WorldWideScience

Sample records for significant ion heating

  1. Low-altitude ion heating with downflowing and upflowing ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Howarth, A. D.; Yau, A. W.; James, G.; Miles, D.; Cogger, L. L.; Perry, G. W.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanisms that energize ions at the initial stage of ion upflow are still not well understood. We statistically investigate ionospheric ion energization and field-aligned motion at very low altitudes (330-730 km) using simultaneous plasma, magnetic field, wave electric field and optical data from the e-POP satellite. The high-time-resolution (10 ms) dataset enables us to study the micro-structures of ion heating and field-aligned ion motion. The ion temperature and field-aligned bulk flow velocity are derived from 2-D ion distribution functions measured by the SEI instrument. From March 2015 to March 2016, we've found 17 orbits (in total 24 ion heating periods) with clear ion heating signatures passing across the dayside cleft or the nightside auroral regions. Most of these events have consistent ion heating and flow velocity characteristics observed from both the SEI and IRM instruments. The perpendicular ion temperature goes up to 4.5 eV within a 2 km-wide region in some cases, in which the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) sees broadband extremely low frequency (BBELF) waves, demonstrating significant wave-ion heating down to as low as 350 km. The e-POP Fast Auroral Imager (FAI) and Magnetic Field (MGF) instruments show that many events are associated with active aurora and are within downward current regions. Contrary to what would be expected from mirror-force acceleration of heated ions, the majority of these heating events (17 out of 24) are associated with the core ion downflow rather than upflow. These statistical results provide us with new sights into ion heating and field-aligned flow processes at very low altitudes.

  2. Ion Bernstein wave heating research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-03-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) utilizes the ion Bernstein wave (IBW), a hot plasma wave, to carry the radio frequency (rf) power to heat tokamak reactor core. Earlier wave accessibility studies have shown that this finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) mode should penetrate into a hot dense reactor plasma core without significant attenuation. Moreover, the IBW's low phase velocity (ω/k perpendicular ∼ V Ti much-lt V α ) greatly reduces the otherwise serious wave absorption by the 3.5 MeV fusion α-particles. In addition, the property of IBW's that k perpendicular ρ i ∼ 1 makes localized bulk ion heating possible at the ion cyclotron harmonic layers. Such bulk ion heating can prove useful in optimizing fusion reactivity. In another vein, with proper selection of parameters, IBW's can be made subject to strong localized electron Landau damping near the major ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layers. This property can be useful, for example, for rf current drive in the reactor plasma core. This paper discusses this research

  3. On the role of ion heating in ICRF-heated discharges in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.; Hoang, G.; Bergeaud, V.

    2000-09-01

    The effect of bulk ion heating in Tore Supra has been investigated by studying discharges with varying concentrations of minority ions during ICRF hydrogen minority heating in Deuterium/ 4 He plasmas. As expected, the level of bulk ion heating is found to increase with the minority concentration. Higher levels of ion heating are shown to be accompanied by two significant effects: an improved energy confinement and a strong influence on the plasma rotation. (author)

  4. Heating tokamaks via the ion-cyclotron and ion-ion hybrid resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1977-04-01

    For the ion-ion hybrid resonance it is shown that: (1) the energy absorption occurs via a sequence of mode conversions; (2) a poloidal field component normal to the ion-ion hybrid mode conversion surface strongly influences the mode conversion process so that roughly equal electron and ion heating occurs in the present proton-deuterium experiments, while solely electron heating is predicted to prevail in deuterium-tritium reactors; (3) the ion-ion hybrid resonance suppresses toroidal eigenmodes; and (4) wave absorption in minority fundamental ion-cyclotron heating experiments will be dominated by ion-ion hybrid mode conversion absorption for minority concentrations exceeding roughly 1 percent. For the ion-cyclotron resonance, it is shown that: (1) ion-cyclotron mode conversion leads to surface electron heating; and (2) ion-cyclotron mode conversion absorption dominates fundamental ion-cyclotron absorption thereby preventing efficient ion heating

  5. Ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating of plasmas in tokamak and EBT configurations has been studied using 1-2/2 and 2-1/2 dimensional fully self-consistent electromagnetic particle codes. We have tested two major antenna configurations; we have also compared heating efficiencies for one and two ion species plasmas. We model a tokamak plasma with a uniform poloidal field and 1/R toroidal field on a particular q surface. Ion cyclotron waves are excited on the low field side by antennas parallel either to the poloidal direction or to the toroidal direction with different phase velocities. In 2D, minority ion heating (vsub(perpendicular)) and electron heating (vsub(parallel),vsub(perpendicular)) are observed. The exponential electron heating seems due to the decay instability. The minority heating is consistent with mode conversion of fast Alfven waves and heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron modes. Minority heating is stronger with a poloidal antenna. The strong electron heating is accompanied by toroidal current generation. In 1D, no thermal instability was observed and only strong minority heating resulted. For an EBT plasma we model it by a multiple mirror. We have tested heating efficiency with various minority concentrations, temperatures, mirror ratios, and phase velocities. In this geometry we have beach or inverse beach heating associated with the mode conversion layer perpendicular to the toroidal field. No appreciable electron heating is observed. Heating of ions is linear in time. For both tokamak and EBT slight majority heating above the collisional rate is observed due to the second harmonic heating. (author)

  6. Ion and electron heating in ICRF heating experiments on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    2001-02-01

    This paper reports on the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating conducted in 1999 in the 3rd experimental campaign on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with an emphasis on the optimization of the heating regime. Specifically, an exhaustive study of seven different heating regimes was carried out by changing the RF frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity, and the dependence of the heating efficiency on H-minority concentration was investigated. It was found in the experiment that both ion and electron heating are attainable with the same experimental setup by properly choosing the frequency relative to the magnetic field intensity. In the cases of both electron heating and ion heating, the power absorption efficiency depends on the minority ion concentration. An optimum minority concentration exists in the ion heating case while, in the electron heating case, the efficiency increases with concentration monotonically. A simple model calculation is introduced to provide a heuristic understanding of these experimental results. Among the heating regimes examined in this experiment, one of the ion heating regimes was finally chosen as the optimized heating regime and various high performance discharges were realized with it. (author)

  7. Orbit losses of strongly ICRF-heated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Dillner, Oe.; Lisak, M.

    1992-01-01

    An approximate analytical investigation is made to assess the importance of orbit losses of strongly ICRF-heated minority ions. Explicit expressions for the fraction of lost minority ions are derived and shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulation results. The results indicate that present day ICRF heating power density levels cannot be raised significantly without causing important particle and energy losses due to unconfined particle orbits. 6 refs., 5 figs

  8. Majority ion heating near the ion-ion hybrid layer in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.C.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Efficient direct majority ion heating in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor-grade plasma via absorption of fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is discussed. Majority ion heating results from resonance overlap between the cyclotron layers and the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer in hot, dense plasmas for fast waves launched with high parallel wavenumbers. Analytic and numerical models are used to explore the regime in ITER plasmas

  9. Resistive Heating and Ion Drag in Saturn's Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesema, Jess William; Koskinen, Tommi; Yelle, Roger V.

    2017-10-01

    One of the most puzzling observations of the jovian planets is that the thermospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are all several times hotter than solar heating can account for (Strobel and Smith 1973; Yelle and Miller 2004; Muller-Wodarg et al. 2006). On Saturn, resistive heating appears sufficient to explain these temperatures in auroral regions, but the particular mechanism(s) responsible for heating the lower latitudes remains unclear. The most commonly proposed heating mechanisms are breaking gravity waves and auroral heating at the poles followed by redistribution of energy to mid-and low latitudes. Both of these energy sources are potentially important but also come with significant problems. Wave heating would have to be continuous and global to produce consistently elevated temperatures and the strong Coriolis forces coupled with polar ion drag appear to hinder redistribution of auroral energy (see Strobel et al. 2016 for review). Here we explore an alternative: wind-driven electrodynamics that can alter circulation and produce substantial heating outside of the auroral region. Smith (2013) showed this in-situ mechanism to be potentially significant in Jupiter’s thermosphere. We present new results from an axisymmetric, steady-state model that calculates resistive (Joule) heating rates through rigorous solutions of the electrodynamic equations for the coupled neutral atmosphere and ionosphere of Saturn. At present, we assume a dipole magnetic field and neglect any contributions from the magnetosphere. We use ion mixing ratios from the model of Kim et al. (2014) and the observed temperature-pressure profile from Koskinen et al. (2015) to calculate the generalized conductivity tensor as described by Koskinen et al. (2014). We calculate the current density under the assumption that it has no divergence and use it to calculate the resistive heating rates and ion drag. Our results suggest that resistive heating and ion drag at low latitudes likely

  10. Solar and seasonal dependence of ion frictional heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Ion frictional heating constitutes one of the principal mechanisms whereby energy, originating in the solar wind, is deposited into the Earth's ionosphere and ultimately the neutral atmosphere. Common programme observations by the EISCAT UHF radar system, spanning the years 1984 to 1995, provide the basis for a comprehensive statistical study of ion frictional heating, results of which are documented in this and a previous paper by the authors. In the present work, the authors demonstrate the solar and seasonal dependence of the universal time distribution of frictional heating, and explain these results with reference to corresponding dependences of the ion velocity. Although EISCAT observes a significant increase in the occurrence of enhanced ion velocities associated with increased solar activity, the latter characterised according to the prevailing 10.7 cm solar flux, this is not reflected to such an extent in the occurrence of frictional heating. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the decreased neutral atmosphere response times associated with active solar conditions, resulting from the higher ionospheric plasma densities present. Seasonal effects on the diurnal distribution of ion frictional heating are well explained by corresponding variations in ionospheric convection, the latter principally a result of geometrical factors. It is noted that, over the entire dataset, the variations in the unperturbed F-region ion temperature, required to implement the identification criterion for ion heating, are highly correlated with model values of thermospheric temperature.Keywords. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density

  11. ION HEATING IN INHOMOGENEOUS EXPANDING SOLAR WIND PLASMA: THE ROLE OF PARALLEL AND OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozak, N.; Ofman, L.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Remote sensing observations of coronal holes show that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic. In-situ observations of fast solar wind streams provide direct evidence for turbulent Alfvén wave spectrum, left-hand polarized ion-cyclotron waves, and He ++ - proton drift in the solar wind plasma, which can produce temperature anisotropies by resonant absorption and perpendicular heating of the ions. Furthermore, the solar wind is expected to be inhomogeneous on decreasing scales approaching the Sun. We study the heating of solar wind ions in inhomogeneous plasma with a 2.5D hybrid code. We include the expansion of the solar wind in an inhomogeneous plasma background, combined with the effects of a turbulent wave spectrum of Alfvénic fluctuations and initial ion-proton drifts. We study the influence of these effects on the perpendicular ion heating and cooling and on the spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations in the inhomogeneous background wind. We find that inhomogeneities in the plasma lead to enhanced heating compared to the homogenous solar wind, and the generation of significant power of oblique waves in the solar wind plasma. The cooling effect due to the expansion is not significant for super-Alfvénic drifts, and is diminished further when we include an inhomogeneous background density. We reproduce the ion temperature anisotropy seen in observations and previous models, which is present regardless of the perpendicular cooling due to solar wind expansion. We conclude that small scale inhomogeneities in the inner heliosphere can significantly affect resonant wave ion heating

  12. Ion heat transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P; Angioni, C; Baiocchi, B

    2011-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of ion heat transport have been carried out in JET exploiting the upgrade of active charge exchange spectroscopy and the availability of multi-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating with 3He minority. The determination of ion temperature gradient (ITG) threshold a...

  13. Experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S.C.

    2000-01-28

    This dissertation reports an experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection, which is the annihilation and topological rearrangement of magnetic flux in a conductive plasma. Reconnection is invoked often to explain particle heating and acceleration in both laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas. However, a simultaneous account of reconnection and its associated energy conversion has been elusive due to the extreme inaccessibility of reconnection events, e.g. in the solar corona, the Earth's magnetosphere, or in fusion research plasmas. Experiments for this work were conducted on MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment), which creates a plasma environment allowing the reconnection process to be isolated, reproduced, and diagnosed in detail. Key findings of this work are the identification of local ion heating during magnetic reconnection and the determination that non-classical effects must provide the heating mechanism. Measured ion flows are sub-Alfvenic and can provide only slight viscous heating, and classical ion-electron interactions can be neglected due to the very long energy equipartition time. The plasma resistivity in the reconnection layer is seen to be enhanced over the classical value, and the ion heating is observed to scale with the enhancement factor, suggesting a relationship between the magnetic energy dissipation mechanism and the ion heating mechanism. The observation of non-classical ion heating during reconnection has significant implications for understanding the role played by non-classical dissipation mechanisms in generating fast reconnection. The findings are relevant for many areas of space and laboratory plasma research, a prime example being the currently unsolved problem of solar coronal heating. In the process of performing this work, local measurements of ion temperature and flows in a well-characterized reconnection layer were obtained for the first time in either laboratory or observational

  14. Experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation reports an experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection, which is the annihilation and topological rearrangement of magnetic flux in a conductive plasma. Reconnection is invoked often to explain particle heating and acceleration in both laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas. However, a simultaneous account of reconnection and its associated energy conversion has been elusive due to the extreme inaccessibility of reconnection events, e.g. in the solar corona, the Earth's magnetosphere, or in fusion research plasmas. Experiments for this work were conducted on MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment), which creates a plasma environment allowing the reconnection process to be isolated, reproduced, and diagnosed in detail. Key findings of this work are the identification of local ion heating during magnetic reconnection and the determination that non-classical effects must provide the heating mechanism. Measured ion flows are sub-Alfvenic and can provide only slight viscous heating, and classical ion-electron interactions can be neglected due to the very long energy equipartition time. The plasma resistivity in the reconnection layer is seen to be enhanced over the classical value, and the ion heating is observed to scale with the enhancement factor, suggesting a relationship between the magnetic energy dissipation mechanism and the ion heating mechanism. The observation of non-classical ion heating during reconnection has significant implications for understanding the role played by non-classical dissipation mechanisms in generating fast reconnection. The findings are relevant for many areas of space and laboratory plasma research, a prime example being the currently unsolved problem of solar coronal heating. In the process of performing this work, local measurements of ion temperature and flows in a well-characterized reconnection layer were obtained for the first time in either laboratory or observational

  15. Heating effects in a liquid metal ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, G.L.R.; Aitken, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A reassessment is made of the heating occurring at the anode of a liquid metal ion source, in the light of new microscopic observations. The apex region of the cones is in the form of a cusp, or jet, even at very low currents. The calculation for ohmic heating is conclusive for low currents; no heating occurs at the anode; for high currents (approx. 50-100 μA), substantial heating is conceivable, if a long, very thin, cylindrical jet exists at the apex of the anode. The answer to the problem of external heating, in the form of electrons bombarding the anode, is not quite conclusive; this is because of the impossibility of correctly assessing the electron flux entering the anode. However, it would appear to be a definite conclusion that for reasons of self-consistency field-ionisation of thermally released atoms cannot be a significant ion emission mechanism. (author)

  16. Theory of ion heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, Y.V.; Yurchenko, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments which have been carried out in several tokamaks to determine the ion thermal conductivity show that it is several times the value predicted by the neoclassical theory. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is proposed. When the finite width of a banana is taken into account, there are substantial increases in the heat fluxes which stem from the important contribution of superthermal ions to the transport. If the electron diffusive flux is zero, a systematic account of the ions with E>T leads to an ion heat flux with a finite banana width which is two to four times the neoclassical prediction. The effect of the anomalous nature of the electron flux on the ion heat transport is analyzed. An expression is derived for calculating the ion heat transport over the entire range of collision rates

  17. Integrated heat transport simulation of high ion temperature plasma of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Sakai, A.

    2014-10-01

    A first dynamical simulation of high ion temperature plasma with carbon pellet injection of LHD is performed by the integrated simulation GNET-TD + TASK3D. NBI heating deposition of time evolving plasma is evaluated by the 5D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET-TD and the heat transport of multi-ion species plasma (e, H, He, C) is studied by the integrated transport simulation code, TASK3D. Achievement of high ion temperature plasma is attributed to the 1) increase of heating power per ion due to the temporal increase of effective charge, 2) reduction of effective neoclassical transport with impurities, 3) reduction of turbulence transport. The reduction of turbulence transport is most significant contribution to achieve the high ion temperature and the reduction of the turbulent transport from the L-mode plasma (normal hydrogen plasma) is evaluated to be a factor about five by using integrated heat transport simulation code. Applying the Z effective dependent turbulent reduction model we obtain a similar time behavior of ion temperature after the C pellet injection with the experimental results. (author)

  18. Plasma heating and hot ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Ågren, O.

    2012-01-01

    Possibilities of plasma heating and sloshing ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids are briefly reviewed. Sloshing ions, i.e. energetic ions with a velocity distribution concentrated to a certain pitch-angle, play an important role in plasma confinement and generation of fusion neutrons in mirror machines. Neutral beam injection (NBI) is first discussed as a method to generate sloshing ions. Numerical results of NBI modeling for a stellarator-mirror hybrid are analyzed. The sloshing ions could alternatively be sustained by RF heating. Fast wave heating schemes, i.e. magnetic beach, minority and second harmonic heating, are addressed and their similarities and differences are described. Characteristic features of wave propagation in mirror hybrid devices including both fundamental harmonic minority and second harmonic heating are examined. Minority heating is efficient for a wide range of minority concentration and plasma densities; it allows one to place the antenna aside from the hot ion location. A simple-design strap antenna suitable for this has good performance. However, this scenario is appropriate only for light minority ions. The second harmonic heating can be applied for the heavy ion component. Arrangements are similar for minority and second harmonic heating. The efficiency of second harmonic heating is influenced by a weaker wave damping than for minority heating. Numerical calculations show that in a hybrid reactor scaled mirror machine the deuterium sloshing ions could be heated within the minority heating scheme, while the tritium ions could be sustained by second harmonic heating.

  19. Electron Currents and Heating in the Ion Diffusion Region of Asymmetric Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Norgren, C.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Ergun, R. E.; Paterson, W. R.; Gershman, D. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In this letter the structure of the ion diffusion region of magnetic reconnection at Earths magnetopause is investigated using the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft. The ion diffusion region is characterized by a strong DC electric field, approximately equal to the Hall electric field, intense currents, and electron heating parallel to the background magnetic field. Current structures well below ion spatial scales are resolved, and the electron motion associated with lower hybrid drift waves is shown to contribute significantly to the total current density. The electron heating is shown to be consistent with large-scale parallel electric fields trapping and accelerating electrons, rather than wave-particle interactions. These results show that sub-ion scale processes occur in the ion diffusion region and are important for understanding electron heating and acceleration.

  20. Simulation study of two-ion hybrid resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Tajima, T.

    1986-02-01

    A one-dimensional low-noise, low-frequency electromagnetic particle simulation code that is appropriate for investigation of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is developed. Retaining the hyperbolicity of the electromagnetic waves and exploiting nearly one-dimensional characteristics (perpendicular to the external magnetic field) of the ICRH, we use the guiding center electron approximation for the transverse electronic current calculation. We observe mode conversion of the incoming magnetosonic wave into the electrostatic ion-ion hybrid mode accompanied by strong ion-heating. The dependence of this heating on the different plasma parameters is examined through a series of simulations, focusing mainly on wave incidence from the high field side. Because K/sub parallel/ = 0 in our runs, the conventional Landau damping cannot explain the ion heating. Non-linear mechanisms for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy transfer are discussed. Our numerical results demonstrate the importance of the non-linear wave particle interaction for energy absorption during radio frequency heating in the ion cyclotron regime. 32 refs., 17 figs

  1. ICRF heating of passing ions in a thermal barrier tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Dimonte, G.; Campbell, R.; Barter, J.; Cummins, W.F.; Falabella, S.; Poulsen, P.

    1985-05-01

    Ion heating is used in the central cells of tandem mirrors to reduce the collisional trapping of passing ions in the end cell thermal barriers. In this paper, we reevaluate ICRF heating of the TMX-U central cell in two limits. The first we term isotropic, because we impose the condition that ions heated in the perpendicular direction be confined for at least one 90 0 scattering time, thereby heating the passing ions. The second we call anisotropic heating. It uses higher ICRF power to mirror trap a majority of the ions near the midplane, thereby reducing the density and collisionality of passing ions. Anisotropic heating has the advantage of increasing with ICRF power, whereas isotropic heating is limited by ion collisionality. Both techniques require gas fueling near the central cell midplane, with an ion cyclotron resonance toward each end cell to heat the cold ions

  2. The Ion Cyclotron, Lower Hybrid, and Alfven Wave Heating Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.

    2004-01-01

    This lecture covers the practical features and experimental results of the three heating methods. The emphasis is on ion cyclotron heating. First, we briefly come back to the main non-collisional heating mechanisms and to the particular features of the quasilinear coefficient in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). The specific case of the ion-ion hybrid resonance is treated, as well as the polarisation issue and minority heating scheme. The various ICRF scenarios are reviewed. The experimental applications of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems are outlined. Then, the lower hybrid and Alfven wave heating and current drive experimental results are covered more briefly. Where applicable, the prospects for ITER are commented

  3. Helicon plasma ion temperature measurements and observed ion cyclotron heating in proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, C. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Isler, R. C.; Martin, E. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caneses, J. F.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Kafle, N.; Rapp, J.

    2018-01-01

    The Prototype-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) linear plasma device is a test bed for exploring and developing plasma source concepts to be employed in the future steady-state linear device Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) that will study plasma-material interactions for the nuclear fusion program. The concept foresees using a helicon plasma source supplemented with electron and ion heating systems to reach necessary plasma conditions. In this paper, we discuss ion temperature measurements obtained from Doppler broadening of spectral lines from argon ion test particles. Plasmas produced with helicon heating alone have average ion temperatures downstream of the Helicon antenna in the range of 3 ± 1 eV; ion temperature increases to 10 ± 3 eV are observed with the addition of ion cyclotron heating (ICH). The temperatures are higher at the edge than the center of the plasma either with or without ICH. This type of profile is observed with electrons as well. A one-dimensional RF antenna model is used to show where heating of the plasma is expected.

  4. Quasilinear ion distribution function during first harmonic ion cyclotron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1993-12-01

    The quasilinear modification of the ion distribution function during first harmonic ion cyclotron (FHIC) heating is investigated both with a simple already well established analytic one-dimensional approach, and with a new two dimensional steady state solver of the quasilinear kinetic equation, SSFPQL. By accepting to disregard the effects of ion trapping in banana orbits, but including finite Larmor radius effects, the latter code has been made much faster than full surface-averaged codes; yet it can provide most of the relevant information on the suprathermal ion tail produced by this heating method. With SSFPQL we confirm that the one-dimensional model gives fair approximations for global properties of the distribution function, such as the average energy content of the tail and the fusion reactivity. On the other hand the tail is found to be very anisotropic, the increase of the parallel effective temperature being a small fraction of the total energy increase. Information on the anisotropy is essential to study the feedback of the fast ion tail on wave propagation and absorption, which is quite sensitive to the distribution of parallel velocities. The insight gained in the derivation and discussion of this model can be used to build a selfconsistent description of this heating scenario, whose implementation requires only a reasonable numerical effort. (orig.)

  5. Transverse eV Ion Heating by Random Electric Field Fluctuations in the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Blum, L.

    2017-01-01

    Charged particle acceleration in the Earth inner magnetosphere is believed to be mainly due to the local resonant wave-particle interaction or particle transport processes. However, the Van Allen Probes have recently provided interesting evidence of a relatively slow transverse heating of eV ions at distances about 2-3 Earth radii during quiet times. Waves that are able to resonantly interact with such very cold ions are generally rare in this region of space, called the plasmasphere. Thus, non-resonant wave-particle interactions are expected to play an important role in the observed ion heating. We demonstrate that stochastic heating by random transverse electric field fluctuations of whistler (and possibly electromagnetic ion cyclotron) waves could explain this weak and slow transverse heating of H+ and O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. The essential element of the proposed model of ion heating is the presence of trains of random whistler (hiss) wave packets, with significant amplitude modulations produced by strong wave damping, rapid wave growth, or a superposition of wave packets of different frequencies, phases, and amplitudes. Such characteristics correspond to measured characteristics of hiss waves in this region. Using test particle simulations with typical wave and plasma parameters, we demonstrate that the corresponding stochastic transverse ion heating reaches 0.07-0.2 eV/h for protons and 0.007-0.015 eV/h for O+ ions. This global temperature increase of the Maxwellian ion population from an initial Ti approx. 0.3 eV could potentially explain the observations.

  6. Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection are studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The plasma is in the two-fluid regime, where the motion of the ions is decoupled from that of the electrons within the ion diffusion region. The reconnection process studied here is quasi-symmetric since plasma parameters such as the magnitude of the reconnecting magnetic field, the plasma density, and temperature are compatible on each side of the current sheet. Our experimental data show that the in-plane (Hall) electric field plays a key role in ion heating and acceleration. The electrostatic potential that produces the in-plane electric field is established by electrons that are accelerated near the electron diffusion region. The in-plane profile of this electrostatic potential shows a “well” structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet. This well becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. Since the in-plane electric field is 3–4 times larger than the out-of-plane reconnection electric field, it is the primary source of energy for the unmagnetized ions. With regard to ion acceleration, the Hall electric field causes ions near separatrices to be ballistically accelerated toward the outflow direction. Ion heating occurs as the accelerated ions travel into the high pressure downstream region. This downstream ion heating cannot be explained by classical, unmagnetized transport theory; instead, we conclude that ions are heated by re-magnetization of ions in the reconnection exhaust and collisions. Two-dimensional (2-D) simulations with the global geometry similar to MRX demonstrate downstream ion thermalization by the above mechanisms. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the

  7. Simulation study of energetic ion distribution during combined NBI and ICRF heating in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Kasilov, V.

    2006-01-01

    In the LHD, significant performances of ICRF heating (fundamental, minority heating regime) have been demonstrated and up to 500keV of energetic tail ions have been observed by fast neutral particle analysis (NPA). These measured results indicate a good property of energetic ion confinement in helical systems. From the 9th campaign of LHD experiment (FY2005) a new perpendicular NBI heating system (P<3MW) has been installed and an effective heating of perpendicularly injected beam ions by the higher harmonics ICRF heating is expected. ICRF heating generates highly energetic tail ions, which drift around the torus for a long time (typically on a collisional time scale). Thus, the behavior of these energetic ions is strongly affected by the characteristics of the drift motions, which depend on the magnetic field configuration. In particular, in a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic configuration, complicated drift motions of trapped particles would play an important role in the confinement of the energetic ions and the ICRF heating process. Therefore a global simulation of ICRF heating is necessary for the accurate modeling of the plasma heating process in a 3D magnetic configuration. In this paper we study the energetic ion distribution during combined NBI and 2nd harmonics ICRF heating in LHD using two global simulation codes: a full wave field solver TASK/WK and a drift kinetic equation solver GNET. GNET solves a linearized drift kinetic equation for energetic ions including complicated behavior of trapped particles in 5-D phase space. TASK/WM solves Maxwell's equation for RF wave electric field with complex frequency as a boundary value problem in the 3D magnetic configuration. (author)

  8. Development of heat resistant ion exchange resin. First Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Teruo; Shindo, Manabu

    1995-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, as a means of maintaining the soundness of nuclear reactors, the cleaning of reactor cooling water has been carried out. But as for the ion exchange resin which is used as the cleaning agent in the filtrating and desalting facility in reactor water cleaning system, since the heat resistance is low, high temperature reactor water is cooled once and cleaned, therefore large heat loss occurs. If the cleaning can be done at higher temperature, the reduction of heat loss and compact cleaning facilities become possible. In this study, a new ion exchange resin having superior heat resistance has been developed, and the results of the test of evaluating the performance of the developed ion exchange resin are reported. The heat loss in reactor water cleaning system, the heat deterioration of conventional ion exchange resin, and the development of the anion exchange resin of alkyl spacer type are described. The outline of the performance evaluation test, the experimental method, and the results of the heat resistance, ion exchange characteristics and so on of C4 resin are reported. The with standable temperature of the developed anion exchange resin was estimated as 80 - 90degC. The ion exchange performance at 95degC of this resin did not change from that at low temperature in chloride ions and silica, and was equivalent to that of existing anion exchange resin. (K.I.)

  9. Development of heat resistant ion exchange resin. First Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Teruo; Shindo, Manabu [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Sendai (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, as a means of maintaining the soundness of nuclear reactors, the cleaning of reactor cooling water has been carried out. But as for the ion exchange resin which is used as the cleaning agent in the filtrating and desalting facility in reactor water cleaning system, since the heat resistance is low, high temperature reactor water is cooled once and cleaned, therefore large heat loss occurs. If the cleaning can be done at higher temperature, the reduction of heat loss and compact cleaning facilities become possible. In this study, a new ion exchange resin having superior heat resistance has been developed, and the results of the test of evaluating the performance of the developed ion exchange resin are reported. The heat loss in reactor water cleaning system, the heat deterioration of conventional ion exchange resin, and the development of the anion exchange resin of alkyl spacer type are described. The outline of the performance evaluation test, the experimental method, and the results of the heat resistance, ion exchange characteristics and so on of C4 resin are reported. The with standable temperature of the developed anion exchange resin was estimated as 80 - 90degC. The ion exchange performance at 95degC of this resin did not change from that at low temperature in chloride ions and silica, and was equivalent to that of existing anion exchange resin. (K.I.).

  10. Turbulent ion heating in TCV Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatter, Ch.

    2009-08-01

    The Tokamak à configuration variable (TCV) features the highest electron cyclotron wave power density available to resonantly heat (ECRH) the electrons and to drive noninductive currents in a fusion grade plasma (ECCD). In more than 15 years of exploitation, much effort has been expended on real and velocity space engineering of the plasma electron energy distribution function and thus making electron physics a major research contribution of TCV. When a plasma was first subjected to ECCD, a surprising energisation of the ions, perpendicular to the confining magnetic field, was observed on the charge exchange spectrum measured with the vertical neutral particle analyser (VNPA). It was soon concluded that the ion acceleration was not due to power equipartition between electrons and ions, which, due to the absence of direct ion heating on TCV, has thus far been considered as the only mechanism heating the ions. However, although observed for more than ten years, little attention was paid to this phenomenon, whose cause has remained unexplained to date. The key subject of this thesis is the experimental study of this anomalous ion acceleration, the characterisation in terms of relevant parameters and the presentation of a model simulation of the potential process responsible for the appearance of fast ions. The installation of a new compact neutral particle analyser (CNPA) with an extended high energy range (≥ 50 keV) greatly improved the fast ion properties diagnosis. The CNPA was commissioned and the information derived from its measurement (ion temperature and density, isotopic plasma composition) was validated against other ion diagnostics, namely the active carbon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system (CXRS) and a neutron counter. In ohmic plasmas, where the ion heating agrees with classical theory, the radial ion temperature profile was successfully reconstructed by vertically displacing the plasma across the horizontal CNPA line of sight. Active

  11. Thermal insulation of high confinement mode with dominant electron heating in comparison to dominant ion heating and corresponding changes of torque input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Fabian H.D.

    2013-01-01

    whereas the central ion temperature decreases significantly with increasing ECRH fraction. The relative contribution of the heat exchange is smaller so that the electrons still carry a substantial fraction of heat at the edge. The ion heat flux is still independent of the heating mix and the ion heat diffusivity exceeds the electron one. The radial electrical field does not show any variation with changing heating mix. The analysis of the whole database of discharges shows a degradation of the ion temperature gradient with increasing T e /T i and a steepening with increasing gradient of the toroidal rotation. These findings complement previous studies. The electron density, and the electron and ion temperatures were modelled with a first principle code. The applied sawtooth model could reproduce the experimental observations. The profile shapes, the changing T e /T i and the peaking of the density and temperature profiles agree very well with the experimental data. Linear gyrokinetic calculations found the ion temperature gradient mode to be the dominant candidate for heat transport. The investigations can explain the observed phenomena in the experiment, like the different degree of increase of ion heat flux or density peaking for various collisionalities. The results presented in this work show a consistent picture of the observed phenomena and the understanding of the main underlying physics. They allow a correct implementation in the applied computer codes and a reliable prediction of the performance of future fusion devices.

  12. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating in a toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Sprott, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    rf power near the ion cyclotron-resonance frequency has been used to produce a hundredfold increase (from approximately-less-than1 to approx.100 eV) in the ion temperature in a toroidal octupole device. The heating produces no noticeable instabilities or other deleterious effects except for a high reflux of neutrals from the walls. The heating rate is consistent with theory and the limiting ion temperature is determined by charge-exchange losses

  13. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H{sup −} current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  14. Ion heating in minority ICRH experiments on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Start, D.F.H.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bures, M.

    1991-06-01

    Bulk ion heating by high power H-minority ICRH has been demonstrated in JET during both pellet enhanced performance H-mode experiments (PEP + H - mode) and in density limit studies. In the PEP + H - mode plasmas the electron and ion temperatures both reached 10 keV at an electron density of 7 x 10 19 /m 3 . According to Fokker-Planck calculations the power from the minority was transfered almost equally to the electrons and majority ions as a result of both the high electron density, n e , and the high minority density, n h , (n h /n e ≅ 0.15). For the first time with ICRH on JET a central ion temperature greater than the central electron temperature was achieved. In the density limit experiments which involved strong gas puffing into limiter discharges, there was strong evidence of a transfer from electron heating to ion heating as the electron density was ramped up to 8 x 10 19 /m 3 . (Author)

  15. Ion beam heating for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, S.Yu.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The characteristics features of the formation of the spatial distribution of the energy transferred to the plasma from a beam of ions with different initial energies, masses and charges under fast ignition conditions are determined. The motion of the Bragg peak is extended with respect to the spatial distribution of the temperature of the ion-beam-heated medium. The parameters of the ion beams are determined to initiate different regimes of fast ignition of thermonuclear fuel precompressed to a density of 300-500 g/cm 3 - the edge regime, in which the ignition region is formed at the outer boundary of the fuel, and the internal regime, in which the ignition region is formed in central parts of the fuel. The conclusion on the requirements for fast ignition by light and heavy ion beams is presented. It is shown that the edge heating with negative temperature gradient is described by a self-similar solution. Such a temperature distribution is the reason of the fact that the ignited beam energy at the edge heating is larger than the minimal ignition energy by factor 1.65. The temperature Bragg peak may be produced by ion beam heating in the reactor scale targets with pR-parameter larger than 3-4 g/cm 2 . In particular, for central ignition of the targets with pR-parameters in the range of 4-8 g/cm 2 the ion beam energy should be, respectively, from 5 to 7 times larger than the minimal ignition energy. The work by S.Ye. Gus'kov, D.V. Il'in, and V.E. Sherman was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation under the program 'Development of the Scientific Potential of High Education for 2009-2010' (project no. 2.1.1/1505) and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no. 08-02-01394 a ). The work by J. Limpouch and O. Klimo was supported by the Czech Ministry of Education (project no. LC528, MSM6840770022).

  16. Study of ion exchange equilibrium and determination of heat of ion exchange by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kailu; Yang Wenying

    1996-01-01

    Ion chromatography using pellicularia ion exchange resins and dilute solution can be devoted to the study of ion exchange thermodynamics and kinetics. Ion exchange equilibrium equation was obtained, and examined by the experiments. Based on ion exchange equilibrium, the influence of eluent concentration and resin capacity on adjusted retention volumes was examined. The effect of temperature on adjusted retention volumes was investigated and heats of ion exchange of seven anions were determined by ion chromatography. The interaction between anions and skeleton structure of resins were observed

  17. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  18. High harmonic ion cyclotron heating in DIII-D: Beam ion absorption and sawtooth stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Mau, T.K.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    Combined neutral beam injection and fast wave heating at the fourth cyclotron harmonic produce an energetic deuterium beam ion tail in the DIII-D tokamak. When the concentration of thermal hydrogen exceeds ∼ 5%, the beam ion absorption is suppressed in favour of second harmonic hydrogen absorption. As theoretically expected, the beam absorption increases with beam ion gyro-radius; also, central absorption at the fifth harmonic is weaker than central absorption at the fourth harmonic. For central heating at the fourth harmonic, an energetic, perpendicular, beam population forms inside the q = 1 surface. The beam ion tail transiently stabilizes the sawtooth instability but destabilizes toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). Saturation of the central heating correlates with the onset of the TAEs. Continued expansion of the q = 1 radius eventually precipitates a sawtooth crash; complete magnetic reconnection is observed. (author)

  19. Characteristics of ion Bernstein wave heating in JIPPT-II-U tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Ono, M.

    1985-11-01

    Using a transport code combined with an ion Bernstein wave tokamak ray tracing code, a modelling code for the ion Bernstein wave heating has been developed. Using this code, the ion Bernstein wave heating experiment on the JIPPT-II-U tokamak has been analyzed. It is assumed that the resonance layer is formed by the third harmonic of deuterium-like ions, such as fully ionized carbon, and oxygen ions near the plasma center. For wave absorption mechanisms, electron Landau damping, ion cyclotron harmonic damping, and collisional damping are considered. The characteristics of the ion Bernstein wave heating experiment, such as the ion temperature increase, the strong dependence of the quality factor on the magnetic field strength, and the dependence of the ion temperature increment on the input power, are well reproduced

  20. Ion heating and MHD dynamo fluctuations in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, E.E.

    1992-05-01

    Ion temperature measurements, time resolved to 10 μs, have been made in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) with a five channel charge exchange analyzer. The characteristic anomalously high ion temperature of RFP discharges has been observed in the MST. The evolution of the ion and electron temperature, as well as density and charge exchange power loss, were measured for a series of reproducible discharges. The ion heating expected from collisional processes with the electrons is calculated and shown too small to explain the measured ion temperatures. The charge exchange determined ion temperature is also compared to measurements of the thermally broadened CV 227.1 nm line. The ion temperature, T i ∼ 250 eV for I = 360 kA, increases by more than 100% during discrete dynamo bursts in MST discharges. Magnetic field fluctuations in the range 0.5 endash 5 MHz were also measured during the dynamo bursts. Structure in the fluctuation frequency spectrum at the ion cyclotron frequency appears as the bursts terminate, suggesting that the mechanism of ion heating involves the dissipation of dynamo fluctuations at ion cyclotron frequencies. Theoretical models for ion heating are reviewed and discussed in light of the experimental results. Similar electron heating mechanisms may be responsible for the discrepancy between measured and expected loop voltages in the RFP. The electrons, as well as the ions, may be heated by turbulent mechanisms, and a RFP energy budget including such phenomena is described

  1. Temperature-dependent electrochemical heat generation in a commercial lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhauer, Todd M.; Garimella, Srinivas; Fuller, Thomas F.

    2014-02-01

    Lithium-ion batteries suffer from inherent thermal limitations (i.e., capacity fade and thermal runaway); thus, it is critical to understand heat generation experienced in the batteries under normal operation. In the current study, reversible and irreversible electrochemical heat generation rates were measured experimentally on a small commercially available C/LiFePO4 lithium-ion battery designed for high-rate applications. The battery was tested over a wide range of temperatures (10-60 °C) and discharge and charge rates (∼C/4-5C) to elucidate their effects. Two samples were tested in a specially designed wind tunnel to maintain constant battery surface temperature within a maximum variation of ±0.88 °C. A data normalization technique was employed to account for the observed capacity fade, which was largest at the highest rates. The heat rate was shown to increase with both increasing rate and decreasing temperature, and the reversible heat rate was shown to be significant even at the highest rate and temperature (7.4% at 5C and 55 °C). Results from cycling the battery using a dynamic power profile also showed that constant-current data predict the dynamic performance data well. In addition, the reversible heat rate in the dynamic simulation was shown to be significant, especially for charge-depleting HEV applications.

  2. Microwave chemistry: Effect of ions on dielectric heating in microwave ovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the interactions of microwaves with dielectric materials and their conversion to thermal energy in aqueous systems, the effect of ionic concentration has been studied. Aqueous solutions of inorganic ions were exposed to microwaves (2.45 GHz in a modified oven under identical conditions. Difference in solution temperatures with reference to pure (deionized water was monitored in each case. A significant decrease in the temperature was observed with an increase in the quantity of ions. Experiments were repeated with several inorganic ions varying in size and charge. The information can be helpful in understanding the role of ions during dielectric heating.

  3. Heat and momentum transport of ion internal transport barrier plasmas on Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2010-11-01

    The peaked ion-temperature profile with steep gradient so called ion internal transport barrier (ion ITB) was formed in the neutral beam heated plasmas on the Large Helical Device (LHD) and the high-ion-temperature regime of helical plasmas has been significantly extended. The ion thermal diffusivity in the ion ITB plasma decreases down to the neoclassical transport level. The heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) observed the smooth potential profile with negative radial electric field (ion root) in the core region where the ion thermal diffusivity decreases significantly. The large toroidal rotation was also observed in the ion ITB core and the transport of toroidal momentum was analyzed qualitatively. The decrease of momentum diffusivity with ion temperature increase was observed in the ion ITB core. The toroidal rotation driven by ion temperature gradient so called intrinsic rotation is also identified. (author)

  4. Ion beam heating of thin silicon membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, P.E.; Hart, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    For silicon membranes irradiated by an ion beam in a vacuum environment, such as the masks used for ion beam lithography and the membranes used for thin film self-annealing, the heat transfer modes are radiation and limited conduction through the thin membrane. The radiation component depends on the total hemispherical emissivity which varies with the thickness and temperature of the membrane. A semiempirical correlation for the absorption coefficient of high resistivity silicon was derived and the variation of the total emissivity with temperature was computed for membranes with thicknesses between 0.1 and 10 μm. Based on this result, the temperatures reached during exposure to ion beams of varying intensities were computed. A proper modeling of the emissivity is shown to be important for beam heating of thin silicon membranes. (orig.)

  5. Ion Cyclotron Heating on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Campbell, I. H.; Caneses, J. F.; Kafle, N.; Ray, H. B.; Showers, M. A.; Piotrowicz, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ion cyclotron heating will be used on Proto-MPEX (Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment) to increase heat flux to the target, to produce varying ion energies without substrate biasing, and to vary the extent of the magnetic pre-sheath for the case of a tilted target. A 25 cm long, 9 cm diameter dual half-turn helical ion cyclotron antenna has been installed in the device located at the magnetic field maximum. It couples power to ions via single pass damping of the slow wave at the fundamental resonance, and operates with ω 0.8ωci at the antenna location. It is designed to operate at power levels up to 30 kW, with a later 200 kW upgrade planned. Near term experiments include measuring RF loading at low power as a function of frequency and antenna gap. The plasma is generated by a helicon plasma source that has achieved ne > 5 ×1019m-3 operating with deuterium, as measured downstream from the ion cyclotron antenna location. Measurements will be compared with 1-D and 2-D models of RF coupling. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Active ion temperature measurement with heating neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yukitoshi; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shin

    1987-03-01

    When the heating neutral-beam (hydrogen beam) is injected into a deuterium plasma, the density of neutral particles is increased locally. By using this increased neutral particles, the local ion temperature is measured by the active charge-exchange method. The analyzer is the E//B type mass-separated neutral particle energy analyzer and the measured position is about one third outside of the plasma radius. The deuterium energy spectrum is Maxwellian, and the temperature is increased from 350 eV to 900 eV during heating. Since the local hydrogen to deuterium density concentration and the density of the heating neutral-beam as well as the ion temperature can be obtained good S/N ratio, the usefulness of this method during neutral-beam heating is confirmed by this experiment. (author)

  7. Electron and ion heat transport with lower hybrid current drive and neutral beam injection heating in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeldner, F.X.; Pereverzev, G.V.; Bartiromo, R.; Fahrbach, H.U.; Leuterer, F.; Murmann, H.D.; Staebler, A.; Steuer, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    Transport code calculations were made for experiments with the combined operation of lower hybrid current drive and heating and of neutral beam injection heating on ASDEX. Peaking or flattening of the electron temperature profile are mainly explained by modifications of the MHD induced electron heat transport. They originate from current profile changes due to lower hybrid and neutral beam current drive and to contributions from the bootstrap current. Ion heat transport cannot be described by one single model for all heating scenarios. The ion heat conductivity is reduced during lower hybrid heated phases with respect to Ohmic and neutral beam heating. (author). 13 refs, 5 figs

  8. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.

    1999-01-01

    toroidal momentum. For a trapped ion, this leads to a change in its radial position. If toroidally asymmetric ICRF waves are used, the resulting spatial drift of the trapped ions is either inwards or outwards depending on the direction of the launched ICRF wave. ICRF heating experiments with different ICRF antenna phasings at JET give first experimental evidence for the presence of this ICRF-induced pinch. Significant differences are observed when the ICRF waves are launched in opposite toroidal directions. Analysis of the experiments with a three-dimensional orbit-averaged Monte Carlo code shows that the observations are consistent with theory. A technique for fast numerical evaluation of the wave-particle interaction in such a code has been developed and implemented. In general, good agreement between the simulations and experimental results has been obtained, which indicates that the present theoretical picture of ICRF heating is consistent with experiments. This gives confidence in simulations of other experiments and in the modelling ICRF heating schemes for future reactor plasmas. However, certain limitations have been identified in the present modelling of mode conversion and high-power ICRF heating in low-density plasmas, which require further investigation. (orig.)

  9. Anisotropic distribution function of minority tail ions generated by strong ion-cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Colestock, P.

    1989-05-01

    The highly anisotropic particle distribution function of minority tail ions driven by ion-cyclotron resonance heating at the fundamental harmonic is calculated in a two-dimensional velocity space. It is assumed that the heating is strong enough to drive most of the resonant ions above the in-electron critical slowing-down energy. Simple analytic expressions for the tail distribution are obtained fro the case when the Doppler effect is sufficiently large to flatten the sharp pitch angle dependence in the bounce averaged qualilinear heating coefficient, D/sub b/, and for the case when D/sub b/ is assumed to be constant in pitch angle and energy. It is found that a simple constant-D/sub b/ solution can be used instead of the more complicated sharp-D/sub b/ solution for many analytic purposes. 4 refs., 4 figs

  10. Fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of JET deuterium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasilnikov, A V; Amosov, V N; Kaschuck, Yu A; Van Eester, D; Lerche, E; Ongena, J; Bonheure, G; Biewer, T; Crombe, K; Ericsson, G; Giacomelli, L; Hellesen, C; Hjalmarsson, A; Esposito, B; Marocco, D; Jachmich, S; Kiptily, V; Leggate, H; Mailloux, J; Kallne, J

    2009-01-01

    Radio frequency heating of majority ions is of prime importance for understanding the basic role of auxiliary heating in the activated D-T phase of ITER. Majority deuterium ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) experiments at the fundamental cyclotron frequency were performed in JET. In spite of the poor antenna coupling at 25 MHz, this heating scheme proved promising when adopted in combination with D neutral beam injection (NBI). The effect of fundamental ICRH of a D population was clearly demonstrated in these experiments: by adding ∼25% of heating power the fusion power was increased up to 30-50%, depending on the type of NBI adopted. At this power level, the ion and electron temperatures increased from T i ∼ 4.0 keV and T e ∼ 4.5 keV (NBI-only phase) to T i ∼ 5.5 keV and T e ∼ 5.2 keV (ICRH + NBI phase), respectively. The increase in the neutron yield was stronger when 80 keV rather than 130 keV deuterons were injected in the plasma. It is shown that the neutron rate, the diamagnetic energy and the electron as well as the ion temperature scale roughly linearly with the applied RF power. A synergistic effect of the combined use of ICRF and NBI heating was observed: (i) the number of neutron counts measured by the neutron camera during the combined ICRF + NBI phases of the discharges exceeded the sum of the individual counts of the NBI-only and ICRF-only phases; (ii) a substantial increase in the number of slowing-down beam ions was detected by the time of flight neutron spectrometer when ICRF power was switched on; (iii) a small D subpopulation with energies slightly above the NBI launch energy was detected by the neutral particle analyzer and γ-ray spectroscopy.

  11. Paraffin Nanocomposites for Heat Management of Lithium-Ion Batteries: A Computational Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. N. Shirazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries are currently considered as vital components for advances in mobile technologies such as those in communications and transport. Nonetheless, Li-ion batteries suffer from temperature rises which sometimes lead to operational damages or may even cause fire. An appropriate solution to control the temperature changes during the operation of Li-ion batteries is to embed batteries inside a paraffin matrix to absorb and dissipate heat. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the possibility of making paraffin nanocomposites for better heat management of a Li-ion battery pack. To fulfill this aim, heat generation during a battery charging/discharging cycles was simulated using Newman’s well established electrochemical pseudo-2D model. We couple this model to a 3D heat transfer model to predict the temperature evolution during the battery operation. In the later model, we considered different paraffin nanocomposites structures made by the addition of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and fullerene by assuming the same thermal conductivity for all fillers. This way, our results mainly correlate with the geometry of the fillers. Our results assess the degree of enhancement in heat dissipation of Li-ion batteries through the use of paraffin nanocomposites. Our results may be used as a guide for experimental set-ups to improve the heat management of Li-ion batteries.

  12. Continuous, edge localized ion heating during non-solenoidal plasma startup and sustainment in a low aspect ratio tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. G.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2017-07-01

    Plasmas in the Pegasus spherical tokamak are initiated and grown by the non-solenoidal local helicity injection (LHI) current drive technique. The LHI system consists of three adjacent electron current sources that inject multiple helical current filaments that can reconnect with each other. Anomalously high impurity ion temperatures are observed during LHI with T i,OV  ⩽  650 eV, which is in contrast to T i,OV  ⩽  70 eV from Ohmic heating alone. Spatial profiles of T i,OV indicate an edge localized heating source, with T i,OV ~ 650 eV near the outboard major radius of the injectors and dropping to ~150 eV near the plasma magnetic axis. Experiments without a background tokamak plasma indicate the ion heating results from magnetic reconnection between adjacent injected current filaments. In these experiments, the HeII T i perpendicular to the magnetic field is found to scale with the reconnecting field strength, local density, and guide field, while {{T}\\text{i,\\parallel}} experiences little change, in agreement with two-fluid reconnection theory. This ion heating is not expected to significantly impact the LHI plasma performance in Pegasus, as it does not contribute significantly to the electron heating. However, estimates of the power transfer to the bulk ion are quite large, and thus LHI current drive provides an auxiliary ion heating mechanism to the tokamak plasma.

  13. High frequency ion Bernstein wave heating experiment on JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Watari, T.

    1992-08-01

    An experiment in a new regime of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating has been carried out using 130 MHz high power transmitters in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. The heating regime utilized the IBW branch between the 3rd and 4th harmonics of the hydrogen ion cyclotron frequencies. This harmonic number is the highest among those used in the IBW experiments ever conducted. The net radio-frequency (RF) power injected into the plasma is around 400 kW, limited by the transmitter output power. Core heating of ions and electrons was confirmed in the experiment and density profile peaking was found to feature the IBW heating (IBWH). The peaking of the density profile was also found when IBW was applied to the neutral beam injection heated discharges. An analysis by use of a transport code with these experimental data indicates that the particle confinement should be improved in the plasma core region on the application of IBWH. It is also found that the ion energy distribution function observed during IBWH has less high energy tail than those in conventional ion cyclotron range of frequency heating regimes. The observed IBWH-produced ion energy distribution function is in a reasonable agreement with the calculation based on the quasi-linear RF diffusion / Fokker-Planck model. (author)

  14. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1999-06-01

    toroidal momentum. For a trapped ion, this leads to a change in its radial position. If toroidally asymmetric ICRF waves are used, the resulting spatial drift of the trapped ions is either inwards or outwards depending on the direction of the launched ICRF wave. ICRF heating experiments with different ICRF antenna phasings at JET give first experimental evidence for the presence of this ICRF-induced pinch. Significant differences are observed when the ICRF waves are launched in opposite toroidal directions. Analysis of the experiments with a three-dimensional orbit-averaged Monte Carlo code shows that the observations are consistent with theory. A technique for fast numerical evaluation of the wave-particle interaction in such a code has been developed and implemented. In general, good agreement between the simulations and experimental results has been obtained, which indicates that the present theoretical picture of ICRF heating is consistent with experiments. This gives confidence in simulations of other experiments and in the modelling ICRF heating schemes for future reactor plasmas. However, certain limitations have been identified in the present modelling of mode conversion and high-power ICRF heating in low-density plasmas, which require further investigation. (orig.) 75 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  15. Characterization of ion heat conduction in JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas with and without internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, R C [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM/FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Baranov, Y [UKAEA/EURATOM Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Garbet, X [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Hawkes, N [UKAEA/EURATOM Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Peeters, A G [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Challis, C [UKAEA/EURATOM Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Baar, M de [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafyisica Rijnhuizen, Association EURATO-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Giroud, C [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafyisica Rijnhuizen, Association EURATO-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Joffrin, E [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Mantsinen, M [Helsinki University of Technology, Association-EURATOM Tekes, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland); Mazon, D [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la fusion, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Meister, H [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Suttrop, W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zastrow, K-D [UKAEA/EURATOM Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade and JET, the ion temperature profiles can be described by R/L{sub Ti} which exhibits only little variations, both locally, when comparing different discharges, and radially over a wide range of the poloidal cross-section. Considering a change of the local ion heat flux of more than a factor of two, this behaviour indicates some degree of profile stiffness. In JET, covering a large ion temperature range from 1 to 25 keV, the normalized ion temperature gradient, R/L{sub Ti}, shows a dependence on the electron to ion temperature ratio or toroidal rotational shear. In particular, in hot ion plasmas, produced predominantly by neutral beam heating at low densities, in which large T{sub i}/T{sub e} is coupled to strong toroidal rotation, the effect of the two quantities cannot be distinguished. Both in ASDEX Upgrade and JET, plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs), including the PEP mode in JET, are characterized by a significant increase of R/L{sub Ti} above the value of L- and H-mode plasmas. In agreement with previous ASDEX Upgrade results, no increase of the ion heat transport in reversed magnetic shear ITB plasmas is found in JET when raising the electron heating. Evidence is presented that magnetic shear directly influences R/L{sub Ti}, namely decreasing the ion heat transport when going from weakly positive to negative magnetic shear.

  16. Ion Heating During Local Helicity Injection Plasma Startup in the Pegasus ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. G.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas in the Pegasus ST are initiated either through standard, MHD stable, inductive current drive or non-solenoidal local helicity injection (LHI) current drive with strong reconnection activity, providing a rich environment to study ion dynamics. During LHI discharges, a large amount of impurity ion heating has been observed, with the passively measured impurity Ti as high as 800 eV compared to Ti ~ 60 eV and Te ~ 175 eV during standard inductive current drive discharges. In addition, non-thermal ion velocity distributions are observed and appear to be strongest near the helicity injectors. The ion heating is hypothesized to be a result of large-scale magnetic reconnection activity, as the amount of heating scales with increasing fluctuation amplitude of the dominant, edge localized, n =1 MHD mode. An approximate temporal scaling of the heating with the amplitude of higher frequency magnetic fluctuations has also been observed, with large amounts of power spectral density present at several impurity ion cyclotron frequencies. Recent experiments have focused on investigating the impurity ion heating scaling with the ion charge to mass ratio as well as the reconnecting field strength. The ion charge to mass ratio was modified by observing different impurity charge states in similar LHI plasmas while the reconnecting field strength was modified by changing the amount of injected edge current. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  17. Particle simulation study of electron heating by counter-streaming ion beams ahead of supernova remnant shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, M E; Sarri, G; Kourakis, I; Borghesi, M; Bret, A; Perez Alvaro, E

    2012-01-01

    The growth and saturation of Buneman-type instabilities is examined with a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for parameters that are representative for the foreshock region of fast supernova remnant shocks. A dense ion beam and the electrons correspond to the upstream plasma and a fast ion beam to the shock-reflected ions. The purpose of the 2D simulation is to identify the nonlinear saturation mechanisms, the electron heating and potential secondary instabilities that arise from anisotropic electron heating and result in the growth of magnetic fields. We confirm that the instabilities between both ion beams and the electrons saturate by the formation of phase space holes by the beam-aligned modes. The slower oblique modes accelerate some electrons, but they cannot heat up the electrons significantly before they are trapped by the faster beam-aligned modes. Two circular electron velocity distributions develop, which are centred around the velocity of each ion beam. They develop due to the scattering of the electrons by the electrostatic wave potentials. The growth of magnetic fields is observed, but their amplitude remains low. (paper)

  18. Enhanced loss of fast ions during mode conversion ion Bernstein wave heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Heeter, R.F.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    A strong interaction of fast ions with ion Bernstein waves has been observed in TFTR. It results in a large increase in the fast ion loss rate, and heats the lost particles to several MeV. The lost ions are observed at the passing/trapped boundary and appear to be either DD fusion produced tritons or accelerated D neutral beam ions. Under some conditions, enhanced loss of DT alpha particles is also seen. The losses provide experimental support for some of the elements required for alpha energy channeling

  19. Heating of Solar Wind Ions via Cyclotron Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R.; Moya, P. S.; Figueroa-Vinas, A.; Munoz, V.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Remote and in situ observations in the solar wind show that ion and electron velocity distributions persistently deviate from thermal equilibrium in the form of relative streaming between species components, temperature anisotropy, etc. These non-thermal features represent a source of free energy for the excitation of kinetic instabilities and fluctuations in the plasma. In this regard, it is believed that plasma particles can be heated, through a second order Fermi acceleration process, by multiple resonances with unstable counter-propagating field-aligned Ion-cyclotron waves. For multi-species plasmas, several collective wave modes participate in this process. In this work, we test this model by studying the percentage of ions that resonate with the waves modes described by the proper kinetic multi-species dispersion relation in a solar-wind-like plasma composed of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. Numerical results are compared with WIND spacecraft data to test its relevance for the existence of thresholds for the preferential perpendicular heating of He+2 ions as observed in the solar wind fast streams.

  20. Bulk Ion Heating with ICRF Waves in Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER...... when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central 3He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the Ti profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LTi of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG...

  1. A heating mechanism of ions due to large amplitude coherent ion acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Nobuo; Kawai, Yoshinobu; Kogiso, Ken.

    1978-05-01

    Ion heating mechanism in a plasma with a coherent ion acoustic wave is studied experimentally and numerically. Ions are accelerated periodically in the electrostatic potential of the coherent wave and their oscillation energy is converted into the thermal energy of ions through the collision with the neutral atoms in plasma. The Monte Carlo calculation is applied to obtain the ion temperature. The amplitude of the electrostatic potential, the mean number of collisions and the mean life time of ions are treated as parameters in the calculation. The numerical results are compared with the experiments and both of them agree well. It is found that the ion temperature increases as the amplitude of the coherent wave increases and the high energy tail in the distribution function of ions are observed for the case of large wave-amplitude. (author)

  2. Two-state ion heating at quasi-parallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, M.F.; Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; Onsager, T.G.; Russell, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study of ion heating at quasi-parallel shocks, the authors showed a case in which the ion distributions downstream from the shock alternated between a cooler, denser, core/shoulder type and a hotter, less dense, more Maxwellian type. In this paper they further document the alternating occurrence of two different ion states downstream from several quasi-parallel shocks. Three separate lines of evidence are presented to show that the two states are not related in an evolutionary sense, but rather both are produced alternately at the shock: (1) the asymptotic downstream plasma parameters (density, ion temperature, and flow speed) are intermediate between those characterizing the two different states closer to the shock, suggesting that the asymptotic state is produced by a mixing of the two initial states; (2) examples of apparently interpenetrating (i.e., mixing) distributions can be found during transitions from one state to the other; and (3) examples of both types of distributions can be found at actual crossings of the shock ramp. The alternation between the two different types of ion distribution provides direct observational support for the idea that the dissipative dynamics of at least some quasi-parallel shocks is non-stationary and cyclic in nature, as demonstrated by recent numerical simulations. Typical cycle times between intervals of similar ion heating states are ∼2 upstream ion gyroperiods. Both the simulations and the in situ observations indicate that a process of coherent ion reflection is commonly an important part of the dissipation at quasi-parallel shocks

  3. Edge Ion Heating by Launched High Harmonic Fast Waves in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biewer, T.M.; Bell, R.E.; Diem, S.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Ryan, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    A new spectroscopic diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge simultaneously along both poloidal and toroidal views. An anisotropic ion temperature is measured during high-power high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) radio-frequency (rf) heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature roughly twice the toroidal ion temperature. Moreover, the measured spectral distribution suggests that two populations of ions are present and have temperatures of typically 500 eV and 50 eV with rotation velocities of -50 km/s and -10 km/s, respectively (predominantly perpendicular to the local magnetic field). This bi-modal distribution is observed in both the toroidal and poloidal views (for both He + and C 2+ ions), and is well correlated with the period of rf power application to the plasma. The temperature of the hot component is observed to increase with the applied rf power, which was scanned between 0 and 4.3 MW . The 30 MHz HHFW launched by the NSTX antenna is expected and observed to heat core electrons, but plasma ions do not resonate with the launched wave, which is typically at >10th harmonic of the ion cyclotron frequency in the region of observation. A likely ion heating mechanism is parametric decay of the launched HHFW into an Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW). The presence of the IBW in NSTX plasmas during HHFW application has been directly confirmed with probe measurements. IBW heating occurs in the perpendicular ion distribution, consistent with the toroidal and poloidal observations. Calculations of IBW propagation indicate that multiple waves could be created in the parametric decay process, and that most of the IBW power would be absorbed in the outer 10 to 20 cm of the plasma, predominantly on fully stripped ions. These predictions are in qualitative agreement with the observations, and must be accounted for when calculating the energy budget of the plasma

  4. Ion-cyclotron heating with low dissipation in T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikaev, V.V.; Vdovin, V.L.; Lisenko, S.E.; Chesnokov, A.V.; Shapotkovskii, N.V.

    1979-02-01

    This paper examines the problem of plasma heating in the T-10 tokamak using the second harmonic of ion-cyclotron frequency ω = 2ω/sub Bi/. There are several promising methods for heating in this frequency range, for example ion-ion hybrid resonance. We will, however, concentrate our attention in this paper on the study of fast wave heating methods under conditions of low dissipation using resonance pumping. Multi-mode character of plasma resonator is a characteristic feature of such a large machine with a dense plasma. It will be shown, therefore, that a comparatively small absorption spans over a majority of modes; this simplifies considerably the matching of the excitation device to the generator under the conditions of changing electron density. An important consequence of mode spanning at low dissipation is the localization of electromagnetic energy under the exciter

  5. ICRF heating of passing ions in TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Dimonte, G.; Barter, J.; Campbell, R.; Cummins, W.F.; Falabella, S.; Ferguson, S.W.; Poulsen, P.

    1986-04-01

    By placing ion-cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas on both sides of a midplane gas-feed system in the central cell of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), our results have improved in the following areas: (a) The end losses out both ends show a factor of 3 to 4 increase in passing-ion temperatures and a factor of 2 to 3 decrease in passing-ion densities. (b) The passing-ion heating is consistent with Monte Carlo predictions. (c) The plasma density can be sustained by ICRF plus gas fueling as observed on other experiments

  6. Ion track membranes providing heat pipe surfaces with capillary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akapiev, G.N.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Erler, B.; Shirkova, V.V.; Schulz, A.; Pietsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    The microgalvanic method for metal filling of etched ion tracks in organic foils is of particular interest for the fabrication of microsized structures. Microstructures like copper whiskers with a high aspect ratio produced in ion track membranes are suitable for the generation of high-performance heat transfer surfaces. A surface with good heat transfer characteristics is defined as a surface on which a small temperature difference causes a large heat transfer from the surface material to the liquid. It is well-known that a porous surface layer transfers to an evaporating liquid a given quantity of heat at a smaller temperature difference than does a usual smooth surface. Copper whiskers with high aspect ratio and a density 10 5 per cm 2 form such a porous structure, which produces strong capillary forces and therefore a maximum of heat transfer coefficients

  7. Ion Bernstein wave heating on the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat, D.W.; Ono, M.

    1989-02-01

    In the present plan, CIT is to be heated by power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) may be used if suitable rf sources can be developed. We consider the option of ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH). The key points are that a simple vacuum waveguide launcher can be well- removed from high fluxes of heat and particles and that the development of a suitable source is straightforward. A practical point is that an IBWH waveguide launcher, including transition from coaxial power feeds, fits inside the shield wall surrounding CIT. To confirm IBWH as an option for CIT, experiments are needed on a shaped, H-mode plasma at high power. Successful experiments should be followed by a tube development program to allow CIT heating at 200 - 275 MHz. 2 refs., 3 figs

  8. Two-ion ICRF heating in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennfors, E.

    1985-03-01

    The practical consequences for tokamak plasma heating in the ion cyclotron frequency regime of the two-dimensional treatment of the two-ion mode conversion layer are analyzed. The problem of evaluation of the condition for fast wave resonance is analyzed, as well as the limitations imposed by warm plasma effects. Simple ways to find the mode conversion surfaces when they exist are presented. Also for large tokamaks, it is possible to obtain mode conversion conditions for realistic antenna spectra provided species concentration and frequency are chosen such that the surface Epsilon = 0 intersects the plasma midplane just outside of the magnetic axis. (Author)

  9. Frictional Heating of Ions In The F2-region of The Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhizhko, G. O.; Vlasov, V. G.

    Auroral electron beams unstable on the Cherenkov resonance are stabilized by large- scale inhomogeneity of the plasma density during all their way from the acceleration region to the E-region of the ionosphere. The generation of plasma waves by beam is possible only in the region of small plasma density gradients, that always is the area of the F2-region maximum. Thus, collective dissipation of the electron beam energy occurs in the local region with the length about several tens of kilometers. This leads to the intensive heating of the electrons(up to temperatures about 10000 K) and will give origin to the ion upflows with velocity about 1 km/s and density about 109 cm-2 s-1. These flows can result in the ion frictional heating. At the same time ion temperatures reach the values about 5000 K. A numerical simulation of the ion frictional heating in the presence of collective elec- tron heating in the high-latitude F2-region of the ionosphere was performed. The sim- ulation has shown that the most critical parameter for the occurence of the ion fric- tional heating was the the steepness of the plasma density profile above the F2-region maximum.

  10. Ion-cyclotron-resonance heating in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.; Sprott, J.C.; Strait, E.J.

    1983-06-01

    Ion-cyclotron-resonance heating has been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, on the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. Heating of both ions and electrons has been observed. Typically, a two-component ion energy distribution is produced (300 eV and 50 eV) with 500 kW of rf power coupled into a 5 x 10 12 cm -3 plasma. Power is coupled to the plasma with an antenna that also serves as the inductor of an oscillator tank circuit. The oscillator is tunable from 1 to 3 MHz and can be applied for periods up to 10 msec. The experiments were performed with hydrogen, gun-injected plasmas. Most of the theortical work presented deals with a calculation that predicts the plasma loading. A slab model is used, and the questions of accessibility, polarization, and damping of the radio-frequency electromagnetic fields are addressed. It is found that cold-plasma theory cannot account for the heating and, therefore, hot-plasma theory is invoked to explain the results. The loading measurements and theoretical predictions are found to be in reasonable agreement

  11. Electron heating caused by the ion-acoustic decay instability in a finite-length system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, P.W.; Woo, W.; DeGroot, J.S.; Mizuno, K.

    1984-01-01

    The ion-acoustic decay instability is investigated for a finite-length plasma with density somewhat below the cutoff density of the electromagnetic driver (napprox.0.7n/sub c/). For this regime, the heating in a very long system can overpopulate the electron tail and cause linear saturation of the low phase velocity electron plasma waves. For a short system, the instability is nonlinearly saturated at larger amplitude by ion trapping. Absorption can be significantly increased by the large-amplitude ion waves. These results compare favorably with microwave experiments

  12. Study of high energy ion loss during hydrogen minority heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.; Zweben, S.J.

    1994-03-01

    High energy ion loss during hydrogen minority ICRF heating is measured and compared with the loss of the D-D fusion products. During H minority heating a relatively large loss of high energy ions is observed at 45 degrees below the outer midplane, with or without simultaneous NBI heating. This increase is most likely due to a loss of the minority tail protons, a possible model for this process is described

  13. Neoclassical electron heat conduction in tokamaks performed by the ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.A.

    1987-07-01

    The increment to neoclassical ion heat conduction caused by electron collisions is shown to act like electron heat conduction since the energy is taken from and given back to the electrons at each diffusion step length. It can exceed electron neoclassical heat conduction by an order of magnitude

  14. Ion heat conduction losses in Extrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennfors, E.

    1989-08-01

    The classical ion heat conduction losses in Extrap discharges are calculated using polynomial magnetic field profiles and compared to the power input. For polynomials matched to magnetic field profiles measured in present experiments, these losses are small. By varying the coefficients of the polynomials, a region is found, where the power input can balance the classical heat conduction losses. Each set of coefficients corresponds to values of the parameters F and Θ used in RFP physics. The region determines a region in an F-Θ diagram, including the usual RFP region but extending to higher values of Θ and βΘ

  15. Fast-wave ion cyclotron heating in the Princeton Large Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Boyd, D.; Bretz, N.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results for ICRF heating in PLT are presented. For the two-ion regime in D-H or D- 3 He plasmas minority H and 3 He ions are found to absorb the RF power and transfer it to the deuterons and electrons in accordance with Fokker-Planck theory. The deuteron heating rate is approximately 3eVx10 13 cm -3 .kW for H and approximately 6eVx10 13 cm -3 .kW for 3 He minorities. Neutron fluxes of approximately 3x10 11 s -1 corresponding to a Tsub(d) approximately 2keV (ΔTsub(d) approximately 1.2keV) have been produced with Psub(RF) approximately 620kW at anti nsub(e) approximately 2.9x10 13 cm -3 . Neutron energy spectra and mass-sensitive charge-exchange spectra indicate Maxwellian deuteron distributions. In addition, D- 3 He fusion reaction rates approximately >10 12 s -1 have been produced by the energetic 3 He ions. For the second-harmonic regime, initial heating results for an H plasma at Psub(RF) approximately 140kW are consistent with the Fokker-Planck theory, and the bulk heating rate is comparable with that of D-heating in the D-H minority regime. (author)

  16. Lower hybrid heating data on the Wega experiment revisited using ion stochastic heating and electron Landau damping theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormezano, C.; Hess, W.; Ichtchenko, G.

    1980-07-01

    The already obtained data on the Wega Tokamak by lower hybrid heating (f=500 MHz - Psub(HF)=130 KW) are revisited in the light of recent theories on ion stochastic heating and quasi-linear electron Landau damping. It is possible to correctly estimate with these theories the fast ion mean energy, the H.F. power density coupled to the ions and that coupled to the electrons. The values of the parallel index of refraction, Nsub(//), which are necessary to obtain a good quantitative agreement between experiment and theoretical estimates, are the same for the ions and for the electrons, even though at higher values than expected

  17. The ion source development for neutral injection heating at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, H.; Itoh, T.; Kondoh, U.; Matsuda, S.; Ohara, Y.; Ohga, T.; Shibata, T.; Sugawara, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1976-01-01

    The neutral beam research and development effort at JAERI has been mainly concentrated on design, construction and testing of ion sources needed for present and planned heating experiments. Fundamental characteristics of the ion sources developed are described

  18. Role of lower hybrid waves in ion heating at dipolarization fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A.; Artemyev, A.; Zimbardo, G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2017-05-01

    One of the important sources of hot ions in the magnetotail is the bursty bulk flows propagating away from the reconnection region and heating the ambient plasma. Charged particles interact with nonlinear magnetic field pulses (dipolarization fronts, DFs) embedded into these flows. The convection electric fields associated with DF propagation are known to reflect and accelerate ambient ions. Moreover, a wide range of waves is observed within/near these fronts, the electric field fluctuations being dominated by the lower hybrid drift (LHD) instability. Here we investigate the potential role of these waves in the further acceleration of ambient ions. We use a LHD wave emission profile superimposed on the leading edge of a two-dimensional model profile of a DF and a test particle approach. We show that LHD waves with realistic amplitudes can significantly increase the upper limit of energies gained by ions. Wave-particle interaction near the front is more effective in producing superthermal ions than in increasing the flux of thermal ions. Comparison of test particle simulations and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms observations show that ion acceleration by LHD waves is more important for slower DFs.

  19. Anomalous Ion Heating, Intrinsic and Induced Rotation in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. G.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Perry, J. M.; Redd, A. J.; Thome, K. E.

    2014-10-01

    Pegasus plasmas are initiated through either standard, MHD stable, inductive current drive or non-solenoidal local helicity injection (LHI) current drive with strong reconnection activity, providing a rich environment to study ion dynamics. During LHI discharges, a large amount of anomalous impurity ion heating has been observed, with Ti ~ 800 eV but Te < 100 eV. The ion heating is hypothesized to be a result of large-scale magnetic reconnection activity, as the amount of heating scales with increasing fluctuation amplitude of the dominant, edge localized, n = 1 MHD mode. Chordal Ti spatial profiles indicate centrally peaked temperatures, suggesting a region of good confinement near the plasma core surrounded by a stochastic region. LHI plasmas are observed to rotate, perhaps due to an inward radial current generated by the stochastization of the plasma edge by the injected current streams. H-mode plasmas are initiated using a combination of high-field side fueling and Ohmic current drive. This regime shows a significant increase in rotation shear compared to L-mode plasmas. In addition, these plasmas have been observed to rotate in the counter-Ip direction without any external momentum sources. The intrinsic rotation direction is consistent with predictions from the saturated Ohmic confinement regime. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  20. Mass and Heat Transfer in Ion-Exchange Membranes Applicable to Solid Polymer Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otteroey, M

    1996-04-01

    In this doctoral thesis, an improved emf method for determination of transference numbers of two counter ions in ion-exchange membranes is presented. Transference numbers were obtained as a continuous function of the composition. The method avoids problems with diffusion by using a stack of membranes. Water transference coefficients in ion-exchange membranes is discussed and reversible and irreversible water transfer is studied by emf methods. Efforts were made to get data relevant to the solid polymer fuel cell. The results support the findings of other researchers that the reversible water transfer is lower than earlier predicted. A chapter on the conductivity of ion-exchange membranes establishes a method to separate the very thin liquid layers surrounding the membranes in a stack. Using the method it was found that the conductivity is obtained with high accuracy and that the liquid layer in a membrane stack can contribute significantly to the total measured resistance. A four point impedance method was tested to measure the conductivity of membranes under fuel cell conditions. Finally, there is a discussion of reversible heat effects and heat transfer in ion-exchange membranes. 155 refs., 45 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Ion heating due to rotation and collision in magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderegg, F.; Stern, R.A.; Skiff, F.; Hammel, B.A.; Tran, M.Q.; Paris, P.J.; Kohler, P.

    1986-01-01

    The E x B rotation and associated collisional ion heating of noble-gas magnetized plasmas are investigated with high resolution by means of laser-induced fluorescence and electrical probes. Plasma rotation results from a radial potential gradient which can be controlled by biasing of the discharge electrodes. The time and space evolution of the potential, the rotation velocity v/sub t//sub h//sub e//sub t//sub a/, and the ion perpendicular temperature indicate that heating is due to the randomization of v/sub t//sub h//sub e//sub t//sub a/ by ion-neutral collisions, and leads to temperature increases as high as a factor of 50 over initial values

  2. Calculation of heat fluxes induced by radio frequency heating on the actively cooled protections of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid (LH) antennas in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, G., E-mail: Guillaume.ritz@gmail.com [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Corre, Y., E-mail: Yann.corre@cea.fr [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rault, M.; Missirlian, M. [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Portafaix, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Martinez, A.; Ekedahl, A.; Colas, L.; Guilhem, D.; Salami, M.; Loarer, T. [CEA, Institut de la Recherche sur la Fusion Magnétique (IRFM), 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The heat flux generated by radiofrequency (RF) heating was calculated using Tore Supra's heating antennas. ► The highest heat flux value, generated by ions accelerated in RF-rectified sheath potentials, was 5 MW/m{sup 2}. ► The heat flux on the limiters of antennas was in the same order of magnitude as that on the toroidal pumping limiter. -- Abstract: Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are recognized as important auxiliary heating and current drive methods for present and next step fusion devices. However, these radio frequency (RF) systems generate a heat flux up to several MW/m{sup 2} on the RF antennas during plasma operation. This paper focuses on the determination of the heat flux deposited on the lateral protections of the RF antennas in Tore Supra. The heat flux was calculated by finite element method (FEM) using a model of the lateral protection. The FEM calculation was based on surface temperature measurements using infrared cameras monitoring the RF antennas. The heat flux related to the acceleration of electrons in front of the LHCD grills (LHCD active) and to the acceleration of ions in RF-rectified sheath potentials (ICRH active) were calculated. Complementary results on the heat flux related to fast ions (ICRH active with a relatively low magnetic field) are also reported in this paper.

  3. Ion Bernstein wave heating in a multi-component plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, S.

    1980-10-01

    Conditions for the coupling and absorption of Gross-Bernstein ion-cyclotron waves in a multi-component plasma are examined. Two cases are distinguished depending upon whether, the antenna initially launches, (i) the quasi-torsional slow electromagnetic wave with azimuthal magnetic field (TM) polarization, or (ii) the quasi-compressional fast wave with the electric field oriented azimuthally (TE). Analytic expressions for the plasma surface impedance are derived taking into account the pertinent warm plasma modifications near the vacuum-plasma interface. Antenna configurations capable of efficient coupling of the radio frequency energy to these modes are studied. A method for simulating waveguide like launching using transmission lines is pointed out. It is found that impurity concentrations exceeding a few parts in a thousand are capable of competing with the bulk ions in the energy absorption processes; this could lead to energy deposition near the plasma edge. Measures for avoiding edge heating problems by a careful choice of parameters e.g. restricting the heating frequency to the fundamental ion gyrofrequency are outlined. Equal care is to be exercised in limiting the nsub(z) spectrum to low discrete values in order to avoid the potentially dangerous problem of runaway electron heating. (orig.)

  4. Influence of RF heating and MHD instabilities on the fast-ion distribution in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, Markus

    2016-06-07

    been redesigned to measure blue and red Doppler shifts simultaneously. These upgrades allow a tomographic reconstruction of the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution at several well-defined measurement positions. The tomography has been successfully tested analyzing different fast-ion populations in plasmas free of instabilities. These enhanced diagnostic capabilities are used to study fast-ion transport caused by plasma instabilities. In particular, the velocity-space dependence of the fast-ion redistribution during sawtooth crashes is investigated. It is found, that fast ions with high velocity components perpendicular to the magnetic field are less affected by sawtooth crashes than other fast ions, and theoretical explanations for these observations are discussed. In addition, radial redistribution by Alfven eigenmodes is analyzed. Significant radial fast-ion redistribution is found in the presence of a reversed-shear Alfven eigenmode cascade. Furthermore, the acceleration of fast deuterium beam ions by 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating is investigated. This is important, because future fusion devices are foreseen to use 2nd harmonic absorption as heating scheme, in contrast to 1st harmonic minority ICRH, which is used in most present-day devices. Hence, the physic principles of 2nd harmonic absorption must be investigated and well understood in order to ensure, that theoretical predictions for e.g. ITER are correct. In the tomographic reconstruction of FIDA signals, clear high energy tails due to 2nd harmonic ICRH are seen, and comparisons to theoretical codes are presented.

  5. Influence of RF heating and MHD instabilities on the fast-ion distribution in ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, Markus

    2016-01-01

    been redesigned to measure blue and red Doppler shifts simultaneously. These upgrades allow a tomographic reconstruction of the 2D fast-ion velocity distribution at several well-defined measurement positions. The tomography has been successfully tested analyzing different fast-ion populations in plasmas free of instabilities. These enhanced diagnostic capabilities are used to study fast-ion transport caused by plasma instabilities. In particular, the velocity-space dependence of the fast-ion redistribution during sawtooth crashes is investigated. It is found, that fast ions with high velocity components perpendicular to the magnetic field are less affected by sawtooth crashes than other fast ions, and theoretical explanations for these observations are discussed. In addition, radial redistribution by Alfven eigenmodes is analyzed. Significant radial fast-ion redistribution is found in the presence of a reversed-shear Alfven eigenmode cascade. Furthermore, the acceleration of fast deuterium beam ions by 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating is investigated. This is important, because future fusion devices are foreseen to use 2nd harmonic absorption as heating scheme, in contrast to 1st harmonic minority ICRH, which is used in most present-day devices. Hence, the physic principles of 2nd harmonic absorption must be investigated and well understood in order to ensure, that theoretical predictions for e.g. ITER are correct. In the tomographic reconstruction of FIDA signals, clear high energy tails due to 2nd harmonic ICRH are seen, and comparisons to theoretical codes are presented.

  6. Observation of fluctuations responsible for stochastic ion heating in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagishi, Y.; Iguchi, H.; Ito, Y.; Kawabe, T.

    1977-10-01

    Experiments are described in which the correlation time and fluctuation level of ion acoustic waves are measured under the condition of turbulent heating using twin capacitive probes. At the anomalously resistive time, the correlation time becomes shorter, typically several periods of ion waves, and the energy density of the waves is of the order of 10 -2 n sub(e)T sub(e). The ion heating rate previously reported is well explained by these results to be due to stochastic mechanism. (auth.)

  7. Fast-wave ion-cyclotron heating in the Princeton Large Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Boyd, D.; Bretz, N.

    1981-02-01

    Recent experimental results for ICRF heating in PLT are presented. For the two-ion regime in D-H or D- 3 He plasmas minority H and 3 He ions are found to absorb the rf power and transfer it to the deuterons and electrons in accordance with Fokker-Planck theory. The deuteron heating rate is approx. 3 eV x 10 13 cm -3 /kW for H and approx. 6 eV x 10 13 cm -3 /kW for 3 He minorities. Neutron fluxes of approx. 3 x 10 11 sec -1 corresponding to a T/sub d/ approx. 2 keV (ΔT/sub d/ approx. 1.2 keV) have been produced with P/sub rf/ approx. = 620 kW at anti n/sub e/ approx. = 2.9 x 10 13 cm -3 . Neutron energy spectra and mass sensitive charge exchange spectra indicate Maxwellian deuteron distributions. In addition, D- 3 He fusion reaction rates greater than or equal to 10 12 sec -1 have been produced by the energetic 3 He ions. For the second harmonic regime, initial heating results for an H plasma at P/sub rf/ approx. = 140 kW are consistent with the Fokker-Planck theory and the bulk heating rate is comparable to that of D heating in the D-H minority regime

  8. Ion cyclotron heating in TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimonte, G.; Barter, J.; Romesser, T.; Molvik, A.W.; Cummins, W.F.; Falabella, S.; Poulsen, P.

    1987-01-01

    Ion cyclotron heating (ICH) is applied to TMX-U to improve the thermal barrier performance by reducing the passing ion collisionality. During its development, measurements of the antenna loading resistance, R p , and the absorption efficiency, η, were compared with calculations with the antenna design code ANTENA over a wide range of densities and frequencies. Good agreement in R p was obtained in the short wavelength slow wave regime but not for long wavelength fast waves because the experimental magnetic field gradients are not modelled in ANTENA. Similarly, η is much larger experimentally (40%) than in ANTENA (10%) due to the magnetic beach in TMX-U. In its application, ICH successfully decreased the passing ion collisionality tenfold but did not extend thermal barrier plugging to higher density, indicating that collisional barrier filling is not currently limiting TMX-U performance. (author). 23 refs, 23 figs

  9. Modeling transverse heating and outflow of ionospheric ions from the dayside cusp/cleft. 1 A parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The transport patterns of non-thermal H + and O + field-aligned flows from the dayside cusp/cleft, associated with transverse heating by means of wave-particle interactions and in combination with the poleward motion due to the magnetospheric convection are investigated. This has been accomplished by developing a steady-state, two-dimensional, trajectory-based code. The ion heating is modelled by means of a Monte Carlo technique, via the process of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, with the electromagnetic left-hand circular polarized component of a broad-band, extremely low-frequency (BBELF turbulence. The altitude dependence of ICR heating from 1000 km to 3 Earth radii (RE is modelled by a power law spectrum, with an index a, and a parameter w0 that is proportional to the spectral density at a referenced gyrofrequency. Because of the finite latitudinal extent of the cusp/cleft, the incorporation of the horizontal convection drift leads to a maximum residence time tD of the ions when being energized. A large set of simulations has been computed so as to study the transport patterns of the H + and O + bulk parameters as a function of tD , a, and w0. Residence time effects are significant in O + density patterns while negligible for H +. When comparing the results with analytical one-dimensional theories (Chang et al., 1986; Crew et al., 1990, we find that mean ion energies and pitch angles at the poleward edge of the heating region are slightly influenced by tD and may be used as a probe of ICR parameters ( a, w0. Conversely, poleward of the heating region, upward velocity and mean energy dispersive patterns depend mainly on tD (e.g. the magnitude of the convection drift with latitudinal profiles varying versus tD . In short, the main conclusion of the paper is that any triplet (tD , a, w0 leads to a unique transport-pattern feature of ion flows associated with a cusp/cleft ionospheric source. In a companion paper, by using high-altitude (1.5–3 RE

  10. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta β e = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field B o , and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to B o . The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating

  11. High-power ion-cyclotron-resonance heating in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.

    1983-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating has been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically, on the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. Heating of both ions and electrons has been observed. Typically, a two component ion energy distribution is produced (300 eV and 50 eV) with the application of 500 kW of rf power into a 5 x 10 12 cm -3 density plasma. Power is coupled to the plasma with an antenna that also serves as the inductor of an oscillator tank circuit. The oscillator is tunable from 1 to 3 MHz and can be applied for periods up to 10 msec. The experiments were performed with hydrogen, gun injected plasmas

  12. Hall and ion slip effects on peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid with Joule heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); NAAM Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Shafique, Maryam [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Tanveer, A., E-mail: anum@math.qau.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Alsaedi, A. [NAAM Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses mixed convective peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with complaint walls. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Hall and ion slip effects are also taken into account. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating, Hall and ion slip parameters are investigated in detail. It is observed that velocity increases and temperature decreases with Hall and ion slip parameters. Further the thermal radiation on temperature has qualitatively similar role to that of Hall and ion slip effects. - Highlights: • Peristalsis in the presence of Jeffery nanofluid is formulated. • Compliant properties of channel walls are addressed. • Impact of Hall and ion slip effects is outlined. • Influence of Joule heating and radiation is investigated. • Mixed convection for both heat and mass transfer is present.

  13. Ion heating at the disruptive instability in the LT-3 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Hutchinson, I.H.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the ion temperature and the toroidal current density and electric field during the disruptive instability in LT-3 are presented. Rapid ion heating and strong current inhibition have been observed. Fluctuation measurements suggest that these effects may be attributable to the excitation of ion cyclotron drift waves in the plasma

  14. A phenomenological explanation for the anomalous ion heating observed in the JET alpha-heating experiment of 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, D.; Albergante, M.

    2012-08-01

    In the so-called ‘alpha-heating’ experiment performed on the JET tokamak during the deuterium-tritium campaign of 1997, the ion temperature was found to be far exceeding (both in absolute value and in its rise time) the level that could have been expected from direct collisional heating by the fusion-born alpha particles themselves and energy equipartition with the electrons. To date, no explanation has been put forward for this long standing puzzle, despite much work having been performed on this subject in the early 2000s. Two analysis methods that have recently become available have been employed to re-analyse these observations of an anomalous ion heating. First, an algorithm based on the sparse representation of signals has been used to analyse magnetic, reflectometry and electron-cyclotron emission measurements of the turbulence spectra in the drift-wave range of frequencies. This analysis has then been complemented with turbulence simulations performed with the GENE code. We find, both experimentally and in the simulations, that the presence of a minority, but sufficiently large, population of fusion-born alpha particles that have not yet fully thermalized stabilizes the turbulence in the ion-drift direction, but practically does not affect the turbulence in the electron-drift direction. We link such stabilization of the ion-drift-wave turbulence to the increase in the ion temperature above the level achieved in similar discharges that did not have (at all or enough) alpha particles. When the fusion-born alpha particles have fully thermalized, the turbulence spectrum in the ion-drift direction reappears at somewhat larger amplitudes, which we link to the ensuing reduction in the ion temperature. This phenomenological dynamics fully corresponds to the actual experimental observations. By taking into account an effect of the alpha particles that had not been previously considered, our new analysis finally presents a phenomenological explanation for the so

  15. A phenomenological explanation for the anomalous ion heating observed in the JET alpha-heating experiment of 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, D.; Albergante, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the so-called ‘alpha-heating’ experiment performed on the JET tokamak during the deuterium–tritium campaign of 1997, the ion temperature was found to be far exceeding (both in absolute value and in its rise time) the level that could have been expected from direct collisional heating by the fusion-born alpha particles themselves and energy equipartition with the electrons. To date, no explanation has been put forward for this long standing puzzle, despite much work having been performed on this subject in the early 2000s. Two analysis methods that have recently become available have been employed to re-analyse these observations of an anomalous ion heating. First, an algorithm based on the sparse representation of signals has been used to analyse magnetic, reflectometry and electron-cyclotron emission measurements of the turbulence spectra in the drift-wave range of frequencies. This analysis has then been complemented with turbulence simulations performed with the GENE code. We find, both experimentally and in the simulations, that the presence of a minority, but sufficiently large, population of fusion-born alpha particles that have not yet fully thermalized stabilizes the turbulence in the ion-drift direction, but practically does not affect the turbulence in the electron-drift direction. We link such stabilization of the ion-drift-wave turbulence to the increase in the ion temperature above the level achieved in similar discharges that did not have (at all or enough) alpha particles. When the fusion-born alpha particles have fully thermalized, the turbulence spectrum in the ion-drift direction reappears at somewhat larger amplitudes, which we link to the ensuing reduction in the ion temperature. This phenomenological dynamics fully corresponds to the actual experimental observations. By taking into account an effect of the alpha particles that had not been previously considered, our new analysis finally presents a phenomenological explanation for the

  16. Lithium-ion battery structure that self-heats at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhang, Guangsheng; Ge, Shanhai; Xu, Terrence; Ji, Yan; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Leng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries suffer severe power loss at temperatures below zero degrees Celsius, limiting their use in applications such as electric cars in cold climates and high-altitude drones. The practical consequences of such power loss are the need for larger, more expensive battery packs to perform engine cold cranking, slow charging in cold weather, restricted regenerative braking, and reduction of vehicle cruise range by as much as 40 per cent. Previous attempts to improve the low-temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries have focused on developing additives to improve the low-temperature behaviour of electrolytes, and on externally heating and insulating the cells. Here we report a lithium-ion battery structure, the ‘all-climate battery’ cell, that heats itself up from below zero degrees Celsius without requiring external heating devices or electrolyte additives. The self-heating mechanism creates an electrochemical interface that is favourable for high discharge/charge power. We show that the internal warm-up of such a cell to zero degrees Celsius occurs within 20 seconds at minus 20 degrees Celsius and within 30 seconds at minus 30 degrees Celsius, consuming only 3.8 per cent and 5.5 per cent of cell capacity, respectively. The self-heated all-climate battery cell yields a discharge/regeneration power of 1,061/1,425 watts per kilogram at a 50 per cent state of charge and at minus 30 degrees Celsius, delivering 6.4-12.3 times the power of state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells. We expect the all-climate battery to enable engine stop-start technology capable of saving 5-10 per cent of the fuel for 80 million new vehicles manufactured every year. Given that only a small fraction of the battery energy is used for self-heating, we envisage that the all-climate battery cell may also prove useful for plug-in electric vehicles, robotics and space exploration applications.

  17. Lithium-ion battery structure that self-heats at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhang, Guangsheng; Ge, Shanhai; Xu, Terrence; Ji, Yan; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Leng, Yongjun

    2016-01-28

    Lithium-ion batteries suffer severe power loss at temperatures below zero degrees Celsius, limiting their use in applications such as electric cars in cold climates and high-altitude drones. The practical consequences of such power loss are the need for larger, more expensive battery packs to perform engine cold cranking, slow charging in cold weather, restricted regenerative braking, and reduction of vehicle cruise range by as much as 40 per cent. Previous attempts to improve the low-temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries have focused on developing additives to improve the low-temperature behaviour of electrolytes, and on externally heating and insulating the cells. Here we report a lithium-ion battery structure, the 'all-climate battery' cell, that heats itself up from below zero degrees Celsius without requiring external heating devices or electrolyte additives. The self-heating mechanism creates an electrochemical interface that is favourable for high discharge/charge power. We show that the internal warm-up of such a cell to zero degrees Celsius occurs within 20 seconds at minus 20 degrees Celsius and within 30 seconds at minus 30 degrees Celsius, consuming only 3.8 per cent and 5.5 per cent of cell capacity, respectively. The self-heated all-climate battery cell yields a discharge/regeneration power of 1,061/1,425 watts per kilogram at a 50 per cent state of charge and at minus 30 degrees Celsius, delivering 6.4-12.3 times the power of state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells. We expect the all-climate battery to enable engine stop-start technology capable of saving 5-10 per cent of the fuel for 80 million new vehicles manufactured every year. Given that only a small fraction of the battery energy is used for self-heating, we envisage that the all-climate battery cell may also prove useful for plug-in electric vehicles, robotics and space exploration applications.

  18. Performance evaluation of citric ion-stabilized magnetic fluid heat pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyadevan, B. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Department of Geoscience and Technology, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-7589 (Japan)]. E-mail: jeya@mail.kankyo.tohoku.ac.jp; Koganezawa, H. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Department of Geoscience and Technology, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-7589 (Japan); Nakatsuka, K. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Department of Geoscience and Technology, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba 01, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-7589 (Japan)

    2005-03-15

    The performance of heat pipe (HP) using citric ion-stabilized magnetic fluid (CMF) as working fluid (WF) was evaluated. The heat transferred was influenced by the application of magnetic field and was enhanced by a maximum of 30% compared to the field-free case. Furthermore, under the optimum magnetic field configuration, the heat transferred by CMF HP was 10% higher than that with water as WF.

  19. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time). (author)

  20. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1982-07-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time).

  1. Measurements of the fast ion distribution during neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron heating in ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Kwon, M.; Thomas, C.E.; Colchin, R.J.; England, A.C.; Gossett, J.M.; Horton, L.D.; Isler, R.C.; Lyon, J.F.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Rayburn, T.M.; Shepard, T.D.; Bell, G.L.; Fowler, R.H.; Morris, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    A neutral particle analyzer (NPA) with horizontal and vertical scanning capability has been used to make initial measurements of the fast ion distribution during neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron heating (ICH) on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). These measurements are presented and compared with the results of modeling codes that predict the analyzer signals during these heating processes. 6 refs., 5 figs

  2. Paralysis and heart failure precede ion balance disruption in heat-stressed European green crabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lisa B; Overgaard, Johannes; MacMillan, Heath A

    2017-08-01

    Acute exposure of ectotherms to critically high temperatures causes injury and death, and this mortality has been associated with a number of physiological perturbations including impaired oxygen transport, loss of ion and water homeostasis, and neuronal failure. It is difficult to discern which of these factors, if any, is the proximate cause of heat injury because, for example, loss of ion homeostasis can impair neuromuscular function (including cardiac function), and conversely impaired oxygen transport reduces ATP supply and can thus reduce ion transport capacity. In this study we investigated if heat stress causes a loss of ion homeostasis in marine crabs and examined if such loss is related to heart failure. We held crabs (Carcinus maenas) at temperatures just below their critical thermal maximum and measured extracellular (hemolymph) and intracellular (muscle) ion concentrations over time. Analysis of Arrhenius plots for heart rates during heating ramps revealed a breakpoint temperature below which heart rate increased with temperature, and above which heart rate declined until complete cardiac failure. As hypothesised, heat stress reduced the Nernst equilibrium potentials of both K + and Na + , likely causing a depolarization of the membrane potential. To examine whether this loss of ion balance was likely to cause disruption of neuromuscular function, we exposed crabs to the same temperatures, but this time measured ion concentrations at the individual-specific times of complete paralysis (from which the crabs never recovered), and at the time of cardiac failure. Loss of ion balance was observed only after both paralysis and complete heart failure had occurred; indicating that the loss of neuromuscular function is not caused by a loss of ion homeostasis. Instead we suggest that the observed loss of ion balance may be linked to tissue damage related to heat death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Heating and acceleration of solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous expanding plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, Leon, E-mail: Leon.Ofman@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Visiting, Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ozak, Nataly [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Near the Sun (< 10R{sub s}) the acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super-Alfvénic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  4. Fast wave ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, T.D.

    1988-09-01

    Minority regime fast wave ICRF heating experiments have been conducted on the Alcator C tokamak at rf power levels sufficient to produce significant changes in plasma properties, and in particular to investigate the scaling to high density of the rf heating efficiency. Up to 450 kW of rf power at frequency f = 180 MHz, was injected into plasmas composed of deuterium majority and hydrogen minority ion species at magnetic field B 0 = 12 T, density 0.8 ≤ /bar n/sub e// ≤ 5 /times/ 10 20 m -3 , ion temperature T/sub D/(0) /approximately/ 1 keV, electron temperature T/sub e/(0) /approximately/ 1.5--2.5 keV, and minority concentration 0.25 /approx lt/ /eta/sub H// ≤ 8%. Deuterium heating ΔT/sub D/(0) = 400 eV was observed at /bar n/sub e// = 1 /times/ 10 20 m -3 , with smaller temperature increases at higher density. However, there was no significant change in electron temperature and the minority temperatures were insufficient to account for the launched rf power. Minority concentration scans indicated most efficient deuterium heating at the lowest possible concentration, in apparent contradiction with theory. Incremental heating /tau/sub inc// /equivalent to/ ΔW/ΔP up to 5 ms was independent of density, in spite of theoretical predictions of favorable density scaling of rf absorption and in stark contrast to Ohmic confinement times /tau/sub E// /equivalent to/ W/P. After accounting for mode conversion and minority losses due to toroidal field ripple, unconfined orbits, asymmetric drag, neoclassical and sawtooth transport, and charge-exchange, it was found that the losses as well as the net power deposition on deuterium do scale very favorably with density. Nevertheless, when the net rf and Ohmic powers deposited on deuterium are compared, they are found to be equally efficient at heating the deuterium. 139 refs

  5. Hydrodynamic motion of a heavy-ion-beam-heated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, J.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Mueller, R.W.; Mahrt-Olt, K.; Arnold, R.C.; Schneider, V.; Maruhn, J.

    1990-01-01

    The first experimental study is reported of a plasma produced by a heavy-ion beam. Relevant parameters for heating with heavy ions are described, temperature and density of the plasma are determined, and the hydrodynamic motion in the target induced by the beam is studied. The measured temperature and the free-electron density are compared with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic-model calculation. In accordance with the model, a radial rarefaction wave reaching the center of the target was observed and the penetration velocity of the ion beam into the xenon-gas target was measured

  6. Heating and Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Turbulent Wave Spectrum in Inhomogeneous Expanding Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2016-01-01

    Near the Sun (plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super- Alfvenic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  7. Ion cyclotron resonance heating in the Wisconsin supported toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.; Sprott, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Ion heating at the fundamental of the cyclotron resonance (1 MHz 12 cm -3 ) with no evidence of parametric decay or enhanced particle loss other than temperature dependent losses such as thermal flow to obstacles. Ion temperatures are limited by charge exchange on the large neutral reflux at the higher rf powers. (author)

  8. Ion cyclotron heating of JET D-D and D-T optimised shear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, G.; Baranov, Y.; Bartlett, D.

    1998-12-01

    This paper discusses the unique roles played by Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) in the preparation, formation and sustainment of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in high fusion performance JET optimised shear experiments using the Mk. H poloidal divertor. Together with Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), low power ICRH is applied during the early ramp-up phase of the plasma current, 'freezing in' a hollow or flat current density profile with q(0)>1. In combination with up to ∼ 20 MW of Neutral Beam Injection (NBI), the ICRH power is stepped up to ∼ 6 MW during the main low confinement (L-mode) heating phase. An ITB forms promptly after the power step, revealed by a region of reduced central energy transport and peaked profiles, with the ion thermal diffusivity falling to values close to the standard neo-classical level near the centre of both D-D and D-T plasmas. At the critical time of ITB formation, the plasma contains an energetic ICRF hydrogen minority ion population, contributing ∼ 50% to the total plasma pressure and heating mainly electrons. As both the NBI population and the thermal ion pressure develop, a substantial part of the ICRF power is damped resonantly on core ions (ω = 2 ω cD = 3 ω cT ) contributing to the ion heating. In NBI step-down experiments, high performance has been sustained by maintaining central ICRH heating; analysis shows the efficiency of central ICRH ion heating to be comparable with that of NBI. The highest D-D fusion neutron rates (R NT = 5.6 x 10 16 s -1 ) yet achieved in JET plasmas have been produced by combining a low magnetic shear core with a high confinement (H-mode) edge. In D-T, a fusion triple product n i T i τ E = (1.2 ± 0.2) x 10 21 m -3 keVs was achieved with 7.2 MW of fusion power obtained in the L-mode and up to 8.2 MW of fusion power in the H-mode phase. (author)

  9. Confinement improvement in high-ion temperature plasmas heated with high-energy negative-NBI in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeiri, Y.; Morita, S.; Ikeda, K.

    2006-10-01

    The increase in the ion temperature due to transport improvement has been observed in plasmas heated with high-energy negative-NBI, in which electrons are dominantly heated, in Large Helical Device (LHD). When the centrally focused ECRH is superposed on the NBI plasma, the ion temperature is observed to rise, accompanied by formation of the electron-ITB. This is ascribed to the ion transport improvement with the transition to the neoclassical electron root with a positive radial electric field. In high-Z plasmas, the ion temperature is increased with an increase in the ion heating power, and reaches 13.5keV. The central ion temperature increases with an increase in a gradient of the electron temperature in an outer plasma region of ρ=0.8, suggesting the ion transport improvement in the outer plasma region induced by the neoclassical electron root. These results indicate the effectiveness of the electron-root scenario for obtaining high-ion temperature plasmas in helical systems. (author)

  10. Ion Thermalization and Electron Heating across Quasi-Perpendicular Shocks Observed by the MMS Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. J.; Wilson, L. B., III; Wang, S.; Bessho, N.; Figueroa-Vinas, A.; Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hesse, M.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Ergun, R.; Dorelli, J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Paterson, W. R.; Lavraud, B.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.

    2017-12-01

    Collisionless shocks often involve intense plasma heating in space and astrophysical systems. Despite decades of research, a number of key questions concerning electron and ion heating across collisionless shocks remain unanswered. We `image' 20 supercritical quasi-perpendicular bow shocks encountered by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft with electron and ion distribution functions to address how ions are thermalized and how electrons are heated. The continuous burst measurements of 3D plasma distribution functions from MMS reveal that the primary thermalization phase of ions occurs concurrently with the main temperature increase of electrons as well as large-amplitude wave fluctuations. Approaching the shock from upstream, the ion temperature (Ti) increases due to the reflected ions joining the incoming solar wind population, as recognized by prior studies, and the increase of Ti precedes that of the electrons. Thermalization in the form of merging between the decelerated solar wind ions and the reflected component often results in a decrease in Ti. In most cases, the Ti decrease is followed by a gradual increase further downstream. Anisotropic, energy-dependent, and/or nongyrotropic electron energization are observed in association with large electric field fluctuations in the main electron temperature (Te) gradient, motivating a renewed scrutiny of the effects from the electrostatic cross-shock potential and wave fluctuations on electron heating. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to assist interpretations of the MMS observations. We assess the roles of instabilities and the cross-shock potential in thermalizing ions and heating electrons based on the MMS measurements and PIC simulation results. Challenges will be posted for future computational studies and laboratory experiments on collisionless shocks.

  11. High power heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, A.P.; Sprott, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fast wave heating at the second, third and fourth harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance, and slow wave heating at the fundamental in a single ion species hydrogen plasma, are found to be in good agreement with warm plasma theory at rf power levels <= 130 kW. Ion heating is negligible off an eigenmode. Ion body temperatures are more than doubled to 75 eV from the 35 eV ohmically heated case with tails comprising 8% of the plasma at 320 eV. No deleterious effects except a non-disruptive 10% shortening of the discharge length caused by impurity influx are noted. A passive mode tracking technique allows approximately equal to 40% increase in power deposition in a passing eigenmode over that of a fixed frequency rf source. Ion temperatures are limited by charge exchange due to the < 50 eV central temperature and the small 13 cm radius current channel. (author)

  12. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-06-01

    ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using the results based on Monte Carlo simulations. The global energy confinement time including energetic ion effect can be expressed in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density, and magnetic field strength in heliotrons. Our results in the CHS plasma show the systematic decrement of the global energy confinement time due to the energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. Also we apply our model to the ICRF minority heating in the LHD plasma in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. The clear increment of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the 'orbit improved' configuration, while the decrement is observed in the 'standard' configuration. (author)

  13. Effect of energetic ion loss on ICRF heating efficiency and energy confinement time in heliotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Nuehrenberg, J.

    1999-01-01

    The ICRF heating efficiency and the global energy confinement time during ICRF heating are investigated, including the effect of energetic ion loss in heliotrons. The approximate formula of ICRF heating efficiency is derived using results based on Monte Carlo simulations (Murakami, S., et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 26 (1995) 209). The global energy confinement time including the energetic ion effect can be expressed in heliotrons in terms of ICRF heating power, plasma density and magnetic field strength. Results in plasmas at CHS show a systematic decrease of the global energy confinement time due to energetic ion loss from the assumed energy confinement scaling law, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The model is also applied to ICRF minority heating in LHD plasmas in two cases of typical magnetic configurations. A clear increase of the global energy confinement time due to the stored energy of energetic tail ions is obtained in the 'orbit improved' configuration, while a decrease is observed in the 'standard' configuration. (author)

  14. An inductively heated hot cavity catcher laser ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Reponen, M; Pohjalainen, I; Rothe, S; Savonen, M; Sonnenschein, V; Voss, A

    2015-01-01

    An inductively heated hot cavity catcher has been constructed for the production of low-energy ion beams of exotic, neutron-deficient Agisotopes. A proof-of-principle experiment has been realized by implanting primary 107Ag21+ ions from a heavy-ion cyclotron into a graphite catcher. A variable-thickness nickel foil was used to degrade the energy of the primary beam in order to mimic the implantation depth expected from the heavy-ion fusion-evaporation recoils of N = Z94Ag. Following implantation, the silver atoms diffused out of the graphite and effused into the catcher cavity and transfer tube, where they were resonantly laser ionized using a three-step excitation and ionization scheme. Following mass separation, the ions were identified by scanning the frequency of the first resonant excitation step while recording the ion count rate. Ion release time profiles were measured for different implantation depths and cavity temperatures with the mean delay time varying from 10 to 600 ms. In addition, the diffusio...

  15. An improved routine for the fast estimate of ion cyclotron heating efficiency in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1992-02-01

    The subroutine ICEVAL for the rapid simulation of Ion Cyclotron Heating in tokamak plasmas is based on analytic estimates of the wave behaviour near resonances, and on drastic but reasonable simplifications of the real geometry. The subroutine has been rewritten to improve the model and to facilitate its use as input in transport codes. In the new version the influence of quasilinear minority heating on the damping efficiency is taken into account using the well-known Stix analytic approximation. Among other improvements are: a) the possibility of considering plasmas with more than two ion species; b) inclusion of Landau, Transit Time and collisional damping on the electrons non localised at resonances; c) better models for the antenna spectrum and for the construction of the power deposition profiles. The results of ICEVAL are compared in detail with those of the full-wave code FELICE for the case of Hydrogen minority heating in a Deuterium plasma; except for details which depend on the excitation of global eigenmodes, agreement is excellent. ICEVAL is also used to investigate the enhancement of the absorption efficiency due to quasilinear heating of the minority ions. The effect is a strongly non-linear function of the available power, and decreases rapidly with increasing concentration. For parameters typical of Asdex Upgrade plasmas, about 4 MW are required to produce a significant increase of the single-pass absorption at concentrations between 10 and 20%. (orig.)

  16. Suppression of cyclotron instability in Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion sources by two-frequency heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple frequency heating is one of the most effective techniques to improve the performance of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources. The method increases the beam current and average charge state of the extracted ions and enhances the temporal stability of the ion beams. It is demonstrated in this paper that the stabilizing effect of two-frequency heating is connected with the suppression of electron cyclotron instability. Experimental data show that the interaction between the secondary microwave radiation and the hot electron component of ECR ion source plasmas plays a crucial role in mitigation of the instabilities

  17. Parallel gradient effects on ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smithe, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects on Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating of parallel nonuniformity in the magnetic field which arises from the poloidal field in a tokamak and the universal (major radius)/sup /minus/1/ scaling of the cyclotron frequency. The goal of the analysis is the macroscopic warm plasma current including temperature in the sense of the finite Larmor radius expansion and the quasilocal approximation of the parallel guiding center motion. A 1-D numerical application of the fully nonlocal integral dielectric is performed. Parallel gradient effects are studied for He-3 minority, 2nd harmonic deuterium, and hydrogen minority heating in tokamaks. The results show quite significant alteration of the toroidal wavenumber absorption spectrum, and a wealth of new behavior on the local propagation scale. 95 refs., 37 figs

  18. Ion heating and MHD dynamo fluctuations in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, E.; Hokin, S.; Watts, C.; Mattor, N.

    1992-01-01

    Ion temperature measurements, time resolved to 10 μs, have been made in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch with a five channel charge exchange analyzer. The ion temperature, T i ∼ 200 eV for I = 350 kA, increases by as much as 100% during discrete dynamo bursts in MST discharges. Magnetic field fluctuations in the range 0.5--5 MHz were also measured. Structure in the fluctuation frequency spectrum at the ion cyclotron frequency appears as the bursts terminate, suggesting that the mechanism of ion heating involves the dissipation of dynamo fluctuations at ion gyro-orbit scales

  19. Ion temperature measurements of turbulently heated tokamak plasma by Doppler-broadening of visible lines in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Toi, K; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-01-01

    In the turbulent heating experiment of the high-field tokamak TRIAM-1, the bulk ion heating shown by the neutral energy analyzer measurement is confirmed by the Doppler broadening measurement of visible lines. The increasing rate and decay time of the Doppler ion temperature are almost the same as those derived from the neutral energy analyzer measurement. From both methods of ion temperature measurements, it is shown that the ion temperature has a parabolic profile within 50 ..mu..s after the application of the heating pulse.

  20. Modeling transverse heating and outflow of ionospheric ions from the dayside cusp/cleft. 1 A parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    Full Text Available The transport patterns of non-thermal H + and O + field-aligned flows from the dayside cusp/cleft, associated with transverse heating by means of wave-particle interactions and in combination with the poleward motion due to the magnetospheric convection are investigated. This has been accomplished by developing a steady-state, two-dimensional, trajectory-based code. The ion heating is modelled by means of a Monte Carlo technique, via the process of ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, with the electromagnetic left-hand circular polarized component of a broad-band, extremely low-frequency (BBELF turbulence. The altitude dependence of ICR heating from 1000 km to 3 Earth radii (RE is modelled by a power law spectrum, with an index a, and a parameter w0 that is proportional to the spectral density at a referenced gyrofrequency. Because of the finite latitudinal extent of the cusp/cleft, the incorporation of the horizontal convection drift leads to a maximum residence time tD of the ions when being energized. A large set of simulations has been computed so as to study the transport patterns of the H + and O + bulk parameters as a function of tD , a, and w0. Residence time effects are significant in O + density patterns while negligible for H +. When comparing the results with analytical one-dimensional theories (Chang et al., 1986; Crew et al., 1990, we find that mean ion energies and pitch angles at the poleward edge of the heating region are slightly influenced by tD and may be used as a probe of ICR parameters ( a, w0. Conversely, poleward of the heating region, upward velocity and mean energy dispersive patterns depend mainly on tD (e.g. the magnitude of the convection drift with latitudinal profiles varying versus

  1. Experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.; Ishihara, O.; Wong, K.L.; Kristiansen, M.; Hagler, M.

    1986-01-01

    The first experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions is reported. Ions were asymmetrically heated by a unidirectional fast Alfven wave launched by a slow wave antenna inside a tokamak. Current generation was detected by measuring the asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current with probes at the top and bottom of the toroidal plasma column

  2. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    description of the rf system and experimental conditions can be found in [3]. In all the cases, the ion temperature equal to half of the electron temperature as generally observed in ohmically heated Aditya plasma [8] is considered. The parameters of the representa- tive shot # 20685 taken for the numerical simulation of fast ...

  3. A self-consistent derivation of ion drag and Joule heating for atmospheric dynamics in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The thermosphere is subject to additional electric and magnetic forces, not important in the middle and lower atmosphere, due to its partially ionized atmosphere. The effects of charged particles on the neutral atmospheric dynamics are often parameterized by ion drag in the momentum equations and Joule heating in the energy equation. Presented in this paper are a set of more accurate parameterizations for the ion drag and Joule heating for the neutral atmosphere that are functions of the difference between bulk ion velocity and neutral wind. The parameterized expressions also depend on the magnetic field, the Pedersen and Hall conductivities, and the ratio of the ion cyclotron frequency to the ion-neutral collision frequency. The formal relationship between the electromagnetic energy, atmospheric kinetic energy, and Joule heating is illustrated through the conversion terms between these three types of energy. It is shown that there will always be an accompanying conversion of kinetic energy into Joule heating when electromagnetic energy is generated through the dynamo mechanism of the atmospheric neutral wind. Likewise, electromagnetic energy cannot be fully converted into kinetic energy without producing Joule heating in the thermosphere.

  4. Self-consistent calculation of the effects of RF injection in the HHFW heating regimes on the evolution of fast ions in toroidal plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertelli Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical question for the use of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF heating in the ITER device and beyond is interaction of fast waves with energetic ion populations from neutral beam injection (NBI, fusion reactions, and minority ions accelerated by the RF waves themselves. Several experiments have demonstrated that the interaction between fast waves and fast ions can indeed be strong enough to significantly modify the NB ion population. To model the RF/fast ion interaction and the resulting fast ion distribution, a recent extension of the full wave solver TORIC v.5 that includes non-Maxwellian effects has been combined with the Monte Carlo NUBEAM code through an RF “kick” operator. In this work, we present an initial verification of the NUBEAM RF “kick” operator for high harmonic fast wave (HHFW heating regime in NSTX plasma.

  5. Rapid self-heating and internal temperature sensing of lithium-ion batteries at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangsheng; Ge, Shanhai; Xu, Terrence; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Tian, Hua; Wang, Chao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-heating lithium-ion battery (SHLB) structure provided a practical solution to the poor performance at subzero temperatures. • We report an improved SHLB that heats from −20 °C to 0 °C in 12.5 seconds, or 56% more rapidly, while consuming 24% less energy than previously reported. • The nickel foil heating element embedded inside a SHLB cell plays a dominant role in rapid self-heating. • The embedded nickel foil can simultaneously perform as an internal temperature sensor (ITS). • 2-sheet design self-heats faster than 1-sheet design due to more uniform internal temperature distribution. - Abstract: The recently discovered self-heating lithium-ion battery structure provided a practical solution to the poor performance at subzero temperatures that has hampered battery technology for decades. Here we report an improved self-heating lithium-ion battery (SHLB) that heats from −20 °C to 0 °C in 12.5 seconds, or 56% more rapidly, while consuming 24% less energy than that reported previously. We reveal that a nickel foil heating element embedded inside a SHLB cell plays a dominant role in self-heating and we experimentally demonstrate that a 2-sheet design can achieve dramatically accelerated self-heating due to more uniform internal temperature distribution. We also report, for the first time, that this embedded nickel foil can simultaneously perform as an internal temperature sensor (ITS) due to the perfectly linear relationship between the foil’s electrical resistance and temperature.

  6. Modeling transverse heating and outflow of ionospheric ions from the dayside cusp/cleft. 2 Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouhram

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider major ion energization mechanisms in the dayside cusp/cleft region. This includes transverse ion heating by ion cyclotron resonance (ICR, ion energization through structures of field-aligned electric potential drops, and transverse heating by lower hybrid (LH waves. First, we present and discuss three typical cusp/cleft crossings associated with one of the first two mechanisms mentioned above. Then, we develop a procedure for finding the altitude dependence of ICR heating for any data set in the high-altitude cusp/cleft under the absence of field-aligned potential drops. This has been accomplished using a large set of numerical simulations from a two-dimensional, steady-state, Monte Carlo, trajectory-based code, as discussed in detail in the first companion paper (Bouhram et al., 2003. The procedure is applied and tested successfully for the first two events, by using patterns of ion moments along the satellite track as constraints. Then, we present a statistical study that uses 25 cusp/cleft crossings associated with steady IMF conditions, where ICR heating is expected to occur alone. It is pointed out that the ICR heating increases gradually versus geocentric distance as s 3.3 ± 1.8 . The inferred values of the wave power and the spectral index associated with the component responsible for ICR heating are lower than those characterizing the broad-band, extremely low-frequency (BBELF turbulence usually observed in the cusp/cleft. This strengthens the idea that more than one wave-mode is contained in the BBELF turbulence, and only a small fraction of the observed turbulence is responsible for ICR heating. Then, we study the occurrence versus magnetic local time (MLT of field-aligned potential drops. According to previous statistical studies, such structures are not common in the cusp and tend to be associated with the cleft region. We also discuss the effects of LH heating in the cusp on the observed ion distributions

  7. Rapid heating evaporation of Pb(NO3)2. Evidence for heterogeneous ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radus, T.P.; Udseth, H.R.; Friedman, L.

    1979-01-01

    A mass spectrometric investigation of the lead nitrate system is reported in which the lead nitrate was evaporated from a probe filament that was heated as rapidly as 5000 0 C/s. Both electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) source techniques were used in this study. Fragment ions and decomposition products were observed under EI conditions. Under CI conditions solvated fragment ions and protonated solvated molecular ions were detected. Temperature measurements of rates of evaporation were made by monitoring the resistance of the probe filament as it was heated. Activation energies calculated by using these temperature coefficients of evaporation rates indicate that evaporations under CI conditions are assisted by heterogeneous ion-molecule reactions

  8. Ion Bernstein wave heating experiments in HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanping

    2005-01-01

    Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) experiments have been carried out in recent years in the HT-7 superconducting Tokamak. The electron heating experiment has been concentrated on deuterium plasma with an injecting RF power up to 350 kw. The globe heating and localized heating can be seen clearly by controlling the ICRF resonance layer's position. On-axis and off-axis electron heating have been realized by properly setting the target plasma parameters. Experimental results show that the maximum increment in electron temperature has been more than 1 keV, the electron temperature profile has been modified by IBW under different plasma conditions, and both energy and particle confinement improvements have been obtained. (author)

  9. Lithium droplet divertor collector for ions and heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, W.M.

    1979-01-01

    Coping with the ion and energy fluxes which must be collected with a tokamak divertor is one of the more difficult technological challenges for a power producing reactor. Use of stationary solid surfaces to collect ions and the attendant heat flux faces technology feasibility questions. Calculations indicate that gravity-driven flow of liquid metals having a free surface will not move adequately fast. It is proposed to circumvent these problems by having high velocity lithium droplets perform the collection functions. Droplets which are not in contact with a wall encounter only very small retardation effects in a magnetic field, and these droplets can be formed by nozzles outside of the magnetic field. If they travel at about 150 m/s, they can absorb in excess of 1 kW/cm 2 of projected area. The hydrogen isotope ion fluence is well below the saturation dose which has been achieved with lithium

  10. Formation of core transport barrier and CH-Mode by ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Gettelfinger, G.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.

    1995-01-01

    Observation of core transport barrier formation (for particles, ion and electron energies, and toroidal momentum) by ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) in PBX-M plasma is reported. The formation of a transport barrier leads to a strong peaking and significant increase of the core pressure (70%) and toroidal momentum (20%), and has been termed the core-high confinement mode (CH-Mode). This formation of a transport barrier is consistent, in terms of the expected barrier location as well as the required threshold power, with a theoretical model based on the poloidal sheared flow generation by the ion Bernstein wave power. The use of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) induced sheared flow as a tool to control plasma pressure and bootstrap current profiles shows a favorable scaling for the use in future reactor grade tokamak plasmas

  11. Ion cyclotron instability saturation and turbulent plasma heating in the presence of ions moving across the magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlenko, V.S.; Stepanov, K.N.

    1981-01-01

    Ion cyclotron instability saturation is considered in terms of the turbulence theory when there is a beam of heavy ions with large thermal longitudinal velocity spread. The instability excitation is due to a cyclotron interaction with ions of the beam under the anomalous Doppler effect. The instability is shown to be saturated due to an induced plasma ion scattering of ion cyclotron waves when the beam ion charge number Zsub(b) is approximately 1. Decay processes, wave scattering by virtual wave polarization clouds and resonance broadening due to random walk of plasma ions in turbulent instability fields appear to be unimportant. For Zsub(b)>>1 the induced wave scattering by the beam ions is the main process determining the nonlinear stage of the instability. Estimates are given for the oscillation energy density in the instability saturation state and for the turbulent heating rate of plasma and beam ions [ru

  12. Preferential heating of oxygen 5{sup +} ions by finite-amplitude oblique Alfvén waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Poedts, Stefaan [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Viñas, Adolfo [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, 20771 MD (United States); Araneda, Jaime [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160 - C, Concepción (Chile)

    2016-03-25

    Minor ions in the fast solar wind are known to have higher temperatures and to flow faster than protons in the interplanetary space. In this study we combine previous research on parametric instability theory and 2.5D hybrid simulations to study the onset of preferential heating of Oxygen 5{sup +} ions by large-scale finite-amplitude Alfvén waves in the collisionless fast solar wind. We consider initially non-drifting isotropic multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal massless fluid electrons, kinetic protons and kinetic Oxygen 5{sup +} ions. The external energy source for the plasma heating and energization are oblique monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron waves. The waves have been created by rotating the direction of initial parallel pump, which is a solution of the multi-fluid plasma dispersion relation. We consider propagation angles θ ≤ 30°. The obliquely propagating Alfvén pump waves lead to strong diffusion in the ion phase space, resulting in highly anisotropic heavy ion velocity distribution functions and proton beams. We discuss the application of the model to the problems of preferential heating of minor ions in the solar corona and the fast solar wind.

  13. High-frequency heating of plasma with two ion species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klima, R.; Longinov, A.V.; Stepanov, K.N.

    1975-01-01

    The authors consider the penetration of electromagnetic waves with a frequency of the order of the ion cyclotron frequencies and with a fixed longitudinal wave number ksub(long), so that Nsub(long)=ksub(long)c/ω>>1 deep into an inhomogeneous plasma with two ion species. The propagation of two kinds of waves (fast and slow) with widely differing polarization and transverse refraction index is possible. For both types of waves there is an evanescence region at the plasma periphery. The evanescence region is narrow for slow waves and they easily penetrate the plasma. In a dense plasma they become electrostatic and can reach the ion-ion hybrid resonance region. However, the damping of these waves due to Cherenkov interaction with electrons in a high-temperature plasma is strong and therefore they are not suitable for heating plasma of large dimensions, as they are absorbed at the plasma periphery. The fast waves have a wider evanescence region and can be excited effectively only if N 2 is not too high. These waves can be completely absorbed in the plasma (due to Cherenkov interaction with electrons) if xi approximately (v 2 sub(Ti)/v 2 sub(A))Zsub(e)(ωsub(pi)a/c)exp(-Zsub(e) 2 ) > 1, where a is the plasma radius and Zsub(e) = ω/(√2 ksub(long)vsub(Te)). Fast waves can also reach the region where they are transformed into slow waves. In this region their damping increases considerably. It is shown that the transformation region in an inhomogeneous plasma with two ion species in a non-uniform magnetic field may be at the centre of the plasma. Fast waves can be used effectively for heating plasma of large dimensions. (author)

  14. Radio frequency heating in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Both the theory of the absorption process in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies and some of the experiments which slow the promise and problems with radio frequency plasma heating in this range are discussed. It is shown that mode conversion is invariably involved in the process and so an extensive review of mode conversion theory, expecially as it applies to problems with back-to-back cutoff-resonance pairs, is included. This includes a discussion of the tunneling equation with and without absorption effects and with and without energy conservation. The general theory is applied to various ion-cyclotron harmonics, the two-ion hybrid resonance, and to a case where a wave converts to a Bernstein mode at the plasma edge. The results are given analytically for a variety of cases without absorption, and empirical formulas are given for the second and third harmonics of the ion-cyclotron frequency, which include effects of absorption. Various problem areas in the theory are also discussed with some of the limitations caused by the approximations involved. A number of experiments are also discussed which show effective heating, and some show the features of the mode conversion process, indicating that the general processes of absorption are reasonably well understood. Areas where further work is necessary, both in fundamental theory and in comparing theory with experiment, are also discussed

  15. Control of cluster ion sizes for efficient injection heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enjoji, Hiroshi; Be, S.H.; Yano, Katsuki; Okamoto, Kosuke

    1976-01-01

    For heating of plasmas by injection of hydrogen cluster ions, the specific size (N/Z) approximately 10 2 molecules/charge is believed to be most desirable. A fundamental research to develop a practical method for tailoring large cluster ions into small suitable sizes has been carried out by using nitrogen cluster ions of the initial mean specific size (N/Z) 0 approximately 10 5 . The beam of neutral large clusters of total intensity 20 mAsub(eq) was led to an ionizer and then the large cluster ions are accelerated to 8.9 keV before entering the divider which disintegrates them into small fragments by multiple ionization. The mean specific size of disintegrated cluster ions (N/Z)' becomes smaller with increase in ionizing electron current of the divider. (N/Z)' becomes 10 3 approximately 10 4 at an electron current of 140 mA and an accelerating voltage of 680 V of the divider with its efficiency of 20 approximately 60%. Thus, the original large cluster ions are divided into small fragments of which the mean specific size is 1/20 approximately 1/100 of the initial value without much decrease in total intensity of the cluster ion beam

  16. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y. G. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vinas, A. F. [Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  17. Improved confinement with ion cyclotron hydrogen minority heating on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.T.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Aniel, T.; Bourdelle, C.; Eriksson, L.G.; Garbet, X.; Grisolia, C.; Platz, P.; Budny, R.V.

    1999-02-01

    Tore Supra experiments are presently devoted to study the high density and high radiation regimes with radio frequency heating. Recent results of ion cyclotron minority heating have been obtained with an improved L-mode confinement, close to ELMy H-mode, at relatively high density (up to 80% of Greenwald limit). Such a regime is very promising as possible scenario in a next step tokamak. (authors)

  18. Heat flux driven ion turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    1998-01-01

    This work is an analysis of an ion turbulence in a tokamak in the case where the thermal flux is fixed and the temperature profile is allowed to fluctuate. The system exhibits some features of Self-Organized Critical systems. In particular, avalanches are observed. Also the frequency spectrum of the thermal flux exhibits a structure similar to the one of a sand pile automaton, including a 1/f behavior. However, the time average temperature profile is found to be supercritical, i.e. the temperature gradient stays above the critical value. Moreover, the heat diffusivity is lower for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than a fixed temperature gradient, with the same time average temperature. This behavior is attributed to a stabilizing effect of avalanches. (author)

  19. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Hiraki, N; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-07-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time).

  20. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1981-01-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time). (author)

  1. Re-entering fast ion effects on NBI heating power in high-beta plasmas of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Ryosuke; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Funaba, Hisamichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Satoru; Ohdachi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka

    2011-10-01

    We calculate the heating power of the neutral beam injection (NBI) in the = 4.8% high-beta discharge achieved in the Large Helical Device (LHD). We investigate the difference of the heating efficiency and the heating power profile between with and without the re-entering fast ion effects. When the re-entering fast ion effects are taken into account, the heating efficiency in the co injection of the NBI (co-NBI case) is improved and it is about 1.8 times larger than that without the re-entering effects. In contrast, the heating efficiency with the re-entering effects in the counter injection of the NBI (ctr-NBI case) rarely differs from that without the re-entering ones. We also study the re-entering fast ion effects on the transport properties in the LHD high beta discharges. It is found that the tendency of the thermal conductivities on the beta value is not so much sensitive with and without the re-entering effects. In addition, we investigate the difference in the re-entering fast ion effects caused by the field strength and the magnetic configuration. In the co-NBI case, the re-entering fast ion effects on the heating efficiency increases with the decrease of the field strength. In the contrast, the re-entering fast ion effects in the ctr-NBI case rarely differs by changing the field strength. (author)

  2. A study on specific heat capacities of Li-ion cell components and their influence on thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loges, André; Herberger, Sabrina; Seegert, Philipp; Wetzel, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Thermal models of Li-ion cells on various geometrical scales and with various complexity have been developed in the past to account for the temperature dependent behaviour of Li-ion cells. These models require accurate data on thermal material properties to offer reliable validation and interpretation of the results. In this context a thorough study on the specific heat capacities of Li-ion cells starting from raw materials and electrode coatings to representative unit cells of jelly rolls/electrode stacks with lumped values was conducted. The specific heat capacity is reported as a function of temperature and state of charge (SOC). Seven Li-ion cells from different manufactures with different cell chemistry, application and design were considered and generally applicable correlations were developed. A 2D thermal model of an automotive Li-ion cell for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) application illustrates the influence of specific heat capacity on the effectivity of cooling concepts and the temperature development of Li-ion cells.

  3. Self-consistent Study of Fast Particle Redistribution by Alfven Eigenmodes During Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergkvist, T.; Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) excited by fusion born α particles can degrade the heating efficiency of a burning plasma and throw out αs. To experimentally study the effects of excitation of AEs and the redistribution of the fast ions, ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is often used. The distribution function of thermonuclear αs in a reactor is expected to be isotropic and constantly renewed through DT reactions. The distribution function of cyclotron heated ions is strongly anisotropic, and the ICRH do not only renew the distribution function but also provide a strong decorrelation mechanism between the fast ions and the AE. Because of the sensitivity of the AE dynamics on the details of the distribution function, the location of the resonance surfaces in phase space and the extent of the overlapping resonant regions for different AEs, a self-consistent treatment of the AE excitation and the ICRH is necessary. Interactions of fast ions with AEs during ICRH has been implemented in the SELFO code. Simulations are in good agreement with the experimentally observer pitch-fork splitting and rapid damping of the AE as ICRH is turned off. The redistribution of fast ions have been studied in the presence of several driven AEs. (author)

  4. Measurements with vertically viewing charge exchange analyzers during ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Hammett, G.W.; Gammel, G.; Goldston, R.J.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.; Young, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of charge exchange neutral particle analyzers for studying energetic ion distributions in high-temperature plasmas has been demonstrated in a variety of tokamak experiments. Power deposition profiles have been estimated in the Princeton large torus (PLT) from particle measurements as a function of energy and angle during heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and extensive studies of this heating mode are planned for the upcoming operational period in the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR). Unlike the horizontally scanning analyzer on PLT, the TFTR system consists of vertical sightlines intersecting a poloidal cross section of the plasma. A bounce-averaged Fokker--Planck program, which includes a quasilinear operator to calculate ICRF-generated energetic ions, is used to simulate the charge exchange flux expected during fundamental hydrogen heating. These sightlines also cross the trajectory of a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB), and it may be possible to observe the fast ion tail during 3 He minority heating, if the DNB is operated in helium for double charge exchange neutralization

  5. Simulation of Heating with the Waves of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Cheng; Zhu Sizheng; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    Simulation on the heating scenarios in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) was performed by using a full wave code TORIC. The locations of resonance layers for these heating schemes are predicted and the simulations for different schemes in ICRF experiments in EAST, for example, ion heating (both fundamental and harmonic frequency) or electron heating (by direct fast waves or by mode conversion waves), on-axis or off-axis heating, and high-field-side (HFS) launching or low-field-side (LFS) launching, etc, were conducted. For the on-axis minority ion heating of 3 He in D( 3 He) plasma, the impacts of both density and temperature on heating were discussed in the EAST parameter ranges.

  6. MeV ion loss during 3He minority heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Hammett, G.; Boivin, R.; Phillips, C.; Wilson, R.

    1992-01-01

    The loss of MeV ions during 3 He ICRH minority heating experiments has been measured using scintillator detectors near the wall of TFTR. The observed MeV ion losses to the bottom (90 degrees poloidal) detector are generally consistent with the expected first-orbit loss of D- 3 He alpha particle fusion products, with an inferred global reaction rate up to ∼10 16 reactions/sec. A qualitatively similar but unexpectedly large loss occurs 45 degrees poloidally below the outer midplane. This additional loss might be due to ICRH tail ions or to ICRH wave-induced loss of previously confined fusion products

  7. Behavior of lithium ions in the turbulent near-wall tokamak plasma under heating of ions and electrons of the main plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shurygin, R. V.; Morozov, D. Kh.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent dynamics of the near-wall tokamak plasma is simulated by numerically solving the nonlinear reduced Braginskii magnetohydrodynamic equations with allowance for a lithium ion admixture. The effects of turbulence and radiation of the admixture are analyzed in the framework of a self-consistent approach. The radial distributions of the radiative loss power and the density of Li 0 atoms and Li +1 ions are obtained as functions of the electron and ion temperatures of the main plasma in the near-wall layer. The results of numerical simulations show that supply of lithium ions into the low-temperature near-wall plasma substantially depends on whether the additional power is deposited into the electron or ion component of the main plasma. If the electron temperature in the layer increases (ECR heating), then the ion density drops. At the same time, an increase in the temperature of the main ions (ICR heating) leads to an increase in the density of Li +1 ions. The results of numerical simulations are explained by the different influence of the electron and ion temperatures on the atomic processes governing the accumulation and loss of particles in the balance equations for neutral Li 0 atoms and Li +1 ions in the admixture. The radial profile of the electron temperature and the corresponding distribution of the radiative loss power for different densities of neutral Li 0 atoms on the wall are obtained. The calculations show that the presence of Li +1 ions affects turbulent transport of the main ions. In this case, the electron heat flux increases by 20–30% with increasing Li +1 density, whereas the flux of the main ions drops by nearly the same amount. The radial profile of the turbulent flux of lithium ions is obtained. It is demonstrated that the appearance of the pinch effect is related to the positive density gradient of lithium ions across the calculation layer. For the parameters of the T-10 tokamak, the effect of radiative cooling of the near-wall plasma

  8. Confinement characteristics of high-energy ions produced by ICRF heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, R; Saito, K; Torii, Y; Mutoh, T; Seki, T; Watari, T; Osakabe, M; Murakami, S; Sasao, M; Watanabe, T; Yamamoto, T; Notake, T; Takeuchi, N; Saida, T; Shimpo, F; Nomura, G; Yokota, M; Kato, A; Zao, Y; Okada, H; Isobe, M; Ozaki, T; Narihara, K; Nagayama, Y; Inagaki, S; Morita, S; Krasilnikov, A V; Idei, H; Kubo, S; Ohkubo, K; Sato, M; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Ikeda, K; Nagaoka, K; Oka, Y; Takeiri, Y; Tsumori, K; Ashikawa, N; Emoto, M; Funaba, H; Goto, M; Ida, K; Kobuchi, T; Liang, Y; Masuzaki, S; Minami, T; Miyazawa, J; Morisaki, T; Muto, S; Nakamura, Y; Nakanishi, H; Nishimura, K; Noda, N; Ohdachi, S; Peterson, B J; Sagara, A; Sakakibara, S; Sakamoto, R; Sato, K; Shoji, M; Suzuki, H; Tanaka, K; Toi, K; Tokuzawa, T; Watanabe, K Y; Yamada, I; Yamamoto, S; Yoshinuma, M; Yokoyama, M; Watanabe, K-Y; Kaneko, O; Kawahata, K; Komori, A; Ohyabu, N; Yamada, H; Yamazaki, K; Sudo, S; Matsuoka, K; Hamada, Y; Motojima, O; Fujiwara, M

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of high-energy ions accelerated by an ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) electric field in the large helical device (LHD) is discussed. A better confinement performance of high-energy ions in the inward-shifted magnetic axis configuration was experimentally verified by measuring their energy spectrum and comparing it with the effective temperature determined by an electron slowing down process. In the standard magnetic axis configuration a saturation of the measured tail temperature was observed as the effective temperature was increased. The ratio between these two quantities is a measure of the quality of transfer efficiency from high-energy ions to a bulk plasma; when this efficiency was compared with Monte Carlo simulations the results agreed fairly well. The ratio of the stored energy of the high-energy ions to that of the bulk plasma was measured using an ICRF heating power modulation method; it was deduced from phase differences between total and bulk plasma stored energies and the modulated ICRF heating power. The measured high energy fraction agreed with that calculated using the injected ICRF heating power, the transfer efficiency determined in the experiment and the confinement scaling of the LHD plasma

  9. Efficient ion heating of tokamak plasma by application of positive and negative current pulse in TRIAM-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Mitarai, Osamu; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1980-01-01

    The efficient heating of bulk ions of tokamak plasma is observed by application of the pulsed toroidal electric field much higher than the Dreicer field with the positive and negative polarities for the ohmic heating field. No deleterious effect on the confinement properties of tokamak plasma appears by the heating. The decay time of ion temperature raised by the heating pulse agrees well with the prediction by the neoclassical transport theory. The magnitude of the current induced by the pulsed electric field with the positive polarity is limited by the violent current disruption. In the case of the negative polarity, this is limited by lack of the MHD equilibrium due to vanishing the total plasma current. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal one / attains around 0.5, which suggests that the efficient ion heating may be due to the current-driven turbulence. (author)

  10. Efficient ion heating of tokamak plasma by application of positive and negative current pulse in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K; Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Mitarai, O; Kawai, Y [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-02-01

    The efficient heating of bulk ions of tokamak plasma is observed by application of the pulsed toroidal electric field much higher than the Dreicer field with the positive and negative polarities for the ohmic heating field. No deleterious effect on the confinement properties of tokamak plasma appears by the heating. The decay time of ion temperature raised by the heating pulse agrees well with the prediction by the neoclassical transport theory. The magnitude of the current induced by the pulsed electric field with the positive polarity is limited by the violent current disruption. In the case of the negative polarity, this is limited by lack of the MHD equilibrium due to vanishing the total plasma current. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal one / attains around 0.5, which suggests that the efficient ion heating may be due to the current-driven turbulence.

  11. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wei, Chaochen [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate.

  12. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd; Wei, Chaochen; Shao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate

  13. A model for the numerical simulations of ion cyclotron heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1986-05-01

    We present a complete set of equations for the numerical simulation of ion cyclotron heating of tokamak plasmas. The model includes the full geometry of the tokamak equilibrium, full parallel dispersion, and perpendicular dispersion to second order in the Larmor radius. It is therefore capable of describing correctly ion cyclotron damping at the fundamental and first harmonic, as well as mode conversion to the ion Bernstein wave and/or the shear Alfven wave, depending on the heating scenario. It includes also electron magnitude pumping and Landau damping, the latter to lowest order in msub(e)/msub(i). Relying on the knowledge gained from slab and ray tracing analysis, we also situate with respect to this standard model some of the further approximations which are commonly encountered in the literature. Finally, two procedures for the numerical solution of the standard model are proposed. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of collective Thomson scattering signals due to fast ions in ITER scenarios with fusion and auxiliary heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Asunta, O.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2009-01-01

    Auxiliary heating such as neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) will accelerate ions in ITER up to energies in the MeV range, i.e. energies which are also typical for alpha particles. Fast ions of any of these populations will elevate the collective Thomson...... functions of fast ions generated by NBI and ICRH are calculated for a steady-state ITER burning plasma equilibrium with the ASCOT and PION codes, respectively. The parameters for the auxiliary heating systems correspond to the design currently foreseen for ITER. The geometry of the CTS system for ITER...... is chosen such that near perpendicular and near parallel velocity components are resolved. In the investigated ICRH scenario, waves at 50MHz resonate with tritium at the second harmonic off-axis on the low field side. Effects of a minority heating scheme with He-3 are also considered. CTS scattering...

  15. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs

  16. Identification of minority ion cyclotron emission during radio frequency heating in the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, G.A.

    1999-11-01

    First measurements and identification of Minority Ion Cyclotron Emission (MICE) during ICRF (H)D minority heating in the JET tokamak are presented. An inner wall radiofrequency (rf) probe shows the new single MICE spectral line, downshifted from the heating, frequency and appearing ∼ 400 ms after the ICRH switch-on. The line is narrow (Δω / ω) ∼ 0.04), characterised by the ion cyclotron frequency of minority protons in the outer edge mid-plane plasma and is observed irrespective of whether single or multi-frequency ICRH is applied. Threshold conditions for MICE are: coupled RF power to the plasma P rf ≥ 4.5 MW; total fast ion energy content W fast ≥ 0.6 MJ. At the time of the rapid switch-on of MICE, the measured power loss from the energetic minority ions is ∼ 0.1 ± 0.1 MW, constituting rf . The observations are consistent with the classical evolution and population of the plasma edge with ∼ 3 MeV ICRH protons on orbits near the outboard limiters. Particle loss and energy filtering contribute to a local non-Maxwellian energetic ion distribution which is susceptible to ion cyclotron instability

  17. TRANSP modeling of minority ion sawtooth mixing in ICRF + NBI heated discharges in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinger, R.C.; Batchelor, D.B.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Budny, R.; Hammett, G.W.; McCune, D.M.; Wilson, J.R.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    Time independent code analysis indicates that the sawtooth relaxation phenomenon affects RF power deposition profiles through the mixing of fast ions. Predicted central electron heating rates are substantially above experimental values unless sawtooth relaxation is included. The PPPL time dependent transport analysis code, TRANSP, currently has a model to redistribute thermal electron and ion species, energy densities, plasma current density, and fast ions from neutral beam injection at each sawtooth event using the Kadomtsev (3) prescription. Results are presented here in which the set of models is extended to include sawtooth mixing effects on the hot ion population generated from ICRF heating. The ICRF generated hot ion distribution function, line-integral(ν parallel , ν perpendicular ), which is strongly peaked at the center before each sawtooth, is replaced throughout the sawtooth mixing volume by its volume averaged value at each sawtooth. The modified line-integral(ν parallel ,ν perpendicular ) is then used to recalculate the collisional transfer of power from the minority species to the background species. Results demonstrate that neglect of sawtooth mixing of ICRF-induced fast ions leads to prediction of faster central electron reheat rates than are measured experimentally

  18. Electron and ion cyclotron heating calculations in the tandem-mirror modeling code MERTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    To better understand and predict tandem-mirror experiments, we are building a comprehensive Mirror Equilibrium Radial Transport and Heating (MERTH) code. In this paper we first describe our method for developing the code. Then we report our plans for the installation of physics packages for electron- and ion-cyclotron heating of the plasma

  19. Neoclassical offset toroidal velocity and auxiliary ion heating in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, E., E-mail: lazzaro@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma CNR (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g., RF or any isotropic auxiliary heating) cannot give rise to net forces or torques. Experimental evidence on contemporary tokamaks shows that the near central absorption of RF heating power (ICH and ECH) and current drive in presence of MHD activity drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co-I{sub p} direction, opposite to the initial one. Also the appearance of classical or neoclassical tearing modes provides a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to clamp the rotation profile at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P{sub RF} absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in the equilibrium configuration or in power deposition, but here we point out also an effect of the response of the so-called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity due to internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by kinetic and fluid calculations, that the absorption of auxiliary power by ions modifies this offset proportionally to the injected power thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  20. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailloux, A.

    1997-01-01

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10 12 ions/cm 3 ) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O'ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author)

  1. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  2. Ion heat pulse after sawtooth crash in the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Y.; Okano, F.; Suzuki, N.; Mori, M.; Hoshino, K.; Maeda, H.; Takizuka, T.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.

    1993-08-01

    The ion heat pulse after sawtooth crash is studied with the time-of-flight neutral measurement on the JFT-2M tokamak. The rapid change of the bulk ion energy distribution near the edge is observed after sawtooth crash. The delay time is measured and the effective measuring position is estimated by a neutral transport code, then the thermal conductivity, χ i HP , of about 15±10m 2 /sec is evaluated for the L-mode plasma. The simple diffusive model with constant χ i HP , however, does not explain the amplitude of the pulse in the ion energy distribution. (author)

  3. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  4. Multi-megajoule heating of large tokamaks with high energy heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei-Cas, R.

    1981-07-01

    The fast neutral injection heating and RF heating for tokamak like plasmas are now well established. We consider in this paper the use of high energy (approximately 1 GeV) heavy ions (Xe 132 ) to reach ignition in JET or INTOR like tokamaks. The main advantages of such a method will be outlined. The capture and the confinement of heavy ions have been analysed in a particular case and with the described RF linac it seems possible to inject in the order of 50 MJ in 1 sec with a modest increase of the effective charge Zsub(eff)<1.05 in a JET-like plasma for a particle life time of 1 sec and then the additional radiated power should be maintained at a relatively low level in comparison to the injected power

  5. Thermal Characteristics of an Oscillating Heat Pipe Cooling System for Electric Vehicle Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ri-Guang Chi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The heat generation of lithium ion batteries in electric vehicles (EVs leads to a degradation of energy capacity and lifetime. To solve this problem, a new cooling concept using an oscillating heat pipe (OHP is proposed. In the present study, an OHP has been adopted for Li-ion battery cooling. Due to the limited space in EVs, the cooling channel is installed on the bottom of the battery module. In the bottom cooling method with an OHP, generated heat can be dissipated easily and conveniently. However, most studies on heat pipes have used bottom heating and top or side cooling methods, so we investigate the various effects of parameters with a top heating/bottom cooling mode with the OHP, i.e., the inclination angle of the system, amount of working fluid charged, the heating amount, and the cold plate temperature with ethanol as a working fluid. The experimental results show that the thermal resistance (0.6 °C/W and uneven pulsating features influence the heat transfer performance. A heater used as a simulated battery was sustained under 60 °C under 10 W and 14 W heating conditions. This indicates that the proposed cooling system with the bottom cooling is feasible for use as an EV’s battery cooling system.

  6. Fast wave heating experiments in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies on ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, M; Shepard, T D; Goulding, R H [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); and others

    1992-07-01

    Fast wave heating experiments in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were performed on target plasmas produced by 350 kW of electron cyclotron heating at 53 GHz and also by neutral beam injection in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). Various heating regimes were investigated in the frequency range between 9.2 MHz and 28.8 MHz with magnetic fields of 0.95 T and 1.9 T on axis. The nominal pulse lengths of up to 200 kW RF power were in the range between 100 and 400 ms. Data from spectroscopy, loading measurements, and edge RF and Langmuir probes were used to characterize the RF induced effects on the ATF plasma. In the hydrogen minority regime at low plasma density, large suprathermal ion tails were observed with a neutral particle analyser. At high density (n-bar{sub e} {>=} 5.0 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) substantial increases in antenna loading were observed, but ICRF power was insufficient to produce definitive heating results. A two-dimensional RF heating code, ORION, and a Fokker-Planck code, RFTRANS, were used to simulate these experiments. A simulation of future high power, higher density experiments in ATF indicates improved bulk heating results due to the improved loading and more efficient thermalization of the minority tail. (author). 29 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs.

  7. Ion heating at the cyclotron resonance in plasmas magnetically confined in a toroidal octupole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures as high as 600 eV have been produced using rf wave heating at the ion cyclotron resonance frequency in a toroidal octupole magnetic field. Rf is coupled to the plasma with an externally driven ''fifth'' hoop which forms the inductive leg of an oscillator tank circuit. Power levels up to 1 MW at 1 to 3 MHz have been applied for periods up to 2 msec. Plasmas produced either by ECRH or by gun injection are simulated with a computer program in which known particle and energy production and loss mechanisms are used to predict the spatially averaged time behaviour of the plasma in the presence of the applied ion heating. The program can be used to calculate the consequences of the heating model in the presence of many cooling mechanisms which may each have a separate dependence on instantaneous plasma parameters. Experimental quantities compared to computer predictions include density, ion temperature, and loading of the hoop by the plasma, both resistive and reactive, and neutral reflux from the wall by electron and ion impact. Wave penetration to the resonance zone is good up to the highest densities available (6 x 10 12 cm -3 by gun injection) in good agreement with theory. Neutral reflux from the walls and the large charge exchange cooling which results is the dominant loss mechanism at the higher hoop voltages

  8. A comparative study of plasma heating by ion acoustic and modified two-stream instabilities at subcritical quasi-perpendicular shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Giacalone, J.; Thomsen, M.F.; Mellott, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma heating due to the ion instability and the modified two-stream instability is examined for quasi-perpendicular subcritical shocks. Electron and ion heating is investigated as a function of upstream electron to ion temperature ratio and plasma beta using second-order heating rates. A simple shock model is employed in which the cross-field electron-ion drift speed is adjusted until the total (adiabatic plus anomalous) heating matches that required by the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. Quantities such as the width of the shock and the maximum electric field fluctuations are also calculated, and the results are compared with the ISEE data set of subcritical box shock crossings. The observed width of the shock, the amount of plasma heating, and the low-frequency electric field intensity are in reasonably good agreement with the calculations for the modified two-stream instability. On the other hand, the wave intensities at higher frequency are about 4 orders of magnitude smaller than those predicted for the ion acoustic instability at saturation, consistent with the fact that the measured shock widths imply cross-field drift speeds that are below threshold for this instability. It is therefore concluded that the dissipation at these shocks is most likely due to the lower frequency, modified two-stream instability

  9. Localized Beampipe Heating due to $e^{-}$ Capture and Nuclear Excitation in Heavy Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, S R

    2001-01-01

    At heavy ion colliders, two major sources of beam loss are expected to be $e^+e^-$ production, where the $e^-$ is bound to one of the nuclei, and photonuclear excitation and decay via neutron emission. Both processes alter the ions charged to mass ratio by well defined amounts, creating beams of particles with altered magnetic rigidity. These beams will deposit their energy in a localized region of the accelerator, causing localized heating, The size of the target region depends on the collider optics. For medium and heavy ions, at design luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider, local heating may be more than an order of magnitude higher than expected. This could cause magnet quenches if the local cooling is inadequate. The altered-rigidity beams will also produce localized radiation damage. The beams could also be extracted and used for fixed target experiments.

  10. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is the energy conversion process which keeps the sun shining. For the last six decades, researchers have been investigating the physics involved in order to enable the usage of this energy supply on Earth. The most promising candidates for fusion power plants are based on magnetic confinement of plasma to provide the ideal conditions for efficient thermonuclear fusion in well controlled surroundings. One important aspect is the control of instabilities that occur in the edge region of the plasma and lead to an ejection of huge amounts of energy. Magnetic perturbation fields which are resonant in the plasma edge are found to modify the plasma favourably and reduce the impact of these instabilities. This dissertation focuses on the effects of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the ejected energy as well as on the drawbacks of these perturbation fields. The transient energy ejection which is triggered by the instabilities causes extreme heat loads on the wall components in fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how resonant magnetic perturbation fields affect the heat load deposition. Furthermore, the impact of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the confinement of fast ions is an important aspect as fast ions are still required to be well confined in order to avoid additional wall loads and increase the fusion efficiency. Recent upgrades on the Joint European Torus allow for a detailed study of the heat load deposition profiles caused by transient events. Throughout this work, the new features are used for the study of the modifications of the transient heat load depositions that occur if resonant magnetic perturbation fields are applied. This leads to a further understanding of the processes involved during the plasma edge instabilities. Additionally, an alternative method using lower hybrid waves for applying resonant magnetic perturbations is investigated. Furthermore, a new diagnostic, capable of detecting fast ion

  11. Influence of resonant magnetic perturbations on transient heat load deposition and fast ion losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Michael Thomas

    2014-07-11

    Thermonuclear fusion is the energy conversion process which keeps the sun shining. For the last six decades, researchers have been investigating the physics involved in order to enable the usage of this energy supply on Earth. The most promising candidates for fusion power plants are based on magnetic confinement of plasma to provide the ideal conditions for efficient thermonuclear fusion in well controlled surroundings. One important aspect is the control of instabilities that occur in the edge region of the plasma and lead to an ejection of huge amounts of energy. Magnetic perturbation fields which are resonant in the plasma edge are found to modify the plasma favourably and reduce the impact of these instabilities. This dissertation focuses on the effects of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the ejected energy as well as on the drawbacks of these perturbation fields. The transient energy ejection which is triggered by the instabilities causes extreme heat loads on the wall components in fusion devices. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how resonant magnetic perturbation fields affect the heat load deposition. Furthermore, the impact of resonant magnetic perturbation fields on the confinement of fast ions is an important aspect as fast ions are still required to be well confined in order to avoid additional wall loads and increase the fusion efficiency. Recent upgrades on the Joint European Torus allow for a detailed study of the heat load deposition profiles caused by transient events. Throughout this work, the new features are used for the study of the modifications of the transient heat load depositions that occur if resonant magnetic perturbation fields are applied. This leads to a further understanding of the processes involved during the plasma edge instabilities. Additionally, an alternative method using lower hybrid waves for applying resonant magnetic perturbations is investigated. Furthermore, a new diagnostic, capable of detecting fast ion

  12. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number k z is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the k z spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B 0 , and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44 Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. Experimental characteristics of ion Bernstein wave heating on JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Ando, R.

    1986-03-01

    The directly launched Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) heating experiments have been carried out on JIPP T-IIU tokamak for two experimental conditions; (a) the ''3rd-branch'' of the IBW between 3rd- and 4th-cyclotron harmonics of the deuterium, and (b) the ''2nd-branch'' of the IBW between 2nd- and 3rd-cyclotron harmonics. In the case (a), the direct hydrogen heating at ω = 1.5 Ω H has been found in previous experiments. Here we present additional data to support this subharmonics heating, i.e., the spectroscopic measurement of Fe XVIII lines and mass separated analysis of charge-exchange neutrals. While, in the case (b), the remarkable increase of the electron temperature has been observed, especially at the central region of the plasma, and it has been estimated from the global energy balance that almost all of IBW power is delivered to the electron. To investigate this difference of the heating mode, the power absorption has been calculated with the ray tracing code, taking into account of the effect of the plasma/antenna coupling. It is concluded from the consideration of the electron Landau damping that the transition from the ion heating mode to the electron one would be explained by the difference of the electron temperature at the ohmic phase; i.e., T e (0) = 0.7 keV for the case (a) and T e (0) = 1.3 keV for the case (b). (author)

  14. Effects of D-region RF heating studied with the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-F. Enell

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, or ionospheric D region, is an atmospheric layer which is difficult to access experimentally. A useful method that also has a large potential for further studies is artificial heating of electrons by means of powerful radio transmitters. Here we estimate the effect of D-region heating for a few typical cases of high electron density – daylight, typical auroral electron precipitation, and a solar proton event – by coupling a model of RF electron heating to the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model. The predicted effects are among others an increase in the ratio of the concentration of negative ions to that of free electrons, and an increase in the absorption of cosmic noise as measured by riometers. For the model runs presented in this paper we have calculated the absorption for the frequency (38.2MHz of the IRIS imaging riometer in Kilpisjärvi, Finland, as observing the ionosphere above the EISCAT Heater in Tromsø, Norway. The predicted enhancements of the absorption are 0.2–0.8dB, an effect which is clearly detectable.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Active experiments; Ion chemistry and composition; Wave propagation

  15. Effects of D-region RF heating studied with the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-F. Enell

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, or ionospheric D region, is an atmospheric layer which is difficult to access experimentally. A useful method that also has a large potential for further studies is artificial heating of electrons by means of powerful radio transmitters. Here we estimate the effect of D-region heating for a few typical cases of high electron density – daylight, typical auroral electron precipitation, and a solar proton event – by coupling a model of RF electron heating to the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model. The predicted effects are among others an increase in the ratio of the concentration of negative ions to that of free electrons, and an increase in the absorption of cosmic noise as measured by riometers. For the model runs presented in this paper we have calculated the absorption for the frequency (38.2MHz of the IRIS imaging riometer in Kilpisjärvi, Finland, as observing the ionosphere above the EISCAT Heater in Tromsø, Norway. The predicted enhancements of the absorption are 0.2–0.8dB, an effect which is clearly detectable. Keywords. Ionosphere (Active experiments; Ion chemistry and composition; Wave propagation

  16. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  17. Solar wind heating by an embedded quasi-isothermal pick-up ion fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the solar wind plasma consists of primary ions of solar coronal origin and secondary ions of interstellar origin. Interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and when ionized there are converted into secondary ions. These are implanted into the magnetized solar wind flow and are essentially enforced to co-move with this flow. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves the latter are processed in the co-moving velocity space. This pick-up process, however, also causes actions back upon the original solar wind flow, leading to a deceleration, as well as a heating of the solar wind plasma. The resulting deceleration is not only due to the loading effect, but also due to the action of the pressure gradient. To calculate the latter, it is important to take into account the stochastic acceleration that suffers at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by the quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in terms of the current, most likely values of interstellar gas parameters. In a consistent view of the thermodynamics of the solar wind plasma, which is composed of secondary ions and solar wind protons, we also derive that the latter are globally heated at their motion to larger solar distances. The arising heat transfer is due to the action of suprathermal ions which drive MHD waves that are partially absorbed by solar wind protons and thereby establish their observed quasi-polytropy. We obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances, as has been observed by the VOYAGERS. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of the intitial energy

  18. Reducing cell-to-cell spacing for large-format lithium ion battery modules with aluminum or PCM heat sinks under failure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Brittany; Ostanek, Jason; Heinzel, John

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Finite element analysis to evaluate heat sinks for large format li-ion batteries. • Solid metal heat sink and composite heat sink (metal filler and wax). • Transient simulations show response from rest to steady-state with normal load. • Transient simulations of two different failure modes were considered. • Significance of spacing, material properties, interface quality, and phase change. - Abstract: Thermal management is critical for large-scale, shipboard energy storage systems utilizing lithium-ion batteries. In recent years, there has been growing research in thermal management of lithium-ion battery modules. However, there is little information available on the minimum cell-to-cell spacing limits for indirect, liquid cooled modules when considering heat release during a single cell failure. For this purpose, a generic four-cell module was modeled using finite element analysis to determine the sensitivity of module temperatures to cell spacing. Additionally, the effects of different heat sink materials and interface qualities were investigated. Two materials were considered, a solid aluminum block and a metal/wax composite block. Simulations were run for three different transient load profiles. The first profile simulates sustained high rate operation where the system begins at rest and generates heat continuously until it reaches steady state. And, two failure mode simulations were conducted to investigate block performance during a slow and a fast exothermic reaction, respectively. Results indicate that composite materials can perform well under normal operation and provide some protection against single cell failure; although, for very compact designs, the amount of wax available to absorb heat is reduced and the effectiveness of the phase change material is diminished. The aluminum block design performed well under all conditions, and showed that heat generated during a failure is quickly dissipated to the coolant, even under the

  19. High-ion temperature experiments with negative-ion-based NBI in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeiri, Y.; Morita, S.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Oka, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Goto, M.; Miyazawa, J.; Masuzaki, S.; Ashikawa, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Inagaki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Peterson, B.J.; Ida, K.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.; Murakami, S.

    2005-01-01

    High-Z plasmas have been produced with Ar- and/or Ne-gas fuelling to increase the ion temperature in the LHD plasmas heated with the high-energy negative-ion-based NBI. Although the electron heating is dominant in the high-energy NBI heating, the direct ion heating power is much enhanced effectively in low-density plasmas due to both an increase in the beam absorption (ionisation) power and a reduction of the ion density in the high-Z plasmas. Intensive Ne- and/or Ar-glow discharge cleaning works well to suppress dilution of the high-Z plasmas with the wall-absorbed hydrogen. As a result, the ion temperature increases with an increase in the ion heating power normalized by the ion density, and reaches 10 keV. An increase in the ion temperature is also observed with an addition of the centrally focused ECRH to the low-density and high-Z NBI plasma, suggesting improvement of the ion transport. The results obtained in the high-Z plasma experiments with the high-energy NBI heating indicate that an increase in the direct ion heating power and improvement of the ion transport are essential to the ion temperature rise, and that a high-ion temperature would be obtained as well in hydrogen plasmas with low-energy positive-NBI heating which is planed in near future in LHD. (author)

  20. Ion heating and energy partition at the heliospheric termination shock: hybrid simulations and analytical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Pin [BOSTON UNIV.; Schwadron, N A [BOSTON UNIV.; Lee, M [UNIV OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

    2009-01-01

    The Los Alamos hybrid simulation code is used to examine heating and the partition of dissipation energy at the perpendicular heliospheric termination shock in the presence of pickup ions. The simulations are one-dimensional in space but three-dimensional in field and velocity components, and are carried out for a range of values of pickup ion relative density. Results from the simulations show that because the solar wind ions are relatively cold upstream, the temperature of these ions is raised by a relatively larger factor than the temperature of the pickup ions. An analytic model for energy partition is developed on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and a polytropic energy equation. The polytropic index {gamma} used in the Rankine-Hugoniot relations is varied to improve agreement between the model and the simulations concerning the fraction of downstream heating in the pickup ions as well as the compression ratio at the shock. When the pickup ion density is less than 20%, the polytropic index is about 5/3, whereas for pickup ion densities greater than 20%, the polytropic index tends toward 2.2, suggesting a fundamental change in the character of the shock, as seen in the simulations, when the pickup ion density is large. The model and the simulations both indicate for the upstream parameters chosen for Voyager 2 conditions that the pickup ion density is about 25% and the pickup ions gain the larger share (approximately 90%) of the downstream thermal pressure, consistent with Voyager 2 observations near the shock.

  1. Second harmonic ion cylotron resonance heating by the fast magnetosonic wave on the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating by the fast magnetosonic wave, and the propagation of the fast wave from the fundamental of the ion cyclotron frequency to its second harmonic was investigated in a hydrogen plasma on the PLT tokamak. The theory of fast magnetosonic wave propagation was extended to include the effects of density gradients, plasma current, and impurity ion species. The damping of the fast wave at the second harmonic is calculated, where the theory has been extended to include the full radial dependence of the fast wave fields. Power deposition profiles and eigenmode Q's are calculated using this theory. The effects of the interaction between the ion Bernstein wave and the fast magnetosonic wave are calculated, and enhanced fast wave damping is predicted. The antenna loading is calculated including the effects of overlap of the fast wave eigenmodes. During the second harmonic heating experiments, the antenna loading was characterized as a function of the plasma parameters, and efficient coupling of the RF power to the plasma at high density was observed. At very low densities, fast wave eigenmodes were identified on PLT, and their Q's are measured. Eigenmodes with different toroidal directions of propagation were observed to exhibit large splitting in density due to the plasma current. Efficient bulk heating, with centrally peaked profiles, is observed at the second harmonic, and a tail, which decreases monotonically with energy, is observed on the ion distribution

  2. Investigation of the critical edge ion heat flux for L-H transitions in Alcator C-Mod and its dependence on B T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmayr, M.; Hughes, J. W.; Ryter, F.; Wolfrum, E.; Cao, N.; Creely, A. J.; Howard, N.; Hubbard, A. E.; Lin, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Tolman, E. A.; Wukitch, S.; Ma, Y.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents investigations on the role of the edge ion heat flux for transitions from L-mode to H-mode in Alcator C-Mod. Previous results from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak indicated that a critical value of edge ion heat flux per particle is needed for the transition. Analysis of C-Mod data confirms this result. The edge ion heat flux is indeed found to increase linearly with density at given magnetic field and plasma current. Furthermore, the Alcator C-Mod data indicate that the edge ion heat flux at the L-H transition also increases with magnetic field. Combining the data from Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade yields a general expression for the edge ion heat flux at the L-H transition. These results are discussed from the point of view of the possible physics mechanism of the L-H transition. They are also compared to the L-H power threshold scaling and an extrapolation for ITER is given.

  3. TRPV3 and TRPV4 ion channels are not major contributors to mouse heat sensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Juan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV ion channels provided a potential molecular explanation for the perception of innocuous and noxious heat stimuli. TRPV1 has a significant role in acute heat nociception and inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Yet, substantial innocuous and noxious heat sensitivity remains in TRPV1 knockout animals. Here we investigated the role of two related channels, TRPV3 and TRPV4, in these capacities. We studied TRPV3 knockout animals on both C57BL6 and 129S6 backgrounds, as well as animals deficient in both TRPV3 and TRPV4 on a C57BL6 background. Additionally, we assessed the contributions of TRPV3 and TRPV4 to acute heat nociception and inflammatory heat hyperalgesia during inhibition of TRPV1. Results TRPV3 knockout mice on the C57BL6 background exhibited no obvious alterations in thermal preference behavior. On the 129S6 background, absence of TRPV3 resulted in a more restrictive range of occupancy centered around cooler floor temperatures. TRPV3 knockout mice showed no deficits in acute heat nociception on either background. Mice deficient in both TRPV3 and TRPV4 on a C57BL6 background showed thermal preference behavior similar to wild-type controls on the thermal gradient, and little or no change in acute heat nociception or inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Masking of TRPV1 by the TRPV1 antagonist JNJ-17203212 did not reveal differences between C57BL6 animals deficient in TRPV3 and TRPV4, compared to their wild-type counterparts. Conclusions Our results support the notion that TRPV3 and TRPV4 likely make limited and strain-dependent contributions to innocuous warm temperature perception or noxious heat sensation, even when TRPV1 is masked. These findings imply the existence of other significant mechanisms for heat perception.

  4. Heat deposition on the first wall due to ICRF-induced loss of fast ions in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Y.; Tobita, K.; Kimura, H.; Hamamatsu, K.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, M.; Saigusa, M.; Moriyama, S.; Tani, K.; Koide, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Nishitani, T.; Ushigusa, K.

    1995-01-01

    In JT-60U, the heat deposition on the first wall due to the ICRF-induced loss of fast ions was investigated by changing the position of the resonance layer in the ripple-trapping region. A heat spot appears on the first wall of the same major radius as the resonance layer of the ICRF waves. The broadening of the heat spot in the major radius direction is consistent with that of the resonance layer due to the Doppler broadening. The heat spot is considered to be formed by the ICRF-induced ripple-trapped loss of fast ions. Although the total ICRF-induced loss power to the heat spot is as low as 2% of the total ICRF power, the additional heat flux will become a new issue because of the localized heat deposition on the first wall. ((orig.))

  5. A pre-heating method based on sinusoidal alternating current for lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wentao; Sun, Fengchun; Guo, Shanshan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a method of low temperature pre-heating of sinusoidal alternating current (SAC) is proposed. Generally, the lower the frequency of the AC current, the higher the heat generation rate. Yet at low frequency, there is a risk of lithium-ion deposition during the half cycle of charging. This study develops a temperature-adaptive, deposition-free AC pre-heating method. a equivalent electric circuit(EEC) model is established to predict the heat generation rate and temperature status, whose parameters are calibrated from the EIS impedance measurements. The effects of current frequency and amplitude on the heating effect are investigated respectively. A multistep temperature-adaptive amplitude strategy is proposed and the cell can be heated from -20°C to 5°C within 509s at 100Hz frequency with this method.

  6. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the tandem mirror experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). This analyzer indicates an increase in ion temperature from ∼20 eV before ICRH to ∼150 eV during ICRH, with ∼60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial integral of n i T i as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma potential is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat, as the plasma conditions varied over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U

  7. Ion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, A.P.

    1980-06-01

    Ion temperatures of 75 eV, a doubling of the ohmic heating temperature in a normal discharge, have been achieved using the fast magnetosonic wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the cyclotron frequency in a single component hydrogen plasma. The wave launching structure is a single turn, shielded, insulated loop which constitutes the inductor of the rf source tank circuit. Power levels of 800 kW have been applied to the plasma for periods of up to 1.1 milliseconds. Good agreement has been found between theory and experiment for loading and wave propagation in the plasma for m = 0 and m = +1 modes. Eigenmodes have been observed by peaking of both the rf wave amplitude and the loading of the oscillator, as well as by oscillator frequency shifts imposed by their passage

  8. An assessment of ion temperature measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and implications for ion fluid heat flux limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, D; LaBombard, B; Churchill, R M; Hughes, J; Lipschultz, B; Ochoukov, R; Theiler, C; Walk, J; Rognlien, T D; Umansky, M V; Whyte, D

    2013-01-01

    The ion temperature is not frequently measured in the boundary of magnetic fusion devices. Comparisons among different ion temperature techniques and simulations are even rarer. Here we present a comparison of ion temperature measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak from three different diagnostics: charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS), an ion sensitive probe (ISP), and a retarding field analyzer (RFA). Comparison between CXRS and the ISP along with close examination of the ISP measurements reveals that the ISP is space charge limited. It is thus unable to measure ion temperature in the high density (>10 19 m −3 ) boundary plasma of C-Mod with its present geometry. Comparison of ion temperatures measured by CXRS and the RFA shows fair agreement. Ion and electron parallel heat flow is analyzed with a simple 1D fluid code. The code takes divertor measurements as input and results are compared to the measured ratios of upstream ion to electron temperature, as inferred respectively by CXRS and a Langmuir probe. The analysis reveals the limits of the fluid model at high Knudsen number. The upstream temperature ratio is under predicted by a factor of 2. Heat flux limiters (kinetic corrections) to the fluid model are necessary to match experimental data. The values required are found to be close to those reported in kinetic simulations. The 1D code is benchmarked against the 2D plasma fluid code UEDGE with good agreement. (paper)

  9. An assessment of ion temperature measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and implications for ion fluid heat flux limiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Churchill, R. M.; Hughes, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Rognlien, T. D.; Theiler, C.; Walk, J.; Umansky, M. V.; Whyte, D.

    2013-09-01

    The ion temperature is not frequently measured in the boundary of magnetic fusion devices. Comparisons among different ion temperature techniques and simulations are even rarer. Here we present a comparison of ion temperature measurements in the boundary of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak from three different diagnostics: charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS), an ion sensitive probe (ISP), and a retarding field analyzer (RFA). Comparison between CXRS and the ISP along with close examination of the ISP measurements reveals that the ISP is space charge limited. It is thus unable to measure ion temperature in the high density (>1019 m-3) boundary plasma of C-Mod with its present geometry. Comparison of ion temperatures measured by CXRS and the RFA shows fair agreement. Ion and electron parallel heat flow is analyzed with a simple 1D fluid code. The code takes divertor measurements as input and results are compared to the measured ratios of upstream ion to electron temperature, as inferred respectively by CXRS and a Langmuir probe. The analysis reveals the limits of the fluid model at high Knudsen number. The upstream temperature ratio is under predicted by a factor of 2. Heat flux limiters (kinetic corrections) to the fluid model are necessary to match experimental data. The values required are found to be close to those reported in kinetic simulations. The 1D code is benchmarked against the 2D plasma fluid code UEDGE with good agreement.

  10. Modeling heat dominated electric breakdown in air, with adaptivity to electron or ion time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnihotri, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2017-01-01

    We model heat dominated electrical breakdown in air in a short planar gap. We couple the discharge dynamics in fluid approximation with the hydrodynamic motion of the air heated by the discharge. To be computationally efficient, we derive a reduced model on the ion time scale, and we switch between

  11. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost......, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (He-3)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar...... rotation profiles are seen when heating at the second harmonic cyclotron frequency of He-3 and with mode conversion at high concentrations of He-3. The magnitude of the counter-rotation is found to decrease with an increasing plasma current. The correlation of the rotation with the electron temperature...

  12. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui; Alotaibi, Hamad S.; Sun, Haiding; Lin, Ronghui; Guo, Wenzhe; Torres-Castanedo, Carlos G.; Liu, Kaikai; Galan, Sergio V.; Li, Xiaohang

    2018-01-01

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  13. Induction-heating MOCVD reactor with significantly improved heating efficiency and reduced harmful magnetic coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Kuang-Hui

    2018-02-23

    In a conventional induction-heating III-nitride metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, the induction coil is outside the chamber. Therefore, the magnetic field does not couple with the susceptor well, leading to compromised heating efficiency and harmful coupling with the gas inlet and thus possible overheating. Hence, the gas inlet has to be at a minimum distance away from the susceptor. Because of the elongated flow path, premature reactions can be more severe, particularly between Al- and B-containing precursors and NH3. Here, we propose a structure that can significantly improve the heating efficiency and allow the gas inlet to be closer to the susceptor. Specifically, the induction coil is designed to surround the vertical cylinder of a T-shaped susceptor comprising the cylinder and a top horizontal plate holding the wafer substrate within the reactor. Therefore, the cylinder coupled most magnetic field to serve as the thermal source for the plate. Furthermore, the plate can block and thus significantly reduce the uncoupled magnetic field above the susceptor, thereby allowing the gas inlet to be closer. The results show approximately 140% and 2.6 times increase in the heating and susceptor coupling efficiencies, respectively, as well as a 90% reduction in the harmful magnetic flux on the gas inlet.

  14. Numerical modeling of the EBT-S ion-cyclotron heating experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperling, J.L.; Hamasaki, S.; Klein, H.H.; Krall, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    To determine the effect of ion-cyclotron heating on EBT-S plasma parameters, a one-dimensional, time dependent neoclassical model of plasma particle and energy transport was used. For EBT-S the code was run with the following parameters: B/sub O/ = 0.7 tesla (axial field at the midplane), B/sub O/ = 1.4 tesla (axial field at the throat), R/sub T/ = 150 cm (major radius), a = 15 cm

  15. Specific power reduction of an ion source due to heating and cathode sputtering of electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, G.U.; Semashko, N.N.

    The potentialities and limitations of the water-cooled ion-optical system of the ion source designed for continuous operation of the high-power neutral beam injector are determined. The following problems are analyzed: thermal expansion and deformation of electrodes, electrode sputtering as a result of bombardment, and heat transfer to turbulent flow of water

  16. Ion heating and magnetic flux pile-up in a magnetic reconnection experiment with super-Alfvénic plasma inflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, L. G.; Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ciardi, A.; Loureiro, N. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Halliday, J. W. D.; Niasse, N.; Russell, D.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Tubman, E.; Lane, T.; Ma, J.; Robinson, T.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N.

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a magnetic reconnection experiment in which the kinetic, magnetic, and thermal properties of the plasma each play an important role in the overall energy balance and structure of the generated reconnection layer. Magnetic reconnection occurs during the interaction of continuous and steady flows of super-Alfvénic, magnetized, aluminum plasma, which collide in a geometry with two-dimensional symmetry, producing a stable and long-lasting reconnection layer. Optical Thomson scattering measurements show that when the layer forms, ions inside the layer are more strongly heated than electrons, reaching temperatures of Ti˜Z ¯ Te≳300 eV—much greater than can be expected from strong shock and viscous heating alone. Later in time, as the plasma density in the layer increases, the electron and ion temperatures are found to equilibrate, and a constant plasma temperature is achieved through a balance of the heating mechanisms and radiative losses of the plasma. Measurements from Faraday rotation polarimetry also indicate the presence of significant magnetic field pile-up occurring at the boundary of the reconnection region, which is consistent with the super-Alfvénic velocity of the inflows.

  17. Experiments on the indirect heating of low density aerogels for applications in heavy ion stopping in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosmej, O.N.; Blazevic, A.; Suslov, N.; Kunin, A.; Pinegin, A.; Schaefer, D.; Nisius, Th.; Zhao, Y.; Rinecker, T.; Wiechula, J.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The unique combination of a Petawatt High-Energy Laser System for Ion beam eXperiments - 'Phelix' (Nd:glass, 1053 nm, 300-500 J, 1-15 ns) and intense heavy ion beams of the UNILAC accelerator at GSI-Darmstadt allow creating and probing of hot plasma with a density of some percentage of solid-state density. The experimental program aims at the investigation of fundamental features of heavy ion stopping in ionized matter in view of promising applications for the Heavy Ion Fusion and astrophysics. For combined experiments on the interaction of heavy ion beams with ionized matter (GSI) a high density plasma target with homogeneous in time (∼ 5 ns) and space (∼ 1 mm) plasma parameters in required. For these purposes we are developing the combined target which consists on the Gold hohlraum (converter) and low Z foam target heated by the hohlraum radiation before probed by an ion bunch. Foam targets are rather promising due to the effective conversion of the deposited radiation energy into the internal plasma energy and slow hydrodynamic response on the heating. Direct irradiation of the Gold converter walls with a nanosecond pulse delivered by the PHELIX-laser system (GSI) leads to hohlraum radiation spectra in the photon energy range of 50-500 eV. Expected temperatures of the foam targets heated by this radiation amount to 20-30 eV at electron densities of 10 21 cm -3 . The results of the last hohlraum experiments carried out at PHELIX-laser energies of 200-250 J will be presented. In experiments the hohlraum radiation field, the conversion efficiency of the laser energy into soft X-rays, duration of the soft X-ray pulse, and parameters of the heated with X-rays foam targets have been measured. Acknowledgements. This work is supported by ISTC 2264 grant.

  18. Thermal modeling of cylindrical lithium ion battery during discharge cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Baek, Seung Man

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. → This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. → A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. → The contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate. → The contribution of heat source due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. - Abstract: Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. The simplified model by adopting a cylindrical coordinate was employed. This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. The mathematical model solves conservation of energy considering heat generations due to both joule heating and entropy change. A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. The temperature profile from simulation had similar tendency with experiment. The temperature profile was decomposed with contributions of each heat sources and was presented at several discharge rates. It was found that the contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate, whereas that due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. Also the effect of cooling condition and the LiNiCoMnO 2 /C battery were analyzed for the purpose of temperature reduction.

  19. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  20. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D. [Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computational Science and Engineering and Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  1. Analysis of resonant fast ion distributions during combined ICRF and NBI heating with transients using neutron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, C.; Mantsinen, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Kiptily, V. G.; Nabais, F.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    ICRF heating at the fundamental cyclotron frequency of a hydrogen minority ion species also gives rise to a partial power absorption by deuterium ions at their second harmonic resonance. This paper studies the deuterium distributions resulting from such 2nd harmonic heating at JET using neutron emission spectroscopy data from the time of flight spectrometer TOFOR. The fast deuterium distributions are obtained over the energy range 100 keV to 2 MeV. Specifically, we study how the fast deuterium distributions vary as ICRF heating is used alone as well as in combination with NBI heating. When comparing the different heating scenarios, we observed both a difference in the shapes of the distributions as well as in their absolute level. The differences are most pronounced below 0.5 MeV. Comparisons are made with corresponding distributions calculated with the code PION. We find a good agreement between the measured distributions and those calculated with PION, both in terms of their shapes as well as their amplitudes. However, we also identified a period with signs of an inverted fast ion distribution, which showed large disagreements between the modeled and measured results. Resonant interactions with tornado modes, i.e. core localized toroidal alfven eigenmodes (TAEs), are put forward as a possible explanation for the inverted distribution.

  2. Modification of boundary plasma behavior by Ion Bernstein Wave heating on the HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, G.S.; Wan, B.N.; Song, M.; Ling, B.L.; Li, C.F.; Li, J.

    2003-01-01

    The boundary plasma behavior during Ion Bernstein Wave heating was investigated using Langmuir probe arrays on the HT-7 tokamak. A distinct weak turbulence regime was reproducibly observed in the 30 MHz IBW heated plasmas with RF power larger than 120 kW, which resulted in a particle confinement improvement of a factor of 2. The strong suppression and decorrelation effect of fluctuations resulted in the turbulent particle flux dropping by more than an order of magnitude in the plasma boundary region. An additional inward radial electric field and associated poloidal ExB flows were produced, which could account for the additional poloidal velocity in the electron diamagnetic direction at some radial locations of the boundary plasma. The electrostatic fluctuations were nearly completely decorrelated in the high frequency region and only low frequency fluctuations remained. The poloidal correlation was considerably reduced in the high poloidal wave number region and only the fluctuations with long poloidal wavelength remained. Three-wave nonlinear phase coupling between the whole frequency domain and the very low frequency region increased significantly in both the plasma edge and the SOL. Quite low frequency fluctuations (about 5 kHz) were generated, which dominated the boundary turbulence during IBW heating. Detailed analyses suggested that, when an IBW with a frequency of 30 MHz was launched into a plasma with the toroidal magnetic field between 1.75 T and 2.0 T, the ion cyclotron resonant layer of 5/2.D was located in the plasma edge region. The poloidal ExB sheared flows generated by IBW near this layer due to a ponderomotive interaction were found to be the mechanism underlying these phenomena. (author)

  3. Design of an ion cyclotron resonance heating system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yugo, J.J.; Goranson, P.L.; Swain, D.W.; Baity, F.W.; Vesey, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires 10-20 MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power to raise the plasma temperature to ignition. The initial ICRH system will provide 10 MW of power to the plasma, utilizing a total of six rf power units feeding six current straps in three ports. The systems may be expanded to 20 MW with additional rf power units, antennas, and ports. Plasma heating will be achieved through coupling to the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance of a 3 He minority species (also the second harmonic of tritium). The proposed antenna is a resonant double loop (RDL) structure with vacuum, shorted stubs at each end for tuning and impedance matching. The antennas are of modular, compact construction for installation and removal through the midplane port. Remote maintainability and the reactorlike operating environment have a major impact on the design of the launcher for this machine. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Method of processing spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazuhide; Tamada, Shin; Kikuchi, Makoto; Matsuda, Masami; Aoyama, Yoshiyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of radioactive spent ion exchange resins generated from nuclear power plants, etc and process them into stable inorganic compounds through heat decomposition. Method: Spent ion exchange resins are heat-decomposed in an inert atmosphere to selectively decompose only ion exchange groups in the preceeding step while high molecular skeltons are completely heat-decomposed in an oxidizing atmosphere in the succeeding step. In this way, gaseous sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides are generated in the preceeding step, while gaseous carbon dioxide and hydrogen requiring no discharge gas procession are generated in the succeeding step. Accordingly, the amount of discharged gases requiring procession can significantly be reduced, as well as the residues can be converted into stable inorganic compounds. Further, if transition metals are ionically adsorbed as the catalyst to the ion exchange resins, the ion exchange groups are decomposed at 130 - 300 0 C, while the high molecular skeltons are thermally decomposed at 240 - 300 0 C. Thus, the temperature for the heat decomposition can be lowered to prevent the degradation of the reactor materials. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Cooling and heating of the ion flux on the transmission through crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Gruener, F.; Assmann, W.

    2003-01-01

    Transmission of charged particles through a monocrystalline medium is accompanied by many interesting phenomena, and a new one - redistribution of the isotropic flux - is now studied experimentally and described. The cooling or heating in the transverse momentum coordinate arises as a result of crystal-induced modification of the transmission trajectories. This indicates the violation of the reversibility rule, and cannot be explained within prevailing theory of channeling. The type of image (enhancement or reduction) and its intensity are dependent on the ion and crystal species, on the energy of ions and on the crystal thickness. Such dependencies have been studied experimentally and the mechanism involving the regular sequence of charge-exchange events with the transverse-energy non-conservation is attracted for understanding. The crystal response to ion flux transmission is also reviewed and characterized by the original results

  6. The wire array Z-pinch: an efficient x-ray source for ICF and a new ion heating mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, M. G.

    2008-10-01

    The Z-pinch provides an efficient x-ray source for driving a hohlraum for inertial confinement fusion. The basic physics of wire-array implosions is reviewed. It can be understood in several sequential stages. Firstly, the wires heat and form a surrounding vapour which ionizes, causing the current to transfer to this lower resistance. The J×B global force leads to ejection of this plasma towards the axis to form a precursor plasma. The wire cores continue to ablate due to the heat flux from the Joule-heated nearby plasma. The cooling of this plasma by the wire-cores leads to a low magnetic Reynolds number so that the precursor plasma carries little or no current. When gaps appear in the liquid/vapour cores the plasma temperature and Reynolds number rise and this plasma accelerates in towards the axis carrying the current. This is the main implosion, and it sweeps up earlier ablated plasma, which acts to reduce Rayleigh-Taylor growth. At stagnation, the ion kinetic energy is thermalized and equipartition heats the electrons, which then radiate in a 5 ns pulse. In some conditions the energy radiated by soft x-rays exceeds the ion kinetic energy by a factor of 3 or 4. A theory has been developed to explain this in which fine-scale, fast growing m= 0 MHD instabilities grow to saturation, viscous dissipation of which leads to ion heating, followed by equipartition. World record ion temperatures of 2-3 billion Kelvin were predicted, and measured at Sandia National Laboratory. Lastly, progress in capsule implosions and in application to inertial fusion energy is reported.

  7. Phase-space resolved measurement of 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating using FIDA tomography at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, M.; Bilato, R.; Geiger, B.

    2017-01-01

    Recent upgrades to the FIDA (fast-ion D-alpha) diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade allow to reconstruct the fast-ion phase space at several radial positions with decent energy and pitch resolution. These new diagnostic capabilities are applied to study the physics of 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating, w....... Furthermore, comparisons to other fast-ion diagnostics (neutron yield and neutral particle analyzers) are discussed....

  8. A Study of Ion-Ion Hybrid Instability in the Mixed Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yong Kim

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available There are more oxygen ions than hydrogen ions in the auroral field zone. We consider both analytic and numerical simulation study of the heating of hydrogen and oxygen ions by auroral electrons. With the low drift speed of electron beams, the ion-ion hybrid wave becomes unstable instead of the lower hybrid wave so that a preferential heating of oxygen ions occurs.

  9. Optimal neutral beam heating scenario for FED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Optimal neutral beam heating scenarios are determined for FED based on a 1/one-half/-D transport analysis. Tradeoffs are examined between neutral beam energy, power, and species mix for positive ion systems. A ramped density startup is found to provide the most economical heating. The resulting plasma power requirements are reduced by 10-30% from a constant density startup. For beam energies between 100 and 200 keV, the power needed to heat the plasma does not decrease significantly as beam energy is increased. This is due to reduced ion heating, more power in the fractional energy components, and rising power supply requirements as beam energy increases

  10. High heat load experiments for first wall materials by high power ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Tsutomu; Kaneko, Osamu; Sakurai, Keiichi; Oka, Yoshihide; Shibui, Masanao; Ohmori, Junji

    1985-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented with some analytical calculations for thermal shock fractures of first-wall material candidates under plasma disruption heating conditions. A 120 keV - 90 A ion source has been used as an energy source to heat large specimens with heat fluxes of about 9 kW/cm/sup 2/ for pulse length of about 57 msec. Materials examined here are graphite (POCO), SiC, AlN, TiC-coated graphite, and sus 304. The SiC and AlN specimens were completely broken by only one thermal shock. The web-like surface cracks with a depth of about 0.6 mm were created in the tungsten specimen during five shots. No apparent destructive changes were observed in the graphite specimen.

  11. Influence of heat-treatment on lithium ion anode properties of mesoporous carbons with nanosheet-like walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Fanyan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hou, Zhaohui, E-mail: zhqh96@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, Yueyang 414006 (China); He, Binhong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, Yueyang 414006 (China); Ge, Chongyong; Cao, Jianguo [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Kuang, Yafei, E-mail: yafeik@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Mesoporous carbons possess unique nanosheet-like pore walls which can be changed by heat treatment. ► Lithium ion anode properties of mesoporous carbons could be influenced by the nanosheet-like walls. ► Mesoporous carbons with nanosheet-like walls exhibit enhanced electrochemical properties LIBs. -- Abstract: Mesoporous carbons (MCs) with nanosheet-like walls have been prepared as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries by a simple one-step infiltrating method under the action of capillary flow. The influence of heat treatment temperature on the surface topography, pore/phase structure and anode performances of as-prepared materials has been investigated. The results reveal that melted liquid-crystal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could be anchored on liquid/silica interfaces by molecule engineering. After carbonization, the nanosheets are formed as the pore walls of MCs and are perpendicular to the long axis of pores. The anode properties demonstrate that C-1200 displays higher reversible capacitance than those treated in higher temperature. The rate performances of C-1200 and C-1800 are similar and more excellent than that of C-2400. These improved lithium ion anode properties could be attributed to the nanosheet-like walls of MCs which can be influenced by the heat treatment temperature.

  12. Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) start-up antenna for the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.M.; Romesser, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the ICRH start-up antenna on MFTF-B is to heat the plasma and control the ion distribution as the density increases during start-up. The antenna, consisting of two center fed half turn loops phased 180 0 apart, has been designed for 1 MW of input power, with a goal of coupling 400 kW into the ions. To vary the heating frequency relative to the local ion cyclotron frequency, the antenna is tunable over a range from 7.5 to 12.5 MHz. The thermal requirements common to low duty cycle ICRH antennas are especially severe for the MFTF-B antenna. The stress requirements are also unique, deriving from the possibility of seismic activity or JxB forces if the magnets unexpectedly quench. Considerable attention has been paid to contact control at high current bolt-up joints, and arranging geometries so as to minimize the possibility of voltage breakdown

  13. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  14. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi, E-mail: hiratsuka.junichi@jaea.go.jp; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Miyamoto, Kenji [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  15. On ion-cyclotron-resonance heating of the corona and solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concisely summarizes and critically reviews recent work by the authors on models of the heating of the solar corona by resonance of ions with high-frequency waves (up to the proton cyclotron frequency. The quasi-linear theory of pitch angle diffusion is presented in connection with relevant solar wind proton observations. Hybrid fluid-kinetic model equations, which include wave-particle interactions and collisions, are derived. Numerical solutions are discussed, representative of the inner corona and near-Sun solar wind. A semi-kinetic model for reduced velocity distributions is presented, yielding kinetic results for heavy ions in the solar corona. It is concluded that a self-consistent treatment of particle distributions and wave spectra is required, in order to adequately describe coronal physics and to obtain agreement with observations.

  16. Fast wave heating of two-ion plasmas in the Princeton large torus through minority cyclotron resonance damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Bernabei, S.; Colestock, P.

    1979-07-01

    Strong minority proton heating is produced in PLT through ion cyclotron resonance damping of fast waves at moderate rf power levels. In addition to demonstrating good proton confinement, the proton energy distribution is consistent with Fokker--Planck theory which provides the prescription for extrapolation of this heating regime to higher rf power levels

  17. Nonlinear parametric phenomena in plasma during radio frequency heating in the ion cyclotron frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, K.N.

    1996-01-01

    Parametric phenomena in plasma which occur due to varying electric fields with the ion cyclotron frequency are reviewed. Beam-like lower hybrid instability emerges in strong pumping fields provided that the transverse relative velocity of particles is larger than the ion thermal speed (υ Ti ). The resulting turbulence and the following numerous manifestations observed experimentally are addressed. The turbulence may prove important for experiments aimed at plasma production or radio frequency (RF) cleaning of metallic surfaces of vacuum chambers in stellarators, tokamaks and helicon devices. In contrast, for a weak field (U Ti ) the kinetic parametric instabilities of ion cyclotron oscillations arise due to electrons. The issues of the turbulence, mathematical modelling, its role in turbulent heating observed on the torsatron Uragan-3M, decay instabilities associated with ion cyclotron oscillations and the triggering of ion quasimodes are considered. (author)

  18. Ion temperature measurements of turbulently heated TRIAM-1 plasmas by the Doppler-broadening of visible lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Toi, K; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-07-01

    The ion temperature of the turbulently heated TRIAM-1 plasma is obtained from the Doppler-broadening of visible lines. The radial profiles of the volume emission of visible lines are measured beforehand to examine whether the volume emissions are localized at a specified position of the minor cross-section of the plasma or not. The ion temperature of the specified position is determined from these profiles. The time behaviour of thus obtained Doppler ion temperature shows a good agreement with that of the one derived from the Neutral Energy Analyzer.

  19. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-01-01

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10 12 cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Ion cyclotron resonant heating 2 x 1700 loop antenna for the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksby, C.A.; Ferguson, S.W.; Molvik, A.W.; Barter, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanical design and improvements that have taken place on the loop type ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas that are located in the center cell region of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

  2. Relation between heat of vaporization, ion transport, molar volume, and cation-anion binding energy for ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg

    2009-09-10

    A number of correlations between heat of vaporization (H(vap)), cation-anion binding energy (E(+/-)), molar volume (V(m)), self-diffusion coefficient (D), and ionic conductivity for 29 ionic liquids have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that employed accurate and validated many-body polarizable force fields. A significant correlation between D and H(vap) has been found, while the best correlation was found for -log(DV(m)) vs H(vap) + 0.28E(+/-). A combination of enthalpy of vaporization and a fraction of the cation-anion binding energy was suggested as a measure of the effective cohesive energy for ionic liquids. A deviation of some ILs from the reported master curve is explained based upon ion packing and proposed diffusion pathways. No general correlations were found between the ion diffusion coefficient and molecular volume or the diffusion coefficient and cation/anion binding energy.

  3. Numerical analyses on optimizing a heat pipe thermal management system for lithium-ion batteries during fast charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yonghuang; Saw, Lip Huat; Shi, Yixiang; Tay, Andrew A.O.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal management is crucial for the operation of electric vehicles because lithium ion batteries are vulnerable to excessive heat generation during fast charging or other severe scenarios. In this work, an optimized heat pipe thermal management system (HPTMS) is proposed for fast charging lithium ion battery cell/pack. A numerical model is developed and comprehensively validated with experimental results. This model is then employed to investigate the thermal performance of the HPTMS under steady state and transient conditions. It is found that a cylinder vortex generator placed in front of the heat pipe condensers in the coolant stream improves the temperature uniformity. The uses of cooper heat spreaders and cooling fins greatly improve the performance of the thermal management system. Experiments and transient simulations of heat pipe thermal management system integrated with batteries prove that the improved HPTMS is capable for thermal management of batteries during fast charging. The air-cooled HPTMS is infeasible for thermal management of batteries during fast charging at the pack level due to the limitation of low specific heat capacity. - Highlights: • We develop a numerical model for optimizing a heat pipe thermal management system for fast charging batteries. • The numerical model is comprehensively validated with experimental data. • A cylinder vortex generator is placed at the inlet of the cooling stream to improve the temperature uniformity. • We validate the effectiveness of the optimized system with integration of prismatic batteries

  4. Modeling of intense pulsed ion beam heated masked targets for extreme materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, John J.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams locally heat materials and deliver dense electronic excitations that can induce material modifications and phase transitions. Material properties can potentially be stabilized by rapid quenching. Pulsed ion beams with pulse lengths of order ns have recently become available for materials processing. Here, we optimize mask geometries for local modification of materials by intense ion pulses. The goal is to rapidly excite targets volumetrically to the point where a phase transition or local lattice reconstruction is induced followed by rapid cooling that stabilizes desired material's properties fast enough before the target is altered or damaged by, e.g., hydrodynamic expansion. By using a mask, the longitudinal dimension can be large compared to the transverse dimension, allowing the possibility of rapid transverse cooling. We performed HYDRA simulations that calculate peak temperatures for a series of excitation conditions and cooling rates of silicon targets with micro-structured masks and compare these to a simple analytical model. The model gives scaling laws that can guide the design of targets over a wide range of pulsed ion beam parameters.

  5. Influence of aging on the heat and gas emissions from commercial lithium ion cells in case of thermal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lammer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A method for thermal ramp experiments on cylindrical 18650 Li-ion cells has been established. The method was applied on pristine cells as well as on devices aged by cyclisation or by storage at elevated temperature respectively. The tested cells comprise three types of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cells for either high power or high energy applications. The heat flux to and from the cell was investigated. Degradation and exothermic breakdown released large amounts of heat and gas. The total gas and heat emission from cycled cells was significantly larger than emission from cells aged by storage. After aging, the low energy cell ICR18650HE4 did not transgress into thermal runaway. Gas composition changed mainly in the early stage of the experiment. The composition of the initial gas release changed from predominantly CO2 towards hydrocarbons. The thermal runaway emitted for all tests a comparable mixture of H2, CO and CO2.

  6. Dynamics of fast ions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.

    1994-01-01

    Fast ions play a prominent role in the heating of tokamak plasmas by, e.g. neutral-beam injection, ion-cyclotron-resonance heating, and alpha-particle heating. In this thesis, a number of physical and mathematical problems concerning the dynamics of fast ions in tokamaks are addressed. First, the motion under adiabatic perturbations is studied. The frequencies of instabilities excited in tokamaks sometimes vary slowly with time. The existence of an adiabatic invariant of particle motion in such circumstances is shown to lead to a rapid convection of particles in the radial direction. Generalized adiabatic invariants are constructed for systems where the slowly varying parameter is subjected to small, but rapidly varying, fluctuations. Second, the onset of stochastic motion under resonant perturbations is considered. It is shown that the finite width of fast-ion drift orbits significantly affects the threshold for stochastic motion caused by magnetic field ripple or ion-cyclotron-resonance heating. Finite-orbit-width effects are also shown to reduce the strength of resonant interaction between alpha particles and internal kink modes. Third, the diffusive motion in the stochastic regime is analysed mathematically. Monte Carlo operators for the motion on long time-scales are constructed, and the validity of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient is examined. Finally, the effects of close ion collisions are investigated. It is demonstrated that close encounters with fast ions produce a high-energy tail in the distribution functions of impurity ions, and that close collisions between fusion-generated alpha particles give rise to a population of such particles with energies extending up to twice the birth energy. 44 refs

  7. Prompt loss of beam ions in KSTAR plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Young Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For a toroidal plasma facility to realize fusion energy, researching the transport of fast ions is important not only due to its close relation to the heating and current drive efficiencies but also to determine the heat load on the plasma-facing components. We present a theoretical analysis and orbit simulation for the origin of lost fast-ions during neutral beam injection (NBI heating in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR device. We adopted a two-dimensional phase diagram of the toroidal momentum and magnetic moment and describe detectable momentums at the fast-ion loss detector (FILD position as a quadratic line. This simple method was used to model birth ions deposited by NBI and drawn as points in the momentum phase space. A Lorentz orbit code was used to calculate the fast-ion orbits and present the prompt loss characteristics of the KSTAR NBI. The scrape-off layer deposition of fast ions produces a significant prompt loss, and the model and experimental results closely agreed on the pitch-angle range of the NBI prompt loss. Our approach can provide wall load information from the fast ion loss.

  8. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Technological issues of ion cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.Q.; Fortgang, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    With the recent promising results of plasma heating using electromagnetic waves (EM waves) in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak the feasibility of employing ICRF heating to a reactor-like magnetic confinement device is increasing. The high power ICRF experiments funded on JET (Joint European Torus in England) and JT-60 (in Japan) will have rf source power in the range of 10-30 MW. The time scale for the duration of the RF pulse will range from seconds up to steady-state. The development of new RF components that can transmit and launch such high power, long pulse length, EM waves in a plasma environment is a major technological task. In general, the technology issues may be divided into two categories. The first category concerns the region where the plasma comes in contact with the wave launchers. The problems here are dominated by plasmamaterial interaction, heat deposition by the plasma onto the wave launcher, and erosion of the launcher material. It is necessary to minimize the heat deposition from the plasma, the losses of the RF wave energy in the structure, and to prevent sputtering of the antenna components. A solution involves a combined design using special materials and optimal shaping of the Faraday shield (the electrostatic shields which can be used both for an EM wave polarization adjustment and as a particle shield for the launcher). Recent studies by PPPL and McDonnell Douglas Corp. on the Faraday shield designs will be discussed. The second important area where technology development will be necessary is the transmission of high power RF waves through a gas/vacuum interface region. In the past, the vacuum feedthrough has been the bottle neck which prevented high power operation of the PLT antenna

  10. Effect of heating on the behaviors of hydrogen in C-TiC films with auger electron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Y.; Wang, L.W.; Huang, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    C-TiC films with a content of 75% TiC were prepared with magnetron sputtering deposition followed by Ar + ion bombardment. Effect of heating on the behaviors of hydrogen in C-TiC films before and after heating was studied with Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analyses. SIMS depth profiles of hydrogen after H + ion implantation and thermal treatment show different hydrogen concentrations in C-TiC coatings and stainless steel. SIMS measurements show the existence of TiH, TiH 2 , CH 3 , CH 4 , C 2 H 2 bonds in the films after H + ion irradiation and the changes in the Ti LMM, Ti LMV and C KLL Auger line shape reveal that they have a good hydrogen retention ability after heating up to the temperature 393 K. All the results show that C-TiC coatings can be used as a hydrogen retainer or hydrogen permeable barrier on stainless steel to protect it from hydrogen brittleness

  11. Modification of boundary plasma behavior by Ion Bernstein Wave heating on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guoshen

    2002-01-01

    Cooperated with Fusion Research Center, the University of Texas at Austin, U.S.A. The boundary plasma behavior during Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) heating was investigated using Langmuir probe arrays on HT-7 tokamak. The particle confinement improvement of over a factor of 2 was observed in 30 MHz IBW heated plasma with RF power > 120 kW. The strong de-correlation effect of fluctuations resulted in that the turbulent particle flux dropped more than an order of magnitude. In IBW heated plasma, an additional inward E r and associated poloidal ExB flows were produced, which could account for the additional poloidal velocity in the electron diamagnetic direction in the scrape-of layer (SOL). Three-wave nonlinear phase coupling increased evidently and low frequency fluctuations (about 5 kHz) were generated, which dominated the boundary turbulence during IBW heating. The 5/2-D resonant layer was located in the plasma edge region, which is found to be the mechanism underlying these phenomena. (author)

  12. Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades

  13. Poly-crystallinity of indium-tin-oxide films improved by using simultaneous ion beam and heat treatment of the plastic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Phil Kook; Kim, Tae Hyung; Choi, Suk Won; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2012-01-01

    The combined treatment effects of an ion beam with directionality and heat of a low temperature on a plastic substrate was investigated as a method to increase the electrical conductivity of indium tinoxide (ITO) films deposited on plastic substrate surfaces at low temperatures. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface treatment by using an ion beam at low temperature (120 .deg. C), which can be applied to plastic substrates, improves the conductivity of ITO films. X-ray diffraction indicates that ITO films deposited on PET surfaces treated simultaneously by using an ion beam and heat of a low temperature have an almost polycrystalline structure even though they have small amorphous party on. As a supplementary measurement, the contact angle showed that the polycrystalline structure was due to a self-assembly effect at the PET surfaces. Consequently, the electrical conductivity of an ITO film deposited by using the proposed technique is three times higher than that of an ITO film treated only with heat of low temperature due to the improved polycrystalline structure.

  14. Poly-crystallinity of indium-tin-oxide films improved by using simultaneous ion beam and heat treatment of the plastic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Phil Kook; Kim, Taehyung; Choi, Suk-Won; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2012-08-01

    The combined treatment effects of an ion beam with directionality and heat of a low temperature on a plastic substrate was investigated as a method to increase the electrical conductivity of indiumtin-oxide (ITO) films deposited on plastic substrate surfaces at low temperatures. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface treatment by using an ion beam at low temperature (120 °C), which can be applied to plastic substrates, improves the conductivity of ITO films. X-ray diffraction indicates that ITO films deposited on PET surfaces treated simultaneously by using an ion beam and heat of a low temperature have an almost polycrystalline structure even though they have small amorphous party on. As a supplementary measurement, the contact angle showed that the polycrystalline structure was due to a self-assembly effect at the PET surfaces. Consequently, the electrical conductivity of an ITO film deposited by using the proposed technique is three times higher than that of an ITO film treated only with heat of low temperature due to the improved polycrystalline structure.

  15. Measurements of energetic helium-3 minority distributions during ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating in the Princeton large torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammett, G.W.; Kaita, R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating experiments were performed with a 3 He minority ion species in a 4 He majority plasma in the Princeton Large Torus. The energetic 3 He ion 'tail' was measured directly with a charge exchange neutral analyser for the first time. Comparisons with bounce averaged quasi-linear calculations suggest a modestly peaked radiofrequency power deposition profile. The double charge exchange process 3 He ++ + 4 He o -> 3 He o + 4 He ++ demonstrated in these measurements may be useful as part of an alpha particle diagnostic in a fusion reactor experiment. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs

  16. RF-heating of plasma in the frequency domain of the ion cyclotron harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahnekamp, H.G.; Stampa, A.; Tuczek, H.; Laeuter, R.; Wulf, H.O.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on rf-heating of plasmas in the frequency domain of the ion cyclotron harmonics are reported. The rf-power is coupled to the magneto-acoustic wave for frequencies between ωsub(ci) and 5ωsub(ci). The measurements indicate that the damping of the pump wave is mainly due to the excitation of turbulence, whereas direct resonance at 2ωsub(ci) seems to be of minor importance

  17. Graphene-enhanced hybrid phase change materials for thermal management of Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Pradyumna; Legedza, Stanislav; Dhar, Aditya; Salgado, Ruben; Renteria, Jacqueline; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2014-02-01

    Li-ion batteries are crucial components for progress in mobile communications and transport technologies. However, Li-ion batteries suffer from strong self-heating, which limits their life-time and creates reliability and environmental problems. Here we show that thermal management and the reliability of Li-ion batteries can be drastically improved using hybrid phase change material with graphene fillers. Conventional thermal management of batteries relies on the latent heat stored in the phase change material as its phase changes over a small temperature range, thereby reducing the temperature rise inside the battery. Incorporation of graphene to the hydrocarbon-based phase change material allows one to increase its thermal conductivity by more than two orders of magnitude while preserving its latent heat storage ability. A combination of the sensible and latent heat storage together with the improved heat conduction outside of the battery pack leads to a significant decrease in the temperature rise inside a typical Li-ion battery pack. The described combined heat storage-heat conduction approach can lead to a transformative change in thermal management of Li-ion and other types of batteries.

  18. Comparison between off-resonance and electron Bernstein waves heating regime in a microwave discharge ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G.; Di Giugno, R.; Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Lanaia, D.; Ciavola, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F. [Universita di Messina, Ctr. da Papardo-Sperone, 98100 Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); IET-Institute of Energy Technology, LEC-Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-02-15

    A microwave discharge ion source (MDIS) operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of INFN, Catania has been used to compare the traditional electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating with an innovative mechanisms of plasma ignition based on the electrostatic Bernstein waves (EBW). EBW are obtained via the inner plasma electromagnetic-to-electrostatic wave conversion and they are absorbed by the plasma at cyclotron resonance harmonics. The heating of plasma by means of EBW at particular frequencies enabled us to reach densities much larger than the cutoff ones. Evidences of EBW generation and absorption together with X-ray emissions due to high energy electrons will be shown. A characterization of the discharge heating process in MDISs as a generalization of the ECR heating mechanism by means of ray tracing will be shown in order to highlight the fundamental physical differences between ECR and EBW heating.

  19. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2003-01-01

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows

  20. Enhanced O2 Loss at Mars Due to an Ambipolar Electric Field from Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; Mcenulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (T sub e) in Mars dayside ionosphere above approx. 180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to approx. 500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher T(sub e) (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher T(sub e) may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced T(sub e) in Mars ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (e) of several k(sub b)T(sub e), which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  1. Slow wave antenna coupling to ion Bernstein waves for plasma heating in ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, W.N-C.; Amano, T.; Ando, R.; Fukuyama, A.; Watari, T.

    1984-10-01

    The coupling of ICRF power from a slow wave antenna to a plasma with finite temperature is examined theoretically and compared to an independent computer calculation. It is shown that such antennas can be highly efficient in trasferring most of the antenna power directly to ion Bernstein waves, with only a very small fraction going into fast waves. The potentiality of this coupling scheme for plasma heating in ICRF is briefly discussed. (author)

  2. Fast-ion stabilization of tokamak plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Siena, A.; Görler, T.; Doerk, H.; Poli, E.; Bilato, R.

    2018-05-01

    A significant reduction of the turbulence-induced anomalous heat transport has been observed in recent studies of magnetically confined plasmas in the presence of a significant fast-ion fractions. Therefore, the control of fast-ion populations with external heating might open the way to more optimistic scenarios for future fusion devices. However, little is known about the parameter range of relevance of these fast-ion effects which are often only highlighted in correlation with substantial electromagnetic fluctuations. Here, a significant fast ion induced stabilization is also found in both linear and nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic simulations which cannot be explained with the conventional assumptions based on pressure profile and dilution effects. Strong wave-fast particle resonant interactions are observed for realistic parameters where the fast particle trace approximation clearly failed and explained with the help of a reduced Vlasov model. In contrast to previous interpretations, fast particles can actively modify the Poisson field equation—even at low fast particle densities where dilution tends to be negligible and at relatively high temperatures, i.e. T  <  30T e . Further key parameters controlling the role of the fast ions are identified in the following and various ways of further optimizing their beneficial impact are explored. Finally, possible extensions into the electromagnetic regime are briefly discussed and the relevance of these findings for ITER standard scenarios is highlighted.

  3. Main-ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements based on scattering of electron cyclotron heating waves in ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Stejner; Rasmussen, Jesper; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate measurements of spectra of O-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) waves scattered collectively from microscopic plasma fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade discharges with an ITER-like ECRH scenario. The measured spectra are shown to allow determination of the main ion...... temperature and plasma rotation velocity. This demonstrates that ECRH systems can be exploited for diagnostic purposes alongside their primary heating purpose in a reactor relevant scenario....

  4. Accelerating action of stresses on crystallization kinetics in silicon ion-implanted layers during pulsed heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the effect of stressed in ion-implanted layers on kinetics of amorphous phase transformations is performed. The suggested model of accounting stresses including concentration ones is based on the locality of action of interstitial addition atoms and on general structural inhomogeneity of amorphous semiconductor leading to the formation of areas of the facilitated phase transition. Accounting of effect of energy variation of silicon atoms interaction on probability of displacement events and atoms building in lattice points or atomic bonds disintegration allows one to trace the accelerating action of introduced by ion implantation stresses on the kinetics of layer crystallization during pulsed heating

  5. Experimental investigation on performance of lithium-ion battery thermal management system using flat plate loop heat pipe for electric vehicle application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putra, Nandy; Ariantara, Bambang; Pamungkas, Rangga Aji

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flat plate loop heat pipe (FPLHP) is studied in the thermal management system for electric vehicle. • Distilled water, alcohol, and acetone on thermal performances of FPLHP were tested. • The FPLHP can start up at fairly low heat load. • Temperature overshoot phenomena were observed during the start-up period. - Abstract: The development of electric vehicle batteries has resulted in very high energy density lithium-ion batteries. However, this growth is accompanied by the risk of thermal runaway, which can cause serious accidents. Heat pipes are heat exchangers that are suitable to be applied in electric vehicle battery thermal management for their lightweight and compact size, and they do not require external power supply. This study examined experimentally a flat plate loop heat pipe (FPLHP) performance as a heat exchanger in the thermal management system of the lithium-ion battery for electric vehicle application. The heat generation of the battery was simulated using a cartridge heater. Stainless steel screen mesh was used as the capillary wick. Distilled water, alcohol, and acetone were used as working fluids with a filling ratio of 60%. It was found that acetone gave the best performance that produces a thermal resistance of 0.22 W/°C with 50 °C evaporator temperature at heat flux load of 1.61 W/cm"2.

  6. Investigation of the role of electron cyclotron resonance heating and magnetic configuration on the suprathermal ion population in the stellarator TJ-II using a luminescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.; Jiménez-Rey, D.; Tribaldos, V.

    2018-02-01

    Numerous observation exist of a population of high energetic ions with energies well above the corresponding thermal values in plasmas generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in TJ-II stellarator and in other magnetically confined plasmas devices. In this work we study the impact of ECR heating different conditions (positions and powers) on fast ions escaping from plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator. For this study, an ion luminescent probe operated in counting mode is used to measure the energy distribution of suprathermal ions, in the range from 1 to 30 keV. It is observed that some suprathermal ions characteristics (such as temperature, particle and energy fluxes) are related directly with the gyrotron power and focus position of the heating beam in the plasma. Moreover, it is found that suprathermal ion characteristics vary during a magnetic configuration scan (performed along a single discharge). By investigating the suprathermal ions escaping from plasmas generated using two gyrotrons, one with fixed power and the other modulated (on/off) at low frequency (10 Hz), the de-confinement time of the suprathermal ions can be measured, which is of the order of a few milliseconds (power balance is used to understand the de-confinement times in terms of the interaction of suprathermal ions and plasma components. This model also can be used to interpret experimental results of energy loss due to suprathermal ions. Finally, observations of increases (peaks) in the population of escaping suprathermal ions, which are well localized at discrete energies, is documented, these peaks being observed in the energy distributions along a discharge.

  7. Heat storage in forest biomass significantly improves energy balance closure particularly during stable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, A.; Mölder, M.; Lagergren, F.

    2009-08-01

    Temperature measurements in trunks and branches in a mature ca. 100 years-old mixed pine and spruce forest in central Sweden were used to estimate the heat storage in the tree biomass. The estimated heat flux in the sample trees and data on biomass distributions were used to scale up to stand level biomass heat fluxes. The rate of change of sensible and latent heat storage in the air layer below the level of the flux measurements was estimated from air temperature and humidity profile measurements and soil heat flux was estimated from heat flux plates and soil temperature measurements. The fluxes of sensible and latent heat from the forest were measured with an eddy covariance system in a tower. The analysis was made for a two-month period in summer of 1995. The tree biomass heat flux was the largest of the estimated storage components and varied between 40 and -35 W m-2 on summer days with nice weather. Averaged over two months the diurnal maximum of total heat storage was 45 W m-2 and the minimum was -35 W m-2. The soil heat flux and the sensible heat storage in air were out of phase with the biomass flux and they reached maximum values that were about 75% of the maximum of the tree biomass heat storage. The energy balance closure improved significantly when the total heat storage was added to the turbulent fluxes. The slope of a regression line with sum of fluxes and storage as independent and net radiation as dependent variable, increased from 0.86 to 0.95 for half-hourly data and the scatter was also reduced. The most significant finding was, however, that during nights with strongly stable conditions when the sensible heat flux dropped to nearly zero, the total storage matched the net radiation nearly perfectly. Another interesting result was that the mean energy imbalance started to increase when the Richardson number became more negative than ca. -0.1. In fact, the largest energy deficit occurred at maximum instability. Our conclusion is that eddy

  8. Mechanistic elucidation of thermal runaway in potassium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ryan A.; Varma, Arvind; Pol, Vilas G.

    2018-01-01

    For the first time, thermal runaway of charged graphite anodes for K-ion batteries is investigated, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to probe the exothermic degradation reactions. Investigated parameters such as state of charge, cycle number, surface area, and binder demonstrate strong influences on the DSC profiles. Thermal runaway initiates at 100 °C owing to KxC8 - electrolyte reactions, but the K-ion graphite anode evolves significantly less heat as compared to the analogous Li-ion system (395 J g-1 vs. 1048 J g-1). The large volumetric expansion of graphite during potassiation cracks the SEI layer, enabling contact and reaction of KC8 - electrolyte, which diminishes with cycle number due to continuous SEI growth. High surface area graphite decreases the total heat generation, owing to thermal stability of the K-ion SEI layer. These findings illustrate the dynamic nature of K-ion thermal runaway and its many contrasts with the Li-ion graphite system, permitting possible engineering solutions for safer batteries.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation study of ICRF minority heating in the large helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Okada, H.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code is developed for ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating in helical systems, which takes into account finite beta effects, complicated orbits of high energetic particles, Coulomb collisions and interactions between particles and the applied waves. The code is used to investigate ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The configuration of the magnetic fields changes significantly due to finite beta effects in the LHD. The resonance layer position is found to be crucial to the heating efficiency as the plasma beta increases. When the strength of the resonance magnetic field is set to the value at the magnetic axis, a higher heat efficiency is obtained and no clear difference of the heat efficiency due to finite beta effects is found in the high ICRF wave power region. However, the radial profile of the power transferred to majority ions and electrons from minority ions changes because of the deformation of the trapped particle due to the finite beta effects. The heat efficiency is improved if the radial electric field, E r , is positive (E r is directed radially outward) and it is also improved by supplying 3 He minority ions rather than proton minority ions. (author). 26 refs, 11 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Observation of bulk-ion heating in a tokamak plasma by application of positive and negative current pulses in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K; Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Mitarai, O; Kawai, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-09-01

    A positive of negative current pulse induced by a pulsed toroidal electric field much higher than the Dreicer field increases the bulk-ion temperature of the plasma centre two to three times, without macroscopic plasma destruction. The decay time of the raised ion temperature agrees well with the prediction from neoclassical transport theory. The magnitude of the positive current pulse is limited by violent current disruption, and that of the negative current by a lack of MHD equilibrium which is due to a marked reduction of the total plasma current. The relevant current-driven instabilities in the turbulent heating of a tokamak plasma, skin heating and inward transfer of the energy deposition in the skin layer are briefly discussed.

  11. Parametric variations of ion transport in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, S.D.; Ernst, D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is divided into three roughly independent sections. The first is a historical review of the twenty year history of experimental ion heat transport measurements from many tokamaks. The second is a study of ion heat transport in Ohmic TFTR plasmas which shows that χi ∼ χe ∼ 15χi neo . Thus, ion heat transport is demonstrated to be strongly anomalous even the absence of auxiliary heating. The third section describes the variation of χi with local ion temperature in TFTR during auxiliary heating, with emphasis on characterizing the differecens between transport in the L-mode and supershot regimes. The results are consistent with the conjecture that improved ion energy confinement in supershot plasmas is caused by a high ratio of T 1 /T e

  12. Adomian decomposition method for Hall and ion-slip effects on mixed convection flow of a chemically reacting Newtonian fluid between parallel plates with heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch.Ram Reddy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the heat and mass transfer characteristics on mixed convective fully developed flow in an electrically conducting Newtonian fluid between vertical parallel plates. The chemical reaction, heat generation, Hall and ion-slip effects are taken into consideration. By using similarity transformations the nonlinear governing equations are reduced into dimensionless form and hence solved using Adomian decomposition method (ADM. The influence of magnetic parameter, Hall parameter, ion-slip parameter, chemical reaction parameter, and heat generation/absorption parameter on non-dimensional velocities, temperature and concentration profiles are exhibited graphically. In addition, the numerical data for skin friction, heat and mass transfer rates are shown in tabular form.

  13. Energy measurement of fast ions trapped in the toroidal magnetic field ripple of Tore Supra during ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Grisolia, C.; Hutter, T.; Mayaux, G.; Martin, G.; Saoutic, B.; Vartanian, S.

    1995-01-01

    Direct losses of ions trapped in the toroidal field ripple of Tore Supra using two techniques were made. The first (DRIPPLE I) correlates the ion loss current measured by an electric probe with the ion loss power measured by a calorimeter. As the calorimeter integrates over all particle energies and time, it yields only the averaged lost ion energy. The second technique (DRIPPLE II), still under development, is a Faraday cup positioned and filtered so as to select ions by their Larmor radius. The currents measured are small (1-100 nA), and improvements in instrumentation are needed to take full advantage of the data, but the preliminary results are still useful. During ICRH (hydrogen minority regime, resonance on axis) a direct correlation between the lost ion mean energy and the density of hydrogen was seen. The energy increased when the hydrogen minority density decreased. Moreover, the line averaged density and the lower hybrid heating (LH) had also an effect on fast ion losses. (authors). 3 refs., 7 figs

  14. Foundations of ICRF heating--A historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Tom Stix has made many major contributions to the development of understanding of a wide array of rf heating and diagnostics methods, in experiment and theory. In recognition of his profound influence on ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating research, this paper is focused on two major building blocks contributed by him which served to help guide and quantify the research toward establishing ICRF heating as a viable technique for the reactor regime: (1) the formalism for quantitative evaluation of antenna loading contained in his 1962 text book and (2) his Fokker-Planck analysis for heating of ions and especially minority species ions in his 1975 Nuclear Fusion paper. Importantly, his work from the mid 1950s to the mid 1970s from which these two building blocks derive, provided a solid basis for the rapid developing ion cyclotron heating research in the 1970s and helped to guide that research to definitive demonstration of the viability of the minority ion heating regime as a reactor heating method by the end of the decade

  15. Power deposition for ion cyclotron heating in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellsten, T.; Villard, L.

    1988-01-01

    The power deposition profiles during minority ion cyclotron heating are analysed in large tokamaks by using the global, toroidal wave code LION. For tokamaks with large aspect ratio and with circular cross-section, the wave is focused on the magnetic axis and can be absorbed there by cyclotron absorption when the cyclotron resonance passes through the magnetic axis. The power deposition profile is then essentially determined by the Doppler broadening of the ion cyclotron resonance. For equilibria either non-circular or with a small aspect ratio the power deposition profile depends also on the strength of the damping. In this case the power deposition profile can be expressed as a sum of two power deposition profiles. One is related to the power absorbed in a single pass, and its shape is similar to that obtained for large aspect ratio and circular cross-section. The other profile is obtained by calculating the power deposition in the limit of weak damping, in which case the wave electric field is almost constant along the cyclotron resonance layer. A heuristic formula for the power deposition is given. The formula includes a number of calibration curves and functions which has been calculated with the LION code for JET relevant equilibria. The formula enables calculation of the power deposition profile in a simple way when the launched wave spectrum and damping coefficients are known. (author). 7 refs, 11 figs

  16. Two distinct groups within the Bacillus subtilis group display significantly different spore heat resistance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Zwietering, Marcel H; Kuipers, Oscar P; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-02-01

    The survival of bacterial spores after heat treatment and the subsequent germination and outgrowth in a food product can lead to spoilage of the food product and economical losses. Prediction of time-temperature conditions that lead to sufficient inactivation requires access to detailed spore thermal inactivation kinetics of relevant model strains. In this study, the thermal inactivation kinetics of spores of fourteen strains belonging to the Bacillus subtilis group were determined in detail, using both batch heating in capillary tubes and continuous flow heating in a micro heater. The inactivation data were fitted using a log linear model. Based on the spore heat resistance data, two distinct groups (p subtilis group could be identified. One group of strains had spores with an average D120 °C of 0.33 s, while the spores of the other group displayed significantly higher heat resistances, with an average D120 °C of 45.7 s. When comparing spore inactivation data obtained using batch- and continuous flow heating, the z-values were significantly different, hence extrapolation from one system to the other was not justified. This study clearly shows that heat resistances of spores from different strains in the B. subtilis group can vary greatly. Strains can be separated into two groups, to which different spore heat inactivation kinetics apply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Grids heat loading of an ion source in two-stage acceleration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yoshikazu; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Ohga, Tokumichi

    1978-05-01

    Heat loading of the extraction grids, which is one of the critical problems limiting the beam pulse duration at high power level, has been investigated experimentally, with an ion source in a two-stage acceleration system of four multi-aperture grids. The loading of each grid depends largely on extraction current and grid gap pressures; it decreases with improvement of the beam optics and with decrease of the pressures. In optimum operating modes, its level is typically less than -- 2% of the total beam power or -- 200 W/cm 2 at beam energies of 50 - 70 kV. (auth.)

  18. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly IBW-generated sheared flows

  19. Response of thermal ions to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves generated by 10 - 50 keV protons in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere will interact with the ambient low-energy ions also found in this region. We examine H(+) and He(+) distribution functions from approx. equals 1 to 160 eV using the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment instrument on AMPTE/CCE to investigate the thermal ion response to the waves. A total of 48 intervals were chosen on the basis of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave activity: 24 with prevalent EMIC waves and 24 with no EMIC waves observed on the orbit. There is a close correlation between EMIC waves and perpendicular heated ion distributions. For protons the perpendicular temperature increase is modest, about 5 eV, and is always observed at 90 deg pitch angles. This is consistent with a nonresonant interaction near the equator. By contrast, He(+) temperatures during EMIC wave events averaged 35 eV and sometimes exceeded 100 eV, indicating stronger interaction with the waves. Furthermore, heated He(+) ions have X-type distributions with maximum fluxes occurring at pitch angles intermediate between field-aligned and perpendicular directions. The X-type He(+) distributions are consistent with a gyroresonant interaction off the equator. The concentration of He(+) relative to H(+) is found to correlate with EMIC wave activity, but it is suggested that the preferential heating of He(+) accounts for the apparent increase in relative He(+) concentration by increasing the proportion of He(+) detected by the ion instrument.

  20. Dynamics of a reconnection-driven runaway ion tail in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. K., E-mail: jkanders@wisc.edu; Kim, J.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Sears, S. H. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    While reconnection-driven ion heating is common in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, the underlying mechanisms for converting magnetic to kinetic energy remain not fully understood. Reversed field pinch discharges are often characterized by rapid ion heating during impulsive reconnection, generating an ion distribution with an enhanced bulk temperature, mainly perpendicular to magnetic field. In the Madison Symmetric Torus, a subset of discharges with the strongest reconnection events develop a very anisotropic, high energy tail parallel to magnetic field in addition to bulk perpendicular heating, which produces a fusion neutron flux orders of magnitude higher than that expected from a Maxwellian distribution. Here, we demonstrate that two factors in addition to a perpendicular bulk heating mechanism must be considered to explain this distribution. First, ion runaway can occur in the strong parallel-to-B electric field induced by a rapid equilibrium change triggered by reconnection-based relaxation; this effect is particularly strong on perpendicularly heated ions which experience a reduced frictional drag relative to bulk ions. Second, the confinement of ions varies dramatically as a function of velocity. Whereas thermal ions are governed by stochastic diffusion along tearing-altered field lines (and radial diffusion increases with parallel speed), sufficiently energetic ions are well confined, only weakly affected by a stochastic magnetic field. High energy ions traveling mainly in the direction of toroidal plasma current are nearly classically confined, while counter-propagating ions experience an intermediate confinement, greater than that of thermal ions but significantly less than classical expectations. The details of ion confinement tend to reinforce the asymmetric drive of the parallel electric field, resulting in a very asymmetric, anisotropic distribution.

  1. Observation of the low-frequency ion acoustic instability in the turbulently heated TRIAM-1 tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitarai, O; Watanabe, T; Nakamura, Y; Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Kawai, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-12-01

    Density fluctuations in the frequency range of several MHz are observed in the turbulently heated TRIAM-1 tokamak plasma by means of a 4 mm microwave scattering method. It is found from the measurement of the dispersion relation that this instability is considered to be the low-frequency ion acoustic instability propagating nearly perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field.

  2. Analytical models for predicting the ion velocity distributions in JET in the presence of ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Lisak, M.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the work performed within the contract JT4/9008, the aim of which is to derive analytical models for ion velocity distributions resulting from ICRF heating on JET. The work has been performed over a two-year-period ending in August 1986 and has involved a total effort of 2.4 man years. (author)

  3. Effect of heavy ion irradiation and α+β phase heat treatment on oxide of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@barc.gov.in [Quality Assurance Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Mukherjee, P.; Gayathri, N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, 700064 (India); Kain, V.; Kiran Kumar, M.; Srivastava, D. [Material Science Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Mukherjee, D. [Quality Assurance Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Dey, G.K. [Material Science Division, BARC, Mumbai, 400085 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Effect of heavy-ion irradiation on the crystalline phase transformation of oxide of Zr-2.5Nb alloys has been studied. The steam-autoclaved oxide of pressure tube is irradiated with 306 KeV Ar{sup +9} ions at a dose of 3 × 10{sup 19} Ar{sup +9}/m{sup 2}. The damage profile has been estimated using “Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter” computer program. The variation of the crystal structure along the depth of the irradiated oxide have been characterized non-destructively by Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction technique and compared with unirradiated-oxide. The effect of different base metal microstructures on the characteristic of oxide has also been studied. Base metal microstructure as well as the cross-sectional oxide have been characterized using transmission electron microscope. Heavy ion irradiation can significantly alter the distribution of phases in the oxide of the alloy. The difference in chemical state of alloying element has also been found between unirradiated-oxide with that of irradiated-oxide using X-ray photo electron spectroscopy. Chemical state of Nb in steam autoclaved oxide is also altered when the base metal is α + β heat treated.

  4. Heat shock protein 72: release and biological significance during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Martin; Fortes, Matthew Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    The cumulative stressors of exercise manifest themselves at a cellular level by threatening the protein homeostasis of the cell. In these conditions, Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) are synthesised to chaperone mis-folded and denatured proteins. As such, the intracellular HSP response is thought to aid cell survival in the face of otherwise lethal cellular stress. Recently, the inducible isoform of the 70 Kda heat shock protein family, Hsp72 has been detected in the extracellular environment. Furthermore, the release of this protein into the circulation has been shown to occur in response to a range of exercise bouts. The present review summarises the current research on the exercise Hsp72 response, the possible mediators and mechanisms of extracellular (e)Hsp72 release, and the possible biological significance of this systemic response. In particular, the possible role of eHsp72 in the modulation of immunity during exercise is discussed.

  5. Reversed shear Alfven eigenmode stabilization by localized electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Zeeland, M A; Hyatt, A W; Lohr, J; Petty, C C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608 San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Heidbrink, W W [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Nazikian, R; Solomon, W M; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G J [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); Austin, M E [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Berk, H L [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Holcomb, C T; Makowski, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); McKee, G R [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53726 (United States); Sharapov, S E [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rhodes, T L [University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, 90095 (United States)], E-mail: vanzeeland@fusion.gat.com

    2008-03-15

    Reversed shear Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) activity in DIII-D is stabilized by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) applied near the minimum of the magnetic safety factor (q{sub min}) in neutral beam heated discharges with reversed-magnetic shear. The degree of RSAE stabilization, fast ion density and the volume averaged neutron production (S{sub n}) are highly dependent on ECH deposition location relative to q{sub min}. While discharges with ECH stabilization of RSAEs have higher S{sub n} and more peaked fast ion profiles than discharges with significant RSAE activity, neutron production remains strongly reduced (up to 60% relative to TRANSP predictions assuming classical fast ion transport) even when RSAEs are stabilized.

  6. ICRF heating analysis on ASDEX plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Kimitaka; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Morishita, Takayuki; Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    1988-01-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) waves heating in an ASDEX tokamak are analyzed. The excitation, propagation and absorption are studied by using a global wave code. This analysis is combined with a Fokker-Planck code. The waveform in the plasma, the loading resistance and the reactance of the antenna are calculated for both the minority ion heating and the second harmonic resonance heating. Attention is given to the change of the antenna loading associated with the L/H transition. Optimum conditions for the loading are discussed. In the minority heating case, the tail generation and thermalization are analyzed. Spatial profiles of the tail-ion temperature and the power transferred to the bulk electrons and ions are obtained. Central as well as off-central heating cases are investigated. The effect of the reactive electric field is discussed in connection with rf losses and impurity production. (author)

  7. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  8. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  9. Auroral ion beams and ion acoustic wave generation by fan instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaivads, A

    1996-04-01

    Satellite observations indicate that efficient energy transport among various plasma particles and between plasma waves and plasma particles is taking place in auroral ion beam regions. These observations show that two characteristic wave types are associated with the auroral ion beam regions: electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves with frequencies above hydrogen gyrofrequency, and low frequency waves with frequencies below hydrogen gyrofrequency. We speculate that the low frequency waves can be ion acoustic waves generated through the fan instability. The presence of a cold background ion component is necessary for the onset of this instability. A cold ion component has been directly observed and has been indirectly suggested from observations of solitary wave structures. The wave-particle interaction during the development of the fan instability results in an efficient ion beam heating in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The fan instability development and the ion beam heating is demonstrated in a numerical particle simulation. 23 refs, 16 figs.

  10. High heat flux facility GLADIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuner, H.; Boeswirth, B.; Boscary, J.; McNeely, P.

    2007-01-01

    The new ion beam facility GLADIS started the operation at IPP Garching. The facility is equipped with two individual 1.1 MW power ion sources for testing actively cooled plasma facing components under high heat fluxes. Each ion source generates heat loads between 3 and 55 MW/m 2 with a beam diameter of 70 mm at the target position. These parameters allow effective testing from probes to large components up to 2 m length. The high heat flux allows the target to be installed inclined to the beam and thus increases the heated surface length up to 200 mm for a heat flux of 15 MW/m 2 in the standard operating regime. Thus the facility has the potential capability for testing of full scale ITER divertor targets. Heat load tests on the WENDELSTEIN 7-X pre-series divertor targets have been successfully started. These tests will validate the design and manufacturing for the production of 950 elements

  11. Cumulative effects of using pin fin heat sink and porous metal foam on thermal management of lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadian, Shahabeddin K.; Zhang, Yuwen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D transient thermal analysis of a pouch Li-ion cell has been carried out. • Using pin fin heat sink improves the temperature reduction at low pumping powers. • Using pin fin heat sink enhances the temperature uniformity at low air flow rates. • Porous aluminum foam insertion with pin fins improves temperature reduction. • Porous aluminum foam insertion with pin fins enhances temperature uniformity. - Abstract: Three-dimensional transient thermal analysis of an air-cooled module was carried out to investigate cumulative effects of using pin fin heat sink and porous metal foam on thermal management of a Li-ion (lithium-ion) battery pack. Five different cases were designed as Case 1: flow channel without any pin fin or porous metal foam insertion, Case 2: flow channel with aluminum pin fins, Case 3: flow channel with porous aluminum foam pin fins, Case 4: fully inserted flow channel with porous aluminum foam, and Case 5: fully inserted flow channel with porous aluminum foam and aluminum pin fins. The effects of porous aluminum insertions, pin fin types, air flow inlet temperature, and air flow inlet velocity on the temperature uniformity and maximum temperature inside the battery pack were systematically investigated. The results showed that using pin fin heat sink (Case 2) is appropriate only for low air flow velocities. In addition, the use of porous aluminum pin fins or embedding porous aluminum foam inside the air flow channel (Cases 3 and 4) are not beneficial for thermal management improvement. The combination of aluminum pin fins and porous aluminum foam insertion inside the air flow channel (Case 5) is a proper option that improves both temperature reduction and temperature uniformity inside the battery cell.

  12. Effect of heat stress on the gene expression of ion transporters/channels in the uterus of laying hens during eggshell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Shahab; Dehghani Samani, Amir; Hassanpour, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Heat stress is a problem in laying hens as it decreases egg quality by decreasing eggshell mineralization. Heat stress alters gene expression, hence our aim was to investigate effects of heat stress on gene expression of ion transport elements involving in uterine mineralization (TRPV6, CALB1, ITPR3, SCNN1G, SLC4A4, KCNJ15, SLC4A9, and CLCN2) by real time quantitative PCR. Forty 23-week-old White Leghorn laying hens were housed in two rooms. The control group (n = 20) was maintained at 21-23 °C, and the heat stress group (n = 20) was exposed to 36-38 °C for 8 weeks. All parameters of egg quality including egg weight, surface area, volume, and eggshell weight, thickness, ash weight, and calcium content were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 26.9%, 32.7%, 44.1%, 38.4%, 31.7%, 39.4%, and 11.1%, respectively). Total plasma calcium was decreased by 13.4%. Levels of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 transcripts in the uterine lining were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 61.4%, 66.1%, and 66.1%, respectively). CALB1 transcript level was increased (by 34.2 fold) in the heat stress group of hens compared to controls. TRPV6, SCNN1G, KCNJ15, and CLCN2 transcript levels did not significantly differ between control and heat stress groups of laying hens. It is concluded that the down-expression of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 genes may impair transportation of Cl - , HCO 3 - , and Na + in eggshell mineralization during heat stress. Increased CALB1 gene expression may increase resistance of uterine cells to detrimental effects of heat stress.

  13. Improvement of JT-60U Negative Ion Source Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kuriyama, M.; Kawai, M.; Itoh, T.; Umeda, N.

    2000-01-01

    The negative ion neutral beam system now operating on JT-60U was the first application of negative ion technology to the production of beams of high current and power for conversion to neutral beams, and has successfully demonstrated the feasibility of negative ion beam heating systems for ITER and future tokamak reactors [1, 2]. It also demonstrated significant electron heating[3] and high current drive efficiency in JT-60U[4]. Because this was such a large advance in the state of the art with respect to all system parameters, many new physical processes appeared during the earlier phases of the beam injection experiments. We have explored the physical mechanisms responsible for these processes, and implemented solutions for some of them, in particular excessive beam stripping, the secular dependence of the arc and beam parameters, and nonuniformity of the plasma illuminating the beam extraction grid. This has reduced the percentage of beam heat loading on the downstream grids by roug hly a third, and permitted longer beam pulses at higher powers. Progress is being made in improving the negative ion current density, and in coping with the sensitivity of the cesium in the ion sources to oxidation by tiny air or water leaks, and the cathode operation is being altered

  14. Electrochemical evidences and consequences of significant differences in ions diffusion rate in polyacrylate-based ion-selective membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźnica, Emilia; Mieczkowski, Józef; Michalska, Agata

    2011-11-21

    The origin and effect of surface accumulation of primary ions within the ion-selective poly(n-butyl acrylate)-based membrane, obtained by thermal polymerization, is discussed. Using a new method, based on the relation between the shape of a potentiometric plot and preconditioning time, the diffusion of copper ions in the membrane was found to be slow (the diffusion coefficient estimated to be close to 10(-11) cm(2) s(-1)), especially when compared to ion-exchanger counter ions--sodium cations diffusion (a diffusion coefficient above 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1)). The higher mobility of sodium ions than those of the copper-ionophore complex results in exposed ion-exchanger role leading to undesirably exposed sensitivity to sodium or potassium ions.

  15. Amylase for Apple Juice Processing: Effects of pH, Heat, and Ca2+ Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana N. Ceci

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of pH, heat, and Ca2+ ions on the α-amylase activities in a commercial amylolytic enzyme (Tyazyme L300, used for apple juice processing. Kinetics of thermal inactivation was studied in acetate and citrate/phosphate buffers at different temperatures (55–70 °C and enzyme concentrations (0.276 and 0.552 mL/100 mL. Maximum α-amylase activity was observed at pH=3.4 in both buffers. Effects of the addition of calcium chloride during and after thermal treatments were also investigated. α-amylase activities were measured by an iodometric method and thermal inactivation constants and D values (time for reducing 90 % of the enzymatic activity were estimated. The enzyme was more sensible to pH changes and heat when citrate ions were present in the reaction medium. If Ca2+ in the enzyme structure is bound to citrate then the resistance of the enzyme to pH changes and heat is lowered. Kinetics obtained according to Arrhenius equation and two enzymatic fractions (thermo-labile and thermoresistant were observed too. In citrate buffer the following relation was observed for thermo-labile fraction: log (D value = -0.144 t/°C + 12.992. The level of thermal inactivation also depended on the enzyme concentration. Higher thermal inactivation rates were obtained by increasing the enzyme concentration in the case when citrate was present. It was also found that the addition of calcium chloride (1 g/L after thermal treatment in median containing citrate reactivated the enzyme treated at 60 and 65 °C. The possible implications of these findings in apple juice processing were discussed.

  16. Reduction of ion thermal diffusivity associated with the transition of the radial electric field in neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the large helical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K; Funaba, H; Kado, S; Narihara, K; Tanaka, K; Takeiri, Y; Nakamura, Y; Ohyabu, N; Yamazaki, K; Yokoyama, M; Murakami, S; Ashikawa, N; deVries, P C; Emoto, M; Goto, M; Idei, H; Ikeda, K; Inagaki, S; Inoue, N; Isobe, M; Itoh, K; Kaneko, O; Kawahata, K; Khlopenkov, K; Komori, A; Kubo, S; Kumazawa, R; Liang, Y; Masuzaki, S; Minami, T; Miyazawa, J; Morisaki, T; Morita, S; Mutoh, T; Muto, S; Nagayama, Y; Nakanishi, H; Nishimura, K; Noda, N; Notake, T; Kobuchi, T; Ohdachi, S; Ohkubo, K; Oka, Y; Osakabe, M; Ozaki, T; Pavlichenko, R O; Peterson, B J; Sagara, A; Saito, K; Sakakibara, S; Sakamoto, R; Sanuki, H; Sasao, H; Sasao, M; Sato, K; Sato, M; Seki, T; Shimozuma, T; Shoji, M; Suzuki, H; Sudo, S; Tamura, N; Toi, K; Tokuzawa, T; Torii, Y; Tsumori, K; Yamamoto, T; Yamada, H; Yamada, I; Yamaguchi, S; Yamamoto, S; Yoshimura, Y; Watanabe, K Y; Watari, T; Hamada, Y; Motojima, O; Fujiwara, M

    2001-06-04

    Recent large helical device experiments revealed that the transition from ion root to electron root occurred for the first time in neutral-beam-heated discharges, where no nonthermal electrons exist. The measured values of the radial electric field were found to be in qualitative agreement with those estimated by neoclassical theory. A clear reduction of ion thermal diffusivity was observed after the mode transition from ion root to electron root as predicted by neoclassical theory when the neoclassical ion loss is more dominant than the anomalous ion loss.

  17. Influence of impurities on the transition from minority to mode conversion heating in ({sup 3}He)-H)- plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Trilateral Euregio Cluster Partner, Brussels (Belgium); Fülöp, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Göteborg (Sweden); Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association ' EURATOM-Belgian State' , Trilateral Euregio Cluster Partner, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-12

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is one of the main auxiliary heating systems used in present-day tokamaks and is planned to be installed in ITER. In the initial full-field phase of ITER operating with hydrogen majority plasmas, fundamental resonance heating of helium-3 ions is one of a few ICRH schemes available. Past JET experiments with the carbon wall revealed a significant impact of impurities on the ICRH performance in ({sup 3}He)-H plasmas. A significant reduction of the helium-3 concentration, at which the transition from minority ion to mode conversion heating occurs, was found to be due to a high plasma contamination with carbon ions. In this paper we discuss the effect of Be and another impurity species present at JET after the installation of a new ITER-like wall on the transition helium-3 concentration in ({sup 3}He)-H plasmas. We suggest a potential method for controlling helium-3 level needed for a specific ICRH regime by puffing an extra helium-4 gas to the plasma.

  18. Early-phase immunodetection of metallothionein and heat shock proteins in extruded earthworm coelomocytes after dermal exposure to metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Joanna; Olchawa, Ewa; Stuerzenbaum, Stephen R.; John Morgan, A.; Plytycz, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides direct evidence that earthworm immune cells, coelomocytes, are exposed to bio-reactive quantities of metals within 3 days after dermal exposure, and that they respond by upregulating metallothionein (MT) and heat shock protein (HSP70, HSP72) expression. Indirect support for the hypothesis that coelomocytes are capable of trafficking metals was also obtained. Coelomocytes were expelled from adult individuals of Eisenia fetida after 3-day exposure either to metal ions (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) or to distilled water (controls) via filter papers. The number of coelomocytes was significantly decreased after Cu, Pb, or Cd treatment. Cytospin preparations of coelomocytes were subjected to immunoperoxidase staining with monoclonal antibodies against human heat shock proteins (HSP70 or HSP72), or rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against metallothionein 2 (w-MT2) of Lumbricus rubellus. Applied antibodies detected the respective proteins of E. fetida and revealed that the expression of HSP70, HSP72 and w-MT2 proteins was either induced or significantly enhanced in coelomocytes from metal-exposed animals. In conclusion, stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes may be used as sensitive biomarkers of metal contaminations. Further experimentation is needed for quantitative analysis of kinetics of metal-induced stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes. - Metals upregulate stress response proteins in earthworm coelomocytes

  19. Early-phase immunodetection of metallothionein and heat shock proteins in extruded earthworm coelomocytes after dermal exposure to metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homa, Joanna [Department of Evolutionary Immunobiology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, R. Ingardena 6, PL 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Olchawa, Ewa [Department of Evolutionary Immunobiology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, R. Ingardena 6, PL 30-060 Cracow (Poland); Stuerzenbaum, Stephen R. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, PO Box 915, Cardiff Wales CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); John Morgan, A. [Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, PO Box 915, Cardiff Wales CF10 3TL (United Kingdom); Plytycz, Barbara [Department of Evolutionary Immunobiology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, R. Ingardena 6, PL 30-060 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: plyt@zuk.iz.uj.edu.pl

    2005-05-01

    This paper provides direct evidence that earthworm immune cells, coelomocytes, are exposed to bio-reactive quantities of metals within 3 days after dermal exposure, and that they respond by upregulating metallothionein (MT) and heat shock protein (HSP70, HSP72) expression. Indirect support for the hypothesis that coelomocytes are capable of trafficking metals was also obtained. Coelomocytes were expelled from adult individuals of Eisenia fetida after 3-day exposure either to metal ions (Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd) or to distilled water (controls) via filter papers. The number of coelomocytes was significantly decreased after Cu, Pb, or Cd treatment. Cytospin preparations of coelomocytes were subjected to immunoperoxidase staining with monoclonal antibodies against human heat shock proteins (HSP70 or HSP72), or rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against metallothionein 2 (w-MT2) of Lumbricus rubellus. Applied antibodies detected the respective proteins of E. fetida and revealed that the expression of HSP70, HSP72 and w-MT2 proteins was either induced or significantly enhanced in coelomocytes from metal-exposed animals. In conclusion, stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes may be used as sensitive biomarkers of metal contaminations. Further experimentation is needed for quantitative analysis of kinetics of metal-induced stress protein expression in earthworm coelomocytes. - Metals upregulate stress response proteins in earthworm coelomocytes.

  20. Construction of thermionic alkali-ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul Haq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which singly charged alkali ions of K, Na, Li, Rb and Cs are produced by heating ultra-pure chemical salts of different alkali metals on tungsten filaments without employing a temperature measuring device. The character of alkali-ion currents at different heating powers and the remarkably constant ion emission current for prolonged periods are discussed. (author)

  1. Control of ITBs in Fusion Self-Heated Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Terry, Paul; Sanchez, Raul

    2015-11-01

    Simple dynamical models have been able to capture a remarkable amount of the dynamics of the transport barriers found in many devices, including the often disconnected nature of the electron thermal transport channel sometimes observed in the presence of a standard (``ion channel'') barrier. By including in this rich though simple dynamic transport model an evolution equation for electron fluctuations we have previously investigated the interaction between the formation of the standard ion channel barrier and the somewhat less common electron channel barrier. The electron channel formation and evolution is even more sensitive to the alignment of the various gradients making up the sheared radial electric field then the ion barrier is. Because of this sensitivity and coupling of the barrier dynamics, the dynamic evolution of the fusion self-heating profile can have a significant impact on the barrier location and dynamics. To investigate this, self-heating has been added this model and the impact of the self-heating on the formation and controllability of the various barriers is explored. It has been found that the evolution of the heating profiles can suppress or collapse the electron channel barrier. NBI and RF schemes will be investigated for profile/barrier control.

  2. Effects of ion beam heating on Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulman, Martin; Skakalova, Viera; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Roth, S.

    2009-01-01

    Free standing films of single-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated with energetic N + and C 4+ ions. The observed changes in the Raman line shape of the radial breathing mode and the G band of the C 4+ irradiated samples were similar to those found for a thermally annealed sample. We ascribe these changes to thermal desorption of volatile dopants from the initially doped nanotubes. A simple geometry of the experiment allows us to estimate the temperature rise by one-dimensional heat conductance equation. The calculation indicates that irradiation-mediated increase in temperature may account for the observed Raman spectra changes

  3. Adaptive thermal modeling of Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadman Rad, M.; Danilov, D.L.; Baghalha, M.; Kazemeini, M.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple, accurate and adaptive thermal model is proposed for Li-ion batteries. • Equilibrium voltages, overpotentials and entropy changes are quantified from experimental results. • Entropy changes are highly dependent on the battery State-of-Charge. • Good agreement between simulated and measured heat development is obtained under all conditions. • Radiation contributes to about 50% of heat dissipation at elevated temperatures. -- Abstract: An accurate thermal model to predict the heat generation in rechargeable batteries is an essential tool for advanced thermal management in high power applications, such as electric vehicles. For such applications, the battery materials’ details and cell design are normally not provided. In this work a simple, though accurate, thermal model for batteries has been developed, considering the temperature- and current-dependent overpotential heat generation and State-of-Charge dependent entropy contributions. High power rechargeable Li-ion (7.5 Ah) batteries have been experimentally investigated and the results are used for model verification. It is shown that the State-of-Charge dependent entropy is a significant heat source and is therefore essential to correctly predict the thermal behavior of Li-ion batteries under a wide variety of operating conditions. An adaptive model is introduced to obtain these entropy values. A temperature-dependent equation for heat transfer to the environment is also taken into account. Good agreement between the simulations and measurements is obtained in all cases. The parameters for both the heat generation and heat transfer processes can be applied to the thermal design of advanced battery packs. The proposed methodology is generic and independent on the cell chemistry and battery design. The parameters for the adaptive model can be determined by performing simple cell potential/current and temperature measurements for a limited number of charge/discharge cycles

  4. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bush, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium heating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%--40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority 3 He (n 3 He /n e > 10%). By changing the 3 He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation showed that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated (OH) target plasma in TFIR

  5. Thermodynamic properties of heavy ion heated refractory metals; Thermodynamische Eigenschaften von schwerionengeheizten hochschmelzenden Metallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, Alexander

    2011-05-04

    Knowledge of basic physical properties of matter in high-energy-density (HED) states such as the equation-of-state (EOS) is of fundamental importance for various branches of basic and applied physics. However, such matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure - also called ''warm dense matter'' (WDM) - can only be generated in dynamic experiments employing the most powerful drivers. At the high temperature experimental area HHT of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany), intense beams of energetic heavy ions are used for this purpose. The aim of this work is to study thermophysical properties of refractory metals in hot solid and liquid states by precise temperature measurements. In order to identify the melting plateau and to limit the maximum target temperature to the region of interest, relatively long (one microsecond) bunches of uranium and xenon ions have been used to heat initially solid samples. The intense ion beams were focused on a millimetre spot at the target in order to achieve uniform conditions. The temperature on the target surface was determined by analysing thermal radiation emitted from a 0.03 mm{sup 2} area at five different wavelengths. In order to obtain the physical temperature, one has to measure not only the thermal radiation but also the emissivity, ε(T,λ) of the target surface which is not known ab initio. For this purpose, a set-up for direct target reflection measurement was designed and embedded into the fast multichannel pyrometer system. The reflection signal provides the necessary information about modifications of the target surface properties during the interaction with the ion beam. Beside the pyrometric and reflection measurement set-ups, various hardware and software components of the data acquisition system for the heavy-ion beam driven experiments were substantially enhanced. The emissivity was also obtained by identifying the melting plateau and using the

  6. High heat flux (HHF) elements for negative ion systems on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milnes, J.; Chuilon, B.; Xue, Y.; Martin, D.; Waldon, C.

    2007-01-01

    Negative Ion Neutral Beam systems on ITER will require actively cooled scrapers and dumps to process and shape the beam before injection into the tokamak. The scale of the systems is much larger than any presently operating, bringing challenges for designers in terms of available sub cooling, total pressure drop, deflection and mandatory remote maintenance. High heat fluxes (∼15-20 MW/m 2 ), pulse lengths in excess of 3000 s and high number of cycles pose new challenges in terms of stress and fatigue life. The designs outlined in the Design Description Document for the ITER Neutral Beam System [N53 DDD 29 01-07-03 R 0.1. ITER Design Description Document, DDD 5.3, Neutral Beam H and CD system (including Appendices).], based on swirl tubes, have been reviewed as part of the design process and recommendations made. Additionally, alternative designs have been proposed based on the Hypervapotron high heat flux elements with modified geometry and drawing upon a vast background knowledge of large scale equipment procurement and integration. A full thermo-mechanical analysis of all HHF components has also been undertaken based on ITER design criteria and the limited material data available. The advantages and disadvantages of all designs are presented and recommendations for improvements discussed

  7. Significant questions in thin liquid film heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankoff, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    Thin liquid films appear in many contexts, such as the cooling of gas turbine blade tips, rocket engines, microelectronics arrays, and hot fuel element surfaces in hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents. Apart from these direct cooling applications of thin liquid layers, thin films form a crucial element in determining the allowable heat flux limits in boiling. This is because the last stages of dryout almost invariably involve the rupture of a residual liquid film, either as a microlayer underneath the bubbles, or a thin annular layer in a high-quality burnout scenario. The destabilization of these thin films under the combined actions of shear stress, evaporation, and thermocapillary effects is quite complex. The later stages of actual rupture to form dry regions, which then expand, resulting in possible overheating, are even more complex and less well understood. However, significant progress has been made in understanding the behavior of these thin films, which are subject to competing instabilities prior to actual rupture. This will be reviewed briefly. Recent work on the advance, or recession, of contact lines will also be described briefly, and significant questions that still remain to be answered will be discussed. 68 refs., 7 figs

  8. Spatial distribution of {gamma} emissivity and fast ions during ({sup 3}He)D ICRF heating experiments on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Start, D F.H. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Righi, E [Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (United Kingdom); Warrick, C [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented that can simulate the {gamma} emissivity in the poloidal cross-section during ({sup 3}He)D ICRF heated discharges in JET plasmas, by merging information obtained from the fast ion distribution and from nuclear reactions producing the observed {gamma} emissivity (production of {gamma} photons during {sup 3}He-{sup 9}Be reactions). This technique can play an important role in the identification of plasma instabilities that affect the redistribution of the fast ions in the plasma, like the TAE modes and the ripple in the tokamak magnetic field. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Solvation thermodynamics and heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-03-01

    The solvation thermodynamics and in particular the solvation heat capacity of polar and charged solutes in water is studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. As ionic solutes we consider a F- and a Na+ ion, as an example for a polar molecule with vanishing net charge we take a SPC/E water molecule. The partial charges of all three solutes are varied in a wide range by a scaling factor. Using a recently introduced method for the accurate determination of the solvation free energy of polar solutes, we determine the free energy, entropy, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the three different solutes as a function of temperature and partial solute charge. We find that the sum of the solvation heat capacities of the Na+ and F- ions is negative, in agreement with experimental observations, but our results uncover a pronounced difference in the heat capacity between positively and negatively charged groups. While the solvation heat capacity ΔCp stays positive and even increases slightly upon charging the Na+ ion, it decreases upon charging the F- ion and becomes negative beyond an ion charge of q = -0.3e. On the other hand, the heat capacity of the overall charge-neutral polar solute derived from a SPC/E water molecule is positive for all charge scaling factors considered by us. This means that the heat capacity of a wide class of polar solutes with vanishing net charge is positive. The common ascription of negative heat capacities to polar chemical groups might arise from the neglect of non-additive interaction effects between polar and apolar groups. The reason behind this non-additivity is suggested to be related to the second solvation shell that significantly affects the solvation thermodynamics and due to its large spatial extent induces quite long-ranged interactions between solvated molecular parts and groups.

  10. Effects of high power ion Bernstein waves on a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.

    1987-04-01

    Ion Bernstein wave heating (IBWH) has been investigated on PLT with up to 650 kW of rf power coupled to the plasma, exceeding the ohmic power of 550 kW. Plasma antenna loading of 2 Ω has been observed, resulting in 80 to 90% of the rf power being coupled to the plasma. An ion heating efficiency of ΔT/sub i/(0)n/sub e//P/sub rf/ = 6 x 10 13 eV cm -3 /kW, without high energy tail ions, has been observed up to the maximum rf power. The deuterium particle confinement during high power IBWH increases significantly (as much as 300%). Associated with it, a longer injected impurity confinement time, reduced drift wave turbulence activity, frequency shifts of drfit wave turbulence, and development of a large negative edge potential were observed. The energy confinement time, however, shows some degradation from the ohmic value, which can be attributed to the enhanced radiation loss observed during IBWH. The ion heating and energy confinement time are relatively independent of plasma current

  11. Adiabatic Cooling for Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Karin

    2017-01-01

    The field of cold molecular ions is a fast growing one, with applications in high resolution spectroscopy and metrology, the search for time variations of fundamental constants, cold chemistry and collisions, and quantum information processing, to name a few. The study of single molecular ions...... is attractive as it enables one to push the limits of spectroscopic accuracy. Non-destructive spectroscopic detection of molecular ions can be achieved by co-trapping with an easier to detect atomic ion. The ion chain has coupled motion, and transitions which change both the internal and motional states...... to the measured heating rates, almost perfectly fitting existing heating rate theory. Further, the same model successfully predicted the heating rates of the in-phase mode of a two-ion crystal, indicating that we can use it to predict the heating rates in experiments on molecule-atom chains. Adiabatic cooling...

  12. Monte Carlo simulation study of the ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Ohnishi, M.; Okada, H.

    1993-10-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation code is developed for the ICRF heating in helical systems, which takes into account finite beta effects, complicated orbits of high energetic particles, Coulomb collisions, and interactions between the particles and the applied waves. The code is used to investigate the ICRF minority heating in the Large Helical Device. The configuration of the magnetic fields changes significantly due to finite beta effects in the Large Helical Device. The resonance layer position is found to be crucial to the heating efficiency as the plasma beta increases. When the strength of the resonance magnetic field is set to the value at the magnetic axis, the higher heat efficiency is obtained and no clear difference of the heat efficiency due to the finite beta effects is found at the high ICRF wave power region. However the radial profile of the transferred power to majority ions and electrons from minority ions changes by the deformation of the trapped particle orbits due to the finite beta effects. The heat efficiency is improved if the radial electric field, E r , is positive (E r is directed radially outward) and it is also improved by supplying 3 He minority ions rather than proton minority ions. (author)

  13. Status of the Negative Ion Based Heating and Diagnostic Neutral Beams for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunke, B.; Bora, D.; Hemsworth, R.; Tanga, A.

    2009-03-01

    The current baseline of ITER foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beam (HNB's) systems based on negative ion technology, each accelerating to 1 MeV 40 A of D- and capable of delivering 16.5 MW of D0 to the ITER plasma, with a 3rd HNB injector foreseen as an upgrade option [1]. In addition a dedicated Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) accelerating 60 A of H- to 100 keV will inject ≈15 A equivalent of H0 for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and other diagnostics. Recently the RF driven negative ion source developed by IPP Garching has replaced the filamented ion source as the reference ITER design. The RF source developed at IPP, which is approximately a quarter scale of the source needed for ITER, is expected to have reduced caesium consumption compared to the filamented arc driven ion source. The RF driven source has demonstrated adequate accelerated D- and H- current densities as well as long-pulse operation [2, 3]. It is foreseen that the HNB's and the DNB will use the same negative ion source. Experiments with a half ITER-size ion source are on-going at IPP and the operation of a full-scale ion source will be demonstrated, at full power and pulse length, in the dedicated Ion Source Test Bed (ISTF), which will be part of the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), in Padua, Italy. This facility will carry out the necessary R&D for the HNB's for ITER and demonstrate operation of the full-scale HNB beamline. An overview of the current status of the neutral beam (NB) systems and the chosen configuration will be given and the ongoing integration effort into the ITER plant will be highlighted. It will be demonstrated how installation and maintenance logistics have influenced the design, notably the top access scheme facilitating access for maintenance and installation. The impact of the ITER Design Review and recent design change requests (DCRs) will be briefly discussed, including start-up and commissioning issues. The low current hydrogen phase now envisaged for start

  14. Status of the Negative Ion Based Heating and Diagnostic Neutral Beams for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schunke, B.; Bora, D.; Hemsworth, R.; Tanga, A.

    2009-01-01

    The current baseline of ITER foresees 2 Heating Neutral Beam (HNB's) systems based on negative ion technology, each accelerating to 1 MeV 40 A of D - and capable of delivering 16.5 MW of D 0 to the ITER plasma, with a 3rd HNB injector foreseen as an upgrade option. In addition a dedicated Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) accelerating 60 A of H - to 100 keV will inject ≅15 A equivalent of H 0 for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and other diagnostics. Recently the RF driven negative ion source developed by IPP Garching has replaced the filamented ion source as the reference ITER design. The RF source developed at IPP, which is approximately a quarter scale of the source needed for ITER, is expected to have reduced caesium consumption compared to the filamented arc driven ion source. The RF driven source has demonstrated adequate accelerated D - and H - current densities as well as long-pulse operation. It is foreseen that the HNB's and the DNB will use the same negative ion source. Experiments with a half ITER-size ion source are on-going at IPP and the operation of a full-scale ion source will be demonstrated, at full power and pulse length, in the dedicated Ion Source Test Bed (ISTF), which will be part of the Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), in Padua, Italy. This facility will carry out the necessary R and D for the HNB's for ITER and demonstrate operation of the full-scale HNB beamline. An overview of the current status of the neutral beam (NB) systems and the chosen configuration will be given and the ongoing integration effort into the ITER plant will be highlighted. It will be demonstrated how installation and maintenance logistics have influenced the design, notably the top access scheme facilitating access for maintenance and installation. The impact of the ITER Design Review and recent design change requests (DCRs) will be briefly discussed, including start-up and commissioning issues. The low current hydrogen phase now envisaged for start

  15. Variable eigenmode excitation in the beach heating of two-ion-species mirror plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Variable eigenmode excitation scans of the ion species ratio of hydrogen-helium and hydrogen-deuterium plasmas has been examined in the bench-heating configuration of the Phaedrus-B central cell. m = -1 fields were selectively excited by a ''rotating-field'' antenna array at ω/Ω H = 0.8. The coupled wave energy propagates through a steep axial magnetic gradient into a region of strong ion-cyclotron resonance absorption which is located triangle z = 50cm from the antenna. Evidence of varied fast- and slow-wave eigenmode excitation and absorption, including variations in the radial profiles of waves magnetic field and plasma parameters, was observed during the scans. Optimal peak parameters in the plasma core, n e = 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , T eparallel = 20eV, T iparallel = 140eV, T iperpendicular = 450eV, and β = 0.2, were obtained for moderate helium or deuterium ion fractions (puffed n He /n e = n D /n e ∼ 0.25). These parameters exceed those obtained under the same conditions with ''pure'' hydrogen plasmas: n e = 7.0 x 10 12 cm -3 , T eparallel = 25eV, T iparallel = 80eV, T iperpendicular = 300eV, and β = 0.1. These variations are in agreement with those expected from antenna-eigenmode coupling considerations

  16. Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Sauter, O.; Zucca, C.; Asunta, O.; Buttery, R. J.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T.; Igochine, V.; Johnson, T.; Jucker, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lennholm, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-06-01

    13 MW of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) power deposited inside the q = 1 surface is likely to reduce the sawtooth period in ITER baseline scenario below the level empirically predicted to trigger neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). However, since the ECCD control scheme is solely predicated upon changing the local magnetic shear, it is prudent to plan to use a complementary scheme which directly decreases the potential energy of the kink mode in order to reduce the sawtooth period. In the event that the natural sawtooth period is longer than expected, due to enhanced α particle stabilization for instance, this ancillary sawtooth control can be provided from >10MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power with a resonance just inside the q = 1 surface. Both ECCD and ICRH control schemes would benefit greatly from active feedback of the deposition with respect to the rational surface. If the q = 1 surface can be maintained closer to the magnetic axis, the efficacy of ECCD and ICRH schemes significantly increases, the negative effect on the fusion gain is reduced, and off-axis negative-ion neutral beam injection (NNBI) can also be considered for sawtooth control. Consequently, schemes to reduce the q = 1 radius are highly desirable, such as early heating to delay the current penetration and, of course, active sawtooth destabilization to mediate small frequent sawteeth and retain a small q = 1 radius. Finally, there remains a residual risk that the ECCD + ICRH control actuators cannot keep the sawtooth period below the threshold for triggering NTMs (since this is derived only from empirical scaling and the control modelling has numerous caveats). If this is the case, a secondary control scheme of sawtooth stabilization via ECCD + ICRH + NNBI, interspersed with deliberate triggering of a crash through auxiliary power reduction and simultaneous pre-emptive NTM control by off-axis ECCD has been considered, permitting long transient periods with high fusion

  17. The BEAN experiment - An EISCAT study of ion temperature anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. W. McCrea

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a novel EISCAT special programme, SP-UK-BEAN, intended for the direct measurement of the ion temperature anisotropy during ion frictional heating events in the high-latitude F-region. The experiment employs a geometry which provides three simultaneous estimates of the ion temperature in a single F-region observing volume at a range of aspect angles from 0° to 36°. In contrast to most previous EISCAT experiments to study ion temperature anisotropies, field-aligned observations are made using the Sodankylä radar, while the Kiruna radar measures at an aspect angle of the order of 30°. Anisotropic effects can thus be studied within a small common volume whose size and altitude range is limited by the radar beamwidth, rather than in volumes which overlap but cover different altitudes. The derivation of line-of-sight ion temperature is made more complex by the presence of an unknown percentage of atomic and molecular ions at the observing altitude and the possibility of non-Maxwellian distortion of the ion thermal velocity distribution. The first problem has been partly accounted for by insisting that a constant value of electron temperature be maintained. This enables an estimate of the ion composition to be made, and facilitates the derivation of more realistic line-of-sight ion temperatures and temperature anisotropies. The latter problem has been addressed by assuming that the thermal velocity distribution remains bi-Maxwellian. The limitations of these approaches are discussed. The ion temperature anisotropies and temperature partition coefficients during two ion heating events give values intermediate between those expected for atomic and for molecular species. This result is consistent with an analysis which indicates that significant proportions of molecular ions (up to 50% were present at the times of greatest heating.

  18. Thermal analysis and two-directional air flow thermal management for lithium-ion battery pack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuahai; Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yongzhou; Li, Changhao

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management is a routine but crucial strategy to ensure thermal stability and long-term durability of the lithium-ion batteries. An air-flow-integrated thermal management system is designed in the present study to dissipate heat generation and uniformize the distribution of temperature in the lithium-ion batteries. The system contains of two types of air ducts with independent intake channels and fans. One is to cool the batteries through the regular channel, and the other minimizes the heat accumulations in the middle pack of batteries through jet cooling. A three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer model is developed to describe the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion batteries with the integration of heat generation theory, and validated through both simulations and experiments. Moreover, the simulations and experiments show that the maximum temperature can be decreased to 33.1 °C through the new thermal management system in comparison with 42.3 °C through the traditional ones, and temperature uniformity of the lithium-ion battery packs is enhanced, significantly.

  19. Significant enhancement of metal heat dissipation from mechanically exfoliated graphene nanosheets through thermal radiation effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiong Hu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a facile approach to significantly enhance the heat dissipation potential of conventional aluminum (Al heat sinks by mechanically coating graphene nanosheets. For Al and graphene-coated Al heat sinks, the change in temperature with change in coating coverage, coating thickness and heat flux are studied. It is found that with the increase in coating coverage from 0 to 100%, the steady-state temperature is decreased by 5 °C at a heat flux of 1.8 W cm-1. By increasing the average thickness of graphene coating from 480 nm to 1900 nm, a remarkable temperature reduction up to 7 °C can be observed. Moreover, with the increase in heat flux from 1.2 W cm-1 to 2.4 W cm-1, the temperature difference between uncoated and graphene-coated samples increases from 1 °C to 6 °C. The thermal analysis and finite element simulation reveal that the thermal radiation plays a key role in enhancing the heat dissipation performance. The effect of heat convection remains weak owing to the low air velocity at surface-air boundary. This work provides a technological innovation in improving metal heat dissipation using graphene nanosheets.

  20. Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, T., E-mail: shibat@post.j-parc.jp; Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Asano, H.; Naito, F. [J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Nishida, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Hatayama, A. [Keio University, Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken 223-8522 (Japan); Mattei, S.; Lettry, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30–120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna.

  1. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance; Fluorescence induite par laser sur des plasmas fortement magnetises, chauffes par resonnance cyclotron ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailloux, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O`ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author) 62 refs.

  2. Ion transport studies on the PLT tokamak during neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Cavallo, A.; Cohen, S.

    1983-12-01

    Radial transport of ions during co- and counter-neutral beam heating in the PLT tokamak has been studied, using molybdenum and scandium ions as tracer elements. The time evolution of the radial profiles of several ionization stages of both elements, injected by laser blowoff during the neutral beam heating, were measured under three significantly different beam-plasma combinations. No noticeable differences in the radial profiles attributable to the beam direction were observed. However, a given injected amount resulted in considerably larger interior concentrations of the tracer element in the counter-beam heating cases, suggesting larger penetration of the plasma periphery. Computer simulation with the MIST code suggests a net inward drift of the order 10 3 cm/sec superposed to a diffusion coefficient of the order 10 4 cm 2 /sec for both scandium and molybdenum ions. Injection of larger amounts of the tracer element, sufficient to cause measurable central electron temperature changes, resulted in dramatic changes in ion-state distributions, making some appear peaked in the center while others disappeared. This effect could be produced with both co- and counter-beam heating, but with lesser amounts in the latter case. It is interpreted as rearrangement of the ionization balance, rather than any preferential accumulation of the injected element

  3. Ion stochastic heating by obliquely propagating magnetosonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xinliang; Lu Quanming; Wu Mingyu; Wang Shui

    2012-01-01

    The ion motions in obliquely propagating Alfven waves with sufficiently large amplitudes have already been studied by Chen et al.[Phys. Plasmas 8, 4713 (2001)], and it was found that the ion motions are stochastic when the wave frequency is at a fraction of the ion gyro-frequency. In this paper, with test particle simulations, we investigate the ion motions in obliquely propagating magnetosonic waves and find that the ion motions also become stochastic when the amplitude of the magnetosonic waves is sufficiently large due to the resonance at sub-cyclotron frequencies. Similar to the Alfven wave, the increase of the propagating angle, wave frequency, and the number of the wave modes can lower the stochastic threshold of the ion motions. However, because the magnetosonic waves become more and more compressive with the increase of the propagating angle, the decrease of the stochastic threshold with the increase of the propagating angle is more obvious in the magnetosonic waves than that in the Alfven waves.

  4. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D 0 formed from D - . The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV

  5. Hamiltonian study of the response of a tokamak plasma to the ion cyclotron heating wave: minor heating and current generation by the fast wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.

    1990-06-01

    The role of additional Heatings, such as the Ion Cyclotron Heating, is to raise magnetic fusion plasmas to higher temperatures, to satisfy the ignition condition. The understanding of the wave absorption mechanisms by the plasma first requires a precise description of the particle individual trajectories. The Hamiltonian mechanics, through action-angle variables, allows this description, and makes the computation of the wave-particle interaction easier. We then derive a quantitative evaluation of the intrinsic stochasticity for ionic trajectories perturbated by the fast wave. This stochasticity, combinated to the collisional effects, gives the validity domain for a quasilinear approximation of the evolution equation. This equation is then written under a variational formulation, and solved semi-analytically. Results conclude to the importance of the Hamiltonian chaos in the formation of the deeply anisotropic distribution tails, encountered in minority heating scenarios. Direct interaction of the electrons and the fast wave is similarly analysed. The influence of the various parameters (wave spectrum, magnetic configuration, frequency,...) is then examined in order to optimize this scenario of fast wave current drive in tokamaks [fr

  6. Comparison of experimentally-inferred ion thermal diffusivities with neoclassical theory for neutral beam-heated discharges in the Doublet III tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    The study of ion transport in neutral beam-heated discharges in tokamaks is necessary to determine if neoclassical theory can reliably be used to predict the performance of future machines. Previous studies of ion tranport have generally been difficult due to the lack of information regarding the ion temperature profile. The standard procedure used to study ion transport has been to model the T/sub i/ profile with the assumption that the ion thermal diffusivity profile chi/sub i/(r) was equal to a multiplier times chi/sub i//sup neo/(r), the ion thermal diffusivity calculated from neoclassical theory. The multiplier was varied until the calculated T/sub i/ profile agreed with the available ion temperature data, usually T/sub i/(0) or the measured neutron rate. Values of the multiplier in the range of 1 to 10 have generally been obtained with few estimates of the uncertainties in these values. Furthermore, there have been few, if any, attempts to calculate chi/sub i/ by modeling the ion temperature profiles in other ways. As a result, the issue as to whether or not the ion transport in tokamaks is in agreement with neoclassical theory has not been definitively answered

  7. ICRF power-deposition profiles, heating and confinement of monster sawtooth and peaked-density profile discharges in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.P.; Taroni, A.; Ellis, J.J.; Jacquinot, J.; Start, D.F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The ion cyclotron resonance heating of monster sawtooth (period greater than the energy confinement time) and pellet-fueled peaked-density profiles in limiter discharges of JET Tokamak are studied. The monster sawtooth is a characteristic JET regime which is related to fast ions generated during the minority ion heating. In the ICRF heating of peaked-density profile discharges, we find typically the T i0 is higher roughly by a factor of 2 and T e0 roughly by 35% at a fixed P TOT /n e0 when compared to non-peaked profile cases. Here, T e0 and T i0 are central electron and ion temperatures, respectively, n e0 is the central electron density and P TOT is the total input power. The ion heating is improved in the pellet case, in part, due to a higher collisionality between the background ions and the energetic minority, but more significantly by a reduction of local ion energy transport in the central region. The transport-code simulation of these discharges reveals that there is a reduction of both χ e and χ i in the central region of the plasma in the ICRF heated peaked-profile discharges where χ e and χ i are the electron and ion heat conductivities, respectively. The improvement of confinement is not explained quantitatively by any of the existing η i -driven turbulence theories as the n i parameter (η i = d ln T i /d ln n i where T i is the ion temperature and n i is the ion density), instead of dropping below the critical value, remains above it for most of the duration of the improved confinement phase. The physical mechanism(s) that plays a role in this improvement is not yet clear. (author)

  8. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  9. Fast-ion Dα measurements of the fast-ion distribution (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2010-01-01

    The fast-ion Dα (FIDA) diagnostic is an application of charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Fast ions that neutralize in an injected neutral beam emit Balmer-α light with a large Doppler shift. The spectral shift is exploited to distinguish the FIDA emission from other bright sources of Dα light. Background subtraction is the main technical challenge. A spectroscopic diagnostic typically achieves temporal, energy, and transverse spatial resolution of ∼1 ms, ∼10 keV, and ∼2 cm, respectively. Installations that use narrow-band filters achieve high spatial and temporal resolution at the expense of spectral information. For high temporal resolution, the bandpass-filtered light goes directly to a photomultiplier, allowing detection of ∼50 kHz oscillations in FIDA signal. For two-dimensional spatial profiles, the bandpass-filtered light goes to a charge-coupled device camera; detailed images of fast-ion redistribution at instabilities are obtained. Qualitative and quantitative models relate the measured FIDA signals to the fast-ion distribution function. The first quantitative comparisons between theory and experiment found excellent agreement in beam-heated magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)-quiescent plasmas. FIDA diagnostics are now in operation at magnetic-fusion facilities worldwide. They are used to study fast-ion acceleration by ion cyclotron heating, to detect fast-ion transport by MHD modes and microturbulence, and to study fast-ion driven instabilities.

  10. Impact of electro-magnetic stabilization, small- scale turbulence and multi-scale interactions on heat transport in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Heat transport experiments in JET, based on ICRH heat flux scans and temperature modulation, have confirmed the importance of two transport mechanisms that are often neglected in modeling experimental results, but are crucial to reach agreement between theory and experiment and may be significant in ITER. The first mechanism is the stabilizing effect of the total pressure gradient (including fast ions) on ITG driven ion heat transport. Such stabilization is found in non-linear gyro-kinetic electro-magnetic simulations using GENE and GYRO, and is the explanation for the observed loss of ion stiffness in the core of high NBI-power JET plasmas. The effect was recently observed also in JET plasmas with dominant ICRH heating and small rotation, due to ICRH fast ions, which is promising for ITER. Such mechanism dominates over ExB flow shear in the core and needs to be included in quasi-linear models to increase their ability to capture the relevant physics. The second mechanism is the capability of small- scale ETG instabilities to carry a significant fraction of electron heat. A decrease in Te peaking is observed when decreasing Zeff Te/Ti, which cannot be ascribed to TEMs but is in line with ETGs. Non-linear GENE single-scale simulations of ETGs and ITG/TEMs show that the ITG/TEM electron heat flux is not enough to match experiment. TEM stiffness is also much lower than measured. In the ETG single scale simulations the external flow shear is used to saturate the ETG streamers. Multi-scale simulations are ongoing, in which the ion zonal flows are the main saturating mechanism for ETGs. These costly simulations should provide the final answer on the importance of ETG-driven electron heat flux in JET. with JET contributors [F.Romanelli, Proc.25thIAEA FEC]. Supported by EUROfusion Grant 633053.

  11. Microstructural Analysis of the Effects of Thermal Runaway on Li-Ion and Na-Ion Battery Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finegan, Donal [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robinson, James B. [University College London; Heenan, Thomas M. M. [University College London; Smith, Katherine [Sharp Laboratories of Europe; Kendrick, Emma [Sharp Laboratories of Europe; University College London; Brett, Daniel J. L. [University College London; Shearing, Paul R. [University College London

    2017-12-06

    Thermal runaway is a phenomenon that occurs due to self-sustaining reactions within batteries at elevated temperatures resulting in catastrophic failure. Here, the thermal runaway process is studied for a Li-ion and Na-ion pouch cells of similar energy density (10.5 Wh, 12 Wh, respectively) using accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC). Both cells were constructed with a z-fold configuration, with a standard shutdown separator in the Li-ion and a low-cost polypropylene (PP) separator in the Na-ion. Even with the shutdown separator, it is shown that the self-heating rate and rate of thermal runaway in Na-ion cells is significantly slower than that observed in Li-ion systems. The thermal runaway event initiates at a higher temperature in Na-ion cells. The effect of thermal runaway on the architecture of the cells is examined using X-ray microcomputed tomography, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to examine the failed electrodes of both cells. Finally, from examination of the respective electrodes, likely due to the carbonate solvent containing electrolyte, it is suggested that thermal runaway in Na-ion batteries (NIBs) occurs via a similar mechanism to that reported for Li-ion cells.

  12. Experimental investigation of ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating scenarios for ITER's half-field hydrogen phase performed in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Johnson, T. J.; Hellsten, T.; Ongena, J.; Mayoral, M. L.; Frigione, D.; Sozzi, C.; Calabro, G.; Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P.; Blackman, T.; Brennan, D.; Brett, A.; Cecconello, M.; Coffey, I.; Coyne, A.; Crombe, K.; Czarnecka, A.; Felton, R.; Giroud, C.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Jacquet, P.; Kiptily, V.; Knipe, S.; Krasilnikov, A.; Maslov, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Nocente, M.; Pangioni, L.; Proverbio, I.; Sergienko, G.; Stamp, M.; Studholme, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Vdovin, V.; Versloot, T.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Whitehurst, A.; Wooldridge, E.; Zoita, V.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2012-01-01

    Two ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating schemes proposed for the half-field operation phase of ITER in hydrogen plasmas—fundamental H majority and second harmonic 3 He ICRF heating—were recently investigated in JET. Although the same magnetic field and RF frequencies ( f ≈ 42 MHz and f

  13. Impurity ion transport studies on the PLT tokamak during neutral-beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Cavallo, A.; Cohen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radial transport of medium- and high-Z ions during co- and counter-neutral-beam heating in the PLT tokamak is studied, using molybdenum and scandium ions as tracer elements. The time evolution of the radial profiles of several ionization stages of both elements, injected by laser blowoff during the neutral-beam heating, is measured under three significantly different beam-plasma combinations. No noticeable differences in the radial profiles attributable to the beam direction are observed. However, a given injected amount resulted in considerably larger interior concentrations of the tracer element in the counter-beam heating cases, suggesting larger penetration of the plasma periphery. Computer simulation with the MIST code suggests a net inward drift of the order 10 3 cm.s -1 superposed to a diffusion coefficient of the order 10 4 cm 2 .s -1 for both scandium and molybdenum ions. Injection of larger amounts of the tracer element, sufficient to cause measurable central electron temperature changes, resulted in dramatic changes in ion-state distributions, making some appear peaked in the centre while others disappeared. This effect could be produced with both co- and counter-beam heating, but with lesser amounts in the latter case. It is interpreted as rearrangement of the ionization balance, rather than any preferential accumulation of the injected element. (author)

  14. High-energy ion tail formation due to ion acoustic turbulence in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1982-02-01

    The two-component ion energy spectra observed in the TRIAM-1 tokamak are explained as a result of the high-energy ion tail formation due to ion acoustic turbulence driven by a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating.

  15. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  16. Phase formation and microstructure evolution of arc ion deposited Cr2AlC coating after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.J.; Qian, Y.H.; Niu, D.; Zhang, M.M.; Liu, Z.M.; Li, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cr 2 AlC coating was prepared by arc ion plating combined with post annealing. ► The coating deposited by arc ion plating without heating was amorphous. ► Amorphous coating transformed to crystalline Cr 2 AlC after annealing at 620 °C in Ar. - Abstract: Due to the excellent oxidation and hot corrosion resistance and matched thermal expansion coefficient to normal alloys, Cr 2 AlC has potential applications as high-temperature protective coating. In the present work, the preparation of Cr 2 AlC coating has been achieved through cathodic arc deposition method combined with heat post-treatment. It was found that the coating, deposited from Cr 2 AlC compound target in the unintentional heating condition, was amorphous. After annealing at 620 °C in Ar for 20 h, the amorphous Cr–Al–C coating happened to crystallize and transformed to crystalline Cr 2 AlC as the major phase. It is obvious that the formation temperature of Cr 2 AlC was decreased from about 1050 °C for sintered bulk to around 620 °C for the as-deposited coating, resulting from the homogeneous mixture of the Cr, Al and C at atomic level in the Cr–Al–C coating. Apart from crystalline Cr 2 AlC, the annealed coating also contained AlCr 2 and little Cr 7 C 3 . AlCr 2 formed due to the loss of C during deposition, and little Cr 7 C 3 always existed in the sintered Cr 2 AlC compound target as impurity phase.

  17. ICRF heating and current drive experiments on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.; Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at TFTR have focused on the RF physics relevant to advanced tokamak D-T reactors. Experiments performed either tested confinement in reactor relevant plasmas or tested specific ICRF heating scenarios under consideration for reactors. H-minority heating was used to supply identical heating sources for matched D-T and D only L-mode plasmas to determine the species scaling for energy confinement. Second harmonic tritium heating was performed with only thermal tritium ions in an L-mode target plasma, verifying a possible start-up scenario for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Direct electron heating in Enhanced Reverse Shear (ERS) plasmas has been found to delay the back transition out of the ERS state. D-T mode conversion of the fast magnetosonic wave to an Ion Berstein Wave (IBW) for off-axis heating and current drive has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Parasitic Li 7 cyclotron damping limited the fraction of the power going to the electrons to less than 30%. Similar parasitic damping by Be 9 could be problematic in ITER. Doppler shifted fundamental resonance heating of beam ions and alpha particles has also been observed

  18. The effects of electrode thickness on the electrochemical and thermal characteristics of lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Rui; Liu, Jie; Gu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A coupling model is developed to study the behaviors of Li-ion batteries. • Thick electrode battery (CEB) has high temperature response during discharge. • Thin electrode battery has a relative lower capacity fading rate. • Less heat is generated in thin electrode battery with even heat distribution. • CEBs underutilize active materials and stop discharge early at high rates. - Abstract: Lithium ion (Li-ion) battery, consisting of multiple electrochemical cells, is a complex system whose high electrochemical and thermal stability is often critical to the well-being and functional capabilities of electric devices. Considering any change in the specifications may significantly affect the overall performance and life of a battery, an investigation on the impacts of electrode thickness on the electrochemical and thermal properties of lithium-ion battery cells based on experiments and a coupling model composed of a 1D electrochemical model and a 3D thermal model is conducted in this work. In-depth analyses on the basis of the experimental and simulated results are carried out for one cell of different depths of discharge as well as for a set of cells with different electrode thicknesses. Pertinent results have demonstrated that the electrode thickness can significantly influence the battery from many key aspects such as energy density, temperature response, capacity fading rate, overall heat generation, distribution and proportion of heat sources

  19. Fast ion dynamics in ASDEX upgrade and TEXTOR measured by collective Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseev, D.

    2011-11-01

    Fast ions are an essential ingredient in burning nuclear fusion plasmas: they are responsible for heating the bulk plasma, carry a significant amount of plasma current and moreover interact with various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic is sensitive to the projection of fast ion velocity distribution function. This thesis is mainly devoted to investigations of fast ion physics in tokamak plasmas by means of CTS. (Author)

  20. Fast ion dynamics in ASDEX upgrade and TEXTOR measured by collective Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseev, D.

    2011-11-15

    Fast ions are an essential ingredient in burning nuclear fusion plasmas: they are responsible for heating the bulk plasma, carry a significant amount of plasma current and moreover interact with various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic is sensitive to the projection of fast ion velocity distribution function. This thesis is mainly devoted to investigations of fast ion physics in tokamak plasmas by means of CTS. (Author)

  1. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on the 2nd Joint Grenoble-Varenna International Symposium on Heating in Toroidal Plasmas, held at Como, Italy, from the 3-12 September 1980. Important problems in relation to the different existing processes of heating. The plasma were identified and discussed. Among others, the main processes discussed were: a) neutral beam heating, b) ion-(electron)-cyclotron resonance heating, c) hybrid resonance and low frequency heating

  2. ICRF heating and transport of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Bretz, N.L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes results of the first experiments utilizing high-power ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in reactor-relevant regimes on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Results from these experiments have demonstrated efficient core, second harmonic, tritium beating of D-T supershot plasmas with tritium concentrations ranging from 6%-40%. Significant direct ion heating on the order of 60% of the input radio frequency (rf) power has been observed. The measured deposition profiles are in good agreement with two-dimensional modeling code predictions. Energy confinement in an rf-heated supershot is at least similar to that without rf, and possibly better in the electron channel. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves (IBW) has been demonstrated in ohmic, deuterium-deuterium and DT-neutral beam injection plasmas with high concentrations of minority 3 He (n 3He /n e = 15% - 30%). By changing the 3 He concentration or the toroidal field strength, the location of the mode-conversion radius was varied. The power deposition profile measured with rf power modulation indicated that up to 70% of the power can be deposited on electrons at an off-axis position. Preliminary results with up to 4 MW coupled into the plasma by 90-degree phased antennas showed directional propagation of the mode-converted IBW. Analysis of heat wave propagation showed no strong inward thermal pinch in off-axis heating of an ohmically-heated target plasma in TFTR

  3. Density response to central electron heating: theoretical investigations and experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, C.; Peeters, A. G.; Garbet, X.; Manini, A.; Ryter, F.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2004-08-01

    Theory of ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron modes (TEMs) is applied to the study of particle transport in experimental conditions with central electron heating. It is shown that in the unstable domain of TEMs, the electron thermodiffusive flux is directed outwards. By means of such a flux, a mechanism is identified likely to account for density flattening with central electron heating. Theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade. A parameter domain (including L- and H-mode plasmas) is identified, in which flattening with central electron heating is observed in the experiments. In general, this domain turns out to be the same domain in which the dominant plasma instability is a TEM. On the contrary, the dominant instability is an ITG in plasmas whose density profile is not affected significantly by central electron heating. The flattening predicted by quasi-linear theory for low density L-mode plasmas is too small compared to the experimental observations. At very high density, even when the dominant instability is an ITG, electron heating can provide density flattening, via the coupling with the ion heat channel. In these conditions the anomalous diffusivity increases in response to the increased ion heat flux, while the large collisionality makes the anomalous pinch small and the Ware pinch important.

  4. An evaluation of two types of nickel-titanium wires in terms of micromorphology and nickel ions' release following oral environment exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazal, Abdul Razzak A; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Al-Sabbagh, Rabab; Alghoraibi, Ibrahim; Aldiry, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare superelastic and heat-activated nickel-titanium orthodontic wires' surface morphology and potential release of nickel ions following exposure to oral environment conditions. Twenty-four 20-mm-length distal cuts of superelastic (NiTi Force I®) and 24 20-mm-length distal cuts of heat-activated (Therma-Ti Lite®) nickel-titanium wires (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) were divided into two equal groups: 12 wire segments left unused and 12 segments passively exposed to oral environment for 1 month. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to analyze surface morphology of the wires which were then immersed in artificial saliva for 1 month to determine potential nickel ions' release by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heat-activated nickel-titanium (NiTi) wires were rougher than superelastic wires, and both types of wires released almost the same amount of Ni ions. After clinical exposure, more surface roughness was recorded for superelastic NiTi wires and heat-activated NiTi wires. However, retrieved superelastic NiTi wires released less Ni ions in artificial saliva after clinical exposure, and the same result was recorded regarding heat-activated wires. Both types of NiTi wires were obviously affected by oral environment conditions; their surface roughness significantly increased while the amount of the released Ni ions significantly declined.

  5. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  6. Global and local Joule heating effects seen by DE 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    In the altitude region between 350 and 550 km, variations in the ion temperature principally reflect similar variations in the local frictional heating produced by a velocity difference between the ions and the neutrals. Here, the distribution of the ion temperature in this altitude region is shown, and its attributes in relation to previous work on local Joule heating rates are discussed. In addition to the ion temperature, instrumentation on the DE 2 satellite also provides a measure of the ion velocity vector representative of the total electric field. From this information, the local Joule heating rate is derived. From an estimate of the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity it is also possible to estimate the global (height-integrated) Joule heating rate. Here, the differences and relationships between these various parameters are described.

  7. Neoclassical transport of energetic beam ions in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Osamu

    2000-01-01

    The neoclassical (collisional) transport of energetic ions is investigated by the global neoclassical transport simulation in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The steady state distributions of energetic ions are evaluated assuming an energetic particle source by NBI heating (tangentally injected). Significant radial transport of energetic ions can be seen due to the radial motion of trapped particles in the velocity region below near critical velocity. Our simulation results show relatively good agreements with the experimental results of fast particle measurements in the LHD. This suggests an important role of neoclassical transport in the radial transport process of energetic ions in heliotrons. (author)

  8. Ion heating up to 1 MeV range with higher harmonic ICRF wave on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, M.; Kusama, Y.; Hamamatsu, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujii, T.; Moriyama, S.; Saigusa, M.; Afanassiev, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of protons under accleration by an ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves with the second to fourth hydrogen harmonics have been investigated in the JT-60U tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Protons have been accelerated up to 1 MeV in the presence of an ICRF wave of fixed frequency, neutral beams (NB), and a fixed toroidal magnetic field which is scanned through several plasma discharges. The tail temperature of the protons, which is evaluated in the range 0.32-0.86 MeV, has been observed to increase in the second to third harmonics, however increase of the tail temperature in the third to fourth harmonics has not been observed clearly. Furthermore, the dependence of tail temperature on the harmonic number has been found to be in qualitative agreement with results from a simulation code analysis based upon the one-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation coupled with the kinetic wave equation. Experimental values for the stored energy of the accelerated ions have shown, however, that the response of stored energy to changes in absorbed ICRF power is much stronger than the response to changes in harmonic number. Also, the incremental energy confinement times for heating discharges matching the third and fourth harmonics (3 ω CH) and 4 ω CH) of hydrogen have been observed to be less than half that for those matching the second harmonic. It has been found that suppression of the absorbed ICRF power accompanied with the occurence of cavity resonance in the 3ω CH and 4ω CH heating discharges reduces the stored energy of the accelerated ions and the incremental energy confinement time. (Author)

  9. INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHOI, M.; CHAN, V.S.; CHIU, S.C.; OMELCHENKO, Y.A.; SENTOKU, Y.; STJOH, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 INTERACTION OF NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTED FAST IONS WITH CYCLOTRON RESONANCE FREQUENCY WAVES. Existing tokamaks such as DIII-D and future experiments like ITER employ both NB injection (NBI) and ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) for auxiliary heating and current drive. The presence of energetic particles produced by NBI can result in absorption of the Ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) power. ICRF can also interact with the energetic beam ions to alter the characteristics of NBI momentum deposition and resultant impact on current drive and plasma rotation. To study the synergism between NBI and ICRF, a simple physical model for the slowing-down of NB injected fast ions is implemented in a Monte-Carlo rf orbit code. This paper presents the first results. The velocity space distributions of energetic ions generated by ICRF and NBI are calculated and compared. The change in mechanical momentum of the beam and an estimate of its impact on the NB-driven current are presented and compared with ONETWO simulation results

  10. Ion-Ion Plasmas Produced by Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, R. F.; Leonhardt, D.; Walton, S. G.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    The ability of plasmas to etch deep, small-scale features in materials is limited by localized charging of the features. The features charge because of the difference in electron and ion anisotropy, and thus one solution now being explored is to use ion-ion plasmas in place of electron-ion plasmas. Ion-ion plasmas are effectively electron-free and consist mainly of positive and negative ions. Since the two ion species behave similarly, localized charging is largely eliminated. However, the only way to produce ion-ion plasmas at low gas pressure is to convert electrons into negative ions through two-body attachment to neutrals. While the electron attachment rate is large at low electron temperatures (Te < 1 eV) in many of the halogen gases used for processing, these temperatures occur in most reactors only during the afterglow when the heating fields are turned off and the plasma is decaying. By contrast, Te is low nearly all the time in plasmas produced by electron beams, and therefore electron beams can potentially produce ion-ion plasmas continuously. The theory of ion-ion plasmas formed by pulsed electron beams is examined in this talk and compared with experimental results presented elsewhere [1]. Some general limitations of ion-ion plasmas, including relatively low flux levels, are discussed as well. [1] See the presentation by D. Leonhardt et al. at this conference.

  11. Experimental Observations of Ion Phase-Space Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Armstrong, R. J.; Trulsen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental observations of ion phase-space vortices are reported. The ion phase-space vortices form in the region of heated ions behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical and analytic studies....

  12. Extreme ion heating in the dayside ionosphere in response to the arrival of a coronal mass ejection on 12 March 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of the polar ionosphere with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT ultra high frequency (UHF radar at Tromsø and the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR at Longyearbyen were made during 07:00–12:00 UT on 12 March 2012. During the period, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE spacecraft observed changes in the solar wind which were due to the arrival of coronal mass ejection (CME effects associated with the 10 March M8.4 X-ray event. The solar wind showed two-step variations which caused strong ionospheric heating. First, the arrival of shock structures in the solar wind with enhancements of density and velocity, and a negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF-Bz component caused strong ionospheric heating around Longyearbyen; the ion temperature at about 300 km increased from about 1100 to 3400 K over Longyearbyen while that over Tromsø increased from about 1050 to 1200 K. After the passage of the shock structures, the IMF-Bz component showed positive values and the solar wind speed and density also decreased. The second strong ionospheric heating occurred after the IMF-Bz component showed negative values again; the negative values lasted for more than 1.5 h. This solar wind variation caused stronger heating of the ionosphere in the lower latitudes than higher latitudes, suggesting expansion of the auroral oval/heating region to the lower latitude region. This study shows an example of the CME-induced dayside ionospheric heating: a short-duration and very large rise in the ion temperature which was closely related to the polar cap size and polar cap potential variations as a result of interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere.

  13. Impurity behavior during ion-Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, R. C.; Post-Zwicker, A. P.; Paul, S. F.; Tighe, W.; Ono, M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Bell, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Kaita, R.

    1994-07-01

    Ion-Bernstein-wave heating (IBWH) has been tested in several tokamaks. In some cases the results have been quite positive, producing temperature increases and also improving both energy and particle confinement times, whereas in others, no distinctive changes were observed. Most recently, IBWH has been utilized in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M) where the long-range goal is the achievement of operation in the second stable region by current and pressure profile control. Investigations have been performed in this machine using IBWH as the sole source of auxiliary power or using IBWH in conjunction with neutral-beam injection (NBI) or with lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD). Impurity studies seem particularly important for IBWH since not only have influxes often been observed to increase, but the global impurity confinement time has also been shown to lengthen as the confinement of the working gas improved. The authors present here a set of characteristic experimental results regarding the impurity behavior in PBX-M; in general, these are consonant with previous observations in other tokamaks.

  14. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP's and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 μs, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity

  15. Transport in Auxiliary Heated NSTX Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.P.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bitte, M.L.; Bourdelle, C.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.F.; Redi, M.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rosenberg, A.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.A.; Wilson, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The NSTX spherical torus (ST) provides a unique platform to investigate magnetic confinement in auxiliary-heated plasmas at low aspect ratio. Auxiliary power is routinely coupled to ohmically heated plasmas by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI) and by high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW) launch. While theory predicts both techniques to preferentially heat electrons, experiment reveals the electron temperature is greater than the ion temperature during HHFW, but the electron temperature is less than the ion temperature during NBI. In the following we present the experimental data and the results of transport analyses

  16. Pyrolytic Carbon Nanosheets for Ultrafast and Ultrastable Sodium-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Se Youn; Kang, Minjee; Choi, Jaewon; Lee, Min Eui; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Hae Jin; Leal, Cecilia; Lee, Sungho; Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Yun, Young Soo

    2018-04-01

    Na-ion cointercalation in the graphite host structure in a glyme-based electrolyte represents a new possibility for using carbon-based materials (CMs) as anodes for Na-ion storage. However, local microstructures and nanoscale morphological features in CMs affect their electrochemical performances; they require intensive studies to achieve high levels of Na-ion storage performances. Here, pyrolytic carbon nanosheets (PCNs) composed of multitudinous graphitic nanocrystals are prepared from renewable bioresources by heating. In particular, PCN-2800 prepared by heating at 2800 °C has a distinctive sp 2 carbon bonding nature, crystalline domain size of ≈44.2 Å, and high electrical conductivity of ≈320 S cm -1 , presenting significantly high rate capability at 600 C (60 A g -1 ) and stable cycling behaviors over 40 000 cycles as an anode for Na-ion storage. The results of this study show the unusual graphitization behaviors of a char-type carbon precursor and exceptionally high rate and cycling performances of the resulting graphitic material, PCN-2800, even surpassing those of supercapacitors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Negative ion based neutral beams for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelec, K.

    1978-01-01

    Neutral beam systems based on negative ions have been considered because of a high expected power efficiency. Methods for the production, acceleration and neutralization of negative ions will be reviewed and possibilities for an application in neutral beam lines explored

  18. Optimal laser heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitela, J.; Akcasu, A.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Optimal Control Theory is used to analyze the laser-heating of plasmas confined in strong solenoidal magnetic fields. Heating strategies that minimize a linear combination of heating time and total energy spent by the laser system are found. A numerical example is used to illustrate the theory. Results of this example show that by an appropriate modulation of the laser intensity, significant savings in the laser energy are possible with only slight increases in the heating time. However, results may depend strongly on the initial state of the plasma and on the final ion temperature. (orig.)

  19. Review of recent advances in heating and current drive on TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiaen, A.M.; Eester, D. Van; Koch, R.

    1993-01-01

    Co-injection (D o →D + ) applied to TEXTOR leads to a hot ion mode regime with enhanced confinement. A synergistic increase of the beam effects is observed with the addition of ICRH at ω=2ω cD = ω cH (H minority heating scenario) resulting, beside other reviewed effects, in a significant increase of the ion temperature and of the beam driven current (respectively larger than 30% and 50% for the addition of an RF power comparable to the NBI one). The large ion heating efficiency of ICRH also remains when ICRH is added to balanced injection and the hot ion mode regime remains up to the maximum achieved β (=2/3 of the Troyon limit with more than 6MW of auxiliary heating). ICRH also leads to the formation of a more isotropic tail. These results are interpreted with the help of a Fokker-Planck code which computes the beam distribution function in presence of RF and of TRANSP simulations. The amount of RF absorption by the H minority, by the ion beam and the bulk plasma is theoretically evaluated. It is shown that a large part of the synergistic effects can be explained by the rise of the electron temperature due to the minority heating which increases the beam slowing down time and its critical energy. A smaller contribution to the effects is due to direct coupling of the RF power to the beam (less than 10% of the total RF absorbed power) and to the decrease of the plasma toroidal rotation induced by the RF. ICRH has also been added to co-injection at ω=3ω CD . In this case no minority heating is present and the RF energy coupling to the beam is one of the dominant effects. It leads to the formation of a very energetic tail of the ion beam with a strong increase of the beam-target neutron reactivity. (Author)

  20. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  1. Effect of the minority concentration on ion cyclotron resonance heating in presence of the ITER-like wall in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Crombé, K.; Jachmich, S. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association Euratom-Belgian State, TEC Partner, Brussels (Belgium); Jacquet, P.; Graham, M.; Kiptily, V.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mc Cormick, K.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Rimini, F.; Solano, E. R. [Euratom-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik Euratom Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Coenen, J. W. [IEK-4, EURATOM-FZJ, TEC Partner, Jülich (Germany); and others

    2014-02-12

    The most recent JET campaign has focused on characterizing operation with the 'ITER-like' wall. One of the questions that needed to be answered is whether the auxiliary heating methods do not lead to unacceptably high levels of impurity influx, preventing fusion-relevant operation. In view of its high single pass absorption, hydrogen minority fundamental cyclotron heating in a deuterium plasma was chosen as the reference wave heating scheme in the ion cyclotron domain of frequencies. The present paper discusses the plasma behavior as a function of the minority concentration X[H] in L-mode with up to 4MW of RF power. It was found that the tungsten concentration decreases by a factor of 4 when the minority concentration is increased from X[H] ≈ 5% to X[H] % 20% and that it remains at a similar level when X[H] is further increased to 30%; a monotonic decrease in Beryllium emission is simultaneously observed. The radiated power drops by a factor of 2 and reaches a minimum at X[H] ≈ 20%. It is discussed that poor single pass absorption at too high minority concentrations ultimately tailors the avoidance of the RF induced impurity influx. The edge density being different for different minority concentrations, it is argued that the impact ICRH has on the fate of heavy ions is not only a result of core (wave and transport) physics but also of edge dynamics and fueling.

  2. Thermal modulation voltammetry with laser heating at an aqueous|nitrobenzene solution microinterface: determination of the standard entropy changes of transfer for tetraalkylammonium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoue, Teruo; Ikeda, Eiji; Watariguchi, Shigeru; Kibune, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Thermal modulation voltammetry (TMV) with laser heating was successfully performed at an aqueous|nitrobenzene (NB) solution microinterface, by taking advantage of the fact that laser light with a wavelength of 325.0 nm is optically transparent to the aqueous solution but opaque to the NB solution. When the laser beam impinges upon the interface from the aqueous solution side, a temperature is raised around the interface through the thermal diffusion subsequent to the light-to-heat conversion following the optical absorption by the NB solution near the interface. Based on such a principle, we achieved a fluctuating temperature perturbation around the interface for TMV by periodically irradiating the interface with the laser beam. On the other hand, the fluctuating temperature perturbation has influence on currents for transfer of an ion across the interface to produce fluctuating currents synchronized with the perturbation through temperature coefficients of several variables concerning the transfer, such as the standard transfer potential and the diffusion coefficient of the ion. Consequently, TMV has the possibility of providing information about the standard entropy change of transfer corresponding to a temperature coefficient of the standard transfer potential and a temperature coefficient of the diffusion coefficient. In this work, the aqueous|NB solution interface of 30 microm in diameter was irradiated with the laser beam at 10 Hz, and the currents synchronized with the periodical irradiation were recorded as a function of the potential difference across the interface in order to construct a TM voltammogram. TM voltammograms were measured for transfer of tetramethylammonium, tetraethylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, and tetra-n-butylammonium ions from the aqueous solution to the NB solution, and the standard entropy change of transfer was determined for each ion, according to an analytical procedure based on a mathematical expression of the TM voltammogram

  3. Turbulent transport of energetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, Tilman; Hauff, Thilo; Jenko, Frank; Guenter, Sibylle

    2006-01-01

    Approaching ITER operation, the issue of anomalous transport of fast particles becomes more and more important. This is partly because the ITER heating and current drive system relies heavily on neutral beam injection. Moreover burning plasmas are heated by fast fusion α particles.Fusion α particles are characterised by a fixed energy and an isotropic velocity distribution. Therefore they have gyroradii one magnitude larger than the thermal ions. The dependency of the particle diffusion of α test particles on the Kubo number K = VExBτc/λc (VExB mean E x B velocity, τc, λc correlation time and length of the turbulent potential) is presented. For different turbulent regimes, different dependency of the diffusion on the gyroradius is found. For large Kubo numbers, the transport is found to remain constant for gyroradii up to the correlation length of the potential, whereas it is drastically reduced in the small Kubo number regime.In the second part, a model for beam ions injected along the equilibrium magnetic field is described. The beam ions are treated gyrokinetically in a self-consistent way with the equilibrium distribution function taken as a shifted Maxwellian. The implications of such a model for the Vlasov equation, the field equations, and the calculation of moments and fluxes are discussed. Linear and nonlinear results, obtained with the gyrokinetic flux tube code GENE show the existence of a new instability driven by fast beam ions. The instability has a maximum growth rate at perpendicular wave numbers of kyρs ∼ 0.15 and depends mainly on the beam velocity and the density gradient of the beam ions. This instability leads to a replacement of bulk ion particle transport by fast ion particle transport, connected to a strongly enhanced heat flux. In the presence of this instability, the turbulent particle and heat transport is dominated by fast ions

  4. Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient driven drift waves in pair-ion plasma with nonthermal electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Javaria; Haque, Q.; Khan, Majid; Bhatti, Adnan Mehmood; Kamran, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven waves is investigated in pair-ion plasma comprising ions and nonthermal electrons (kappa, Cairns). By using the transport equations of the Braginskii model, a new set of nonlinear equations are derived. A linear dispersion relation is obtained and discussed analytically as well as numerically. It is shown that the nonthermal population of electrons affects both the linear and nonlinear characteristics of the ITG mode in pair-ion plasma. This work will be useful in tokamaks and stellarators where non-Maxwellian population of electrons may exist due to resonant frequency heating, electron cyclotron heating, runaway electrons, etc.

  5. Significance of atmospheric effects of heat rejection from energy centers in the semi arid northwest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Drake, R.L.; Young, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The results presented in this paper have been obtained using simple atmospheric models in an attempt to optimize heat sink management in a conceptual nuclear energy center (NEC) at Hanford. The models have been designed to be conservatice in the sense that they are biased toward over prediction of the impact of cooling system effluents on humidity and fog. Thus the models are screening tools to be used to identify subjects for further, more realistic examination. Within this context the following conclusions have been reached: the evaluation of any atmospheric impact postulated for heat dissipation must be conducted in quantitative terms which can be used to determine the significance of the impact; of the potential atmospheric impacts of large heat releases from energy centers, the one most amenable to quantitative evaluation in meaningful terms as the increase in fog; a postulated increase in frequency of fog can be translated into terms of visibility and both can be evaluated statistically; the translation of a increase in fog to visibility terms permits economic evaluation of the impact; and the predicted impact of the HNEC on fog and visibility is statistically significant whether the energy center consists of 20 or 40 units

  6. Poloidal asymmetries of the heavy ions in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odstrcil, Tomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Puetterich, Thomas; Angioni, Clemente; Bilato, Roberto; Gude, Anja; Vezinet, Didier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Mazon, Didier [CEA, IRFM, Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Poloidal asymmetries of heavy ions in the tokamak plasma are caused by the presence of forces parallel with field-lines which have comparable magnitude to the thermal pressure. The most important examples are the centrifugal force (CF) and the electric force (EF). The CF is caused by fast toroidal rotation of the plasma column which is pushing impurity ions, that have a substantially higher mass than the main ions, on the outer-side of the plasma. And the EF can be produced by ion cyclotron heated fast particles with high pitch angle that are trapped by the mirror force on the low field side of the plasma. The excessive charge produced by these particles is affecting highly charged impurities and pushing them to the high field side of the plasma. From predictions based on neoclassical and turbulent theory, it follows that the radial flux of heavy ions will be significantly changed by the presence of these asymmetries. The purpose of this study is to investigate the presence of these asymmetries in ASDEX Upgrade and verify the predicted consequences on the particles flux. High intrinsic content of the tungsten in AUG plasma makes this device well suitable for such studies. Precise measurement of the SXR (soft-X-ray) radiation profiles has identified a presence of CF generated asymmetries in every NBI heated Asdex discharge. Poloidal asymmetry should than lead to the significant change in the neoclassical and turbulent radial transport of these heavy ions. High intrinsic content of the tungsten in Asdex plasma makes this device well suitable for studying these asymmetries. Precise measurement of the SXR (soft-X-ray) radiation profiles has identified a presence of CF generated asymmetries in every NBI heated Asdex discharge. For heavy and highly charged impurities multiple mechanisms exist that produce non-constant impurities densities on the flux surfaces. As for neoclassical and turbulent transport models such an asymmetry is of highly importance an effort is

  7. A method to study electron heating during ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.; Hellsten, T.

    1989-01-01

    Collisionless absorption of ICRF waves occurs either by ion cyclotron absorption or by electron Landau (ELD) and transit damping (TTMP). Both ion cyclotron absorption, and direct electron absorption results in electron heating. Electron heating by minority ions occurs after a high energy tail of the resonating ions has been formed i.e. typically after 0.2-1s in present JET experiments. Electron heating through ELD, and TTMP, takes place on the timescale given by electron-electron collisions which is typically of the order of ms. This difference in the timescales can be used to separate the two damping mechanisms. This can be done by measuring the time derivatives of the electron temperature after sawtooth crashes during ramp-up and ramp-down of the RF-power. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  8. Search for diffusion of counter-passing MeV ions in the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Boivin, R.; Chang, C.S.; Hammett, G.; Mynick, H.E.

    1991-07-01

    Confinement studies of MeV ions will play an important role in the research leading to burning plasmas in tokamaks, since any significant radial transport of MeV alpha particles will affect the heating rate or heating profiles of these plasmas. Because the energy, gyroradius, and collisionality of these MeV ions is very different from that of the background plasma, their transport rates cannot be assumed equal to those of the bulk plasma ions. Note that the desired confinement time for 3.5 MeV alphas is set by their thermalization time, which can be up to τ th,α ∼1 sec for the steady-state phase of ITER, requiring D 2 /sec. This is equivalent to over ∼100,000 alpha particle transits of the torus. 28 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Ion Heating by Fast Particle Induced Alfven Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.; Gorelenkov, N.; White, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    A novel mechanism that directly transfers energy from Super-Alfvenic energetic ions to thermal ions in high-beta plasmas is described. The mechanism involves the excitation of compressional Alfvin eigenmodes (CAEs) in the frequency range with omega less than or approximately equal to omega(subscript ci). The broadband turbulence resulting from the large number of excited modes causes stochastic diffusion in velocity space, which transfers wave energy to thermal ions. This effect may be important on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and may scale up to reactor scenarios. This has important implications for low aspect ratio reactor concepts, since it potentially allows for the modification of the ignition criterion

  10. ECR ion source with electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zu Q.; Lyneis, Claude M.

    1993-01-01

    An Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10) having an electron gun (52) for introducing electrons into the plasma chamber (18) of the ion source (10). The ion source (10) has a injection enclosure (12) and a plasma chamber tank (14). The plasma chamber (18) is defined by a plurality of longitudinal magnets (16). The electron gun (52) injects electrons axially into the plasma chamber (18) such that ionization within the plasma chamber (18) occurs in the presence of the additional electrons produced by the electron gun (52). The electron gun (52) has a cathode (116) for emitting electrons therefrom which is heated by current supplied from an AC power supply (96) while bias potential is provided by a bias power supply (118). A concentric inner conductor (60) and Outer conductor (62) carry heating current to a carbon chuck (104) and carbon pusher (114) Which hold the cathode (116) in place and also heat the cathode (16). In the Advanced Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (10), the electron gun (52) replaces the conventional first stage used in prior art electron cyclotron resonance ion generators.

  11. An RF heated tandem mirror plasma propulsion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. F.; Yao, X.; Peng, S.; Krueger, W. A.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results on a tandem mirror hybrid plume rocket involving a three-stage system of plasma injection, heating, and subsequent injection through a magnetic nozzle are presented. In the experiments, a plasma is created by breaking down the gas with electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2 kW in the central cell, and the ion species is then heated to high temperatures with ion cyclotron resonance heating at 10 kW in the end cell. A Langmuir probe measured an electron density of 2.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu m and a temperature of 100 eV in the central cell and an ion density of 1.25 x 10 to the 17th/cu m and a temperature of 500 eV in the end cell.

  12. Experimental studies on the high-frequency heating of a plasma in the frequency range of the ion cyclotron harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laeuter, R.

    1976-05-01

    Experiments on the HF heating of a plasma in a cylindrical arrangement with pump frequencies ω 0 in the ion cyclotron harmonics nωsub(ci) are described. A magnetized plasma of relativily high density (approximately 10 14 cm -3 ) is generated in a pinch-like source with pulsated gas inlet, and said plasma then expands along diverging magnetic-field lines in a quasi-static homogeneous guide field B 0 = 330 G. This results in a practically fully ionized, low-impurity and more or less homogeneous plasma column of a diameter of approximately 20 cm at a variable density between 5 x 10 11 and 5 x 10 12 cm -3 and at electron temperatures of 5 to 8 eV. A standing magneto-hydrodynamic wave is excited in this plasma by means of a 1.8 m Stix coil which is part of the anode resonant circuit of a pulsated 1 MHz 500-kW transmitter. The axial wavelength is lambdasub(z) = 45 cm, the pulse duration amounts to tau = 200 μs. The degree of modulation B tilde/B 0 of the quasi-static magnetic field by the HF field is adjustable and ranges between 0.015 and 0.06. The heating at 2ωsub(ci) and 4ωsub(ci) is investigated within this study. Efficiency measurements show that a very effective energy transfer to the plasma occurs with both frequencies. Ion temperatures between 70 and 100 eV are ascertained by means of a retarding-potential spectrometer. For plasma heating, similar turbulent mechanisms seem to be responsible in both cases whereas the linear wave-particle resonance at 2ωsub(ci) seems to be of subordinated importance. The theoretically assumed parametric decay into ion-Bernstein waves, which should be possible at 4 ωsub(ci), is not observed. Measurements with compensated magnetic loops and electrostatic probes make a disturbance of the radial plasma confinement obvious, by which an anormally high pulse frequency might be explained. (orig.) [de

  13. They’re heating up: Internet search query trends reveal significant public interest in heat-not-burn tobacco products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Theodore L.; Leas, Eric; Dredze, Mark; Cohen, Joanna E.; Ayers, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Heat-not-burn tobacco products, battery powered devices that heat leaf tobacco to approximately 500 degrees Fahrenheit to produce an inhalable aerosol, are being introduced in markets around the world. Japan, where manufacturers have marketed several heat-not-burn brands since 2014, has been the focal national test market, with the intention of developing global marketing strategies. We used Google search query data to estimate, for the first time, the scale and growth potential of heat-not-burn tobacco products. Average monthly searches for heat-not-burn products rose 1,426% (95%CI: 746,3574) between their first (2015) and second (2016) complete years on the market and an additional 100% (95%CI: 60, 173) between the products second (2016) and third years on the market (Jan-Sep 2017). There are now between 5.9 and 7.5 million heat-not-burn related Google searches in Japan each month based on September 2017 estimates. Moreover, forecasts relying on the historical trends suggest heat-not-burn searches will increase an additional 32% (95%CI: -4 to 79) during 2018, compared to current estimates for 2017 (Jan-Sep), with continued growth thereafter expected. Contrasting heat-not-burn’s rise in Japan to electronic cigarettes’ rise in the United States we find searches for heat-not-burn eclipsed electronic cigarette searches during April 2016. Moreover, the change in average monthly queries for heat-not-burn in Japan between 2015 and 2017 was 399 (95% CI: 184, 1490) times larger than the change in average monthly queries for electronic cigarettes in the Unites States over the same time period, increasing by 2,956% (95% CI: 1729, 7304) compared to only 7% (95% CI: 3,13). Our findings are a clarion call for tobacco control leaders to ready themselves as heat-not-burn tobacco products will likely garner substantial interest as they are introduced into new markets. Public health practitioners should expand heat-not-burn tobacco product surveillance, adjust existing tobacco

  14. They're heating up: Internet search query trends reveal significant public interest in heat-not-burn tobacco products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore L Caputi

    Full Text Available Heat-not-burn tobacco products, battery powered devices that heat leaf tobacco to approximately 500 degrees Fahrenheit to produce an inhalable aerosol, are being introduced in markets around the world. Japan, where manufacturers have marketed several heat-not-burn brands since 2014, has been the focal national test market, with the intention of developing global marketing strategies. We used Google search query data to estimate, for the first time, the scale and growth potential of heat-not-burn tobacco products. Average monthly searches for heat-not-burn products rose 1,426% (95%CI: 746,3574 between their first (2015 and second (2016 complete years on the market and an additional 100% (95%CI: 60, 173 between the products second (2016 and third years on the market (Jan-Sep 2017. There are now between 5.9 and 7.5 million heat-not-burn related Google searches in Japan each month based on September 2017 estimates. Moreover, forecasts relying on the historical trends suggest heat-not-burn searches will increase an additional 32% (95%CI: -4 to 79 during 2018, compared to current estimates for 2017 (Jan-Sep, with continued growth thereafter expected. Contrasting heat-not-burn's rise in Japan to electronic cigarettes' rise in the United States we find searches for heat-not-burn eclipsed electronic cigarette searches during April 2016. Moreover, the change in average monthly queries for heat-not-burn in Japan between 2015 and 2017 was 399 (95% CI: 184, 1490 times larger than the change in average monthly queries for electronic cigarettes in the Unites States over the same time period, increasing by 2,956% (95% CI: 1729, 7304 compared to only 7% (95% CI: 3,13. Our findings are a clarion call for tobacco control leaders to ready themselves as heat-not-burn tobacco products will likely garner substantial interest as they are introduced into new markets. Public health practitioners should expand heat-not-burn tobacco product surveillance, adjust existing

  15. They're heating up: Internet search query trends reveal significant public interest in heat-not-burn tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Theodore L; Leas, Eric; Dredze, Mark; Cohen, Joanna E; Ayers, John W

    2017-01-01

    Heat-not-burn tobacco products, battery powered devices that heat leaf tobacco to approximately 500 degrees Fahrenheit to produce an inhalable aerosol, are being introduced in markets around the world. Japan, where manufacturers have marketed several heat-not-burn brands since 2014, has been the focal national test market, with the intention of developing global marketing strategies. We used Google search query data to estimate, for the first time, the scale and growth potential of heat-not-burn tobacco products. Average monthly searches for heat-not-burn products rose 1,426% (95%CI: 746,3574) between their first (2015) and second (2016) complete years on the market and an additional 100% (95%CI: 60, 173) between the products second (2016) and third years on the market (Jan-Sep 2017). There are now between 5.9 and 7.5 million heat-not-burn related Google searches in Japan each month based on September 2017 estimates. Moreover, forecasts relying on the historical trends suggest heat-not-burn searches will increase an additional 32% (95%CI: -4 to 79) during 2018, compared to current estimates for 2017 (Jan-Sep), with continued growth thereafter expected. Contrasting heat-not-burn's rise in Japan to electronic cigarettes' rise in the United States we find searches for heat-not-burn eclipsed electronic cigarette searches during April 2016. Moreover, the change in average monthly queries for heat-not-burn in Japan between 2015 and 2017 was 399 (95% CI: 184, 1490) times larger than the change in average monthly queries for electronic cigarettes in the Unites States over the same time period, increasing by 2,956% (95% CI: 1729, 7304) compared to only 7% (95% CI: 3,13). Our findings are a clarion call for tobacco control leaders to ready themselves as heat-not-burn tobacco products will likely garner substantial interest as they are introduced into new markets. Public health practitioners should expand heat-not-burn tobacco product surveillance, adjust existing tobacco

  16. Heating experiments of JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In JT-60, after the finish of the first stage Joule experiment, the heating facilities were installed, and the heating experiment was started in August, 1986. As to neutral beam injection, the beam injection experiment at the maximum rating 20 MW carried out, and also as to RF, the injection experiment up to 1.4 MW was carried out in both ion cyclotron and low band hybrid waves. The results worthy of special mention in the heating experiment were the success in the current drive up to 1.7 MA at maximum using low band hybrid waves and the improvement of plasma confinement characteristics obtained by the compound heating of NBI and RF. In this paper, the main results of these heating experiments and their significance are explained. The JT-60 is the testing facilities for attaining the critical plasma condition by additionally heating the plasma which is generated by Joule electric discharge with NBI and RF heatings. The experimental operation cycle of the JT-60 consists of the unit cycle of two weeks, and the number of days in operation is nine days. The temperature of heated plasma rose to 70 million deg C in the 20 MW NBI heating. Hereafter, the improvement of confinement time by increasing the stored energy of plasma is attempted. (Kako, I.)

  17. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  18. Ion-Beam-Excited, Electrostatic, Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  19. Fast ions and momentum transport in JET tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Fast ions are an inseparable part of fusion plasmas. They can be generated using electromagnetic waves or injected into plasmas as neutrals to heat the bulk plasma and to drive toroidal rotation and current. In future power plants fusion born fast ions deliver the main heating into the plasma. Understanding and controlling the fast ions is of crucial importance for the operation of a power plant. Furthermore, fast ions provide ways to probe the properties of the thermal plasma and get insight of its confinement properties. In this thesis, numerical code packages are used and developed to simulate JET experiments for a range of physics issues related to fast ions. Namely, the clamping fast ion distribution at high energies with RF heating, fast ion ripple torque generation and the toroidal momentum transport properties using NBI modulation technique are investigated. Through a comparison of numerical simulations and the JET experimental data it is shown that the finite Larmor radius effects in ion cyclotron resonance heating are important and that they can prevent fast ion tail formation beyond certain energy. The identified mechanism could be used for tailoring the fast ion distribution in future experiments. Secondly, ASCOT simulations of NBI ions in a ripple field showed that most of the reduction of the toroidal rotation that has been observed in the JET enhanced ripple experiments could be attributed to fast ion ripple torque. Finally, fast ion torque calculations together with momentum transport analysis have led to the conclusion that momentum transport in not purely diffusive but that a convective component, which increases monotonically in radius, exists in a wide range of JET plasmas. Using parameter scans, the convective transport has been shown to be insensitive to collisionality and q-profile but to increase strongly against density gradient. (orig.)

  20. Fast ions and momentum transport in JET tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Fast ions are an inseparable part of fusion plasmas. They can be generated using electromagnetic waves or injected into plasmas as neutrals to heat the bulk plasma and to drive toroidal rotation and current. In future power plants fusion born fast ions deliver the main heating into the plasma. Understanding and controlling the fast ions is of crucial importance for the operation of a power plant. Furthermore, fast ions provide ways to probe the properties of the thermal plasma and get insight of its confinement properties. In this thesis, numerical code packages are used and developed to simulate JET experiments for a range of physics issues related to fast ions. Namely, the clamping fast ion distribution at high energies with RF heating, fast ion ripple torque generation and the toroidal momentum transport properties using NBI modulation technique are investigated. Through a comparison of numerical simulations and the JET experimental data it is shown that the finite Larmor radius effects in ion cyclotron resonance heating are important and that they can prevent fast ion tail formation beyond certain energy. The identified mechanism could be used for tailoring the fast ion distribution in future experiments. Secondly, ASCOT simulations of NBI ions in a ripple field showed that most of the reduction of the toroidal rotation that has been observed in the JET enhanced ripple experiments could be attributed to fast ion ripple torque. Finally, fast ion torque calculations together with momentum transport analysis have led to the conclusion that momentum transport in not purely diffusive but that a convective component, which increases monotonically in radius, exists in a wide range of JET plasmas. Using parameter scans, the convective transport has been shown to be insensitive to collisionality and q-profile but to increase strongly against density gradient. (orig.)

  1. Mathematical modelling for magnetite (crude removal from primary heat transfer loop by ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Nawaz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present research focuses to develop mathematical model for the removal of iron (magnetite by ion-exchange resin from primary heat transfer loop of process industries. This mathematical model is based on operating capacities (that’s provide more effective design as compared to loading capacity from static laboratory tests. Results showed non-steady state distribution of external Fe2+ and limitations imposed on operating conditions, these conditions includes; loading and elution cycle time, flow rate, concentration of both loading and removal, volume of resin required. Number of generalized assumptions was made under shortcut modeling techniques to overcome the gap of theoretical and actual process design.

  2. Confinement of ohmically heated plasmas and turbulent heating in high-magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Itoh, S; Kawai, Y; Toi, K; Nakamura, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1979-12-01

    TRIAM-1, the tokamak device with high toroidal magnetic field, has been constructed to establish the scaling laws of advanced tokamak devices such as Alcator, and to study the possibility of the turbulent heating as a further economical heating method of the fusion oriented plasmas. The plasma parameters obtained by ohmic heating alone are as follows; central electron temperature T sub(e0) = 640 eV, central ion temperature T sub(i0) = 280 eV and line-average electron density n average sub(e) = 2.2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. The empirical scaling laws are investigated concerning T sub(e0), T sub(i0) and n average sub(e). The turbulent heating has been carried out by applying the high electric field in the toroidal direction to the typical tokamak discharge with T sub(i0) asymptotically equals 200 eV. The efficient ion heating is observed and T sub(i0) attains to about 600 eV.

  3. Radioactive ion beam production challenges at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigs, M.J.; Alton, G.D.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Tatum, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive ion beam (RIB) project at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) will provide for reconfiguration of the HHIRF accelerator system to enable provision of low-intensity RIBs for nuclear and astrophysics research. As we have progressed with the design of the reconfiguration, we have encountered several challenges that were not immediately obvious when first contemplating the project. The challenges do not seem insurmountable but should keep life interesting for those of us doing the work. A brief review of the project will allow a better understanding of the challenges in RIB production. Radioactive ion beams will be produced with the Isotope Separator On-Line (ISOL) postacceleration technique. In particular, radioactive atoms will be produced by reactions in the thick stopping target of an ISOL-type target-ion source assembly using intense beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron equipped with a light-ion internal source. This ISOL target-ion source assembly will be mounted on a high-voltage platform with a mass separator. The target ion source will operate at potentials up to 50 kV with respect to the high voltage platform. The radioactive atoms produced by nuclear reactions in the target diffuse to the surface of the heated target material, desorb from this surface, and effuse through a heated transfer tube into an ion source where ionization and extraction take place. Two types of ion sources will be initially considered. A Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge source, similar to those used by the ISOLDE facility at CERN and by the UNISOR facility at ORNL, will be built to produce positive ions. These positive ions will be focused through an alkali vapor charge-exchange canal to produce negative ions for tandem injection. In addition, a direct negative surface ionization addition or modification to the above source will be built and investigated

  4. The effect of electron cyclotron heating on density fluctuations at ion and electron scales in ITER baseline scenario discharges on the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, A.; Pinsker, R. I.; Porkolab, M.; Rost, J. C.; Davis, E. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; Staebler, G. M.; Grierson, B. A.; McKee, G. R.; Rhodes, T. L.; The DIII-D Team

    2017-12-01

    Experiments simulating the ITER baseline scenario on the DIII-D tokamak show that torque-free pure electron heating, when coupled to plasmas subject to a net co-current beam torque, affects density fluctuations at electron scales on a sub-confinement time scale, whereas fluctuations at ion scales change only after profiles have evolved to a new stationary state. Modifications to the density fluctuations measured by the phase contrast imaging diagnostic (PCI) are assessed by analyzing the time evolution following the switch-off of electron cyclotron heating (ECH), thus going from mixed beam/ECH to pure neutral beam heating at fixed βN . Within 20 ms after turning off ECH, the intensity of fluctuations is observed to increase at frequencies higher than 200 kHz in contrast, fluctuations at lower frequency are seen to decrease in intensity on a longer time scale, after other equilibrium quantities have evolved. Non-linear gyro-kinetic modeling at ion and electron scales scales suggest that, while the low frequency response of the diagnostic is consistent with the dominant ITG modes being weakened by the slow-time increase in flow shear, the high frequency response is due to prompt changes to the electron temperature profile that enhance electron modes and generate a larger heat flux and an inward particle pinch. These results suggest that electron heated regimes in ITER will feature multi-scale fluctuations that might affect fusion performance via modifications to profiles.

  5. Study of parametric instabilities during the Alcator C lower hybrid wave heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Y.

    1983-10-01

    Parametric excitation of ion-cyclotron quasi-modes (ω/sub R/ approx. = nω/sub ci/) and ion-sound quasi-modes (ω/sub R/ approx. = k/sub parallel to/v/sub ti/) during lower hybrid wave heating of tokamak plasmas have been studied in detail. Such instabilities may significantly modify the incident wavenumber spectrum near the plasma edge. Convective losses for these instabilities are high if well-defined resonance cones exist, but they are significantly reduced if the resonance cones spread and fill the plasma volume (or some region of it). These instabilities preferentially excite lower hybrid waves with larger values of n/sub parallel to/ than themselves possess, and the new waves tend to be absorbed near the outer layers of the plasma. Parametric instabilities during lower hybrid heating of Alcator C plasmas have been investigated using rf probes (to study tilde phi and tilde n/sub i/) and CO 2 scattering technique (to study tilde n/sub e/). At lower densities (anti n/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.5 x 10 14 cm -3 ) where waves observed in the plasma interior using CO 2 scattering appear to be localized, parametric decay is very weak. Both ion-sound and ion-cyclotron parametric decay processes have been observed at higher densities (anti n greater than or equal to 1.5 x 10 14 cm -3 ) where waves appear to be unlocalized. Finally, at still higher densities (anti n /sub e/ greater than or equal to 2 x 10 4 cm -3 ) pump depletion has been observed. Above these densities heating and current drive efficiencies are expected to degrade significantly

  6. ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] heating and antenna coupling in a high beta tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elet, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Maxwell's Equations are solved in two-dimensions for the electromagnetic fields in a toroidal cavity using the cold plasma fluid dielectric tensor in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). The Vector Wave Equation is transformed to a set of two, coupled second-order partial differential equations with inhomogeneous forcing functions which model a wave launcher. The resulting equations are finite differenced and solved numerically with a complex banded matrix algorithm on a Cray-2 computer using a code described in this report. This code is used to study power coupling characteristics of a wave launcher for low and high beta tokamaks. The low and high beta equilibrium tokamak magnetic fields applied in this model are determined from analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation. The code shows good correspondence with the results of low field side ICRF heating experiments performed on the Tokamak of Fontenay-Aux-Roses (TFR). Low field side and high field side antenna coupling properties for ICRF heating in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT) experiment are calculated with this code. Variations of antenna position in the tokamak, ionic concentration and plasma density, and volume-averaged beta have been analyzed for HBT. It is found that the location of the antenna with respect to the plasma has the dominant role in the design of an ICRF heating experiment in HBT. 10 refs., 52 figs., 13 tabs

  7. Two-point theory of current-driven ion-cyclotron turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiueh, T.; Diamond, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    An analytical theory of current-driven ion-cyclotron turbulenc which treats incoherent phase space density granulations (clumps) is presented. In contrast to previous investigations, attention is focused on the physically relevant regime of weak collective dissipation, where waves and clumps coexist. The threshold current for nonlinear instability is calculated, and is found to deviate from the linear threshold. A necessary condition for the existence of stationary wave-clump turbulence is derived, and shown to be analogous to the test particle model fluctuation-dissipation theorem result. The structure of three dimensional magnetized clumps is characterized. It is proposed that instability is saturated by collective dissipation due to ion-wave scattering. For this wave-clump turbulence regime, it is found that the fluctuation level (e psi/T/sub e/)/sub rms/ less than or equal to 0.1, and that the modification of anomalous resistivity to levels predicted by conventional nonlinear wave theories is moderate. It is also shown that, in marked contrast to the quasilinear prediction, ion heating significantly exceeds electron heating

  8. Electron heating in JET by ICRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordey, J.G.; Christiansen, J.P.; Core, W.G.F.; Cotrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Kovanen, M.A.; Lomas, P.; Start, D.F.H.; Taroni, A.; Tibone, F.

    1991-01-01

    Several ICRH experiments carried out on JET during the period 1988-90 have been directed specifically at raising the electron temperature to a high value by maximizing the total input power per particle (P tot /n). It has been found that the electron temperature saturates around 12-14 keV in sharp contrast to NBI ion heating experiments in which ion temperatures exceed 25 keV. Initial calculations suggested that this saturation was due to strongly enhanced transport in the central region. It is shown in this paper that the saturation is due to a lack of heating in the plasma center. The power input to electrons in an ICRF minority heating scheme is mainly via collisional transfer from the minority fast ions and a main problem is to maintain a peaked profile of fast ions. In the present experiments the highest fast ion energy content 4MJ has been achieved with a He 3 minority scheme, the equivalent fast ion toroidal β is 8%; electron temperatures in the range 11-14 keV are attained in these pulses. There are several possible physical effects that can give rise to the broadening of the fast ion radial profile: sawteeth, fishbones, fast ion finite orbit effects and Alfven or drift wave turbulence driven by the large gradients of fast ion pressure (discussed in section IV). The existence of such phenomena in many JET pulses means that the calculation of the power input profile by codes which contain purely classical collisional processes can be misleading. Hence an alternative approach is developed in section II; the measured fast ion energy is used directly to evaluate the power input to the central region; the scaling of the electron temperature with the actual power per particle can therefore be determined (section III). (author) 6 refs., 5 figs

  9. Numerical simulation of ion production processes in EBIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalagin, I.V.; Ovsyannikov, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    The numerical model of EBIS is presented. The calculation of Kr ionization by cooling with Ne ions was carried out taking into account charge exchange, ion heating by electrons, ion-ion energy exchange and ion escape processes. A good agreement with experimental data was observed. 19 refs., 13 figs

  10. Technologies for Trapped-Ion Quantum Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    we discuss work aiming to leverage a commer- cial CMOS (complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor ) process to develop an integrated ion trap architecture...this integration: alignment of optical elements with tiny modes to point emitters, and trap- ping charged particles close to dielectric surfaces. Inte...far by heating in several ways. The deep optical potentials required to confine a charged particle against stray fields impart significant recoil

  11. Theory of neutral injection heating of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordey, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    The present state of injection theory is reviewed with particular emphasis on the consequences of high power injection. The subject is divided into the following six sections: fast ion deposition; the slowing down and scattering of the fast ions; energy and momentum transfer rates; heating of the thermal ions; other perturbations; microinstabilities. The theory is compared with the experimental results. The questions that remain to be answered to establish neutral injection as a useful heating technique in reactors, are listed (26 references)

  12. On the automatic control of the ITER ion cyclotron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosia, G. [Department of General Physics, University of Turin, Via P. Giuria 1, 10 125 Turin (Italy)], E-mail: giuseppe.bosia@to.infn.it

    2007-10-15

    The ITER ion cyclotron heating system requires an efficient control system capable of: (i) providing the desired array radiation spectrum, to optimize plasma coupling and absorption and to minimize parasitic power losses in the plasma edge; (ii) maintaining the RF power flow to the plasma against significant load variations, including fast fluctuations induced by ELMs; (iii) reliably detecting and suppressing RF voltage breakdowns in the array and/or in the transmission system, to avoid local equipment damage and (iv) implementing an accurate real time record of performance. In this paper specific aspects of the tuning control system, related to recent conceptual and engineering effort [K. Vulliez, et al., Design of the ITER ion cyclotron heating launcher based on in-vessel tuning system, Article ID106C, this conference] are addressed.

  13. Thresholds of ion turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Laurent, L.; Mourgues, F.; Roubin, J.P.; Samain, A.; Zou, X.L.

    1991-01-01

    The linear thresholds of ionic turbulence are numerically calculated for the Tokamaks JET and TORE SUPRA. It is proved that the stability domain at η i >0 is determined by trapped ion modes and is characterized by η i ≥1 and a threshold L Ti /R of order (0.2/0.3)/(1+T i /T e ). The latter value is significantly smaller than what has been previously predicted. Experimental temperature profiles in heated discharges are usually marginal with respect to this criterium. It is also shown that the eigenmodes are low frequency, low wavenumber ballooned modes, which may produce a very large transport once the threshold ion temperature gradient is reached

  14. High ion temperatures from buried layers irradiated with Vulcan Petawatt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, S.; Schreiber, J.; Willingale, L.; Lancaster, K.; Habara, H.; Nilson, P.; Gopal, A.; Wei, M. S.; Stoeckl, C.; Evans, R.; Clarke, R.; Heathcote, R.; Najmudin, Z.; Krushelnick, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    Deuteron acceleration from CH/CD/CH layer targets irradiated with PW laser pulses has been studied using. Thomson parabola spectrometers and neutron TOF spectroscopy. The measured ion and neutron spectra reveal significant MeV deuteron acceleration from the deeply buried CD layer, which scales with the thickness of the overlying CH layer. While the neutron spectra reveal the scaling of the thermal heating with target thickness, the ion spectra indicate the presence of an efficient nonthermal acceleration mechanism inside. the bulk. Possible explanations will be discussed. (Author)

  15. Science Court on ICRH [ion cyclotron resonance heating] modeling of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sadowski, W.L.

    1987-10-01

    The Applied Plasma Physics (APP) Theory program in the Office of Fusion Energy is charged with supporting the development of advanced physics models for fusion research. One such effort is ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), which has seen substantial progress recently. However, due to serious questions about the adequacy of present models for CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak), a Science Court was formed to assess ICRH models, including: validity of theoretical and computational approximations; underlying physics assumptions and corresponding limits on the results; self-consistency; any subsidiary issues needing resolution (e.g., new computer tools); adequacy of the models in simulating experiments (especially CIT); and new or improved experiments to validate and refine the models. The Court did not review work by specific individuals, institutions, or programs, thereby avoiding any biases along these lines. Rather, the Science Court was carefully structured as a technical review of ICRH theory and modeling in the US. This paper discusses the Science Court process, findings, and conclusions

  16. Results of measurements of the ion temperature profile of ECR heated plasmas in the L-2M stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronov, G.S.; Voronova, E.V.; Grebenshchikov, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    After boronization of the vacuum chamber of the L-2M stellarator, the confinement characteristics and the electron temperature profile changed markedly. In this connection, our immediate task was to carry out studies of the behavior of the ion temperature under these conditions. Previous measurements of Ti were performed by analyzing the energy distribution of fast hydrogen ions produced by charge exchange. In recent studies, the ion temperature was determined from Doppler broadening of spectral lines of impurity ions. With the help of a set of mirrors, the plasma radiation was focused on the entrance slit of a VMS-1 monochromator (D/F=1:6.5, F=600 mm, 1200 lines/mm,1.3 nm/mm, 200 - 800 nm). The detector was a CCD plate (1040 1 140 pixels of size 16 1 6 ∝ m) covered in part with an opaque screen. The plasma spectrum produced in the uncovered area was rapidly scanned and copied into the covered region. With this partial exposition method, the rate of recording was successfully increased up to 1000 frames per second. The instrument function of the whole system was 0.04 nm, which corresponds to Ti ∼1 eV for hydrogen and ∼17 eV for boron ions. The plasma ion temperature is considerably higher, so the accuracy of measurements of Ti is limited primarily by a low intensity of signals from the plasma with a low impurity concentration. The results of measurements of the evolution of HeII, BII, and BIV ions temperature during the ECR heating of a helium plasma are shown in the figure. The plasma density in these experiments was ∼2.10 19 m -3 , and the gyrotron pulse power was ∼200 kW. The results of measurements of Ti were compared with the time evolution of the ion temperature calculated by using the TRANSZ code. The latter includes a complete set of neoclassical equations and involves additional anomalous fluxes corresponding to accepted empirical scalings. The calculated values of Ti are in fair agreement with the measured ones

  17. Ion-acoustic plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Y.; Silin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is developed of the nonlinear state that is established in a plasma as a result of development of ion-acoustic instability. Account is taken simultaneously of the linear induced scattering of the waves by the ions and of the quasilinear relaxation of the electrons by the ion-acoustic pulsations. The distribution of the ion-acoustic turbulence in frequency and in angle is obtained. An Ohm's law is established and expressions are obtained for the electronic heat flux and for the relaxation time of the electron temperature in a turbulent plasma. Anomalously large absorption and scattering of the electromagnetic waves by the ion-acoustic pulsations is predicted

  18. Effect of multi-ions on electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves with a hot plasma around the polar cusp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Soniya; Varma, P; Tiwari, M S

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) instabilities with an isotropic ion beam and general loss-cone distribution of hot core plasmas are discussed. The growth rate of the wave, perpendicular heating of ions, parallel resonant energy and marginal instability of the EMIC waves in homogeneous plasmas are obtained using the dispersion relation for hot plasmas consisting of H + , He + ,O + ions and electrons. The wave is assumed to propagate parallel to the static magnetic field. The whole plasma is considered to consist of resonant and non-resonant particles permeated by the isotropic ion beam. It is assumed that the resonant particles and the ion beam participate in energy exchange with the wave, whereas the non-resonant particles support the oscillatory motion of the wave. We determined the variation in energies and growth rate in hot plasmas by the energy conservation method with a general loss-cone distribution function. We also discuss the effect of positive and negative ion beam velocity on the growth rate of the wave. The thermal anisotropy of the ions of the core plasma acts as a source of free energy for EMIC waves and enhances the growth rate. Heating of ions perpendicular to the magnetic field is discussed along with EMIC wave emission in the polar cusp region.

  19. Prospective utilization of accelerated heavy ions in basic and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flerov, G.; Oganesyan, Yu.

    1982-01-01

    Some important and interesting trends of heavy ion physics are briefly presented, such as giant processes which are characterized by fundamental restructuring of nuclear systems containing hundreds of nucleons, the mechanism of heavy nuclei interaction, the study of nuclear matter compression, the study of the specificity of heating and thermal conductivity of nuclear matter, the study of heavy ion/nucleus interactions at energies of 200 to 300 MeV/nucleon when the meson degree of freedom becomes manifest, the possibility of the production of ions with a large excess or deficiency of neutrons, new possibilities for determining the fission barrier, the critical verification of fundamental physical concepts of quantum electrodynamics and other possibilities of using accelerated heavy ions. The significance of heavy ion physics for the development of acceleration technologies is also described. (B.S.)

  20. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current

  1. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassie, J. S. de; Baker, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Prater, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Rice, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. The pinch of cold ions from recycling in the tokamak edge pedestal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Chen Yang; Park, Gun-Young; Chang, Choong-Seock; Stotler, Daren

    2011-01-01

    We apply the ''natural fueling mechanism'' [W. Wan, S. E. Parker, Y. Chen, and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 17, 040701 (2010)] to the edge pedestal. The natural fueling mechanism is where cold ions naturally pinch radially inward for a heat-flux dominated plasma. It is shown from neoclassical-neutral transport coupled simulations that the recycling neutrals and the associated source ions are colder than the main ions in the edge pedestal. These recycling source ions will pinch radially inward due to microturbulence. Gyrokinetic turbulence simulations indicate that near the top of the pedestal, the pinch velocity of the recycling source ions is much higher than the main ion outgoing flow velocity. The turbulent pinch of the recycling source ions may play a role in the edge pedestal transport and dynamics. The cold ion temperature significantly enhances the pinch velocity of the recycling source ions near to the pedestal top. Neoclassical calculations show a cold ion pinch in the pedestal as well.

  3. Production of highly charged ion beams from ECR ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.Q.

    1997-09-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source development has progressed with multiple-frequency plasma heating, higher mirror magnetic fields and better technique to provide extra cold electrons. Such techniques greatly enhance the production of highly charged ions from ECR ion sources. So far at cw mode operation, up to 300 eμA of O 7+ and 1.15 emA of O 6+ , more than 100 eμA of intermediate heavy ions for charge states up to Ar 13+ , Ca 13+ , Fe 13+ , Co 14+ and Kr 18+ , and tens of eμA of heavy ions with charge states to Kr 26+ , Xe 28+ , Au 35+ , Bi 34+ and U 34+ have been produced from ECR ion sources. At an intensity of at least 1 eμA, the maximum charge state available for the heavy ions are Xe 36+ , Au 46+ , Bi 47+ and U 48+ . An order of magnitude enhancement for fully stripped argon ions (I ≥ 60 enA) also has been achieved. This article will review the ECR ion source progress and discuss key requirement for ECR ion sources to produce the highly charged ion beams

  4. Ion-ion collisions and ion storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mowat, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Improved understanding of fundamental ion-ion interactions is expected to emerge from research carried out with ion storage rings. In this short survey the significant advantages and unique features that make stored ions useful targets for collision experiments are reviewed and discussed. It is pointed out that improvements to existing ion-ion experiments, as well as qualitatively new experiments, should occur over the next few years as ion storage rings become available for atomic physics. Some new experiments are suggested which are difficult if not impossible with present-day technology, but which seem feasible at storage rings facilities. (orig.)

  5. A statistical study of ion energization at 1700 km in the auroral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamrin

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive overview of several potentially relevant causes for the oxygen energization in the auroral region. Data from the Freja satellite near 1700 km altitude are used for an unconditional statistical investigation. The data are obtained in the Northern Hemisphere during 21 months in the declining phase of the solar cycle. The importance of various wave types for the ion energization is statistically studied. We also investigate the correlation of ion heating with precipitating protons, accelerated auroral electrons, suprathermal electron bursts, the electron density variations, Kp index and solar illumination of the nearest conjugate ionosphere. We find that sufficiently strong broad-band ELF waves, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and waves around the lower hybrid frequency are foremost associated with the ion heating. However, magnetosonic waves, with a sharp, lower frequency cutoff just below the proton gyrofrequency, are not found to contribute to the ion heating. In the absence of the first three wave emissions, transversely energized ions are rare. These wave types are approximately equally efficient in heating the ions, but we find that the main source for the heating is broadband ELF waves, since they are most common in the auroral region. We have also observed that the conditions for ion heating are more favourable for smaller ratios of the spectral densities SE /SB of the broadband ELF waves at the oxygen gyrofrequency.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; wave propogation Magnetospheric physics (electric fields

  6. Analysis of the ion energy transport in ohmic discharges in the ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmet, E.E.; Fahrbach, H.U.; Herrmann, W.; Stroth, U.

    1996-10-01

    An analysis of the local ion energy transport is performed for more than one hundred well documented ohmic ASDEX discharges. These are characterized by three different confinement regimes: the linear ohmic confinement (LOC), the saturated ohmic confinement (SOC) and the improved ohmic confinement (IOC). All three are covered by this study. To identify the most important local transport mechanism of the ion heat, the ion power balance equation is analyzed. Two methods are used: straightforward calculation with experimental data only, and a comparison of measured and calculated profiles of the ion temperature and the ion heat conductivity, respectively. A discussion of the power balance shows that conductive losses dominate the ion energy transport in all ohmic discharges of ASDEX. Only inside the q=1-surface losses due to sawtooth activity play a role, while at the edge convective fluxes and CX-losses influence the ion energy transport. Both methods lead to the result that both the ion temperature and the ion heat conductivity are consistent with predictions of the neoclassical theory. Enhanced heat losses as suggested by theories eg. on the basis of η i modes can be excluded. (orig.)

  7. Characteristics of confining ohm-heated plasma in TRIAM-IM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatae, Takaki; Yamagajyo, Takashi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Jotaki, Eriko; Fujita, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Ito, Satoshi

    1994-01-01

    In the initial experiment after the increase of the power of ohm heating power source for the superconducting strong magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-IM, the measurement of the electron temperature distribution, ion temperature distribution and beam average electron density of ohm-heated plasma was carried out. By analyzing the experimental results, the dependence of the accumulated energy obtained from the temperature distribution and the time of energy confinement of beam average electron density became clear. Especially the time of energy confinement increased in proportion to the increase of beam average electron density when it is 6.5 x 10 12 /m 2 , and it was found that the time of energy confinement conforms to the Neo-Alcator proportional law. Moreover, by solving the heat transport equation for ions, the radial distribution of thermal diffusion coefficient for ions was calculated, and compared with that obtained by the new classic theory. As the result, it was found that the TRIAM-IM has ion confinement characteristics equivalent to those of other medium tokamaks. The experiment of producing ohm-heated plasma, the fitting of electron temperature and ion temperature, the density dependence of temperature, accumulated energy and the time of energy confinement, the time of energy confinement and the Neo-Alcator proportional law, the energy balance of ions and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Transmission line component testing for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Richard; Bell, G. L.; Deibele, C. E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Barber, G. C.; Barbier, C. N.; Cambell, I. H.; Moon, R. L.; Pesavento, P. V.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.

    2014-10-01

    High power RF testing is underway to evaluate transmission line components for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System. The transmission line has a characteristic impedance Z0 = 50 Ω and a nominal outer diameter of 305 mm. It is specified to carry up to 6 MW at VSWR = 1.5 for 3600 s pulses, with transient voltages up to 40 kV. The transmission line is actively cooled, with turbulent gas flow (N2) used to transfer heat from the inner to outer conductor, which is water cooled. High voltage and high current testing of components has been performed using resonant lines generating steady state voltages of 35 kV and transient voltages up to 60 kV. A resonant ring, which has operated with circulating power of 6 MW for 1 hr pulses, is being used to test high power, low VSWR operation. Components tested to date include gas barriers, straight sections of various lengths, and 90 degree elbows. Designs tested include gas barriers fabricated from quartz and aluminum nitride, and transmission lines with quartz and alumina inner conductor supports. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Heating and transport in TFTR D-T plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Scott, S.D.

    1994-01-01

    The confinement and heating of supershot plasmas are significantly enhanced with tritium beam injection relative to deuterium injection in TFTR. The global energy confinement and local thermal transport are analyzed for deuterium and tritium fueled plasmas to quantify their dependence on the average mass of the hydrogenic ions. The radial profiles of the deuterium and tritium densities are determined from the DT fusion neutron emission profile

  10. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Suominen, P. [CERN Geneve 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Koponen, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Nanoscience Center, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  11. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.; Mazzitelli, G.

    1984-01-01

    The article is a rather detailed report on the highlights in the area of the ''Heating in toroidal plasmas'', as derived from the presentations and discussions at the international symposium with the same name, held in Rome, March 1984. The symposium covered both the physics (experiments and theory) and technology of toroidal fusion plasma heating. Both large fusion devices (either already in operation or near completion) requiring auxiliary heating systems at the level of tens of megawatts, as well as physics of their heating processes and their induced side effects (as studied on smaller devices), received attention. Substantial progress was reported on the broad front of auxiliary plasma heating and Ohmic heating. The presentation of the main conclusions of the symposium is divided under the following topics: neutral-beam heating, Alfven wave heating, ion cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating, RF current drive, electron cyclotron heating, Ohmic heating and special contributions

  12. Review of lower hybrid wave heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gormezano, C.

    1986-01-01

    Interaction of Lower Hybrid waves and plasmas is a very versatile method which has proven to be effective in a large range of applications: bulk ion heating, bulk electron heating, non inductive current drive. If the ratio between the mean velocity of HF induced fast particles and the thermal velocity of the bulk population is relatively small, effective bulk ion heating or bulk electron heating can occur via collisional transfer. If the above ratio is too large, fast ions, which have mainly a perpendicular energy, are poorly confined. Moreover they can be harmful for the discharge (impurities, etc...) since they are lost on the walls. In contrast, HF induced fast electrons gain essentially a parallel momentum from the wave. If unidirectional waves are launched, the dissymetry in electron distribution result in the obtention of an effective non inductive current

  13. On the Heating of Ions in Noncylindrical Z-Pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    The method proposed here for analyzing processes in a hot plasma of noncylindrical Z-pinches is based on separation of the group of high-energy ions into a special fraction. Such ions constitute an insignificant fraction ( 10%) of the total volume of the Z-pinch plasma, but these ions contribute the most to the formation of conditions in which the pinch becomes a source of nuclear fusion products and X-ray radiation. The method allows a quite correct approach to obtaining quantitative estimates of the plasma parameters, the nuclear fusion energy yield, and the features of neutron fluxes in experiments with Z-pinches.

  14. The effects of electron cyclotron heating and current drive on toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, S. E.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Bobkov, B.; Classen, I. G. J.; Ferreira, J.; Figueiredo, A.; Fitzgerald, M.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Gallart, D.; Geiger, B.; Gonzalez-Martin, J.; Johnson, T.; Lauber, P.; Mantsinen, M.; Nabais, F.; Nikolaeva, V.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Schneider, P. A.; Snicker, A.; Vallejos, P.; the AUG Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-01-01

    Dedicated studies performed for toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) in ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG) discharges with monotonic q-profiles have shown that electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) can make TAEs more unstable. In these AUG discharges, energetic ions driving TAEs were obtained by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). It was found that off-axis ECRH facilitated TAE instability, with TAEs appearing and disappearing on timescales of a few milliseconds when the ECRH power was switched on and off. On-axis ECRH had a much weaker effect on TAEs, and in AUG discharges performed with co- and counter-current electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the effects of ECCD were found to be similar to those of ECRH. Fast ion distributions produced by ICRH were computed with the PION and SELFO codes. A significant increase in T e caused by ECRH applied off-axis is found to increase the fast ion slowing-down time and fast ion pressure causing a significant increase in the TAE drive by ICRH-accelerated ions. TAE stability calculations show that the rise in T e causes also an increase in TAE radiative damping and thermal ion Landau damping, but to a lesser extent than the fast ion drive. As a result of the competition between larger drive and damping effects caused by ECRH, TAEs become more unstable. It is concluded, that although ECRH effects on AE stability in present-day experiments may be quite significant, they are determined by the changes in the plasma profiles and are not particularly ECRH specific.

  15. Infrared thermography non-destructive evaluation of lithium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-jun; Li, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    The power lithium-ion battery with its high specific energy, high theoretical capacity and good cycle-life is a prime candidate as a power source for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Safety is especially important for large-scale lithium-ion batteries, especially the thermal analysis is essential for their development and design. Thermal modeling is an effective way to understand the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion battery during charging and discharging. With the charging and discharging, the internal heat generation of the lithium-ion battery becomes large, and the temperature rises leading to an uneven temperature distribution induces partial degradation. Infrared (IR) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) has been well developed for decades years in materials, structures, and aircraft. Most thermographic methods need thermal excitation to the measurement structures. In NDE of battery, the thermal excitation is the heat generated from carbon and cobalt electrodes in electrolyte. A technique named "power function" has been developed to determine the heat by chemical reactions. In this paper, the simulations of the transient response of the temperature distribution in the lithium-ion battery are developed. The key to resolving the security problem lies in the thermal controlling, including the heat generation and the internal and external heat transfer. Therefore, three-dimensional modelling for capturing geometrical thermal effects on battery thermal abuse behaviour is required. The simulation model contains the heat generation during electrolyte decomposition and electrical resistance component. Oven tests are simulated by three-dimensional model and the discharge test preformed by test system. Infrared thermography of discharge is recorded in order to analyze the security of the lithium-ion power battery. Nondestructive detection is performed for thermal abuse analysis and discharge analysis.

  16. Energy transfer between energetic ring current H(+) and O(+) by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the frequency range below the helium gyrofrequency can be excited in the equatorial region of the outer magnetosphere by cyclotron resonant instability with anisotropic ring current H(+) ions. As the unducted waves propagate to higher latitudes, the wave normal should become highly inclined to the ambient magnetic field. Under such conditions, wave energy can be absorbed by cyclotron resonant interactions with ambient O(+), leading to ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. Resonant wave absorption peaks in the vicinity of the bi-ion frequency and the second harmonic of the O(+) gyrofrequrency. This absorption should mainly occur at latitudes between 10 deg and 30 deg along auroral field lines (L is greater than or equal to 7) in the postnoon sector. The concomitant ion heating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can contribute to the isotropization and geomagnetic trapping of collapsed O(+) ion conics (or beams) that originate from a low-altitude ionospheric source region. During geomagnetic storms when the O(+) content of the magnetosphere is significantly enhanced, the absorption of EMIC waves should become more efficient, and it may contribute to the observed acceleration of O(+) ions of ionospheric origin up to ring current energies.

  17. [Anomalous ion transport and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The slab branch of the ITG mode was produced by a d.c. ion acceleration heating scheme and definitively identified in CLM under the previous DOE grant. A transit-time rf heating scheme was used to produce a more Maxwellian ion population to produce and identify a more predictable slab ITG mode. These experiments are partly based on some theoretical work on the substantial effects of anisotropy in η i on the slab mode. The progress under the present DOE grant are described below

  18. Temporal evolution of confined fast-ion velocity distributions measured by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik; Porte, L.

    2008-01-01

    reported [Bindslev , Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205005 2006]. Here we extend the discussion of these results which were obtained at the TEXTOR tokamak. The fast ions are generated by neutral-beam injection and ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The CTS system uses 100-150 kW of 110-GHz gyrotron probing radiation......Fast ions created in the fusion processes will provide up to 70% of the heating in ITER. To optimize heating and current drive in magnetically confined plasmas insight into fast-ion dynamics is important. First measurements of such dynamics by collective Thomson scattering (CTS) were recently...... of the velocity distribution after turnoff of the ion heating. These results are in close agreement with numerical simulations....

  19. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE GLASSES WITH CERIUM IONS AND ANTIMONY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Klykova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the results of an experimental study of luminescence excitation spectra and luminescence of silicate glasses containing cerium ions and antimony. The aim of this work was to study the features of the luminescence and the effect of UV irradiation and heat treatment on luminescence and the state of cerium ions and antimony in glass. We investigated glass system Na2O-ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2-NaF-NaBr with additives CeO2 and Sb2O3. Synthesis was carried out in platinum crucibles in the air at 14500C. The samples were polished glass plates with a thickness of 0.5-1 mm. UV irradiation was carried out with a mercury lamp having a wide range of radiation in the spectral range 240-390 nm. It was conducted in a Nabertherm muffle furnaces. Luminescence spectra and excitation spectra were measured using a spectrofluorimeter MPF-44A (PerkinElmer at the room temperature. Measured luminescence spectra were corrected in view of the spectral sensitivity of the photodetector for spectrofluorimeter. Adjustment of the excitation spectra for the spectral dependence of the intensity of the excitation source was not carried out. During the experiments it was found that in silicate glasses Sb3+ ions can exist in two energy states, which corresponds to a different environment with oxygen ions. Heat treatment of these glasses in an oxidizing atmosphere leads to an increase in ion concentration of Sb3+ ions with a greater amount of oxygen in the environment. In glasses containing antimony and cerium ions, ultraviolet irradiation causes a change in the valence of cerium ions and antimony, which is accompanied by luminescence quenching. Subsequent heat treatment of glass leads to the inverse processes and restore luminescence excitation spectra. The study of fluorescent properties of silicate glasses with cerium and antimony ions led to the conclusion of the practical significance of this work. Promising multifunctional materials can be created on the basis of

  20. Distance scaling of electric-field noise in a surface-electrode ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, J. A.; Greene, A.; Stuart, J.; McConnell, R.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate anomalous ion-motional heating, a limitation to multiqubit quantum-logic gate fidelity in trapped-ion systems, as a function of ion-electrode separation. Using a multizone surface-electrode trap in which ions can be held at five discrete distances from the metal electrodes, we measure power-law dependencies of the electric-field noise experienced by the ion on the ion-electrode distance d . We find a scaling of approximately d-4 regardless of whether the electrodes are at room temperature or cryogenic temperature, despite the fact that the heating rates are approximately two orders of magnitude smaller in the latter case. Through auxiliary measurements using the application of noise to the electrodes, we rule out technical limitations to the measured heating rates and scalings. We also measure the frequency scaling of the inherent electric-field noise close to 1 /f at both temperatures. These measurements eliminate from consideration anomalous-heating models which do not have a d-4 distance dependence, including several microscopic models of current interest.

  1. Ion Bernstein wave experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    Ion Bernstein wave experiments are carried out on the Alcator C tokamak to study wave excitation, propagation, absorption, and plasma heating due to wave power absorption. It is shown that ion Bernstein wave power is coupled into the plasma and follows the expected dispersion relation. The antenna loading is maximized when the hydrogen second harmonic layer is positioned just behind the antenna. Plasma heating results at three values of the toroidal magnetic field are presented. Central ion temperature increases of ΔT/sub i//Ti /approx lt/ 0.1 and density increases Δn/n 6 s/sup /minus/1/ for plasmas within the density range 0.6 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ ≤ /bar n//sub e/ ≤ 4 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ and magnetic fields 2.4 ≥ ω/Ω/sub H/ ≥ 1.1. The density increases is usually accompanied by an improvement in the global particle confinement time relative to the Ohmic value. The ion heating rate is measured to be ΔT/sub i//P/sub rf/ ≅ 2-4.5 eV/kW at low densities. At higher densities /bar n//sub e/ ≤ 1.5 /times/ 10 20 m/sup /minus/3/ the ion heating rate dramatically decreases. It is shown that the decrease in the ion heating rate can be explained by the combined effects of wave scattering through the edge turbulence and the decreasing on energy confinement of these discharges with density. The effect of observed edge turbulence is shown to cause a broadening of the rf power deposition profile with increasing density. It is shown that the inferred value of the Ohmic ion thermal conduction, when compared to the Chang-Hinton neoclassical prediction, exhibits an increasing anomaly with increasing plasma density

  2. ICRF heating experiments in JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    This is an experimental study of ICRF heating on JFT-2 Tokamak in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this study, we first clarified physical and engineering problems of ICRF heating of tokamak plasma. Next, we optimized the design of the ICRF heating system, and the plasma parameters for the heating. Finally, we could demonstrate a high efficiency of this additional heating method by launching RF power which is two or three times as large as an ohmic input power to a plasma. And we achieved following things. (1) We optimized a design of an antenna, and we improved a durability of the system for high voltage. With the result that we achieved the maximum power density on an antenna. (2) We demonstrated that electron heating regime and ion heating regime can be easily accessed by controlling plasma parameters. Also we found the optimum heating conditions in each heating regime. (3) We experimentally clarified the production mechanism of impurities during ICRF heating. We could reduce the influx of metal impurity ions to a plasma by employing low z materials for limiters and antenna shields. Consequently, we improved a heating efficiency of electrons. Next, we studied a power balance of plasma during ICRF heating, and we could compare heating characteristics of ICRF with other additional heatings on JFT-2. (author)

  3. Heat exchange between a microparticle and plasma. Contribution of charge transfer processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uglov, A.A.; Gnedovets, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer in interaction of a microparticle with a dense plasma have been considered analytically. At that, calculation methods developed as applied to probe diagnostics of slightly ionized plasma are also used in the case of relatively high degrees of ionization, at which heat flows of plasma charged particles Qe and Qi become comparable with molecular ones. High efficiency of energy transfer during electron and ion collisions with a microparticle is due to the following: 1) effective cross section of ion collision with a microparticle, which acquires in a quasineutral plasma the potential phisub(f) < 0, surpasses the geometric one; the maximum contribution of electron and ion constituent is achieved when the cross section ion collisions with a microparticle is linearly connected with its potential, 2) with a charged microparticle electrons from distribution function ''tail'' collide, their energy exceeds potential barrier near the surface and, consequently, the mean heat energy; 3) besides the energy of a microparticle thermal movement during electron recombination and ion neutralization on its surface the heat Qsub(e) and Qsub(i), which considerably exceed the heat of molecular adsorption and mean heat energy of plasma particles at kT approximately 1 eV, are transmitted to the microparticle

  4. ICRF heating in T.F.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambier, D.J.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments on plasma heating by RF in the ion cyclotron range of frequency have been performed on T.F.R. in various regimes, such as the mode conversion regime and the minority regime. The latest theoretical developments of ICRF modeling are presented and the experimental data obtained in a deuterium plasma containing 20% or 5% of hydrogen are reviewed. With 20% of hydrogen a large increase of both ion and electron temperature is observed while the level of metallic impurity radiation has been considerably reduced using a carbon limiter. With 5% of hydrogen the location of the antenna system in the minor cross section produces no dramatic differences with respect to ion heating. Finally the metallic impurity production is examined and thus allows one to eliminate the Faraday shield of the antenna as the main source of pollution by heavy ions of the plasma

  5. Observations of transverse ion acceleration in the topside auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbe, G.P.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Moore, T.E.; Kintner, P.M.; Vago, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Data obtained from a sounding rocket flight which reached an apogee of 927 km and passed through several auroral arcs are reported. During portions of the flight when the rocket was not in an energetic auroral structure, the ion data are fit to a Maxwellian function which yields the plasma parameters. Throughout the middle portion of the flight when above 700 km altitude, ion distributions having a superthermal tail were measured. These ion distributions generally coexisted with a cold thermal core distribution and peaked at pitch angles slightly greater than 90 degree, which identifies them as conic distributions. These ions can be modeled using a bi-Maxwellian distribution function with a perpendicular (to B) temperature about 10 times greater than the parallel temperature of 0.15 eV. When the rocket was immersed in energetic auroral electron precipitation, two other ion distributions were observed. Transversely accelerated ions which represented bulk heating of the ambient population were observed. Transversely accelerated ions which represented bulk heating of the ambient population were observed continuously in these arcs. The characteristic perpendicular energy of the transversely bulk heated ions reached as high as 3 eV compared to typically less than 0.4 eV during nonauroral times. Cold ions flowing down the magnetic field were also continuously observed when the rocket was immersed in auroral electron precipitation and had downward speeds between 3 and 5 km/s. If one balances electric and collisional forces, these speeds translate to an electric field pointing into the atmosphere of magnitude 0.01 mV/m. A close correlation between auroral electron precipitation, measured electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves, cold downflowing ions and transversely bulk heated ions will be shown

  6. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospelkaus, Christian; Langer, Christopher E.; Amini, Jason M.; Brown, Kenton R.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing. With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ions and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering decoherence, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates. A potentially beneficial environment for the implementation of such schemes is a cryogenic ion trap, because small length scale traps with low motional heating rates can be realized. A cryogenic ion trap experiment is currently under construction at NIST.

  7. Heavy ion source support gas mixing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments on mixing an easily ionized support gas with the primary ion source gas have produced large beam enhancements for high charge state light ions (masses less than or equal to 20). In the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC), the beam increase has been a factor of 5 or greater, depending on ion species and charge state. Approximately 0.1 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas (argon, krypton, or xenon) is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas line and the primary gas flow is reduced by approximately 30 percent. The proposed mechanism for increased intensity is as follows: The heavier support gas ionizes readily to a higher charge state, providing increased cathode heating. The increased heating permits a reduction in primary gas flow (lower pressure) and the subsequent beam increase

  8. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  9. After-heat removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashige, Kengo; Otsuka, Masaya; Yokoyama, Iwao; Yamakawa, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an after-heat removing device for first reactors. A heat accumulation portion provided in a cooling channel of an after-heat removing device is disposed before a coil-like heat conduction pipe for cooling of the after-heat removing device. During normal reactor operation, the temperature in the heat accumulation portion is near the temperature of the high temperature plenum due to heat conduction and heat transfer from the high temperature plenum. When the reactor is shutdown and the after-heat removing device is started, coolants cooled in the air cooler start circulation. The coolants arriving at the heat accumulation portion deprive heat from the heat accumulation portion and, ion turn, increase their temperature and then reach the cooling coil. Subsequently, the heat calorie possessed in the heat accumulation portion is reduced and the after-heat removing device is started for the operation at a full power. This can reduce the thermal shocks applied to the cooling coil or structures in a reactor vessel upon starting the after-heat removing device. (I.N.)

  10. Hamiltonian theory of the ion cyclotron minority heating dynamics in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becoulet, A.; Gambier, D.J.; Samain, A.

    1990-03-01

    The question of heating a tokamak plasma by means of electromagnetic waves in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) is considered in the perspective of large RF powers and in the low collisionality regime. In such case the Quasi Linear Theory (QLT) is validated by the Hamiltonian dynamics of the wave particle interaction which exceeds the threshold of the intrinsic stochasticity. The Hamiltonian dynamics is represented by the evolution of a set of three canonical action angle variables well adapted to the tokamak magnetic configuration. This approach allows to derive the RF diffusion coefficient with very few assumptions. The distribution function of the resonant ions is written as a Fokker Planck equation but the emphasis is put on the QL diffusion instead of on the usual diffusion induced by collisions. Then the Fokker Planck equation is given a variational from which a solution is derived in the form of a semi analytical trial function of three parameters: the percentage of resonant particle contained in the tail; an isotropic width ΔT and an anisotropic one ΔP. This solution is successfully tested against real experimental observations. Practically it is shown that in the case of JET the distribution function is influenced by adiabatic barriers which in turn limit the Hamiltonian stochasticity domain within energy values typically in the MeV range. Consequently and for a given ICRF power, the tail energy excursion is lower and its concentration higher than that of a bounce averaged prediction. This may actually be an advantage for machines like JET considering the energy range required to simulate the α-particle behaviour in a relevant fusion reactor

  11. Small electrostatic storage rings; also for highly charged ions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.P.; Pedersen, U.V.

    2001-01-01

    Two years ago, a small electrostatic storage ring ELISA (electrostatic ion storage ring, Aarhus) was put into operation. The design of this small 7 m circumference ring was based on electrostatic deflection plates and quadrupoles. This is in contrast to the larger ion storage rings, which are based on magnetic focusing and deflection. The result is a small, relatively inexpensive, storage ring being able to store ions of any mass and any charge at low energy ( -11 mbar resulting in storage times of several tens of seconds for singly charged ions. The maximum number of singly charged ions that can be stored is a few 10 7 . Several experiments have already been performed in ELISA. These include lifetime studies of metastable ions and studies of fullerenes and metal-cluster ions. Lasers are also used for excitation of the circulating ions. Heating/cooling of the ring is possible. Cooling of the ring leads to significantly lower pressures, and correspondingly longer lifetimes. A change of the temperature of the vacuum chambers surrounding the ion beam also leads to a change of the spectrum of the black-body radiation, which has a significant influence on weakly bound negative ions. At the time of writing, at least two other electrostatic storage rings are being built, and more are planned. In the following, the electrostatic storage ring ELISA will be described, and results from some of the initial experiments demonstrating the performance will be shown. The relative merits of such a ring, as opposed to the larger magnetic rings and the smaller ion traps will be discussed. The potential for highly charged ions will be briefly mentioned. (orig.)

  12. Transport of negative hydrogen and deuterium ions in RF-driven ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutser, R; Wuenderlich, D; Fantz, U

    2010-01-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources are major components of neutral beam injection systems for plasma heating in future large-scale fusion experiments such as ITER. In order to fulfill the requirements of the ITER neutral beam injection, a high-performance, large-area RF-driven ion source for negative ions is being developed at the MPI fuer Plasmaphysik. Negative hydrogen ions are mainly generated on a converter surface by impinging neutral particles and positive ions under the influence of magnetic fields and the plasma sheath potential. The 3D transport code TrajAn has been applied in order to obtain the total and spatially resolved extraction probabilities for H - and D - ions under identical plasma parameters and the realistic magnetic field topology of the ion source. A comparison of the isotopes shows a lower total extraction probability in the case of deuterium ions, caused by a different transport effect. The transport calculation shows that distortions of the spatial distributions of ion birth and extraction by the magnetic electron suppression field are present for both negative hydrogen and deuterium ions.

  13. Ion thermal conductivity and convective energy transport in JET hot-ion regimes and H-modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibone, F.; Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Local transport in a recent series of JET experiments has been studied using interpretive codes. Auxiliary heating, mainly via neutral beam injection, was applied on low-density target plasmas confined in the double-null X-point configuration. This has produced two-component plasmas with high ion temperature and neutron yield and, above a threshold density, H-modes characterised by peak density and power deposition profiles. H-mode confinement was also obtained for the first time with 25 MW auxiliary power, of which 10 MW was from ion cyclotron resonance heating. We have used profile measurements of electron temperature T e from electron cyclotron emission and LIDAR Thomson scattering, ion temperature T i from charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (during NBI), electron density n e from LIDAR and Abel-inverted interferometer measurements. Only sparse information is, however, available to date concerning radial profiles of effective ionic charge and radiation losses. Deuterium depletion due to high impurity levels is an important effect in these discharges, and our interpretation of thermal ion energy content, neutron yield and ion particle fluxes needs to be confirmed using measured Z eff -profiles. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  14. Energetic ion loss detector on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, D C; Granetz, R S; Vieira, R; Bader, A; Bosco, J; Darrow, D S; Fiore, C; Irby, J; Parker, R R; Parkin, W; Reinke, M L; Terry, J L; Wolfe, S M; Wukitch, S J; Zweben, S J

    2012-07-01

    A scintillator-based energetic ion loss detector has been successfully commissioned on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This probe is located just below the outer midplane, where it captures ions of energies up to 2 MeV resulting from ion cyclotron resonance heating. After passing through a collimating aperture, ions impact different regions of the scintillator according to their gyroradius (energy) and pitch angle. The probe geometry and installation location are determined based on modeling of expected lost ions. The resulting probe is compact and resembles a standard plasma facing tile. Four separate fiber optic cables view different regions of the scintillator to provide phase space resolution. Evolving loss levels are measured during ion cyclotron resonance heating, including variation dependent upon individual antennae.

  15. Significant effect of Ca2+ on improving the heat resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2013-07-01

    The heat resistance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been extensively investigated due to its highly practical significance. Reconstituted skim milk (RSM) has been found to be one of the most effective protectant wall materials for microencapsulating microorganisms during convective drying, such as spray drying. In addition to proteins and carbohydrate, RSM is rich in calcium. It is not clear which component is critical in the RSM protection mechanism. This study investigated the independent effect of calcium. Ca(2+) was added to lactose solution to examine its influence on the heat resistance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ZY, Lactobacillus casei Zhang, Lactobacillus plantarum P8 and Streptococcus thermophilus ND03. The results showed that certain Ca(2+) concentrations enhanced the heat resistance of the LAB strains to different extents, that is produced higher survival and shorter regrowth lag times of the bacterial cells. In some cases, the improvements were dramatic. More scientifically insightful and more intensive instrumental study of the Ca(2+) behavior around and in the cells should be carried out in the near future. In the meantime, this work may lead to the development of more cost-effective wall materials with Ca(2+) added as a prime factor. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TRIAM-1 turbulent heating experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Nagao, Akihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1983-02-01

    The experimental studies on the containment of high temperature plasma and turbulent heating using the tokamak device with strong magnetic field (TRIAM-1) started in 1977 have achieved much results up to fiscal 1979, and the anticipated objectives were almost attained. The results of these studies were summarized in the ''Report of the results of strong magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1 experiment''. In this report, the results obtained by the second stage project of the TRIAM-1 project are summarized. The second stage was the two-year project for fiscal 1980 and 81. In the second stage project, by the complete preparation of measuring instrument and the improvement of the experimental setup, the carefully planned experiment on turbulent heating was performed, in particular, the clarification of the mechanism of turbulent heating was the central theme. As the important results obtained, the detection of ion sound waves at the time of turbulent heating, the formation of high energy ions by wave-particle interaction and the clarification of the process of their energy relaxation, and the verification of the effectiveness of double pulse turbulent heating are enumerated.

  17. TRIAM-1 turbulent heating experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Nagao, Akihiro

    1983-01-01

    The experimental studies on the containment of high temperature plasma and turbulent heating using the tokamak device with strong magnetic field (TRIAM-1) started in 1977 have achieved much results up to fiscal 1979, and the anticipated objectives were almost attained. The results of these studies were summarized in the ''Report of the results of strong magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1 experiment''. In this report, the results obtained by the second stage project of the TRIAM-1 project are summarized. The second stage was the two-year project for fiscal 1980 and 81. In the second stage project, by the complete preparation of measuring instrument and the improvement of the experimental setup, the carefully planned experiment on turbulent heating was performed, in particular, the clarification of the mechanism of turbulent heating was the central theme. As the important results obtained, the detection of ion sound waves at the time of turbulent heating, the formation of high energy ions by waveparticle interaction and the clarification of the process of their energy relaxation, and the verification of the effectiveness of double pulse turbulent heating are enumerated. (Kako, I.)

  18. FTIR study of aquamarines after gamma irradiation, heat treatment and electrodiffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkmim, Danielle Gomides; Almeida, Frederico Ozanan Tomaz de; Lameiras, Fernando Soares

    2017-01-01

    Beryl, Be_3Al_2(SiO_3)_6, is a natural gemstone with many colors. Some of these colors can be induced or modified by exposure to ionizing radiation, by heating, and maybe by electrodiffusion. Small contents of chromophore chemical elements are related to the colors of beryl, like iron, chromium, vanadium, manganese, and others. There is great interest in relation to methods of improving or inducing colors in beryl. There is evidence that infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) can contribute to foresee beryl behavior submitted to procedures for color change. It was observed that electrodiffusion with or without contaminant ions did not alter the FTIR spectrum of aquamarines, unlike heat treatment. Green samples have a higher content of type I water molecules, whereas blue samples have a higher content of type II water molecules. Significant changes in FTIR spectra of aquamarines were observed only in green samples after exposure to gamma rays or to heat. The vanishing of the band at 3633 cm"-"1 may be related to the position of Na"+ ion in the crystal lattice of beryl. (author)

  19. FTIR study of aquamarines after gamma irradiation, heat treatment and electrodiffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Gomides Alkmim

    Full Text Available Abstract Beryl, Be3Al2(SiO36, is a natural gemstone with many colors. Some of these colors can be induced or modified by exposure to ionizing radiation, by heating, and maybe by electrodiffusion. Small contents of chromophore chemical elements are related to the colors of beryl, like iron, chromium, vanadium, manganese, and others. There is great interest in relation to methods of improving or inducing colors in beryl. There is evidence that infrared spectroscopy (FTIR can contribute to foresee beryl behavior submitted to procedures for color change. It was observed that electrodiffusion with or without contaminant ions did not alter the FTIR spectrum of aquamarines, unlike heat treatment. Green samples have a higher content of type I water molecules, whereas blue samples have a higher content of type II water molecules. Significant changes in FTIR spectra of aquamarines were observed only in green samples after exposure to gamma rays or to heat. The vanishing of the band at 3633 cm-1 may be related to the position of Na+ ion in the crystal lattice of beryl.

  20. Fast-ion dynamics in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Nielsen, S.K.; Porte, L.

    2006-01-01

    Here we present the first measurements by collective Thomson scattering of the evolution of fast-ion populations in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. 150 kW and 110 Ghz radiation from a gyrotron were scattered in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma with energetic ions generated by neutral beam injection...... and ion cyclotron resonance heating. The temporal behavior of the spatially resolved fast-ion velocity distribution is inferred from the received scattered radiation. The fast-ion dynamics at sawteeth and the slowdown after switch off of auxiliary heating is resolved in time. The latter is shown...

  1. Future prospects for ECR ion sources with improved charge state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the steady advance in the technology of the ECR ion source, present art forms have not yet reached their full potential in terms of charge state and intensity within a particular charge state, in part, because of the narrow band width. single-frequency microwave radiation used to heat the plasma electrons. This article identifies fundamentally important methods which may enhance the performances of ECR ion sources through the use of: (1) a tailored magnetic field configuration (spatial domain) in combination with single-frequency microwave radiation to create a large uniformly distributed ECR ''volume'' or (2) the use of broadband frequency domain techniques (variable-frequency, broad-band frequency, or multiple-discrete-frequency microwave radiation), derived from standard TWT technology, to transform the resonant plasma ''surfaces'' of traditional ECR ion sources into resonant plasma ''volume''. The creation of a large ECR plasma ''volume'' permits coupling of more power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, thereby producing higher charge state ions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present forms of' the source. The ECR ion source concepts described in this article offer exciting opportunities to significantly advance the-state-of-the-art of ECR technology and as a consequence, open new opportunities in fundamental and applied research and for a variety of industrial applications

  2. On the electron-ion temperature ratio established by collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco; Broersen, Sjors; Bykov, Andrei; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Astrophysical shocks are often collisionless shocks, in which the changes in plasma flow and temperatures across the shock are established not through Coulomb interactions, but through electric and magnetic fields. An open question about collisionless shocks is whether electrons and ions each establish their own post-shock temperature (non-equilibration of temperatures), or whether they quickly equilibrate in the shock region. Here we provide a simple, thermodynamic, relation for the minimum electron-ion temperature ratios that should be expected as a function of Mach number. The basic assumption is that the enthalpy-flux of the electrons is conserved separately, but that all particle species should undergo the same density jump across the shock, in order for the plasma to remain charge neutral. The only form of additional electron heating that we allow for is adiabatic heating, caused by the compression of the electron gas. These assumptions result in an analytic treatment of expected electron-ion temperature ratio that agrees with observations of collisionless shocks: at low sonic Mach numbers, Ms ≲ 2, the electron-ion temperature ratio is close to unity, whereas for Mach numbers above Ms ≈ 60 the electron-ion temperature ratio asymptotically approaches a temperature ratio of Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩. In the intermediate Mach number range the electron-ion temperature ratio scales as Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2. In addition, we calculate the electron-ion temperature ratios under the assumption of adiabatic heating of the electrons only, which results in a higher electron-ion temperature ratio, but preserves the Te/Ti ∝ Ms-2 scaling. We also show that for magnetised shocks the electron-ion temperature ratio approaches the asymptotic value Te/Ti = me/ ⟨ mi ⟩ for lower magnetosonic Mach numbers (Mms), mainly because for a strongly magnetised shock the sonic Mach number is larger than the magnetosonic Mach number (Mms ≤ Ms). The predicted scaling of the electron-ion

  3. Calculations of Neutral Beam Ion Confinement for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redi, M.H.; Darrow, D.S.; Egedal, J.; Kaye, S.M.; White, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    The spherical torus (ST) concept underlies several contemporary plasma physics experiments, in which relatively low magnetic fields, high plasma edge q, and low aspect ratio combine for potentially compact, high beta and high performance fusion reactors. An important issue for the ST is the calculation of energetic ion confinement, as large Larmor radius makes conventional guiding center codes of limited usefulness and efficient plasma heating by RF and neutral beam ion technology requires minimal fast ion losses. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a medium-sized, low aspect ratio ST, with R=0.85 m, a=0.67 m, R/a=1.26, Ip*1.4 MA, Bt*0.6 T, 5 MW of neutral beam heating and 6 MW of RF heating. 80 keV neutral beam ions at tangency radii of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7 m are routinely used to achieve plasma betas above 30%. Transport analyses for experiments on NSTX often exhibit a puzzling ion power balance. It will be necessary to have reliable beam ion calculations to distinguish among the source and loss channels, and to explore the possibilities for new physics phenomena, such as the recently proposed compressional Alfven eigenmode ion heating

  4. Extraction of negative lithium ions from a lithium-containing hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Sasao, M.

    1996-01-01

    Negative lithium ions (Li - ) were extracted from a 6-cm-diam 7-cm-long negative hydrogen ion (H - ) source to simulate the condition of Li - extraction from a Li vapor introduced ion source for the neutral beam heating. The amount of the Li - current extracted from a hydrogen plasma with Li vapor was comparable to that extracted from a pure Li plasma. However, the amount of the H - current decreased as the H 2 gas pressure in the source decreased due to a getter-pump effect of Li during the introduction of Li vapor. A heat shield installed to keep a high wall temperature was effective in mitigating the pressure decrease. However, the H - current extracted from the ion source equipped with the heat shield became 20% of the original value, as Li vapor was injected into the ion source. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  5. Mechanism of negative hydrogen ion emission from heated saline hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Serizawa, Naoshi; Takeda, Makiko; Hasegawa, Seiji [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-02-01

    To find a clue to the mechanism of negative hydrogen ion emission from a heated sample ({approx}10 mg) of powdery saline hydride (LiH or CaH{sub 2}) deposited on a molybdenum ribbon ({approx}0.1 cm{sup 2}), both the ionic and electronic emission currents were measured as a function of sample temperature ({approx}700 - 800 K), thereby yielding {approx}10{sup -15} - 10{sup -12} A of H{sup -} after mass analysis and {approx}10{sup -7} - 10{sup -5} A of thermal electron. Thermophysical analysis of these data indicates that the desorption energy (E{sup -}) of H{sup -} and work function ({phi}) of the emitting sample surface are 5.1 {+-} 0.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.2 eV for LiH, respectively, while E{sup -} is 7.7 {+-} 0.3 eV and {phi} is 5.0 {+-} 0.2 eV for CaH{sub 2}. Thermochemical analysis based on our simple model on the emissions indicates that the values of E{sup -} - {phi} are 2.35 and 2.31 eV for LiH and CaH{sub 2}, respectively, which are in fair agreement with the respective values (2.1 {+-} 0.3 and 2.6 {+-} 0.3 eV) determined experimentally. This agreement indicates that the emission of H{sup -} is reasonably explained by our model from the viewpoint of reaction energy. (author)

  6. Broadband frequency ECR ion source concepts with large resonant plasma volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    New techniques are proposed for enhancing the performances of ECR ion sources. The techniques are based on the use of high-power, variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, or broadband microwave radiation, derived from standard TWT technology, to effect large resonant ''volume'' ECR sources. The creation of a large ECR plasma ''volume'' permits coupling of more power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present forms of the ECR ion source. If successful, these developments could significantly impact future accelerator designs and accelerator-based, heavy-ion-research programs by providing multiply-charged ion beams with the energies and intensities required for nuclear physics research from existing ECR ion sources. The methods described in this article can be used to retrofit any ECR ion source predicated on B-minimum plasma confinement techniques

  7. The lumped heat capacity method applied to target heating

    OpenAIRE

    Rickards, J.

    2013-01-01

    The temperature of metal samples was measured while they were bombarded by the beam from the a particle accelerator. The evolution of the temperature with time can be explained using the lumped heat capacity method of heat transfer. A strong dependence on the type of mounting was found. Se midió la temperatura de muestras metálicas al ser bombardeadas por el haz de iones del Acelerador Pelletron del Instituto de Física. La evolución de la temperatura con el tiempo se puede explicar usando ...

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs fluctuations and crash events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quite periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E x B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E x B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  9. Negative ion formation and neutralization processes, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    This review has been made preliminary for the purpose of contribute to the plasma heating by ''negative ion based neutral beam injection'' in the magnetic confinement fusion reactor. A compilation includes the survey of the general processes of negative ion formation, the data of the cross section of H - ion formation and the neutralization of H - ion, and some of new processes of H - ion formation. The data of cross section are mainly experimental, but partly include the results of theoretical calculation. (author)

  10. Enhanced ion acoustic fluctuations and ion outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. E. Forme

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations showing enhanced ion acoustic echoes observed by means of incoherent scatter radars have been reported in the literature. The received power is extremely enhanced by up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude above usual values, and it is mostly contained in one of the two ion acoustic lines. This spectral asymmetry and the intensity of the received signal cannot be resolved by the standard analysis procedure and often causes its failure. As a result, and in spite of a very clear spectral signature, the analysis is unable to fit the plasma parameters inside the regions of ion acoustic turbulence. We present European Incoherent Scatter radar (EISCAT observations of large ion outflows associated with the simultaneous occurrence of enhanced ion acoustic echoes. The ion fluxes can reach 1014 m-2 s-1 at 800 km altitude. From the very clear spectral signatures of these echoes, a method is presented to extract estimates of the electron temperature and the ion drift within the turbulent regions. It is shown that the electron gas is strongly heated up to 11 000 K. Also electron temperature gradients of about 0.02 K/m exist. Finally, the estimates of the electron temperature and of the ion drift are used to study the possible implications for the plasma transport inside turbulent regions. It is shown that strong electron temperature gradients cause enhancement of the ambipolar electric field and can account for the observed ion outflows.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere · magnetosphere interactions; plasma waves and instabilities.

  11. Sensible heat has significantly affected the global hydrological cycle over the historical period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, G; Samset, B H; Hodnebrog, Ø; Andrews, T; Boucher, O; Faluvegi, G; Fläschner, D; Forster, P M; Kasoar, M; Kharin, V; Kirkevåg, A; Lamarque, J-F; Olivié, D; Richardson, T B; Shawki, D; Shindell, D; Shine, K P; Stjern, C W; Takemura, T; Voulgarakis, A

    2018-05-15

    Globally, latent heating associated with a change in precipitation is balanced by changes to atmospheric radiative cooling and sensible heat fluxes. Both components can be altered by climate forcing mechanisms and through climate feedbacks, but the impacts of climate forcing and feedbacks on sensible heat fluxes have received much less attention. Here we show, using a range of climate modelling results, that changes in sensible heat are the dominant contributor to the present global-mean precipitation change since preindustrial time, because the radiative impact of forcings and feedbacks approximately compensate. The model results show a dissimilar influence on sensible heat and precipitation from various drivers of climate change. Due to its strong atmospheric absorption, black carbon is found to influence the sensible heat very differently compared to other aerosols and greenhouse gases. Our results indicate that this is likely caused by differences in the impact on the lower tropospheric stability.

  12. Non-proximate mass spectrometry using a heated 1-m long PTFE tube and an air-tight APCI ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T.; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Wada, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Masaya; Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Nonami, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Direct and rapid trace-level gas analysis is highly needed in various fields such as safety and security, quality control, food analysis, and forensic medicine. In many cases, the real samples are bulky and are not accessible to the space-limited ion source of the mass spectrometer. In order to circumvent this problem, we developed an airtight atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source equipped with a flexible 1-m-long, 2-mm-i.d. PTFE sniffing tube. The ambient air bearing sample gas was sucked into the heated PTFE tube (130 °C) and was transported to the air-tight ion source without using any extra pumping system or a Venturi device. Analytes were ionized by an ac corona discharge located at 1.5 mm from the inlet of the mass spectrometer. By using the airtight ion source, all the ionized gas in the ion source was introduced into the vacuum of the mass spectrometer via only the evacuation of the mass spectrometer (1.6 l min"−"1). Sub-pg limits of detection were obtained for carbaryl and trinitrotoluene. Owing to its flexibility and high sensitivity, the sniffing tube coupled with a mass spectrometer can be used as the stethoscope for the high-sensitive gas analysis. The experimental results obtained for drugs, hydrogen peroxide and small alkanes were discussed by DFT calculations. - Highlights: • Non-proximate mass spectrometry for the trace-level gas analysis was developed. • Using a 1-m long flexible PTFE tube, it can be applicable to complicated-shape real-world samples. • By atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in the airtight ion source, sub-pg limits of detection were attained. • Adsorption of less-volatility compounds was negligible with the tube temperature at 130° C. • Novel experimental results obtained were fully examined by density functional theory calculations.

  13. Non-proximate mass spectrometry using a heated 1-m long PTFE tube and an air-tight APCI ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T. [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda-4, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-8511 (Japan); Institute of Ion-Plasma and Laser Technologies, Durmon Yoli Street 33, 100125, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Hiraoka, Kenzo, E-mail: hiraoka@yamanashi.ac.jp [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda-4, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-8511 (Japan); Wada, Hiroshi [Kyushu Okinawa Agricultural Research Center, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, 496 Izumi, Chikugo, Fukuoka 833-0041 (Japan); Matsumura, Masaya; Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo [Kyushu Okinawa Agricultural Research Center, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Suya 2421, shiKo, Kumamoto 861-1192 (Japan); Nonami, Hiroshi [Plant Biophysics/Biochemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, 3-5-7 T Tarumi, 790-0905, Matsuyama (Japan); Yamabe, Shinichi, E-mail: yamabesh@gmail.com [Department of Material Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Takayama-cho, 8916-5, Ikoma, Nara, 630−0101 (Japan)

    2017-06-22

    Direct and rapid trace-level gas analysis is highly needed in various fields such as safety and security, quality control, food analysis, and forensic medicine. In many cases, the real samples are bulky and are not accessible to the space-limited ion source of the mass spectrometer. In order to circumvent this problem, we developed an airtight atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) ion source equipped with a flexible 1-m-long, 2-mm-i.d. PTFE sniffing tube. The ambient air bearing sample gas was sucked into the heated PTFE tube (130 °C) and was transported to the air-tight ion source without using any extra pumping system or a Venturi device. Analytes were ionized by an ac corona discharge located at 1.5 mm from the inlet of the mass spectrometer. By using the airtight ion source, all the ionized gas in the ion source was introduced into the vacuum of the mass spectrometer via only the evacuation of the mass spectrometer (1.6 l min{sup −1}). Sub-pg limits of detection were obtained for carbaryl and trinitrotoluene. Owing to its flexibility and high sensitivity, the sniffing tube coupled with a mass spectrometer can be used as the stethoscope for the high-sensitive gas analysis. The experimental results obtained for drugs, hydrogen peroxide and small alkanes were discussed by DFT calculations. - Highlights: • Non-proximate mass spectrometry for the trace-level gas analysis was developed. • Using a 1-m long flexible PTFE tube, it can be applicable to complicated-shape real-world samples. • By atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in the airtight ion source, sub-pg limits of detection were attained. • Adsorption of less-volatility compounds was negligible with the tube temperature at 130° C. • Novel experimental results obtained were fully examined by density functional theory calculations.

  14. Ripple losses during ICRF heating in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bergeaud, V.; Chantant, M.; Martin, G.; Nguyen, F.; Reichle, R.; Vallet, J.C.; Delpeche, L.; Surle, F.

    2004-01-01

    The toroidal field coils in Tore Supra are supra-conducting, and their number is restricted to 18. As a result, the ripple is fairly large, about 7% at the plasma boundary. Tore Supra has consequently been equipped with dedicated ripple loss diagnostics, which has allowed ripple loss studies. This paper reports on the measurements made with these diagnostics and provides an analysis of the experimental results, comparing them with theoretical expectations whenever possible. Furthermore, the main heating source accelerating ions in Tore Supra is ion cyclotron resonance range of frequency (ICRF) heating, and the paper provides new information on the ripple losses of ICRF accelerated ions. (author)

  15. RF heating of currentless plasma in Heliotron E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Sato, M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ion cyclotron range frequency heating (ICRF) experiments performed with a current-free plasma in Heliotron E are described. Parametric studies of ECRH are in progress. For both fundamental and second-harmonic resonances, optimum heating is observed when the plasma density is near the cutoff density (for the ordinary wave, in the case of fundamental resonance and for the extraordinary wave, in the case of second-harmonic resonance) and when a resonance zone exists on the magnetic axis. The maximum heating efficiencies for the fundamental and second-harmonic resonances are 6.5 eV.kW -1 per 10 19 m -3 and 2.4 eV.kW -1 per 10 19 m -3 , respectively. The ray-tracing analysis agrees qualitatively well with the experimental results. The power dependences of the plasma parameters are also investigated. - The first ICRF experiment with fast-wave heating of a current-free plasma has been performed. The ICRF wave power and pulse length are 550 kW and 15 ms, respectively. The frequency is 26.7 MHz. Ions and electrons are heated effectively. The increase in ion temperature is only slightly changed by varying the hydrogen ratio of the gas puff. On the other hand, the electron temperature increase has a definite peak for a high proton ratio (approx. 15%). This agrees qualitatively with the mode conversion picture of minority heating. (author)

  16. Design and Fabrication of the Lithium Beam Ion Injector for NDCX-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakuwa, J.

    2011-01-01

    A 130 keV injector is developed for the NDCX-II facility. It consists of a 10.9 cm diameter lithium doped alumina-silicate ion source heated to ∼1300 C and 3 electrodes. Other components include a segmented Rogowski coil for current and beam position monitoring, a gate valve, pumping ports, a focusing solenoid, a steering coil and space for inspection and maintenance access. Significant design challenges including managing the 3-4 kW of power dissipation from the source heater, temperature uniformity across the emitter surface, quick access for frequent ion source replacement, mechanical alignment with tight tolerance, and structural stabilization of the cantilevered 27-inch OD graded HV ceramic column. The injector fabrication is scheduled to complete by May 2011, and assembly and installation is scheduled to complete by the beginning of July. The Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) is for the study of high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy research utilizing a lithium ion (Li+) beam with a current of 93 mA and a pulse length of 500 ns (compressed to 1 ns at the target). The injector is one of the most complicated sections of the NDCX-II accelerator demanding significant design and fabrication resources. It needs to accommodate a relatively large ion source (10.9 cm), a high heat load (3-4 kW) and specific beam optics developed from the physics model. Some specific design challenges are noted in this paper.

  17. Negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion sources have been originally developed at the request of tandem electrostatic accelerators, and hundreds of nA to several μA negative ion current has been obtained so far for various elements. Recently, the development of large current hydrogen negative ion sources has been demanded from the standpoint of the heating by neutral particle beam injection in nuclear fusion reactors. On the other hand, the physical properties of negative ions are interesting in the thin film formation using ions. Anyway, it is the present status that the mechanism of negative ion action has not been so fully investigated as positive ions because the history of negative ion sources is short. In this report, the many mechanisms about the generation of negative ions proposed so far are described about negative ion generating mechanism, negative ion source plasma, and negative ion generation on metal surfaces. As a result, negative ion sources are roughly divided into two schemes, plasma extraction and secondary ion extraction, and the former is further classified into the PIG ion source and its variation and Duoplasmatron and its variation; while the latter into reflecting and sputtering types. In the second half of the report, the practical negative ion sources of each scheme are described. If the mechanism of negative ion generation will be investigated more in detail and the development will be continued under the unified know-how as negative ion sources in future, the development of negative ion sources with which large current can be obtained for any element is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Guo, J. W.; Lu, W.; Xie, D. Z.; Hitz, D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24-28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of 40Ar+ and 129Xe26+ have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24 +18 GHz ) heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  19. Diagnostic examination of thermally abused high-power lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, D. P.; Roth, E. P.; Kostecki, R.; McCarthy, K.; MacLaren, S.; Doughty, D. H.

    The inherent thermal instability of lithium-ion cells is a significant impediment to their widespread commercialization for hybrid-electric vehicle applications. Cells containing conventional organic electrolyte-based chemistries are prone to thermal runaway at temperatures around 180 °C. We conducted accelerating rate calorimetry measurements on high-power 18650-type lithium-ion cells in an effort to decipher the sequence of events leading to thermal runaway. In addition, electrode and separator samples harvested from a cell that was heated to 150 °C then air-quenched to room temperature were examined by microscopy, spectroscopy, and diffraction techniques. Self-heating of the cell began at 84 °C. The gases generated in the cell included CO 2 and CO, and smaller quantities of H 2, C 2H 4, CH 4, and C 2H 6. The main changes on cell heating to 150 °C were observed on the anode surface, which was covered by a thick layer of surface deposits that included LiF and inorganic and organo-phosphate compounds. The sources of gas generation and the mechanisms leading to the formation of compounds observed on the electrode surfaces are discussed.

  20. Fast Ion Effects During Test Blanket Module Simulation Experiments in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.J.; Budny, R.V.; Ellis, R.; Gorelenkova, M.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Nazikian, R.; Salmi, A.; Schaffer, M.J.; Shinohara, K.; Snipes, J.A.; Spong, D.A.; Koskela, T.; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Fast beam-ion losses were studied in DIII-D in the presence of a scaled mockup of two Test Blanket Modules (TBM) for ITER. Heating of the protective tiles on the front of the TBM surface was found when neutral beams were injected and the TBM fields were engaged. The fast-ion core confinement was not significantly affected. Different orbit-following codes predict the formation of a hot spot on the TBM surface arising from beam-ions deposited near the edge of the plasma. The codes are in good agreement with each other on the total power deposited at the hot spot predicting an increase in power with decreasing separation between the plasma edge and the TBM surface. A thermal analysis of the heat flow through the tiles shows that the simulated power can account for the measured tile temperature rise. The thermal analysis, however, is very sensitive to the details of the localization of the hot spot which is predicted to be different among the various codes.

  1. Lower hybrid heating experiments in tokamaks: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.

    1985-10-01

    Lower hybrid wave propagation theory relevant to heating fusion grade plasmas (tokamaks) is reviewed. A brief discussion of accessibility, absorption, and toroidal ray propagation is given. The main part of the paper reviews recent results in heating experiments on tokamaks. Both electron and ion heating regimes will be discussed. The prospects of heating to high temperatures in reactor grade plasmas will be evaluated

  2. Moment approach to neoclassical flows, currents and transport in auxiliary heated tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yil Bong.

    1988-02-01

    The moment approach is utilized to derive the full complement of neoclassical transport processes in auxiliary heated tokamaks. The effects of auxiliary heating [neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH)] considered arise from the collisional interaction between the background plasma species and the fast-ion-tail species. From a known fast ion distribution function we evaluate the parallel (to the magnetic field) momentum and heat flow inputs to the background plasma. Then, through the momentum and heat flow balance equations, we can determine the induced parallel flows (and current) and radial transpot fluxes in ''equilibrium'' (on the time scale much longer than the collisional relaxation time, i.e., t >> 1ν/sub ii/). In addition to the fast-ion-induced current, the total neoclassical current includes the boostap current, which is driven by the pressure and temperature gradients, the Pfirsch-Schlueter current which is required for charge neutrality, and the neoclassical (including trapped particle effects) Spitzer current due to the parallel electric field. The radial transport fluxes also include off-diagonal compnents in the transport matrix which correspond to the Ware (neoclassical) pinch due to the inductive applied electric field an the fast-ion-induced radial fluxes, in addition to the usual pressure- and temperature-gradient-driven fluxes (particle diffusion and heat conduction). Once the tranport coefficient are completely determined, the radial fluxes and the heat fluxes can be substituted into the density and energy evolution equations to provide a complete description of ''equilibrium'' (δδt << ν/sub ii/) neoclassical transport processes in a plasma. 47 refs., 14 figs

  3. High Heat flux (HHF) elements for Negative Ion Systems on ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milnes, J.; Chuilon, B.; Martin, D.; Waldon, Ch.; Yong Xue

    2006-01-01

    Negative Ion Neutral Beam systems on ITER will require actively cooled scrapers and dumps to process and shape the beam before injection into the tokamak. The scale of the systems is much larger than any presently operating, bringing challenges for designers in terms of available sub cooling, total pressure drop, deflection and mandatory remote maintenance. In common with Positive Ion systems, flux densities in the order of 15-20 MW/m 2 are commonplace but with much longer pulses. A pulse length in excess of 3000 seconds and the anticipated beam breakdown rate pose new challenges in terms of stress and fatigue life. The cooling system specification (up to 26 bar, 80 o C) adds further constraints impacting the material choice and operating temperature. The DDD designs, based on swirl tubes, have been reviewed as part of the design process and recommendations made. Additionally, alternative designs have been proposed based on the Hypervapotron high heat flux elements with modified geometry and drawing upon a vast background knowledge of large scale equipment procurement and integration. Existing operational and design experience has been applied to give a simple, robust and low maintenance alternative. A full thermomechanical analysis of all HHF components has been undertaken based on ITER design criteria and the limited material data available. The results of this analysis will be presented, highlighting areas where further R(and)D is necessary to reach the operating limits set out in the functional specification. Extensive comparison of these analyses is made with the large operational database of existing JET beamline components for benchmarking purposes. A particular feature of the thermo-mechanical analyses is a fully self-consistent description in which ageing characteristics are related to the local temperature, and the components' power loading takes into account the thermal distortion. The advantages and disadvantages of all designs will be presented and

  4. Analysis of influence of heat exchange conditions on the outer surface of the lithium-ion battery to electrolyte temperature under the conditions of high current loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoshlykov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of thermal conditions of a lithium-ion battery using the software package ANSYS Electric and ANSYS Fluent has been carried out. Time dependence of the electrolyte temperature on the various heat exchange conditions on the outer surface has been obtained.

  5. Ion temperature increase during MHD events on the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, A.; Shiraiwa, S.; Takase, Y.; Yamada, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Iijima, D.; Kobori, Y.; Nishi, T.; Taniguchi, T.; Aramasu, M.; Ohara, S.; Ushigome, M.; Yamagishi, K.

    2003-01-01

    Various types of MHD events including internal reconnection events are studied on the TST-2 spherical tokamak. In weak MHD events no positive current spike was observed, but in strong MHD events with positive current spikes, a rapid and significant impurity ion temperature increase was observed. The decrease in the poloidal magnetic energy is the most probable energy source for ion heating. The plasma current shows a stepwise change. The magnitude of this step correlates with the temperature increase and is found to be a good indicator of the strength of each event. (author)

  6. Temperature fluctuation and heat capacity in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Guo Liang; Chen Jin Gen; He Ze-Jun; Long Jia-Li; Lu Zhao-Hui; Ma Yu-Gang; Sá Ben-Hao; Shen Wen-Qing; Wang Kun; Wei Yi-Bin; Zhang Hu-Yong; Zhong Chen

    2004-01-01

    We used LUCIAE3.0 model to simulate the Pb+Pb and C+C in SPS energy. The heat capacity was then extracted from event-by-event temperature fluctuation. It is found that the heat capacity per hadron multiplicity decreases with the increasing of beam energy and impact parameter for a given reaction system. While the hadron mass increases, the heat capacity per hadron multiplicity rises. In addition, we found that, for a given hadron, the heat capacity per hadron multiplicity is almost the same regardless of the reaction system. Some discussions were also given.

  7. Particle acceleration by electromagnetic ion cyclotron turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, G.B.; Chang, Tom

    1990-01-01

    The LF EM-turbulence which furnishes energy for the acceleration of ions in various regions of the earth's magnetosphere efficiently accomplishes its transfer of energy from waves to particles through ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) with the left-hand polarized component of the turbulence; the result of this interaction is a heating of the particle distribution. A general theoretical treatment of ICR heating in a weakly inhomogeneous magnetic geometry is presented, en route to a more detailed examination of auroral ion conics' formation. A substantial simplification of the analysis of the altitude-asymptotic form of the conic distribution is obtained via the similarity transformation introduced into the properties of the electric field spectral density and the earth's dipolar magnetic field. 60 refs

  8. Effects of ion temperature anisotropy on the interhemispheric plasma transport during plasmaspheric refilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Torr, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of temperature anisotropies on the early stage refilling of the outer plasmasphere are studied by solving an appropriate set of hydrodynamic equations. The anisotropies result from the supersonic outflows from the conjugate ionospheres and from the perpendicular ion heating in the equatorial region. The equatorial ion heating affected by wave-particle interaction is included phenomenologically. Even for the equatorial heating associated with moderate wave levels, the mirror force on the flows severely limits the interhemispheric plasma exchange. The temporal evolution of the flow developing in an empty flux tube is characterized by: (1) supersonic plasma outflows from the conjugate ionospheres, (2) reflections of the flows by the mirror force as they begin to penetrate into the opposite hemispheres, (3) formation of shocks in the reflection region and (4) propagations of the shocks to the ionospheres of the origins of the flows. In the quasi-steady state when flow completely subsides, the density distribution in the flux tube shows distinctive large-scale features, determined by the balance between electric, pressure and anisotropy forces. The latter force becomes significant in a broad equatorial region where T t >> T p and also at relatively high geomagnetic latitudes where T t p ; T t and T p are the perpendicular and parallel ion temperatures, respectively

  9. Microwave Coupling to ECR and Alternative Heating Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Celona, L.

    2013-12-16

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) is nowadays the most effective device that can feed particle accelerators in a continuous and reliable way, providing high-current beams of low- and medium-charge-state ions and relatively intense currents for highly charged ions. The ECRIS is an important tool for research with ion beams (in surface, atomic, and nuclear science) while, on the other hand, it implies plasma under extreme conditions and thus constitutes an object of scientific interest in itself. The fundamental aspect of the coupling between the electromagnetic wave and the plasma is hereinafter treated together with some variations to the classical ECR heating mechanism, with particular attention being paid to the frequency tuning effect and two-frequency heating. Considerations of electron and ion dynamics will be presented together with some recent observations connecting the beam shape with the frequency of the electromagnetic wave feeding the cavity. The future challenges of higher-charg...

  10. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  11. Heating of toroidal plasmas by neutral injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, T.H.

    1971-08-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the physics of ion acceleration, charge exchange and ionization, trajectories for fast ions in toroidal magnetic fields, and fast-ion thermalization. The injection of fast atoms is found to be a highly competitive method both for heating present-day experimental toroidal plasmas and for bringing full-scale toroidal CTR plasmas to low-density ignition. 13 refs., 9 figs

  12. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Accelerator and Ion Beam Tradeoffs for Studies of Warm Dense Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, J.J.; Briggs, R.J.; Callahan, D.A.; Davidson, R.C.; Friedman, A.; Grisham, L.; Lee, E.P.; Lee, R.W.; Logan, B.G.; Olson, C.L.; Rose, D.V.; Santhanam, P.; Sessler, A.M.; Staples, J.W.; Tabak, M.; Welch, D.R.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    One approach for heating a target to ''Warm Dense Matter'' conditions (similar, for example, to the interiors of giant planets or certain stages in inertial confinement fusion targets), is to use intense ion beams as the heating source (see refs.[6] and [7] and references therein for motivation and accelerator concepts). By consideration of ion beam phase-space constraints, both at the injector, and at the final focus, and consideration of simple equations of state and relations for ion stopping, approximate conditions at the target foil may be calculated. Thus, target temperature and pressure may be calculated as a function of ion mass, ion energy, pulse duration, velocity tilt, and other accelerator parameters. We connect some of these basic parameters to help search the extensive parameter space including ion mass, ion energy, total charge in beam pulse, beam emittance, target thickness and density

  14. Ion Sources for MedAustron

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, J; Wallner, J; Sargsyan, E; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2010-01-01

    The MedAustron Ion therapy center will be constructed in Wiener Neustadt (Austria) in the vicinity of Vienna. Its accelerator complex consists of four ion sources, a linear accelerator, a synchrotron and a beam delivery system to the three medical treatment rooms and to the research irradiation room. The ion sources shall deliver beams of H31+, C4+ and light ions with utmost reliability and stability. This paper describes the features of the ion sources presently planned for the MedAustron facility; such as ion source main parameters, gas injection, temperature control and cooling systems. A dedicated beam diagnostics technique is proposed in order to characterize ECR ions beams; in the first drift region after the ion source, a fraction of the mixed beam is selected via moveable aperture. With standard beam diagnostics, we then aim to produce position-dependant observables such as ion-current density, beam energy distribution and emittance for each charge states to be compared to simulations of ECR e-heating...

  15. Three-dimensional calculation analysis of ICRF heating in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Tetsuo; Kumazawa, Ryuhei; Mutoh, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is one of the heating methods for the fusion plasma experiments and also effective for the helical plasmas. For the purpose of analysis of the ICRF heating in the helical plasmas, the three-dimensional full-wave code has been developed. The feature of the helical system compared with the tokamak device is the strong coupling of the toroidal harmonic modes. They cannot be treated independently. Dependence of the power absorption on the position of the ion cyclotron resonance layer is calculated including all toroidal modes. Strong power absorption was obtained when the position of the resonance layer is slightly different from the experimental results. Difference of the position of the resonance layer in different toroidal angle is thought to be important to achieve the good heating efficiency in the ICRF heating for the helical plasmas. (author)

  16. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  17. The magnetic fluid for heat transfer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Neveu, S.; Koganezawa, H.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time visual observation of boiling water-based and ionic magnetic fluids (MFs) and heat transfer characteristics in heat pipe using ionic MF stabilized by citrate ions (JC-1) as working liquid are reported. Irrespective of the presence or absence of magnetic field water-based MF degraded during boiling. However, the degradation of JC-1 was avoided by heating the fluid in magnetic field. Furthermore, the heat transfer capacity of JC-1 heat pipe under applied magnetic field was enhanced over the no field case

  18. H- formation process in a multicusp ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1987-07-01

    In recent years, H - ions have been found important applications in high energy accelerators and in neutral beam heating of fusion plasmas. There are different techniques for producing the H - or D - ions. The most attractive scheme is the direct extraction of H - ions from a hydrogen discharge. This technique requires no cesium and it utilizes the existing large area positive ion source technology. This paper investigates this techniques. 14 refs

  19. Rapid plasma heating by collective interactions, using strong turbulence and relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    A multi-kilovolt, moderate density plasma was generated in a magnetic mirror confinement system by two methods: turbulent heating and relativistic electron beam. Extensive diagnostic development permitted the measurement of important plasma characteristics, leading to interesting and novel conclusions regarding heating and loss mechanisms. Electron and ion heating mechanisms were categorized, and parameter studies made to establish ranges of importance. Nonthermal ion and electron energy distributions were measured. Beam propagation and energy deposition studies yielded the spatial dependence of plasma heating

  20. Electron backstream to the source plasma region in an ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.; Akiba, M.; Arakawa, Y.; Okumura, Y.; Sakuraba, J.

    1980-01-01

    The flux of backstream electrons to the source plasma region increases significantly with the acceleration voltage of an ion beam, so that the back plate in the arc chamber should be broken for quasi-dc operation. The flux of backstream electrons is estimated at the acceleration voltage of 50--100 kV for a proton beam with the aid of ion beam simulation code. The power flux of backstream electrons is up to about 7% of the total beam output at the acceleration voltage of 75 kV. It is pointed out that the conventional ion sources such as the duoPIGatron or the bucket source which use a magnetic field for source plasma production are not suitable for quasi-dc and high-energy ion sources, because the surface heat flux of the back plate is increased by the focusing of backstream electrons and the removal of it is quite difficult. A new ion source which has an electron beam dump in the arc chamber is proposed

  1. High current vacuum arc ion source for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, N.; Schein, J.; Gensler, S.; Prasad, R.R.; Krishnan, M.; Brown, I.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy Ion fusion (HIF) is one of the approaches for the controlled thermonuclear power production. A source of heavy ions with charge states 1+ to 2+, in ∼0.5 A current beams with ∼20 micros pulse widths and ∼10 Hz repetition rates are required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the HIF program to date, but suffer from sloe turn-on, heating problems for large areas, are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states, in short and long pulse bursts, with low emittance and high beam currents. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications is investigated. An existing ion source at LBNL was modified to produce ∼0.5 A, ∼60 keV Gd (A∼158) ion beams. The experimental effort concentrated on beam noise reduction, pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and achieving low beam emittance at 0.5 A ion current level. Details of the source development will be reported

  2. Towards a wire-mediated coupling of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert; Lee, Tony; Daniilidis, Nikos; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Häffner, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Most schemes for ion trap quantum computation rely upon the exchange of information between ion-qubits in the same trap region, mediated by their shared vibrational mode. An alternative way to achieve this coupling is via the image charges induced in a conducting wire that connects different traps. This was shown to be theoretically possible by Heinzen and Wineland in 1990, but some important practical questions have remained unaddressed. Among these are how the presence of such a wire modifies the motional frequencies and heating rates of trapped ions. We thus have realized this system as a 1 mm-scale planar segmented rf ion trap combined with an electrically floating gold wire of 25 microns diameter and length 1 cm. This wire is placed close to trapped ions using a set of piezoelectric nanopositioners. We present here experimental measurements of the motional frequencies and heating rates of a single trapped calcium ion as the wire is moved from 3.0 mm to 0.2 mm away from the ion. We discuss the implications of these results for achieving wire-mediated coupling in the present apparatus, as well as in future improved setups.

  3. High-power ICRF and ICRF plus neutral-beam heating on PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.; Bitter, M.; Budny, R.

    1983-01-01

    PLT ICRF experiments with RF powers up to approx.=3 MW have demonstrated efficient plasma heating in both the minority fundamental and the second harmonic ion-cyclotron regimes. In the minority 3 He regime, ion temperatures of approx.=3 keV have been produced along with approx.=1 kW of D- 3 He fusion power and substantial electron heating. In the second harmonic H regime, an equivalent averaged ion energy of approx.=4 keV has been achieved. Combined ICRF plus neutral-beam heating experiments with auxiliary powers totalling up to 4.5 MW have provided insight into auxiliary heating performance at stored plasma energy levels up to approx.=100 kJ. Values of #betta#sub(phi) in the range of 1.5-2% have been attained for Bsub(phi) approx.=17 kG. Energetic discharges with n-barsub(e) up to approx.6x10 13 cm - 3 at Bsub(phi) approx.=28 kG have also been investigated. Preliminary confinement studies suggest that energetic ion losses may contribute to a direct loss of the input RF power in the H minority heating regime but are insignificant in the 3 He minority case. The energy confinement time for the H minority regime is reduced somewhat from the Ohmic value. (author)

  4. Fast wave absorption at the Alfven resonance during ion cyclotron resonance heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Hellsten, T.; Alava, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    For ICRH scenarii where the majority cyclotron resonance intersects the plasma core, mode conversion of the fast magnetosonic wave to an Alfven wave takes place at the plasma boundary on the high field side. Simple analytical estimates of the converted power for this mode conversion process are derived and compared with numerical calculations including finite electron inertia and kinetic effects. The converted power is found to depend on the local value of the wave field as well as on plasma parameters at the Alfven wave resonance. The interference with the reflected wave will therefore modify the mode conversion. If the conversion layer is localized near the wall, the conversion will be strongly reduced. The conversion coefficient is found to be strongest for small density gradients and high density and it is sensitive to the value of the parallel wave number. Whether it increases or decreases with the latter depends on the ion composition. Analysis of this problem for ICRH in JET predicts that a large fraction of the power is mode converted at the plasma boundary for first harmonic heating of tritium in a deuterium-tritium plasma. (author). 13 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  5. Cluster ion-surface interactions: from meV to MeV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordlund, Kai; Meinander, Kristoffer; Jaervi, Tommi T.; Peltola, Jarkko; Samela, Juha [Accelerator Laboratory, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    The nature of cluster ion-surface interactions changes dramatically with the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster species. In this talk I review some of our recent work on the nature of cluster-surface interactions spanning an energy range from a few MeV/cluster to about 1 MeV/cluster and cluster sizes in the range of 10 - 1000 atoms/cluster. In the energy range of a few MeV/cluster ion, the kinetic energy of the incoming ion is insignificant compared to the energy gained when the surface potential energy at the cluster-surface interface is released and partly translated into kinetic energy. Even in this energy regime I show that surprisingly drastic effects can occur. When the energy of the incoming cluster is raised to a few eV/atom, the kinetic energy of the incoming cluster starts to affect the deposition. It will cause the cluster to entirely reform on impact. When the energy is raised to the range of keV's/cluster, the clusters start to penetrate the sample, fairly similar to conventional ion implantation. However, in dense targets the cluster ions may stick close to each other long enough to cause a significant enhancement of the heat spike in the material. Finally, I show that at kinetic energies around 1 MeV/cluster the cluster enhancement of the heat spike may lead to dramatic surface effects.

  6. Stability and heating of a poloidal divertor tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddle, A. P.; Dexter, R. N.; Holly, D. T.; Lipschultz, B.; Osborne, T. H.; Prager, S. C.; Shepard, D.A., Sprott, J.C.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    1980-06-01

    Five experimental studies - two stability and three heating investigations - have been carried out on Tokapole II, a Tokamak with a four node poloidal divertor. First, discharges have been attained with safety factor q as low as 0.6 over most of the column without degradation of confinement, and correlation of helical instability onset with current profile shape is being studied. Second, the axisymmetric instability has been investigated in detail for various noncircular cross-sectional shapes, and results have been compared with a numerical stability code adapted to the Tokapole machine. Third, application of high power fast wave ion cyclotron resonance heating doubles the ion temperature and permits observation of heating as a function of harmonic number and spatial location of the resonance. Fourth, low power shear Alfven wave propagation is underway to test the applicability of this heating method to tokamaks. Fifth, preionization by electron cyclotron heating has been employed to reduce the startup loop voltage by approx. 60%.

  7. Procedure for the ion implantation of MOS elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessner, T.; Vetter, E.; Tolonics, J.

    1986-01-01

    The ion implantation procedure is applied to the doping of MOS elements. The invention guarantees a homogeneous doping in the dose range from 10 10 to 10 12 ions/cm 2 without additional installations of mechanical orifices in high-current implantation devices. The ion source parameters like cathode heating current, pressure at the ion source, extraction and acceleration voltages correspond to the dose range (10 10 to 10 12 ions/cm 2 ) for single charged ions of the doping agent. Double or triple charged ions generated at the ion source have been separated mass-analytically, accelerated and scanned. Ion densities below 100 nA/cm 2 have been obtained

  8. Multi-slit triode ion optical system with ballistic beam focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydenko, V., E-mail: V.I.Davydenko@inp.nsk.su; Amirov, V.; Gorbovsky, A.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A.; Kolmogorov, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Mishagin, V.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Karpushov, A. N. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Smirnov, A. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Uhlemann, R. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research-Plasma Physics, Research Center Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Multi-slit triode ion-optical systems with spherical electrodes are of interest for formation of intense focused neutral beams for plasma heating. At present, two versions of focusing multi-slit triode ion optical system are developed. The first ion optical system forms the proton beam with 15 keV energy, 140 A current, and 30 ms duration. The second ion optical system is intended for heating neutral beam injector of Tokamak Configuration Variable (TCV). The injector produces focused deuterium neutral beam with 35 keV energy, 1 MW power, and 2 s duration. In the later case, the angular beam divergence of the neutral beam is 20-22 mrad in the direction across the slits of the ion optical system and 12 mrad in the direction along the slits.

  9. Resistive Heating in Saturn's Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesema, Jess W.; Koskinen, Tommi; Yelle, Roger V.

    2016-10-01

    The thermospheres of the jovian planets are several times hotter than solar heating alone can account for. On Saturn, resistive heating appears sufficient to explain these temperatures in auroral regions, but the particular mechanism(s) responsible for heating the lower latitudes remains unclear. Smith et al. (2005) suggested that electrodynamics of the equatorial region—particularly resistive heating caused by strong electrojet currents—might explain the observed temperatures at low latitudes. Müller-Wodarg et al. (2006) found that their circulation model could reproduce low-latitude temperatures only when they included resistive heating at the poles and applied a uniform, generic heating source globally. Smith et al. (2007) concluded that heating at the poles leads to meridional circulation that cools low latitudes and argued that in-situ heating is required to explain the temperatures at low latitudes.Resistive heating at low latitudes, arising from enhanced current generation driven by thermospheric winds, is a potentially important in-situ heating mechanism. Ion drag caused by low-latitude electrodynamics can modify global circulation and meridional transport of energy. We present an axisymmetric, steady-state formulation of wind-driven electrodynamics to investigate these possibilities throughout Saturn's thermosphere. At present, we assume a dipole magnetic field and neglect any contributions from the magnetosphere. We use ion mixing ratios from the model of Kim et al. (2014) and the observed temperature-pressure profile from Koskinen et al. (2015) to calculate the generalized conductivity tensor as described by Koskinen et al. (2014). Our model solves the coupled equations for charge continuity and Ohm's law with tensor conductivity while enforcing zero current across the boundaries. The resulting partial differential equation is solved for the current density throughout the domain and used to calculate the net resistive heating rate. We demonstrate

  10. Intense highly charged ion beam production and operation with a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL is a superconducting-magnet-based electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS for the production of intense highly charged heavy ion beams. It is one of the best performing ECRISs worldwide and the first superconducting ECRIS built with an innovative magnet to generate a high strength minimum-B field for operation with heating microwaves up to 24–28 GHz. Since its commissioning in 2005, SECRAL has so far produced a good number of continuous wave intensity records of highly charged ion beams, in which recently the beam intensities of ^{40}Ar^{12+} and ^{129}Xe^{26+} have, for the first time, exceeded 1 emA produced by an ion source. Routine operations commenced in 2007 with the Heavy Ion accelerator Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL, China. Up to June 2017, SECRAL has been providing more than 28,000 hours of highly charged heavy ion beams to the accelerator demonstrating its great capability and reliability. The great achievement of SECRAL is accumulation of numerous technical advancements, such as an innovative magnetic system and an efficient double-frequency (24+18  GHz heating with improved plasma stability. This article reviews the development of SECRAL and production of intense highly charged ion beams by SECRAL focusing on its unique magnet design, source commissioning, performance studies and enhancements, beam quality and long-term operation. SECRAL development and its performance studies representatively reflect the achievements and status of the present ECR ion source, as well as the ECRIS impacts on HIRFL.

  11. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Nayak, B.B.; Mishra, B.K. [CSIR-Institute of Minerals and Materials Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Cr and N ion implantation on natural rubies of low aesthetic quality. • Cr-ion implantation improves colour tone from red to deep red (pigeon eye red). • N-ion implantation at fluence of 3 × 10{sup 17} causes blue coloration on surface. • Certain extent of amorphization is observed in the case of N-ion implantation. - Abstract: Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV–Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 10{sup 17} N-ions/cm{sup 2} fluence, formation of colour centres (F{sup +}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 2}{sup +} and F{sub 2}{sup 2+}) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  12. FTIR study of aquamarines after gamma irradiation, heat treatment and electrodiffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkmim, Danielle Gomides; Almeida, Frederico Ozanan Tomaz de; Lameiras, Fernando Soares, E-mail: alkmia@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fredufmg@gmail.com, E-mail: fsl@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    Beryl, Be{sub 3}Al{sub 2}(SiO{sub 3}){sub 6}, is a natural gemstone with many colors. Some of these colors can be induced or modified by exposure to ionizing radiation, by heating, and maybe by electrodiffusion. Small contents of chromophore chemical elements are related to the colors of beryl, like iron, chromium, vanadium, manganese, and others. There is great interest in relation to methods of improving or inducing colors in beryl. There is evidence that infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) can contribute to foresee beryl behavior submitted to procedures for color change. It was observed that electrodiffusion with or without contaminant ions did not alter the FTIR spectrum of aquamarines, unlike heat treatment. Green samples have a higher content of type I water molecules, whereas blue samples have a higher content of type II water molecules. Significant changes in FTIR spectra of aquamarines were observed only in green samples after exposure to gamma rays or to heat. The vanishing of the band at 3633 cm{sup -1} may be related to the position of Na{sup +} ion in the crystal lattice of beryl. (author)

  13. Heat waves and their significance for a temperate benthic community: A near-natural experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansch, Christian; Scotti, Marco; Barboza, Francisco R; Al-Janabi, Balsam; Brakel, Janina; Briski, Elizabeta; Bucholz, Björn; Franz, Markus; Ito, Maysa; Paiva, Filipa; Saha, Mahasweta; Sawall, Yvonne; Weinberger, Florian; Wahl, Martin

    2018-04-23

    Climate change will not only shift environmental means but will also increase the intensity of extreme events, exerting additional stress on ecosystems. While field observations on the ecological consequences of heat waves are emerging, experimental evidence is rare, and lacking at the community level. Using a novel "near-natural" outdoor mesocosms approach, this study tested whether marine summer heat waves have detrimental consequences for macrofauna of a temperate coastal community, and whether sequential heat waves provoke an increase or decrease of sensitivity to thermal stress. Three treatments were applied, defined and characterized through a statistical analysis of 15 years of temperature records from the experimental site: (1) no heat wave, (2) two heat waves in June and July followed by a summer heat wave in August and (3) the summer heat wave only. Overall, 50% of the species showed positive, negative or positive/negative responses in either abundance and/or biomass. We highlight four possible ways in which single species responded to either three subsequent heat waves or one summer heat wave: (1) absence of a response (tolerance, 50% of species), (2) negative accumulative effects by three subsequent heat waves (tellinid bivalve), (3) buffering by proceeding heat waves due to acclimation and/or shifts in phenology (spionid polychaete) and (4) an accumulative positive effect by subsequent heat waves (amphipod). The differential responses to single or sequential heat waves at the species level entailed shifts at the community level. Community-level differences between single and triple heat waves were more pronounced than those between regimes with vs. without heat waves. Detritivory was reduced by the single heat wave while suspension feeding was less common in the triple heat wave regime. Critical extreme events occur already today and will occur more frequently in a changing climate, thus, leading to detrimental impacts on coastal marine systems.

  14. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Qian, C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Fang, X.

    2016-01-01

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling la