. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavioral Change and Building Performance: Strategies for Significant, Persistent, and Measurable Institutional Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Amy K.; Malone, Elizabeth L.; Heerwagen, Judith H.; Dion, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The people who use Federal buildings — Federal employees, operations and maintenance staff, and the general public — can significantly impact a building’s environmental performance and the consumption of energy, water, and materials. Many factors influence building occupants’ use of resources (use behaviors) including work process requirements, ability to fulfill agency missions, new and possibly unfamiliar high-efficiency/high-performance building technologies; a lack of understanding, education, and training; inaccessible information or ineffective feedback mechanisms; and cultural norms and institutional rules and requirements, among others. While many strategies have been used to introduce new occupant use behaviors that promote sustainability and reduced resource consumption, few have been verified in the scientific literature or have properly documented case study results. This paper documents validated strategies that have been shown to encourage new use behaviors that can result in significant, persistent, and measureable reductions in resource consumption. From the peer-reviewed literature, the paper identifies relevant strategies for Federal facilities and commercial buildings that focus on the individual, groups of individuals (e.g., work groups), and institutions — their policies, requirements, and culture. The paper documents methods with evidence of success in changing use behaviors and enabling occupants to effectively interact with new technologies/designs. It also provides a case study of the strategies used at a Federal facility — Fort Carson, Colorado. The paper documents gaps in the current literature and approaches, and provides topics for future research.

  11. Performance characteristics of SCC radioimmunoassay and clinical significance serum SCC Ag assay in patients with malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Youn

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate the performance characteristics of SCC RIV and the clinical significance of serum SCC Ag assay in patients with malignancy, serum SCC Ag levels were measured by SCC RIV kit in 40 normal controls and 35 percents with various untreated malignancy, who visited Chonju Presbyterian Medical Center. The results were as follows; 1. The SCC RIA was simple to perform and can be completed in two workday. And the standard curve and reproducibility were both good. 2. The mean serum SCC Ag level in normal controls was 1.64 ± 0.93 ng/mL and normal upper limit of serum SCC Ag was defined as 2.6 ng/mL. 3 out of 40 (7.5%) normal controls showed elevated SCC Ag levels above the normal upper limit. 3. In 35 patients with various untreated malignancy, 18 patients (51.4%) showed elevated serum SCC Ag levels, 59.1% of 22 patients with cervical cancer, 80% of 5 patients with lung cancer, 33% of 3 patients with esophageal cancer, 0% of 2 patients with rectal cancer and 0% of 3 patients with breast cancer showed elevated serum SCC Ag levels. Above results represent that SCC RIV is simple method to perform followed by good standard curve and reproducibility, and may be a useful indicator reflecting diagnostic data of patients with cervical cancer and lung cancer

  12. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Aerodynamic Penalties and Mechanisms in Heavy Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations that are conducted on a transport-type airfoil, NACA 64-210, at a Reynolds number of 2.6×106 and LWC of 25 g/m3 explore the aerodynamic penalties and mechanisms that affect airfoil performance in heavy rain conditions. Our simulation results agree well with the experimental data and show significant aerodynamic penalties for the airfoil in heavy rain. The maximum percentage decrease in CL is reached by 13.2% and the maximum percentage increase in CD by 47.6%. Performance degradation in heavy rain at low angles of attack is emulated by an originally creative boundary-layer-tripped technique near the leading edge. Numerical flow visualization technique is used to show premature boundary-layer separation at high angles of attack and the particulate trajectories at various angles of attack. A mathematic model is established to qualitatively study the water film effect on the airfoil geometric changes. All above efforts indicate that two primary mechanisms are accountable for the airfoil aerodynamic penalties. One is to cause premature boundary-layer transition at low AOA and separation at high AOA. The other occurs at times scales consistent with the water film layer, which is thought to alter the airfoil geometry and increase the mass effectively.

  13. 50 CFR 300.40 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalties. 300.40 Section 300.40... South Pacific Tuna Fisheries § 300.40 Civil penalties. The procedures of 15 CFR part 904 apply to the assessment of civil penalties, except as modified by the requirements of section 8 of the Act. ...

  14. 49 CFR 233.11 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalties. 233.11 Section 233.11..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SIGNAL SYSTEMS REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 233.11 Civil penalties. Any person (an... subject to a civil penalty of at least $650 and not more than $25,000 per violation, except that...

  15. 7 CFR 1435.201 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalties. 1435.201 Section 1435.201... Recordkeeping Requirements § 1435.201 Civil penalties. (a) Any processor, refiner, or importer of sugar, syrup... false data required under § 1435.200(a) through (e), is subject to a civil penalty of no more than $10...

  16. 12 CFR 215.11 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalties. 215.11 Section 215.11 Banks... OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, AND PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS OF MEMBER BANKS (REGULATION O) § 215.11 Civil penalties... subject to civil penalties as specified in section 29 of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 504). [Reg. O...

  17. 39 CFR 233.12 - Civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 233.12 Section 233.12 Postal... Civil penalties. False representation and lottery orders— (a) Issuance. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 3005, the... be liable to the United States for a civil penalty in an amount not to exceed $11,000 for each day...

  18. 49 CFR 220.7 - Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., or has caused death or injury, a penalty not to exceed $100,000 per violation may be assessed; and... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalty. 220.7 Section 220.7 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS General § 220.7 Penalty. Any person (including but not limited to a...

  19. Adolescents' Attitudes toward the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Maggioncalda-Aretz, Maria; Stark, Scott Hunter

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether high school (n=142) and college students (n=112) favored the death penalty for certain criminal acts. Findings indicate that high school students rated more criminal acts as meriting the death penalty. Gender and personality were not found to be associated with attitudes toward the death penalty. (RJM)

  20. 49 CFR 232.11 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hazard of death or injury to persons, or has caused death or injury, a penalty not to exceed $100,000 per... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalties. 232.11 Section 232.11 Transportation...-TRAIN DEVICES General § 232.11 Penalties. (a) Any person (including but not limited to a railroad; any...

  1. 49 CFR 221.7 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalty. 221.7 Section 221.7 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION REAR END MARKING DEVICE-PASSENGER, COMMUTER AND FREIGHT TRAINS General § 221.7 Civil penalty. Any... requirement is subject to a civil penalty of at least $650 and not more than $25,000 per violation, except...

  2. 31 CFR 103.57 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalty. 103.57 Section 103.57... REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS General Provisions § 103.57 Civil penalty. (a) For any... willfully participates in the violation, a civil penalty not to exceed $1,000. (b) For any willful violation...

  3. 22 CFR 127.10 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil penalty. 127.10 Section 127.10 Foreign... Civil penalty. (a) The Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs is authorized to impose a civil penalty in an amount not to exceed that authorized by 22 U.S.C. 2778, 2779a and 2780 for...

  4. 49 CFR 218.9 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalty. 218.9 Section 218.9 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD OPERATING PRACTICES General § 218.9 Civil penalty. Any person (an entity of any type... requirement of this part or causes the violation of any such requirement is subject to a civil penalty of at...

  5. 10 CFR 110.64 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalty. 110.64 Section 110.64 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 110.64 Civil penalty. (a) In response to a violation, the Commission may institute a proceeding to impose a civil penalty under section 234 of the Atomic Energy Act by issuing a notice to the...

  6. 10 CFR 1017.29 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalty. 1017.29 Section 1017.29 Energy DEPARTMENT... INFORMATION Violations § 1017.29 Civil penalty. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 66033, Dec. 14, 2009... subject to a civil penalty under this part: (1) 10 CFR Part 1017—Identification and Protection of...

  7. 12 CFR 411.400 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalties. 411.400 Section 411.400 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Penalties and Enforcement § 411.400 Penalties. (a) Any person who makes an expenditure prohibited herein shall be subject to a...

  8. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 1: temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2018-04-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as "field" or "global" significance. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Monthly temperature climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. In winter and in most regions in summer, the downscaled distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones. A systematic cold summer bias occurs in deep river valleys due to overestimated elevations, in coastal areas due probably to enhanced sea breeze circulation, and over large lakes due to the interpolation of water temperatures. Urban areas in concave topography forms have a warm summer bias due to the strong heat islands, not reflected in the observations. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate fine-scale features in the monthly temperature field over regions of complex topography, but over spatially homogeneous areas even small biases can lead to significant deteriorations relative to the driving reanalysis. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the

  9. Significant enhancement in thermoelectric performance of nanostructured higher manganese silicides synthesized employing a melt spinning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Saravanan; Singh, R C; Pathak, B D; Avasthi, Piyush Kumar; Kumar, Rishikesh; Kumar, Anil; Srivastava, A K; Dhar, Ajay

    2018-01-25

    The limited thermoelectric performance of p-type Higher Manganese Silicides (HMS) in terms of their low figure-of-merit (ZT), which is far below unity, is the main bottle-neck for realising an efficient HMS based thermoelectric generator, which has been recognized as the most promising material for harnessing waste-heat in the mid-temperature range, owing to its thermal stability, earth-abundant and environmentally friendly nature of its constituent elements. We report a significant enhancement in the thermoelectric performance of nanostructured HMS synthesized using rapid solidification by optimizing the cooling rates during melt-spinning followed by spark plasma sintering of the resulting melt-spun ribbons. By employing this experimental strategy, an unprecedented ZT ∼ 0.82 at 800 K was realized in spark plasma sintered 5 at% Al-doped MnSi 1.73 HMS, melt spun at an optimized high cooling rate of ∼2 × 10 7 K s -1 . This enhancement in ZT represents a ∼25% increase over the best reported values thus far for HMS and primarily originates from a nano-crystalline microstructure consisting of a HMS matrix (20-40 nm) with excess Si (3-9 nm) uniformly distributed in it. This nanostructure, resulting from the high cooling rates employed during the melt-spinning of HMS, introduces a high density of nano-crystallite boundaries in a wide spectrum of nano-scale dimensions, which scatter the low-to-mid-wavelength heat-carrying phonons. This abundant phonon scattering results in a significantly reduced thermal conductivity of ∼1.5 W m -1 K -1 at 800 K, which primarily contributes to the enhancement in ZT.

  10. Examining significant factors in micro and small enterprises performance: case study in Amhara region, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkos, Tomas; Zegeye, Muluken; Tilahun, Shimelis; Avvari, Muralidhar

    2017-07-01

    Furniture manufacturing micro and small enterprises are confronted with several factors that affect their performance. Some enterprises fail to sustain, some others remain for long period of time without transforming, and most are producing similar and non-standard products. The main aim of this manuscript is on improving the performance and contribution of MSEs by analyzing impact of significant internal and external factors. Data was collected via a questionnaire, group discussion with experts and interviewing process. Randomly selected eight representative main cities of Amhara region with 120 furniture manufacturing enterprises are considered. Data analysis and presentation was made using SPSS tools (correlation, proximity, and T test) and impact-effort analysis matrix tool. The correlation analysis shows that politico-legal with infrastructure, leadership with entrepreneurship skills and finance and credit with marketing factors are those factors, which result in high correlation with Pearson correlation values of r = 0.988, 0.983, and 0.939, respectively. The study investigates that the most critical factors faced by MSEs are work premises, access to finance, infrastructure, entrepreneurship and business managerial problems. The impact of these factors is found to be high and is confirmed by the 50% drop-out rate in 2014/2015. Furthermore, more than 25% work time losses due to power interruption daily and around 65% work premises problems challenged MSEs. Further, an impact-effort matrix was developed to help the MSEs to prioritize the affecting factors.

  11. Religious characteristics and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Monica K; Hayward, R David

    2008-04-01

    Using one mock trial scenario, this study investigated whether religious and demographic factors were related to death penalty attitudes and sentencing verdicts. Those who favored the death penalty differed from those who had doubts about the penalty in gender, affiliation, fundamentalism, evangelism, literal Biblical interpretism, beliefs about God's attitudes toward murders, and perceptions of how their religious groups felt about the death penalty. These relationships generally held after mock jurors were death qualified. Gender, fundamentalism, literal interpretism, beliefs about God's death penalty position, and perceptions of how one's religious group felt about the death penalty predicted death penalty sentencing verdicts. Future research could determine whether using peremptory challenges to exclude potential jurors based on religion can help lawyers choose a more favorable jury.

  12. Evacuation of performance and significant chemical constituents and by products in drinking water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamrah, I. A.

    1999-01-01

    Drinking water treatment is a task that comprises of several processes that eventually lead to the addition of chemicals to achieve the objectives of treatment. This study was conducted to assess treatment performance, explain the presence of significant chemical species in water, and investigate the interactions and chemical by-products that are formed during the course of treatment. Grab water samples were collected on a regular basis from the influent and effluent of Zai water treatment plant. Chemical analysis were conducted to determine the concentrations of various chemical species of interest. Turbidity, temperature, and pH of the samples were also measured. The study concluded that Zai Water Treatment Plant produces potable drinking water in accordance with Jordanian Standards. The use of treatment chemical resulted in an increase in the concentrations of certain materials, such as manganese, aluminum, and sulfate. The turbidity of the raw water and the TOC of the samples were positively correlated, and the treatment results in approximately 20% TOC reduction, which demonstrates that the measures used for the control of TOC (carbon adsorption and permanganate pre-oxidation), are not very effective. The study also showed that the TOC content of our raw water samples and the concentration of tribalomethanes resulting after disinfection were positively correlated, and that bromoform was the dominant component. Also chloroform was the minor component of tribalomethanes formed during treatment. Positive correlation between the total concentration of tribalomethanes in water and the chlorine dose used for disinfection was also observed, and the total concentration of tribalomethanes increased with temperature. The formation of tribalomethanes was enhanced as the pH of water increased and as the concentration of bromide ion in raw water became significant. (author). 25 refs., 14 figs.1 table

  13. No significant effect of prefrontal tDCS on working memory performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna eNilsson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been put forward as a non-pharmacological alternative for alleviating cognitive decline in old age. Although results have shown some promise, little is known about the optimal stimulation parameters for modulation in the cognitive domain. In this study, the effects of tDCS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC on working memory performance were investigated in thirty older adults. An N-back task assessed working memory before, during and after anodal tDCS at a current strength of 1mA and 2mA, in addition to sham stimulation. The study used a single-blind, cross-over design. The results revealed no significant effect of tDCS on accuracy or response times during or after stimulation, for any of the current strengths. These results suggest that a single session of tDCS over the dlPFC is unlikely to improve working memory, as assessed by an N-back task, in old age.

  14. Roles and significance of water conducting features for transport models in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Medina, A.

    1999-01-01

    The term water conducting features (WCF) refers to zones of high hydraulic conductivity. In the context of waste disposal, it is further implied that they are narrow so that chances of sampling them are low. Yet, they may carry significant amounts of water. Moreover, their relatively small volumetric water content causes solutes to travel fast through them. Water-conducting features are a rather common feature of natural media. The fact that they have become a source of concern in recent years, reflects more the increased level of testing and monitoring than any intrinsic property of low permeability media. Accurate simulations of solute transport require a realistic accounting for water conducting features. Methods are presented to do so and examples are shown to illustrate these methods. Since detailed accounting of WCF's will not be possible in actual performance assessments, efforts should be directed towards typification, so as to identify the essential effects of WCF's on solute transport through different types of rocks. Field evidence suggests that, although individual WCF's may be difficult to characterize, their effects are quite predictable. (author)

  15. Death Penalty Disposition in China: What Matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yudu; Longmire, Dennis; Lu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    In theory, sentencing decisions should be driven by legal factors, not extra-legal factors. However, some empirical research on the death penalty in the United States shows significant relationships between offender and victim characteristics and death sentence decisions. Despite the fact that China frequently imposes death sentences, few studies have examined these sanctions to see if similar correlations occur in China's capital cases. Using data from published court cases in China involving three violent crimes-homicide, robbery, and intentional assault-this study examines the net impact of offender's gender, race, and victim-offender relationship on death sentence decisions in China. Our overall multiple regression results indicate that, after controlling for other legal and extra-legal variables, an offender's gender, race, and victim-offender relationship did not produce similar results in China when compared with those in the United States. In contrast, it is the legal factors that played the most significant role in influencing the death penalty decisions. The article concludes with explanations and speculations on the unique social, cultural, and legal conditions in China that may have contributed to these correlations.

  16. ROLE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF STATEMENT OF OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME– IN RESPECT OF REPORTING COMPANIES’ PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Orban

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A commonly accepted rule-system, which name was International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS created the framework for represent the financial performace, and other facts related to the company’s health. In the system of IFRS profit is not equal to income less expenses, this deviation led to the other comprehensive income, OCI term. IFRS have created the term of other comprehensive income, but knowledge and using of it is not widespread. In this paper I tend to present the meaning and essence of this income category, and to reveal how it is work in corporate practice. As basis of the research, definitions and formats related to the statement of comprehensive income will be presented in the paper first. In order to get a clear picture about the differences between the income statements, I make a comparison of the IFRS and the Hungarian Accounting Act in the field of performance’s representation. As a result of my comparison I’ve stated that the EU accepted the international financial reporting standards to present the financial performance of publicly traded companies, and as EU member state it is obligatory for the Hungarian companies as well. This is the reason why Hungary’s present task is taking over the IFRS mentality. After the comparative analysis I’ve examined the Statement of other comprehensive income in the practice of 11 listed companies in the Budapest Stock Exchange. The Premium category includes those companies’ series of liquid shares, which has got broader investor base. The aim of this examination was to reveal if the most significant listed companies calculate other comprehensive income and what kind of items do they present in the statement of OCI. As a result of the research we can state that statement of other comprehensive income is part of the statement of total comprehensive income in general, and not an individual statement. Main items of the other comprehensive income of the examined companies are the

  17. Identifying the most significant indicators of the total road safety performance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tešić, Milan; Hermans, Elke; Lipovac, Krsto; Pešić, Dalibor

    2018-04-01

    The review of the national and international literature dealing with the assessment of the road safety level has shown great efforts of the authors who tried to define the methodology for calculating the composite road safety index on a territory (region, state, etc.). The procedure for obtaining a road safety composite index of an area has been largely harmonized. The question that has not been fully resolved yet concerns the selection of indicators. There is a wide range of road safety indicators used to show a road safety situation on a territory. Road safety performance index (RSPI) obtained on the basis of a larger number of safety performance indicators (SPIs) enable decision makers to more precisely define the earlier goal- oriented actions. However, recording a broader comprehensive set of SPIs helps identify the strengths and weaknesses of a country's road safety system. Providing high quality national and international databases that would include comparable SPIs seems to be difficult since a larger number of countries dispose of a small number of identical indicators available for use. Therefore, there is a need for calculating a road safety performance index with a limited number of indicators (RSPI ln n ) which will provide a comparison of a sufficient quality, of as many countries as possible. The application of the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method and correlative analysis has helped to check if the RSPI ln n is likely to be of sufficient quality. A strong correlation between the RSPI ln n and the RSPI has been identified using the proposed methodology. Based on this, the most contributing indicators and methodologies for gradual monitoring of SPIs, have been defined for each country analyzed. The indicator monitoring phases in the analyzed countries have been defined in the following way: Phase 1- the indicators relating to alcohol, speed and protective systems; Phase 2- the indicators relating to roads and Phase 3- the indicators relating to

  18. Compression stockings significantly improve hemodynamic performance in post-thrombotic syndrome irrespective of class or length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, Christopher R; Azzam, Mustapha; Kalodiki, Evi; Makris, Gregory C; Geroulakos, George

    2013-07-01

    Graduated elastic compression (GEC) stockings have been demonstrated to reduce the morbidity associated with post-thrombotic syndrome. The ideal length or compression strength required to achieve this is speculative and related to physician preference and patient compliance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic performance of four different stockings and determine the patient's preference. Thirty-four consecutive patients (40 legs, 34 male) with post-thrombotic syndrome were tested with four different stockings (Mediven plus open toe, Bayreuth, Germany) of their size in random order: class 1 (18-21 mm Hg) and class II (23-32 mm Hg), below-knee (BK) and above-knee thigh-length (AK). The median age, Venous Clinical Severity Score, Venous Segmental Disease Score, and Villalta scale were 62 years (range, 31-81 years), 8 (range, 1-21), 5 (range, 2-10), and 10 (range, 2-22), respectively. The C of C0-6EsAs,d,pPr,o was C0 = 2, C2 = 1, C3 = 3, C4a = 12, C4b = 7, C5 = 12, C6 = 3. Obstruction and reflux was observed on duplex in 47.5% legs, with deep venous reflux alone in 45%. Air plethysmography was used to measure the venous filling index (VFI), venous volume, and time to fill 90% of the venous volume. Direct pressure measurements were obtained while lying and standing using the PicoPress device (Microlab Elettronica, Nicolò, Italy). The pressure sensor was placed underneath the test stocking 5 cm above and 2 cm posterior to the medial malleolus. At the end of the study session, patients stated their preferred stocking based on comfort. The VFI, venous volume, and time to fill 90% of the venous volume improved significantly with all types of stocking versus no compression. In class I, the VFI (mL/s) improved from a median of 4.9 (range, 1.7-16.3) without compression to 3.7 (range, 0-14) BK (24.5%) and 3.6 (range, 0.6-14.5) AK (26.5%). With class II, the corresponding improvement was to 4.0 (range, 0.3-16.2) BK (18.8%) and 3.7 (range, 0.5-14.2) AK (24

  19. 40 CFR 141.723 - Requirements to respond to significant deficiencies identified in sanitary surveys performed by EPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... deficiencies identified in sanitary surveys performed by EPA. 141.723 Section 141.723 Protection of Environment... performed by EPA, systems must respond in writing to significant deficiencies identified in sanitary survey... will address significant deficiencies noted in the survey. (d) Systems must correct significant...

  20. [Governance of drug advertising control: assessment of misleading advertising penalties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroun, R

    2013-04-01

    Loyal promotion of the pharmaceutical industry has been challenged by stakeholders. Drug advertising is the easiest point to assess. Based on the agency theory, our objective was to describe the governance of advertising control when it was misleading and the terms of penalties within the framework of the contradictory process between the industry and the regulatory authorities. We conducted a thorough analysis of the contents of the minutes of the Board of Control of advertising from April 2007 to May 2010. The amounts of penalties were analyzed according to three criteria: the timing of the examination procedure (first session versus second session), the nature of the penalty (ban versus notice of change) and the company's defense strategy (written response versus presence of company representatives). Thirty-nine reports involving 62 projects to ban advertisements were analyzed. The first two causes of penalties were off label promotion and non-objective use of study results to support claims. The Committee issued 47 advertising bans (76%) and 15 formal notices of change (24%). When the defense strategy of the company involved the presence of representatives, there was a significant reduction of votes in favor of a ban (68% versus 81%, Pstrategy did not influence the nature of the penalty (Chi(2)=2.05; P=n.s). These results should be put into perspective considering the fact that the qualitative composition of the commission was not free of potential conflicts of interest and that, moreover, only 10% of the penalty projects were reviewed. In addition, advertising control does not address the issue of the loyalty of the sales forces. Finally, our results open perspectives for research and managerial applications for the governance of advertising controls. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Parameter definition using vibration prediction software leads to significant drilling performance improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Dalmo; Hanley, Chris Hanley; Fonseca, Isaac; Santos, Juliana [National Oilwell Varco, Houston TX (United States); Leite, Daltro J.; Borella, Augusto; Gozzi, Danilo [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The understanding and mitigation of downhole vibration has been a heavily researched subject in the oil industry as it results in more expensive drilling operations, as vibrations significantly diminish the amount of effective drilling energy available to the bit and generate forces that can push the bit or the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) off its concentric axis of rotation, producing high magnitude impacts with the borehole wall. In order to drill ahead, a sufficient amount of energy must be supplied by the rig to overcome the resistance of the drilling system, including the reactive torque of the system, drag forces, fluid pressure losses and energy dissipated by downhole vibrations, then providing the bit with the energy required to fail the rock. If the drill string enters resonant modes of vibration, not only does it decreases the amount of available energy to drill, but increases the potential for catastrophic downhole equipment and drilling bit failures. In this sense, the mitigation of downhole vibrations will result in faster, smoother, and cheaper drilling operations. A software tool using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been developed to provide better understanding of downhole vibration phenomena in drilling environments. The software tool calculates the response of the drilling system at various input conditions, based on the design of the wellbore along with the geometry of the Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) and the drill string. It identifies where undesired levels of resonant vibration will be driven by certain combinations of specific drilling parameters, and also which combinations of drilling parameters will result in lower levels of vibration, so the least shocks, the highest penetration rate and the lowest cost per foot can be achieved. With the growing performance of personal computers, complex software systems modeling the drilling vibrations using FEA has been accessible to a wider audience of field users, further complimenting with real time

  2. 49 CFR 216.7 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hazard of death or injury to persons, or has caused death or injury, a penalty not to exceed $100,000 per... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalties. 216.7 Section 216.7 Transportation... § 216.7 Penalties. Any person (an entity of any type covered under 1 U.S.C. 1, including but not limited...

  3. Millisecond photo-thermal process on significant improvement of supercapacitor’s performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kui; Wang, Jixiao; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Song; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shichang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A high way for charge transfer is created by a millisecond photo-thermal process which could decrease contact resistance among nanomaterials and improve the electrochemical performances. - Highlights: • Improve conductivity among nanomaterials with a millisecond photo-thermal process. • The specific capacitance can increase about 25% with an photo-thermal process. • The circle stability and rate capability can be improved above 10% with photo-thermal process. • Provide a new way that create electron path to improve electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Supercapacitors fabricated with nanomaterials usually have high specific capacitance and excellent performance. However, the small size of nanomaterials renders a considerable limitation of the contact area among nanomaterials, which is harmful to charge carrier transfer. This fact may hinder the development and application of nanomaterials in electrochemical storage systems. Here, a millisecond photo-thermal process was introduced to create a charge carries transfer path to decrease the contact resistance among nanomaterials, and enhance the electrochemical performance of supercapacitors. Polyaniline (PANI) nanowire, as a model nanomaterial, was used to modify electrodes under different photo-thermal process conditions. The modified electrodes were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the results were analysed by equivalent circuit simulation. These results demonstrate that the photo-thermal process can alter the morphology of PANI nanowires, lower the charge transfer resistances and thus improve the performance of electrodes. The specific capacitance increase of the modified electrodes is about 25%. The improvement of the circle stability and rate capability are above 10%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt on research the effect of photo-thermal process on the conductivity

  4. Evidence That Bimanual Motor Timing Performance Is Not a Significant Factor in Developmental Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Allison I.; Zelaznik, Howard; Smith, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stuttering involves a breakdown in the speech motor system. We address whether stuttering in its early stage is specific to the speech motor system or whether its impact is observable across motor systems. Method: As an extension of Olander, Smith, and Zelaznik (2010), we measured bimanual motor timing performance in 115 children: 70…

  5. Student-Led Project Teams: Significance of Regulation Strategies in High- and Low-Performing Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Judith

    2016-01-01

    We studied group and individual co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies of self-managed student project teams using data from intragroup peer evaluations and a postproject survey. We found that high team performers shared their research and knowledge with others, collaborated to advise and give constructive criticism, and demonstrated moral…

  6. Labour Mobility and Plant Performance in Denmark: The Significance of Related Inflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Bram; Boschma, Ron

    This paper investigates the impact of different types of labour mobility on plant performance, making use of the IDA-database that provides detailed information on all individuals and plants for the whole of Denmark. Our study shows that the effect of labour mobility can only be assessed when one...... performance. Moreover, intra-regional skilled labour mobility had a negative effect on plant performance in general, while the effect of inter-regional labour mobility depends on the type of skills that flow into the plant. We used a sophisticated indicator of revealed relatedness that measures the degree...... accounts for the type of skills that flow into the plant, and the degree to which these match the existing set of skills at the plant level. We found that the inflow of related skills has a positive impact on plant performance, while inflows of similar and unrelated skills have a negative effect on plant...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 386 - Penalty Schedule; Violations and Maximum Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Maximum Civil Penalties The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 [Public Law 104-134, title III... civil penalties set out in paragraphs (e)(1) through (4) of this appendix results in death, serious... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalty Schedule; Violations and Maximum Civil...

  8. 42 CFR 488.434 - Civil money penalties: Notice of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Notice of penalty. 488.434 Section 488.434 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.434 Civil money penalties...

  9. 42 CFR 488.444 - Civil money penalties: Settlement of penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: Settlement of penalties. 488.444 Section 488.444 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.444 Civil money penalties...

  10. Significant Returns in Engagement and Performance with a Free Teaching App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Pedagogical research shows that teaching methods other than traditional lectures may result in better outcomes. However, lecture remains the dominant method in economics, likely due to high implementation costs of methods shown to be effective in the literature. In this article, the author shows significant benefits of using a teaching app for…

  11. The Proposal of Key Performance Indicators in Facility Management and Determination the Weights of Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbalová, Jarmila; Vilčeková, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    The practice of facilities management is rapidly evolving with the increasing interest in the discourse of sustainable development. The industry and its market are forecasted to develop to include non-core functions, activities traditionally not associated with this profession, but which are increasingly being addressed by facilities managers. The scale of growth in the built environment and the consequential growth of the facility management sector is anticipated to be enormous. Key Performance Indicators (KPI) are measure that provides essential information about performance of facility services delivery. In selecting KPI, it is critical to limit them to those factors that are essential to the organization reaching its goals. It is also important to keep the number of KPI small just to keep everyone's attention focused on achieving the same KPIs. This paper deals with the determination of weights of KPI of FM in terms of the design and use of sustainable buildings.

  12. Identifying significant uncertainties in thermally dependent processes for repository performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.; Lamont, A.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the performance of the potential Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, scientific investigations are being conducted to reduce the uncertainty about process models and system parameters. This paper is intended to demonstrate a method for determining a strategy for the cost effective management of these investigations. It is not meant to be a complete study of all processes and interactions, but does outline a method which can be applied to more in-depth investigations

  13. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... initiate civil penalty proceedings; however, violations that cause injury, death, or environmental damage... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties... daily civil penalty assessment. SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to...

  14. 49 CFR 107.336 - Limitation on fines and penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS PROGRAM PROCEDURES Enforcement Criminal Penalties § 107.336 Limitation on fines and penalties. If a State or political subdivision or Indian tribe assesses any fine or penalty determined by the...

  15. In surgeons performing cardiothoracic surgery is sleep deprivation significant in its impact on morbidity or mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Leila; Asfour, Victoria; McCormack, David; Attia, Rizwan

    2014-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: is there a difference in cardiothoracic surgery outcomes in terms of morbidity or mortality of patients operated on by a sleep-deprived surgeon compared with those operated by a non-sleep-deprived surgeon? Reported search criteria yielded 77 papers, of which 15 were deemed to represent the best evidence on the topic. Three studies directly related to cardiothoracic surgery and 12 studies related to non-cardiothoracic surgery. Recommendations are based on 18 121 cardiothoracic patients and 214 666 non-cardiothoracic surgical patients. Different definitions of sleep deprivation were used in the studies, either reviewing surgeon's sleeping hours or out-of-hours operating. Surgical outcomes reviewed included: mortality rate, neurological, renal, pulmonary, infectious complications, length of stay, length of intensive care stay, cardiopulmonary bypass times and aortic-cross-clamp times. There were no significant differences in mortality or intraoperative complications in the groups of patients operated on by sleep-deprived versus non-sleep-deprived surgeons in cardiothoracic studies. One study showed a significant increase in the rate of septicaemia in patients operated on by severely sleep-deprived surgeons (3.6%) compared with the moderately sleep-deprived (0.9%) and non-sleep-deprived groups (0.8%) (P = 0.03). In the non-cardiothoracic studies, 7 of the 12 studies demonstrated statistically significant higher reoperation rate in trauma cases (P sleep deprivation in cardiothoracic surgeons on morbidity or mortality. However, overall the non-cardiothoracic studies have demonstrated that operative time and sleep deprivation can have a significant impact on overall morbidity and mortality. It is likely that other confounding factors concomitantly affect outcomes in out-of-hours surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  16. Significant improvements of electrical discharge machining performance by step-by-step updated adaptive control laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Wu, Jianyang; Xu, Xiaoyi; Mu, Xin; Dou, Yunping

    2018-02-01

    In order to obtain improved electrical discharge machining (EDM) performance, we have dedicated more than a decade to correcting one essential EDM defect, the weak stability of the machining, by developing adaptive control systems. The instabilities of machining are mainly caused by complicated disturbances in discharging. To counteract the effects from the disturbances on machining, we theoretically developed three control laws from minimum variance (MV) control law to minimum variance and pole placements coupled (MVPPC) control law and then to a two-step-ahead prediction (TP) control law. Based on real-time estimation of EDM process model parameters and measured ratio of arcing pulses which is also called gap state, electrode discharging cycle was directly and adaptively tuned so that a stable machining could be achieved. To this end, we not only theoretically provide three proved control laws for a developed EDM adaptive control system, but also practically proved the TP control law to be the best in dealing with machining instability and machining efficiency though the MVPPC control law provided much better EDM performance than the MV control law. It was also shown that the TP control law also provided a burn free machining.

  17. Why do English players fail in soccer penalty shootouts? A study of team status, self-regulation, and choking under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordet, Geir

    2009-01-15

    I examine why players from some nations appear always to choke in major international soccer penalty shootouts. Based on a model on choking under pressure as a type of self-defeating behaviour (Baumeister, 1997), I hypothesized that highly favourable public appraisals of a team would be linked to displays of escapist self-regulation strategies and inferior performance. I selected the eight most merited European nations, obtained videos from penalty shootouts in two major international tournaments (World Cup and European Championships), and analysed all 200 shots taken by players representing these teams. The results showed significant relationships between team status, self-regulation strategies, and performance. Players from countries that, at the time of the penalty shootout, either had many international club titles or featured many internationally decorated players, spent less time preparing their shots and were less successful from the penalty spot than players from countries with lower public status. England and Spain are used to illustrate these effects, as the data suggest that players from these two countries may have underperformed in previous international soccer tournaments because of high public status and misguided self-regulation strategies.

  18. Postexercise Glycogen Recovery and Exercise Performance is Not Significantly Different Between Fast Food and Sport Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Michael J; Dumke, Charles L; Hailes, Walter S; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2015-10-01

    A variety of dietary choices are marketed to enhance glycogen recovery after physical activity. Past research informs recommendations regarding the timing, dose, and nutrient compositions to facilitate glycogen recovery. This study examined the effects of isoenergetic sport supplements (SS) vs. fast food (FF) on glycogen recovery and exercise performance. Eleven males completed two experimental trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Each trial included a 90-min glycogen depletion ride followed by a 4-hr recovery period. Absolute amounts of macronutrients (1.54 ± 0.27 g·kg-1 carbohydrate, 0.24 ± 0.04 g·kg fat-1, and 0.18 ±0.03g·kg protein-1) as either SS or FF were provided at 0 and 2 hr. Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis at 0 and 4 hr post exercise. Blood samples were analyzed at 0, 30, 60, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min post exercise for insulin and glucose, with blood lipids analyzed at 0 and 240 min. A 20k time-trial (TT) was completed following the final muscle biopsy. There were no differences in the blood glucose and insulin responses. Similarly, rates of glycogen recovery were not different across the diets (6.9 ± 1.7 and 7.9 ± 2.4 mmol·kg wet weight- 1·hr-1 for SS and FF, respectively). There was also no difference across the diets for TT performance (34.1 ± 1.8 and 34.3 ± 1.7 min for SS and FF, respectively. These data indicate that short-term food options to initiate glycogen resynthesis can include dietary options not typically marketed as sports nutrition products such as fast food menu items.

  19. Boundedness and convergence of online gradient method with penalty for feedforward neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Wu, Wei; Liu, Fei; Yao, Mingchen

    2009-06-01

    In this brief, we consider an online gradient method with penalty for training feedforward neural networks. Specifically, the penalty is a term proportional to the norm of the weights. Its roles in the method are to control the magnitude of the weights and to improve the generalization performance of the network. By proving that the weights are automatically bounded in the network training with penalty, we simplify the conditions that are required for convergence of online gradient method in literature. A numerical example is given to support the theoretical analysis.

  20. Authoring experience: the significance and performance of storytelling in Socratic dialogue with rehabilitating cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard; Svendsen, Mette Nordahl

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the storytelling aspect in philosophizing with rehabilitating cancer patients in small Socratic dialogue groups (SDG). Recounting an experience to illustrate a philosophical question chosen by the participants is the traditional point of departure for the dialogical exchange. However, narrating is much more than a beginning point or the skeletal framework of events and it deserves more scholarly attention than hitherto given. Storytelling pervades the whole Socratic process and impacts the conceptual analysis in a SDG. In this article we show how the narrative aspect became a rich resource for the compassionate bond between participants and how their stories cultivated the abstract reflection in the group. In addition, the aim of the article is to reveal the different layers in the performance of storytelling, or of authoring experience. By picking, poking and dissecting an experience through a collaborative effort, most participants had their initial experience existentially refined and the chosen concept of which the experience served as an illustration transformed into a moral compass to be used in self-orientation post cancer.

  1. Significant Performance Enhancement in Asymmetric Supercapacitors based on Metal Oxides, Carbon nanotubes and Neutral Aqueous Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2015-10-01

    Amongst the materials being investigated for supercapacitor electrodes, carbon based materials are most investigated. However, pure carbon materials suffer from inherent physical processes which limit the maximum specific energy and power that can be achieved in an energy storage device. Therefore, use of carbon-based composites with suitable nano-materials is attaining prominence. The synergistic effect between the pseudocapacitive nanomaterials (high specific energy) and carbon (high specific power) is expected to deliver the desired improvements. We report the fabrication of high capacitance asymmetric supercapacitor based on electrodes of composites of SnO2 and V2O5 with multiwall carbon nanotubes and neutral 0.5 M Li2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. The advantages of the fabricated asymmetric supercapacitors are compared with the results published in the literature. The widened operating voltage window is due to the higher over-potential of electrolyte decomposition and a large difference in the work functions of the used metal oxides. The charge balanced device returns the specific capacitance of ~198 F g-1 with corresponding specific energy of ~89 Wh kg-1 at 1 A g-1. The proposed composite systems have shown great potential in fabricating high performance supercapacitors.

  2. 40 CFR 302.7 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS DESIGNATION, REPORTABLE QUANTITIES, AND NOTIFICATION § 302.7 Penalties. (a..., including criminal penalties, set forth in section 103(b) of the Act. (b) Notification received pursuant to... any such person in any criminal case, except a prosecution for perjury or for giving a false statement...

  3. 31 CFR 128.4 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOREIGN-CURRENCY TRANSACTIONS AND POSITIONS General Information § 128.4 Penalties. (a) Whoever fails to file a report required by subpart B of this part shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than... of this part may be criminally prosecuted and upon conviction fined not more than $10,000 and, if an...

  4. 49 CFR 235.9 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalty. 235.9 Section 235.9 Transportation... SIGNAL SYSTEM OR RELIEF FROM THE REQUIREMENTS OF PART 236 § 235.9 Civil penalty. Any person (an entity of... violates any requirement of this part or causes the violation of any such requirement is subject to a civil...

  5. 49 CFR 228.21 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalty. 228.21 Section 228.21..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES Records and Reporting § 228.21 Civil... requirement is subject to a civil penalty of at least $650 and not more than $25,000 per violation, except...

  6. 46 CFR 80.40 - Civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalty. 80.40 Section 80.40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS DISCLOSURE OF SAFETY STANDARDS AND COUNTRY OF REGISTRY § 80.40 Civil penalty. For each violation of the regulations in this part, the owner, operator...

  7. 78 FR 672 - Civil Monetary Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Part 3560 RIN 0575AC93 Civil Monetary Penalties AGENCY: Rural Housing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Rural Housing Service (RHS or Agency) proposes to implement two civil monetary... civil monetary penalties under the authority of 42 U.S.C. 1490s (section 543 of the Housing Act of 1949...

  8. 50 CFR 680.9 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the civil and criminal penalty provisions, permit sanctions, and civil forfeiture provisions of the... applicable law. Penalties include but are not limited to permanent or temporary sanctions to PQS, QS, IPQ... in a proceeding to enforce or review the findings or orders of any Government agency having...

  9. 15 CFR 806.6 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalties. 806.6 Section 806.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.6 Penalties. (a) Whoever fails to...

  10. AREVA - 2012 annual results: significant turnaround in performance one year after launching the Action 2016 plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duperray, Julien; Berezowskyj, Katherine; Kempkes, Vincent; Rosso, Jerome; Thebault, Alexandre; Scorbiac, Marie de; Repaire, Philippine du

    2013-01-01

    One year after launching Areva's Action 2016 strategic plan, the first results are in. AREVA is ahead of schedule in executing its recovery plan. While pursuing its efforts in the management of a few difficult projects (such as OL3), Areva group was able to return to a virtuous performance cycle rooted in strong growth in nuclear order intake and good progress on its cost reduction program. Commercially, despite the difficult economic environment, AREVA was able to capitalize on its leadership in the installed base and on its long-term partnerships with strategic customers, beginning with EDF, with which AREVA renewed a confident and constructive working relationship. Areva has secured 80% of its objective of one billion euros of savings by the end of 2015 to improve its competitiveness. The group also continued efforts to optimize working capital requirement and control the capital expenditure trajectory. Together, these results enabled AREVA to exceed the objectives set for 2012 for two key indicators of its strategic plan: EBITDA and free operating cash flow. Nearly 60% of the 2.1 billion euros devoted to capital expenditures for future growth in 2012 were funded by operations, a quasi-doubled share compared to 2011. Areva's floor target for asset disposals was achieved one year ahead of schedule, also helping the Group to control its net debt, which remained below 4 billion euros. In 2013, Areva is continuing to implement the Action 2016 plan to keep its turnaround on track. In summary: - Backlog renewed over the year 2012 to euro 45.4 bn thanks to the increase in nuclear order intake; - Sales revenue growth: euro 9.342 bn (+5.3% vs. 2011), led by nuclear and renewables operations; - Very sharp upturn in EBITDA: euro 1.007 bn (+euro 586 m vs. 2011) - Very net improvement in free operating cash flow: -euro 854 m (+euro 512 m vs. 2011); - Back to positive reported operating income: euro 118 m (+euro 1.984 bn vs. 2011); - 2012-2013 floor target for asset disposals

  11. Is the ozone climate penalty robust in Europe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colette, Augustin; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Meleux, Frédérik; Rouïl, Laurence; Andersson, Camilla; Engardt, Magnuz; Langner, Joakim; Baklanov, Alexander; Brandt, Jørgen; Christensen, Jesper H; Geels, Camilla; Hedegaard, Gitte B; Doherty, Ruth; Giannakopoulos, Christos; Katragkou, Eleni; Lei, Hang; Manders, Astrid; Melas, Dimitris; Sofiev, Mikhail; Soares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ozone air pollution is identified as one of the main threats bearing upon human health and ecosystems, with 25 000 deaths in 2005 attributed to surface ozone in Europe (IIASA 2013 TSAP Report #10). In addition, there is a concern that climate change could negate ozone pollution mitigation strategies, making them insufficient over the long run and jeopardising chances to meet the long term objective set by the European Union Directive of 2008 (Directive 2008/50/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2008) (60 ppbv, daily maximum). This effect has been termed the ozone climate penalty. One way of assessing this climate penalty is by driving chemistry-transport models with future climate projections while holding the ozone precursor emissions constant (although the climate penalty may also be influenced by changes in emission of precursors). Here we present an analysis of the robustness of the climate penalty in Europe across time periods and scenarios by analysing the databases underlying 11 articles published on the topic since 2007, i.e. a total of 25 model projections. This substantial body of literature has never been explored to assess the uncertainty and robustness of the climate ozone penalty because of the use of different scenarios, time periods and ozone metrics. Despite the variability of model design and setup in this database of 25 model projection, the present meta-analysis demonstrates the significance and robustness of the impact of climate change on European surface ozone with a latitudinal gradient from a penalty bearing upon large parts of continental Europe and a benefit over the North Atlantic region of the domain. Future climate scenarios present a penalty for summertime (JJA) surface ozone by the end of the century (2071–2100) of at most 5 ppbv. Over European land surfaces, the 95% confidence interval of JJA ozone change is [0.44; 0.64] and [0.99; 1.50] ppbv for the 2041–2070 and 2071–2100 time windows, respectively

  12. Is the ozone climate penalty robust in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colette, Augustin; Andersson, Camilla; Baklanov, Alexander; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Brandt, Jørgen; Christensen, Jesper H.; Doherty, Ruth; Engardt, Magnuz; Geels, Camilla; Giannakopoulos, Christos; Hedegaard, Gitte B.; Katragkou, Eleni; Langner, Joakim; Lei, Hang; Manders, Astrid; Melas, Dimitris; Meleux, Frédérik; Rouïl, Laurence; Sofiev, Mikhail; Soares, Joana; Stevenson, David S.; Tombrou-Tzella, Maria; Varotsos, Konstantinos V.; Young, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Ozone air pollution is identified as one of the main threats bearing upon human health and ecosystems, with 25 000 deaths in 2005 attributed to surface ozone in Europe (IIASA 2013 TSAP Report #10). In addition, there is a concern that climate change could negate ozone pollution mitigation strategies, making them insufficient over the long run and jeopardising chances to meet the long term objective set by the European Union Directive of 2008 (Directive 2008/50/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2008) (60 ppbv, daily maximum). This effect has been termed the ozone climate penalty. One way of assessing this climate penalty is by driving chemistry-transport models with future climate projections while holding the ozone precursor emissions constant (although the climate penalty may also be influenced by changes in emission of precursors). Here we present an analysis of the robustness of the climate penalty in Europe across time periods and scenarios by analysing the databases underlying 11 articles published on the topic since 2007, i.e. a total of 25 model projections. This substantial body of literature has never been explored to assess the uncertainty and robustness of the climate ozone penalty because of the use of different scenarios, time periods and ozone metrics. Despite the variability of model design and setup in this database of 25 model projection, the present meta-analysis demonstrates the significance and robustness of the impact of climate change on European surface ozone with a latitudinal gradient from a penalty bearing upon large parts of continental Europe and a benefit over the North Atlantic region of the domain. Future climate scenarios present a penalty for summertime (JJA) surface ozone by the end of the century (2071-2100) of at most 5 ppbv. Over European land surfaces, the 95% confidence interval of JJA ozone change is [0.44; 0.64] and [0.99; 1.50] ppbv for the 2041-2070 and 2071-2100 time windows, respectively.

  13. A news media analysis of the economic and reputational penalties of the hospital readmissions reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winborn, Melissa S; Alencherril, Joyce; Pagán, José A

    2014-01-01

    Section 3025 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 established the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP), an initiative designed to penalize hospitals with excess 30-day readmissions. This study investigates whether readmission penalties under HRRP impose significant reputational effects on hospitals. Data extracted from 2012 to 2013 news stories suggest that the higher the actual penalty, the higher the perceived cost of the penalty, the more likely it is that hospitals will state they have no control over the low-income patients they serve or that they will describe themselves as safety net providers. The downside of being singled out as a low-quality hospital deserving a relatively high penalty seems to be larger than the upside of being singled out as a high-quality hospital facing a relatively low penalty. Although the financial burden of the penalties seems to be low, hospitals may be reacting to the fact that information about excess readmissions and readmission penalties is being released widely and is scrutinized by the news media and the general public. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Medicare Payment Penalties and Safety Net Hospital Profitability: Minimal Impact on These Vulnerable Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Thompson, Michael P; Waters, Teresa M

    2018-02-08

    To examine relationships between penalties assessed by Medicare's Hospital Readmission Reduction Program and Value-Based Purchasing Program and hospital financial condition. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, American Hospital Association, and Area Health Resource File data for 4,824 hospital-year observations. Bivariate and multivariate analysis of pooled cross-sectional data. Safety net hospitals have significantly higher HRRP/VBP penalties, but, unlike nonsafety net hospitals, increases in their penalty rate did not significantly affect their total margins. Safety net hospitals appear to rely on nonpatient care revenues to offset higher penalties for the years studied. While reassuring, these funding streams are volatile and may not be able to compensate for cumulative losses over time. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. It's all in the timing: calibrating temporal penalties for biomedical data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weiyi; Wan, Zhiyu; Yin, Zhijun; Gaupp, James; Liu, Yongtai; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Malin, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Biomedical science is driven by datasets that are being accumulated at an unprecedented rate, with ever-growing volume and richness. There are various initiatives to make these datasets more widely available to recipients who sign Data Use Certificate agreements, whereby penalties are levied for violations. A particularly popular penalty is the temporary revocation, often for several months, of the recipient's data usage rights. This policy is based on the assumption that the value of biomedical research data depreciates significantly over time; however, no studies have been performed to substantiate this belief. This study investigates whether this assumption holds true and the data science policy implications. This study tests the hypothesis that the value of data for scientific investigators, in terms of the impact of the publications based on the data, decreases over time. The hypothesis is tested formally through a mixed linear effects model using approximately 1200 publications between 2007 and 2013 that used datasets from the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes, a data-sharing initiative of the National Institutes of Health. The analysis shows that the impact factors for publications based on Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes datasets depreciate in a statistically significant manner. However, we further discover that the depreciation rate is slow, only ∼10% per year, on average. The enduring value of data for subsequent studies implies that revoking usage for short periods of time may not sufficiently deter those who would violate Data Use Certificate agreements and that alternative penalty mechanisms may need to be invoked. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Psychiatry and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles L

    2006-09-01

    Psychiatrists conducting forensic evaluations of defendants facing a potential death penalty must understand the legal and ethical parameters governing these assessments in addition to the important clinical issues. Important areas to review with each defendant include the role of the evaluator, the party requesting the evaluation, circumstances in which the evaluation is not confidential, the nature, scope, and purpose of the evaluation, and the parties to whom the results of the evaluation are to be forwarded. In those circumstances in which the defense attorney has not retained the psychiatrist, the defendant's attorney must be aware that an evaluation has been ordered by the court or requested by the prosecution. The psychiatrist also must be prepared for passionate challenges to their findings from the defense or prosecution and in some instances for vigorous attacks on their own personal ethics. To weather such storms, the mental health evaluator must base their opinion on objective evidence rather than letting any personal bias guide their assessment.

  17. 12 CFR 263.65 - Civil penalty inflation adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalty inflation adjustments. 263.65... Money Penalties § 263.65 Civil penalty inflation adjustments. (a) Inflation adjustments. In accordance with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (28 U.S.C. 2461 note), the Board has...

  18. 46 CFR 506.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 506.3... PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Commission shall... each civil monetary penalty provided by law within the jurisdiction of the Commission by the inflation...

  19. 29 CFR 530.302 - Amounts of civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amounts of civil money penalties. 530.302 Section 530.302... EMPLOYMENT OF HOMEWORKERS IN CERTAIN INDUSTRIES Civil Money Penalties § 530.302 Amounts of civil money penalties. (a) A civil money penalty, not to exceed $500 per affected homeworker for any one violation, may...

  20. 78 FR 4057 - Inflation Adjustment of Civil Money Penalty Amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ...] RIN 2501-AD59 Inflation Adjustment of Civil Money Penalty Amounts AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HUD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule amends HUD's civil money penalty and civil penalty... outdated cross-reference in its civil money penalty regulations. DATES: Effective Date: February 19, 2013...

  1. 24 CFR 81.83 - Civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil money penalties. 81.83... § 81.83 Civil money penalties. (a) Imposition. The Secretary may impose a civil money penalty on a GSE... writing of the Secretary's determination to impose a civil money penalty by issuing a Notice of Intent to...

  2. Jurors' locus of control and defendants' attractiveness in death penalty sentencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Crystal M; Spray, Beverly J; Pietz, Christina A

    2007-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between jurors' locus of control and defendants' attractiveness in death penalty sentencing. Ninety-eight participants voluntarily served as mock jurors. The authors administered J. B. Rotter's (1966) Internal-External Locus of Control Scale to participants and then randomly assigned them to a group with either an attractive or an unattractive defendant (represented by photographs). Participants read a murder vignette and selected a punishment--either a lifetime jail sentence or the death penalty-for the defendant. Results indicated that neither jurors' locus of control nor defendants' attractiveness influenced sentencing. However, jurors' age and gender significantly influenced sentencing. Men, with the exception of the youngest men, were more likely than women to choose the death penalty. Additionally, young women were more likely than older women to select the death penalty. The authors discuss the implications of these results for the study of jury behavior and bias.

  3. 12 CFR 622.61 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation under the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. 622.61...

  4. Density-based penalty parameter optimization on C-SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Lian, Jie; Bartolacci, Michael R; Zeng, Qing-An

    2014-01-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) is one of the most widely used approaches for data classification and regression. SVM achieves the largest distance between the positive and negative support vectors, which neglects the remote instances away from the SVM interface. In order to avoid a position change of the SVM interface as the result of an error system outlier, C-SVM was implemented to decrease the influences of the system's outliers. Traditional C-SVM holds a uniform parameter C for both positive and negative instances; however, according to the different number proportions and the data distribution, positive and negative instances should be set with different weights for the penalty parameter of the error terms. Therefore, in this paper, we propose density-based penalty parameter optimization of C-SVM. The experiential results indicated that our proposed algorithm has outstanding performance with respect to both precision and recall.

  5. New Exact Penalty Functions for Nonlinear Constrained Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingzhuang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For two kinds of nonlinear constrained optimization problems, we propose two simple penalty functions, respectively, by augmenting the dimension of the primal problem with a variable that controls the weight of the penalty terms. Both of the penalty functions enjoy improved smoothness. Under mild conditions, it can be proved that our penalty functions are both exact in the sense that local minimizers of the associated penalty problem are precisely the local minimizers of the original constrained problem.

  6. 31 CFR 594.701 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Penalties. (a) Attention is directed to section 206 of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (the... punished by a like fine, imprisonment, or both and any property, funds, securities, papers, or other...

  7. 31 CFR 585.701 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 585.701 Penalties. (a) Attention is directed to section 206 of the International Emergency Economic... fine, imprisonment or both, and any property, funds, securities, papers, or other articles or documents...

  8. 31 CFR 543.701 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Penalties. (a) Attention is directed to section 206 of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U... fine, imprisonment, or both and any property, funds, securities, papers, or other articles or documents...

  9. The penalty: function and requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Meini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Legitimacy of criminal sanction is originated on its own purposes pursued in a state governed by the Rule of Law. That legitimacy should include the penalty as well as security measures, bearing in mind that both are imposed to someone breaking a rule of conduct, and therefore, someone capable to do it. Reviewing penal capacity or criminal liability concepts is required because if penal capacity means the capacity to understand the reality and adjust the behavior to it, and if every legitimate criminal sanction have to be imposed to someone who have the capacity of break it, then security measures also have to be imposed only to people responsible, capable to understand rules and act in accordance. With regard to people not subject to criminal liability they are standing outside Criminal Law and punish them would be illegitimate. In this line, criminal liability should be seen not only as a crime assumption but also as a basic statement for any dialogue the state shall have with the citizens: at the level of crime itself, proceedings and sentence execution .

  10. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)

  11. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy [Department of Anesthesiology Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)

  12. On the significance of the noise model for the performance of a linear MPC in closed-loop operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagdrup, Morten; Boiroux, Dimitri; Mahmoudi, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the significance of the noise model for the performance of a Model Predictive Controller when operating in closed-loop. The process model is parametrized as a continuous-time (CT) model and the relevant sampled-data filtering and control algorithms are developed. Using CT...... models typically means less parameters to identify. Systematic tuning of such controllers is discussed. Simulation studies are conducted for linear time-invariant systems showing that choosing a noise model of low order is beneficial for closed-loop performance. (C) 2016, IFAC (International Federation...

  13. 42 CFR 488.432 - Civil money penalties: When a penalty is collected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties: When a penalty is collected... PROCEDURES Enforcement of Compliance for Long-Term Care Facilities with Deficiencies § 488.432 Civil money... hearing on the determination of the noncompliance that is the basis for imposition of the civil money...

  14. Significance of uncertainties derived from settling tank model structure and parameters on predicting WWTP performance - A global sensitivity analysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Sin, Gürkan; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2011-01-01

    Uncertainty derived from one of the process models – such as one-dimensional secondary settling tank (SST) models – can impact the output of the other process models, e.g., biokinetic (ASM1), as well as the integrated wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) models. The model structure and parameter...... and from the last aerobic bioreactor upstream to the SST (Garrett/hydraulic method). For model structure uncertainty, two one-dimensional secondary settling tank (1-D SST) models are assessed, including a first-order model (the widely used Takács-model), in which the feasibility of using measured...... uncertainty of settler models can therefore propagate, and add to the uncertainties in prediction of any plant performance criteria. Here we present an assessment of the relative significance of secondary settling model performance in WWTP simulations. We perform a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) based...

  15. Improved solution for ill-posed linear systems using a constrained optimization ruled by a penalty: evaluation in nuclear medicine tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walrand, Stephan; Jamar, François; Pauwels, Stanislas

    2009-01-01

    Ill-posed linear systems occur in many different fields. A class of regularization methods, called constrained optimization, aims to determine the extremum of a penalty function whilst constraining an objective function to a likely value. We propose here a novel heuristic way to screen the local extrema satisfying the discrepancy principle. A modified version of the Landweber algorithm is used for the iteration process. After finding a local extremum, a bound is performed to the 'farthest' estimate in the data space still satisfying the discrepancy principle. Afterwards, the modified Landweber algorithm is again applied to find a new local extremum. This bound-iteration process is repeated until a satisfying solution is reached. For evaluation in nuclear medicine tomography, a novel penalty function that preserves the edge steps in the reconstructed solution was evaluated on Monte Carlo simulations and using real SPECT acquisitions as well. Surprisingly, the first bound always provided a significantly better solution in a wide range of statistics

  16. The European Academy laparoscopic “Suturing Training and Testing’’ (SUTT) significantly improves surgeons’ performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Z.; Tanos, V.; Van Belle, Y.; Carvalho, J.L.; Campo, R.

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of suturing training and testing (SUTT) model by laparoscopy was evaluated, measuring the suturingskill acquisition of trainee gynecologists at the beginning and at the end of a teaching course. During a workshop organized by the European Academy of Gynecological Surgery (EAGS), 25 participants with three different experience levels in laparoscopy (minor, intermediate and major) performed the 4 exercises of the SUTT model (Ex 1: both hands stitching and continuous suturing, Ex 2: right hand stitching and intracorporeal knotting, Ex 3: left hand stitching and intracorporeal knotting, Ex 4: dominant hand stitching, tissue approximation and intracorporeal knotting). The time needed to perform the exercises is recorded for each trainee and group and statistical analysis used to note the differences. Overall, all trainees achieved significant improvement in suturing time (p psychomotor skills, surgery, teaching, training suturing model. PMID:26977264

  17. Power penalties for multi-level PAM modulation formats at arbitrary bit error rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliteevskiy, Nikolay A.; Wood, William A.; Downie, John D.; Hurley, Jason; Sterlingov, Petr

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable interest in combining multi-level pulsed amplitude modulation formats (PAM-L) and forward error correction (FEC) in next-generation, short-range optical communications links for increased capacity. In this paper we derive new formulas for the optical power penalties due to modulation format complexity relative to PAM-2 and due to inter-symbol interference (ISI). We show that these penalties depend on the required system bit-error rate (BER) and that the conventional formulas overestimate link penalties. Our corrections to the standard formulas are very small at conventional BER levels (typically 1×10-12) but become significant at the higher BER levels enabled by FEC technology, especially for signal distortions due to ISI. The standard formula for format complexity, P = 10log(L-1), is shown to overestimate the actual penalty for PAM-4 and PAM-8 by approximately 0.1 and 0.25 dB respectively at 1×10-3 BER. Then we extend the well-known PAM-2 ISI penalty estimation formula from the IEEE 802.3 standard 10G link modeling spreadsheet to the large BER case and generalize it for arbitrary PAM-L formats. To demonstrate and verify the BER dependence of the ISI penalty, a set of PAM-2 experiments and Monte-Carlo modeling simulations are reported. The experimental results and simulations confirm that the conventional formulas can significantly overestimate ISI penalties at relatively high BER levels. In the experiments, overestimates up to 2 dB are observed at 1×10-3 BER.

  18. Brake response time is significantly impaired after total knee arthroplasty: investigation of performing an emergency stop while driving a car.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Maurice; Hofmann, Ulf-Krister; Rondak, Ina; Götze, Marco; Kluba, Torsten; Ipach, Ingmar

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether total knee arthroplasty (TKA) impairs the ability to perform an emergency stop. An automatic transmission brake simulator was developed to evaluate total brake response time. A prospective repeated-measures design was used. Forty patients (20 left/20 right) were measured 8 days and 6, 12, and 52 wks after surgery. Eight days postoperative total brake response time increased significantly by 30% in right TKA and insignificantly by 2% in left TKA. Brake force significantly decreased by 35% in right TKA and by 25% in left TKA during this period. Baseline values were reached at week 12 in right TKA; the impairment of outcome measures, however, was no longer significant at week 6 compared with preoperative values. Total brake response time and brake force in left TKA fell below baseline values at weeks 6 and 12. Brake force in left TKA was the only outcome measure significantly impaired 8 days postoperatively. This study highlights that categorical statements cannot be provided. This study's findings on automatic transmission driving suggest that right TKA patients may resume driving 6 wks postoperatively. Fitness to drive in left TKA is not fully recovered 8 days postoperatively. If testing is not available, patients should refrain from driving until they return from rehabilitation.

  19. SU-F-18C-14: Hessian-Based Norm Penalty for Weighted Least-Square CBCT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, T; Sun, N; Tan, S; Wang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a Hessian-based norm penalty for cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction that has a similar ability in suppressing noise as the total variation (TV) penalty while avoiding the staircase effect and better preserving low-contrast objects. Methods: We extended the TV penalty to a Hessian-based norm penalty based on the Frobenius norm of the Hessian matrix of an image for CBCT reconstruction. The objective function was constructed using the penalized weighted least-square (PWLS) principle. An effective algorithm was developed to minimize the objective function using a majorization-minimization (MM) approach. We evaluated and compared the proposed penalty with the TV penalty on a CatPhan 600 phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom, each acquired at a low-dose protocol (10mA/10ms) and a high-dose protocol (80mA/12ms). For both penalties, contrast-to-noise (CNR) in four low-contrast regions-of-interest (ROIs) and the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of two point-like objects in constructed images were calculated and compared. Results: In the experiment of CatPhan 600 phantom, the Hessian-based norm penalty has slightly higher CNRs and approximately equivalent FWHM values compared with the TV penalty. In the experiment of the anthropomorphic head phantom at the low-dose protocol, the TV penalty result has several artificial piece-wise constant areas known as the staircase effect while in the Hessian-based norm penalty the image appears smoother and more similar to that of the FDK result using the high-dose protocol. Conclusion: The proposed Hessian-based norm penalty has a similar performance in suppressing noise to the TV penalty, but has a potential advantage in suppressing the staircase effect and preserving low-contrast objects. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC), under Grant Nos. 60971112 and 61375018, and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, under Grant No. 2012QN086

  20. 49 CFR 599.514 - Assessment of civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE TO RECYCLE AND SAVE ACT PROGRAM Enforcement § 599.514 Assessment of civil penalties. (a) Not later... the amount of the civil penalty, the severity of the violation and the intent and history of the party...

  1. 31 CFR 544.702 - Pre-Penalty Notice; settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... set forth in this paragraph. The failure to submit a response within the applicable time period set... envelope in which the Pre-Penalty Notice was mailed. If the Pre-Penalty Notice was personally delivered by...

  2. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Wang, Xianghao; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 104 J/m3 and 10 × 104 J/m3, the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between -330 Oe and 330 Oe to between -650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2-20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance.

  3. Penalty kick skill through knee tuck jump exercise and barrier hops exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usli Wargadinata Lingling

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Football always attracts society’s attention. Unfortunately in practice, at school for example, students have difficulties in mastering penalty kick. This research aimed to know the influence of knee tuck jump exercise towards penalty kick result in football and the influence of barrier hops exercise towards penalty kick result in football. The design of this research is pretest–posttest design. The population taken was the entire students from class XI SMK 3 LPPM-RI Batujajar which consisted of 126 students. Purposive sampling technique was used to determine the sample. Intentionally, the writer chose as many as 30 students who joined football extracurricular as sample then divided them into two groups namely group A (knee tuck jump exercise and group B (barrier hops exercise. Based on the result, there was significant difference in mean score between pretest and posttest in group A (29.00 than group B (26.00 towards the result of penalty kick in football. The result of compared t from the difference of two results is 4.92 bigger than t table 1.70. Therefore, knee tuck jump exercise gives more significant result than barrier hops exercise towards penalty kick result in football to the students of football extracurricular in SMK 3 LPPM-RI Batujajar.

  4. 42 CFR 38.8 - Criminal and civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal and civil penalties. 38.8 Section 38.8... EXAMINATIONS DISASTER ASSISTANCE FOR CRISIS COUNSELING AND TRAINING § 38.8 Criminal and civil penalties... a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 for each violation. (c) Whoever knowingly misapplies the...

  5. 29 CFR 500.143 - Civil money penalty assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil money penalty assessment. 500.143 Section 500.143... MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER PROTECTION Enforcement § 500.143 Civil money penalty assessment. (a) A civil money penalty may be assessed for each violation of the Act or these regulations. (b) In...

  6. 30 CFR 208.14 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties. 208.14 Section... MANAGEMENT SALE OF FEDERAL ROYALTY OIL General Provisions § 208.14 Civil and criminal penalties. Failure to abide by the regulations in this part may result in civil and criminal penalties being levied on that...

  7. 10 CFR 824.15 - Collection of civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection of civil penalties. 824.15 Section 824.15 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CIVIL PENALTIES FOR CLASSIFIED INFORMATION SECURITY VIOLATIONS § 824.15 Collection of civil penalties. If any person fails to pay an...

  8. 33 CFR 401.205 - Civil and criminal penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil and criminal penalties. 401... § 401.205 Civil and criminal penalties. (a) If the violation of the Seaway Regulations carries a... criminal proceedings shall not bar the initiation of civil penalty proceedings by the Associate...

  9. 22 CFR 1104.14 - Assessment of civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Assessment of civil penalties. 1104.14 Section... STATES SECTION PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES § 1104.14 Assessment of civil penalties. (a) The Commissioner may assess a civil penalty against any person who has violated any prohibition contained in § 1104...

  10. 46 CFR 221.93 - Collection of civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of civil penalties. 221.93 Section 221.93... RELATED ACTIVITIES REGULATED TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOCUMENTED VESSELS AND OTHER MARITIME INTERESTS Civil Penalties § 221.93 Collection of civil penalties. Within 30 days after receipt of the Hearing Officer's...

  11. 78 FR 49370 - Inflation Adjustment of Maximum Forfeiture Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... ``civil monetary penalties provided by law'' at least once every four years. DATES: Effective September 13... increases the maximum civil monetary forfeiture penalties available to the Commission under its rules... maximum civil penalties established in that section to account for inflation since the last adjustment to...

  12. 78 FR 26545 - Consumer Financial Civil Penalty Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... which civil penalties have been imposed under Federal consumer financial laws. In addition, to the... has violated the law to pay a civil penalty. See, e.g., 12 U.S.C. 5565. Section 1017(d)(1) of the Dodd... activities for which civil penalties have been imposed under the Federal consumer financial laws.'' 12 U.S.C...

  13. 78 FR 26489 - Consumer Financial Civil Penalty Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... administrative action under Federal consumer financial laws. Under the Act, funds in the Civil Penalty Fund may... Bureau may require a party that has violated the law to pay a civil penalty. See, e.g., 12 U.S.C. 5565... or any other provision of law bars the Bureau from using funds in the Civil Penalty Fund for such...

  14. 33 CFR 1.07-90 - Criminal penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criminal penalties. 1.07-90... GENERAL PROVISIONS Enforcement; Civil and Criminal Penalty Proceedings § 1.07-90 Criminal penalties. (a... death. (2) Marine Boards (46 CFR part 4). (3) Violations of port security regulations (33 CFR parts 6...

  15. 20 CFR 410.699a - Penalties for fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalties for fraud. 410.699a Section 410.699a Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969... Review, Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.699a Penalties for fraud. The penalty...

  16. 78 FR 5722 - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Direct... for inflation. The adjustment of civil penalties to account for inflation is required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. Since we have not made any adjustments to...

  17. 77 FR 65100 - Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties for Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... Penalties for Inflation AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The... civil monetary penalties, to adjust for inflation. This rule sets forth the maximum, inflation-adjusted... Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended by the Debt Collection Improvement...

  18. 8 CFR 280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 280.53 Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of...

  19. 78 FR 5760 - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustment AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Proposed... account for inflation. The adjustment of civil penalties to account for inflation is required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended. Since we have not made any...

  20. 32 CFR 269.3 - Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. 269... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.3 Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustment. The Department shall, not later than 180 days after the enactment of the...

  1. 8 CFR 1280.53 - Civil monetary penalties inflation adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil monetary penalties inflation... penalties inflation adjustment. (a) In general. In accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, Pub. L. 101-410, 104 Stat. 890, as amended by the Debt...

  2. 76 FR 74625 - Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ...-2011] RIN 1125-AA69 Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustment AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border... adjust for inflation certain civil monetary penalties assessed under the Immigration and Nationality Act... assessed under the INA. The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990 (Adjustment Act...

  3. 29 CFR 501.19 - Civil money penalty assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... workers. (c) A civil money penalty for each violation of the work contract or a requirement of 8 U.S.C..., with the following exceptions: (1) A civil money penalty for each willful violation of the work... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil money penalty assessment. 501.19 Section 501.19 Labor...

  4. 12 CFR 622.60 - Payment of civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment of civil money penalty. 622.60 Section... Rules and Procedures for Assessment and Collection of Civil Money Penalties § 622.60 Payment of civil money penalty. (a) Payment date. Generally, the date designated in the notice of assessment for payment...

  5. 42 CFR 460.46 - Civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties. 460.46 Section 460.46 Public...) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.46 Civil money penalties. (a) CMS may impose civil money penalties up to the following maximum amounts: (1) For each violation regarding enrollment or...

  6. 42 CFR 438.704 - Amounts of civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amounts of civil money penalties. 438.704 Section... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.704 Amounts of civil money penalties. (a) General rule. The limit on, or the maximum civil money penalty the State may impose varies...

  7. 12 CFR 908.6 - Civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil money penalties. 908.6 Section 908.6... Proceedings § 908.6 Civil money penalties. (a) Notice of assessment—(1) Grounds. The Finance Board may issue and serve a notice of assessment of a civil money penalty on any Bank or any executive officer or...

  8. 12 CFR 509.103 - Civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil money penalties. 509.103 Section 509.103... PROCEDURE IN ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Local Rules § 509.103 Civil money penalties. (a) Assessment. In the... may serve an order of assessment of civil money penalty upon the party concerned. The assessment order...

  9. 16 CFR 1.96 - Compromise of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compromise of penalty. 1.96 Section 1.96 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL... may compromise any penalty or proposed penalty at any time, with leave of court when necessary, taking...

  10. 29 CFR 578.4 - Determination of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of penalty. 578.4 Section 578.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS MINIMUM WAGE AND OVERTIME VIOLATIONS-CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES § 578.4 Determination of penalty. (a) In determining the...

  11. Significant performance enhancement in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor by high-κ organic dielectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ze-Gao, Wang; Yuan-Fu, Chen; Cao, Chen; Ben-Lang, Tian; Fu-Tong, Chu; Xing-Zhao, Liu; Yan-Rong, Li

    2010-01-01

    The electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with and without high-κ organic dielectrics are investigated. The maximum drain current I D max and the maximum transconductance g m max of the organic dielectric/AlGaN/GaN structure can be enhanced by 74.5%, and 73.7% compared with those of the bare AlGaN/GaN HEMT, respectively. Both the threshold voltage V T and g m max of the dielectric/AlGaN/GaN HEMT are strongly dielectric-constant-dependent. Our results suggest that it is promising to significantly improve the performance of the AlGaN/GaN HEMT by introducing the high-κ organic dielectric. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. Functional relationships between plasmids and their significance for metabolism and symbiotic performance of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiak, Grażyna; Mazur, Andrzej; Wielbo, Jerzy; Marczak, Małgorzata; Zebracki, Kamil; Koper, Piotr; Skorupska, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii TA1 (RtTA1) is a soil bacterium establishing a highly specific symbiotic relationship with clover, which is based on the exchange of molecular signals between the host plant and the microsymbiont. The RtTA1 genome is large and multipartite, composed of a chromosome and four plasmids, which comprise approximately 65 % and 35 % of the total genome, respectively. Extrachromosomal replicons were previously shown to confer significant metabolic versatility to bacteria, which is important for their adaptation in the soil and nodulation competitiveness. To investigate the contribution of individual RtTA1 plasmids to the overall cell phenotype, metabolic properties and symbiotic performance, a transposon-based elimination strategy was employed. RtTA1 derivatives cured of pRleTA1b or pRleTA1d and deleted in pRleTA1a were obtained. In contrast to the in silico predictions of pRleTA1b and pRleTA1d, which were described as chromid-like replicons, both appeared to be completely curable. On the other hand, for pRleTA1a (symbiotic plasmid) and pRleTA1c, which were proposed to be unessential for RtTA1 viability, it was not possible to eliminate them at all (pRleTA1c) or entirely (pRleTA1a). Analyses of the phenotypic traits of the RtTA1 derivatives obtained revealed the functional significance of individual plasmids and their indispensability for growth, certain metabolic pathways, production of surface polysaccharides, autoaggregation, biofilm formation, motility and symbiotic performance. Moreover, the results allow us to suggest broad functional cooperation among the plasmids in shaping the phenotypic properties and symbiotic capabilities of rhizobia.

  13. Predictors of early stable symptomatic remission after an exacerbation of schizophrenia: the significance of symptoms, neuropsychological performance and cognitive biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Christina; Roesch-Ely, Daniela; Veckenstedt, Ruth; Bohn, Francesca; Aghotor, Julia; Köther, Ulf; Pfueller, Ute; Moritz, Steffen

    2013-12-30

    Neuropsychological deficits and severity of initial psychopathology have been repeatedly associated with poor symptomatic outcomes in schizophrenia. The role of higher-order cognitive biases on symptomatic outcomes of the disorder has not yet been investigated. The present study aimed to assess the contribution of cognitive biases, psychopathology and neuropsychological deficits on the probability of achieving early symptomatic remission after a psychotic episode in patients with schizophrenia. Participants were 79 patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder undergoing an acute psychotic episode, and 25 healthy controls. According to psychopathology assessments, patients were split into those who had achieved remission after an average follow-up interval of 7 months, and those who had not (NR). Patients who achieved remission exhibited higher premorbid IQ and better performance on the TMT-B, as well as lower baseline positive, disorganized and distress symptoms than NR patients. TMT-B performance and positive symptoms at baseline were the best predictors of remission. Cognitive biases and negative symptoms were not associated with later remission. The findings highlight the significance of initial symptom severity for at least short-term symptomatic outcomes and, thus, the importance of adequate symptomatic treatment and prevention of psychotic outbreaks in patients. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei, E-mail: hust-yangxiaofei@163.com [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Xianghao [School of Information Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-01-28

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 10{sup 4 }J/m{sup 3} and 10 × 10{sup 4 }J/m{sup 3}, the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between −330 Oe and 330 Oe to between −650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2–20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance.

  15. Significant manipulation of output performance of a bridge-structured spin valve magnetoresistance sensor via an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Baiqian; Ou-Yang, Jun; Zhu, Benpeng; Chen, Shi; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xianghao

    2016-01-01

    Through principles of spin-valve giant magnetoresistance (SV-GMR) effect and its application in magnetic sensors, we have investigated electric-field control of the output performance of a bridge-structured Co/Cu/NiFe/IrMn SV-GMR sensor on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate using the micro-magnetic simulation. We centered on the influence of the variation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K) of Co on the output of the bridge, and K was manipulated via the stress of Co, which is generated from the strain of a piezoelectric substrate under an electric field. The results indicate that when K varies between 2 × 10 4  J/m 3 and 10 × 10 4  J/m 3 , the output performance can be significantly manipulated: The linear range alters from between −330 Oe and 330 Oe to between −650 Oe and 650 Oe, and the sensitivity is tuned by almost 7 times, making it possible to measure magnetic fields with very different ranges. According to the converse piezoelectric effect, we have found that this variation of K can be realized by applying an electric field with the magnitude of about 2–20 kV/cm on a PZN-PT piezoelectric substrate, which is realistic in application. This result means that electric-control of SV-GMR effect has potential application in developing SV-GMR sensors with improved performance

  16. Significance of size dependent and material structure coupling on the characteristics and performance of nanocrystalline micro/nano gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, K.; Ghommem, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2018-05-01

    Capacitive-based sensing microelectromechanical (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) gyroscopes have significant advantages over conventional gyroscopes, such as low power consumption, batch fabrication, and possible integration with electronic circuits. However, inadequacies in the modeling of these inertial sensors have presented issues of reliability and functionality of micro-/nano-scale gyroscopes. In this work, a micromechanical model is developed to represent the unique microstructure of nanocrystalline materials and simulate the response of micro-/nano-gyroscope comprising an electrostatically-actuated cantilever beam with a tip mass at the free end. Couple stress and surface elasticity theories are integrated into the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam model in order to derive a size-dependent model. This model is then used to investigate the influence of size-dependent effects on the static pull-in instability, the natural frequencies and the performance output of gyroscopes as the scale decreases from micro-to nano-scale. The simulation results show significant changes in the static pull-in voltage and the natural frequency as the scale of the system is decreased. However, the differential frequency between the two vibration modes of the gyroscope is observed to drastically decrease as the size of the gyroscope is reduced. As such, the frequency-based operation mode may not be an efficient strategy for nano-gyroscopes. The results show that a strong coupling between the surface elasticity and material structure takes place when smaller grain sizes and higher void percentages are considered.

  17. 40 CFR 80.80 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... characteristics that would have existed if the gasoline giving rise to the violations had been produced or... reformulated gasoline that is produced or imported and offered for sale and for which the requirements to... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Reformulated Gasoline § 80.80 Penalties. (a) Any person that violates any...

  18. 28 CFR 20.25 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS State and Local Criminal History Record Information Systems § 20.25 Penalties. Any agency or individual violating subpart B of these regulations shall..., OJARS may initiate fund cut-off procedures against recipients of OJARS assistance. [41 FR 11715, Mar. 19...

  19. Tax penalties in SME tax compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Swistak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small business tax compliance requires special attention. On the one hand small businesses are often incapable of rigorously fulfilling their tax obligations, more vulnerable to external risks and tempted to exploit opportunities to be non-compliant. On the other hand, unlike larger businesses, they are usually sole proprietors or owner-operated businesses, hence highly responsive to personal, social, cognitive and emotional factors. These attributes pave the way to a better use of measures designed to influence their behavior and choices. This paper discusses the role and effectiveness of tax penalties in enhancing tax compliance in small businesses. It argues that tax penalties, although indispensable for tax enforcement, may not be a first-choice tool in ensuring tax compliance. Too punitive a tax regime is an important barrier to business formalization and increasing severity of tax penalties does not produce the intended results. To be effective, tax penalties should deter and motivate taxpayers rather than exert repressive measures against them.

  20. 31 CFR 596.701 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Penalties..., in consultation with the Secretary of State, a United States person, knowing or having reasonable.... App. 2405, as a country supporting international terrorism, engages in a financial transaction with...

  1. 22 CFR 1101.16 - Criminal penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Criminal penalties. 1101.16 Section 1101.16 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES... public notice of a system of records as required by 5 U.S.C. 552a(e)(4). ...

  2. 36 CFR 1001.3 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 1001.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST GENERAL PROVISIONS § 1001.3 Penalties. A... of this chapter, within the area administered by the Presidio Trust, shall be punished by a fine as provided by law, or by imprisonment not exceeding 6 months, or both, and shall be adjudged to pay all costs...

  3. 29 CFR 4010.14 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.14 Penalties. If all of the information required under this part is not provided within the specified time limit, PBGC may assess a...

  4. 36 CFR 903.13 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....13 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION PRIVACY ACT § 903.13 Penalties. The provision of 5 U.S.C. 552a(i), as added by section 3 of the Privacy Act, make it a... agency officers and employees of the Privacy Act or regulations established thereunder. [42 FR 5973, Feb...

  5. 7 CFR 900.211 - Penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalties. 900.211 Section 900.211 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... custody of such official pursuant to the provisions of a marketing agreement or marketing order shall be...

  6. 17 CFR 8.10 - Predetermined penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 8.10 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION EXCHANGE PROCEDURES FOR DISCIPLINARY, SUMMARY, AND MEMBERSHIP DENIAL ACTIONS Disciplinary Procedure § 8.10 Predetermined... the rules of an exchange establish predetermined penalties, the disciplinary committee shall have...

  7. Excess Readmission vs Excess Penalties: Maximum Readmission Penalties as a Function of Socioeconomics and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Chris; Parker, Devin; Marshall, Emily; Brown, Jeremiah

    2017-08-01

    The Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) penalizes hospitals with "excess" readmissions up to 3% of Medicare reimbursement. Approximately 75% of eligible hospitals received penalties, worth an estimated $428 million, in fiscal year 2015. To identify demographic and socioeconomic disparities between matched and localized maximum-penalty and no-penalty hospitals. A case-control study in which cases included were hospitals to receive the maximum 3% penalty under the HRRP during the 2015 fiscal year. Controls were drawn from no-penalty hospitals and matched to cases by hospital characteristics (primary analysis) or geographic proximity (secondary analysis). A selectiion of 3383 US hospitals eligible for HRRP. Thirty-nine case and 39 control hospitals from the HRRP cohort. Socioeconomic status variables were collected by the American Community Survey. Hospital and health system characteristics were drawn from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, American Hospital Association, and Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. The statistical analysis was conducted using Student t tests. Thirty-nine hospitals received a maximum penalty. Relative to controls, maximum-penalty hospitals in counties with lower SES profiles are defined by increased poverty rates (19.1% vs 15.5%, = 0.015) and lower rates of high school graduation (82.2% vs 87.5%, = 0.001). County level age, sex, and ethnicity distributions were similar between cohorts. Cases were more likely than controls to be in counties with low socioeconomic status; highlighting potential unintended consequences of national benchmarks for phenomena underpinned by environmental factors; specifically, whether maximum penalties under the HRRP are a consequence of underperforming hospitals or a manifestation of underserved communities. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  8. A distribution-free newsvendor model with balking penalty and random yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongfeng Lan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to extend the analysis of the distribution-free newsvendor problem in an environment of customer balking, which occurs when customers are reluctant to buy a product if its available inventory falls below a threshold level. Design/methodology/approach: We provide a new tradeoff tool as a replacement of the traditional one to weigh the holding cost and the goodwill costs segment: in addition to the shortage penalty, we also introduce the balking penalty. Furthermore, we extend our model to the case of random yield. Findings: A model is presented for determining both an optimal order quantity and a lower bound on the profit under the worst possible distribution of the demand. We also study the effects of shortage penalty and the balking penalty on the optimal order quantity, which have been largely bypassed in the existing distribution free single period models with balking. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the result. Originality/value: The incorporation of balking penalty and random yield represents an important improvement in inventory policy performance for distribution-free newsvendor problem when customer balking occurs and the distributional form of demand is unknown.

  9. Penalty dynamic programming algorithm for dim targets detection in sensor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dayu; Xue, Anke; Guo, Yunfei

    2012-01-01

    In order to detect and track multiple maneuvering dim targets in sensor systems, an improved dynamic programming track-before-detect algorithm (DP-TBD) called penalty DP-TBD (PDP-TBD) is proposed. The performances of tracking techniques are used as a feedback to the detection part. The feedback is constructed by a penalty term in the merit function, and the penalty term is a function of the possible target state estimation, which can be obtained by the tracking methods. With this feedback, the algorithm combines traditional tracking techniques with DP-TBD and it can be applied to simultaneously detect and track maneuvering dim targets. Meanwhile, a reasonable constraint that a sensor measurement can originate from one target or clutter is proposed to minimize track separation. Thus, the algorithm can be used in the multi-target situation with unknown target numbers. The efficiency and advantages of PDP-TBD compared with two existing methods are demonstrated by several simulations.

  10. A penalty guided stochastic fractal search approach for system reliability optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellal, Mohamed Arezki; Zio, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Modern industry requires components and systems with high reliability levels. In this paper, we address the system reliability optimization problem. A penalty guided stochastic fractal search approach is developed for solving reliability allocation, redundancy allocation, and reliability–redundancy allocation problems. Numerical results of ten case studies are presented as benchmark problems for highlighting the superiority of the proposed approach compared to others from literature. - Highlights: • System reliability optimization is investigated. • A penalty guided stochastic fractal search approach is developed. • Results of ten case studies are compared with previously published methods. • Performance of the approach is demonstrated.

  11. The Execution of Criminal Fine Penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmin Peneoașu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at dissecting the criminal provisions on criminal enforcement of fines in current Romanian criminal law with the goal of highlighting the new penal policy stated in the larger field of criminal penalties. In the new Criminal Code the fine penalty experience a new regulation, but also a wider scope compared to the Criminal Code from 1968, with an exponential growth of the number of offenses or variations of them, for which a fine may be imposed as a unique punishment, but, especially, as an alternative punishment to imprisonment. Consequently, to ensure the efficiency of this punishment, the effective enforcement manner of the fine takes a new dimension. The study aims both students and academics or practitioners in the making. Furthermore, throughout the approach of this scientific research, new matters that new criminal legislation brings, are emphasized regarding this institution, both in a positive, and especially under a critical manner.

  12. Overeducation and Employment Mismatch: Wage Penalties for College Degrees in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ihsuan; Malvin, Mathew; Simonson, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Overeducation and underemployment are of increasing national concern. Recent research estimates that 48% of workers are overeducated for their positions. The wage penalty for overeducation varies significantly across majors by gender. Using the American Community Survey (Ruggles et al., 2010), the authors examine the extent of overeducation among…

  13. 12 CFR 1403.11 - Criminal penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 1403.11 Criminal penalties. Section 552a(i)(3) of the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a(i)(3)) makes it a misdemeanor, subject to a... from an agency under false pretenses. Sections 552a(i) (1) and (2) of the Act (5 U.S.C. 552a(i) (1), (2...

  14. Automatic penalty continuation in structural topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Labanda, Susana; Stolpe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    this issue is addressed. We propose an automatic continuation method, where the material penalization parameter is included as a new variable in the problem and a constraint guarantees that the requested penalty is eventually reached. The numerical results suggest that this approach is an appealing...... alternative to continuation methods. Automatic continuation also generally obtains better designs than the classical formulation using a reduced number of iterations....

  15. 46 CFR 506.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties... MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 506.4 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a... penalty for each civil monetary penalty by the cost-of-living adjustment. Any increase determined under...

  16. Death Penalty Issues Following Atkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, James R.; Keyes, Denis W.

    2006-01-01

    In light of the U.S. Supreme Court's 2002 landmark decision in "Atkins v. Virginia," a diagnosis of mild mental retardation has taken on a life and death significance for people who are the most deeply involved in criminal justice. As such, each aspect of the mental retardation definition (American Association on Mental Retardation, 2002) is a…

  17. Vectorization of a penalty function algorithm for well scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absar, I.

    1984-01-01

    In petroleum engineering, the oil production profiles of a reservoir can be simulated by using a finite gridded model. This profile is affected by the number and choice of wells which in turn is a result of various production limits and constraints including, for example, the economic minimum well spacing, the number of drilling rigs available and the time required to drill and complete a well. After a well is available it may be shut in because of excessive water or gas productions. In order to optimize the field performance a penalty function algorithm was developed for scheduling wells. For an example with some 343 wells and 15 different constraints, the scheduling routine vectorized for the CYBER 205 averaged 560 times faster performance than the scalar version.

  18. Based on Penalty Function Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaq Baba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dual response surface for simultaneously optimizing the mean and variance models as separate functions suffers some deficiencies in handling the tradeoffs between bias and variance components of mean squared error (MSE. In this paper, the accuracy of the predicted response is given a serious attention in the determination of the optimum setting conditions. We consider four different objective functions for the dual response surface optimization approach. The essence of the proposed method is to reduce the influence of variance of the predicted response by minimizing the variability relative to the quality characteristics of interest and at the same time achieving the specific target output. The basic idea is to convert the constraint optimization function into an unconstraint problem by adding the constraint to the original objective function. Numerical examples and simulations study are carried out to compare performance of the proposed method with some existing procedures. Numerical results show that the performance of the proposed method is encouraging and has exhibited clear improvement over the existing approaches.

  19. Evaluation of Techniques to Detect Significant Network Performance Problems using End-to-End Active Network Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, R.Les; Logg, Connie; Chhaparia, Mahesh; /SLAC; Grigoriev, Maxim; /Fermilab; Haro, Felipe; /Chile U., Catolica; Nazir, Fawad; /NUST, Rawalpindi; Sandford, Mark

    2006-01-25

    End-to-End fault and performance problems detection in wide area production networks is becoming increasingly hard as the complexity of the paths, the diversity of the performance, and dependency on the network increase. Several monitoring infrastructures are built to monitor different network metrics and collect monitoring information from thousands of hosts around the globe. Typically there are hundreds to thousands of time-series plots of network metrics which need to be looked at to identify network performance problems or anomalous variations in the traffic. Furthermore, most commercial products rely on a comparison with user configured static thresholds and often require access to SNMP-MIB information, to which a typical end-user does not usually have access. In our paper we propose new techniques to detect network performance problems proactively in close to realtime and we do not rely on static thresholds and SNMP-MIB information. We describe and compare the use of several different algorithms that we have implemented to detect persistent network problems using anomalous variations analysis in real end-to-end Internet performance measurements. We also provide methods and/or guidance for how to set the user settable parameters. The measurements are based on active probes running on 40 production network paths with bottlenecks varying from 0.5Mbits/s to 1000Mbit/s. For well behaved data (no missed measurements and no very large outliers) with small seasonal changes most algorithms identify similar events. We compare the algorithms' robustness with respect to false positives and missed events especially when there are large seasonal effects in the data. Our proposed techniques cover a wide variety of network paths and traffic patterns. We also discuss the applicability of the algorithms in terms of their intuitiveness, their speed of execution as implemented, and areas of applicability. Our encouraging results compare and evaluate the accuracy of our

  20. The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, Alan; Petrongolo, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Women in Britain who work part-time have, on average, hourly earnings about 25% less than that of women working full-time. This gap has widened greatly over the past 30 years. This paper tries to explain this part-time pay penalty. It shows that a sizeable part of the penalty can be explained by the differing characteristics pf FT and PT women. Inclusion of standard demographics halves the estimate of the pay penalty. But inclusion of occupation makes the pay penalty very small, suggesting th...

  1. The Role of the Penalty Clause in Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stegariu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The interest in this topic is determined, on one hand, by the way of interpreting the provisions which regulate the contractual liability in general and of those regarding the penalty clause in particular, and, on the other hand, by the formulation of certain proposals de lege ferenda. By stipulating the penalty clause, the law seeks to execute the contractual obligations, and not to collect penalties. The legal base of the ancillary character of the penalty clause is article 1538, paragraph 3 of the Civil Code.    

  2. Theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of the number of crosstalk signals on the penalty caused by incoherent optical crosstalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Jørgen; Liu, Fenghai; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    1999-01-01

    Calculations based on the exact probability density function of the received power show that for a fixed total crosstalk power, the incoherent crosstalk penalty increases with the number of crosstalk signals. Performed experiments verify this.......Calculations based on the exact probability density function of the received power show that for a fixed total crosstalk power, the incoherent crosstalk penalty increases with the number of crosstalk signals. Performed experiments verify this....

  3. 29 CFR 579.5 - Determining the amount of the penalty and assessing the penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR VIOLATIONS-CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES § 579.5 Determining the amount... to child labor or of any regulation issued under that section, will be based on the available... (2) Whether the evidence shows that the person so charged had no previous history of child labor...

  4. Pt-decorated GaN nanowires with significant improvement in H2 gas-sensing performance at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Q N; Yam, F K; Hassan, Z; Bououdina, M

    2015-12-15

    Superior sensitivity towards H2 gas was successfully achieved with Pt-decorated GaN nanowires (NWs) gas sensor. GaN NWs were fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) route. Morphology (field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy) and crystal structure (high resolution X-ray diffraction) characterizations of the as-synthesized nanostructures demonstrated the formation of GaN NWs having a wurtzite structure, zigzaged shape and an average diameter of 30-166nm. The Pt-decorated GaN NWs sensor shows a high response of 250-2650% upon exposure to H2 gas concentration from 7 to 1000ppm respectively at room temperature (RT), and then increases to about 650-4100% when increasing the operating temperature up to 75°C. The gas-sensing measurements indicated that the Pt-decorated GaN NWs based sensor exhibited efficient detection of H2 at low concentration with excellent sensitivity, repeatability, and free hysteresis phenomena over a period of time of 100min. The large surface-to-volume ratio of GaN NWs and the catalytic activity of Pt metal are the most influential factors leading to the enhancement of H2 gas-sensing performances through the improvement of the interaction between the target molecules (H2) and the sensing NWs surface. The attractive low-cost, low power consumption and high-performance of the resultant decorated GaN NWs gas sensor assure their uppermost potential for H2 gas sensor working at low operating temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heuristic for Stochastic Online Flowshop Problem with Preemption Penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bayat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The deterministic flowshop model is one of the most widely studied problems; whereas its stochastic equivalent has remained a challenge. Furthermore, the preemptive online stochastic flowshop problem has received much less attention, and most of the previous researches have considered a nonpreemptive version. Moreover, little attention has been devoted to the problems where a certain time penalty is incurred when preemption is allowed. This paper examines the preemptive stochastic online flowshop with the objective of minimizing the expected makespan. All the jobs arrive overtime, which means that the existence and the parameters of each job are unknown until its release date. The processing time of the jobs is stochastic and actual processing time is unknown until completion of the job. A heuristic procedure for this problem is presented, which is applicable whenever the job processing times are characterized by their means and standard deviation. The performance of the proposed heuristic method is explored using some numerical examples.

  6. Appropriate design of auctions for renewable energy support – Prequalifications and penalties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiss, Jan; Ehrhart, Karl-Martin; Haufe, Marie-Christin

    2017-01-01

    Auctions are a promising tool to accomplish renewable energy support (RES). However, they involve diverse risks for the auctioneer and the bidders. The major risk for the auctioneer – with respect to the expansion target and the acceptance of auctions for RES in general – is the risk of non-realization: awarded bidders do not realize their projects. The main reasons are bidders' uncertainties concerning their project costs. The auctioneer can reduce the non-realization risk by taking various measures. The most discussed and implemented measures are financial and physical prequalifications and penalties. An evaluation of these measures has relevant implications for an appropriate auctions design for RES. The non-realization option induces lower bids. A suitable combination of financial and physical prequalifications can reduce the non-realization risk significantly, however, involves sunk costs. Counterintuitively, first-price auction and second-price auction lead to different expected award prices and different realization probabilities. Penalties bear a high risk of inefficient auction outcomes. The appropriate parametrization and combination of the measures is challenging. Under consideration of all implications, we recommend high financial and adjusted physical prequalifications to achieve a sufficiently high realization rate while maintaining efficiency. - Highlights: • The non-realization risk is a major problem of auctions for RES. • Designated measures are financial and physical prequalifications and penalties. • Prequalifications and penalties have different effects on auction outcome. • The non-realization option violates the revenue equivalence theorem. • We recommend high financial and adjusted physical prequalifications.

  7. The ethical "elephant" in the death penalty "room".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael

    2008-10-01

    The United States Supreme Court recently ruled that execution by a commonly used protocol of drug administration does not represent cruel or unusual punishment. Various medical journals have editorialized on this drug protocol, the death penalty in general and the role that physicians play. Many physicians, and societies of physicians, express the opinion that it is unethical for doctors to participate in executions. This Target Article explores the harm that occurs to murder victims' relatives when an execution is delayed or indefinitely postponed. By using established principles in psychiatry and the science of the brain, it is shown that victims' relatives can suffer brain damage when justice is not done. Conversely, adequate justice can reverse some of those changes in the brain. Thus, physician opposition to capital punishment may be contributing to significant harm. In this context, the ethics of physician involvement in lethal injection is complex.

  8. 42 CFR 402.105 - Amount of penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... insurance benefit plans (§ 402.1(c)(21)). (b) $1,000. CMS or OIG may impose a penalty of not more than $1... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of penalty. 402.105 Section 402.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL...

  9. 25 CFR 101.15 - Penalties on default.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalties on default. 101.15 Section 101.15 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LOANS TO INDIANS FROM THE REVOLVING LOAN FUND § 101.15 Penalties on default. Unless otherwise provided in the loan agreement between...

  10. Accurate formulas for the penalty caused by interferometric crosstalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Jørgen; Liu, Fenghai; Jeppesen, Palle

    2000-01-01

    New simple formulas for the penalty caused by interferometric crosstalk in PIN receiver systems and optically preamplified receiver systems are presented. They are more accurate than existing formulas.......New simple formulas for the penalty caused by interferometric crosstalk in PIN receiver systems and optically preamplified receiver systems are presented. They are more accurate than existing formulas....

  11. 49 CFR 92.35 - Interest, penalties and administrative costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accrue until payment is received. Interest shall be calculated only on the principal of the debt (simple... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interest, penalties and administrative costs. 92... UNITED STATES BY SALARY OFFSET § 92.35 Interest, penalties and administrative costs. (a) Where a DOT...

  12. 5 CFR 2634.909 - Procedures, penalties, and ethics agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures, penalties, and ethics agreements. 2634.909 Section 2634.909 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS... Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.909 Procedures, penalties, and ethics agreements. (a) The provisions of...

  13. Public Opinion and the Death Penalty: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Diana L.; Freiburger, Tina L.

    2011-01-01

    Strong public support for capital punishment is arguably the number one reason why the death penalty continues to be used as a form of correctional policy in the U.S. criminal justice system. Therefore, it is fundamental that the measure of death penalty opinion be heavily scrutinized. Utilizing a methodological approach not typically employed in…

  14. Critical Analysis of Abolition of Death Penalty in International Law ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The death penalty has been an issue of debate for decades and several reasons have been given that make recourse to the death penalty appears necessary, such as, that it serves as a deterrent, it meets the need for retribution and that of public opinion demands its imposition. Conversely, more convincing arguments ...

  15. The Impact of Information on Death Penalty Support, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Eric G.; Camp, Scott D.; Clarke, Alan; Jiang, Shanhe

    2011-01-01

    In 1972, former Supreme Court Justice Marshall postulated that the public was uninformed about the death penalty and information would change their support for it. There is some indication that information about the death penalty may change people's level of support. This study re-examines data used by Lambert and Clarke (2001). Using multivariate…

  16. 29 CFR 801.42 - Civil money penalties-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil money penalties-assessment. 801.42 Section 801.42... APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Enforcement § 801.42 Civil money penalties—assessment. (a) A civil money penalty in an amount not to exceed $10,000 for any violation may be assessed...

  17. On the definition of penalty functions in data aggregation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bustince, H.; Beliakov, G.; Dimuro, G. P.; Bedregal, B.; Mesiar, Radko

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 323, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-18 ISSN 0165-0114 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Aggregation functions * Averaging aggregation function * Penalty functions * Quasi-penalty functions * Spread measures Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0477083.pdf

  18. 49 CFR 236.0 - Applicability, minimum requirements, and penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... persons, or has caused death or injury, a penalty not to exceed $100,000 per violation may be assessed... state law seeking damages for personal injury, death, or property damage alleging that a party has... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability, minimum requirements, and penalties...

  19. 26 CFR 1.162-21 - Fines and penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... country; or (3) A political subdivision of, or corporation or other entity serving as an agency or... (felony or misdemeanor) in a criminal proceeding; (ii) Paid as a civil penalty imposed by Federal, State... potential liability for a fine or penalty (civil or criminal); or (iv) Forfeited as collateral posted in...

  20. 12 CFR 412.13 - Limitations and penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limitations and penalties. 412.13 Section 412.13 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES ACCEPTANCE OF PAYMENT FROM A NON-FEDERAL SOURCE FOR TRAVEL EXPENSES § 412.13 Limitations and penalties. (a) This part is in addition to and not in...

  1. 29 CFR 502.19 - Civil money penalty assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT (SUSPENDED 6-29-2009) Enforcement of Work Contracts § 502.19 Civil money... money penalty for violation of the work contract will not exceed $1,000 for each violation committed... of the work contract, or for willful discrimination, the civil money penalty shall not exceed $5,000...

  2. 31 CFR 129.6 - Penalties specified by law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Penalties specified by law. 129.6 Section 129.6 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance PORTFOLIO INVESTMENT SURVEY REPORTING § 129.6 Penalties specified by law. Reporters are advised that the Act provides the...

  3. 31 CFR 91.14 - Penalties and other law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Penalties and other law. 91.14... CONDUCT IN OR ON THE BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.14 Penalties and other law. Whoever...). Nothing contained in the regulations in this part shall be construed to abrogate any other Federal laws or...

  4. 76 FR 71554 - Civil Penalties; Notice of Adjusted Maximum Amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... Substances Act (FHSA), and the Flammable Fabrics Act (FFA). The Improvement Act added civil penalty authority... penalty amounts authorized under the Consumer Product Safety Act, the Federal Hazardous Substances Act, and the Flammable Fabrics Act. On August 14, 2009, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008...

  5. 42 CFR 73.21 - Civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalties. 73.21 Section 73.21 Public... SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 73.21 Civil money penalties. (a) The Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services is delegated authority to conduct investigations and to impose civil money...

  6. 12 CFR 1250.3 - Civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil money penalties. 1250.3 Section 1250.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ENTERPRISES FLOOD INSURANCE § 1250.3 Civil money... to § 1250.2, the Director of FHFA, or his or her designee, may assess civil money penalties against...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1834 - Civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil money penalty. 493.1834 Section 493.1834... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1834 Civil money... Secretary to impose civil money penalties on laboratories. Section 1846(b)(3) of the Act specifically...

  8. 7 CFR 781.4 - Assessment of penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... following penalties: (1) Late-filed reports: One-tenth of one percent of the fair market value, as..., but the total penalty imposed shall not exceed 25 percent of the fair market value of the foreign... accurate information: 25 percent of the fair market value, as determined by the Farm Service Agency, of the...

  9. Penalty payments for placement of advertising boards and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ofiarska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the essence, premises of application and sentencing guidelines regarding penalty payments for placement of advertising boards or structures in the public space in violation of regulations and conditions for placement thereof stipulated in the Commune Council resolution (ordinance. Structural elements constituting penalty payments are specified in the Planning and Development Act. The amount of penalty is determined by a decision taken by commune administrator (town mayor, city mayor. The ordinance specifies criteria for establishing the amount of penalty payments, taking into consideration the size of the advertising board or structure and the multiple of applicable advertising fees specified by the Commune Council for a given area or maximum fee recognized in the ordinance. Proceeds from penalty payments constitute a source of municipality’s own revenue, and are included among the so-called non-tax budget receivables.

  10. Performance limits of coated particle fuel. Part I. The significance of empirical performance diagrams and mathematical models in fuel development and power reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, L. W.; Hick, H.

    1973-06-15

    This report introduces a general survey of our present knowledge and understanding of coated particle fuel performance. It defines first the reference power reactor conditions and the reference coated particle design on which the survey is centred. It describes then the typical strategy which has been followed in coated particle fuel development by the Dragon Project R & D Branch. Finally it shows the priorities which have governed the time scale and scope of fuel development and of the present review.

  11. Sharp Penalty Term and Time Step Bounds for the Interior Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Linear Hyperbolic Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geevers, Sjoerd; van der Vegt, J.J.W.

    2017-01-01

    We present sharp and sucient bounds for the interior penalty term and time step size to ensure stability of the symmetric interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin (SIPDG) method combined with an explicit time-stepping scheme. These conditions hold for generic meshes, including unstructured

  12. Microstructure Images Restoration of Metallic Materials Based upon KSVD and Smoothing Penalty Sparse Representation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Liang, Steven Y

    2018-04-20

    Microstructure images of metallic materials play a significant role in industrial applications. To address image degradation problem of metallic materials, a novel image restoration technique based on K-means singular value decomposition (KSVD) and smoothing penalty sparse representation (SPSR) algorithm is proposed in this work, the microstructure images of aluminum alloy 7075 (AA7075) material are used as examples. To begin with, to reflect the detail structure characteristics of the damaged image, the KSVD dictionary is introduced to substitute the traditional sparse transform basis (TSTB) for sparse representation. Then, due to the image restoration, modeling belongs to a highly underdetermined equation, and traditional sparse reconstruction methods may cause instability and obvious artifacts in the reconstructed images, especially reconstructed image with many smooth regions and the noise level is strong, thus the SPSR (here, q = 0.5) algorithm is designed to reconstruct the damaged image. The results of simulation and two practical cases demonstrate that the proposed method has superior performance compared with some state-of-the-art methods in terms of restoration performance factors and visual quality. Meanwhile, the grain size parameters and grain boundaries of microstructure image are discussed before and after they are restored by proposed method.

  13. Tax evasion between fiscal and penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Mihaela Corîci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although in present times a big importance is given to combating and preventing tax evasion, as well as to all tax frauds, there are, however, people who are tax evaders from the point of view of the criminal body, who manage to ease of payment of tax liabilities to the state. By imposing more drastic or lighter penalties, it is attempted to determine the taxpayer in order not to escape the payment of taxes and to commit the crime.If for the financial controlling authority a fiscal crime has a direct impact on the budget of a certain area, the fiscal action is a criminal one for the criminal authority.

  14. Reconstruction of methods of execution of the death penalty by shooting in the years 1949-1954 based on exhumation research of "prison fields" in Osobowicki Cemetery in Wroclaw. Part I--Historical outline and results of research conducted prior to exhumations performed in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szleszkowski, Łukasz

    2012-01-01

    In the period between October and December 2011, a series of exhumation research of the so-called prison quarters dating back to 1949-1954 was conducted in Osobowicki Cemetery in Wrocław. Among the buried there were political prisoners executed by shooting--genuine or alleged members of post-war independence organizations. It was a unique opportunity to determine the method of execution of the death penalty in that period because, according to historical data and the results of two test exhumations, this method considerably differed from instructions on the use of a firing squad during execution of the death penalty.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected extramural venous invasion in rectal cancer before and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Diagnostic performance and prognostic significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sun [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung-Ang University, College of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Ju; Hur, Bo Yun [National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Chan; Hyun, Jong Hee; Chang, Hee Jin; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Dae Yong; Oh, Jae Hwan [National Cancer Centre, Centre for Colorectal Cancer, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Young [National Cancer Centre, Centre for Colorectal Cancer, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Centre, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    We evaluated the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of identifying extramural venous invasion (EMVI) in rectal cancer patients with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and its prognostic significance. During 2008-2010, 200 patients underwent surgery following preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. Two radiologists independently reviewed all pre- and post-CRT MRI retrospectively. We investigated diagnostic performance of pre-CRT MR-EMVI (MR-EMVI) and post-CRT MR-EMVI (yMR-EMVI), based on pathological EMVI as the standard of reference. We assessed correlation between MRI findings and patients' prognosis, such as disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Additionally, subgroup analysis in MR- or yMR-EMVI-positive patients was performed to confirm the significance of the severity of EMVI in MRI on patient's prognosis. The sensitivity and specificity of yMR-EMVI were 76.19% and 79.75% (area under the curve: 0.830), respectively. In univariate analysis, yMR-EMVI was the only significant MRI factor in DFS (P = 0.027). The mean DFS for yMR-EMVI (+) patients was significantly less than for yMR-EMVI (-) patients: 57.56 months versus 72.46 months. yMR-EMVI demonstrated good diagnostic performance. yMR-EMVI was the only significant EMVI-related MRI factor that correlated with patients' DFS in univariate analysis; however, it was not significant in multivariate analysis. (orig.)

  16. 42 CFR 3.404 - Amount of a civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of a civil money penalty. 3.404 Section 3... money penalty. (a) The amount of a civil money penalty will be determined in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section and § 3.408 of this subpart. (b) The Secretary may impose a civil money penalty...

  17. 45 CFR 160.404 - Amount of a civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of a civil money penalty. 160.404 Section... RELATED REQUIREMENTS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Imposition of Civil Money Penalties § 160.404 Amount of a civil money penalty. (a) The amount of a civil money penalty will be determined in accordance...

  18. Underlying causes of the emerging nonmetropolitan mortality penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossman, Jeralynn S; James, Wesley L; Cosby, Arthur G; Cossman, Ronald E

    2010-08-01

    The nonmetropolitan mortality penalty results in an estimated 40 201 excessive US deaths per year, deaths that would not occur if nonmetropolitan and metropolitan residents died at the same rate. We explored the underlying causes of the nonmetropolitan mortality penalty by examining variation in cause of death. Declines in heart disease and cancer death rates in metropolitan areas drive the nonmetropolitan mortality penalty. Future work should explore why the top causes of death are higher in nonmetropolitan areas than they are in metropolitan areas.

  19. The Death Penalty: Pancasila, with Efforts to Eradicated Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    R., Anggun Ariena; Ky, Ade Oktariatas

    2015-01-01

    The rise of drugs criminal in Indonesia at this time, making Indonesia would be drugs emergency. Drugs is an extraordinary crime and need special attention in the eradication effort. Therefore it takes great strength to use legal action heaviest where Indonesia has a death penalty sentence. The purpose of the death penalty is to give hard effect for drugs criminal and as warning for the others. The reality of the death penalty in Indonesia shows the operation of the judicial system is not go...

  20. Lack of significant associations with early career performance suggest no link between the DMRT3 "Gait Keeper" mutation and precocity in Coldblooded trotters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jäderkvist Fegraeus

    Full Text Available The Swedish-Norwegian Coldblooded trotter (CBT is a local breed in Sweden and Norway mainly used for harness racing. Previous studies have shown that a mutation from cytosine (C to adenine (A in the doublesex and mab-3 related transcription factor 3 (DMRT3 gene has a major impact on harness racing performance of different breeds. An association of the DMRT3 mutation with early career performance has also been suggested. The aim of the current study was to investigate this proposed association in a randomly selected group of CBTs. 769 CBTs (485 raced, 284 unraced were genotyped for the DMRT3 mutation. The association with racing performance was investigated for 13 performance traits and three different age intervals: 3 years, 3 to 6 years, and 7 to 10 years of age, using the statistical software R. Each performance trait was analyzed for association with DMRT3 using linear models. The results suggest no association of the DMRT3 mutation with precocity (i.e. performance at 3 years of age. Only two traits (race time and number of disqualifications were significantly different between the genotypes, with AA horses having the fastest times and CC horses having the highest number of disqualifications at 3 years of age. The frequency of the AA genotype was significantly lower in the raced CBT sample compared with the unraced sample and less than 50% of the AA horses participated in a race. For the age intervals 3 to 6 and 7 to 10 years the AA horses also failed to demonstrate significantly better performance than the other genotypes. Although suggested as the most favorable genotype for racing performance in Standardbreds and Finnhorses across all ages, the AA genotype does not appear to be associated with superior performance, early or late, in the racing career of CBTs.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF APPROACH ANGLE ON PENALTY KICKING ACCURACY AND KICK KINEMATICS WITH RECREATIONAL SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Scurr

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Kicking accuracy is an important component of successful penalty kicks, which may be influenced by the approach angle. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of approach angle on kicking accuracy and three-dimensional kinematics of penalty kicks. Seven male amateur recreational soccer players aged (mean ± s 26 ± 3 years, body mass 74.0 ± 6.8 kg, stature 1.74 ± 0.06 m, who were right foot dominant, kicked penalties at a 0.6 x 0.6 m target in a full size goal from their self-selected approach angle, 30º, 45º and 60º (direction of the kick was 0º. Kicking accuracy and three-dimensional kinematics were recorded. Results revealed that there was no significant difference in kicking accuracy (p = 0.27 or ball velocity (p = 0.59 between the approach angles. Pelvic rotation was significantly greater under the 45º and the 60º approach angles than during the self-selected approach angle (p < 0.05. Thigh abduction of the kicking leg at impact using the 60º approach angle was significantly greater than during the self- selected approach (p = 0.01 and the 30º approach (p = 0.04. It was concluded that altering an individual's self-selected approach angle at recreational level did not improve kicking accuracy or ball velocity, despite altering aspects of underlying technique.

  2. Penalty methods for the numerical solution of American multi-asset option problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik; Skavhaug, Ola; Tveito, Aslak

    2008-12-01

    We derive and analyze a penalty method for solving American multi-asset option problems. A small, non-linear penalty term is added to the Black-Scholes equation. This approach gives a fixed solution domain, removing the free and moving boundary imposed by the early exercise feature of the contract. Explicit, implicit and semi-implicit finite difference schemes are derived, and in the case of independent assets, we prove that the approximate option prices satisfy some basic properties of the American option problem. Several numerical experiments are carried out in order to investigate the performance of the schemes. We give examples indicating that our results are sharp. Finally, the experiments indicate that in the case of correlated underlying assets, the same properties are valid as in the independent case.

  3. 7 CFR 46.10 - Nonlicensed person; liability; penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 46.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING OF PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL... Licenses § 46.10 Nonlicensed person; liability; penalty. Any commission merchant, dealer, or broker who...

  4. Unlocking the Poverty Penalty and Upscaling the Respect for Rights ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Kenya's population is becoming increasingly urban. ... web of power and governance, where landlords and criminal organizations thrive, often ... financial and planning models that provide a first approach on how to unlock the poverty penalty.

  5. penalties and liquidated damages in a changing world

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    It revisits the principles of the law of penalties as expounded in the classic case of Dunlop ... to apply to modern commercial dealings and different jurisdictions, ...... Stephen A Smith, Contract Theory (Oxford University Press 2004) Ch 11.2. For.

  6. Capital Punishment: An Overview of Federal Death Penalty Statutes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bazan, Elizabeth B

    2005-01-01

    With the passage of P.L. 103-322, the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, the federal death penalty became available as a possible punishment for a substantial number of new and existing civilian offenses...

  7. Theft of Debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia: Criminal Penalties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murnane, Andrew W; Eig, Larry

    2003-01-01

    .... This report briefly describes possible criminal penalties for conversion of government property, and does not address issues related to the personal property of the Columbia's crew. This report will be updated as warranted.

  8. 77 FR 72915 - Civil Monetary Penalties; Adjustment for Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... Statistics--Delinquency on Delayed Filing of Export Documentation; maximum penalty for each day's delinquency... of Foreign Trade Statistics-- Violations, from $10,000 to $10,000. (d) Economics and Statistics...

  9. Non-clairvoyant weighted flow time scheduling with rejection penalty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Ho-Leung; Chan, Sze-Hang; Lam, Tak-Wah

    2012-01-01

    is defined as the weighted flow time of the job plus the penalty if it is rejected before completion. Previous work on minimizing the total user cost focused on the clairvoyant single-processor setting [BBC+03,CLL11] and has produced O(1)-competitive online algorithm for jobs with arbitrary weights...... algorithm has to decide job rejection and determine the order and speed of job execution. It is interesting to study the tradeoff between the above-mentioned user cost and energy. This paper gives two O(1)-competitive non-clairvoyant algorithms for minimizing the user cost plus energy on a single processor......This paper initiates the study of online scheduling with rejection penalty in the non-clairvoyant setting, i.e., the size (processing time) of a job is not assumed to be known at its release time. In the rejection penalty model, jobs can be rejected with a penalty, and the user cost of a job...

  10. 31 CFR 546.702 - Pre-Penalty Notice; settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Notice must be made within the applicable 30-day period set forth in this paragraph. The failure to...) on or before the 30th day after the postmark date on the envelope in which the Pre-Penalty Notice was...

  11. 31 CFR 548.702 - Pre-Penalty Notice; settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Notice must be made within the applicable 30-day period set forth in this paragraph. The failure to...) on or before the 30th day after the postmark date on the envelope in which the Pre-Penalty Notice was...

  12. Significant determinants of academic performance by new students enrolled in the higher distance education system of Ecuador. The case of the Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Moncada Mora

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the significant determiners of academic performance of new students enrolled in the higher distance education system of Ecuador. A description and correlation of the variables were undertaken to formalize the probabilistic model that confirms the positive, negative, individual and global effects.

  13. Getting to the point: attempting to improve juror comprehension of capital penalty phase instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy E; Haney, Craig

    2011-10-01

    This research examined the effects of several versions of capital penalty phase instructions on juror comprehension. Study One documented the impact of California's recently implemented "plain language" instruction. It showed that although the new instruction has clear advantages over the previous version, significant comprehension problems remain. Study Two evaluated several modified instructions designed to enhance comprehension. Participants heard either a standard patterned instruction or one of two alternatives-a psycholinguistically improved instruction, or a "pinpoint" instruction using case-related facts to illustrate key terms-in a simulated death penalty sentencing phase. Persons who heard modified instructions demonstrated higher levels of comprehension on virtually every measure as compared to those in the standard instruction condition.

  14. An Analysis of the Death Penalty in Indonesia Criminal Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Rifai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research uses normative juridical approach to study on the analysis of the death penalty executions and the legal policy of death executions in Indonesia. There are delays on death executions for the convicted person since they entitled to using rights namely filing a judicial review (PK/Peninjauan Kembali. Furthermore, the legal loophole in the execution of the death penalty by the publication of the Constitutional Court Number 107 / PUU-XIII / 2015 which assert that the Attorney as the executor can ask the convicted person or his family whether to use their rights or not if the convict clearly does not want to use his rights, the executions will be carried out. Legal policy on threats and the implementation of the death penalty in the draft of criminal code was agreed by draftsman of the bill with the solutions. The draftsman of the bill agrees that the death penalty will be an alternative punishment sentenced as a last resort to protect the society. The bill also regulates that the execution among others include that the execution can be delayed by ten years probations. If the public reaction on the convict is not too large or convict has regret and could fix it or the role in the crime is not very important and there is a reason to reduce punishment, the death penalty may be changed. For pregnant women and the mentally ill convicts the execution can only be carried after the birth and the person has recovered from mental illness. The existence of this solutions is still kept putting the death penalty in criminal law, whereas the effectiveness of the death penalty is scientifically still in doubt to solve crimes and to prevent crimes by the death penalty punishment.

  15. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators

    OpenAIRE

    Patry, Marc W.; Penrod, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court’s ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a p...

  16. Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a

  17. European perspective and legal framework of death penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Hnidka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The purpose of this research is to find out what is European union doing for the abolition of the death Method: We used analytical and descriptive method and collected data mainly from EU´s online official sources on legal framework of the death penalty and organized them in chronological order as they entered in to legislation in the following chapters. Results: Based on the theoretical explanation of the issue of the death penalty and with outlining of basic international and European treaties on the death penalty, we concluded that the EU in the issue of the death penalty creates its own contracts and demarches and through their action plans and public statements is trying to regulate and gradualy eliminate the death penalty from legislation of individual states. Society: In the 21st century the death penalty is quite often used but also abused and it is important as far as it is possible to enlighten the public with this issue Limitations / further research: It is close to impossible to gather direct sources especialy from the states where this issue is of highest importance and the resources they are providing are distorted

  18. Penalty Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Dim Targets Detection in Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Guo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect and track multiple maneuvering dim targets in sensor systems, an improved dynamic programming track-before-detect algorithm (DP-TBD called penalty DP-TBD (PDP-TBD is proposed. The performances of tracking techniques are used as a feedback to the detection part. The feedback is constructed by a penalty term in the merit function, and the penalty term is a function of the possible target state estimation, which can be obtained by the tracking methods. With this feedback, the algorithm combines traditional tracking techniques with DP-TBD and it can be applied to simultaneously detect and track maneuvering dim targets. Meanwhile, a reasonable constraint that a sensor measurement can originate from one target or clutter is proposed to minimize track separation. Thus, the algorithm can be used in the multi-target situation with unknown target numbers. The efficiency and advantages of PDP-TBD compared with two existing methods are demonstrated by several simulations.

  19. Selection and Penalty Strategies for Genetic Algorithms Designed to Solve Spatial Forest Planning Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.P.; Sessions, J.; Hamann, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have demonstrated success in solving spatial forest planning problems. We present an adaptive GA that incorporates population-level statistics to dynamically update penalty functions, a process analogous to strategic oscillation from the tabu search literature. We also explore performance of various selection strategies. The GA identified feasible solutions within 96%, 98%, and 93% of a non spatial relaxed upper bound calculated for landscapes of 100, 500, and 1000 units, respectively. The problem solved includes forest structure constraints limiting harvest opening sizes and requiring minimally sized patches of mature forest. Results suggest that the dynamic penalty strategy is superior to the more standard static penalty implementation. Results also suggest that tournament selection can be superior to the more standard implementation of proportional selection for smaller problems, but becomes susceptible to premature convergence as problem size increases. It is therefore important to balance selection pressure with appropriate disruption. We conclude that integrating intelligent search strategies into the context of genetic algorithms can yield improvements and should be investigated for future use in spatial planning with ecological goals.

  20. Composite Differential Evolution with Modified Oracle Penalty Method for Constrained Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minggang Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by recent advancements in differential evolution and constraints handling methods, this paper presents a novel modified oracle penalty function-based composite differential evolution (MOCoDE for constrained optimization problems (COPs. More specifically, the original oracle penalty function approach is modified so as to satisfy the optimization criterion of COPs; then the modified oracle penalty function is incorporated in composite DE. Furthermore, in order to solve more complex COPs with discrete, integer, or binary variables, a discrete variable handling technique is introduced into MOCoDE to solve complex COPs with mix variables. This method is assessed on eleven constrained optimization benchmark functions and seven well-studied engineering problems in real life. Experimental results demonstrate that MOCoDE achieves competitive performance with respect to some other state-of-the-art approaches in constrained optimization evolutionary algorithms. Moreover, the strengths of the proposed method include few parameters and its ease of implementation, rendering it applicable to real life. Therefore, MOCoDE can be an efficient alternative to solving constrained optimization problems.

  1. Does the amount of tagged stool and fluid significantly affect the radiation exposure in low-dose CT colonography performed with an automatic exposure control?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Kyong; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Young Hoon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna [Seoul National University, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yanof, Jeffrey H. [Philips Healthcare, CT Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hwang, Seung-sik [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    To determine whether the amount of tagged stool and fluid significantly affects the radiation exposure in low-dose screening CT colonography performed with an automatic tube-current modulation technique. The study included 311 patients. The tagging agent was barium (n = 271) or iodine (n = 40). Correlation was measured between mean volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the estimated x-ray attenuation of the tagged stool and fluid (ATT). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to determine the effect of ATT on CTDI{sub vol} and the effect of ATT on image noise while adjusting for other variables including abdominal circumference. CTDI{sub vol} varied from 0.88 to 2.54 mGy. There was no significant correlation between CTDI{sub vol} and ATT (p = 0.61). ATT did not significantly affect CTDI{sub vol} (p = 0.93), while abdominal circumference was the only factor significantly affecting CTDI{sub vol} (p < 0.001). Image noise ranged from 59.5 to 64.1 HU. The p value for the regression model explaining the noise was 0.38. The amount of stool and fluid tagging does not significantly affect radiation exposure. (orig.)

  2. Does the amount of tagged stool and fluid significantly affect the radiation exposure in low-dose CT colonography performed with an automatic exposure control?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyun Kyong; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Hyunna; Park, Seong Ho; Yanof, Jeffrey H.; Hwang, Seung-sik

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether the amount of tagged stool and fluid significantly affects the radiation exposure in low-dose screening CT colonography performed with an automatic tube-current modulation technique. The study included 311 patients. The tagging agent was barium (n = 271) or iodine (n = 40). Correlation was measured between mean volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and the estimated x-ray attenuation of the tagged stool and fluid (ATT). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to determine the effect of ATT on CTDI vol and the effect of ATT on image noise while adjusting for other variables including abdominal circumference. CTDI vol varied from 0.88 to 2.54 mGy. There was no significant correlation between CTDI vol and ATT (p = 0.61). ATT did not significantly affect CTDI vol (p = 0.93), while abdominal circumference was the only factor significantly affecting CTDI vol (p < 0.001). Image noise ranged from 59.5 to 64.1 HU. The p value for the regression model explaining the noise was 0.38. The amount of stool and fluid tagging does not significantly affect radiation exposure. (orig.)

  3. Stated response to increased enforcement density and penalty size for speeding and driving unbelted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hössinger, Reinhard; Berger, Wolfgang J

    2012-11-01

    To what extent can traffic offences be reduced through stronger enforcement, higher penalties, and the provision of information to road users? This question was addressed with respect to the offences of "speeding" and "driving unbelted." Data were collected by a telephone survey of admitted speeders, followed by 438 face-to-face stated response interviews. Based on the data collected, separate statistical models were developed for the two offences. The models predict the behavioral effect of increasing enforcement density and/or penalty size as well as the additional effect of providing information to car drivers. All three factors are predicted to be effective in reducing speeding. According to the model, one additional enforcement event per year will cause a driver to reduce his current frequency of speeding by 5%. A penalty increase of 10 Euros is predicted to have the same effect. An announcement of stronger enforcement or higher fines is predicted to have an additional effect on behavior, independent of the actual magnitudes of increase in enforcement or fines. With respect to the use of a seat belt, however, neither an increase in enforcement density nor its announcement is predicted to have a significant effect on driver behavior. An increase in the penalty size is predicted to raise the stated wearing rate, which is already 90% in Austria. It seems that both the fear of punishment and the motivation for driving unbelted are limited, so that there is only a weak tradeoff between the two. This may apply to most traffic offences, with the exception of speeding, which accounts for over 80% of tickets alone, whereas all other offences account for less than 3% each. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Privileges and penalties in the legal profession: an intersectional analysis of career progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jennifer; Valizade, Danat; Muzio, Daniel; Charlwood, Andy; Aulakh, Sundeep

    2018-04-26

    Intersectionality theory is concerned with integrating social characteristics to better understanding complex human relations and inequalities in organizations and societies (McCall ). Recently, intersectionality research has taken a categorical and quantitative turn as scholars critically adopt but retain existing social categories to explain differences in labour market outcomes. A key contention is that social categories carry penalties or privileges and their intersection promotes or hinders the life chances of particular groups and individuals. An emergent debate is whether the intersection of disadvantaged characteristics (such as female gender or minority ethnic status) produce penalties that are additive, multiplicative or ameliorative. Research is inconclusive and as yet pays little attention to moderating factors such as employer type, size, geographic location or work profile. Drawing on administrative records for individuals qualified as solicitors in England and Wales, collected by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), combined with aggregated workforce data and firm characteristics of their law firms, we undertake a statistical analysis of the intersection of gender and ethnicity in the profession with a degree of precision and nuance not previously possible. In response to calls to broaden studies of inequalities and intersectionality beyond their effect on pay or income (Castilla ) we focus on career progression to partnership as our key measure of success. The original contribution of our study is twofold. First, we establish statistically different profiles of law firms, showing how the solicitors' profession is stratified by gender, ethnicity and socio-economic background, as well as the type of legal work undertaken by developing a model of socio-economic stratification in the profession. Second, we demonstrate that while penalties tend to be additive (i.e. the sum of the individual ethnic and gender penalties) this varies significantly by

  5. Performance characteristics of CA 19-9 radioimmunoassay and clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 assay in patients with malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.E.; Shong, Y.K.; Cho, B.Y.; Kim, N.K.; Koh, C.S.; Lee, M.H.; Hong, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the performance characteristics of CA 19-9 radioimmunoassay and the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 assay in patients with malignancy, serum CA 19-9 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay using monoclonal antibody in 135 normal controls, 81 patients with various untreated malignancy, 9 patients of postoperative colon cancer without recurrence and 20 patients with benign gastrointestinal diseases, who visited Seoul National University Hospital from June, 1984 to March, 1985. (Author)

  6. There are lots of big fish in this pond: The role of peer overqualification on task significance, perceived fit, and performance for overqualified employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jia; Erdogan, Berrin; Bauer, Talya N; Jiang, Kaifeng; Liu, Songbo; Li, Yuhui

    2015-07-01

    Research has uncovered mixed results regarding the influence of overqualification on employee performance outcomes, suggesting the existence of boundary conditions for such an influence. Using relative deprivation theory (Crosby, 1976) as the primary theoretical basis, in the current research, we examine the moderating role of peer overqualification and provide insights to the questions regarding whether, when, and how overqualification relates to employee performance. We tested the theoretical model with data gathered across three phases over 6 months from 351 individuals and their supervisors in 72 groups. Results showed that when working with peers whose average overqualification level was high, as opposed to low, employees who felt overqualified for their jobs perceived greater task significance and person-group fit, and demonstrated higher levels of in-role and extra-role performance. We discuss theoretical and managerial implications for overqualification at the individual level and within the larger group context. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Significant Effect of a Pre-Exercise High-Fat Meal after a 3-Day High-Carbohydrate Diet on Endurance Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuma Murakami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of macronutrient composition of pre-exercise meals on endurance performance. Subjects consumed a high-carbohydrate diet at each meal for 3 days, followed by a high-fat meal (HFM; 1007 ± 21 kcal, 30% CHO, 55% F and 15% P or high-carbohydrate meal (HCM; 1007 ± 21 kcal, 71% CHO, 20% F and 9% P 4 h before exercise. Furthermore, just prior to the test, subjects in the HFM group ingested either maltodextrin jelly (M or a placebo jelly (P, while subjects in the HCM ingested a placebo jelly. Endurance performance was measured as running time until exhaustion at a speed between lactate threshold and the onset of blood lactate accumulation. All subjects participated in each trial, randomly assigned at weekly intervals. We observed that the time until exhaustion was significantly longer in the HFM + M (p < 0.05 than in HFM + P and HCM + P conditions. Furthermore, the total amount of fat oxidation during exercise was significantly higher in HFM + M and HFM + P than in HCM + P (p < 0.05. These results suggest that ingestion of a HFM prior to exercise is more favorable for endurance performance than HCM. In addition, HFM and maltodextrin ingestion following 3 days of carbohydrate loading enhances endurance running performance.

  8. A puzzle form of a non-verbal intelligence test gives significantly higher performance measures in children with severe intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Katrina D; Goharpey, Nahal; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2008-08-01

    Assessment of 'potential intellectual ability' of children with severe intellectual disability (ID) is limited, as current tests designed for normal children do not maintain their interest. Thus a manual puzzle version of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) was devised to appeal to the attentional and sensory preferences and language limitations of children with ID. It was hypothesized that performance on the book and manual puzzle forms would not differ for typically developing children but that children with ID would perform better on the puzzle form. The first study assessed the validity of this puzzle form of the RCPM for 76 typically developing children in a test-retest crossover design, with a 3 week interval between tests. A second study tested performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in a sample of 164 children with ID. In the first study, no significant difference was found between performance on the puzzle and book forms in typically developing children, irrespective of the order of completion. The second study demonstrated a significantly higher performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in the ID population. Similar performance on book and puzzle forms of the RCPM by typically developing children suggests that both forms measure the same construct. These findings suggest that the puzzle form does not require greater cognitive ability but demands sensory-motor attention and limits distraction in children with severe ID. Thus, we suggest the puzzle form of the RCPM is a more reliable measure of the non-verbal mentation of children with severe ID than the book form.

  9. Significant improvement of olfactory performance in sleep apnea patients after three months of nasal CPAP therapy - Observational study and randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Boerner

    Full Text Available The olfactory function highly impacts quality of life (QoL. Continuous positive airway pressure is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and is often applied by nasal masks (nCPAP. The influence of nCPAP on the olfactory performance of OSA patients is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the sense of smell before initiation of nCPAP and after three months treatment, in moderate and severe OSA patients.The sense of smell was assessed in 35 patients suffering from daytime sleepiness and moderate to severe OSA (apnea/hypopnea index ≥ 15/h, with the aid of a validated test battery (Sniffin' Sticks before initiation of nCPAP therapy and after three months of treatment. Additionally, adherent subjects were included in a double-blind randomized three weeks CPAP-withdrawal trial (sub-therapeutic CPAP pressure.Twenty five of the 35 patients used the nCPAP therapy for more than four hours per night, and for more than 70% of nights (adherent group. The olfactory performance of these patients improved significantly (p = 0.007 after three months of nCPAP therapy. When considering the entire group of patients, olfaction also improved significantly (p = 0.001. In the randomized phase the sense of smell of six patients deteriorated under sub-therapeutic CPAP pressure (p = 0.046 whereas five patients in the maintenance CPAP group showed no significant difference (p = 0.501.Olfactory performance improved significantly after three months of nCPAP therapy in patients suffering from moderate and severe OSA. It seems that this effect of nCPAP is reversible under sub-therapeutic CPAP pressure.ISRCTN11128866.

  10. Death Penalty and Happiness in States. Was Jeremy Bentham right?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Berg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jeremy Bentham is best known as the founding father of utilitarianism, a moral philosophy that values ‘happiness’ more than all other goals in life. According to this creed, policies should be directed at ‘the greatest happiness for the greatest number’. Besides formulating this general principle, Bentham wrote about several specific topics including the death penalty, which he passionately opposed. He did so, however, without applying his own utilitarian method. In this article the relationship between death penalty and happiness is studied empirically. Average happiness of citizens is compared in states with and without death penalty. Comparisons are made across 127 nation states in the early 2000s and among 47 federal states within the US over the years 1970-2000. The results show that Bentham, from the perspective of his own ethical philosophy, was too negative about the death penalty. It hardly undermines the happiness of nation states and it does not undermine the happiness of American states at all. If one opposes the death penalty, it should be done for non-utilititarian reasons.

  11. Forensic DNA evidence and the death penalty in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ungria, M C A; Sagum, M S; Calacal, G C; Delfin, F C; Tabbada, K A; Dalet, M R M; Te, T O; Diokno, J I; Diokno, M S I; Asplen, C A

    2008-09-01

    The death penalty remains a contentious issue even though it has been abolished in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, European Union member nations and some Asian countries such as Cambodia, East Timor and Nepal. Many argue that the irrevocability of the death penalty, in the face of potential erroneous convictions, can never justify its imposition. The Philippines, the first Asian country that abolished the death penalty in 1987, held the record for the most number of mandatory death offenses (30 offenses) and death eligible offenses (22 offenses) after it was re-imposed in 1994. Majority of death penalty convictions were decided based on testimonial evidence. While such cases undergo automatic review by the Supreme Court, the appellate process in the Philippines is not structured to accept post-conviction evidence, including DNA evidence. Because of the compelling nature of post-conviction DNA evidence in overturning death penalty convictions in the United States, different groups advocated its use in the Philippines. In one such case, People v Reynaldo de Villa, the defendant was charged with raping his 13-year-old niece that supposedly led to birth of a female child, a situation commonly known as 'criminal paternity'. This paper reports the results of the first post-conviction DNA test using 16 Short Tandem Repeat (STR) DNA markers in a criminal paternity case (People v Reynaldo de Villa) and discusses the implications of these results in the Philippine criminal justice system.

  12. Kicks from the penalty mark in soccer: the roles of stress, skill, and fatigue for kick outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordet, Geir; Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris; Lemmink, Koen A P M

    2007-01-15

    The soccer "penalty shootout" in the knock-out phase of major international tournaments is one of the most dramatic events in international soccer. The outcome of these kicks is typically attributed to factors such as psychology (e.g. coping with stress), skill (e.g. kicking technique), physiology (e.g. overcoming the fatigue of 120 min play), and chance (e.g. in what direction the goalkeeper moves). The purpose of this study was to use internet game record data to estimate the relative importance of these performance components for the outcome of penalty kicks in international matches. Data were collected from soccer statistics internet sites on all 41 penalty shootouts and 409 kicks taken in the World Cup, European Championships, and Copa America between 1976 and 2004. The results showed that the importance of the kicks (indicative of stress) was negatively related to the outcomes of the kicks, whereas skill and fatigue were less, or not, related to outcome. It was concluded that psychological components are most influential for the outcome of penalty kicks. We recommend that practitioners work with players to reduce the perceived importance of each kick.

  13. The influence of mitigation evidence, ethnicity, and SES on death penalty decisions by European American and Latino venire persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Russ K E; Willis-Esqueda, Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine whether European American and Latino mock jurors would demonstrate bias in death penalty decision making when mitigation evidence and defendant ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES) were varied. A total of 561 actual venire persons acted as mock jurors and read a trial transcript that varied a defendant's case information (mitigating circumstances: strong/weak, defendant ethnicity: European American/Latino, and defendant SES: low/high). European American jurors recommended the death penalty significantly more often for the low SES Latino defendant when strength of mitigation evidence was weak. In addition, they also assigned this defendant higher culpability ratings and lower ratings on positive personality trait measures compared with all other conditions. Strong mitigation evidence contributed to lower guilt ratings by European American jurors for the high SES European American defendant. Latino jurors did not differ in their death penalty sentencing across defendant mitigation, ethnicity, or SES conditions. Discussion of in-group favoritism and out-group derogation, as well as suggestions for procedures to diminish juror bias in death penalty cases, is provided. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 223 - Schedule of Civil Penalties 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... convenience, penalty citations will cite the CFR section and the penalty code, if any. FRA reserves the right... assessed against an individual only for a willful violation. The Administrator reserves the right to assess...

  15. EXPLAINING THE MOTHERHOOD WAGE PENALTY DURING THE EARLY OCCUPATIONAL CAREER

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAFF, JEREMY; MORTIMER, JEYLAN T.

    2011-01-01

    Prior research shows that mothers earn lower hourly wages than women without children, and that this maternal wage penalty cannot be fully explained by differences between mothers and other women in work experience and job characteristics. This research examines whether the residual motherhood wage penalty results from differences between mothers and other women in the accumulation of work interruptions and breaks in schooling. Using longitudinal data for 486 women followed from ages 19 to 31 in the Youth Development Study, we find that accumulated months not in the labor force and not enrolled in school explain the residual pay gap between mothers and other women. PMID:22037996

  16. The Penalty Cost Functional for the Two-Dimensional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Onomza WAZIRI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs the penalty cost functional for optimizing the two-dimensional control operator of the energized wave equation. In some multiplier methods such as the Lagrange multipliers and Pontrygean maximum principle, the cost of merging the constraint equation to the integral quadratic objective functional to obtain an unconstraint equation is normally guessed or obtained from the first partial derivatives of the unconstrained equation. The Extended Conjugate Gradient Method (ECGM necessitates that the penalty cost be sequentially obtained algebraically. The ECGM problem contains a functional which is completely given in terms of state and time spatial dependent variables.

  17. Triangular preconditioners for saddle point problems with a penalty term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klawonn, A. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Muenster (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Triangular preconditioners for a class of saddle point problems with a penalty term are considered. An important example is the mixed formulation of the pure displacement problem in linear elasticity. It is shown that the spectrum of the preconditioned system is contained in a real, positive interval, and that the interval bounds can be made independent of the discretization and penalty parameters. This fact is used to construct bounds of the convergence rate of the GMRES method used with an energy norm. Numerical results are given for GMRES and BI-CGSTAB.

  18. Significant performance enhancement of InGaN/GaN nanorod LEDs with multi-layer graphene transparent electrodes by alumina surface passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzel, M; Büttner, P; Sarau, G; Höflich, K; Heilmann, M; Chen, W; Wen, X; Conibeer, G; Christiansen, S H

    2017-02-03

    Nanotextured surfaces provide an ideal platform for efficiently capturing and emitting light. However, the increased surface area in combination with surface defects induced by nanostructuring e.g. using reactive ion etching (RIE) negatively affects the device's active region and, thus, drastically decreases device performance. In this work, the influence of structural defects and surface states on the optical and electrical performance of InGaN/GaN nanorod (NR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated by top-down RIE of c-plane GaN with InGaN quantum wells was investigated. After proper surface treatment a significantly improved device performance could be shown. Therefore, wet chemical removal of damaged material in KOH solution followed by atomic layer deposition of only 10 [Formula: see text] alumina as wide bandgap oxide for passivation were successfully applied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the initially compressively strained InGaN/GaN LED layer stack turned into a virtually completely relaxed GaN and partially relaxed InGaN combination after RIE etching of NRs. Time-correlated single photon counting provides evidence that both treatments-chemical etching and alumina deposition-reduce the number of pathways for non-radiative recombination. Steady-state photoluminescence revealed that the luminescent performance of the NR LEDs is increased by about 50% after KOH and 80% after additional alumina passivation. Finally, complete NR LED devices with a suspended graphene contact were fabricated, for which the effectiveness of the alumina passivation was successfully demonstrated by electroluminescence measurements.

  19. Significantly enhanced electrochemical performance of lithium titanate anode for lithium ion battery by the hybrid of nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiyi, Li; Yuanyuan, Jiang; Xiaoyan, Zhou; Zaijun, Li; Zhiguo, Gu; Guangli, Wang; Junkang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    at 2C. The battery performance is significantly better than that of pure LTO electrode and LTO/graphene electrode.

  20. How Good Is Good: Improved Tracking and Managing of Safety Goals, Performance Indicators, Production Targets and Significant Events Using Learning Curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, Rommey B.; Saull, John W.

    2002-01-01

    We show a new way to track and measure safety and performance using learning curves derived on a mathematical basis. When unusual or abnormal events occur in plants and equipment, the regulator and good management practice requires they be reported, investigated, understood and rectified. In addition to reporting so-called 'significant events', both management and the regulator often set targets for individual and collective performance, which are used for both reward and criticism. For almost completely safe systems, like nuclear power plants, commercial aircraft and chemical facilities, many parameters are tracked and measured. Continuous improvement has to be demonstrated, as well as meeting reduced occurrence rates, which are set as management goals or targets. This process usually takes the form of statistics for availability of plant and equipment, forced or unplanned maintenance outage, loss of safety function, safety or procedural violations, etc. These are often rolled up into a set of so-called 'Performance Indicators' as measures of how well safety and operation is being managed at a given facility. The overall operating standards of an industry are also measured. A whole discipline is formed of tracking, measuring, reporting, managing and understanding the plethora of indicators and data. Decreasing occurrence rates and meeting or exceeding goals are seen and rewarded as virtues. Managers and operators need to know how good is their safety management system that has been adopted and used (and paid for), and whether it can itself be improved. We show the importance of accumulated experience in correctly measuring and tracking the decreasing event and error rates speculating a finite minimum rate. We show that the rate of improvement constitutes a measurable 'learning curve', and the attainment of the goals and targets can be affected by the adopted measures. We examine some of the available data on significant events, reportable occurrences, and loss of

  1. Stunting, poor iron status and parasite infection are significant risk factors for lower cognitive performance in Cambodian school-aged children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Perignon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nutrition is one of many factors affecting the cognitive development of children. In Cambodia, 55% of children <5 y were anemic and 40% stunted in 2010. Currently, no data exists on the nutritional status of Cambodian school-aged children, or on how malnutrition potentially affects their cognitive development. OBJECTIVE: To assess the anthropometric and micronutrient status (iron, vitamin A, zinc, iodine of Cambodian schoolchildren and their associations with cognitive performance. METHODS: School children aged 6-16 y (n = 2443 from 20 primary schools in Cambodia were recruited. Anthropometry, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, transferrin receptors, retinol-binding protein and zinc concentrations, inflammation status, urinary iodine concentration and parasite infection were measured. Socio-economic data were collected in a sub-group of children (n = 616. Cognitive performance was assessed using Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM and block design and picture completion, two standardized tests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia, iron, zinc, iodine and vitamin A deficiency were 15.7%; 51.2%, 92.8%, 17.3% and 0.7% respectively. The prevalence of stunting was 40.0%, including 10.9% of severe stunting. Stunted children scored significantly lower than non-stunted children on all tests. In RCPM test, boys with iron-deficiency anemia had lower scores than boys with normal iron status (-1.46, p<0.05. In picture completion test, children with normal iron status tended to score higher than iron-deficient children with anemia (-0.81; p = 0.067 or without anemia (-0.49; p = 0.064. Parasite infection was associated with an increase in risk of scoring below the median value in block design test (OR = 1.62; p<0.05, and with lower scores in other tests, for girls only (both p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Poor cognitive performance of Cambodian school-children was multifactorial and

  2. In-flight icing on unmanned aerial vehicle and its aerodynamic penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilder, K.; Yuan, W.

    2017-06-01

    A numerical prediction of ice accretion on HQ309, SD7032, and SD7037 airfoils and its aerodynamic penalties is described. Ice accretion prediction on a three-dimensional (3D) swept wing is also presented. In addition to airflow and drop trajectory solvers, NRC's (National Research Council) original, 3D, morphogenetic icing modeling approach has been used. The analysis was performed for a wide range of icing conditions identi¦ed in the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) Appendix C icing envelope. They cover a range of drop sizes, air temperatures, and liquid water contents. For selected icing conditions, the resulting decrease in lift and increase in drag have been calculated.

  3. 42 CFR 423.758 - Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS... Intermediate Sanctions § 423.758 Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS. (a) When a Part D plan sponsor does not request a hearing CMS initiates collection of the civil money penalty following the...

  4. 42 CFR 422.758 - Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS... § 422.758 Collection of civil money penalties imposed by CMS. (a) When an MA organization does not request a hearing, CMS initiates collection of the civil money penalty following the expiration of the...

  5. 78 FR 22798 - Hazardous Materials: Revision of Maximum and Minimum Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    .... 5101 et seq.). Section 5123(a) of that law provides civil penalties for knowing violations of Federal... 107--Guidelines for Civil Penalties * * * * * IV. * * * C. * * * Under the Federal hazmat law, 49 U.S... Maximum and Minimum Civil Penalties AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA...

  6. 78 FR 24336 - Rules of Practice and Procedure; Adjusting Civil Money Penalties for Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ... civil monetary penalty was last set or adjusted pursuant to law.'' Furthermore, the increase for each...; Adjusting Civil Money Penalties for Inflation AGENCY: Farm Credit Administration. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation implements inflation adjustments to civil money penalties (CMPs) that the Farm...

  7. 19 CFR 162.66 - Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.66 Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit. In every case where a narcotic drug or marihuana is unladen without a permit, the penalties...

  8. Young, Black, and Sentenced To Die: Black Males and the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Janice

    1996-01-01

    Explores the death penalty as imposed on young black males in the United States and examines the disparity in death penalty rates for homicides with black offenders and white victims. States continue to impose the death penalty rather than viewing youth violence as a failure of the social system. (SLD)

  9. 75 FR 39641 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... law judge (ALJ) reverses the civil money penalty determination in whole or in part, the escrowed..., widespread harm, or resulting in a resident's death is not eligible for the civil money penalty reduction... Penalties for Nursing Homes AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed...

  10. 13 CFR 127.700 - What penalties may be imposed under this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What penalties may be imposed under this part? 127.700 Section 127.700 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WOMEN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESS FEDERAL CONTRACT ASSISTANCE PROCEDURES Penalties § 127.700 What penalties may...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 220 - Schedule of Civil Penalties 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a willful violation. The Administrator reserves the right to assess a penalty of up to $100,000 for... right to assess a penalty of up to $100,000 for any violation where circumstances warrant. See 49 CFR... correspond to any subsection designation(s). For convenience, penalty citations will cite the CFR section and...

  12. 42 CFR 422.752 - Basis for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... money penalties. 422.752 Section 422.752 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Sanctions § 422.752 Basis for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties. (a) All... sanctions at 422.750(a)(1) and (a)(3). (c) Civil Money Penalties. (1) CMS. In addition to, or in place of...

  13. 17 CFR Table IV to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Inflation Adjustments IV Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments Table IV to Subpart E U.S. Code citation Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustments Civil monetary penalty description Year...

  14. 12 CFR 747.1001 - Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of inflation. 747.1001 Section 747.1001 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION... PROCEDURE, AND INVESTIGATIONS Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties § 747.1001 Adjustment of civil money penalties by the rate of inflation. (a) NCUA is required by the Federal Civil Penalties...

  15. 14 CFR 13.305 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cost of living adjustments of civil... Inflation Adjustment § 13.305 Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties. (a) Except for the... and maximum civil monetary penalty for each civil monetary penalty by the cost-of-living adjustment...

  16. 32 CFR 269.4 - Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost of living adjustments of civil monetary... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 269.4 Cost of living... increasing the maximum civil monetary penalty for each civil monetary penalty by the cost-of-living...

  17. 30 CFR 250.1400 - How does MMS begin the civil penalty process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does MMS begin the civil penalty process...) Civil Penalties § 250.1400 How does MMS begin the civil penalty process? This subpart explains MMS's... other minerals operations in the OCS has a violation. Whenever MMS determines, on the basis of available...

  18. 30 CFR 250.1406 - When will MMS notify me and provide penalty information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When will MMS notify me and provide penalty information? 250.1406 Section 250.1406 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... (OCS) Civil Penalties § 250.1406 When will MMS notify me and provide penalty information? If the...

  19. 12 CFR 263.62 - Relevant considerations for assessment of civil penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relevant considerations for assessment of civil... Collection of Civil Money Penalties § 263.62 Relevant considerations for assessment of civil penalty. In... the penalty with respect to the financial resources and good faith of the person charged, the gravity...

  20. 12 CFR 622.55 - Notice of assessment of civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of assessment of civil money penalty... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules and Procedures for Assessment and Collection of Civil Money Penalties § 622.55 Notice of assessment of civil money penalty. (a) Notice of assessment. The notice of assessment for a...

  1. 24 CFR 1007.70 - Disqualification of lenders and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... civil money penalties. 1007.70 Section 1007.70 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to....70 Disqualification of lenders and civil money penalties. (a) In general—(1) Grounds for action. HUD... or holder that are guaranteed under this part. (b) Civil money penalties for intentional violations...

  2. 24 CFR 30.100 - Settlement of a civil money penalty action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Settlement of a civil money penalty... Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.100 Settlement of a civil money penalty action. The officials listed at subpart B of this part, or their...

  3. 45 CFR 160.402 - Basis for a civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for a civil money penalty. 160.402 Section... RELATED REQUIREMENTS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Imposition of Civil Money Penalties § 160.402 Basis for a civil money penalty. (a) General rule. Subject to § 160.410, the Secretary will impose a...

  4. 24 CFR 30.80 - Factors in determining amount of civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... civil money penalty. 30.80 Section 30.80 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES: CERTAIN PROHIBITED CONDUCT Procedures § 30.80 Factors in determining amount of civil money penalty. After determining that a respondent has...

  5. 42 CFR 3.402 - Basis for a civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for a civil money penalty. 3.402 Section 3... money penalty. (a) General rule. A person who discloses identifiable patient safety work product in knowing or reckless violation of the confidentiality provisions shall be subject to a civil money penalty...

  6. Dispersion induced penalty for a 1xN passive interferometric optical MUX/DEMUX and its reduction using all-pass filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lasse; Peucheret, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    The cascadability of 1timesN passband flattened interferometer DEMUX is investigated numerically. The passband flattening process results in detrimental dispersion induced penalty at 10 Gbit/s which can be significantly reduced with all-pass filters on the input arm......The cascadability of 1timesN passband flattened interferometer DEMUX is investigated numerically. The passband flattening process results in detrimental dispersion induced penalty at 10 Gbit/s which can be significantly reduced with all-pass filters on the input arm...

  7. Short-course radiotherapy, with elective delay prior to surgery, in patients with unresectable rectal cancer who have poor performance status or significant co-morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, Paul; Hingorani, Mohan; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Cooper, Rachel; Melcher, Alan; Crellin, Adrian; Kwok-Williams, Michelle; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Standard treatment for rectal cancer which threatens the expected plane of resection on MRI imaging is long-course, pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (1.8-2 Gy, 25-28 fractions). Not all patients are suitable for this because of age, poor performance status or co-morbidities. We describe our experience of short-course (5 x 5 Gy) pre-operative radiotherapy with planned, delayed surgery (SCPRT-delay) in this patient group. Materials and methods: Between April 2001 and October 2007, 43 patients were selected for SCPRT-delay. The clinical records were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Median age was 82 (range 58-87). Forty-one patients had radiotherapy of which 26 (61%) were subsequently able to have surgery. Of these, R0, R1 and R2 resections were performed in 22, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated, although two patients required hospital admission for management of diarrhoea and one developed significant late small bowel toxicity, attributable to radiotherapy. In those undergoing R0 or R1 resection there have been no local recurrences (median follow-up 18 months). Median survival for the whole group was 23 months, although this was 44 months in those undergoing surgery. Conclusions: SCPRT-delay appears to be a useful alternative to long-course pre-operative chemoradiotherapy in this high-risk group of patients.

  8. Imparting improvements in electrochemical sensors: evaluation of different carbon blacks that give rise to significant improvement in the performance of electroanalytical sensing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Ravanini, Amanda E.; Figueiredo-Filho, Luiz C.S.; Iniesta, Jesús; Banks, Craig E.; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Three different carbon black materials have been evaluated as a potential modifier, however, only one demonstrated an improvement in the electrochemical properties. The carbon black structures were characterised with SEM, XPS and Raman spectroscopy and found to be very similar to that of amorphous graphitic materials. The modifications utilised were constructed by three different strategies (using ultrapure water, chitosan and dihexadecylphosphate). The fabricated sensors are electrochemically characterised using N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-para-phenylenediamine and both inner-sphere and outer-sphere redox probes, namely potassium ferrocyanide(II) and hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride, in addition to the biologically relevant and electroactive analytes, dopamine (DA) and acetaminophen (AP). Comparisons are made with an edge-plane pyrolytic graphite and glassy-carbon electrode and the benefits of carbon black implemented as a modifier for sensors within electrochemistry are explored, as well as the characterisation of their electroanalytical performances. We reveal significant improvements in the electrochemical performance (excellent sensitivity, faster heterogeneous electron transfer rate (HET)) over that of a bare glassy-carbon and edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode and thus suggest that there are substantial advantages of using carbon black as modifier in the fabrication of electrochemical based sensors. Such work is highly important and informative for those working in the field of electroanalysis where electrochemistry can provide portable, rapid, reliable and accurate sensing protocols (bringing the laboratory into the field), with particular relevance to those searching for new electrode materials

  9. Performance Characteristics of CA 19-9 Radioimmunoassay and Clinical Significance of Serum CA 19-9 Assay in Patients with Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Eun; Shong, Young Kee; Cho, Bo Youn; Kim, Noe Kyeong; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Hong, Seong Woon; Hong, Kee Suk

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the performance characteristics of CA 19-9 radioimmunoassay and the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 assay in patients with malignancy, serum. CA 19-9 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay using monoclonal antibody in 135 normal controls, 81 patients with various untreated malignancy, 9 patients of postoperative colon cancer without recurrence and 20 patients with benign gastrointestinal diseases, who visited Seoul National University Hospital from June, 1984 to March, 1985. The results were as follows; 1) The CA 19-9 radioimmunoassay was simple to perform and can be completed in one work day. And the between-assay reproducibility and the assay recovery were both excellent. 2) The mean serum CA 19-9 level in 135 normal controls was 8.4±4.2 U/mL. Normal upper limit of serum CA 19-9 was defined as 21.0 U/mL. 4 out of 135 (3.0%) normal controls showed elevated CA 19-9 levels above the normal upper limit. 3) One out of 20 (5.0%) patients with benign gastrointestinal diseases showed elevated serum CA 19-9 level above the normal upper limit. 4) In 81 patients with various untreated malignancy, 41 patients (50.6%) showed elevated serum CA 19-9 levels. 66.7% of 18 patients with colorectal cancer, 100% of 2 patients with pancreatic cancer, 100% of 3 patients with common bile duct cancer, 47.1% of 17 patients with stomach cancer, 28.6% of 28 patients with hepatoma and 60.0% of 5 gastrointestinal tract cancers showed elevated serum CA 19-9 levels. 5) The sensitivities of serum CA 19-9 related to respectability in colorectal and stomach cancer were 33.3% in resectable colorectal cancer, 83.3% in unresectable colorectal cancer, 41.7% in resectable stomach cancer, 60.0% in unresectable stomach cancer respectively. 6) The sensitivity of serum CA 19-9 in 9 patients of postoperative colorectal cancer without recurrence were 33.3% and significantly decreased compared with that of untreated colorectal cancer, 66.7% (p<0.05). 7) In Patients with colorectal cancer

  10. On the computational assessment of white matter hyperintensity progression: difficulties in method selection and bias field correction performance on images with significant white matter pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria del C.; Gonzalez-Castro, Victor; Wang, Xin; Doubal, Fergus; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [Centre for Clinical Brian Sciences, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Ghandour, Dina T. [University of Edinburgh, College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Armitage, Paul A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Subtle inhomogeneities in the scanner's magnetic fields (B{sub 0} and B{sub 1}) alter the intensity levels of the structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affecting the volumetric assessment of WMH changes. Here, we investigate the influence that (1) correcting the images for the B{sub 1} inhomogeneities (i.e. bias field correction (BFC)) and (2) selection of the WMH change assessment method can have on longitudinal analyses of WMH progression and discuss possible solutions. We used brain structural MRI from 46 mild stroke patients scanned at stroke onset and 3 years later. We tested three BFC approaches: FSL-FAST, N4 and exponentially entropy-driven homomorphic unsharp masking (E{sup 2}D-HUM) and analysed their effect on the measured WMH change. Separately, we tested two methods to assess WMH changes: measuring WMH volumes independently at both time points semi-automatically (MCMxxxVI) and subtracting intensity-normalised FLAIR images at both time points following image gamma correction. We then combined the BFC with the computational method that performed best across the whole sample to assess WMH changes. Analysis of the difference in the variance-to-mean intensity ratio in normal tissue between BFC and uncorrected images and visual inspection showed that all BFC methods altered the WMH appearance and distribution, but FSL-FAST in general performed more consistently across the sample and MRI modalities. The WMH volume change over 3 years obtained with MCMxxxVI with vs. without FSL-FAST BFC did not significantly differ (medians(IQR)(with BFC) = 3.2(6.3) vs. 2.9(7.4)ml (without BFC), p = 0.5), but both differed significantly from the WMH volume change obtained from subtracting post-processed FLAIR images (without BFC)(7.6(8.2)ml, p < 0.001). This latter method considerably inflated the WMH volume change as subtle WMH at baseline that became more intense at follow-up were counted as increase in the volumetric change. Measurement of WMH volume change remains

  11. 29 CFR 102.132 - Reporting of prohibited communications; penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... communication shall place or cause to be placed on the public record of the proceeding: (1) The communication... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting of prohibited communications; penalties. 102.132 Section 102.132 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS...

  12. 33 CFR 118.5 - Penalty for failure to maintain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... States who fails or refuses to maintain such lights and other signals, or to obey any of the lawful rules... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Penalty for failure to maintain. 118.5 Section 118.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  13. 7 CFR 3.91 - Adjusted civil monetary penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... articles not for monetary gain), $275,000 in the case of any other person for each violation, and $550,000... violation of the AHPA by an individual moving regulated articles not for monetary gain, $275,000 in the case... and a maximum of $550. (3) Food and Nutrition Service. (i) Civil penalty for hardship fine in lieu of...

  14. 75 FR 17555 - Department of Agriculture Civil Monetary Penalties Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ..., codified at 15 U.S.C. 50, has a maximum of $110. (vii) Civil penalty for live poultry dealer violations... ``the amount specified at Sec. 3.91(b)(10)(iv) of this title''. Dated: January 12, 2010. Thomas J...

  15. Racial Characteristics and the Imposition of the Death Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radelet, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    Data from Florida from 1976-77 show that those accused of murdering Whites are more likely to be sentenced to death than those accused of murdering Blacks. If victim's race is controlled, however, data do not clearly support the hypothesis that defendant's race is strongly associated with imposition of the death penalty. (Author/GC)

  16. The Death Penalty in the United States. Public Talk Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquerella, Lynn

    This program guide provides the information a study circle will need to discuss the death penalty. It offers a balanced, nonpartisan presentation of a spectrum of views. The four positions and the supporting material are designed for use in a single-session program of approximately 2 hours. The four positions are as follows: (1) the death penalty…

  17. 49 CFR 1018.30 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... interest, penalties, and administrative costs on debts owed to the United States Government in accordance.... (e) Interest is computed only on the principal of the debt, and the interest rate remains fixed for.... (d) The Board shall assess interest based upon the rate of the current value of funds to the United...

  18. 10 CFR 15.37 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Interest is computed only on the principal of the debt and the interest rate remains fixed for the duration..., penalties, and administrative costs on debts owed to the United States Government in accordance with the...) The NRC shall waive collection of interest on the debt or any portion of the debt which is paid in...

  19. 49 CFR 1017.14 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OFFSET FROM INDEBTED GOVERNMENT AND FORMER GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES § 1017.14 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. (a) The rate of interest assessed shall be the rate of the current value of funds to the U... of interest can be assessed if the Board can reasonably determine that a higher rate is necessary to...

  20. 15 CFR 6.4 - Adjustments to penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Collection of Foreign Trade Statistics—Delinquency on Delayed Filing of Export Documentation; maximum penalty for each day's delinquency, from $1,000 to $1,000; maximum per violation, from $10,000 to $10,000. (2) 13 U.S.C. 305(b), Collection of Foreign Trade Statistics—Violations, from $10,000 to $10,000. (c...

  1. 30 CFR 845.13 - Point system for penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... seriousness, based upon the extent to which enforcement is obstructed by the violation. (3) Negligence. (i... violation which occurs through no negligence shall be assigned no penalty points for negligence; (B) A violation which is caused by negligence shall be assigned 12 points or less, depending on the degree of...

  2. 30 CFR 723.13 - Point system for penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to which enforcement is obstructed by the violation. (3) Negligence. (i) The Office shall assign up... no negligence shall be assigned no penalty points for negligence; (B) A violation which is caused by negligence shall be assigned 12 points or less, depending on the degree of negligence; (C) A violation which...

  3. 26 CFR 1.6662-2 - Accuracy-related penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....6662-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts, and Assessable Penalties § 1.6662-2... attributable both to negligence and a substantial understatement of income tax, the maximum accuracy-related...

  4. 15 CFR 700.74 - Violations, penalties, and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations, penalties, and remedies. 700.74 Section 700.74 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE...

  5. 76 FR 74720 - Inflation Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION 46 CFR Part 506 [Docket No. 09-04] RIN 3072-AC36 Inflation Adjustment... published in the Federal Register of Friday, July 31, 2009 (74 FR 38114). The rule adjusts for inflation the... accordance with the requirements of the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, as amended...

  6. 77 FR 60047 - Adjustment of Civil Monetary Penalties for Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... provides a penalty of up to $1,000 for an educational organization's failure to disclose certain... of Justice, Attorney General's Manual on the Administrative Procedure Act 31 (1947) and South.... Assessment of Educational Impact Based on our own review, we have determined that these final regulations do...

  7. critical analysis of abolition of death penalty in international law

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    regions” in the world, as most African states still retain the death penalty despite the growing international ..... been likely to endanger our safety. If application of ..... narrower class of crimes, and has excluded an increasingly broader group of .... manufacturing criminals and then killing them is an insult to our intelligence and.

  8. 76 FR 62689 - Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... the penalty if a member of its principal management or the principal management of a branch office... members of the principal management (or principal officers) of the firm or a branch office participated in... Office of Management and Budget in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507(d...

  9. Characterizing the "Time of Emergence" of Air Quality Climate Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, D. A.; Garcia-Menendez, F.; Monier, E.; Solomon, S.; Selin, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    By driving not only local changes in temperature, but also precipitation and regional-scale changes in seasonal circulation patterns, climate change can directly and indirectly influence changes in air quality and its extremes. These changes - often referred to as "climate penalties" - can have important implications for human health, which is often targeted when assessing the potential co-benefits of climate policy. But because climate penalties are driven by slow, spatially-varying, temporal changes in the climate system, their emergence in the real world should also have a spatio-temporal component following regional variability in background air quality. In this work, we attempt to estimate the spatially-varying "time of emergence" of climate penalty signals by using an ensemble modeling framework based on the MIT Integrated Global System Model (MIT IGSM). With this framework we assess three climate policy scenarios assuming three different underlying climate sensitivities, and conduct a 5-member ensemble for each case to capture internal variability within the model. These simulations are used to drive offline chemical transport modeling (using CAM-Chem and GEOS-Chem). In these simulations, we find that the air quality response to climate change can vary dramatically across different regions of the globe. To analyze these regionally-varying climate signals, we employ a hierarchical clustering technique to identify regions with similar seasonal patterns of air quality change. Our simulations suggest that the earliest emergence of ozone climate penalties would occur in Southern Europe (by 2035), should the world neglect climate change and rely on a "business-as-usual" emissions policy. However, even modest climate policy dramatically pushes back the time of emergence of these penalties - to beyond 2100 - across most of the globe. The emergence of climate-forced changes in PM2.5 are much more difficult to detect, partially owing to the large role that changes in

  10. 42 CFR 423.760 - Determinations regarding the amount of civil money penalties and assessment imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... penalties and assessment imposed by CMS. 423.760 Section 423.760 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... penalties and assessment imposed by CMS. (a) Determining the appropriate amount of any penalty. In determining the amount of penalty imposed under 423.752(c)(1), CMS will consider as appropriate: (1) The...

  11. 12 CFR 1411.1 - Inflation adjustment of civil money penalties for failure to file a certified statement, pay any...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inflation adjustment of civil money penalties... Collection of Civil Money Penalties § 1411.1 Inflation adjustment of civil money penalties for failure to... convicted of criminal offenses. In accordance with the Federal Civil Money Penalties Inflation Adjustment...

  12. Performance studies of GooFit on GPUs vs RooFit on CPUs while estimating the statistical significance of a new physical signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Florio, Adriano

    2017-10-01

    In order to test the computing capabilities of GPUs with respect to traditional CPU cores a high-statistics toy Monte Carlo technique has been implemented both in ROOT/RooFit and GooFit frameworks with the purpose to estimate the statistical significance of the structure observed by CMS close to the kinematical boundary of the J/ψϕ invariant mass in the three-body decay B + → J/ψϕK +. GooFit is a data analysis open tool under development that interfaces ROOT/RooFit to CUDA platform on nVidia GPU. The optimized GooFit application running on GPUs hosted by servers in the Bari Tier2 provides striking speed-up performances with respect to the RooFit application parallelised on multiple CPUs by means of PROOF-Lite tool. The considerable resulting speed-up, evident when comparing concurrent GooFit processes allowed by CUDA Multi Process Service and a RooFit/PROOF-Lite process with multiple CPU workers, is presented and discussed in detail. By means of GooFit it has also been possible to explore the behaviour of a likelihood ratio test statistic in different situations in which the Wilks Theorem may or may not apply because its regularity conditions are not satisfied.

  13. Review of Studies of Clay Minerals as Significant Component of Potential Host Rocks or Engineering Barriers for Radioactive Waste Disposals Performed at Comenius University in Bratislava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Uhlik; Vladimir, Sucha; Maria, Caplovicova; Igor, Stricek

    2013-01-01

    About 50 % of electric power is produced by nuclear power plants in Slovakia. In spite of the significant production of nuclear waste, Slovakia has not defined basic strategy of radioactive-waste isolation. However, some pilot projects and studies have been carried out. Five areas were determined as prospective sites for construction of deep geological repository (DGR). Two of them are situated in the south of Slovakia. Szecseny schlier (mixture of siltstones and Clay-stones) of Lucenec Formation (Egerian) is one of the most prospective host rocks from lithological, structural and spatial perspective. Besides the investigation of potential host rock for DGR the studies of bentonite properties as important part of engineering barriers for radioactive waste disposals were performed. Detailed mineral and structural analyses of smectites from the bentonitic material exposed to laboratory Mock-Up test were realised. Particular interest has been focused on interaction between Fe and smectites. Other field of interest is investigation of sorption of Cs and Sr on natural and modified bentonites, including irradiation. Purpose of this work is to present a short review of other studies done by our group with partial focusing to interaction of organic dye (Rhoda-mine 6G) with smectite that is connected with changes of layer charge after treatment; possibilities to measure preferential orientation of clays after compaction by TEM and to effort to use X-ray micro-tomography for inner structure of sediments. (authors)

  14. Heterostructured TiO2/NiTiO3 Nanorod Arrays for Inorganic Sensitized Solar Cells with Significantly Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Ying; Wang, Jian-Gan; Sun, Huan-Huan; Wei, Bingqing

    2018-04-11

    Organic dyes used in the conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) suffer from poor light stability and high cost. In this work, we demonstrate a new inorganic sensitized solar cell based on ordered one-dimensional semiconductor nanorod arrays of TiO 2 /NiTiO 3 (NTO) heterostructures prepared via a facile two-step hydrothermal approach. The semiconductor heterostructure arrays are highly desirable and promising for DSSCs because of their direct charge transport capability and slow charge recombination rate. The low-cost NTO inorganic semiconductor possesses an appropriate band gap that matches well with TiO 2 , which behaves like a "dye" to enable efficient light harvesting and fast electron-hole separation. The solar cells constructed by the ordered TiO 2 /NTO heterostructure photoanodes show a significantly improved power conversion efficiency, high fill factor, and more promising, outstanding life stability. The present work will open up an avenue to design heterostructured inorganics for high-performance solar cells.

  15. When should fractional flow reserve be performed to assess the significance of borderline coronary artery lesions: Derivation of a simplified scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Fadi A; Falasiri, Shayan; Glover, Charles B; Khaliq, Asma; Leung, Calvin C; Mroue, Jad; Ebra, George

    2016-11-01

    To derive a simplified scoring system (SSS) that can assist in selecting patients who would benefit from the application of fractional flow reserve (FFR). Angiographers base decisions to perform FFR on their interpretation of % diameter stenosis (DS), which is subject to variability. Recent studies have shown that the amount of myocardium at jeopardy is an important factor in determining the degree of hemodynamic compromise. We conducted a retrospective multivariable analysis to identify independent predictors of hemodynamic compromise in 289 patients with 317 coronary vessels undergoing FFR. A SSS was derived using the odds ratios as a weighted factor. The receiver operator characteristics curve was used to identify the optimal cutoff (≥3) to discern a functionally significant lesion (FFR≤0.8). Male gender, left anterior descending artery apical wrap, disease proximal to lesion, minimal lumen diameter and % DS predicted abnormal FFR (≤0.8) and lesion location in the left circumflex predicted a normal FFR. Using a cutoff score of ≥3 on the SSS, a specificity of 90.4% (95% CI: 83.0-95.3) and a sensitivity of 38.0% (95% CI: 31.5-44.9) was generated with a positive predictive value of 89.0% (95% CI: 80.7%-94.6%) and negative predictive value of 41.6% (95% CI: 35.1%-48.3%). The decision to use FFR should be based not only on the % DS but also the size of the myocardial mass jeopardized. A score of ≥3 on the SSS should prompt further investigation with a pressure wire. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-04: Multiple Penalties with Different Orders for Structure Adaptive CBCT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Q; Cheng, P; Tan, S; Tan, S; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To combine total variation (TV) and Hessian penalty in a structure adaptive way for cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction. Methods: TV is a widely used first order penalty with good ability in suppressing noise and preserving edges but leads to the staircase effect in regions with smooth intensity transition. The second order Hessian penalty can effectively suppress the staircase effect with extra cost of blurring object edges. To take the best of both penalties we proposed a novel method to combine both for CBCT reconstruction in a structure adaptive way. The proposed method adaptively determined the weight of each penalty according to the geometry of local regions. An specially-designed exponent term with image gradient involved was used to characterize the local geometry such that the weights for Hessian and TV were 1 and 0 respectively at uniform local regions and 0 and 1 at edge regions. For other local regions the weights varied from 0 to 1. The objective functional was minimized using the majorzationminimization approach. We evaluated the proposed method on a modified 3D shepp-logan and a CatPhan 600 phantom. The full-width-at-halfmaximum (FWHM) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated. Results: For 3D shepp-logan the reconstructed images using TV had an obvious staircase effect while those using the proposed method and Hessian preserved the smooth transition regions well. FWHMs of the proposed method TV and Hessian penalty were 1.75 1.61 and 3.16 respectively, indicating that both TV and the proposed method is able to preserve edges. For CatPhan 600 CNR values of the proposed method were similar to those of TV and Hessian. Conclusion: The proposed method retains favorable properties of TV like preserving edges and also has the ability in better preserving gradual transition structure as Hessian does. All methods performs similarly in suppressing noise. This work was supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC) under

  17. A Note on Testing Mediated Effects in Structural Equation Models: Reconciling Past and Current Research on the Performance of the Test of Joint Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Matthew J.; Gonzalez, Oscar; Miocevic, Milica; MacKinnon, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Methods to assess the significance of mediated effects in education and the social sciences are well studied and fall into two categories: single sample methods and computer-intensive methods. A popular single sample method to detect the significance of the mediated effect is the test of joint significance, and a popular computer-intensive method…

  18. Optimal control penalty finite elements - Applications to integrodifferential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, T. J.

    The application of the optimal-control/penalty finite-element method to the solution of integrodifferential equations in radiative-heat-transfer problems (Chung et al.; Chung and Kim, 1982) is discussed and illustrated. The nonself-adjointness of the convective terms in the governing equations is treated by utilizing optimal-control cost functions and employing penalty functions to constrain auxiliary equations which permit the reduction of second-order derivatives to first order. The OCPFE method is applied to combined-mode heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation, both without and with scattering and viscous dissipation; the results are presented graphically and compared to those obtained by other methods. The OCPFE method is shown to give good results in cases where standard Galerkin FE fail, and to facilitate the investigation of scattering and dissipation effects.

  19. Integration between a demo size post-combustion CO2 capture and full size power plant: an integral approach on energy penalty for different process options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, F. de; Magneschi, G.; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Stienstra, G.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    CO2 capture based on post-combustion capture has the potential to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, this capture process reduces considerably the energy efficiency of the power plant. To reduce this energy penalty, this paper studies different

  20. In vivo polymerization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) in the living rat hippocampus does not cause a significant loss of performance in a delayed alternation task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liangqi; Shaw, Crystal L.; Kuo, Chin-chen; Griffin, Amy L.; Martin, David C.

    2014-04-01

    -polymerization time intervals, the polymerization did not cause significant deficits in performance of the DA task, suggesting that hippocampal function was not impaired by PEDOT deposition. However, GFAP+ and ED-1+ cells were also found at the deposition two weeks after the polymerization, suggesting potential secondary scarring. Therefore, less extensive deposition or milder deposition conditions may be desirable to minimize this scarring while maintaining decreased system impedance.

  1. 78 FR 14179 - Adjustments to Civil Monetary Penalty Amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... monetary penalties that may be imposed by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``PCAOB'') in...,500 $7,500 For any other person.... 2010 75,000 80,000 For natural person/fraud 2010 75,000 80,000 For any other person/ 2010 375,000 400,000 fraud. For natural person/ 2010 150,000 160,000 substantial...

  2. Guiding rational reservoir flood operation using penalty-type genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chiu

    2008-06-01

    SummaryReal-time flood control of a multi-purpose reservoir should consider decreasing the flood peak stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage during typhoon seasons. This study proposes a reservoir flood control optimization model with linguistic description of requirements and existing regulations for rational operating decisions. The approach involves formulating reservoir flood operation as an optimization problem and using the genetic algorithm (GA) as a search engine. The optimizing formulation is expressed not only by mathematical forms of objective function and constraints, but also by no analytic expression in terms of parameters. GA is used to search a global optimum of a mixture of mathematical and nonmathematical formulations. Due to the great number of constraints and flood control requirements, it is difficult to reach a solution without violating constraints. To tackle this bottleneck, the proper penalty strategy for each parameter is proposed to guide the GA searching process. The proposed approach is applied to the Shihmen reservoir in North Taiwan for finding the rational release and desired storage as a case study. The hourly historical data sets of 29 typhoon events that have hit the area in last thirty years are investigated bye the proposed method. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the simplex method was performed. The results demonstrated that a penalty-type genetic algorithm could effectively provide rational hydrographs to reduce flood damage during the flood operation and to increase final storage for future usages.

  3. A Modified Penalty Parameter Approach for Optimal Estimation of UH with Simultaneous Estimation of Infiltration Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjya, Rajib Kumar

    2018-05-01

    The unit hydrograph and the infiltration parameters of a watershed can be obtained from observed rainfall-runoff data by using inverse optimization technique. This is a two-stage optimization problem. In the first stage, the infiltration parameters are obtained and the unit hydrograph ordinates are estimated in the second stage. In order to combine this two-stage method into a single stage one, a modified penalty parameter approach is proposed for converting the constrained optimization problem to an unconstrained one. The proposed approach is designed in such a way that the model initially obtains the infiltration parameters and then searches the optimal unit hydrograph ordinates. The optimization model is solved using Genetic Algorithms. A reduction factor is used in the penalty parameter approach so that the obtained optimal infiltration parameters are not destroyed during subsequent generation of genetic algorithms, required for searching optimal unit hydrograph ordinates. The performance of the proposed methodology is evaluated by using two example problems. The evaluation shows that the model is superior, simple in concept and also has the potential for field application.

  4. Mutual Recognition of Financial Penalties between the EU Member States. Critical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Ioana Rusu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the special Romanian law, one of the forms of judicial assistance in criminal matters recognized in the relations between the EU member states is, among others, the one referringto the cooperation in applying the principle of mutual recognition of financial penalties. The European normative act that establishes the general cooperation norms in this matter is the Council’sDecision Frame 2005/214/JAI on February 24, 2005 on the application of the principle of mutual recognition of financial penalties. This European normative act has been transposed in the internallegislation through Law no.302/2004, according to the international judicial cooperation in criminal matters, with the subsequent amendments and completions, the latter being represented by Lawno.222/2008. The amendments and completions instituted by the abovementioned normative act establish the procedure of transmitting the decision, the procedures for recognition and execution ofsuch a decision by the competent Romanian judicial authorities, the grounds of non recognition and non execution, the definition of used terms, as well as other aspects referring to the recognition andexecution of such decisions. Commenting refers to a number of provisions in the law under both European and domestic in the special law, comments aimed in particular the replacement of terms ofrecognition or non-performance reasons, the procedure of identification of persons convicted when they are evade the enforcement of financial obligations and failure to transpose into national law of subsequent changes to European law.

  5. Social penalty promotes cooperation in a cooperative society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-08-04

    Why cooperation is well developed in human society is an unsolved question in biological and human sciences. Vast studies in game theory have revealed that in non-cooperative games selfish behavior generally dominates over cooperation and cooperation can be evolved only under very limited conditions. These studies ask the origin of cooperation; whether cooperation can evolve in a group of selfish individuals. In this paper, instead of asking the origin of cooperation, we consider the enhancement of cooperation in a small already cooperative society. We ask whether cooperative behavior is further promoted in a small cooperative society in which social penalty is devised. We analyze hawk-dove game and prisoner's dilemma introducing social penalty. We then expand it for non-cooperative games in general. The results indicate that cooperation is universally favored if penalty is further imposed. We discuss the current result in terms of the moral, laws, rules and regulations in a society, e.g., criminology and traffic violation.

  6. LEGAL AND ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE LEGAL PENALTY INTEREST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Diana APAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The legal evaluation of the penalty interest, meaning the ex lege determination of its level is applicable only in the case of non-fulfillment of a monetary payment obligation. The applicability of the system of legal evaluation of the interest is generally determined by the absence of a document that ascertains the agreement of the parties, such as a contract, through which the parties, following this agreement, evaluate the prejudice caused by the non-fulfillment of a monetary payment obligation, before the prejudice has occurred. The legal evaluation of the penalty interest, as a component of the regulation in the field of legal interest has the purpose to ensure creditor’s protection. Regardless of the prejudice caused to the creditor, the legal penalty interest shall be determined by relating it to a variable benchmark that is the level of the reference interest rate of the National Bank of Romania, which is the monetary policy interest rate of the National Bank of Romania.

  7. La pena de muerte/The death penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo López Bentacourt (México

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La pena de muerte debe aplicarse debido a múltiples ventajas, argumentos que los abolicionistas se han esmerado en pasar por alto. Es urgente llevar a cabo esta sanción ya que los entes cancerígenos de la sociedad deben ser erradicados para que los problemas sociales no se sigan expandiendo. Sin embargo esta pena debe aplicarse bajo ciertos criterios, es decir en casos extremos y siempre y cuando las autoridades y órganos policíacos hayan desaparecido. La pena de muerte representa el más elemental derecho de legítima defensa social. The death penalty should be applied due to many advantages, arguments that abolitionists have tried to ignore. It is urgent to carry out this punishment since carcinogenic entities of the society must be eradicated, so that social problems have not continue expanding. However this penalty should apply under certain criteria, i.e. in extreme cases and provided the authorities and police bodies have disappeared. The death penalty represents the most basic right of legitimate social defence.

  8. Performance of penalized maximum likelihood in estimation of genetic covariances matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Karin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimation of genetic covariance matrices for multivariate problems comprising more than a few traits is inherently problematic, since sampling variation increases dramatically with the number of traits. This paper investigates the efficacy of regularized estimation of covariance components in a maximum likelihood framework, imposing a penalty on the likelihood designed to reduce sampling variation. In particular, penalties that "borrow strength" from the phenotypic covariance matrix are considered. Methods An extensive simulation study was carried out to investigate the reduction in average 'loss', i.e. the deviation in estimated matrices from the population values, and the accompanying bias for a range of parameter values and sample sizes. A number of penalties are examined, penalizing either the canonical eigenvalues or the genetic covariance or correlation matrices. In addition, several strategies to determine the amount of penalization to be applied, i.e. to estimate the appropriate tuning factor, are explored. Results It is shown that substantial reductions in loss for estimates of genetic covariance can be achieved for small to moderate sample sizes. While no penalty performed best overall, penalizing the variance among the estimated canonical eigenvalues on the logarithmic scale or shrinking the genetic towards the phenotypic correlation matrix appeared most advantageous. Estimating the tuning factor using cross-validation resulted in a loss reduction 10 to 15% less than that obtained if population values were known. Applying a mild penalty, chosen so that the deviation in likelihood from the maximum was non-significant, performed as well if not better than cross-validation and can be recommended as a pragmatic strategy. Conclusions Penalized maximum likelihood estimation provides the means to 'make the most' of limited and precious data and facilitates more stable estimation for multi-dimensional analyses. It should

  9. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Maria Ellegård, Lina; Anell, Anders

    -for-performance in a difference-in-differences analysis. Despite that the monetary incentives were small, we find that P4P significantly increased narrow-spectrum antibiotics' share of RTI antibiotics consumption. We further find larger effects in areas where there were many private providers, where the incentive was formulated...... as a penalty rather than a reward, and where all providers were close to a P4P target....

  10. Effect of ship hull form on the resistance penalty from biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dinis; Larsson, Ann I; Granhag, Lena

    2018-03-01

    Hull biofouling is a well-known problem for the shipping industry, leading to increased resistance and fuel consumption. Considering that the effects of hull form on resistance are known to be higher for a less slender hull, it is hypothesised in this paper that the effect of biofouling roughness on resistance is also dependent on the hull form. To test this hypothesis, previously reported full-scale numerical results on a containership are re-analysed. Form effects on roughness penalties, corresponding to K ΔCT  = 0.058 ± 0.025, are observed at a low speed (19 knots, Re s  = 2.29 × 10 9 ), which are however cancelled out by traditionally neglected roughness effects on wave-making resistance at a higher speed (24 knots, Re s  = 2.89 × 10 9 ). It is concluded that hull form effects on biofouling penalties can be significant at low speeds, though not generalisable for higher speeds, namely when wave-making resistance corresponds to ≥ 29% of total resistance.

  11. Immediate impact of 'penalty points legislation' on acute hospital trauma services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lenehan, Brian

    2012-02-03

    Road traffic accident (RTA) related mortality and injury may be reduced by up to 40% with the introduction of \\'road safety\\' legislation. Little is known regarding changes in pattern of injury and overall resource impact on acute trauma services. This prospective study examines RTA related admissions, injuries sustained and resultant sub-speciality operative workload in a Level 1 Trauma Centre during the 12 months immediately prior to and following the introduction of \\'penalty points\\' legislation. Eight hundred and twenty RTA related admissions were identified over the 24-month period from 01\\/11\\/2001 to 31\\/10\\/2003. There was a 36.7% decrease in RTA related admissions subsequent to the introduction of new legislation. Bed occupancy was almost halved. However, the relative Orthopaedic workload increased from 34% to 41% with a 10% increase in relative bed occupancy. The pattern of orthopaedic injury was significantly altered with a >50% absolute reduction in high velocity injuries. Curiously, there was no change in the absolute number of spinal fractures seen. This favourable early Irish experience of \\'penalty points\\' legislation mirrors that of worldwide published literature. Our findings demonstrate that the injury reduction effects were primarily enjoyed by non-orthopaedic sub-specialities. Such findings mandate consideration when allocating vital resources to sub-specialities within busy trauma units.

  12. Online formative MCQs to supplement traditional teaching: a very significant positive impact on student performance in the short and long run

    OpenAIRE

    Catley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The paper builds on the research underpinning One Lecturer’s Experience of Blending E-learning with Traditional Teaching (Catley, 2005). It analyses the earlier findings in more depth and examines the longer term impact of online quizzes on student performance. Engagement with formative online MCQs is explored generally and the links between MCQ engagement and a range of student characteristics: seminar attendance, “A” level performance, age, nationality, gender and prior study of the discipl...

  13. IPF-LASSO: Integrative L1-Penalized Regression with Penalty Factors for Prediction Based on Multi-Omics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Boulesteix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As modern biotechnologies advance, it has become increasingly frequent that different modalities of high-dimensional molecular data (termed “omics” data in this paper, such as gene expression, methylation, and copy number, are collected from the same patient cohort to predict the clinical outcome. While prediction based on omics data has been widely studied in the last fifteen years, little has been done in the statistical literature on the integration of multiple omics modalities to select a subset of variables for prediction, which is a critical task in personalized medicine. In this paper, we propose a simple penalized regression method to address this problem by assigning different penalty factors to different data modalities for feature selection and prediction. The penalty factors can be chosen in a fully data-driven fashion by cross-validation or by taking practical considerations into account. In simulation studies, we compare the prediction performance of our approach, called IPF-LASSO (Integrative LASSO with Penalty Factors and implemented in the R package ipflasso, with the standard LASSO and sparse group LASSO. The use of IPF-LASSO is also illustrated through applications to two real-life cancer datasets. All data and codes are available on the companion website to ensure reproducibility.

  14. Aspects of Cultural Landscape Application on Classical Stage Art. Ballet Performance in the Open Space as a Significant Element of the Cultural Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Lebedeva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the applications aspects of cultural landscape for the preparation of the classical performing arts staging. Research findings highlighted that the cultural landscape (parks, estates, castles, bastions, etc. objects occupies an increasingly important role in public recreation and classical art development programs. At the same time it is noted that event’s aesthetic and emotional quality suffers due to the fact that no specific attention was given for the preparation of the event space. More methodological materials are necessary for preparation of this type of design spaces. In Lithuania classical performing arts events in cultural landscape open spaces are based on XVI–XVII century tradition and has good prospects for modern development. A review of some of the classical art events installations, based on the importance of quality of open spaces influence on the emotional impact, that should be an integral part of the cultural event. The author summarizes his experience of ballet events in open spaces in the cultural landscape – Klaipėda, Trakai. Presented is Tchaikovsky's ballet “Swan Lake” construction in Klaipėda John Hill project that includes infrastructure and environmental design concept: audience space, stage design, stage design performance solutions. Analogous key decisions are later adapted to the ballet performance in the natural environment of the lake Trakai. Experience of this project dictated the necessity of deeper understanding and methodological basis for the classical performing arts analysis and design.

  15. Significantly improved photovoltaic performance in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells with graphene oxide /PEDOT:PSS double decked hole transport layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Saqib; Abdullah, Shahino Mah; Shahid, Muhammad Mehmood; Ansari, Mohammad Omaish; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2017-01-13

    This work demonstrates the high performance graphene oxide (GO)/PEDOT:PSS doubled decked hole transport layer (HTL) in the PCDTBT:PC 71 BM based bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic device. The devices were tested on merits of their power conversion efficiency (PCE), reproducibility, stability and further compared with the devices with individual GO or PEDOT:PSS HTLs. Solar cells employing GO/PEDOT:PSS HTL yielded a PCE of 4.28% as compared to either of individual GO or PEDOT:PSS HTLs where they demonstrated PCEs of 2.77 and 3.57%, respectively. In case of single GO HTL, an inhomogeneous coating of ITO caused the poor performance whereas PEDOT:PSS is known to be hygroscopic and acidic which upon direct contact with ITO reduced the device performance. The improvement in the photovoltaic performance is mainly ascribed to the increased charge carriers mobility, short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and decreased series resistance. The well matched work function of GO and PEDOT:PSS is likely to facilitate the charge transportation and an overall reduction in the series resistance. Moreover, GO could effectively block the electrons due to its large band-gap of ~3.6 eV, leading to an increased shunt resistance. In addition, we also observed the improvement in the reproducibility and stability.

  16. Significantly improved photovoltaic performance in polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells with graphene oxide /PEDOT:PSS double decked hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Saqib; Abdullah, Shahino Mah; Shahid, Muhammad Mehmood; Ansari, Mohammad Omaish; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates the high performance graphene oxide (GO)/PEDOT:PSS doubled decked hole transport layer (HTL) in the PCDTBT:PC71BM based bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic device. The devices were tested on merits of their power conversion efficiency (PCE), reproducibility, stability and further compared with the devices with individual GO or PEDOT:PSS HTLs. Solar cells employing GO/PEDOT:PSS HTL yielded a PCE of 4.28% as compared to either of individual GO or PEDOT:PSS HTLs where they demonstrated PCEs of 2.77 and 3.57%, respectively. In case of single GO HTL, an inhomogeneous coating of ITO caused the poor performance whereas PEDOT:PSS is known to be hygroscopic and acidic which upon direct contact with ITO reduced the device performance. The improvement in the photovoltaic performance is mainly ascribed to the increased charge carriers mobility, short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and decreased series resistance. The well matched work function of GO and PEDOT:PSS is likely to facilitate the charge transportation and an overall reduction in the series resistance. Moreover, GO could effectively block the electrons due to its large band-gap of ~3.6 eV, leading to an increased shunt resistance. In addition, we also observed the improvement in the reproducibility and stability.

  17. Variation in performance measure criteria significantly affects cardiology practice rankings: Insights from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Zubin J; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Phil G; Maddox, Thomas M; Oetgen, William J; Spertus, John A; Rumsfeld, John S; Heidenreich, Paul A; Peterson, Eric D; Drozda, Joseph P

    2015-06-01

    Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes over 5 years by improving cardiovascular prevention. An important tool in the success of programs like Million Hearts is public ranking on the quality of practices, yet different measures may provide different rankings, so the true quality of practices is difficult to discern. We evaluated the quality of ambulatory cardiology care using performance measure metrics. We compared rankings of practices participating in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence Registry using measures from (1) the physician quality reporting system and (2) the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement. We compared achievement rates for measures between the 2 frameworks and determined correlations in rankings using Spearman correlation coefficients. From January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012, there were 1,711,326 patients enrolled from 111 US practices. Among eligible patients, the physician quality reporting system and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement measures were achieved in 76.1% versus 77.4% for antiplatelet prescription (P performance and failing to achieve public health goals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of intra- and inter-regional labour mobility on plant performance in Denmark: the significance of related labour inflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, B.; Boschma, R.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of labour mobility on plant performance in Denmark. Our study shows that the effect of labour mobility can only be assessed when one accounts for the type of skills that flow into the plant and the degree to which these match the existing skills at the plant

  19. The effect of intra- and inter-regional labour mobility on plant performance in Denmark : The significance of related labour inflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Bram; Boschma, Ron|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123155541

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the impact of labour mobility on plant performance in Denmark. Our study shows that the effect of labour mobility can only be assessed when one accounts for the type of skills that flow into the plant and the degree to which these match the existing skills at the plant

  20. Management and non-supervisory perceptions surrounding the implementation and significance of high-performance work practices in a nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbridge, Gayle Ann

    Change management has become an imperative for organizations as they move into the 21st century; up to 75 percent of change initiatives fail. Nuclear power plants face the same challenges as industrial firms with the added challenge of deregulation. Faced with this challenge, restructuring the electric utility has raised a number of complex issues. Under traditional cost-of-service regulation, electric utilities were able to pass on their costs to consumers who absorbed them. In the new competitive environment, customers will now choose their suppliers based on the most competitive price. The purpose of this study is to determine the degree of congruence between non-supervisory and supervisory personnel regarding the perceived implementation of high performance workplace practices at a nuclear power plant. This study used as its foundation the practices identified in the Road to High Performance Workplaces: A Guide to Better Jobs and Better Business Results by the U.S. Department of Labor's Office of the American Workplace (1994). The population for this study consisted of organizational members at one nuclear power plant. Over 300 individuals completed surveys on high performance workplace practices. Two surveys were administered, one to non-supervisory personnel and one to first line supervisors and above. The determination of implementation levels was accomplished through descriptive statistical analysis. Results of the study revealed 32 areas of noncongruence between non-supervisory and supervisory personnel in regard to the perceived implementation level of the high performance workplace practices. Factor analysis further revealed that the order in which the respondents place emphasis on the variables varies between the two groups. This study provides recommendations that may improve the nuclear power plants alignment of activities. Recommendations are also provided for additional research on high-performance work practices.

  1. Mental Fatigue Impairs Soccer-Specific Physical and Technical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mitchell R; Coutts, Aaron J; Merlini, Michele; Deprez, Dieter; Lenoir, Matthieu; Marcora, Samuele M

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effects of mental fatigue on soccer-specific physical and technical performance. This investigation consisted of two separate studies. Study 1 assessed the soccer-specific physical performance of 12 moderately trained soccer players using the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test, Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1). Study 2 assessed the soccer-specific technical performance of 14 experienced soccer players using the Loughborough Soccer Passing and Shooting Tests (LSPT, LSST). Each test was performed on two occasions and preceded, in a randomized, counterbalanced order, by 30 min of the Stroop task (mentally fatiguing treatment) or 30 min of reading magazines (control treatment). Subjective ratings of mental fatigue were measured before and after treatment, and mental effort and motivation were measured after treatment. Distance run, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion were recorded during the Yo-Yo IR1. LSPT performance time was calculated as original time plus penalty time. LSST performance was assessed using shot speed, shot accuracy, and shot sequence time. Subjective ratings of mental fatigue and effort were higher after the Stroop task in both studies (P motivation was similar between conditions. This mental fatigue significantly reduced running distance in the Yo-Yo IR1 (P performance time were not different between conditions; however, penalty time significantly increased in the mental fatigue condition (P = 0.015). Mental fatigue also impaired shot speed (P = 0.024) and accuracy (P performance.

  2. Carbohydrate gel ingestion significantly improves the intermittent endurance capacity, but not sprint performance, of adolescent team games players during a simulated team games protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shaun M; Turner, Anthony P; Sanderson, Mark F; Sproule, John

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ingesting a carbohydrate (CHO) gel on the intermittent endurance capacity and sprint performance of adolescent team games players. Eleven participants [mean age 13.5 ± 0.7 years, height 1.72 ± 0.08 m, body mass (BM) 62.1 ± 9.4 kg] performed two trials separated by 3-7 days. In each trial, they completed four 15 min periods of part A of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST), followed by an intermittent run to exhaustion (part B). In the 5 min pre-exercise, participants consumed 0.818 mL kg(-1) BM of a CHO or a non-CHO placebo gel, and a further 0.327 mL kg(-1) BM every 15 min during part A of the LIST (38.0 ± 5.5 g CHO h(-1) in the CHO trial). Intermittent endurance capacity was increased by 21.1% during part B when the CHO gel was ingested (4.6 ± 2.0 vs. 3.8 ± 2.4 min, P games players during a simulated team games protocol.

  3. A nonlinear support vector machine model with hard penalty function based on glowworm swarm optimization for forecasting daily global solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, He; Dong, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Eclat data mining algorithm is used to determine the possible predictors. • Support vector machine is converted into a ridge regularization problem. • Hard penalty selects the number of radial basis functions to simply the structure. • Glowworm swarm optimization is utilized to determine the optimal parameters. - Abstract: For a portion of the power which is generated by grid connected photovoltaic installations, an effective solar irradiation forecasting approach must be crucial to ensure the quality and the security of power grid. This paper develops and investigates a novel model to forecast 30 daily global solar radiation at four given locations of the United States. Eclat data mining algorithm is first presented to discover association rules between solar radiation and several meteorological factors laying a theoretical foundation for these correlative factors as input vectors. An effective and innovative intelligent optimization model based on nonlinear support vector machine and hard penalty function is proposed to forecast solar radiation by converting support vector machine into a regularization problem with ridge penalty, adding a hard penalty function to select the number of radial basis functions, and using glowworm swarm optimization algorithm to determine the optimal parameters of the model. In order to illustrate our validity of the proposed method, the datasets at four sites of the United States are split to into training data and test data, separately. The experiment results reveal that the proposed model delivers the best forecasting performances comparing with other competitors.

  4. Stress-first protocol for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging with semiconductor cameras: high diagnostic performances with significant reduction in patient radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Mathieu; Claudin, Marine; Veran, Nicolas; Morel, Olivier; Besseau, Cyril; Boutley, Henri; Djaballah, Wassila; Poussier, Sylvain; Verger, Antoine; Moulin, Frederic; Imbert, Laetitia; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Effective doses of 14 mSv or higher are currently being attained in patients having stress and rest myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed on the same day with conventional protocols. This study aimed to assess the actual reduction in effective doses as well as diagnostic performances for MPI routinely planned with: (1) high-sensitivity cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) cameras, (2) very low injected activities and (3) a stress-first protocol where the normality of stress images may lead to avoiding rest imaging. During a 1-year period, 2,845 patients had MPI on a CZT camera, a single-day stress-first protocol and low injected activities (120 MBq of 99m Tc-sestamibi at stress for 75 kg body weight and threefold higher at rest). The ability to detect > 50 % coronary stenosis was assessed in a subgroup of 149 patients who also had coronary angiography, while the normalcy rate was assessed in a subgroup of 128 patients with a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease (<10 %). Overall, 33 % of patients had abnormal MPI of which 34 % were women and 34 % were obese. The mean effective doses and the percentage of exams involving only stress images were: (1) 3.53 ± 2.10 mSv and 37 % in the overall population, (2) 4.83 ± 1.56 mSv and 5 % in the subgroup with angiography and (3) 1.96 ± 1.52 mSv and 71 % in the low-probability subgroup. Sensitivity and global accuracy for identifying the 106 patients with coronary stenosis were 88 and 80 %, respectively, while the normalcy rate was 97 %. When planned with a low-dose stress-first protocol on a CZT camera, MPI provides high diagnostic performances and a dramatic reduction in patient radiation doses. This reduction is even greater in low-risk subgroups with high rates of normal stress images, thus allowing the mean radiation dose to be balanced against cardiac risk in targeted populations. (orig.)

  5. Death Penalty Decisions: Instruction Comprehension, Attitudes, and Decision Mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patry, Marc W; Penrod, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of this research was to empirically evaluate a set of assumptions, advanced in the Supreme Court's ruling in Buchanan v. Angelone (1998), about jury comprehension of death penalty instructions. Further, this research examined the use of evidence in capital punishment decision making by exploring underlying mediating factors upon which death penalty decisions may be based. Manipulated variables included the type of instructions and several variations of evidence. Study 1 was a paper and pencil study of 245 undergraduate mock jurors. The experimental design was an incomplete 4×2×2×2×2 factorial model resulting in 56 possible conditions. Manipulations included four different types of instructions, presence of a list of case-specific mitigators to accompany the instructions, and three variations in the case facts: age of the defendant, bad prior record, and defendant history of emotional abuse. Study 2 was a fully-crossed 2×2×2×2×2 experiment with four deliberating mock juries per cell. Manipulations included jury instructions (original or revised), presence of a list of case-specific mitigators, defendant history of emotional abuse, bad prior record, and heinousness of the crime. The sample of 735 jury-eligible participants included 130 individuals who identified themselves as students. Participants watched one of 32 stimulus videotapes based on a replication of a capital sentencing hearing. The present findings support previous research showing low comprehension of capital penalty instructions. Further, we found that higher instruction comprehension was associated with higher likelihood of issuing life sentence decisions. The importance of instruction comprehension is emphasized in a social cognitive model of jury decision making at the sentencing phase of capital cases.

  6. Lower rate of invasive revascularisation in acute coronary syndrome patients with significant stenosis on coronary angiography when angiography is performed on a diagnostics only hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Anders; Galatius, Søren; Madsen, Mette

    Patient Register. We included those examined with CAG in the analysis. Information on distance from the patient's home to nearest invasive centre was obtained from Statistics Denmark along with information on education, personal income, previous medicine use and vital status. Patients were grouped...... of the admission. Result Of 24 910 patients with first ACS, 33% lived less than 21 km from one of the 5 invasive centres, 33% lived between 21-64 km and 33% >64 km away. Revascularisation was performed in 13 964 (73%) of the 18263 patients examined with a CAG. Among those examined with a CAG, the cumulative...... incidence of revascularisation was 79% for the third living closest to a centre vs. 74% for those living farthest away. When adjusting for variables like gender, age, vessel disease and the others mentioned above, there was a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.80 (95% CI 0. 73-0.85, p

  7. The use of the standard exercise test to establish the clinical significance of mild echocardiographic changes in a Thoroughbred poor performer : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Meyer

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old Thoroughbred gelding racehorse was referred to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital (OVAH with a history of post-race distress and collapse. In the absence of any obvious abnormalities in the preceding diagnostic work-up, a standard exercise test was performed to determine an underlying cause for the post-race distress reported. In this particular case oxygen desaturation became evident at speeds as slow as 6 m/s, where PO2 was measured at 82.3 mm Hg. Similarly at a blood pH of 7.28, PCO2 had dropped to 30.0mm Hg indicating a combined metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. The cause of the distress was attributed to a severe hypoxia, with an associated hypocapnoea, confirmed on blood gas analyses, where PO2 levels obtained were as low as 56.6 mm Hg with a mean PCO2 level of 25.4 mm Hg during strenuous exercise. Arterial oxygenation returned to normal immediately after cessation of exercise to 106.44 mm Hg, while the hypocapnoeic alkalosis, PCO2 25.67 mm Hg, persisted until the animal's breathing normalized. The results obtained were indicative of a dynamic cardiac insufficiency present during exercise. The combination of an aortic stenosis and a mitral valve insufficiency may have resulted in a condition similar to that described as high-altitude pulmonary oedema, with respiratory changes and compensation as for acute altitude disease. The results obtained were indicative of a dynamic cardiac insufficiency present during exercise and substantiate the fact that an extensive diagnostic regime may be required to establish a cause for poor performance and that the standard exercise test remains an integral part of this work-up.

  8. Significant performance variation among PCR systems in diagnosing congenital toxoplasmosis in São Paulo, Brazil: analysis of 467 amniotic fluid samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Suely Okay

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Performance variation among PCR systems in detecting Toxoplasma gondii has been extensively reported and associated with target genes, primer composition, amplification parameters, treatment during pregnancy, host genetic susceptibility and genotypes of different parasites according to geographical characteristics. PATIENTS: A total of 467 amniotic fluid samples from T. gondii IgM- and IgG-positive Brazilian pregnant women being treated for 1 to 6 weeks at the time of amniocentesis (gestational ages of 14 to 25 weeks. METHODS: One nested-B1-PCR and three one-round amplification systems targeted to rDNA, AF146527 and the B1 gene were employed. RESULTS: Of the 467 samples, 189 (40.47% were positive for one-round amplifications: 120 (63.49% for the B1 gene, 24 (12.69% for AF146527, 45 (23.80% for both AF146527 and the B1 gene, and none for rDNA. Fifty previously negative one-round PCR samples were chosen by computer-assisted randomization analysis and re-tested (nested-B1-PCR, during which nine additional cases were detected (9/50 or 18%. DISCUSSION: The B1 gene PCR was far more sensitive than the AF146527 PCR, and the rDNA PCR was the least effective even though the rDNA had the most repetitive sequence. Considering that the four amplification systems were equally affected by treatment, that the amplification conditions were optimized for the target genes and that most of the primers have already been reported, it is plausible that the striking differences found among PCR performances could be associated with genetic diversity in patients and/or with different Toxoplasma gondii genotypes occurring in Brazil. CONCLUSION: The use of PCR for the diagnosis of fetal Toxoplasma infections in Brazil should be targeted to the B1 gene when only one gene can be amplified, preferably by nested amplification with primers B22/B23.

  9. The Death Penalty in the United States of America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Miron Popa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The death penalty dramatically signifies that society does not excuse or condone the taking of innocent lives. It symbolizes the value of the innocent victim. Incapacity can be imposed by long terms ofimprisonment, particularly for habitual offenders; the policy of "keeping criminals off the streets" does indeed protect the public for a period of time, although it is done at a considerable cost. The object of deterrence is to make the certainty and severity of punishment so great as to inhibit potential criminals from committingcrimes. The best available estimates of the certainty of punishment for serious crime suggest that very few crimes actually result in jail sentences for the perpetrators.

  10. Exact penalty results for mathematical programs with vanishing constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hoheisel, T.; Kanzow, Ch.; Outrata, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 5 (2010), s. 2514-2526 ISSN 0362-546X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Mathematical programs with vanishing constraints * Mathematical programs with equilibrium constraints * Exact penalization * Calmness * Subdifferential calculus * Limiting normal cone Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.279, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/MTR/outrata-exact penalty results for mathematical programs with vanishing constraints.pdf

  11. Partial correlation matrix estimation using ridge penalty followed by thresholding and re-estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Min Jin; Sun, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by the problem of construction of gene co-expression network, we propose a statistical framework for estimating high-dimensional partial correlation matrix by a three-step approach. We first obtain a penalized estimate of a partial correlation matrix using ridge penalty. Next we select the non-zero entries of the partial correlation matrix by hypothesis testing. Finally we re-estimate the partial correlation coefficients at these non-zero entries. In the second step, the null distribution of the test statistics derived from penalized partial correlation estimates has not been established. We address this challenge by estimating the null distribution from the empirical distribution of the test statistics of all the penalized partial correlation estimates. Extensive simulation studies demonstrate the good performance of our method. Application on a yeast cell cycle gene expression data shows that our method delivers better predictions of the protein-protein interactions than the Graphic Lasso. © 2014, The International Biometric Society.

  12. Partial Correlation Matrix Estimation using Ridge Penalty Followed by Thresholding and Reestimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Summary Motivated by the problem of construction gene co-expression network, we propose a statistical framework for estimating high-dimensional partial correlation matrix by a three-step approach. We first obtain a penalized estimate of a partial correlation matrix using ridge penalty. Next we select the non-zero entries of the partial correlation matrix by hypothesis testing. Finally we reestimate the partial correlation coefficients at these non-zero entries. In the second step, the null distribution of the test statistics derived from penalized partial correlation estimates has not been established. We address this challenge by estimating the null distribution from the empirical distribution of the test statistics of all the penalized partial correlation estimates. Extensive simulation studies demonstrate the good performance of our method. Application on a yeast cell cycle gene expression data shows that our method delivers better predictions of the protein-protein interactions than the Graphic Lasso. PMID:24845967

  13. An examination of the effect on cigarette prices and promotions of Philip Morris USA penalties to stores that sell cigarettes to minors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feighery, E C; Schleicher, N C; Ribisl, K M; Rogers, T

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential impact of public policies to regulate price discounting strategies on retail cigarette prices and advertising. Philip Morris USA (PM USA) has a policy designed to sanction stores violating state laws banning illegal tobacco sales to minors by temporarily suspending price discounting incentives. This study examined the impact of those sanctions on retail cigarette prices and sales promotion advertising. In November 2006, the California Attorney General's Office informed PM USA that 196 stores were found guilty of illegal underage sales. Of these, 109 stores that participated in the PM USA Retail Leaders Program were notified that their merchandising and/or promotional resources would be suspended for the month of April 2007. The remaining 87 stores were not sanctioned and served as a comparison group. Trained raters assessed advertising and prices of selected PM USA brands in these stores pre-penalty and during the penalty phase. There were no significant differences between sanctioned and non-sanctioned stores on median changes in price and sales promotion advertising from the pre-penalty to the penalty phase. The lack of impact on cigarette prices and advertising indicate that the PM USA policy may be flawed in its design or execution. If public policies are developed to restrain cigarette price discounting strategies, they should be crafted to ensure compliance and preclude possible compensatory actions by retailers.

  14. A performance model for the communication in fast multipole methods on high-performance computing platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ibeid, Huda; Yokota, Rio; Keyes, David E.

    2016-01-01

    model and the actual communication time on four high-performance computing (HPC) systems, when latency, bandwidth, network topology, and multicore penalties are all taken into account. To our knowledge, this is the first formal characterization

  15. Significant performance enhancement of inverted organic light-emitting diodes by using ZnIx as a hole-blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuan-Hui; Zhang, Bi-Long; Sun, Chao; Li, Ruo-Xuan; Wang, Yuan; Tian, Wen-Ming; Zhao, Chun-Yi; Jin, Sheng-Ye; Liu, Wei-Feng; Luo, Ying-Min; Du, Guo-Tong; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2017-06-01

    A highly efficient inverted organic light emitting diode using 1.0 nm-thick ZnIx as a hole-blocking layer is developed. We fabricate devices with the configuration ITO/ZnIx (1.0 nm)/Alq3 (50 nm)/NPB (50 nm)/MoO3 (6.0 nm)/Al (100 nm). The deposition of a ZnIx layer increases the maximum luminance by two orders of magnitude from 13.4 to 3566.1 cd/m2. In addition, the maximum current efficiency and power efficiency are increased by three orders of magnitude, and the turn-on voltage to reach 1 cd/m2 decreases from 13 to 8 V. The results suggest that the electron injection efficiency is not improved by introducing a ZnIx layer. Instead, the improved device performance originates from the strong hole-blocking ability of ZnIx. This work indicates that layered materials may lead to novel applications in optoelectronic devices.

  16. Direct Reconstruction of CT-based Attenuation Correction Images for PET with Cluster-Based Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Mee; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-dose CT acquisitions for the purpose of PET attenuation correction will have a high level of noise and biasing artifacts due to factors such as photon starvation. This work explores a priori knowledge appropriate for CT iterative image reconstruction for PET attenuation correction. We investigate the maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework with cluster-based, multinomial priors for the direct reconstruction of the PET attenuation map. The objective function for direct iterative attenuation map reconstruction was modeled as a Poisson log-likelihood with prior terms consisting of quadratic (Q) and mixture (M) distributions. The attenuation map is assumed to have values in 4 clusters: air+background, lung, soft tissue, and bone. Under this assumption, the MP was a mixture probability density function consisting of one exponential and three Gaussian distributions. The relative proportion of each cluster was jointly estimated during each voxel update of direct iterative coordinate decent (dICD) method. Noise-free data were generated from NCAT phantom and Poisson noise was added. Reconstruction with FBP (ramp filter) was performed on the noise-free (ground truth) and noisy data. For the noisy data, dICD reconstruction was performed with the combination of different prior strength parameters (β and γ) of Q- and M-penalties. The combined quadratic and mixture penalties reduces the RMSE by 18.7% compared to post-smoothed iterative reconstruction and only 0.7% compared to quadratic alone. For direct PET attenuation map reconstruction from ultra-low dose CT acquisitions, the combination of quadratic and mixture priors offers regularization of both variance and bias and is a potential method to derive attenuation maps with negligible patient dose. However, the small improvement in quantitative accuracy relative to the substantial increase in algorithm complexity does not currently justify the use of mixture-based PET attenuation priors for reconstruction of CT

  17. Significance of findings of both emergency chest X-ray and thoracic computed tomography routinely performed at the emergency unit in 102 polytrauma patients. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieser, T.; Buehne, K.H.; Haeuser, H.; Bohndorf, K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively whether and to what extent both thoracic computed tomography (Tx-CT) and supine X-ray of the chest (Rx-Tx) are able to show additional findings that are therapeutically relevant. Patients and Methods: According to a fixed study protocol, we performed Rx-Tx and Tx-CT in 102 consecutive, haemodynamically stable polytrauma patients (mean age, 41.2 yrs; age range, 12-93 yrs). Findings of therapeutical relevance drawn from both Tx-CT and Rx-Tx, and urgent interventions indicated by an attending trauma team were documented on a standardized evaluation sheet immediately. Any change in the patient's management that is different from routine life-saving procedures, and any therapeutical intervention done in the emergency room or elsewhere (operating theatre, angiographic facility) were considered therapeutically relevant. Results: Of 102 patients, 43 (42.2%) had a total of 51 therapeutically relevant findings. Rx-Tx alone yielded 23 relevant findings (45.1%) in 23 patients (22.5%). Of them, Tx-CT has shown additional important findings in 7 patients (30.4%). When Tx-CT alone is considered, it revealed 22 new findings of therapeutical relevance (43.2%) in 20 patients (46.5%). Altogether, Tx-CT was able to show 30 relevant findings in 27 patients, i.e., there was a therapeutical benefit for 26.5% of all polytrauma patients included. Most frequently, there was a need for chest-tube insertion (n=29). Conclusions: Polytrauma patients if haemodynamically stable may profit from computed tomography of the chest when therapeutically relevant thoracic injuries are looked for or early therapeutical interventions are to be checked. However, chest X-ray should stay as a 'front-line' screening method because of its superbly quick feasibility and availability. (orig.) [de

  18. Auction-Based Cloud Service Pricing and Penalty with Availability on Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Availability is one of the main concerns of cloud users, and cloud providers always try to provide higher availability to improve user satisfaction. However, higher availability results in higher provider costs and lower social welfare. In this paper, taking into account both the users’ valuation and desired availability, we design resource allocation, pricing and penalty mechanisms with availability on demand. Considering two scenarios: public availability in which the desired availabilities of all users are public information, and private availability in which the desired availabilities are private information of users, and, analyzing the possible behaviours of users, we design a truthful deterministic mechanism with 2-approximation in public availability scenario and a universal truthful mechanism with 1 1 + γ approximation in private availability scenario, where γ is the backup ratio of resources with the highest availability. The experiment results show that our mechanisms significantly improve the social welfare compared to the mechanism without considering availability demand of users.

  19. Understanding Death Penalty Support and Opposition Among Criminal Justice and Law Enforcement Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Sethuraju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a sizable number of studies have gathered information from college students regarding their varying degrees of support for capital punishment, few have explored the underlying rationales behind these students’ death penalty support or opposition. In addition, although criminal justice majors have frequently been used as study participants, little research has sought to explore if law enforcement majors are different in manners for supporting or opposing capital punishment than other criminal justice majors. In the current study, a survey designed to measure reasons for support or opposition to capital punishment was administered to a convenience sample of 135 criminal justice and law enforcement majors at a mid-size Midwestern university. The results indicated that law enforcement majors were not significantly different from criminal justice majors on measures of support or opposition to capital punishment. There were, however, some notable differences found related to the academic standing of the students.

  20. Equalization of FBG-induced group-delay ripples penalties using a coherent receiver and digital signal processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veljanovski, V.; Al Fiad, M.S.A.S.; Borne, van den D.; Jansen, S.L.; Wuth, T.

    2009-01-01

    We show the mitigation of fiber Bragg gratings induced group delay ripple penalties through the use of coherent detection and electronic equalizer. For 111-Gb/s POLMUX-RZDQPSK only a negligible penalty is observed after 10 cascaded FBGs.

  1. The "Russian roulette" of soccer? : Perceived control and anxiety in a major tournament penalty shootout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordet, Geir; T Elferink-Gemser, Marije; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Visscher, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Kicks from the penalty mark (official term for the "penalty shootout") are regularly featured in major soccer tournaments to determine the outcome of tied games. Based on the contingency-competence-control (CCC) model (Weisz & Stipek, 1982), this study provides an examination of the control beliefs

  2. 20 CFR 416.1340 - Penalty for making false or misleading statements or withholding information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....1340 Penalty for making false or misleading statements or withholding information. (a) Why would SSA... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalty for making false or misleading statements or withholding information. 416.1340 Section 416.1340 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY...

  3. 20 CFR 404.459 - Penalty for making false or misleading statements or withholding information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Nonpayments of Benefits § 404.459 Penalty for making false or misleading statements or withholding information... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalty for making false or misleading statements or withholding information. 404.459 Section 404.459 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY...

  4. 75 FR 57230 - 340B Drug Pricing Program Manufacturer Civil Monetary Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Civil Monetary Penalties AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking and request for comments. SUMMARY: Section 602 of Public Law 102-585, the... of civil monetary penalties for manufacturers that knowingly and intentionally overcharge a covered...

  5. 30 CFR 241.77 - How may MMS collect the penalty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the amount of the penalty from any sums the United States owes to you; and (3) Using judicial process to compel your payment under 30 U.S.C. 1719(k). (b) If the Department uses judicial process, or if you seek judicial review under § 241.74 and the court upholds assessment of a penalty, the court shall...

  6. 76 FR 63574 - Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Tax Return Preparer Penalties Under Section 6695; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... to the tax return preparer penalties under section 6695 of the Internal Revenue Code. The proposed regulations are necessary to monitor and to improve compliance with the tax return preparer due to diligence...

  7. Primal and Dual Penalty Methods for Contact Problems with Geometrical Non-linearities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondrák, V.; Dostál, Z.; Dobiáš, Jiří; Pták, Svatopluk

    -, č. 5 (2005), s. 449-450 ISSN 1617-7061. [GAMM Annual Meeting 2005. Luxembourg, 28.03.2005-01.04.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/0423 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : primal penalty * dual penalty * contact problem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  8. 25 CFR 304.1 - Penalties for imitation or unauthorized use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalties for imitation or unauthorized use. 304.1... SILVER, USE OF GOVERNMENT MARK § 304.1 Penalties for imitation or unauthorized use. The use of Government trade-marks in an unauthorized manner, or the colorable imitation of such marks, is subject to the...

  9. 78 FR 64496 - Acid Rain Program: Notice of Annual Adjustment Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Factors for Excess Emissions Penalty AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of annual adjustment factors for excess emissions penalty. SUMMARY: The Acid Rain Program under title IV of... excess tons emitted times $2,000 as adjusted by an annual adjustment factor, which must be published in...

  10. 49 CFR 89.23 - Interest, late payment penalties, and collection charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... received. Interest shall be calculated only on the principal of the debt (simple interest). The rate of... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interest, late payment penalties, and collection... THE FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT Collection of Claims § 89.23 Interest, late payment penalties, and...

  11. 75 FR 72935 - Revisions to the Civil Penalty Inflation Adjustment Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... environmental assessment or environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy Act in the... for inflation the minimum and maximum civil monetary penalty amounts the FAA may impose for violations... civil monetary penalties for violations of the statues it enforces to preserve their deterrent effect...

  12. 47 CFR 0.560 - Penalty for false representation of identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Penalty for false representation of identity. 0.560 Section 0.560 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Privacy Act Regulations § 0.560 Penalty for false representation of identity. Any individual who knowingly...

  13. 6 CFR 13.43 - Collection of civil penalties and assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection of civil penalties and assessments. 13.43 Section 13.43 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.43 Collection of civil penalties and assessments. Sections 3806 and 3808...

  14. 6 CFR 13.3 - Basis for civil penalties and assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis for civil penalties and assessments. 13.3 Section 13.3 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.3 Basis for civil penalties and assessments. (a) Claims. (1) Except as provided in...

  15. 6 CFR 13.31 - Determining the amount of penalties and assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determining the amount of penalties and assessments. 13.31 Section 13.31 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.31 Determining the amount of penalties and assessments. (a) In...

  16. The Within-Job Motherhood Wage Penalty in Norway, 1979-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Trond; Penner, Andrew M.; Hogsnes, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The motherhood wage penalty is a substantial obstacle to progress in gender equality at work. Using matched employer-employee data from Norway (1979-1996, N = 236,857 individuals, N = 1,027,462 individual-years), a country with public policies that promote combining family and career, we investigate (a) whether the penalty arises from differential…

  17. 26 CFR 1.6662-1 - Overview of the accuracy-related penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... one or more of the following: (a) Negligence or disregard of rules or regulations; (b) Any substantial..., i.e., the penalties for negligence or disregard of rules or regulations, substantial understatements...), respectively. The penalties for negligence and for a substantial (or gross) valuation misstatement under...

  18. 31 CFR 1.28 - Training, rules of conduct, penalties for non-compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Such training shall provide suitable emphasis on the civil and criminal penalties imposed on the... the criminal penalties and civil liabilities provided therein, and the regulations in this subpart... collect, maintain, use nor disseminate information concerning an individual's religious or political...

  19. 26 CFR 1.6664-4 - Reasonable cause and good faith exception to section 6662 penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Additions to the Tax, Additional Amounts... penalty attributable to a substantial understatement of income tax (within the meaning of section 6662(d... penalty attributable to tax shelter items of corporations.) Generally, the most important factor is the...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 241 - Schedule of Civil Penalties 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for a willful violation. The Administrator reserves the right to assess a penalty of up to $100,000... the right, should litigation become necessary, to substitute in its complaint the CFR citation in place of the combined designation cited in the civil penalty demand letter. [67 FR 75960, Dec. 10, 2002...

  1. 42 CFR 422.756 - Procedures for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... civil money penalties. 422.756 Section 422.756 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Sanctions § 422.756 Procedures for imposing intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties. (a) Notice of... money penalties—(1) CMS notice to OIG. If CMS determines that an MA organization has failed to comply...

  2. 42 CFR 422.750 - Types of intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of intermediate sanctions and civil money... § 422.750 Types of intermediate sanctions and civil money penalties. (a) The following intermediate... organization. (b) CMS may impose civil money penalties as specified in 422.760. [72 FR 68725, Dec. 5, 2007, as...

  3. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the check or money order number of the payment. (c) If an excess emissions penalty due under this part... shall be made by money order, cashier's check, certified check, or U.S. Treasury check made payable to.... Box 952491, St. Louis, MO 63195-2491. (3) Payments of penalties of $25,000 or more may be made by wire...

  4. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. Code...

  5. 75 FR 43840 - Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ...-17530; Notice No. 2] RIN 2130-ZA03 Inflation Adjustment of the Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum... remains at $250. These adjustments are required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990...

  6. 17 CFR 143.8 - Inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inflation-adjusted civil... JURISDICTION General Provisions § 143.8 Inflation-adjusted civil monetary penalties. (a) Unless otherwise amended by an act of Congress, the inflation-adjusted maximum civil monetary penalty for each violation of...

  7. 42 CFR 3.408 - Factors considered in determining the amount of a civil money penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... civil money penalty. 3.408 Section 3.408 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS PATIENT SAFETY ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Enforcement Program § 3.408 Factors considered in determining the amount of a civil money penalty. In...

  8. 30 CFR 241.76 - Can MMS reduce my penalty once it is assessed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can MMS reduce my penalty once it is assessed? 241.76 Section 241.76 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Provisions § 241.76 Can MMS reduce my penalty once it is assessed? Under 30 U.S.C. 1719(g), the Director or...

  9. 78 FR 75304 - Medicare Program; Medicare Secondary Payer and Certain Civil Money Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... [CMS-6061-ANPRM] RIN 0938-AR88 Medicare Program; Medicare Secondary Payer and Certain Civil Money... practices for which civil money penalties (CMPs) may or may not be imposed for failure to comply with...-3951. I. Background A. Imposition of Civil Money Penalties (CMPs) In 1981, the Congress added section...

  10. 29 CFR 501.22 - Civil money penalties-payment and collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil money penalties-payment and collection. 501.22... SECTION 218 OF THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 501.22 Civil money penalties—payment and collection. Where a civil money penalty is assessed in a final order by the WHD Administrator, by an ALJ, or...

  11. 45 CFR 261.16 - Does the imposition of a penalty affect an individual's work requirement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Provisions Addressing Individual Responsibility? § 261.16 Does the imposition of a penalty affect an individual's work requirement... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Does the imposition of a penalty affect an...

  12. 11 CFR 111.39 - When must the respondent pay the civil money penalty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When must the respondent pay the civil money penalty? 111.39 Section 111.39 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROCEDURE... penalty? (a) If the respondent does not submit a written petition to the district court of the United...

  13. Weight Penalty Incurred in Thermoelectric Recovery of Automobile Exhaust Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, D. M.; Smith, J.; Thomas, G.; Min, G.

    2011-05-01

    Thermoelectric recovery of automobile waste exhaust heat has been identified as having potential for reducing fuel consumption and environmentally unfriendly emissions. Around 35% of combustion energy is discharged as heat through the exhaust system, at temperatures which depend upon the engine's operation and range from 800°C to 900°C at the outlet port to less than 50°C at the tail-pipe. Beneficial reduction in fuel consumption of 5% to 10% is widely quoted in the literature. However, comparison between claims is difficult due to nonuniformity of driving conditions. In this paper the available waste exhaust heat energy produced by a 1.5 L family car when undergoing the new European drive cycle was measured and the potential thermoelectric output estimated. The work required to power the vehicle through the drive cycle was also determined and used to evaluate key parameters. This enabled an estimate to be made of the engine efficiency and additional work required by the engine to meet the load of a thermoelectric generating system. It is concluded that incorporating a thermoelectric generator would attract a penalty of around 12 W/kg. Employing thermoelectric modules fabricated from low-density material such as magnesium silicide would considerably reduce the generator weight penalty.

  14. The penalty points system in Ireland - Does it remain effective 14 years on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, C; Donnelly, M

    2017-05-23

    Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are the leading cause of trauma related mortality in Ireland. The penalty points system (PPS) was introduced in Ireland in 2002 to incentivise safer driving and reduce injury. Its early effect was studied previously 1 which concluded that there was a slight reduction in RTA related femoral shaft fractures (a sensitive indicator of high energy trauma) and a dramatic reduction in RTA related discharges. We hypothesized that over the following 14 years, the penalty points system might lose its effectiveness. Data was again collected from the same HIPE departments from six Dublin teaching hospitals and also University Hospital Waterford (to represent both an urban and a more rural population cohort respectively) examining RTA related femoral shaft fractures over an identical 6 month period (October-April). RTA related discharge data over an identical 6 month period was again acquired and analysed from Beaumont Hospital, Dublin (identical data source to previous study). These results were compared with the identical 6 month period in 2001/02 & 2002/03 (October-April). The total number of RTA related femoral shaft fracture discharges in Dublin decreased from 16 post introduction of PPS in the 2002/03 6-month period to 7 in 2015/16 6-month period. The number remained the same in the Waterford region (n = 5). The total RTA related discharges in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin decreased from 70 post PPS introduction to 57 in the 2015/16 6-month period. This represents an incidence rate of 4.5/1000 discharges (vs 6.9 post introduction) which was a statistically significant reduction (p = 0.014). The mean length of stay for these patients reduced from 13 to 7.7 days. There were consistent reductions in head injury (major & minor), lower limb fracture and facial fracture since the introduction of the PPS. The upper limb, pelvic/acetabular and thoracic injuries remained largely unchanged. Whilst RTA related spinal and abdominal injuries decreased

  15. Predictors of Death Penalty Views in China: An Empirical Comparison Between College Students and Citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanhe; Hu, Ming; Lambert, Eric G

    2018-04-01

    China's current Criminal Law has 46 death-eligible offenses, and China executes more people than any other country in the world. However, there is a lack of study of attitudes toward capital punishment for specific offenses, and no death penalty view comparison between college students and regular citizens in China was found. This study was taken to address these limitations. Using a sample of 401 respondents from Zhejiang, China, in 2016, the present study found that more than 72% of respondents favored the death penalty without any specification of crime types. Level of death penalty support differed by various specific crimes. As expected, relative to college students, general population citizens were more likely to support capital punishment. Both groups had the highest death penalty support for murder. The study also revealed similar and different reasons behind death penalty attitudes between college students and regular citizens.

  16. Abolition or mitigation of the death penalty - A perspective on the laws of Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. N. Lion-Cachet

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue concerning the topic of the death penalty for capital offences is still widely discussed. Those supporting the retention of the death penalty mostly quote the Old Testament as their source of authority. The question, however, is whether confirmation has not been found too easily in the Old Testament, without fully taking into account the conditions of the period. Or should the death penalty not be applied for transgressions other than manslaughter as well? In this paper special attention will he given to the demand for the death penalty for manslaughter and other crimes. The question whether the implementation of the death penalty in the history of old Israel implies the retention or mitigation thereof, will also have to be answered.

  17. A Priority Rule-Based Heuristic for Resource Investment Project Scheduling Problem with Discounted Cash Flows and Tardiness Penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abbas Najafi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Resource investment problem with discounted cash flows (RIPDCFs is a class of project scheduling problem. In RIPDCF, the availability levels of the resources are considered decision variables, and the goal is to find a schedule such that the net present value of the project cash flows optimizes. In this paper, we consider a new RIPDCF in which tardiness of project is permitted with defined penalty. We mathematically formulated the problem and developed a heuristic method to solve it. The results of the performance analysis of the proposed method show an effective solution approach to the problem.

  18. Exécution de penalties et de tirs au but au football : maîtrise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots clés : Penalty, émotion, habileté technique, tireur, gardien de but. English Abstract Football games sometimes end by penalty shoot-out sessions. During these faces to faces between penalty takers and goalkeepers each of the protagonists attempts to guess the intentions of the other to defeat him and win the duel.

  19. 42 CFR 422.760 - Determinations regarding the amount of civil money penalties and assessment imposed by CMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... penalties and assessment imposed by CMS. 422.760 Section 422.760 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... assessment imposed by CMS. (a) Determining the appropriate amount of any penalty. In determining the amount of penalty imposed under 422.752(c)(1), CMS will consider as appropriate: (1) The nature of the...

  20. 75 FR 75448 - Revised Proposal for Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a Federal Railroad Safety Law or Federal Railroad... September 21, 2010. The proposal, if adopted, would amend, line by line, FRA's schedules of civil penalties... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FRA's proposal to amend, line by line, FRA's schedules of civil penalties as well as...

  1. 77 FR 24415 - Inflation Adjustment of the Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalty for a Violation of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... Adjustment of the Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalty for a Violation of a Federal Railroad Safety Law...'') raised the maximum civil penalties available under the railroad safety laws and made individuals liable..., the RSIA raised the maximum civil penalties for violations of the Federal rail safety laws...

  2. 75 FR 57597 - Revised Proposal for Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a Federal Railroad Safety Law or Federal... railroad safety laws and regulations are necessary because many of FRA's civil penalties have not been..., et al. Revised Proposal for Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a...

  3. 78 FR 9845 - Minimum and Ordinary Maximum and Aggravated Maximum Civil Monetary Penalties for a Violation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... maximum penalty amount of $75,000 for each violation, except that if the violation results in death... the maximum civil penalty for a violation is $175,000 if the violation results in death, serious... Penalties for a Violation of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Laws or Regulations, Orders, Special...

  4. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco... guidance for industry entitled ``Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers: Responses to Frequently Asked... civil money penalties for violations of regulations issued under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  5. 76 FR 22905 - Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ...] Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties and No... entitled ``Civil Money Penalties and No- Tobacco-Sale Orders for Tobacco Retailers.'' This guidance document describes FDA's current policies with respect to civil money penalties and no-tobacco-sale orders...

  6. 78 FR 72900 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    ...] Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers... the guidance entitled ``Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers: Responses to Frequently Asked... issuance of civil money penalties for violations of regulations issued under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  7. 75 FR 64987 - Notice of Availability of Draft Policy for the Assessment of Civil Administrative Penalties and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... areas: (1) The handling of recreational, versus commercial, activity in assessing penalties--specifically, whether to create separate matrixes and/or schedules for recreational activity in the penalty... amount added to the adjusted base penalty to recoup the economic benefit of noncompliance. We note that...

  8. Hair penalties: The negative influence of Afrocentric hair on ratings of Black women's dominance and professionalism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina R. Opie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women are penalized if they do not behave in a stereotype-congruent manner (Eagly & Carli, 2007; Heilman, 1983; 2001. For example, because women are not expected to be agentic they incur an agency penalty for expressing anger, dominance or assertiveness (Brescoll & Uhlmann, 2008; Eagly & Karau, 2002; Livingston, Rosette, & Washington, 2012; Rudman, 1998; Rudman & Fairchild, 2004; Rudman & Glick, 1999, 2001. Yet, all women are not equally penalized (Livingston, Rosette, & Washington, 2012. We make a novel contribution by examining how both White and Black evaluators respond to Black women’s dominance, in this case, whether Black women choose to wear Afrocentric or Eurocentric hairstyles. Design/methodology/approach: We conducted three experimental studies to examine the influence of target hairstyle and participant race on ratings of the target’s professionalism (Studies 1, 2 and 3 and dominance (Study 2. Study 1 was an online experimental study with 200 participants (112 females, 87 males, 1 missing gender; 160 Whites, 19 Blacks, 11 Latinos, 7 Asian Americans and 3 who identify as other; Mage= 35.5, SD = 11.4. Study 2 was an online experimental study with 510 participants (276 women, 234 males; 256 Blacks, 254 Whites; Mage = 41.25 years, SD = 12.21. Study 3 was an online experimental study with 291 participants (141 Blacks, 150 Whites, Mage= 47.5 years, SD = 11.66. Findings: Black, as compared to White, evaluators gave higher agency penalties to Black employment candidates when they donned Afrocentric versus Eurocentric hair, rating them as more dominant and less professional. Implications: The present research illustrates the significance of considering both target and evaluator race when examining the influence of agency, and specifically dominance, on ratings of professionalism.

  9. Hypoxia: Exposure Time Until Significant Performance Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    three alcoholic beverages per day (on average), or were taking any prescription medication (besides oral contraceptives). Likewise, those who were...or tested positively for pregnancy were disqualified from the study, as the risks of hypoxia to a human fetus are currently unknown. Also, those...that could impact inclusion in the study. After the questionnaire, all female participants provided a urine sample for pregnancy testing. Participants

  10. Significant improvement of electrochemical performance of Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LiVPO4F cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. YU ZHANGa,∗, XIAOLAN BAIb ... and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). ... Analysis of electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) ... studied with a SEM (JSM-7500F, Japan) equipped with.

  11. Kinematics of the field hockey penalty corner push-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rebecca; Ness, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The aims of the study were to determine those variables that significantly affect push-in execution and thereby formulate coaching recommendations specific to the push-in. Two 50 Hz video cameras recorded transverse and longitudinal views of push-in trials performed by eight experienced and nine inexperienced male push-in performers. Video footage was digitized for data analysis of ball speed, stance width, drag distance, drag time, drag speed, centre of massy displacement and segment and stick displacements and velocities. Experienced push-in performers demonstrated a significantly greater (p push-in and a significantly faster ball speed than inexperienced performers. In addition, the experienced performers showed a significant positive correlation between ball speed and playing experience and tended to adopt a combination of simultaneous and sequential segment rotation to achieve accuracy and fast ball speed. The study yielded the following coaching recommendations for enhanced push-in performance: maximize drag distance by maximizing front foot-ball distance at the start of the push-in; use a combination of simultaneous and sequential segment rotations to optimise both accuracy and ball speed and maximize drag speed.

  12. Performance Analysis of MYSEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Services FSD Federated Services Daemon I&A Identification and Authentication IKE Internet Key Exchange KPI Key Performance Indicator LAN Local Area...spection takes place in different processes in the server architecture. Key Performance Indica- tor ( KPI )s associated with the system need to be...application and risk analysis of security controls. Thus, measurement of the KPIs is needed before an informed tradeoff between the performance penalties

  13. Reassessing the Wage Penalty for Temps in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Elke

    As a consequence of the rapid growth of temporary agency employment in Germany, the debate on the poor working conditions of temps, specifically their remuneration, has intensified recently. Using administrative data, the paper shows that the wage gap for German temp workers is rather large...... and varies between occupation and region. But temps already suffer from a marked wage decline before entering the temporary help sector. Nevertheless, temporary agency employment does not leave a long lasting scar. Two years after leaving the sector, temps no longer suffer from a wage penalty. A recent...... change in the law set a high incentive for temporary help agencies to pay their workers according to a sectoral collective agreement. Surprisingly, the unionization of the sector could not bring the widening wage gap to a halt....

  14. The need for specific penalties for hacking in criminal law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sangkyo; Lee, Kyungho

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the fact that hacking is a widely used term, it is still not legally established. Moreover, the definition of the concept of hacking has been deployed in a wide variety of ways in national literature. This ambiguity has led to various side effects. Recently in the United States, reforms collectively known as Aaron's Law were proposed as intended amendments to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). Most experts expect that this change will put the brakes on the CFAA as a severe punishment policy, and result in a drop in controversial court decisions. In this study, we analyze the definitions and the penalties for hacking for each country and compare them with the national law and then make suggestions through more specific legislation. We expect it will reduce legal controversy and prevent excessive punishment.

  15. The Need for Specific Penalties for Hacking in Criminal Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkyo Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that hacking is a widely used term, it is still not legally established. Moreover, the definition of the concept of hacking has been deployed in a wide variety of ways in national literature. This ambiguity has led to various side effects. Recently in the United States, reforms collectively known as Aaron's Law were proposed as intended amendments to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA. Most experts expect that this change will put the brakes on the CFAA as a severe punishment policy, and result in a drop in controversial court decisions. In this study, we analyze the definitions and the penalties for hacking for each country and compare them with the national law and then make suggestions through more specific legislation. We expect it will reduce legal controversy and prevent excessive punishment.

  16. Underground siting of nuclear power plants: potential benefits and penalties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allensworth, J.A.; Finger, J.T.; Milloy, J.A.; Murfin, W.B.; Rodeman, R.; Vandevender, S.G.

    1977-08-01

    The potential for improving nuclear power safety is analyzed by siting plants underground in mined cavities or by covering plants with fill earth after construction in an excavated cut. Potential benefits and penalties of underground plants are referenced to analogous plants located on the surface. Three representative regional sites having requisite underground geology were used to evaluate underground siting. The major factors which were evaluated for all three sites were: (1) containment of radioactive materials, (2) transport of groundwater contamination, and (3) seismic vulnerability. External protection, plant security, feasibility, operational considerations, and cost were evaluated on a generic basis. Additionally, the national availability of sites having the requisite geology for both underground siting concepts was determined

  17. The Death Penalty and Human Dignity: An Existential Fallacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Nagelsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of capital punishment in the United States frequently cite the evolution from electrocution and hanging to lethal injection as an indication that the evolving standards of decency exhibited by such a transition demonstrate a respect for human dignity. This essay examines that claim by evaluating two standards for assessing whether an act comports with accepted definitions of human dignity: a personal-achievement model, based on work by economist Amartya Sen of Harvard University, and a universal and intrinsic approach to human dignity articulated by criminologist Robert Johnson of the American University. We evaluate Sen’s capabilities model through the lens of a condemned prisoner’s ability to achieve self-defined goals. We then assess Johnson’s claim that preserving human dignity requires an elimination of the death penalty, irrespective of any prisoner’s ability to lead a restricted, albeit goal-directed, existence.

  18. THE PENALTY FOR THE CORRUPTOR IN THE SOCIOLOGICAL PERSFEKTIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsul Haling

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sociological perfective in the many offer social sanctions can be applied in corrupt behavior result. The idea of social sanctions was proposed as a reaction against the growing number of corrupt behavior difficult resolved only through national and international legal instruments. It is time the exact type of sanctions was found to tackle corrupt behavior that are already classified as extraordinary crimes. Some ideas proposed as social sanctions to eradicate corrupt behavior i.e. criminal sanctions established on the basis of social stratification,  hint herself and family corruptor, no corpse prayer corruptor before is no guarantee of the financial returns of the State by the family of the perpetrator, serving in the corruptor's face television and penalties for disseminating the corruptor after death and as sanctions ultimatum remedied every corruptor will be charged all his deeds before God after death.

  19. Classification of Pulse Waveforms Using Edit Distance with Real Penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongyu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in sensor and signal processing techniques have provided effective tools for quantitative research in traditional Chinese pulse diagnosis (TCPD. Because of the inevitable intraclass variation of pulse patterns, the automatic classification of pulse waveforms has remained a difficult problem. In this paper, by referring to the edit distance with real penalty (ERP and the recent progress in -nearest neighbors (KNN classifiers, we propose two novel ERP-based KNN classifiers. Taking advantage of the metric property of ERP, we first develop an ERP-induced inner product and a Gaussian ERP kernel, then embed them into difference-weighted KNN classifiers, and finally develop two novel classifiers for pulse waveform classification. The experimental results show that the proposed classifiers are effective for accurate classification of pulse waveform.

  20. Financial penalties for the unhealthy? Ethical guidelines for holding employees responsible for their health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Steven D; Lieber, Sarah R

    2009-01-01

    As health care costs continue to rise, an increasing number of self-insured employers are using financial rewards or penalties to promote healthy behavior and control costs. These incentive programs have triggered a backlash from those concerned that holding employees responsible for their health, particularly through the use of penalties, violates individual liberties and discriminates against the unhealthy. This paper offers an ethical analysis of employee health incentive programs and presents an argument for a set of conditions under which penalties can be used in an ethical and responsible way to contain health care costs and encourage healthy behavior among employees.

  1. PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cilli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the kinematic and kinetic changes when resistance is applied in horizontal and vertical directions, produced by using different percentages of body weight, caused by jumping movements during a dynamic warm-up. The group of subjects consisted of 35 voluntary male athletes (19 basketball and 16 volleyball players; age: 23.4 ± 1.4 years, training experience: 9.6 ± 2.7 years; height: 177.2 ± 5.7 cm, body weight: 69.9 ± 6.9 kg studying Physical Education, who had a jump training background and who were training for 2 hours, on 4 days in a week. A dynamic warm-up protocol containing seven specific resistance movements with specific resistance corresponding to different percentages of body weight (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10% was applied randomly on non consecutive days. Effects of different warm-up protocols were assessed by pre-/post- exercise changes in jump height in the countermovement jump (CMJ and the squat jump (SJ measured using a force platform and changes in hip and knee joint angles at the end of the eccentric phase measured using a video camera. A significant increase in jump height was observed in the dynamic resistance warm-up conducted with different percentages of body weight (p 0.05. In jump movements before and after the warm-up, while no significant difference between the vertical ground reaction forces applied by athletes was observed (p>0.05, in some cases of resistance, a significant reduction was observed in hip and knee joint angles (p<0.05. The dynamic resistance warm-up method was found to cause changes in the kinematics of jumping movements, as well as an increase in jump height values. As a result, dynamic warm-up exercises could be applicable in cases of resistance corresponding to 6-10% of body weight applied in horizontal and vertical directions in order to increase the jump performance acutely.

  2. 45 CFR 305.2 - Performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAM PERFORMANCE MEASURES, STANDARDS, FINANCIAL INCENTIVES, AND PENALTIES § 305.2 Performance measures. (a) The child support incentive system measures State performance levels in five program areas... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance measures. 305.2 Section 305.2 Public...

  3. Strategy changing penalty promotes cooperation in spatial prisoner’s dilemma game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Qing; Wang Zhen; Wang Zhen; Wang Yiling

    2012-01-01

    Many classical studies suggest that punishment is a useful way to promote cooperation in the well-mixed public goods game, whereas relative evidence in the research of spatial prisoner’s dilemma game is absent. To address this issue, we introduce a mechanism of strategy changing penalty, combining memory and penalty during the update process, into spatial prisoner’s dilemma game. We find that increasing penalty rate or memory length is able to promote the evolution of cooperation monotonously. Compared with traditional version, recorded penalty could facilitate cooperation better. Moreover, through examining the process of evolution, we provide an interpretation for this promotion phenomenon, namely, the effect of promotion can be warranted by an evolution resonance of standard deviation of fitness coefficient. Finally, we validate our results by studying the impact of uncertainty within strategy adoptions on the evolution of cooperation. We hope that our work may shed light on the understanding of the cooperative behavior in the society.

  4. Unpaid Payroll Taxes Billions in Delinquent Taxes and Penalty Assessments Are Owed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    This report responds to your request for information on payroll taxes owed to the federal government and the associated trust fund recovery penalties assessed individuals responsible for the nonpayment of these taxes...

  5. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... 3383 would amend the Atomic Energy Act by eliminating the exemption that currently allows certain nonprofit contractors to avoid paying civil penalties if they violate DOE's nuclear safety rules...

  6. Moderate running and plyometric training during off-season did not show a significant difference on soccer-related high-intensity performances compared with no-training controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Yasumatsu, Mikinobu; Akimoto, Takayuki

    2012-12-01

    Several investigators have reported the effects of reduced training and interrupted training on athletic performance, but few reports are available for soccer players. The purpose of this study was to examine, using the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (YoYoIR2) test and sprint performance, the effects on soccer players of a reduced training program consisting of either moderate running training, plyometric training. After the completion of a competitive season, 29 male soccer players were divided into 3 groups: the running group (n = 13), the plyometric group (n = 11), and the control group (n = 5). Both training groups completed either running or plyometric training sessions 2 d·wk(-1) for 3 weeks, whereas the control group was not allowed to perform any training. The subjects performed YoYoIR2 and 20-m sprint tests before (pre) and after (post) the experimental period. Neither training group showed any significant training effects on the YoYoIR2 performance or 20-m sprint times compared with the control group. This study suggests that neither endurance running nor plyometric training 2 d·wk(-1) for 3 weeks has a significant effect on high-intensity performance compared with a nontraining regimen. However, our results do not support complete inactivity. These results may have important implications for the management of training cessation for a few weeks.

  7. Cultural Differences, Assimilation and Behavior: Player Nationality and Penalties in Football

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca, Giacomo; Schokkaert, Jeroen; Swinnen, Johan F. M.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of a different cultural background on individual behavior, focusing on violence on the football field of southern European and nothern European football players in the English Premier League. We find that southern European football players collect on average more football penalties than their nothern European colleagues. We also find that the initially higher number of football penalties incurred by southern European players converges towards the local average, the longe...

  8. Participatory workplace wellness programs: reward, penalty, and regulatory conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeranz, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    POLICY POINTS: Workplace wellness programs that provide incentives for completing a health risk assessment are a form of participatory programs. There are legal and ethical concerns when employers assess penalties for not completing a health risk assessment, raising questions about the voluntariness of such a program. The Departments of Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services' 2013 regulations for participatory programs and employers' current practices conflict with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's prevailing interpretation of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. In keeping with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Congress revised the law related to workplace wellness programs. In June 2013, the Departments of Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services passed the final regulations, updating their 2006 regulatory framework. Participatory programs that reward the completion of a health risk assessment are now the most common type of wellness program in the United States. However, legal and ethical concerns emerge when employers utilize incentives that raise questions about the voluntariness of such programs. At issue is that under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, employers cannot require health-related inquiries and exams. To analyze the current interpretation of the ADA, I conducted research on both LexisNexis and federal agency websites. The resulting article evaluates the differences in the language of Congress's enabling legislation and the federal departments' regulations and how they may conflict with the ADA. It also reviews the federal government's authority to address both the legal conflict and ethical concerns related to nonvoluntary participatory programs. Employers' practices and the federal departments' regulations conflict with the current interpretation of the ADA by permitting employers to penalize employees who do not complete a health risk assessment. The departments' regulations may be

  9. Do Red and Blue Uniforms Matter in Football and Handball Penalties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Bjoern; Pernhaupt, Niklas; Handsteiner, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Past research has revealed ambiguous results on the impact of red uniforms in sports competition. The current study was aimed at analyzing the role of red and blue uniforms in football and handball penalties. Two experiments were conducted using a within subjects design, where participants rated uniform color-manipulated video clips. In the first study, participants (n = 39) watched footage of football players kicking a penalty, whereas in the second study (n = 118) videos of handball penalty takers, handball goalkeepers and football goalkeepers preparing themselves to score/save a penalty were shown. Participants rated player's/goalkeeper's level of confidence and the expected position of the ball crossing the goal line in the first experiment and additionally the probability of scoring the penalty against the goalkeepers in the second experiment. The videos stopped at the point where the ball was leaving the foot and hand respectively. Results did not show any beneficial impact of red uniforms. Rather, football players wearing blue were rated to kick the ball higher. The study contradicts any positive effect of red versus blue uniforms in the context of football and handball penalties, which emphasizes the need of searching for potential moderators of color's impact on human behavior.

  10. Discrimination and instructional comprehension: guided discretion, racial bias, and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M; Haney, C

    2000-06-01

    This study links two previously unrelated lines of research: the lack of comprehension of capital penalty-phase jury instructions and discriminatory death sentencing. Jury-eligible subjects were randomly assigned to view one of four versions of a simulated capital penalty trial in which the race of defendant (Black or White) and the race of victim (Black or White) were varied orthogonally. Dependent measures included a sentencing verdict (life without the possibility of parole or the death penalty), ratings of penalty phase evidence, and a test of instructional comprehension. Results indicated that instructional comprehension was poor overall and that, although Black defendants were treated only slightly more punitively than White defendants in general, discriminatory effects were concentrated among participants whose comprehension was poorest. In addition, the use of penalty phase evidence differed as a function of race of defendant and whether the participant sentenced the defendant to life or death. The study suggest that racially biased and capricious death sentencing may be in part caused or exacerbated by the inability to comprehend penalty phase instructions.

  11. Implementation of the Death Penalty in the Perspective of Human Rights in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Sina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 1945 Constitution of Indonesia provides for rights to life and to remain free from torture that are fundamental human rights that shall not be curtailed under any circumstance. Since 1945, Indonesia does not regulate the protection of the right of life to the citizens. Until 1946, enacted Law No. 1 of 1946 concerning the Indonesian Criminal Code which in several provisions concerning the death penalty. Death sentences and executions in Indonesia is always debatable. However, it is still implemented and can not be avoided, unless the change of its legal provisions. This study was a normative research or doctrinal research. The results of the study shows that the provisions of death penalty in Indonesia is still enforced because have been regulated in the Criminal Code and several organic laws such as the law of terrorism, narcotics, corruption, and human rights justice. The death penalty is contrary to Article 28I of the 1945 Constitution. It has set the rights to life, so that no one may violate human rights, including the government and the country is not granted the right to revoke rights for every citizen. The Indonesian government should not impose the death penalty contained in the draft new Code, and abolish the death penalty in its organic law that had been imposed on the offenders. Preferably, the death penalty may be replaced by alternative punishment with life imprisonment, a prison within a specified time or according to the judge’s decision.

  12. Noise reduction in Lidar signal using correlation-based EMD combined with soft thresholding and roughness penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhua; Zhu, Lingyan; Li, Hongxu; Xu, Fan; Liu, Binggang; Yang, Zhenbo

    2018-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is widely used to analyze the non-linear and non-stationary signals for noise reduction. In this study, a novel EMD-based denoising method, referred to as EMD with soft thresholding and roughness penalty (EMD-STRP), is proposed for the Lidar signal denoising. With the proposed method, the relevant and irrelevant intrinsic mode functions are first distinguished via a correlation coefficient. Then, the soft thresholding technique is applied to the irrelevant modes, and the roughness penalty technique is applied to the relevant modes to extract as much information as possible. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using three typical signals contaminated by white Gaussian noise. The denoising performance was then compared to the denoising capabilities of other techniques, such as correlation-based EMD partial reconstruction, correlation-based EMD hard thresholding, and wavelet transform. The use of EMD-STRP on the measured Lidar signal resulted in the noise being efficiently suppressed, with an improved signal to noise ratio of 22.25 dB and an extended detection range of 11 km.

  13. Independent from muscle power and balance performance, a creatinine clearance below 65 ml/min is a significant and independent risk factor for falls and fall-related fractures in elderly men and women diagnosed with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukas, L; Schacht, E; Runge, M

    2010-07-01

    We assessed in a cross-sectional study in elderly men and women with osteoporosis, the association between the creatinine clearance (CrCl) and the performance in different balance and muscle power and function tests and found that a decreasing creatinine clearance was significantly associated with lower balance and muscle power. To determine if a creatinine clearance of balance and an increased risk for falls and fractures. We assessed in a cross-sectional-study in 1781 German osteoporotic patients, the association between the CrCl, the physical performance, and the number of falls and fractures. Controlling for age, gender, BMI, and osteoporosis treatment (fracture analysis only), a decreasing CrCl was associated with lower physical performance in the timed-up-and-go test (corr -0.2337, P risk for falls (47.7% vs. 36.2%, P = 0.0008) and fall-related fractures (33.1% vs. 22.9%, P = 0.0003) compared with a CrCl of >or=65 ml/min. In this study, we found a significant gender-independent correlation between decreasing CrCl and lower performance in balance and muscle power tests. Reduced muscle power and balance may therefore be involved in the low creatinine clearance associated increased risk for falls and fall-related fractures. Furthermore, we found that a CrCl balance tests, is a significant risk factor for falls and fractures.

  14. Testing Significance Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim I. Krueger

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The practice of Significance Testing (ST remains widespread in psychological science despite continual criticism of its flaws and abuses. Using simulation experiments, we address four concerns about ST and for two of these we compare ST’s performance with prominent alternatives. We find the following: First, the 'p' values delivered by ST predict the posterior probability of the tested hypothesis well under many research conditions. Second, low 'p' values support inductive inferences because they are most likely to occur when the tested hypothesis is false. Third, 'p' values track likelihood ratios without raising the uncertainties of relative inference. Fourth, 'p' values predict the replicability of research findings better than confidence intervals do. Given these results, we conclude that 'p' values may be used judiciously as a heuristic tool for inductive inference. Yet, 'p' values cannot bear the full burden of inference. We encourage researchers to be flexible in their selection and use of statistical methods.

  15. HUMAN TRAFFICKING DRUG TRAFFICKING, AND THE DEATH PENALTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Gerry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both Australia and Indonesia have made commitments to combatting human trafficking.  Through the experience of Mary Jane Veloso it can be seen that it is most often the vulnerable ‘mule’ that is apprehended by law enforcement and not the powerful leaders of crime syndicates. It is unacceptable that those vulnerable individuals may face execution for acts committed under threat of force, coercion, fraud, deception or abuse of power. For this reason it is vital that a system of victim identification is developed, including better training for law enforcement, legal representatives and members of the judiciary. This paper builds on submissions by authors for Australian Parliamentary Inquiry into Human Trafficking, and focusses on issues arising in the complex cross section of human trafficking, drug trafficking, and the death penalty with particular attention on identifying victims and effective reporting mechanisms in both Australia and Indonesia. It concludes that, in the context of human trafficking both countries could make three main improvements to law and policy, among others, 1 enactment of laws that create clear mandatory protection for human trafficking victims; 2 enactment of criminal laws that provides complete defence for victim of human trafficking; 3 enactment of corporate reporting mechanisms. Systemic protection and support is not sufficiently available without clear legislative protection as this paper suggests together with standardised referral mechanisms and effective financial reporting mechanisms. The implementation can be achieved through collaborative responses and inter-agency coordination with data collection and properly trained specialists.

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of National Labor Relations Act Remedies: Analysis and Comparison with Other Workplace Penalty Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Morris M. Kleiner; David Weil

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the implied penalty policies underlying the remedies created by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) in terms of the policies' impact on employer and union behaviors. We present a simple model of deterrence as a means of evaluating workplace penalty policies in terms of their influence on employer behavior, particularly through deterrence effects. We also compare the remedies for violations embodied in the NLRA with penalty policies under other workplac...

  17. Structured Sparse Principal Components Analysis With the TV-Elastic Net Penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pierrefeu, Amicie; Lofstedt, Tommy; Hadj-Selem, Fouad; Dubois, Mathieu; Jardri, Renaud; Fovet, Thomas; Ciuciu, Philippe; Frouin, Vincent; Duchesnay, Edouard

    2018-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is an exploratory tool widely used in data analysis to uncover the dominant patterns of variability within a population. Despite its ability to represent a data set in a low-dimensional space, PCA's interpretability remains limited. Indeed, the components produced by PCA are often noisy or exhibit no visually meaningful patterns. Furthermore, the fact that the components are usually non-sparse may also impede interpretation, unless arbitrary thresholding is applied. However, in neuroimaging, it is essential to uncover clinically interpretable phenotypic markers that would account for the main variability in the brain images of a population. Recently, some alternatives to the standard PCA approach, such as sparse PCA (SPCA), have been proposed, their aim being to limit the density of the components. Nonetheless, sparsity alone does not entirely solve the interpretability problem in neuroimaging, since it may yield scattered and unstable components. We hypothesized that the incorporation of prior information regarding the structure of the data may lead to improved relevance and interpretability of brain patterns. We therefore present a simple extension of the popular PCA framework that adds structured sparsity penalties on the loading vectors in order to identify the few stable regions in the brain images that capture most of the variability. Such structured sparsity can be obtained by combining, e.g., and total variation (TV) penalties, where the TV regularization encodes information on the underlying structure of the data. This paper presents the structured SPCA (denoted SPCA-TV) optimization framework and its resolution. We demonstrate SPCA-TV's effectiveness and versatility on three different data sets. It can be applied to any kind of structured data, such as, e.g., -dimensional array images or meshes of cortical surfaces. The gains of SPCA-TV over unstructured approaches (such as SPCA and ElasticNet PCA) or structured approach

  18. Improved Variable Selection Algorithm Using a LASSO-Type Penalty, with an Application to Assessing Hepatitis B Infection Relevant Factors in Community Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pi; Zeng, Fangfang; Hu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Dingmei; Zhu, Shuming; Deng, Yu; Hao, Yuantao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In epidemiological studies, it is important to identify independent associations between collective exposures and a health outcome. The current stepwise selection technique ignores stochastic errors and suffers from a lack of stability. The alternative LASSO-penalized regression model can be applied to detect significant predictors from a pool of candidate variables. However, this technique is prone to false positives and tends to create excessive biases. It remains challenging to develop robust variable selection methods and enhance predictability. Material and methods Two improved algorithms denoted the two-stage hybrid and bootstrap ranking procedures, both using a LASSO-type penalty, were developed for epidemiological association analysis. The performance of the proposed procedures and other methods including conventional LASSO, Bolasso, stepwise and stability selection models were evaluated using intensive simulation. In addition, methods were compared by using an empirical analysis based on large-scale survey data of hepatitis B infection-relevant factors among Guangdong residents. Results The proposed procedures produced comparable or less biased selection results when compared to conventional variable selection models. In total, the two newly proposed procedures were stable with respect to various scenarios of simulation, demonstrating a higher power and a lower false positive rate during variable selection than the compared methods. In empirical analysis, the proposed procedures yielding a sparse set of hepatitis B infection-relevant factors gave the best predictive performance and showed that the procedures were able to select a more stringent set of factors. The individual history of hepatitis B vaccination, family and individual history of hepatitis B infection were associated with hepatitis B infection in the studied residents according to the proposed procedures. Conclusions The newly proposed procedures improve the identification of

  19. Assessment and improvement of radiation oncology trainee contouring ability utilizing consensus-based penalty metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, Abhirami; Read, Nancy; D'Souza, David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and assess the feasibility of utilizing consensus-based penalty metrics for the purpose of critical structure and organ at risk (OAR) contouring quality assurance and improvement. A Delphi study was conducted to obtain consensus on contouring penalty metrics to assess trainee-generated OAR contours. Voxel-based penalty metric equations were used to score regions of discordance between trainee and expert contour sets. The utility of these penalty metric scores for objective feedback on contouring quality was assessed by using cases prepared for weekly radiation oncology radiation oncology trainee treatment planning rounds. In two Delphi rounds, six radiation oncology specialists reached agreement on clinical importance/impact and organ radiosensitivity as the two primary criteria for the creation of the Critical Structure Inter-comparison of Segmentation (CriSIS) penalty functions. Linear/quadratic penalty scoring functions (for over- and under-contouring) with one of four levels of severity (none, low, moderate and high) were assigned for each of 20 OARs in order to generate a CriSIS score when new OAR contours are compared with reference/expert standards. Six cases (central nervous system, head and neck, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynaecological and thoracic) then were used to validate 18 OAR metrics through comparison of trainee and expert contour sets using the consensus derived CriSIS functions. For 14 OARs, there was an improvement in CriSIS score post-educational intervention. The use of consensus-based contouring penalty metrics to provide quantitative information for contouring improvement is feasible.

  20. Utilizing a vanadium redox flow battery to avoid wind power deviation penalties in an electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turker, Burak; Arroyo Klein, Sebastian; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Trujillo, Juan José; Bremen, Lueder von; Kühn, Martin; Busse, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Vanadium redox flow battery utilized for wind power grid integration was studied. • Technical and financial analyses at single wind farm level were performed. • 2 MW/6 MW h VRFB is suitable for mitigating power deviations for a 10 MW wind farm. • Economic incentives might be required in the short-term until the VRFB prices drop. - Abstract: Utilizing a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) for better market integration of wind power at a single wind farm level was evaluated. A model which combines a VRFB unit and a medium sized (10 MW) wind farm was developed and the battery was utilized to compensate for the deviations resulting from the forecast errors in an electricity market bidding structure. VRFB software model which was introduced in our previous paper was integrated with real wind power data, power forecasts and market data based on the Spanish electricity market. Economy of the system was evaluated by financial assessments which were done by considering the VRFB costs and the amount of deviation penalty payments resulting from forecast inaccuracies

  1. Loading pattern optimization with maximum utilization of discharging fuel employing adaptively constrained discontinuous penalty function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, T. K.; Joo, H. G.; Kim, C. H.

    2010-01-01

    In order to find the most economical loading pattern (LP) considering multi-cycle fuel loading, multi-objective fuel LP optimization problems are examined by employing an adaptively constrained discontinuous penalty function (ACDPF) method. This is an improved method to simplify the complicated acceptance logic of the original DPF method in that the stochastic effects caused by the different random number sequence can be reduced. The effectiveness of the multi-objective simulated annealing (SA) algorithm employing ACDPF is examined for the reload core LP of Cycle 4 of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 4. Several optimization runs are performed with different numbers of objectives consisting of cycle length and average burnup of fuels to be discharged or reloaded. The candidate LPs obtained from the multi-objective optimization runs turn out to be better than the reference LP in the aspects of cycle length and utilization of given fuels. It is note that the proposed ACDPF based MOSA algorithm can be a practical method to obtain an economical LP considering multi-cycle fuel loading. (authors)

  2. Image Segmentation Based on Constrained Spectral Variance Difference and Edge Penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation, which is usually the first step in object-based image analysis (OBIA, greatly influences the quality of final OBIA results. In many existing multi-scale segmentation algorithms, a common problem is that under-segmentation and over-segmentation always coexist at any scale. To address this issue, we propose a new method that integrates the newly developed constrained spectral variance difference (CSVD and the edge penalty (EP. First, initial segments are produced by a fast scan. Second, the generated segments are merged via a global mutual best-fitting strategy using the CSVD and EP as merging criteria. Finally, very small objects are merged with their nearest neighbors to eliminate the remaining noise. A series of experiments based on three sets of remote sensing images, each with different spatial resolutions, were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Both visual and quantitative assessments were performed, and the results show that large objects were better preserved as integral entities while small objects were also still effectively delineated. The results were also found to be superior to those from eCongnition’s multi-scale segmentation.

  3. Haemoglobin variants may cause significant differences in haemoglobin A1c as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymatic methods in diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, Shuichi; Nakayama, Hitomi; Ohki, Tsuyoshi; Soejima, Eri; Tajiri, Yuji; Yamada, Kentaro

    2017-07-01

    Background We aimed to determine whether the discrepancy between haemoglobin A1c values determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymatic haemoglobin A1c measurements in diabetic patients was clinically relevant. Methods We randomly recruited 1421 outpatients undergoing diabetic treatment and follow-up who underwent at least three haemoglobin A1c measurements between April 2014 and March 2015 at our clinic. In 6369 samples, haemoglobin A1c was simultaneously measured by HA-8160 and MetaboLead (enzymatic assay), and the values were compared. Results haemoglobin A1c measurements by high-performance liquid chromatography and enzymatic assay were strongly correlated (correlation coefficient: 0.9828, linear approximation curve y = 0.9986x - 0.2507). Mean haemoglobin A1c (6.8 ± 1.0%) measured by high-performance liquid chromatography was significantly higher than that measured by enzymatic assay (6.5 ± 1.0%, P liquid chromatography than those from enzymatic assay. Of these, three had Hb Toranomon [β112 (G14) Cys→Trp]. The fourth had Hb Ube-2 [α68 (E17) Asn→Asp]. One other subject presented consistently higher haemoglobin A1c values (>1%) by high-performance liquid chromatography than those from enzymatic assay and was diagnosed with a -77 (T > C) mutation in the δ-globin gene. These unrelated asymptomatic subjects had normal erythrocyte profiles, without anaemia. Conclusions We showed that haemoglobin A1c values measured by high-performance liquid chromatography were significantly higher than those measured by enzymatic assay in diabetic subjects. However, when an oversized deviation (>0.7%) between glycaemic control status and haemoglobin A1c is apparent, clinicians should check the methods used to measure haemoglobin A1c and consider the possible presence of a haemoglobin variant.

  4. Proposal of the penalty factor equations considering weld strength over-match

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Sung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Wook [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Yong [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dept. of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-06-15

    This paper proposes penalty factor equations that take into consideration the weld strength over-match given in the classified form similar to the revised equations presented in the Code Case N-779 via cyclic elastic-plastic finite element analysis. It was found that the Ke analysis data reflecting elastic follow-up can be consolidated by normalizing the primary-plus-secondary stress intensity ranges excluding the nonlinear thermal stress intensity component, S{sub n} to over-match degree of yield strength, M{sub F}. For the effect of over-match on K{sub n} × K{sub v{sup 1}}, dispersion of the Kn × K{sub v} analysis data can be sharply reduced by dividing total stress intensity range, excluding local thermal stresses, S{sub p-lt} by M{sub F}. Finally, the proposed equations were applied to the weld between the safe end and the piping of a pressurizer surge nozzle in pressurized water reactors in order to calculate a cumulative usage factor. The cumulative usage factor was then compared with those derived by the previous K{sub e} factor equations. The result shows that application of the proposed equations can significantly reduce conservatism of fatigue assessment using the previous K{sub e} factor equations.

  5. Proposal of the penalty factor equations considering weld strength over-match

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Jeong, Jae Wook; Lee, Kang Yong

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes penalty factor equations that take into consideration the weld strength over-match given in the classified form similar to the revised equations presented in the Code Case N-779 via cyclic elastic-plastic finite element analysis. It was found that the Ke analysis data reflecting elastic follow-up can be consolidated by normalizing the primary-plus-secondary stress intensity ranges excluding the nonlinear thermal stress intensity component, S_n to over-match degree of yield strength, M_F. For the effect of over-match on K_n × K_v_"1, dispersion of the Kn × K_v analysis data can be sharply reduced by dividing total stress intensity range, excluding local thermal stresses, S_p_-_l_t by M_F. Finally, the proposed equations were applied to the weld between the safe end and the piping of a pressurizer surge nozzle in pressurized water reactors in order to calculate a cumulative usage factor. The cumulative usage factor was then compared with those derived by the previous K_e factor equations. The result shows that application of the proposed equations can significantly reduce conservatism of fatigue assessment using the previous K_e factor equations

  6. Proposal of the Penalty Factor Equations Considering Weld Strength Over-Match

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Sung Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes penalty factor equations that take into consideration the weld strength over-match given in the classified form similar to the revised equations presented in the Code Case N-779 via cyclic elastic-plastic finite element analysis. It was found that the Ke analysis data reflecting elastic follow-up can be consolidated by normalizing the primary-plus-secondary stress intensity ranges excluding the nonlinear thermal stress intensity component, Sn to over-match degree of yield strength, MF. For the effect of over-match on Kn × Κν, dispersion of the Kn × Κν analysis data can be sharply reduced by dividing total stress intensity range, excluding local thermal stresses, Sp-lt by MF. Finally, the proposed equations were applied to the weld between the safe end and the piping of a pressurizer surge nozzle in pressurized water reactors in order to calculate a cumulative usage factor. The cumulative usage factor was then compared with those derived by the previous Ke factor equations. The result shows that application of the proposed equations can significantly reduce conservatism of fatigue assessment using the previous Ke factor equations.

  7. Ozone Climate Penalty and Mortality in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakami, A.; Zhao, S.; Pappin, A.; Mesbah, M.

    2013-12-01

    The expected increase in ozone concentrations with temperature is referred to as the climate penalty factor (CPF). Observed ozone trends have resulted in estimations of regional CPFs in the range of 1-3 ppb/K in the Eastern US, and larger values around the globe. We use the adjoint of a regional model (CMAQ) for attributing changes in ozone mortality and attainment metrics to increased temperature levels at each location in North America during the summer of 2007. Unlike previous forward sensitivity analysis studies, we estimate how changes in temperatures at various locations influence such policy-relevant metrics. Our analysis accounts for separate temperature impact pathways through gas-phase chemistry, moisture abundance, and biogenic emissions. We find that water vapor impact, while mostly negative, is positive and large for temperature changes in urban areas. We also find that increased biogenic emissions plays an important role in the overall temperature influence. Our simulations show a wide range of spatial variability in CPFs between -0.4 and 6.2 ppb/K with largest values in urban areas. We also estimate mortality-based CPFs of up to 4 deaths/K for each grid cell, again with large localization in urban areas. This amounts to an estimated 370 deaths/K for the 3-month period of the simulation. We find that this number is almost equivalent to 5% reduction in anthropogenic NOx emissions for each degree increase in temperature. We show how the CPF will change as the result progressive NOx emission controls from various anthropogenic sectors and sources at different locations. Our findings suggest that urban NOx control can be regarded as an adaptation strategy with regards to ozone air quality. Also, the strong temperature dependence in urban environments suggests that the health and attainment burden of urban heat island may be more substantial than previously thought. Spatial distribution of average adjoint-based CPFs Adjoint-based CPF and Mortality CPF

  8. INDONESIA’S DEATH PENALTY EXECUTION FROM THE REALIST VIEW OF INTERNATIONAL LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Azmi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the first half of 2015, Indonesia executed fourteen prisoners who had been convicted of smuggling drugs to and from Indonesia. Twelve of them were foreigners. This execution led to withdrawal of the ambassador of Brazil, Netherlands, and Australia, whose citizens are among those executed. Criticism came from around the world, and small number of Indonesians. Most critics cited human rights abuse; and death penalty is against international law. However, the lack of further explanation can make the statement misunderstood. The distinctive nature of international law is one factor that makes death penalty issue is still debatable. Another factor is the inconsistent world’s reaction on human rights issues, showing realistic behavior in international relations. Therefore it is important to understand the nature of international law from the realist perspective of international relations in explaining death penalty in Indonesia. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate Indonesia’s death penalty from the realist perspective of international law. Keywords: realism, international law, international relations, death penalty

  9. Significant Radionuclides Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo A. Ziegler

    2001-07-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to identify radionuclides that are significant to offsite doses from potential preclosure events for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste expected to be received at the potential Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). In this calculation, high-level radioactive waste is included in references to DOE SNF. A previous document, ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b), calculated the source terms and offsite doses for Department of Energy (DOE) and Naval SNF for use in design basis event analyses. This calculation reproduces only DOE SNF work (i.e., no naval SNF work is included in this calculation) created in ''DOE SNF DBE Offsite Dose Calculations'' and expands the calculation to include DOE SNF expected to produce a high dose consequence (even though the quantity of the SNF is expected to be small) and SNF owned by commercial nuclear power producers. The calculation does not address any specific off-normal/DBE event scenarios for receiving, handling, or packaging of SNF. The results of this calculation are developed for comparative analysis to establish the important radionuclides and do not represent the final source terms to be used for license application. This calculation will be used as input to preclosure safety analyses and is performed in accordance with procedure AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'', and is subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2000) as determined by the activity evaluation contained in ''Technical Work Plan for: Preclosure Safety Analysis, TWP-MGR-SE-000010'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b) in accordance with procedure AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''.

  10. Estrategias abierta y cerrada del penalti en jugadores de nivel intermedio de fútbol Open and closed penalty kick strategies in intermediate soccer player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Castillo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Este estudio compara el efecto en la aplicación de un sistema automatizado inalámbrico en el terreno de juego para simular una estrategia que tiene en cuanta la actuación del portero (abierta frente a otra estrategia que la ignora (cerrada sobre la eficacia de lanzadores intermedios de penalti. Lanzadores (n=12 intermedios de penalti realizaron un test pre-tratamiento de 32 tiros en “situación real” con porteros (n=3 intermedios. A continuación se establecieron dos grupos de lanzadores que completaron 11 sesiones de tratamiento utilizando estrategias distintas y por último repitieron un test post-postratamiento. Como variables medimos el número de goles conseguidos, la dirección del chut en la misma o en dirección no coincidente respecto al movimiento del portero (DNC, la velocidad del balón y la duración del movimiento de golpeo. Los resultados sugieren mayor capacidad de identificación de señales de avance en los porteros frente a los lanzadores GC (grupo de estrategia cerrada pero menor velocidad del balón en los lanzadores GA (grupo de estrategia abierta relacionada con una modificación en la superficie de contacto del golpeo.
    Palabras Clave:penalti, anticipación, toma de decisiones, campo, entrenamiento.

    This study investigates the efficacy of intermediate penalty kickers by comparing the effect of applying an automated WiFi (Wireless Fidelity  system on the field of play to simulate a strategy that takes account of goalkeeper action (open with another for which goalkeeper strategy is irrelevant (closed. Intermediate penalty kickers (n=12 took a pretreatment test of 32 kicks in a “real-play” situation with intermediate goalkeepers (n=3. We established two groups of kickers who underwent 11 treatment sessions using different strategies and then conducted a posttreatment test. The variables we measured were the number of goals

  11. Improved flux calculations for viscous incompressible flow by the variable penalty method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheshgi, H.; Luskin, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes system for viscous, incompressible flow is considered, taking into account a replacement of the continuity equation by the perturbed continuity equation. The introduction of the approximation allows the pressure variable to be eliminated to obtain the system of equations for the approximate velocity. The penalty approximation is often applied to numerical discretizations since it provides a reduction in the size and band-width of the system of equations. Attention is given to error estimates, and to two numerical experiments which illustrate the error estimates considered. It is found that the variable penalty method provides an accurate solution for a much wider range of epsilon than the classical penalty method. 8 references

  12. Fees and penalties for use of the environment – financial and legal aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Borodo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fees and penalties for use of the environment, regulated by the Environmental Protection Act, are legal structures related with each other. These are the four basic fees (for the emission of gases or dust into the air, the discharge of sewage, for water drawing and for storage of waste, as well as increased fees and penalties. Fees and penalties for use of the environment are separate institutions in relation to other categories of public revenues (taxes, fees for services. These are the payments for use directly the components of the environment (e.g. air, water. They constitute public burden for the use of the environment, which the state legislature imposes on entities using the environment. Their aim is to limit the use of the natural environment and the accumulation of funds for financing the tasks in the area of environmental protection.

  13. Two-Level Iteration Penalty Methods for the Navier-Stokes Equations with Friction Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two-level iteration penalty finite element methods to approximate the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with friction boundary conditions. The basic idea is to solve the Navier-Stokes type variational inequality problem on a coarse mesh with mesh size H in combining with solving a Stokes, Oseen, or linearized Navier-Stokes type variational inequality problem for Stokes, Oseen, or Newton iteration on a fine mesh with mesh size h. The error estimate obtained in this paper shows that if H, h, and ε can be chosen appropriately, then these two-level iteration penalty methods are of the same convergence orders as the usual one-level iteration penalty method.

  14. Improvements of the Penalty Avoiding Rational Policy Making Algorithm and an Application to the Othello Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kazuteru; Tsuboi, Sougo; Kobayashi, Shigenobu

    The purpose of reinforcement learning is to learn an optimal policy in general. However, in 2-players games such as the othello game, it is important to acquire a penalty avoiding policy. In this paper, we focus on formation of a penalty avoiding policy based on the Penalty Avoiding Rational Policy Making algorithm [Miyazaki 01]. In applying it to large-scale problems, we are confronted with the curse of dimensionality. We introduce several ideas and heuristics to overcome the combinational explosion in large-scale problems. First, we propose an algorithm to save the memory by calculation of state transition. Second, we describe how to restrict exploration by two type knowledge; KIFU database and evaluation funcion. We show that our learning player can always defeat against the well-known othello game program KITTY.

  15. APPLICATION OF PENALTY ANALYSIS TO INTERPRET JAR DATA – A CASE STUDY ON ORANGE JUICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dida Iserliyska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Penalty analysis is a graphical technique to reveal the possible penalty paid by the product in terms of reduced overall liking by not being Just About Right (JAR on a characteristic. Thus consumer affective tests were conducted to investigate the use of penalty analysis to model consumer acceptance of six well-known brands of orange juice using the proposed method to infer the drivers of liking from JAR data. Just-about-right (JAR and hedonic ratings were used to measure each attribute evaluated. Consumers (n=81 were asked to rate the overall acceptance using a 9-point hedonic scale. Just About Right (JAR scales were used to evaluate the rest of the attributes as followed: color, sweet taste, sour taste, bitter taste and amount of pulp. Means and frequencies of each sensory attribute were obtained. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients gave the relationship between the sensory attributes and the overall liking.

  16. The death penalty in Catholic teaching and medicine: intersections and places for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norko, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Current debate on the death penalty in public and professional spheres is seen as divisive in nature, disallowing the possibility of common agreement. The history of views of the death penalty within the Catholic Church illustrates centuries of tensions and ambiguities as well as a current posture that manages to hold these tensions while advocating a strong position. That history of church views itself contains allusions to and intersections with medicine. There is something tangible to be gained in understanding religious views on the death penalty, in the debates both within medicine and in the public sphere. An argument is made for sufficient overlap of contemporary purpose between the goals of church and medicine to warrant further dialogue in enhanced and deliberative democratic processes.

  17. In the public interest: intellectual disability, the Supreme Court, and the death penalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Norman

    2010-11-01

    This article deals with a case that recently came before the U.S. Supreme Court. The issues involved whether attorneys provided effective assistance to a person convicted of murder when no mitigating evidence was presented (either strategically or by neglect) to the jury concerning the intellectual disabilities of their client during the death penalty phase of the trial. The Supreme Court had previously ruled that the death penalty for intellectually disabled individuals (mentally retarded) constituted cruel and unusual punishment. In this case the attorneys made a strategic decision not to present possibly mitigating evidence for the death penalty phase. The Supreme Court considered whether the appeals court abdicated its judicial review responsibilities. The results of psychological evaluations are presented, and the decisions of the Supreme Court are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. A non-penalty recurrent neural network for solving a class of constrained optimization problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explain a methodology to analyze convergence of some differential inclusion-based neural networks for solving nonsmooth optimization problems. For a general differential inclusion, we show that if its right hand-side set valued map satisfies some conditions, then solution trajectory of the differential inclusion converges to optimal solution set of its corresponding in optimization problem. Based on the obtained methodology, we introduce a new recurrent neural network for solving nonsmooth optimization problems. Objective function does not need to be convex on R(n) nor does the new neural network model require any penalty parameter. We compare our new method with some penalty-based and non-penalty based models. Moreover for differentiable cases, we implement circuit diagram of the new neural network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stable multi-domain spectral penalty methods for fractional partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinwu; Hesthaven, Jan S.

    2014-01-01

    We propose stable multi-domain spectral penalty methods suitable for solving fractional partial differential equations with fractional derivatives of any order. First, a high order discretization is proposed to approximate fractional derivatives of any order on any given grids based on orthogonal polynomials. The approximation order is analyzed and verified through numerical examples. Based on the discrete fractional derivative, we introduce stable multi-domain spectral penalty methods for solving fractional advection and diffusion equations. The equations are discretized in each sub-domain separately and the global schemes are obtained by weakly imposed boundary and interface conditions through a penalty term. Stability of the schemes are analyzed and numerical examples based on both uniform and nonuniform grids are considered to highlight the flexibility and high accuracy of the proposed schemes.

  20. 14 CFR 406.105 - Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... civil penalties and advising the FAA decisionmaker. 406.105 Section 406.105 Aeronautics and Space... INVESTIGATIONS, ENFORCEMENT, AND ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Rules of Practice in FAA Space Transportation Adjudications § 406.105 Separation of functions for prosecuting civil penalties and advising the FAA...