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Sample records for signalling complex activation

  1. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Multifractal analysis of sEMG signal of the complex muscle activity

    CERN Document Server

    Trybek, Paulina; Nowakowski, Michal; Machura, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    The neuro--muscular activity while working on laparoscopic trainer is the example of the complex (and complicated) movement. This class of problems are still waiting for the proper theory which will be able to describe the actual properties of the muscle performance. Here we consider the signals obtained from three states of muscle activity: at maximum contraction, during complex movements (at actual work) and in the completely relaxed state. In addition the difference between a professional and an amateur is presented. The Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis was used in description of the properties the kinesiological surface electromyographic signals (sEMG). We demonstrate the dissimilarity between each state of work for the selected group of muscles as well as between trained and untrained individuals.

  3. Complex Auditory Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    I I!ED REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE AD-A 199 332 b RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS 3. DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITY OF REPORT A.Proved for pj ." ic release 2b...remarkably little experimental nent complexes. In the first experiment, a single evidence documenting these claims. Viemeister component of a 21-component...deci relts~to a l’rn NI betwen CtMRd tipoe ( 1959 ) and Gabriel and Colburn ( 1981 ) xk Ill be con- ot:ilcl tlope dlcelati ’o nos dids e lceredl .t% h

  4. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.thiel@uks.eu

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  5. Mutations in MAP3K7 that Alter the Activity of the TAK1 Signaling Complex Cause Frontometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Emma M; Daniel, Philip B; Jenkins, Zandra A; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Leo, Paul; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie Claude; Adès, Lesley C; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Kim, Chong A; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Irma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Strom, Tim M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Markie, David M; Robertson, Stephen P

    2016-08-04

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a progressive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia affecting the long bones and skull. The cause of FMD in some individuals is gain-of-function mutations in FLNA, although how these mutations result in a hyperostotic phenotype remains unknown. Approximately one half of individuals with FMD have no identified mutation in FLNA and are phenotypically very similar to individuals with FLNA mutations, except for an increased tendency to form keloid scars. Using whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing in 19 FMD-affected individuals with no identifiable FLNA mutation, we identified mutations in two genes-MAP3K7, encoding transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase (TAK1), and TAB2, encoding TAK1-associated binding protein 2 (TAB2). Four mutations were found in MAP3K7, including one highly recurrent (n = 15) de novo mutation (c.1454C>T [ p.Pro485Leu]) proximal to the coiled-coil domain of TAK1 and three missense mutations affecting the kinase domain (c.208G>C [p.Glu70Gln], c.299T>A [p.Val100Glu], and c.502G>C [p.Gly168Arg]). Notably, the subjects with the latter three mutations had a milder FMD phenotype. An additional de novo mutation was found in TAB2 (c.1705G>A, p.Glu569Lys). The recurrent mutation does not destabilize TAK1, or impair its ability to homodimerize or bind TAB2, but it does increase TAK1 autophosphorylation and alter the activity of more than one signaling pathway regulated by the TAK1 kinase complex. These findings show that dysregulation of the TAK1 complex produces a close phenocopy of FMD caused by FLNA mutations. Furthermore, they suggest that the pathogenesis of some of the filaminopathies caused by FLNA mutations might be mediated by misregulation of signaling coordinated through the TAK1 signaling complex. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. HLA-DR molecules enhance signal transduction through the CD3/Ti complex in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in activated human T cells. Here we have studied the effect of DR on CD3-induced signal transduction...... in allospecific T-cell clones and T-leukemia (HUT78) cells. Co-crosslinking of DR with CD3 produced an enhanced [Ca2+]i response compared to that seen with CD3 alone. In contrast, CD2 responses were not enhanced by co-crosslinking with DR. Co-crosslinking CD45 in a tri-molecular complex of CD45, CD3, and DR...... completely abrogated the enhancing effects of DR on CD3-induced [Ca2+]i responses. In contrast, the enhancing effect of co-crosslinking CD4 on CD3 responses was not inhibited by co-crosslinking CD45. Thus, the DR-mediated accessory signals appear to be regulated differently from those provided by CD4...

  7. Glycemic Control, Hand Activity, and Complexity of Biological Signals in Diabetes Mellitus

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    Hsien-Tsai Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both glycemic control and handgrip strength affect microvascular function. Multiscale entropy (MSE of photoplethysmographic (PPG pulse amplitudes may differ by diabetes status and hand activity. Of a middle-to-old aged and right-handed cohort without clinical cardiovascular disease, we controlled age, sex, and weight to select the unaffected (no type 2 diabetes, n=36, the well-controlled diabetes (HbA1c < 8%, n=22, and the poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c ≥ 8%, n=22 groups. MSEs were calculated from consecutive 1,500 PPG pulse amplitudes of bilateral index fingertips. The small-,  medium-, and large-scale MSEs were defined as the average of scale 1 (MSE1, scales 2–4 (MSE2–4, and scales 5–10 (MSE5–10, respectively. Intra- and intergroups were compared by one- and two-sample t-tests, respectively. The dominant hand MSE5–10 was lower in the poorly controlled diabetes group than the well-controlled diabetes and the unaffected (1.28 versus 1.52 and 1.56, p=0.019 and 0.001, resp. groups, whereas the nondominant hand MSE5–10 was lower in the well- and poorly controlled diabetes groups than the unaffected group (1.35 and 1.29 versus 1.58, p=0.008 and 0.005, resp.. The MSE1 of dominant hand was higher than that of nondominant hand in the well-controlled diabetes (1.35 versus 1.10, p=0.048. In conclusion, diabetes status and hand dominance may affect the MSE of PPG pulse amplitudes.

  8. Activation of Rac1 by paxillin-Crk-DOCK180 signaling complex is antagonized by Rap1 in migrating NBT-II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallés, Ana M; Beuvin, Maud; Boyer, Brigitte

    2004-10-22

    Induction of epithelial cell motility is a fundamental morphogenetic event that is recapitulated during carcinoma metastasis. Random motility of NBT-II carcinoma cells on collagen critically depends on paxillin phosphorylation at Tyr-31 and Tyr-118, the binding sites for the adapter protein CrkII. Two constitutive partners of CrkII are the exchange factors DOCK180 and C3G. CrkII bound to DOCK180 formed a signaling complex with phosphorylated paxillin that was necessary for cell migration as inferred from the inhibition caused by a DOCK180-interfering mutant. DOCK180, which acts predominantly on the Rho family GTPase Rac1, restored cell locomotion in cells expressing Phe-31/118 paxillin mutants deficient in Rac1 GTP-loading, suggesting that formation of paxillin-Crk-DOCK180 signaling complex controls collagen-dependent migration mainly through Rac1 activation. In migrating cells, CrkII constitutive association with C3G was not sufficient to stimulate its GDP/GTP exchange activity toward the Ras family GTPase Rap1. However, when constitutively active RapV12 was overexpressed, it negatively regulated cell motility. Activation of the C3G/Rap1 signaling pathway resulted in down-regulation of the paxillin-Crk-DOCK180 complex and reduction of Rac1-GTP, suggesting that Rap1 activation could suppress the Rac1 signaling pathway in epithelial cells.

  9. The late endosomal HOPS complex anchors active G-protein signaling essential for pathogenesis in magnaporthe oryzae.

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    Ravikrishna Ramanujam

    Full Text Available In Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal ascomycete of the devastating rice blast disease, the conidial germ tube tip must sense and respond to a wide array of requisite cues from the host in order to switch from polarized to isotropic growth, ultimately forming the dome-shaped infection cell known as the appressorium. Although the role for G-protein mediated Cyclic AMP signaling in appressorium formation was first identified almost two decades ago, little is known about the spatio-temporal dynamics of the cascade and how the signal is transmitted through the intracellular network during cell growth and morphogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that the late endosomal compartments, comprising of a PI3P-rich (Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate highly dynamic tubulo-vesicular network, scaffold active MagA/GαS, Rgs1 (a GAP for MagA, Adenylate cyclase and Pth11 (a non-canonical GPCR in the likely absence of AKAP-like anchors during early pathogenic development in M. oryzae. Loss of HOPS component Vps39 and consequently the late endosomal function caused a disruption of adenylate cyclase localization, cAMP signaling and appressorium formation. Remarkably, exogenous cAMP rescued the appressorium formation defects associated with VPS39 deletion in M. oryzae. We propose that sequestration of key G-protein signaling components on dynamic late endosomes and/or endolysosomes, provides an effective molecular means to compartmentalize and control the spatio-temporal activation and rapid downregulation (likely via vacuolar degradation of cAMP signaling amidst changing cellular geometry during pathogenic development in M. oryzae.

  10. LUBAC-Recruited CYLD and A20 Regulate Gene Activation and Cell Death by Exerting Opposing Effects on Linear Ubiquitin in Signaling Complexes

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    Peter Draber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitination and deubiquitination are crucial for assembly and disassembly of signaling complexes. LUBAC-generated linear (M1 ubiquitin is important for signaling via various immune receptors. We show here that the deubiquitinases CYLD and A20, but not OTULIN, are recruited to the TNFR1- and NOD2-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC and NOD2-SC, at which they cooperate to limit gene activation. Whereas CYLD recruitment depends on its interaction with LUBAC, but not on LUBAC’s M1-chain-forming capacity, A20 recruitment requires this activity. Intriguingly, CYLD and A20 exert opposing effects on M1 chain stability in the TNF-RSC and NOD2-SC. While CYLD cleaves M1 chains, and thereby sensitizes cells to TNF-induced death, A20 binding to them prevents their removal and, consequently, inhibits cell death. Thus, CYLD and A20 cooperatively restrict gene activation and regulate cell death via their respective activities on M1 chains. Hence, the interplay between LUBAC, M1-ubiquitin, CYLD, and A20 is central for physiological signaling through innate immune receptors.

  11. How complex are intracellular immune receptor signaling complexes?

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    Vera eBonardi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs are the major class of intracellular immune receptors in plants. NLRs typically function to specifically recognize pathogen effectors and to initiate and control defense responses that severely limit pathogen growth in plants (termed effector triggered immunity, or ETI. Despite numerous reports supporting a central role in innate immunity, the molecular mechanisms driving NLR activation and downstream signaling remain largely elusive. Recent reports shed light on the pre- and post-activation dynamics of a few NLR-containing protein complexes. Recent technological advances in the use of proteomics may enable high-resolution definition of immune protein complexes and possible activation-relevant post-translational modifications of the components in these complexes. In this mini-review, we focus on research aimed at characterizing pre- and post-activation NLR protein complexes and the molecular events that follow activation. We discuss the use of new or improved technologies as tools to unveil the molecular mechanisms that define NLR-mediated pathogen recognition.

  12. Structure and dynamics of GPCR signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Daniel; Masureel, Matthieu; Kobilka, Brian K

    2018-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay numerous extracellular signals by triggering intracellular signaling through coupling with G proteins and arrestins. Recent breakthroughs in the structural determination of GPCRs and GPCR-transducer complexes represent important steps toward deciphering GPCR signal transduction at a molecular level. A full understanding of the molecular basis of GPCR-mediated signaling requires elucidation of the dynamics of receptors and their transducer complexes as well as their energy landscapes and conformational transition rates. Here, we summarize current insights into the structural plasticity of GPCR-G-protein and GPCR-arrestin complexes that underlies the regulation of the receptor's intracellular signaling profile.

  13. Flagellar activation of epithelial signaling.

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    Prince, Alice

    2006-05-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells are an important component of the innate immune system forming a physical and immunologic barrier to inhaled bacteria. As polarized cells with tight junctions, the immunologic signaling functions of airway epithelial cells differ from those of professional immune cells. While many bacterial gene products activate airway mucosal cells, flagella are especially immunostimulatory. The motility function provided by flagella is essential for the initial stages of respiratory infection associated with opportunists such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Apically presented toll-like receptor 5 responds specifically to bacterial flagellin transducing a number of epithelial proinflammatory signaling cascades, including the induction of Ca2+ fluxes; activation of NF-kappaB, IL-8, and matrilysin; and mucin expression. The complexities of flagella and flagellin structures, how these bacterial components initiate host signaling and their potential as a vaccine target are reviewed.

  14. Hierarchical nanostructure and synergy of multimolecular signalling complexes

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    Sherman, Eilon; Barr, Valarie A.; Merrill, Robert K.; Regan, Carole K.; Sommers, Connie L.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2016-07-01

    Signalling complexes are dynamic, multimolecular structures and sites for intracellular signal transduction. Although they play a crucial role in cellular activation, current research techniques fail to resolve their structure in intact cells. Here we present a multicolour, photoactivated localization microscopy approach for imaging multiple types of single molecules in fixed and live cells and statistical tools to determine the nanoscale organization, topology and synergy of molecular interactions in signalling complexes downstream of the T-cell antigen receptor. We observe that signalling complexes nucleated at the key adapter LAT show a hierarchical topology. The critical enzymes PLCγ1 and VAV1 localize to the centre of LAT-based complexes, and the adapter SLP-76 and actin molecules localize to the periphery. Conditional second-order statistics reveal a hierarchical network of synergic interactions between these molecules. Our results extend our understanding of the nanostructure of signalling complexes and are relevant to studying a wide range of multimolecular complexes.

  15. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets-C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways.

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    Chun Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+-p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration.

  16. The complexity of DNA double strand break is a crucial factor for activating ATR signaling pathway for G2/M checkpoint regulation regardless of ATM function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lian; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Miura, Masahiko; Cui, Xing; Liu, Cuihua; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Hirohiko; Yu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice following ionizing radiation (IR) is currently an appealing research topic, which is still largely unclear. Our recent paper indicated that the complexity of DSBs is a critical factor that enhances DNA end resection. It has been well accepted that the RPA-coated single strand DNA produced by resection is a signaling structure for ATR activation. Therefore, taking advantage of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to effectively produce complex DSBs, we investigated how the complexity of DSB influences the function of ATR pathway on the G2/M checkpoint regulation. Human skin fibroblast cells with or without ATM were irradiated with X rays or heavy ion particles, and dual-parameter flow cytometry was used to quantitatively assess the mitotic entry at early period post radiation by detecting the cells positive for phosphor histone H3. In ATM-deficient cells, ATR pathway played a pivotal role and functioned in a dose- and LET-dependent way to regulate the early G2/M arrest even as low as 0.2Gy for heavy ion radiation, which indicated that ATR pathway could be rapidly activated and functioned in an ATM-independent, but DSB complexity-dependent manner following exposure to IR. Furthermore, ATR pathway also functioned more efficiently in ATM-proficient cells to block G2 to M transition at early period of particle radiation exposure. Accordingly, in contrast to ATM inhibitor, ATR inhibitor had a more effective radiosensitizing effect on survival fraction following heavy ion beams as compared with X ray radiation. Taken together, our results reveal that the complexity of DSBs is a crucial factor for the activation of ATR pathway for G2/M checkpoint regulation, and ATM-dependent end resection is not essential for the activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules Modulate Activation Threshold and Early Signaling of T Cell Antigen Receptor–γ/δ Stimulated by Nonpeptidic Ligands

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    Carena, Ilaria; Shamshiev, Abdijapar; Donda, Alena; Colonna, Marco; Libero, Gennaro De

    1997-01-01

    Killer cell inhibitory receptors and CD94-NKG2-A/B heterodimers are major histocompatibility complex class I–specific inhibitory receptors expressed by natural killer cells, T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-γ/δ cells, and a subset of TCR-α/β cells. We studied the functional interaction between TCR-γ/δ and CD94, this inhibitory receptor being expressed on the majority of γ/δ T cells. When engaged by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen class I molecules, CD94 downmodulates activation of human TCR-γ/δ by phosphorylated ligands. CD94-mediated inhibition is more effective at low than at high doses of TCR ligand, which may focus T cell responses towards antigen-presenting cells presenting high amounts of antigen. CD94 engagement has major effects on TCR signaling cascade. It facilitates recruitment of SHP-1 phosphatase to TCR–CD3 complex and affects phosphorylation of Lck and ZAP-70 kinase, but not of CD3 ζ chain upon TCR triggering. These events may cause abortion of proximal TCR-mediated signaling and set a higher TCR activation threshold. PMID:9362537

  18. Nipah and Hendra Virus Nucleoproteins Inhibit Nuclear Accumulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 by Interfering with Their Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroki; Takayama, Ikuyo; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2017-11-01

    Henipaviruses, such as Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses, are highly pathogenic zoonotic agents within the Paramyxoviridae family. The phosphoprotein (P) gene products of the paramyxoviruses have been well characterized for their interferon (IFN) antagonist activity and their contribution to viral pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrated that the nucleoprotein (N) of henipaviruses also prevents the host IFN signaling response. Reporter assays demonstrated that the NiV and HeV N proteins (NiV-N and HeV-N, respectively) dose-dependently suppressed both type I and type II IFN responses and that the inhibitory effect was mediated by their core domains. Additionally, NiV-N prevented the nuclear transport of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2. However, NiV-N did not associate with Impα5, Impβ1, or Ran, which are members of the nuclear transport system for STATs. Although P protein is known as a binding partner of N protein and actively retains N protein in the cytoplasm, the IFN antagonist activity of N protein was not abolished by the coexpression of P protein. This suggests that the IFN inhibition by N protein occurs in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the complex formation of STATs was hampered in the N protein-expressing cells. As a result, STAT nuclear accumulation was reduced, causing a subsequent downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) due to low promoter occupancy by STAT complexes. This novel route for preventing host IFN responses by henipavirus N proteins provides new insight into the pathogenesis of these viruses. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are well known for suppressing interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity with their phosphoprotein (P) gene products, and the henipaviruses also possess P, V, W, and C proteins for evading host antiviral responses. There are numerous studies providing evidence for the relationship between viral pathogenicity and antagonistic activities against IFN

  19. Nonvisual complex spike signals in the rabbit cerebellar flocculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkelman, B.H.; Belton, Tim; Suh, Minah; Coesmans, Michiel; Morpurgo, Menno M; Simpson, John I

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the well-known signals of retinal image slip, floccular complex spikes (CSs) also convey nonvisual signals. We recorded eye movement and CS activity from Purkinje cells in awake rabbits sinusoidally oscillated in the dark on a vestibular turntable. The stimulus frequency ranged from

  20. Autophagosomal Membrane Serves as Platform for Intracellular Death-inducing Signaling Complex (iDISC)-mediated Caspase-8 Activation and Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Megan M.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Khan, Osman; Park, Sungman; Hori, Tsukasa; Yun, Jong; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Hu, Chang-Deng; Zhang, Jianke; Kester, Mark; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy and apoptosis are two evolutionarily conserved processes that regulate cell fate in response to cytotoxic stress. However, the functional relationship between these two processes remains far from clear. Here, we demonstrate an autophagy-dependent mechanism of caspase-8 activation and initiation of the apoptotic cascade in response to SKI-I, a pan-sphingosine kinase inhibitor, and bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor. Autophagy is induced concomitantly with caspase-8 activation, which is responsible for initiation of the caspase cascade and the mitochondrial amplification loop that is required for full execution of apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagosome formation by depletion of Atg5 or Atg3 results in a marked suppression of caspase-8 activation and apoptosis. Although caspase-8 self-association depends on p62/SQSTM1, its self-processing requires the autophagosomal membrane. Caspase-8 forms a complex with Atg5 and colocalizes with LC3 and p62. Moreover, FADD, an adaptor protein for caspase-8 activation, associates with Atg5 on Atg16L- and LC3-positive autophagosomal membranes and loss of FADD suppresses cell death. Taken together, these results indicate that the autophagosomal membrane serves as a platform for an intracellular death-inducing signaling complex (iDISC) that recruits self-associated caspase-8 to initiate the caspase-8/-3 cascade. PMID:22362782

  1. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  2. Brain signal complexity rises with repetition suppression in visual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Marc Philippe; Lacourse, Karine; Lina, Jean-Marc; McIntosh, Anthony R; Gosselin, Frédéric; Théoret, Hugo; Lippé, Sarah

    2016-06-21

    Neuronal activity associated with visual processing of an unfamiliar face gradually diminishes when it is viewed repeatedly. This process, known as repetition suppression (RS), is involved in the acquisition of familiarity. Current models suggest that RS results from interactions between visual information processing areas located in the occipito-temporal cortex and higher order areas, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Brain signal complexity, which reflects information dynamics of cortical networks, has been shown to increase as unfamiliar faces become familiar. However, the complementarity of RS and increases in brain signal complexity have yet to be demonstrated within the same measurements. We hypothesized that RS and brain signal complexity increase occur simultaneously during learning of unfamiliar faces. Further, we expected alteration of DLPFC function by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate RS and brain signal complexity over the occipito-temporal cortex. Participants underwent three tDCS conditions in random order: right anodal/left cathodal, right cathodal/left anodal and sham. Following tDCS, participants learned unfamiliar faces, while an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. Results revealed RS over occipito-temporal electrode sites during learning, reflected by a decrease in signal energy, a measure of amplitude. Simultaneously, as signal energy decreased, brain signal complexity, as estimated with multiscale entropy (MSE), increased. In addition, prefrontal tDCS modulated brain signal complexity over the right occipito-temporal cortex during the first presentation of faces. These results suggest that although RS may reflect a brain mechanism essential to learning, complementary processes reflected by increases in brain signal complexity, may be instrumental in the acquisition of novel visual information. Such processes likely involve long-range coordinated activity between prefrontal and lower order visual

  3. Stromal liver kinase B1 [STK11] signaling loss induces oviductal adenomas and endometrial cancer by activating mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1.

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    Pradeep S Tanwar

    Full Text Available Germline mutations of the Liver Kinase b1 (LKB1/STK11 tumor suppressor gene have been linked to Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS, an autosomal-dominant, cancer-prone disorder in which patients develop neoplasms in several organs, including the oviduct, ovary, and cervix. We have conditionally deleted Lkb1 in Müllerian duct mesenchyme-derived cells of the female reproductive tract and observed expansion of the stromal compartment and hyperplasia and/or neoplasia of adjacent epithelial cells throughout the reproductive tract with paratubal cysts and adenomyomas in oviducts and, eventually, endometrial cancer. Examination of the proliferation marker phospho-histone H3 and mammalian Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 pathway members revealed increased proliferation and mTORC1 activation in stromal cells of both the oviduct and uterus. Treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 activity, decreased tumor burden in adult Lkb1 mutant mice. Deletion of the genes for Tuberous Sclerosis 1 (Tsc1 or Tsc2, regulators of mTORC1 that are downstream of LKB1 signaling, in the oviductal and uterine stroma phenocopies some of the defects observed in Lkb1 mutant mice, confirming that dysregulated mTORC1 activation in the Lkb1-deleted stroma contributes to the phenotype. Loss of PTEN, an upstream regulator of mTORC1 signaling, along with Lkb1 deletion significantly increased tumor burden in uteri and induced tumorigenesis in the cervix and vagina. These studies show that LKB1/TSC1/TSC2/mTORC1 signaling in mesenchymal cells is important for the maintenance of epithelial integrity and suppression of carcinogenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. Because similar changes in the stromal population are also observed in human oviductal/ovarian adenoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma patients, we predict that dysregulated mTORC1 activity by upstream mechanisms similar to those described in these model systems contributes to the pathogenesis of these human diseases.

  4. Community detection by signaling on complex networks

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    Hu, Yanqing; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2008-07-01

    Based on a signaling process of complex networks, a method for identification of community structure is proposed. For a network with n nodes, every node is assumed to be a system which can send, receive, and record signals. Each node is taken as the initial signal source to excite the whole network one time. Then the source node is associated with an n -dimensional vector which records the effects of the signaling process. By this process, the topological relationship of nodes on the network could be transferred into a geometrical structure of vectors in n -dimensional Euclidean space. Then the best partition of groups is determined by F statistics and the final community structure is given by the K -means clustering method. This method can detect community structure both in unweighted and weighted networks. It has been applied to ad hoc networks and some real networks such as the Zachary karate club network and football team network. The results indicate that the algorithm based on the signaling process works well.

  5. Community detection by signaling on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanqing; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2008-07-01

    Based on a signaling process of complex networks, a method for identification of community structure is proposed. For a network with n nodes, every node is assumed to be a system which can send, receive, and record signals. Each node is taken as the initial signal source to excite the whole network one time. Then the source node is associated with an n -dimensional vector which records the effects of the signaling process. By this process, the topological relationship of nodes on the network could be transferred into a geometrical structure of vectors in n -dimensional Euclidean space. Then the best partition of groups is determined by F statistics and the final community structure is given by the K -means clustering method. This method can detect community structure both in unweighted and weighted networks. It has been applied to ad hoc networks and some real networks such as the Zachary karate club network and football team network. The results indicate that the algorithm based on the signaling process works well.

  6. Signal focusing through active transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  7. ErbB2-Driven Breast Cancer Cell Invasion Depends on a Complex Signaling Network Activating Myeloid Zinc Finger-1-Dependent Cathepsin B Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafn, Bo; Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Andersen, Sofie Hagel

    2012-01-01

    signaling network activates the transcription of cathepsin B gene (CTSB) via myeloid zinc finger-1 transcription factor that binds to an ErbB2-responsive enhancer element in the first intron of CTSB. This work provides a model system for ErbB2-induced breast cancer cell invasiveness, reveals a signaling...... as effectors of ErbB2-induced invasion in vitro. We identify Cdc42-binding protein kinase beta, extracellular regulated kinase 2, p21-activated protein kinase 4, and protein kinase C alpha as essential mediators of ErbB2-induced cysteine cathepsin expression and breast cancer cell invasiveness. The identified...

  8. Signal peptide etiquette during assembly of a complex respiratory enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Martyn J; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a Gram-negative pathogen capable of respiration with a number of terminal electron acceptors. Tetrathionate reductase is important for the infection process and is encoded by the ttrBCA operon where TtrA and TtrB are metallocofactor-containing proteins targeted to the periplasmic side of the membrane by two different Tat targeting peptides. In this work, the inter-relationship between these two signal peptides has been explored. Molecular genetics and biochemical approaches reveal that the processing of the TtrB Tat signal peptide is dependent on the successful assembly of its partner protein, TtrA. Inactivation of either the TtrA or the TtrB Tat targeting peptides individually was observed to have limited overall effects on assembly of the enzyme or on cellular tetrathionate reductase activity. However, inactivation of both signal peptides simultaneously was found to completely abolish physiological tetrathionate reductase activity. These data suggest both signals are normally active during assembly of the enzyme, and imply a code of conduct exists between the signal peptides where one can compensate for inactivity in the other. Since it appears likely that tetrathionate reductase presents itself for export as a multi-signal complex, these observations also have implications for the mechanism of the bacterial Tat translocase. © 2013 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Structural Features of Caspase-Activating Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Ho Park

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, also called programmed cell death, is an orderly cellular suicide program that is critical for the development, immune regulation and homeostasis of a multi-cellular organism. Failure to control this process can lead to serious human diseases, including many types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmununity. The process of apoptosis is mediated by the sequential activation of caspases, which are cysteine proteases. Initiator caspases, such as caspase-2, -8, -9, and -10, are activated by formation of caspase-activating complexes, which function as a platform to recruit caspases, providing proximity for self-activation. Well-known initiator caspase-activating complexes include (1 DISC (Death Inducing Signaling Complex, which activates caspases-8 and 10; (2 Apoptosome, which activates caspase-9; and (3 PIDDosome, which activates caspase-2. Because of the fundamental biological importance of capases, many structural and biochemical studies to understand the molecular basis of assembly mechanism of caspase-activating complexes have been performed. In this review, we summarize previous studies that have examined the structural and biochemical features of caspase-activating complexes. By analyzing the structural basis for the assembly mechanism of the caspase-activating complex, we hope to provide a comprehensive understanding of caspase activation by these important oligomeric complexes.

  10. Nonvisual complex spike signals in the rabbit cerebellar flocculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Beerend H J; Belton, Tim; Suh, Minah; Coesmans, Michiel; Morpurgo, Menno M; Simpson, John I

    2014-02-26

    In addition to the well-known signals of retinal image slip, floccular complex spikes (CSs) also convey nonvisual signals. We recorded eye movement and CS activity from Purkinje cells in awake rabbits sinusoidally oscillated in the dark on a vestibular turntable. The stimulus frequency ranged from 0.2 to 1.2 Hz, and the velocity amplitude ranged from 6.3 to 50°/s. The average CS modulation was evaluated at each combination of stimulus frequency and amplitude. More than 75% of the Purkinje cells carried nonvisual CS signals. The amplitude of this modulation remained relatively constant over the entire stimulus range. The phase response of the CS modulation in the dark was opposite to that during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in the light. With increased frequency, the phase response systematically shifted from being aligned with contraversive head velocity toward peak contralateral head position. At fixed frequency, the phase response was dependent on peak head velocity, indicating a system nonlinearity. The nonvisual CS modulation apparently reflects a competition between eye movement and vestibular signals, resulting in an eye movement error signal inferred from nonvisual sources. The combination of this error signal with the retinal slip signal in the inferior olive results in a net error signal reporting the discrepancy between the actual visually measured eye movement error and the inferred eye movement error derived from measures of the internal state. The presence of two error signals requires that the role of CSs in models of the floccular control of VOR adaption be expanded beyond retinal slip.

  11. The CFP-10/ESAT-6 complex of Mycobacterium tuberculosis potentiates the activation of murine macrophages involvement of IFN-gamma signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Si; Bao, Lang; Qin, Zi Fang; Shi, Xin Xin

    2010-05-01

    Secretory antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, culture filtered protein 10(CFP-10) and early secreted antigenic target 6 kDa protein (ESAT-6) are closely correlated with immunogenicity and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. But the mechanism of its immunogenicity and virulence is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of the CFP-10/ESAT-6 complex on production of IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO) produced by the ANA-1 macrophage cell line. Preincubation with the complex in a time-dependent manner significantly enhanced production of NO and IL-12 released from ANA-1 cells following IFN-gamma stimulation. In addition, the complex up-modulated expression level of IFN-gammaR1 on surface of the macrophages. Furthermore, the effect of the complex on production of IL-12 and NO in ANA-1 cells was suppressed by AG490, a selective inhibitor of JAK/STAT pathway. These data suggest that in the presence of IFN-gamma, CFP-10/ESAT-6 complex represents a new immunogenicity and protective factor that may be, at least partly, due to up modulation of IFN-gammaR1 expression and activation of JAK/STAT pathway.

  12. PR65A phosphorylation regulates PP2A complex signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Kotlo

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A, a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac; a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa; and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314. Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A, elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure.

  13. The R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 complex controls endothelial cell adhesion and morphogenesis via active integrin endocytosis and Rac signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Chiara; Caccavari, Francesca; Valdembri, Donatella; Camillo, Chiara; Veltel, Stefan; Santambrogio, Martina; Lanzetti, Letizia; Bussolino, Federico; Ivaska, Johanna; Serini, Guido

    2012-01-01

    During developmental and tumor angiogenesis, semaphorins regulate blood vessel navigation by signaling through plexin receptors that inhibit the R-Ras subfamily of small GTPases. R-Ras is mainly expressed in vascular cells, where it induces adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through unknown mechanisms. We identify the Ras and Rab5 interacting protein RIN2 as a key effector that in endothelial cells interacts with and mediates the pro-adhesive and -angiogenic activity of R-Ras. Both R-Ras-GTP and RIN2 localize at nascent ECM adhesion sites associated with lamellipodia. Upon binding, GTP-loaded R-Ras converts RIN2 from a Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) to an adaptor that first interacts at high affinity with Rab5-GTP to promote the selective endocytosis of ligand-bound/active β1 integrins and then causes the translocation of R-Ras to early endosomes. Here, the R-Ras/RIN2/Rab5 signaling module activates Rac1-dependent cell adhesion via TIAM1, a Rac GEF that localizes on early endosomes and is stimulated by the interaction with both Ras proteins and the vesicular lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate. In conclusion, the ability of R-Ras-GTP to convert RIN2 from a GEF to an adaptor that preferentially binds Rab5-GTP allows the triggering of the endocytosis of ECM-bound/active β1 integrins and the ensuing funneling of R-Ras-GTP toward early endosomes to elicit the pro-adhesive and TIAM1-mediated activation of Rac1. PMID:22825554

  14. A Signal-Interleaving Complex Bandpass Sigma-Delta Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wad, Paul Emmanuel

    1997-01-01

    Complex or quadrature Sigma-Delta converters operate on complex signals, i.e. signals consisting of a real and an imaginary component, whereas conventional converters operate only on real signals. The advantage of complex signal processing in the discrete-time domain is that the entire sampling f...... than conventional converters, and a new signal-interleaving switched-capacitor architecture is derived for these complex converters.......Complex or quadrature Sigma-Delta converters operate on complex signals, i.e. signals consisting of a real and an imaginary component, whereas conventional converters operate only on real signals. The advantage of complex signal processing in the discrete-time domain is that the entire sampling...... frequency bandwidth - not just half of it - is available, and that network zeros and poles can be placed anywhere without having to appear in complex conjugate pairs. This paper demonstrates how these properties can be used to design complex bandpass Sigma-Delta converters with a better noise performance...

  15. Diagramming Complex Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    We increasingly live in heterogeneous ever-changing webs of activities where human actions are intertwined with events created by automatic machines.  In order to make such webs understandable to its human participants, their structure should be represented by displays emphasizing their action...

  16. Measures of complexity in signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurths, J.; Schwarz, U.; Witt, A.; Krampe, R. Th.; Abel, M.

    1996-06-01

    Observational data of natural systems, as measured in astrophysical, geophysical or physiological experiments are typically quite different from those obtained in laboratories. Due to the peculiarities with these data, well-known characteristics processes, such as periodicities or fractal dimension, often do not provide a suitable description. To study such data, we present here the use of measures of complexity, which are mainly basing on symbolic dynamics. We distinguish two types of such quantities: traditional measures (e.g. algorithmic complexity) which are measures of randomness and alternative measures (e.g. ɛ-complexity) which relate highest complexity to some critical points. It is important to note that there is no optimum measure of complexity. Its choice should depend on the context. Mostly, a combination of some such quantities is appropriate. Applying this concept to three examples in astrophysics, cardiology and cognitive psychology, we show that it can be helpful also in cases where other tools of data analysis fail.

  17. Association between increased EEG signal complexity and cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprevote, Vincent; Bon, Laura; Krieg, Julien; Schwitzer, Thomas; Bourion-Bedes, Stéphanie; Maillard, Louis; Schwan, Raymund

    2017-11-10

    Both acute and regular cannabis use affects the functioning of the brain. While several studies have demonstrated that regular cannabis use can impair the capacity to synchronize neural assemblies during specific tasks, less is known about spontaneous brain activity. This can be explored by measuring EEG complexity, which reflects the spontaneous variability of human brain activity. A recent study has shown that acute cannabis use can affect that complexity. Since the characteristics of cannabis use can affect the impact on brain functioning, this study sets out to measure EEG complexity in regular cannabis users with or without dependence, in comparison with healthy controls. We recruited 26 healthy controls, 25 cannabis users without cannabis dependence and 14 cannabis users with cannabis dependence, based on DSM IV TR criteria. The EEG signal was extracted from at least 250 epochs of the 500ms pre-stimulation phase during a visual evoked potential paradigm. Brain complexity was estimated using Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC), which was compared across groups by non-parametric Kruskall-Wallis ANOVA. The analysis revealed a significant difference between the groups, with higher LZC in participants with cannabis dependence than in non-dependent cannabis users. There was no specific localization of this effect across electrodes. We showed that cannabis dependence is associated to an increased spontaneous brain complexity in regular users. This result is in line with previous results in acute cannabis users. It may reflect increased randomness of neural activity in cannabis dependence. Future studies should explore whether this effect is permanent or diminishes with cannabis cessation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional Properties and Regulatory Complexity of a Minimal RBCS Light-Responsive Unit Activated by Phytochrome, Cryptochrome, and Plastid Signals1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hernández, Aída; López-Ochoa, Luisa; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Light-inducible promoters are able to respond to a wide spectrum of light through multiple photoreceptor systems. Several cis-acting elements have been identified as components of light-responsive promoter elements; however, none of these regulatory elements by itself appears to be sufficient to confer light responsiveness; rather, the combination of at least two elements seems to be required. Using phylogenetic structural analysis, we have identified conserved DNA modular arrays (CMAs) associated with light-responsive promoter regions that have been conserved throughout the evolutionary radiation of angiosperms. Here, we report the functional characterization of CMA5, a native 52-bp fragment of the Nicotiana plumbaginifolia rbcS 8B promoter, which contains an I- and a G-box cis-element. CMA5 behaves as a light-responsive minimal unit capable of activating a heterologous minimal promoter in a phytochrome-, cryptochrome-, and plastid-dependent manner. We also show that CMA5 light induction requires HY5 and that downstream negative regulators COP (constitutive photomorphogenic)/DET (de-etiolated) regulate its activity. Our results show that the simplest light-responsive promoter element from photosynthesis-associated genes described to date is the common target for different signals involved in light regulation. The possible mechanism involved in light-transcriptional regulation and tissue specificity of combinatorial elements units is discussed. PMID:11950971

  19. Measures of complexity in signal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurths, J.; Schwarz, U.; Witt, A. [Arbeitsgruppe Nichtlineare Dynamik der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft an der Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais, D-14415 Potsdam, PSF 601553 (Germany); Krampe, R.T. [Institut fuer Psychologie, Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais, D-14415 Potsdam, PSF 601553 (Germany); Abel, M. [Arbeitsgruppe Nichtlineare Dynamik der Max-Planck-Gessellschaft an der Universitaet Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais, D-14415 Potsdam, PSF 601553 (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    Observational data of natural systems, as measured in astrophysical, geophysical or physiological experiments are typically quite different from those obtained in laboratories. Due to the peculiarities with these data, well-known characteristics processes, such as periodicities or fractal dimension, often do not provide a suitable description. To study such data, we present here the use of measures of complexity, which are mainly basing on symbolic dynamics. We distinguish two types of such quantities: traditional measures (e.g. algorithmic complexity) which are measures of randomness and alternative measures (e.g. {epsilon}-complexity) which relate highest complexity to some critical points. It is important to note that there is no optimum measure of complexity. Its choice should depend on the context. Mostly, a combination of some such quantities is appropriate. Applying this concept to three examples in astrophysics, cardiology and cognitive psychology, we show that it can be helpful also in cases where other tools of data analysis fail. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Is complex signal processing for bone conduction hearing aids useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompis, Martin; Kurz, Anja; Pfiffner, Flurin; Senn, Pascal; Arnold, Andreas; Caversaccio, Marco

    2014-05-01

    To establish whether complex signal processing is beneficial for users of bone anchored hearing aids. Review and analysis of two studies from our own group, each comparing a speech processor with basic digital signal processing (either Baha Divino or Baha Intenso) and a processor with complex digital signal processing (either Baha BP100 or Baha BP110 power). The main differences between basic and complex signal processing are the number of audiologist accessible frequency channels and the availability and complexity of the directional multi-microphone noise reduction and loudness compression systems. Both studies show a small, statistically non-significant improvement of speech understanding in quiet with the complex digital signal processing. The average improvement for speech in noise is +0.9 dB, if speech and noise are emitted both from the front of the listener. If noise is emitted from the rear and speech from the front of the listener, the advantage of the devices with complex digital signal processing as opposed to those with basic signal processing increases, on average, to +3.2 dB (range +2.3 … +5.1 dB, p ≤ 0.0032). Complex digital signal processing does indeed improve speech understanding, especially in noise coming from the rear. This finding has been supported by another study, which has been published recently by a different research group. When compared to basic digital signal processing, complex digital signal processing can increase speech understanding of users of bone anchored hearing aids. The benefit is most significant for speech understanding in noise.

  1. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Architecture of a complex arithmetic processor for communication signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfeather, Susan L.; Gehman, John B., Jr.; Harrison, Calvin

    1994-10-01

    The Complex Arithmetic Processor (CAP) is a high performance, single chip Digital Signal Processor optimized for communication signal processing operations. The CAP VLSI provides the communication system building block necessary to meet the increased signal processing requirements of complex modulation types, voice and image compression while maintaining the requirement for small, low power implementations. The chip is intended for high speed, low power digital communication system applications such as hand held spread spectrum communications systems. The CAP architecture has been developed specifically for the complex arithmetic functions required in communication signal processing. The CAP is a software programmable, highly integrated parallel array of processors containing the arithmetic resources, memories, address generation, bit manipulation and logic functions necessary to support the sophisticated processing required in advanced communication equipment. The CAP executes a 1024 point complex Fast Fourier Transform in 131 microseconds.

  3. Modulation of EEG Theta Band Signal Complexity by Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of monochord (MC) sounds, a type of archaic sounds used in music therapy, on the neural complexity of EEG signals obtained from patients undergoing chemotherapy. The secondary goal was to compare the EEG signal complexity values for monochords with those for progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), an alternative therapy for relaxation. Forty cancer patients were randomly allocated to one of the two relaxation groups, MC and PMR, over a period of six months; continuous EEG signals were recorded during the first and last sessions. EEG signals were analyzed by applying signal mode complexity, a measure of complexity of neuronal oscillations. Across sessions, both groups showed a modulation of complexity of beta-2 band (20-29Hz) at midfrontal regions, but only MC group showed a modulation of complexity of theta band (3.5-7.5Hz) at posterior regions. Therefore, the neuronal complexity patterns showed different changes in EEG frequency band specific complexity resulting in two different types of interventions. Moreover, the different neural responses to listening to monochords and PMR were observed after regular relaxation interventions over a short time span.

  4. Noisy signal filtration using complex wavelet basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, A. S.; Pavlova, O. N.; Pavlov, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    Methods of noisy signal filtration using a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) with real basis sets of the Daubechies family are compared to methods employing a double-density dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DDCWT) with excess (nonorthonormalized) basis sets. Recommendations concerning the choice of filter parameters for minimization of the error of noisy signal filtration are formulated.

  5. SPATA2-Mediated Binding of CYLD to HOIP Enables CYLD Recruitment to Signaling Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kupka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recruitment of the deubiquitinase CYLD to signaling complexes is mediated by its interaction with HOIP, the catalytically active component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC. Here, we identify SPATA2 as a constitutive direct binding partner of HOIP that bridges the interaction between CYLD and HOIP. SPATA2 recruitment to TNFR1- and NOD2-signaling complexes is dependent on HOIP, and loss of SPATA2 abolishes CYLD recruitment. Deficiency in SPATA2 exerts limited effects on gene activation pathways but diminishes necroptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF, resembling loss of CYLD. In summary, we describe SPATA2 as a previously unrecognized factor in LUBAC-dependent signaling pathways that serves as an adaptor between HOIP and CYLD, thereby enabling recruitment of CYLD to signaling complexes.

  6. Fractal Complexity-Based Feature Extraction Algorithm of Communication Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Jingchao; Guo, Lili; Dou, Zheng; Lin, Yun; Zhou, Ruolin

    How to analyze and identify the characteristics of radiation sources and estimate the threat level by means of detecting, intercepting and locating has been the central issue of electronic support in the electronic warfare, and communication signal recognition is one of the key points to solve this issue. Aiming at accurately extracting the individual characteristics of the radiation source for the increasingly complex communication electromagnetic environment, a novel feature extraction algorithm for individual characteristics of the communication radiation source based on the fractal complexity of the signal is proposed. According to the complexity of the received signal and the situation of environmental noise, use the fractal dimension characteristics of different complexity to depict the subtle characteristics of the signal to establish the characteristic database, and then identify different broadcasting station by gray relation theory system. The simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm can achieve recognition rate of 94% even in the environment with SNR of ‑10dB, and this provides an important theoretical basis for the accurate identification of the subtle features of the signal at low SNR in the field of information confrontation.

  7. Complex variational mode decomposition for signal processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxue; Liu, Fuyun; Jiang, Zhansi; He, Shuilong; Mo, Qiuyun

    2017-03-01

    Complex-valued signals occur in many areas of science and engineering and are thus of fundamental interest. The complex variational mode decomposition (CVMD) is proposed as a natural and a generic extension of the original VMD algorithm for the analysis of complex-valued data in this work. Moreover, the equivalent filter bank structure of the CVMD in the presence of white noise, and the effects of initialization of center frequency on the filter bank property are both investigated via numerical experiments. Benefiting from the advantages of CVMD algorithm, its bi-directional Hilbert time-frequency spectrum is developed as well, in which the positive and negative frequency components are formulated on the positive and negative frequency planes separately. Several applications in the real-world complex-valued signals support the analysis.

  8. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  9. Machines vs. ensembles: effective MAPK signaling through heterogeneous sets of protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Suderman

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of intracellular signaling networks, there is currently no consensus regarding the fundamental nature of the protein complexes such networks employ. One prominent view involves stable signaling machines with well-defined quaternary structures. The combinatorial complexity of signaling networks has led to an opposing perspective, namely that signaling proceeds via heterogeneous pleiomorphic ensembles of transient complexes. Since many hypotheses regarding network function rely on how we conceptualize signaling complexes, resolving this issue is a central problem in systems biology. Unfortunately, direct experimental characterization of these complexes has proven technologically difficult, while combinatorial complexity has prevented traditional modeling methods from approaching this question. Here we employ rule-based modeling, a technique that overcomes these limitations, to construct a model of the yeast pheromone signaling network. We found that this model exhibits significant ensemble character while generating reliable responses that match experimental observations. To contrast the ensemble behavior, we constructed a model that employs hierarchical assembly pathways to produce scaffold-based signaling machines. We found that this machine model could not replicate the experimentally observed combinatorial inhibition that arises when the scaffold is overexpressed. This finding provides evidence against the hierarchical assembly of machines in the pheromone signaling network and suggests that machines and ensembles may serve distinct purposes in vivo. In some cases, e.g. core enzymatic activities like protein synthesis and degradation, machines assembled via hierarchical energy landscapes may provide functional stability for the cell. In other cases, such as signaling, ensembles may represent a form of weak linkage, facilitating variation and plasticity in network evolution. The capacity of ensembles to signal effectively

  10. Aliasing in the Complex Cepstrum of Linear-Phase Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Tommy Kristensen

    1997-01-01

    Assuming linear-phase of the associated time signal, this paper presents an approximated analytical description of the unavoidable aliasing in practical use of complex cepstrums. The linear-phase assumption covers two major applications of complex cepstrums which are linear- to minimum-phase FIR......-filter transformation and minimum-phase estimation from amplitude specifications. The description is made in the cepstrum domain, the Fourier transform of the complex cepstrum and in the frequency domain. Two examples are given, one for verification of the derived equations and one using the description to reduce...

  11. The Fos-Related Antigen 1–JUNB/Activator Protein 1 Transcription Complex, a Downstream Target of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3, Induces T Helper 17 Differentiation and Promotes Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Mee Moon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of T helper 17 (Th17 cells leads to chronic inflammatory disorders. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 orchestrates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and pathogenic cell differentiation from interleukin (IL-17-producing Th17 cells. However, the pathways mediated by STAT3 signaling are not fully understood. Here, we observed that Fos-related antigen 1 (FRA1 and JUNB are directly involved in STAT3 binding to sites in the promoters of Fosl1 and Junb. Promoter binding increased expression of IL-17 and the development of Th17 cells. Overexpression of Fra1 and Junb in mice resulted in susceptibility to collagen-induced arthritis and an increase in Th17 cell numbers and inflammatory cytokine production. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, FRA1 and JUNB were colocalized with STAT3 in the inflamed synovium. These observations suggest that FRA1 and JUNB are associated closely with STAT3 activation, and that this activation leads to Th17 cell differentiation in autoimmune diseases and inflammation.

  12. Complexity of EEG-signal in Time Domain - Possible Biomedical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonowski, Wlodzimierz; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Stepien, Robert

    2002-07-01

    Human brain is a highly complex nonlinear system. So it is not surprising that in analysis of EEG-signal, which represents overall activity of the brain, the methods of Nonlinear Dynamics (or Chaos Theory as it is commonly called) can be used. Even if the signal is not chaotic these methods are a motivating tool to explore changes in brain activity due to different functional activation states, e.g. different sleep stages, or to applied therapy, e.g. exposure to chemical agents (drugs) and physical factors (light, magnetic field). The methods supplied by Nonlinear Dynamics reveal signal characteristics that are not revealed by linear methods like FFT. Better understanding of principles that govern dynamics and complexity of EEG-signal can help to find `the signatures' of different physiological and pathological states of human brain, quantitative characteristics that may find applications in medical diagnostics.

  13. Signal decomposition and reconstruction using complex exponential models

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Hu, Sau-Lon; Yang, Wen-Long; Li, Hua-Jun

    2013-11-01

    The theme of this paper is signal decomposition and reconstruction, not specific for or limited to system identification. In dealing with aperiodic damped signals, Prony-based techniques — which decompose a signal into real- and/or complex-valued exponential components — are often utilized. In essence, the derivation of Prony's method has been based on a high order homogeneous difference equation. In this paper, an alternative approach that uses a first-order matrix homogenous difference equation (state-space model) to replace the high order homogenous difference equation is advocated. Although the proposed method and Prony's method appear to be theoretically identical, this paper shows that they are drastically different over crucial numerical issues, including conditioning and stability. While Prony's method is very sensitive to sampling rate and round-off error, the proposed method is not. While Prony's method has trouble to deal with noise embedded in the signal, the proposed method can handle noisy signals properly because it has a build-in noise rejection mechanism via the usage of truncated singular value decomposition. While root-finding of a high order polynomial — a classical ill-conditioned problem — is a required step in Prony's method, the proposed method completely avoids it. The proposed method is also applicable to intermittent signals, and can recover the missing parts of intermittent signals nicely through reconstruction.

  14. Complex networks of self-incompatibility signaling in the Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, Mikhail E; Nasrallah, June B

    2010-10-01

    The self-pollination barrier of self-incompatibility in the Brassicaceae is based on the activity of a polymorphic stigma receptor and its pollen ligand, whose allele-specific interaction triggers a signaling cascade within the stigma epidermal cell that culminates in the inhibition of pollen tube development. Recent analyses have identified signaling intermediates and revealed unexpected cross-talk between self-incompatibility signaling and pistil development. The self-incompatibility response is now thought to be based on a phosphorylation and ubiquitin-mediated degradation pathway that inhibits the secretion of factors required for successful pollination. Because manipulation of the identified signaling intermediates results in only partial disruption of the self-incompatibility reaction, this pathway likely functions in conjunction with other as-yet unidentified signaling pathways to effect complete inhibition of self-pollen. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Suppressor of cytokine Signaling-3 inhibits interleukin-1 signaling by targeting the TRAF-6/TAK1 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobøse, Helle; Rønn, Sif Groth; Heding, Peter E

    2006-01-01

    -activated kinase 1, TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)6, and TGFbeta-activated kinase (TAK)1, but not when the MAP3K MAPK/ERK kinase kinase-1 is used instead of TAK1, indicating that the target for SOCS-3 is the TRAF6/TAK1 signaling complex. By coimmunoprecipitation, it was shown that SOCS-3 inhibited...... the association between TRAF6 and TAK1 and that SOCS-3 coimmunoprecipitated with TAK1 and TRAF6. Furthermore, SOCS-3 inhibited the IL-1-induced catalytic activity of TAK1. Because ubiquitination of TRAF6 is required for activation of TAK1, we analyzed the role of SOCS-3 on TRAF6 ubiquitination and found that SOCS......-3 inhibited ubiquitin modification of TRAF6. These results indicate that SOCS-3 inhibits IL-1 signal transduction by inhibiting ubiquitination of TRAF6, thus preventing association and activation of TAK1....

  16. Invariant Chain Complexes and Clusters as Platforms for MIF Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lindner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invariant chain (Ii/CD74 has been identified as a surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF. Most cells that express Ii also synthesize major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II molecules, which depend on Ii as a chaperone and a targeting factor. The assembly of nonameric complexes consisting of one Ii trimer and three MHC II molecules (each of which is a heterodimer has been regarded as a prerequisite for efficient delivery to the cell surface. Due to rapid endocytosis, however, only low levels of Ii-MHC II complexes are displayed on the cell surface of professional antigen presenting cells and very little free Ii trimers. The association of Ii and MHC II has been reported to block the interaction with MIF, thus questioning the role of surface Ii as a receptor for MIF on MHC II-expressing cells. Recent work offers a potential solution to this conundrum: Many Ii-complexes at the cell surface appear to be under-saturated with MHC II, leaving unoccupied Ii subunits as potential binding sites for MIF. Some of this work also sheds light on novel aspects of signal transduction by Ii-bound MIF in B-lymphocytes: membrane raft association of Ii-MHC II complexes enables MIF to target Ii-MHC II to antigen-clustered B-cell-receptors (BCR and to foster BCR-driven signaling and intracellular trafficking.

  17. Multivariate phenotypic selection on a complex sexual signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jessie C; Ward, Jessica L; Shaw, Ruth G; Bee, Mark A

    2017-07-01

    Animal signals are complex, comprising multiple components that receivers may use to inform their decisions. Components may carry information of differing value to receivers, and selection on one component could modulate or reverse selection on another, necessitating a multivariate approach to estimating selection gradients. However, surprisingly few empirical studies have estimated the strength of phenotypic selection on complex signals with appropriate design and adequate power to detect nonlinear selection. We used phonotaxis assays to measure sexual selection on the advertisement signal of Cope's gray tree frog, Hyla chrysoscelis. Female preferences were assessed for five signal components using single- and two-stimulus behavioral assays. Linear, quadratic, and correlational selection gradients were estimated from the single-stimulus data. Significant directional selection is acting on call duration, call rate, pulse rate, and relative amplitude; stabilizing selection is acting on call duration and call rate. Under the two-stimulus paradigm, conclusions were qualitatively different, revealing nonlinear selection on all components except call duration. For individual subjects, the outcomes of single- and two-stimulus trials were frequently discordant, suggesting that the choice of testing paradigm may affect conclusions drawn from experiments. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  19. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  20. Doing molecular biophysics: finding, naming, and picturing signal within complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jane S; Richardson, David C

    2013-01-01

    A macromolecular structure, as measured data or as a list of coordinates or even on-screen as a full atomic model, is an extremely complex and confusing object. The underlying rules of how it folds, moves, and interacts as a biological entity are even less evident or intuitive to the human mind. To do science on such molecules, or to relate them usefully to higher levels of biology, we need to start with a natural history that names their features in meaningful ways and with multiple representations (visual or algebraic) that show some aspect of their organizing principles. The two of us have jointly enjoyed a highly varied and engrossing career in biophysical research over nearly 50 years. Our frequent changes of emphasis are tied together by two threads: first, by finding the right names, visualizations, and methods to help both ourselves and others to better understand the 3D structures of protein and RNA molecules, and second, by redefining the boundary between signal and noise for complex data, in both directions-sometimes identifying and promoting real signal up out of what seemed just noise, and sometimes demoting apparent signal into noise or systematic error. Here we relate parts of our scientific and personal lives, including ups and downs, influences, anecdotes, and guiding principles such as the title theme.

  1. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. S.; Hill, C. C.; Calero, G. A.; Myers, C. R.; Lee, K. H.; Sethna, J. P.; Cerione, R. A.

    2004-10-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  2. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  3. Organization of proximal signal initiation at the TCR:CD3 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Clifford S; Vignali, Dario A A

    2009-11-01

    The series of events leading to T-cell activation following antigen recognition has been extensively investigated. Although the exact mechanisms of ligand binding and transmission of this extracellular interaction into a productive intracellular signaling sequence remains incomplete, it has been known for many years that the immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motifs (ITAMs) of the T-cell receptor (TCR):CD3 complex are required for initiation of this signaling cascade because of the recruitment and activation of multiple protein tyrosine kinases, signaling intermediates, and adapter molecules. It however remains unclear why the TCR:CD3 complex requires 10 ITAMs, while many other ITAM-containing immune receptors, such as Fc receptors (FcRs) and the B cell receptor (BCR), contain far fewer ITAMs. We have recently demonstrated that various parameters of T cell development and activation are influenced by the number, as well as location and type, of ITAMs within the TCR:CD3 complex and hence propose that the TCR is capable of 'scalable signaling' that facilitates the initiation and orchestration of diverse T-cell functions. While many of the underlying mechanisms remain hypothetical, this review intends to amalgamate what we have learned from conventional biochemical analyses regarding initiation and diversification of T-cell signaling, with more recent evidence from molecular and fluorescent microscopic analyses, to propose a broader purpose for the TCR:CD3 ITAMs. Rather than simply signal initiation, individual ITAMs may also be responsible for the differential recruitment of signaling and regulatory molecules which ultimately affects T-cell development, activation and differentiation.

  4. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A novel feature extracting method of QRS complex classification for mobile ECG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyun; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xianying; Wang, Yue

    2007-12-01

    The conventional classification parameters of QRS complex suffer from larger activity rang of patients and lower signal to noise ratio in mobile cardiac telemonitoring system and can not meet the identification needs of ECG signal. Based on individual sinus heart rhythm template built with mobile ECG signals in time window, we present semblance index to extract the classification features of QRS complex precisely and expeditiously. Relative approximation r2 and absolute error r3 are used as estimating parameters of semblance between testing QRS complex and template. The evaluate parameters corresponding to QRS width and types are demonstrated to choose the proper index. The results show that 99.99 percent of the QRS complex for sinus and superventricular ECG signals can be distinguished through r2 but its average accurate ratio is only 46.16%. More than 97.84 percent of QRS complexes are identified using r3 but its accurate ratio to the sinus and superventricular is not better than r2. By the feature parameter of width, only 42.65 percent of QRS complexes are classified correctly, but its accurate ratio to the ventricular is superior to r2. To combine the respective superiority of three parameters, a nonlinear weighing computation of QRS width, r2 and r3 is introduced and the total classification accuracy up to 99.48% by combing indexes.

  6. Self-assembly of receptor/signaling complexes in bacterial chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Peter M.; Baker, Melinda D.; Francis, Noreen R.; Thomas, Dennis R.; Derosier, David J.; Stock, Jeffry B.

    2006-09-01

    Escherichia coli chemotaxis is mediated by membrane receptor/histidine kinase signaling complexes. Fusing the cytoplasmic domain of the aspartate receptor, Tar, to a leucine zipper dimerization domain produces a hybrid, lzTarC, that forms soluble complexes with CheA and CheW. The three-dimensional reconstruction of these complexes was different from that anticipated based solely on structures of the isolated components. We found that analogous complexes self-assembled with a monomeric cytoplasmic domain fragment of the serine receptor without the leucine zipper dimerization domain. These complexes have essentially the same size, composition, and architecture as those formed from lzTarC. Thus, the organization of these receptor/signaling complexes is determined by conserved interactions between the constituent chemotaxis proteins and may represent the active form in vivo. To understand this structure in its cellular context, we propose a model involving parallel membrane segments in receptor-mediated CheA activation in vivo. CheA | histidine kinase | serine receptor | signal transduction

  7. Complex Interplay of Hormonal Signals during Grape Berry Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Fortes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Grape and wine production and quality is extremely dependent on the fruit ripening process. Sensory and nutritional characteristics are important aspects for consumers and their development during fruit ripening involves complex hormonal control. In this review, we explored data already published on grape ripening and compared it with the hormonal regulation of ripening of other climacteric and non-climacteric fruits. The roles of abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroids as promoters of ripening are discussed, as well as the role of auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, jasmonates, and polyamines as inhibitors of ripening. In particular, the recently described role of polyamine catabolism in grape ripening is discussed, together with its putative interaction with other hormones. Furthermore, other recent examples of cross-talk among the different hormones are presented, revealing a complex interplay of signals during grape development and ripening.

  8. Complex Interplay of Hormonal Signals during Grape Berry Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Ana Margarida; Teixeira, Rita Teresa; Agudelo-Romero, Patricia

    2015-05-21

    Grape and wine production and quality is extremely dependent on the fruit ripening process. Sensory and nutritional characteristics are important aspects for consumers and their development during fruit ripening involves complex hormonal control. In this review, we explored data already published on grape ripening and compared it with the hormonal regulation of ripening of other climacteric and non-climacteric fruits. The roles of abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroids as promoters of ripening are discussed, as well as the role of auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, jasmonates, and polyamines as inhibitors of ripening. In particular, the recently described role of polyamine catabolism in grape ripening is discussed, together with its putative interaction with other hormones. Furthermore, other recent examples of cross-talk among the different hormones are presented, revealing a complex interplay of signals during grape development and ripening.

  9. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2 and RGS4 form distinct G protein-dependent complexes with protease activated-receptor 1 (PAR1 in live cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Ghil

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR that is activated by natural proteases to regulate many physiological actions. We previously reported that PAR1 couples to Gi, Gq and G12 to activate linked signaling pathways. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins serve as GTPase activating proteins to inhibit GPCR/G protein signaling. Some RGS proteins interact directly with certain GPCRs to modulate their signals, though cellular mechanisms dictating selective RGS/GPCR coupling are poorly understood. Here, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET, we tested whether RGS2 and RGS4 bind to PAR1 in live COS-7 cells to regulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling. We report that PAR1 selectively interacts with either RGS2 or RGS4 in a G protein-dependent manner. Very little BRET activity is observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven and either RGS2-Luciferase (RGS2-Luc or RGS4-Luc in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of specific Gα subunits, BRET activity was markedly enhanced between PAR1-RGS2 by Gαq/11, and PAR1-RGS4 by Gαo, but not by other Gα subunits. Gαq/11-YFP/RGS2-Luc BRET activity is promoted by PAR1 and is markedly enhanced by agonist (TFLLR stimulation. However, PAR1-Ven/RGS-Luc BRET activity was blocked by a PAR1 mutant (R205A that eliminates PAR1-Gq/11 coupling. The purified intracellular third loop of PAR1 binds directly to purified His-RGS2 or His-RGS4. In cells, RGS2 and RGS4 inhibited PAR1/Gα-mediated calcium and MAPK/ERK signaling, respectively, but not RhoA signaling. Our findings indicate that RGS2 and RGS4 interact directly with PAR1 in Gα-dependent manner to modulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling, and highlight a cellular mechanism for selective GPCR/G protein/RGS coupling.

  10. Enabling complex genetic circuits to respond to extrinsic environmental signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Shopera, Tatenda; Hinman, Kristina; Creamer, John Philip; Moon, Tae Seok

    2017-07-01

    Genetic circuits have the potential to improve a broad range of metabolic engineering processes and address a variety of medical and environmental challenges. However, in order to engineer genetic circuits that can meet the needs of these real-world applications, genetic sensors that respond to relevant extrinsic and intrinsic signals must be implemented in complex genetic circuits. In this work, we construct the first AND and NAND gates that respond to temperature and pH, two signals that have relevance in a variety of real-world applications. A previously identified pH-responsive promoter and a temperature-responsive promoter were extracted from the E. coli genome, characterized, and modified to suit the needs of the genetic circuits. These promoters were combined with components of the type III secretion system in Salmonella typhimurium and used to construct a set of AND gates with up to 23-fold change. Next, an antisense RNA was integrated into the circuit architecture to invert the logic of the AND gate and generate a set of NAND gates with up to 1168-fold change. These circuits provide the first demonstration of complex pH- and temperature-responsive genetic circuits, and lay the groundwork for the use of similar circuits in real-world applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1626-1631. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor signaling complexity in neuronal tissue: implications for novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Luttrell, Louis M

    2007-02-01

    The manipulation of transmembrane signaling by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitutes perhaps the single most important therapeutic target in medicine. Therapeutics acting on GPCRs have traditionally been classified as agonists, partial agonists, or antagonists based on a two state model of receptor function embodied in the ternary complex model. Over the past decade, however, many lines of investigation have shown that GPCR signaling exhibits greater diversity and 'texture' than previously appreciated. Signal diversity arises from numerous factors, among them the ability of receptors to adopt multiple 'active' states with different effector coupling profiles, the formation of receptor dimers that exhibit unique pharmacology, signaling, and trafficking, the dissociation of receptor 'activation' from desensitization and internalization, and the discovery that non-G protein effectors mediate some aspects of GPCR signaling. At the same time, clustering of GPCRs with their downstream effectors in membrane microdomains, and interactions between receptors and a plethora of multidomain scaffolding proteins and accessory/chaperone molecules confers signal preorganization, efficiency, and specificity. More importantly it is likely that alteration in the interactions of these proteins with GPCRs may occur in aging or neurodegenerative disorders, thus defining a distinct 'pharmacology' from that seen in young organisms or normal physiology. In this context, the concept of agonist selective trafficking of receptor signaling, which recognizes that a bound ligand may select between a menu of 'active' receptor conformations and induce only a subset of the possible response profile, presents the opportunity to develop drugs that change the quality as well as the quantity of efficacy and enhance these qualities for specific disorders or other paradigms. As a more comprehensive understanding of the complexity of GPCR signaling is developed, the rational design of ligands

  12. [Complexity analysis of ECG signal based on Jensen-Shannon divergence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan; Wang, Jun

    2012-10-01

    In the present study, complexity measure based on Jensen-Shannon Divergence (JSD) was used to compute complexity of the ECG signals, which include normal sinus rhythm (NSR), congestive heart failure (CHF) and sudden cardiac death (SD) signals from the MIT-BIH standard database. The results showed that the three kinds of signals had different complexity measures. NSR has the highest complexity, followed by CHF, and SD has the lowest complexity. The variance test indicated that above-mentioned analysis could disclose significant differences among complexities of these three signals. It has good reference for clinical detecting and diagnosing with CHF and SD signals.

  13. Human Evoked Cortical Activity to Signal-to-Noise Ratio and Absolute Signal Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Curtis J.; Tremblay, Kelly L.; Stecker, G. Christopher; Tolin, Wendy M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of signal level and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the latency and amplitude of evoked cortical activity to further our understanding of how the human central auditory system encodes signals in noise. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) were recorded from 15 young normal-hearing adults in response to a 1000 Hz tone presented at two tone levels in quiet and while continuous background noise levels were varied in five equivalent SNR steps. These 12 conditions were used to determine the effects of signal level and SNR level on CAEP components P1, N1, P2, and N2. Based on prior signal-in-noise experiments conducted in animals, we hypothesized that SNR, would be a key contributor to human CAEP characteristics. As hypothesized, amplitude increased and latency decreased with increasing SNR; in addition, there was no main effect of tone level across the two signal levels tested (60 and 75 dB SPL). Morphology of the P1-N1-P2 complex was driven primarily by SNR, highlighting the importance of noise when recording CAEPs. Results are discussed in terms of the current interest in recording CAEPs in hearing aid users. PMID:19364526

  14. Complexity analysis of human physiological signals based on case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Maia; Holloway, Philip; Ellis, Jason

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on methods for investigation of physiological time series based on complexity analysis. It is a part of a wider programme to determine non-invasive markers for healthy ageing. We consider two case studies investigated with actigraphy: (a) sleep and alternations with insomnia, and (b) ageing effects on mobility patterns. We illustrate, using these case studies, the application of fractal analysis to the investigation of regulation patterns and control, and change of physiological function. In the first case study, fractal analysis techniques were implemented to study the correlations present in sleep actigraphy for individuals suffering from acute insomnia in comparison with healthy controls. The aim was to investigate if complexity analysis can detect the onset of adverse health-related events. The subjects with acute insomnia displayed significantly higher levels of complexity, possibly a result of too much activity in the underlying regulatory systems. The second case study considered mobility patterns during night time and their variations with age. It showed that complexity metrics can identify change in physiological function with ageing. Both studies demonstrated that complexity analysis can be used to investigate markers of health, disease and healthy ageing.

  15. Complex signal recovery from multiple fractional Fourier-transform intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertosun, M Günhan; Atli, Haluk; Ozaktas, Haldun M; Barshan, Billur

    2005-08-10

    The problem of recovering a complex signal from the magnitudes of any number of its fractional Fourier transforms at any set of fractional orders is addressed. This problem corresponds to the problem of phase retrieval from the transverse intensity profiles of an optical field at arbitrary locations in an optical system involving arbitrary concatenations of lenses and sections of free space. The dependence of the results on the number of orders, their spread, and the noise is investigated. Generally, increasing the number of orders improves the results, but with diminishing return beyond a certain point. Selecting the measurement planes such that their fractional orders are well separated or spread as much as possible also leads to better results.

  16. Rho GTPase signaling complexes in cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Campbell D; Ridley, Anne J

    2017-12-12

    Cell migration is dependent on the dynamic formation and disassembly of actin filament-based structures, including lamellipodia, filopodia, invadopodia, and membrane blebs, as well as on cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesions. These processes all involve Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), which are regulated by the opposing actions of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Rho GTPase activity needs to be precisely tuned at distinct cellular locations to enable cells to move in response to different environments and stimuli. In this review, we focus on the ability of RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs to form complexes with diverse binding partners, and describe how this influences their ability to control localized GTPase activity in the context of migration and invasion. © 2018 Lawson and Ridley.

  17. Movement Complexity and Neuromechanical Factors Affect the Entropic Half-Life of Myoelectric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson-Tole, Emma F.; Wakeling, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate neuromuscular functioning is essential for survival and features underpinning motor control are present in myoelectric signals recorded from skeletal muscles. One approach to quantify control processes related to function is to assess signal variability using measures such as Sample Entropy. Here we developed a theoretical framework to simulate the effect of variability in burst duration, activation duty cycle, and intensity on the Entropic Half-Life (EnHL) in myoelectric signals. EnHLs were predicted to be signal amplitude and activation duty cycle. Comparison with myoelectic data from rats walking and running at a range of speeds and inclines confirmed the range of EnHLs, however, the direction of EnHL change in response to altered locomotor demand was not correctly predicted. The discrepancy reflected different associations between the ratio of the standard deviation and mean signal intensity (Ist:It¯) and duty factor in simulated and physiological data, likely reflecting additional information in the signals from the physiological data (e.g., quiescent phase content; variation in action potential shapes). EnHL could have significant value as a novel marker of neuromuscular responses to alterations in perceived locomotor task complexity and intensity. PMID:28974932

  18. Spying on IgE receptor signaling: simply complex, or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomre, Derek

    2005-11-07

    Plasma membrane organization and the potential role, or not, of lipid raft microdomains in signal transduction is a controversial topic. Cross-correlation fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (CC-FCS) shows promise as a new approach to rapidly probe protein-protein interactions in living cells during signal transduction. CC-FCS data from studies of IgE receptor signaling challenge models of large stable lipid raft signaling domains and reveal a new complexity in the dynamic (re)organization of signaling complexes.

  19. ATP release and purinergic signaling in NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle eCOUILLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome is a protein complex involved in IL-1β and IL-18 processing that senses pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns. One step- or two step- models have been proposed to explain the tight regulation of IL-1β production during inflammation. Moreover, cellular stimulation triggers ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors at the cell surface. Importantly some studies have reported roles for extracellular ATP (eATP, in NLRP3 inflammasome activation in response to PAMPs and DAMPs. In this mini review, we will discuss the link between active ATP release, purinergic signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We will focus on the role of autocrine or paracrine ATP export in particle-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and discuss how particle activators are competent to induce maturation and secretion of IL-1β through a process that involves, as a first event, extracellular release of endogenous ATP through hemichannel opening, and as a second event, signaling through purinergic receptors that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Finally, we will review the evidence for ATP as a key proinflammatory mediator released by dying cells. In particular we will discuss how cancer cells dying via autophagy trigger ATP-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the macrophages engulfing them, eliciting an immunogenic response against tumors.

  20. Cutting the Gordian knot: Complex signaling in African cichlids is more than multimodal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira J. VAN STAADEN, Adam R. SMITH

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The active transmission of information from sender to receiver is a fundamental component of communication, and is therefore a primary facet in evolutionary models of sexual selection. Research in several systems has underlined the importance of multiple sensory modalities in courtship signals. However, we still tend to think of individuals as having a relatively static signal in consecutive communicative events. While this may be true for certain traits such as body size or coloration, behaviorally modulated signals can quickly violate this assumption. In this work, we explore how intraspecific variation may be an important component of interspecific signal divergence using cichlid fishes from Lake Malawi. Behavioral analyses were made using six species of Malawian cichlids from two divergent genera. While interspecific differences were found between congeners based on species-level analyses of both acoustic and audiovisual signals, intraspecific variation was of a similar magnitude. Specifically, individual fishes were found to possess highly plastic signal repertoires. This finding was ubiquitous across all species and resulted in a great deal of overlap between heterospecific individuals, despite statistically distinct species means. These results demonstrate that some aspects of courtship in Malawian cichlids are more plastic than previously proposed, and that studies must account for signal variability within individuals. We propose here that behavioral variability in signaling is important in determining the communication landscape on which signals are perceived. We review potential complexity deriving from multimodal signaling, discuss the sources for such lability, and suggest ways in which this issue may be approached experimentally [Current Zoology 57 (2: 237–252, 2011].

  1. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies. PMID:22981989

  2. The PSGL-1–L-selectin signaling complex regulates neutrophil adhesion under flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadtmann, Anika; Germena, Giulia; Block, Helena; Boras, Mark; Rossaint, Jan; Sundd, Prithu; Lefort, Craig; Fisher, Charles I.; Buscher, Konrad; Gelschefarth, Bernadette; Urzainqui, Ana; Gerke, Volker; Ley, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are recruited from the blood to sites of inflammation, where they contribute to immune defense but may also cause tissue damage. During inflammation, neutrophils roll along the microvascular endothelium before arresting and transmigrating. Arrest requires conformational activation of the integrin lymphocyte function–associated antigen 1 (LFA-1), which can be induced by selectin engagement. Here, we demonstrate that a subset of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) molecules is constitutively associated with L-selectin. Although this association does not require the known lectin-like interaction between L-selectin and PSGL-1, the signaling output is dependent on this interaction and the cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin. The PSGL-1–L-selectin complex signals through Src family kinases, ITAM domain–containing adaptor proteins, and other kinases to ultimately result in LFA-1 activation. The PSGL-1–L-selectin complex–induced signaling effects on neutrophil slow rolling and recruitment in vivo demonstrate the functional importance of this pathway. We conclude that this is a signaling complex specialized for sensing adhesion under flow. PMID:24127491

  3. Complex courtship displays facilitate male reproductive success and plasticity in signaling across variable environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin J. WILGERS, Eileen A. HEBETS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective signal transmission is essential for communication. In environments where signal transmission is highly variable, signalers may utilize complex signals, which incorporate multiple components and modalities, to maintain effective communication. Male Rabidosa rabida wolf spiders produce complex courtship signals, consisting of both visual and seismic components. We test the hypothesis that the complex signaling of R. rabida contributes to male reproductive success in variable signaling environments. We first examine the condition-dependence of ornamentation (a presumed visual signal and seismic signal components and find that both may provide potentially redundant information on foraging history. Next, we assessed reproductive success across manipulated signaling environments that varied in the effectiveness of visual and/or seismic signal transmission. In environments where only one signal could be successfully transmitted (e.g., visual or seismic, pairs were still able to successfully copulate. Additionally, we found that males altered their courtship display depending on the current signaling environment. Specifically, males reduced their use of a visual display component in signaling environments where visual signal transmission was ablated. Incorporating signals in multiple modalities not only enables R. rabida males to maintain copulation success across variable signaling environments, but it also enables males to adjust their composite courtship display to current signaling conditions [Current Zoology 57 (2: 175–186, 2011].

  4. Insulin signals through the dorsal vagal complex to regulate energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Beatrice M; Bassiri, Aria; Abraham, Mona A; Duca, Frank A; Yue, Jessica T Y; Lam, Tony K T

    2014-03-01

    Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus regulates food intake and hepatic glucose production in rodents. Although it is known that insulin also activates insulin receptor in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) to lower glucose production through an extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)-dependent and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-independent pathway, it is unknown whether DVC insulin action regulates food intake. We report here that a single acute infusion of insulin into the DVC decreased food intake in healthy male rats. Chemical and molecular inhibition of Erk1/2 signaling in the DVC negated the acute anorectic effect of insulin in healthy rats, while DVC insulin acute infusion failed to lower food intake in high fat-fed rats. Finally, molecular disruption of Erk1/2 signaling in the DVC of healthy rats per se increased food intake and induced obesity over a period of 2 weeks, whereas a daily repeated acute DVC insulin infusion for 12 days conversely decreased food intake and body weight in healthy rats. In summary, insulin activates Erk1/2 signaling in the DVC to regulate energy balance.

  5. Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase Pathways: A Complex Interplay in Cellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The cellular reaction to external challenges is a tightly regulated process consisting of integrated processes mediated by a variety of signaling molecules, generated as a result of modulation of corresponding biosynthetic systems. Both, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) systems, consist of constitutive forms (NOS1, NOS3 and COX-1), which are mostly involved in housekeeping tasks, and inducible forms (NOS2 and COX-2), which shape the cellular response to stress and variety of bioactive agents. The complex interplay between NOS and COX pathways can be observed at least at three levels. Firstly, products of NOS and Cox systems can mediate the regulation and the expression of inducible forms (NOS2 and COX-2) in response of similar and dissimilar stimulus. Secondly, the reciprocal modulation of cyclooxygenase activity by nitric oxide and NOS activity by prostaglandins at the posttranslational level has been shown to occur. Mechanisms by which nitric oxide can modulate prostaglandin synthesis include direct S-nitrosylation of COX and inactivation of prostaglandin I synthase by peroxynitrite, product of superoxide reaction with nitric oxide. Prostaglandins, conversely, can promote an increased association of dynein light chain (DLC) (also known as protein inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase) with NOS1, thereby reducing its activity. The third level of interplay is provided by intracellular crosstalk of signaling pathways stimulated by products of NOS and COX which contributes significantly to the complexity of cellular signaling. Since modulation of COX and NOS pathways was shown to be principally involved in a variety of pathological conditions, the dissection of their complex relationship is needed for better understanding of possible therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on implications of interplay between NOS and COX for cellular function and signal integration.

  6. Microscopic insight into thermodynamics of conformational changes of SAP-SLAM complex in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-04-01

    The signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, associate with SLAM-associated protein (SAP)-related molecules, composed of single SH2 domain architecture. SAP activates Src-family kinase Fyn after SLAM ligation, resulting in a SLAM-SAP-Fyn complex, where, SAP binds the Fyn SH3 domain that does not involve canonical SH3 or SH2 interactions. This demands insight into this SAP mediated signalling cascade. Thermodynamics of the conformational changes are extracted from the histograms of dihedral angles obtained from the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of this structurally well characterized SAP-SLAM complex. The results incorporate the binding induced thermodynamic changes of individual amino acid as well as the secondary structural elements of the protein and the solvent. Stabilization of the peptide partially comes through a strong hydrogen bonding network with the protein, while hydrophobic interactions also play a significant role where the peptide inserts itself into a hydrophobic cavity of the protein. SLAM binding widens SAP's second binding site for Fyn, which is the next step in the signal transduction cascade. The higher stabilization and less fluctuation of specific residues of SAP in the Fyn binding site, induced by SAP-SLAM complexation, emerge as the key structural elements to trigger the recognition of SAP by the SH3 domain of Fyn. The thermodynamic quantification of the protein due to complexation not only throws deeper understanding in the established mode of SAP-SLAM interaction but also assists in the recognition of the relevant residues of the protein responsible for alterations in its activity.

  7. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can

  8. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER(II COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Čongrádyová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Two novel copper(II 5-chlorosalicylate complexes with either 1,10-phenantroline or its methyl derivative 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (neocuproine have been prepared and studied. A potential antimicrobial or antifungal activity of both complexes has been tested on prokaryotic Escherichia coli and eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae model organisms. Crystal structure of [Cu(phen(5-Clsal(5-ClsalH2]2 a dimeric structure, whereas the second complex of formula [Cu(H2O(5-Clsal(Neo] has been shown to be monomeric. Our results confirmed the toxic effect of prepared copper complexes as well as bioactive ligands on the yeast and bacteria growth. The effect of copper complexes was stronger compared to the solutions of free ligands. Our preliminary results showed that the complex [Cu(H2O(5-Clsal(Neo] exhibited higher antimicrobial activity compared to the complex [Cu(phen(5-Clsal(5-ClsalH2]2.

  9. Active Wnt signaling in response to cardiac injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, M.I.; Goumans, M.J.; van Middelaar, B.; Clevers, H.; Doevendans, P.A.; Sluijter, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Although the contribution of Wnt signaling in infarct healing is suggested, its exact role after myocardial infarction (MI) still needs to be unraveled. We evaluated the cardiac presence of active Wnt signaling in vivo following MI, and investigated in which cell types active Wnt signaling was

  10. Differential maturation of brain signal complexity in the human auditory and visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Lippe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain development carries with it a large number of structural changes at the local level which impact on the functional interactions of distributed neuronal networks for perceptual processing. Such changes enhance information processing capacity, which can be indexed by estimation of neural signal complexity. Here, we show that during development, EEG signal complexity increases from one month to 5 years of age in response to auditory and visual stimulation. However, the rates of change in complexity were not equivalent for the two responses. Infants’ signal complexity for the visual condition was greater than auditory signal complexity, whereas adults showed the same level of complexity to both types of stimuli. The differential rates of complexity change may reflect a combination of innate and experiential factors on the structure and function of the two sensory systems.

  11. LINGO-1 is a component of the Nogo-66 receptor/p75 signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Sha; Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Thill, Greg; Ji, Benxiu; Relton, Jane; Levesque, Melissa; Allaire, Norm; Perrin, Steve; Sands, Bryan; Crowell, Thomas; Cate, Richard L; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2004-03-01

    Axon regeneration in the adult CNS is prevented by inhibitors in myelin. These inhibitors seem to modulate RhoA activity by binding to a receptor complex comprising a ligand-binding subunit (the Nogo-66 receptor NgR1) and a signal transducing subunit (the neurotrophin receptor p75). However, in reconstituted non-neuronal systems, NgR1 and p75 together are unable to activate RhoA, suggesting that additional components of the receptor may exist. Here we describe LINGO-1, a nervous system-specific transmembrane protein that binds NgR1 and p75 and that is an additional functional component of the NgR1/p75 signaling complex. In non-neuronal cells, coexpression of human NgR1, p75 and LINGO-1 conferred responsiveness to oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein, as measured by RhoA activation. A dominant-negative human LINGO-1 construct attenuated myelin inhibition in transfected primary neuronal cultures. This effect on neurons was mimicked using an exogenously added human LINGO-1-Fc fusion protein. Together these observations suggest that LINGO-1 has an important role in CNS biology.

  12. Precise signal amplitude retrieval for a non-homogeneous diagnostic beam using complex interferometry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, M.; Kalal, M.; Dostal, J.; Dudzak, R.; Juha, L.

    2017-08-01

    Classical interferometry became widely used method of active optical diagnostics. Its more advanced version, allowing reconstruction of three sets of data from just one especially designed interferogram (so called complex interferogram) was developed in the past and became known as complex interferometry. Along with the phase shift, which can be also retrieved using classical interferometry, the amplitude modifications of the probing part of the diagnostic beam caused by the object under study (to be called the signal amplitude) as well as the contrast of the interference fringes can be retrieved using the complex interferometry approach. In order to partially compensate for errors in the reconstruction due to imperfections in the diagnostic beam intensity structure as well as for errors caused by a non-ideal optical setup of the interferometer itself (including the quality of its optical components), a reference interferogram can be put to a good use. This method of interferogram analysis of experimental data has been successfully implemented in practice. However, in majority of interferometer setups (especially in the case of the ones employing the wavefront division) the probe and the reference part of the diagnostic beam would feature different intensity distributions over their respective cross sections. This introduces additional error into the reconstruction of the signal amplitude and the fringe contrast, which cannot be resolved using the reference interferogram only. In order to deal with this error it was found that additional separately recorded images of the intensity distribution of the probe and the reference part of the diagnostic beam (with no signal present) are needed. For the best results a sufficient shot-to-shot stability of the whole diagnostic system is required. In this paper, efficiency of the complex interferometry approach for obtaining the highest possible accuracy of the signal amplitude reconstruction is verified using the computer

  13. SOCS3 binds specific receptor-JAK complexes to control cytokine signaling by direct kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Nadia J; Murphy, James M; Liau, Nicholas P D; Varghese, Leila N; Laktyushin, Artem; Whitlock, Eden L; Lucet, Isabelle S; Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2013-04-01

    The inhibitory protein SOCS3 plays a key part in the immune and hematopoietic systems by regulating signaling induced by specific cytokines. SOCS3 functions by inhibiting the catalytic activity of Janus kinases (JAKs) that initiate signaling within the cell. We determined the crystal structure of a ternary complex between mouse SOCS3, JAK2 (kinase domain) and a fragment of the interleukin-6 receptor β-chain. The structure shows that SOCS3 binds JAK2 and receptor simultaneously, using two opposing surfaces. While the phosphotyrosine-binding groove on the SOCS3 SH2 domain is occupied by receptor, JAK2 binds in a phosphoindependent manner to a noncanonical surface. The kinase-inhibitory region of SOCS3 occludes the substrate-binding groove on JAK2, and biochemical studies show that it blocks substrate association. These studies reveal that SOCS3 targets specific JAK-cytokine receptor pairs and explains the mechanism and specificity of SOCS action.

  14. Structural reorganization of the interleukin-7 signaling complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElroy, Craig A.; Holland, Paul J.; Zhao, Peng; Lim, Jae-Min; Wells, Lance; Eisenstein, Edward; Walsh, Scott T.R. (Maryland); (Battelle); (Georgia)

    2012-06-29

    We report here an unliganded receptor structure in the common gamma-chain ({gamma}{sub c}) family of receptors and cytokines. The crystal structure of the unliganded form of the interleukin-7 alpha receptor (IL-7R{alpha}) extracellular domain (ECD) at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution reveals a homodimer forming an 'X' geometry looking down onto the cell surface with the C termini of the two chains separated by 110 {angstrom} and the dimer interface comprising residues critical for IL-7 binding. Further biophysical studies indicate a weak association of the IL-7R{alpha} ECDs but a stronger association between the {gamma}{sub c}/IL-7R{alpha} ECDs, similar to previous studies of the full-length receptors on CD4{sup +} T cells. Based on these and previous results, we propose a molecular mechanism detailing the progression from the inactive IL-7R{alpha} homodimer and IL-7R{alpha}-{gamma}{sub c} heterodimer to the active IL-7-IL-7R{alpha}-{gamma}{sub c} ternary complex whereby the two receptors undergo at least a 90{sup o} rotation away from the cell surface, moving the C termini of IL-7R{alpha} and {gamma}{sub c} from a distance of 110 {angstrom} to less than 30 {angstrom} at the cell surface. This molecular mechanism can be used to explain recently discovered IL-7- and {gamma}{sub c}-independent gain-of-function mutations in IL-7R{alpha} from B- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. The mechanism may also be applicable to other {gamma}{sub c} receptors that form inactive homodimers and heterodimers independent of their cytokines.

  15. Complexity of Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Signal Analysis in Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chin Weng

    Full Text Available Absence epilepsy is an important epileptic syndrome in children. Multiscale entropy (MSE, an entropy-based method to measure dynamic complexity at multiple temporal scales, is helpful to disclose the information of brain connectivity. This study investigated the complexity of electroencephalogram (EEG signals using MSE in children with absence epilepsy. In this research, EEG signals from 19 channels of the entire brain in 21 children aged 5-12 years with absence epilepsy were analyzed. The EEG signals of pre-ictal (before seizure and ictal states (during seizure were analyzed by sample entropy (SamEn and MSE methods. Variations of complexity index (CI, which was calculated from MSE, from the pre-ictal to the ictal states were also analyzed. The entropy values in the pre-ictal state were significantly higher than those in the ictal state. The MSE revealed more differences in analysis compared to the SamEn. The occurrence of absence seizures decreased the CI in all channels. Changes in CI were also significantly greater in the frontal and central parts of the brain, indicating fronto-central cortical involvement of "cortico-thalamo-cortical network" in the occurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges during absence seizures. Moreover, higher sampling frequency was more sensitive in detecting functional changes in the ictal state. There was significantly higher correlation in ictal states in the same patient in different seizures but there were great differences in CI among different patients, indicating that CI changes were consistent in different absence seizures in the same patient but not from patient to patient. This implies that the brain stays in a homogeneous activation state during the absence seizures. In conclusion, MSE analysis is better than SamEn analysis to analyze complexity of EEG, and CI can be used to investigate the functional brain changes during absence seizures.

  16. Complexity of Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Signal Analysis in Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wen-Chin; Jiang, George J A; Chang, Chi-Feng; Lu, Wen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is an important epileptic syndrome in children. Multiscale entropy (MSE), an entropy-based method to measure dynamic complexity at multiple temporal scales, is helpful to disclose the information of brain connectivity. This study investigated the complexity of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals using MSE in children with absence epilepsy. In this research, EEG signals from 19 channels of the entire brain in 21 children aged 5-12 years with absence epilepsy were analyzed. The EEG signals of pre-ictal (before seizure) and ictal states (during seizure) were analyzed by sample entropy (SamEn) and MSE methods. Variations of complexity index (CI), which was calculated from MSE, from the pre-ictal to the ictal states were also analyzed. The entropy values in the pre-ictal state were significantly higher than those in the ictal state. The MSE revealed more differences in analysis compared to the SamEn. The occurrence of absence seizures decreased the CI in all channels. Changes in CI were also significantly greater in the frontal and central parts of the brain, indicating fronto-central cortical involvement of "cortico-thalamo-cortical network" in the occurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges during absence seizures. Moreover, higher sampling frequency was more sensitive in detecting functional changes in the ictal state. There was significantly higher correlation in ictal states in the same patient in different seizures but there were great differences in CI among different patients, indicating that CI changes were consistent in different absence seizures in the same patient but not from patient to patient. This implies that the brain stays in a homogeneous activation state during the absence seizures. In conclusion, MSE analysis is better than SamEn analysis to analyze complexity of EEG, and CI can be used to investigate the functional brain changes during absence seizures.

  17. Physalin H from Solanum nigrum as an Hh signaling inhibitor blocks GLI1-DNA-complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Midori A; Uchida, Kyoko; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2014-01-13

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays an important role in embryonic development, cell maintenance and cell proliferation. Moreover, Hh signaling contributes to the growth of cancer cells. Physalins are highly oxidized natural products with a complex structure. Physalins (1-7) were isolated from Solanum nigrum (Solanaceae) collected in Bangladesh by using our cell-based assay. The isolated physalins included the previously reported Hh inhibitors 5 and 6. Compounds 1 and 4 showed strong inhibition of GLI1 transcriptional activity, and exhibited cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines with an aberrant activation of Hh signaling. Compound 1 inhibited the production of the Hh-related proteins patched (PTCH) and BCL2. Analysis of the structures of different physalins showed that the left part of the physalins was important for Hh inhibitory activity. Interestingly, physalin H (1) disrupted GLI1 binding to its DNA binding domain, while the weak inhibitor physalin G (2) did not show inhibition of GLI1-DNA complex formation.

  18. Endolysosomal membrane trafficking complexes drive nutrient-dependent TORC1 signaling to control cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Sen, Neelam D; Maeda, Tatsuya; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2014-04-01

    The rapamycin-sensitive and endomembrane-associated TORC1 pathway controls cell growth in response to nutrients in eukaryotes. Mutations in class C Vps (Vps-C) complexes are synthetically lethal with tor1 mutations and confer rapamycin hypersensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting a role for these complexes in TORC1 signaling. Vps-C complexes are required for vesicular trafficking and fusion and comprise four distinct complexes: HOPS and CORVET and their minor intermediaries (i)-CORVET and i-HOPS. We show that at least one Vps-C complex is required to promote TORC1 activity, with the HOPS complex having the greatest input. The vps-c mutants fail to recover from rapamycin-induced growth arrest and show low levels of TORC1 activity. TORC1 promotes cell growth via Sch9, a p70(S6) kinase ortholog. Constitutively active SCH9 or hyperactive TOR1 alleles restored rapamycin recovery and TORC1 activity of vps-c mutants, supporting a role for the Vps-C complexes upstream of TORC1. The EGO GTPase complex Exit from G0 Complex (EGOC) and its homologous Rag-GTPase complex convey amino acid signals to TORC1 in yeast and mammals, respectively. Expression of the activated EGOC GTPase subunits Gtr1(GTP) and Gtr2(GDP) partially suppressed vps-c mutant rapamycin recovery defects, and this suppression was enhanced by increased amino acid concentrations. Moreover, vps-c mutations disrupted EGOC-TORC1 interactions. TORC1 defects were more severe for vps-c mutants than those observed in EGOC mutants. Taken together, our results support a model in which distinct endolysosomal trafficking Vps-C complexes promote rapamycin-sensitive TORC1 activity via multiple inputs, one of which involves maintenance of amino acid homeostasis that is sensed and transmitted to TORC1 via interactions with EGOC.

  19. The architecture of the 12RSS in V(D)J recombination signal and synaptic complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubotaru, Mihai; Surleac, Marius D; Metskas, Lauren Ann; Koo, Peter; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Petrescu, Andrei J; Schatz, David G

    2015-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is initiated by RAG1 and RAG2, which together with HMGB1 bind to a recombination signal sequence (12RSS or 23RSS) to form the signal complex (SC) and then capture a complementary partner RSS, yielding the paired complex (PC). Little is known regarding the structural changes that accompany the SC to PC transition or the structural features that allow RAG to distinguish its two asymmetric substrates. To address these issues, we analyzed the structure of the 12RSS in the SC and PC using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and molecular dynamics modeling. The resulting models indicate that the 12RSS adopts a strongly bent V-shaped structure upon RAG/HMGB1 binding and reveal structural differences, particularly near the heptamer, between the 12RSS in the SC and PC. Comparison of models of the 12RSS and 23RSS in the PC reveals broadly similar shapes but a distinct number and location of DNA bends as well as a smaller central cavity for the 12RSS. These findings provide the most detailed view yet of the 12RSS in RAG-DNA complexes and highlight structural features of the RSS that might underlie activation of RAG-mediated cleavage and substrate asymmetry important for the 12/23 rule of V(D)J recombination. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Impaired Reelin-Dab1 Signaling Contributes to Neuronal Migration Deficits of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uk Yeol Moon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including defects in neuronal migration. However, the alterations in cell signaling mechanisms critical for migration and final positioning of neurons in TSC remain unclear. Our detailed cellular analyses reveal that reduced Tsc2 in newborn neurons causes abnormalities in leading processes of migrating neurons, accompanied by significantly delayed migration. Importantly, we demonstrate that Reelin-Dab1 signaling is aberrantly regulated in TSC mouse models and in cortical tubers from TSC patients owing to enhanced expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cul5, a known mediator of pDab1 ubiquitination. Likewise, mTORC1 activation by Rheb overexpression generates similar neuronal and Reelin-Dab1 signaling defects, and directly upregulates Cul5 expression. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin treatment or by reducing Cul5 largely restores normal leading processes and positioning of migrating neurons. Thus, disrupted Reelin-Dab1 signaling is critically involved in the neuronal migration defects of TSC.

  1. Olfactory G proteins: simple and complex signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F A; Chess, A

    1998-06-04

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, olfactory perception is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Recent work, in both mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans, sheds light on the role of specific G proteins in olfactory signal transduction, neuronal morphology and axon guidance.

  2. Information theoretical quantification of cooperativity in signalling complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2009-01-01

    the cooperativity inherent to the assembly of macromolecular complexes. We show how protein complexes can be considered as particular instances of noisy communication channels. Further we show, using a portion of the p27 regulatory pathway, how classical equilibrium thermodynamic quantities such as binding......, for which a particular system acts most effectively, i.e. exchanges the most information. As such this framework opens the possibility of grasping biological qualities such as system sensitivity, robustness or plasticity directly in terms of their effect on information exchange. Although these parameters...

  3. Signal Complexity of Human Intracranial EEG Tracks Successful Associative-Memory Formation across Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Timothy C; Sreekumar, Vishnu; Inati, Sara K; Zaghloul, Kareem A

    2018-02-14

    Memory performance is highly variable among individuals. Most studies examining human memory, however, have largely focused on the neural correlates of successful memory formation within individuals, rather than the differences among them. As such, what gives rise to this variability is poorly understood. Here, we examined intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings captured from 43 participants (23 male) implanted with subdural electrodes for seizure monitoring as they performed a paired-associates verbal memory task. We identified three separate but related signatures of neural activity that tracked differences in successful memory formation across individuals. High-performing individuals consistently exhibited less broadband power, flatter power spectral density slopes, and greater complexity in their iEEG signals. Furthermore, within individuals across three separate time scales ranging from seconds to days, successful recall was positively associated with these same metrics. Our data therefore suggest that memory ability across individuals can be indexed by increased neural signal complexity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show that participants whose intracranial EEG exhibits less low-frequency power, flatter power spectrums, and greater sample entropy overall are better able to memorize associations, and that the same metrics track fluctuations in memory performance across time within individuals. These metrics together signify greater neural signal complexity, which may index the brain's ability to flexibly engage with information and generate separable memory representations. Critically, the current set of results provides a unique window into the neural markers of individual differences in memory performance, which have hitherto been underexplored. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/381744-12$15.00/0.

  4. Identification of brassinosteroid signaling complexes by coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, van Walter; Heerde, van Luc; Boeren, Sjef; Vries, de Sacco C.

    2017-01-01

    A combination of coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) of tagged proteins followed by protein identification and quantitation using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS) has proven to be a reliable method to qualitatively characterize membrane-bound receptor complexes from

  5. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    ... being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs...

  6. A ribosome-bound quality control complex triggers degradation of nascent peptides and signals translation stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, Onn; Stewart-Ornstein, Jacob; Wong, Daisy; Larson, Adam; Williams, Christopher C; Li, Gene-Wei; Zhou, Sharleen; King, David; Shen, Peter S; Weibezahn, Jimena; Dunn, Joshua G; Rouskin, Silvi; Inada, Toshifumi; Frost, Adam; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2012-11-21

    The conserved transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) is a key sensor of proteotoxic and other stress in the eukaryotic cytosol. We surveyed Hsf1 activity in a genome-wide loss-of-function library in Saccaromyces cerevisiae as well as ~78,000 double mutants and found Hsf1 activity to be modulated by highly diverse stresses. These included disruption of a ribosome-bound complex we named the Ribosome Quality Control Complex (RQC) comprising the Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase, two highly conserved but poorly characterized proteins (Tae2 and Rqc1), and Cdc48 and its cofactors. Electron microscopy and biochemical analyses revealed that the RQC forms a stable complex with 60S ribosomal subunits containing stalled polypeptides and triggers their degradation. A negative feedback loop regulates the RQC, and Hsf1 senses an RQC-mediated translation-stress signal distinctly from other stresses. Our work reveals the range of stresses Hsf1 monitors and elucidates a conserved cotranslational protein quality control mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity Recognition Using Complex Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalloul, Nahed; Poree, Fabienne; Viardot, Geoffrey; L'Hostis, Phillipe; Carrault, Guy

    2017-10-12

    In this paper, we perform complex network analysis on a connectivity dataset retrieved from a monitoring system in order to classify simple daily activities. The monitoring system is composed of a set of wearable sensing modules positioned on the subject's body and the connectivity data consists of the correlation between each pair of modules. A number of network measures are then computed followed by the application of statistical significance and feature selection methods. These methods were implemented for the purpose of reducing the total number of modules in the monitoring system required to provide accurate activity classification. The obtained results show that an overall accuracy of 84.6% for activity classification is achieved, using a Random Forest (RF) classifier, and when considering a monitoring system composed of only two modules positioned at the Neck and Thigh of the subject's body.

  8. Hh signaling inhibitors from Vitex negundo; naturally occurring inhibitors of the GLI1-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Midori A; Fujimatsu, Teruhisa; Uchida, Kyoko; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2013-05-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has crucial roles in embryonic development, cell maintenance and proliferation, and is also known to contribute to cancer cell growth. New naturally occurring Hh inhibitors (1, 7 and 9) were isolated from Vitex negundo using our previously constructed cell-based assay. Bioactivity guided isolation provided 9 natural compounds including a new diterpene, nishindanol (9). Compounds 7 and 9 showed cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines in which Hh signaling was aberrantly activated. Vitetrifolin D (7; GLI1 transcriptional inhibition IC50 = 20.2 μM) showed inhibition of Hh related protein (PTCH and BCL2) production. Interestingly, the constructed electrophoresis mobility shift assay revealed that vitetrifolin D (7) disrupted GLI1 binding on its DNA binding domain. epi-Sclareol (8; inactive), possessing a similar structure to 7, did not show inhibition of GLI1–DNA complex formation. This is the first example of naturally occurring inhibitors of GLI1–DNA complex formation.

  9. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  10. Membrane bound GSK-3 activates Wnt signaling through disheveled and arrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudh G Mannava

    Full Text Available Wnt ligands and their downstream pathway components coordinate many developmental and cellular processes. In adults, they regulate tissue homeostasis through regulation of stem cells. Mechanistically, signal transduction through this pathway is complicated by pathway components having both positive and negative roles in signal propagation. Here we examine the positive role of GSK-3/Zw3 in promoting signal transduction at the plasma membrane. We find that targeting GSK-3 to the plasma membrane activates signaling in Drosophila embryos. This activation requires the presence of the co-receptor Arrow-LRP5/6 and the pathway activating protein Disheveled. Our results provide genetic evidence for evolutionarily conserved, separable roles for GSK-3 at the membrane and in the cytosol, and are consistent with a model where the complex cycles from cytosol to membrane in order to promote signaling at the membrane and to prevent it in the cytosol.

  11. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signalling is essential for germinal centre reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshou; Li, Zhirong; Wang, Pengcheng; Huang, Qizhao; Xu, Lifan; He, Ran; Ye, Lilin; Bai, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase that has been shown to be essential for the differentiation and function of various immune cells. Earlier in vitro studies showed that mTOR signalling regulates B-cell biology by supporting their activation and proliferation. However, how mTOR signalling temporally regulates in vivo germinal centre B (GCB) cell development and differentiation into short-lived plasma cells, long-lived plasma cells and memory cells is still not well understood. In this study, we used a combined conditional/inducible knock-out system to investigate the temporal regulation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in the GCB cell response to acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection by deleting Raptor, a main component of mTORC1, specifically in B cells in pre- and late GC phase. Early Raptor deficiency strongly inhibited GCB cell proliferation and differentiation and plasma cell differentiation. Nevertheless, late GC Raptor deficiency caused only decreases in the size of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells through poor maintenance of GCB cells, but it did not change their differentiation. Collectively, our data revealed that mTORC1 signalling supports GCB cell responses at both early and late GC phases during viral infection but does not regulate GCB cell differentiation into memory B cells and plasma cells at the late GC stage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. On chip complex signal processing devices using coupled phononic crystal slab resonators and waveguides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Adibi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report the evidence for the possibility of achieving complex signal processing functionalities such as multiplexing/demultiplexing at high frequencies using phononic crystal (PnC) slabs...

  13. Transfer function between EEG and BOLD signals of epileptic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eLeite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have seen growing application in the evaluation of epilepsy, namely in the characterization of brain networks related to epileptic activity. In EEG-correlated fMRI studies, epileptic events are usually described as boxcar signals based on the timing information retrieved from the EEG, and subsequently convolved with a heamodynamic response function to model the associated BOLD changes. Although more flexible approaches may allow a higher degree of complexity for the haemodynamics, the issue of how to model these dynamics based on the EEG remains an open question. In this work, a new methodology for the integration of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in epilepsy is proposed, which incorporates a transfer function from the EEG to the BOLD signal. Independent component analysis (ICA of the EEG is performed, and a number of metrics expressing different models of the EEG-BOLD transfer function are extracted from the resulting time courses. These metrics are then used to predict the fMRI data and to identify brain areas associated with the EEG epileptic activity. The methodology was tested on both ictal and interictal EEG-fMRI recordings from one patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma. When compared to the conventional analysis approach, plausible, consistent and more significant activations were obtained. Importantly, frequency-weighted EEG metrics yielded superior results than those weighted solely on the EEG power, which comes in agreement with previous literature. Reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity should be addressed in an extended group of patients in order to further validate the proposed methodology and generalize the presented proof of concept.

  14. Notch 1 signaling regulates peripheral T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Todd N; Tang, Qizhi; Wolfe, Michael; He, Yiping; Pear, Warren S; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2004-04-01

    Notch signaling has been identified as an important regulator of leukocyte differentiation and thymic maturation. Less is known about the role of Notch signaling in regulating mature T cells. We examined the role of Notch 1 in regulating peripheral T cell activity in vitro and in vivo. Coligation of Notch 1 together with TCR and CD28 resulted in a dramatic inhibition of T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. This effect was dependent on presenilin activity and induced the expression of HES-1, suggestive of Notch 1 signaling. Biochemical analysis demonstrated an inhibition of AKT and GSK3beta phosphorylation following Notch 1 engagement while other biochemical signals such as TCR and ERK phosphorylation remained intact. Similar effects were observed in vivo in an adoptive transfer model. Therefore, Notch 1 signaling may play an important role in regulating naive T cell activation and homeostasis.

  15. Normalization of informatisation parameter on airfield light-signal bar at flights in complex meteorological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    П.В. Попов

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available  The technique of maintenance of the set level of flights safetivness is developed by normalization of informatisation parameters functional groups of light-signal lightings at technological stages of interaction of crew of the airplane with the airfield light-signals bar at flights in a complex weathercast conditions.

  16. Biologic Activity of Porphyromonas endodontalis complex lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirucki, Christopher S.; Abedi, Mehran; Jiang, Jin; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Safavi, Kamran E.; Clark, Robert B.; Nichols, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Periapical infections secondary to pulpal necrosis are associated with bacterial contamination of the pulp. Porphyromonas endodontalis, a Gram-negative organism, is considered to be a pulpal pathogen. P. gingivalis is phylogenetically related to P. endodontalis and synthesizes several classes of novel complex lipids that possess biological activity, including the capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activation. The purpose of this study was to extract and characterize constituent lipids of P. endodontalis, and evaluate their capacity to promote pro-inflammatory secretory responses in the macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7, as well as their capacity to promote osteoclastogenesis and inhibit osteoblast activity. Methods Constituent lipids of both organisms were fractionated by HPLC and were structurally characterized using electrospray-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) or ESI-MS/MS. The virulence potential of P. endodontalis lipids was then compared with known biologically active lipids isolated from P. gingivalis. Results P. endodontalis total lipids were shown to promote TNF-α secretion from RAW 264.7 cells and the serine lipid fraction appeared to account for the majority of this effect. P. endodontalis lipid preparations also increased osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells but osteoblast differentiation in culture was inhibited and appeared to be dependent on TLR2 expression. Conclusions These effects underscore the importance of P. endodontalis lipids in promoting inflammatory and bone cell activation processes that could lead to periapical pathology. PMID:25146013

  17. Aberrant activation of notch signaling in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Spyros; Clarke, Rob B; Brennan, Keith

    2006-02-01

    A role for Notch signaling in human breast cancer has been suggested by both the development of adenocarcinomas in the murine mammary gland following pathway activation and the loss of Numb expression, a negative regulator of the Notch pathway, in a large proportion of breast carcinomas. However, it is not clear currently whether Notch signaling is frequently activated in breast tumors, and how it causes cellular transformation. Here, we show accumulation of the intracellular domain of Notch1 and hence increased Notch signaling in a wide variety of human breast carcinomas. In addition, we show that increased RBP-Jkappa-dependent Notch signaling is sufficient to transform normal breast epithelial cells and that the mechanism of transformation is most likely through the suppression of apoptosis. More significantly, we show that attenuation of Notch signaling reverts the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that inhibition of Notch signaling may be a therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  18. Micro-earthquake signal analysis and hypocenter determination around Lokon volcano complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firmansyah, Rizky, E-mail: rizkyfirmansyah@hotmail.com [Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Kristianto, E-mail: kris@vsi.esdm.go.id [Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Geological Agency, Bandung, 40122 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Mount Lokon is one of five active volcanoes which is located in the North Sulawesi region. Since June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) for this mountain. The Mount Lokon volcano erupted on July 4{sup th}, 2011 and still continuously erupted until August 28{sup th}, 2011. Due to its high seismic activity, this study is focused to analysis of micro-earthquake signal and determine the micro-earthquake hypocenter location around the complex area of Lokon-Empung Volcano before eruption phase in 2011 (time periods of January, 2009 up to March, 2010). Determination of the hypocenter location was conducted with Geiger Adaptive Damping (GAD) method. We used initial model from previous study in Volcan de Colima, Mexico. The reason behind the model selection was based on the same characteristics that shared between Mount Lokon and Colima including andesitic stratovolcano and small-plinian explosions volcanian types. In this study, a picking events was limited to the volcano-tectonics of A and B types, hybrid, long-period that has a clear signal onset, and local tectonic with different maximum S – P time are not more than three seconds. As a result, we observed the micro-earthquakes occurred in the area north-west of Mount Lokon region.

  19. Structural characterization of the ternary complex that mediates termination of NF-κB signaling by IκBα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sulakshana P; Quintas, Pedro O; McNulty, Reginald; Komives, Elizabeth A; Dyson, H Jane

    2016-05-31

    The transcription factor NF-κB is used in many systems for the transduction of extracellular signals into the expression of signal-responsive genes. Published structural data explain the activation of NF-κB through degradation of its dedicated inhibitor IκBα, but the mechanism by which NF-κB-mediated signaling is turned off by its removal from the DNA in the presence of newly synthesized IκBα (termed stripping) is unknown. Previous kinetic studies showed that IκBα accelerates NF-κB dissociation from DNA, and a transient ternary complex between NF-κB, its cognate DNA sequence, and IκBα was observed. Here we structurally characterize the >100-kDa ternary complex by NMR and negative stain EM and show a modeled structure that is consistent with the measurements. These data provide a structural basis for previously unidentified insights into the molecular mechanism of stripping.

  20. SPATA2 links CYLD to the TNF-α receptor signaling complex and modulates the receptor signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Satpathy, Shankha; Beli, Petra

    2016-01-01

    TNF-α is a key regulator of innate immune and proinflammatory responses. However, the composition of the TNF-α receptor-associated signaling complexes (TNF-RSC) and the architecture of the downstream signaling networks are incompletely understood. We employed quantitative mass spectrometry...... to demonstrate that TNF-α stimulation induces widespread protein phosphorylation and that the scope of phosphorylation expands in a temporal manner. TNF-α stimulation also induces rapid ubiquitylation of components of the TNF-RSC Temporal analysis of the TNF-RSC composition identified SPATA2 as a novel component...

  1. Scopolamine rapidly increases mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling, synaptogenesis, and antidepressant behavioral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Navarria, Andrea; Liu, Rong-Jian; Banasr, Mounira; Li, Nanxin; Terwilliger, Rose; Sanacora, Gerard; Eid, Tore; Aghajanian, George; Duman, Ronald S

    2013-11-15

    Clinical studies report that scopolamine, an acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonist, produces rapid antidepressant effects in depressed patients, but the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response have not been determined. The present study examines the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and synaptogenesis, which have been implicated in the rapid actions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. The influence of scopolamine on mTORC1 signaling was determined by analysis of the phosphorylated and activated forms of mTORC1 signaling proteins in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The numbers and function of spine synapses were analyzed by whole cell patch clamp recording and two-photon image analysis of PFC neurons. The actions of scopolamine were examined in the forced swim test in the absence or presence of selective mTORC1 and glutamate receptor inhibitors. The results demonstrate that a single, low dose of scopolamine rapidly increases mTORC1 signaling and the number and function of spine synapses in layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC. Scopolamine administration also produces an antidepressant response in the forced swim test that is blocked by pretreatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor or by a glutamate alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the antidepressant actions of scopolamine require mTORC1 signaling and are associated with increased glutamate transmission, and synaptogenesis, similar to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. These findings provide novel targets for safer and more efficacious rapid-acting antidepressant agents. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  2. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Karel F.; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking. PMID:22689656

  3. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrantly...... patterns of the receptor itself. Thus, intracellular activation of RTKs by oncogenic mutations in the biosynthetic route may exploit cellular architecture to initiate aberrant signaling cascades, thus evading negative regulation....

  4. A simple iterative independent component analysis algorithm for vibration source signal identification of complex structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sup Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent Component Analysis (ICA, one of the blind source separation methods, can be applied for extracting unknown source signals only from received signals. This is accomplished by finding statistical independence of signal mixtures and has been successfully applied to myriad fields such as medical science, image processing, and numerous others. Nevertheless, there are inherent problems that have been reported when using this technique: insta- bility and invalid ordering of separated signals, particularly when using a conventional ICA technique in vibratory source signal identification of complex structures. In this study, a simple iterative algorithm of the conventional ICA has been proposed to mitigate these problems. The proposed method to extract more stable source signals having valid order includes an iterative and reordering process of extracted mixing matrix to reconstruct finally converged source signals, referring to the magnitudes of correlation coefficients between the intermediately separated signals and the signals measured on or nearby sources. In order to review the problems of the conventional ICA technique and to vali- date the proposed method, numerical analyses have been carried out for a virtual response model and a 30 m class submarine model. Moreover, in order to investigate applicability of the proposed method to real problem of complex structure, an experiment has been carried out for a scaled submarine mockup. The results show that the proposed method could resolve the inherent problems of a conventional ICA technique.

  5. Analysis of Multiresolution Characteristics of Complex Continuous Wave Signal Modulated by Pseudocode Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhuangzhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new type of Continuous Wave (CW signal modulated by pseudocode family is designed, solving the problem of more quantity of warhead dynamic fragments, larger speed variation, larger distribution and more difficult resolution during the measurement of warhead dynamic fragments. This signal has thumbtack ambiguity function and multiresolution characteristics. It can meet the measurement needs very well. Herein, correlation properties and ambiguity function characteristics of this signal are analyzed. Moreover, the signal’s limitations are reported. Recommendations pertaining to signal selection, number option, and usage are presented. The analysis results show that this signal can be used for dynamic fragments measurement of warhead. This signal is also of great importance to improve complex waveform design and radar performance.

  6. Rudra interrupts receptor signaling complexes to negatively regulate the IMD pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamna Aggarwal

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Insects rely primarily on innate immune responses to fight pathogens. In Drosophila, antimicrobial peptides are key contributors to host defense. Antimicrobial peptide gene expression is regulated by the IMD and Toll pathways. Bacterial peptidoglycans trigger these pathways, through recognition by peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs. DAP-type peptidoglycan triggers the IMD pathway via PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE, while lysine-type peptidoglycan is an agonist for the Toll pathway through PGRP-SA and PGRP-SD. Recent work has shown that the intensity and duration of the immune responses initiating with these receptors is tightly regulated at multiple levels, by a series of negative regulators. Through two-hybrid screening with PGRP-LC, we identified Rudra, a new regulator of the IMD pathway, and demonstrate that it is a critical feedback inhibitor of peptidoglycan receptor signaling. Following stimulation of the IMD pathway, rudra expression was rapidly induced. In cells, RNAi targeting of rudra caused a marked up-regulation of antimicrobial peptide gene expression. rudra mutant flies also hyper-activated antimicrobial peptide genes and were more resistant to infection with the insect pathogen Erwinia carotovora carotovora. Molecularly, Rudra was found to bind and interfere with both PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE, disrupting their signaling complex. These results show that Rudra is a critical component in a negative feedback loop, whereby immune-induced gene expression rapidly produces a potent inhibitor that binds and inhibits pattern recognition receptors.

  7. Understanding the GPCR biased signaling through G protein and arrestin complex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2017-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets for many human diseases. The determination of the 3-D structure of GPCRs and their signaling complexes has promoted our understanding of GPCR biology and provided templates for structure-based drug discovery. In this review, we focus on the recent structure work on GPCR signaling complexes, the β2-adrenoreceptor-Gs and the rhodopsin-arrestin complexes in particular, and highlight the structural features of GPCR complexes involved in G protein- and arrestin-mediated signal transduction. The crystal structures reveal distinct structural mechanisms by which GPCRs recruit a G protein and an arrestin. A comparison of the two complex structures provides insight into the molecular mechanism of functionally selective GPCR signaling, and a structural basis for the discovery of G protein- and arrestin-biased treatments of human diseases related to GPCR signal transduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  9. Simulation study on effects of signaling network structure on the developmental increase in complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keranen, Soile V.E.

    2003-04-02

    The developmental increase in structural complexity in multicellular life forms depends on local, often non-periodic differences in gene expression. These depend on a network of gene-gene interactions coded within the organismal genome. To better understand how genomic information generates complex expression patterns, I have modeled the pattern forming behavior of small artificial genomes in virtual blastoderm embryos. I varied several basic properties of these genomic signaling networks, such as the number of genes, the distributions of positive (inductive) and negative (repressive) interactions, and the strengths of gene-gene interactions, and analyzed their effects on developmental pattern formation. The results show how even simple genomes can generate complex non-periodic patterns under suitable conditions. They also show how the frequency of complex patterns depended on the numbers and relative arrangements of positive and negative interactions. For example, negative co-regulation of signaling pathway components increased the likelihood of (complex) patterns relative to differential negative regulation of the pathway components. Interestingly, neither quantitative differences either in strengths of signaling interactions nor multiple response thresholds to signal concentration (as in morphogen gradients) were essential for formation of multiple, spatially unique cell types. Thus, with combinatorial code of gene regulation and hierarchical signaling interactions, it is theoretically possible to organize metazoan embryogenesis with just a small fraction of the metazoan genome. Because even small networks can generate complex patterns when they contain a suitable set of connections, evolution of metazoan complexity may have depended more on selection for favourable configurations of signaling interactions than on the increase in numbers of regulatory genes.

  10. Impaired translocation and activation of mitochondrial Akt1 mitigated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation Complex V activity in diabetic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Ying; Deng, Wu; Chen, Yumay; Fan, Weiwei; Baldwin, Kenneth M; Jope, Richard S; Wallace, Douglas C; Wang, Ping H

    2013-06-01

    Insulin can translocate Akt to mitochondria in cardiac muscle. The goals of this study were to define sub-mitochondrial localization of the translocated Akt, to dissect the effects of insulin on Akt isoform translocation, and to determine the direct effect of mitochondrial Akt activation on Complex V activity in normal and diabetic myocardium. The translocated Akt sequentially localized to the mitochondrial intermembrane space, inner membrane, and matrix. To confirm Akt translocation, in vitro import assay showed rapid entry of Akt into mitochondria. Akt isoforms were differentially regulated by insulin stimulation, only Akt1 translocated into mitochondria. In the insulin-resistant Type 2 diabetes model, Akt1 translocation was blunted. Mitochondrial activation of Akt1 increased Complex V activity by 24% in normal myocardium in vivo and restored Complex V activity in diabetic myocardium. Basal mitochondrial Complex V activity was lower by 22% in the Akt1(-/-) myocardium. Insulin-stimulated Complex V activity was not impaired in the Akt1(-/-) myocardium, due to compensatory translocation of Akt2 to mitochondria. Akt1 is the primary isoform that relayed insulin signaling to mitochondria and modulated mitochondrial Complex V activity. Activation of mitochondrial Akt1 enhanced ATP production and increased phosphocreatine in cardiac muscle cells. Dysregulation of this signal pathway might impair mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic myocardium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Live cell micropatterning reveals the dynamics of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löchte, Sara; Waichman, Sharon; Beutel, Oliver; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob

    2014-11-10

    Interactions of proteins in the plasma membrane are notoriously challenging to study under physiological conditions. We report in this paper a generic approach for spatial organization of plasma membrane proteins into micropatterns as a tool for visualizing and quantifying interactions with extracellular, intracellular, and transmembrane proteins in live cells. Based on a protein-repellent poly(ethylene glycol) polymer brush, micropatterned surface functionalization with the HaloTag ligand for capturing HaloTag fusion proteins and RGD peptides promoting cell adhesion was devised. Efficient micropatterning of the type I interferon (IFN) receptor subunit IFNAR2 fused to the HaloTag was achieved, and highly specific IFN binding to the receptor was detected. The dynamics of this interaction could be quantified on the single molecule level, and IFN-induced receptor dimerization in micropatterns could be monitored. Assembly of active signaling complexes was confirmed by immunostaining of phosphorylated Janus family kinases, and the interaction dynamics of cytosolic effector proteins recruited to the receptor complex were unambiguously quantified by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. © 2014 Löchte et al.

  12. Downscaling the analysis of complex transmembrane signaling cascades to closed attoliter volumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigino Grasso

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling is classically investigated by measuring optical or electrical properties of single or populations of living cells. Here we show that ligand binding to cell surface receptors and subsequent activation of signaling cascades can be monitored in single, (sub-micrometer sized native vesicles with single-molecule sensitivity. The vesicles are derived from live mammalian cells using chemicals or optical tweezers. They comprise parts of a cell's plasma membrane and cytosol and represent the smallest autonomous containers performing cellular signaling reactions thus functioning like minimized cells. Using fluorescence microscopies, we measured in individual vesicles the different steps of G-protein-coupled receptor mediated signaling like ligand binding to receptors, subsequent G-protein activation and finally arrestin translocation indicating receptor deactivation. Observing cellular signaling reactions in individual vesicles opens the door for downscaling bioanalysis of cellular functions to the attoliter range, multiplexing single cell analysis, and investigating receptor mediated signaling in multiarray format.

  13. Intracellular signaling pathways activated by kisspeptins through GPR54: do multiple signals underlie function diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño, Justo P; Martínez-Fuentes, Antonio J; Gutiérrez-Pascual, Ester; Vaudry, Hubert; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Malagón, María M

    2009-01-01

    Kisspeptins, a family of peptide products derived from the KiSS-1 gene, activate their cognate receptor GPR54 in various target tissues to exert disparate functions, including inhibition of tumor metastasis and control of reproductive function. In contrast to the plethora of studies that have analyzed in recent years the regulatory functions of the KiSS-1/GPR54 system, only a limited number of reports have been primarily focused on delineating the intracellular signaling pathways involved. Nevertheless, there is solid evidence indicating that kisspeptin can activate a wide variety of signals via GPR54. These include typical G-protein (Galphaq/11)-coupled cascades, such as activation of phospholipase C (PLC), and subsequent accumulation of inositol-(1,4,5)-triphosphate (IP3), intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, and activation of protein kinase C. However, kisspeptin also activates pathways related to mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), especially ERK1/2, and p38 and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt. Additionally, the kisspeptin/GPR54 pair can also influence cell signaling by interacting with other receptors, such as chemokine receptor CXCR4, and GnRH receptor. Kisspeptin can also affect other signaling events, like expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (via NFkappaB), and that of calcineurin. The information gathered hitherto clearly indicates that activation of a specific set of interconnected signals is selectively triggered by kisspeptin via GPR54 in a cell type-dependent manner to precisely regulate functions as distinct as hormone release and cell migration. In this scenario, it will be important to decipher kisspeptin/GPR54 signaling mechanisms in reproductive and non-reproductive tissues by studying additional models, especially on natural kisspeptin targets expressing endogenous GPR54.

  14. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary prote...

  15. Supramolecular organizing centers (SMOCs) as signaling machines in innate immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qi; Wu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Innate immunity offers the first line of defense against infections and other types of danger such as tumorigenesis. Its discovery provides tremendous therapeutic opportunities for numerous human diseases. Delving into the structural basis of signal transduction by innate immune receptors, our lab has recently helped to establish the new paradigm in which innate immune receptors transduce ligand-binding signals through formation of higher-order assemblies containing intracellular adapters, signaling enzymes and their substrates. These large signalosome assemblies may be visible under light microscopy as punctate structures in the µm scale, connecting to the underlying molecular structures in the nm scale. They drive proximity-induced enzyme activation, and provide a mechanism for signaling amplification by nucleated polymerization. These supramolecular signaling complexes also open new questions on their cellular organization and mode of regulation, pose challenges to our methodology, and afford valuable implications in drug discovery against these medically important pathways.

  16. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction.

  17. Processing of simple and complex acoustic signals in a tonotopically organized ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Jennifer; Wolf, Konstantin; Kössl, Manfred; Nowotny, Manuela

    2014-12-07

    Processing of complex signals in the hearing organ remains poorly understood. This paper aims to contribute to this topic by presenting investigations on the mechanical and neuronal response of the hearing organ of the tropical bushcricket species Mecopoda elongata to simple pure tone signals as well as to the conspecific song as a complex acoustic signal. The high-frequency hearing organ of bushcrickets, the crista acustica (CA), is tonotopically tuned to frequencies between about 4 and 70 kHz. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurements revealed a strong and dominant low-frequency-induced motion of the CA when stimulated with either pure tone or complex stimuli. Consequently, the high-frequency distal area of the CA is more strongly deflected by low-frequency-induced waves than by high-frequency-induced waves. This low-frequency dominance will have strong effects on the processing of complex signals. Therefore, we additionally studied the neuronal response of the CA to native and frequency-manipulated chirps. Again, we found a dominant influence of low-frequency components within the conspecific song, indicating that the mechanical vibration pattern highly determines the neuronal response of the sensory cells. Thus, we conclude that the encoding of communication signals is modulated by ear mechanics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Complex Network for Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daei, Farhad; Safari, Hossein; Dadashi, Neda

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we developed a complex network of solar active regions (ARs) to study various local and global properties of the network. The values of the Hurst exponent (0.8-0.9) were evaluated by both the detrended fluctuation analysis and the rescaled range analysis applied on the time series of the AR numbers. The findings suggest that ARs can be considered as a system of self-organized criticality (SOC). We constructed a growing network based on locations, occurrence times, and the lifetimes of 4227 ARs recorded from 1999 January 1 to 2017 April 14. The behavior of the clustering coefficient shows that the AR network is not a random network. The logarithmic behavior of the length scale has the characteristics of a so-called small-world network. It is found that the probability distribution of the node degrees for undirected networks follows the power law with exponents of about 3.7-4.2. This indicates the scale-free nature of the AR network. The scale-free and small-world properties of the AR network confirm that the system of ARs forms a system of SOC. Our results show that the occurrence probability of flares (classified by GOES class C> 5, M, and X flares) in the position of the AR network hubs takes values greater than that obtained for other nodes.

  19. mTORC2 activity in brain cancer: Extracellular nutrients are required to maintain oncogenic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masui, Kenta; Shibata, Noriyuki; Cavenee, Webster K; Mischel, Paul S

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in growth factor receptor signaling pathways are common in cancer cells, including the highly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM) where they drive tumor growth through mechanisms including altering the uptake and utilization of nutrients. However, the impact of changes in micro-environmental nutrient levels on oncogenic signaling, tumor growth, and drug resistance is not well understood. We recently tested the hypothesis that external nutrients promote GBM growth and treatment resistance by maintaining the activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), a critical intermediate of growth factor receptor signaling, suggesting that altered cellular metabolism is not only a consequence of oncogenic signaling, but also potentially an important determinant of its activity. Here, we describe the studies that corroborate the hypothesis and propose others that derive from them. Notably, this line of reasoning raises the possibility that systemic metabolism may contribute to responsiveness to targeted cancer therapies. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Digital signaling decouples activation probability and population heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tian, Chengzhe; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Digital signaling enhances robustness of cellular decisions in noisy environments, but it is unclear how digital systems transmit temporal information about a stimulus. To understand how temporal input information is encoded and decoded by the NF-κB system, we studied transcription factor dynamic...... and uniform dynamics. These results show that digital NF-κB signaling enables multidimensional control of cellular phenotype via input profile, allowing parallel and independent control of single-cell activation probability and population heterogeneity....

  1. Modulation of β-catenin signaling by glucagon receptor activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyuan Ke

    Full Text Available The glucagon receptor (GCGR is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor family. Activation of GCGR by glucagon leads to increased glucose production by the liver. Thus, glucagon is a key component of glucose homeostasis by counteracting the effect of insulin. In this report, we found that in addition to activation of the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA pathway, activation of GCGR also induced β-catenin stabilization and activated β-catenin-mediated transcription. Activation of β-catenin signaling was PKA-dependent, consistent with previous reports on the parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTH1R and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1R receptors. Since low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5 is an essential co-receptor required for Wnt protein mediated β-catenin signaling, we examined the role of Lrp5 in glucagon-induced β-catenin signaling. Cotransfection with Lrp5 enhanced the glucagon-induced β-catenin stabilization and TCF promoter-mediated transcription. Inhibiting Lrp5/6 function using Dickkopf-1(DKK1 or by expression of the Lrp5 extracellular domain blocked glucagon-induced β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, we showed that Lrp5 physically interacted with GCGR by immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays. Together, these results reveal an unexpected crosstalk between glucagon and β-catenin signaling, and may help to explain the metabolic phenotypes of Lrp5/6 mutations.

  2. Pseudo-stokes vector from complex signal representation of a speckle pattern and its applications to micro-displacement measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Ishijima, R.; Matsuda, A.

    2010-01-01

    of the intensity speckle pattern, which converts the original real-valued signal into a complex signal. In closest analogy to the polarisation of a vector wave, the Stokes-like vector constructed from the spatial derivative of the generated complex signal has been applied for correlation. Experimental results...

  3. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  4. Use of multiple singular value decompositions to analyze complex intracellular calcium ion signals

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez, Josue G.

    2009-12-01

    We compare calcium ion signaling (Ca(2+)) between two exposures; the data are present as movies, or, more prosaically, time series of images. This paper describes novel uses of singular value decompositions (SVD) and weighted versions of them (WSVD) to extract the signals from such movies, in a way that is semi-automatic and tuned closely to the actual data and their many complexities. These complexities include the following. First, the images themselves are of no interest: all interest focuses on the behavior of individual cells across time, and thus, the cells need to be segmented in an automated manner. Second, the cells themselves have 100+ pixels, so that they form 100+ curves measured over time, so that data compression is required to extract the features of these curves. Third, some of the pixels in some of the cells are subject to image saturation due to bit depth limits, and this saturation needs to be accounted for if one is to normalize the images in a reasonably un-biased manner. Finally, the Ca(2+) signals have oscillations or waves that vary with time and these signals need to be extracted. Thus, our aim is to show how to use multiple weighted and standard singular value decompositions to detect, extract and clarify the Ca(2+) signals. Our signal extraction methods then lead to simple although finely focused statistical methods to compare Ca(2+) signals across experimental conditions.

  5. Despiking SEEG signals reveals dynamics of gamma band preictal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jmail, Nawel; Gavaret, Martine; Bartolomei, F; Bénar, Christian-G

    2017-02-01

    Interictal epileptiform discharges, or 'interictal spikes', are the hallmark of epilepsy. Still, there is growing evidence that oscillatory activity-whether in the gamma band (30-120 Hz) or at higher frequencies is another important marker of hyperexcitable tissues. A major difficulty arises from the fact that interictal spikes and oscillations overlap in the frequency domain. This hampers the correct delineation of the cortex producing pathological oscillations by simple filtering. Here, we propose a nonlinear technique for fitting the spike waveform in order to remove it, resulting in a 'despiked' signal. This strategy was first applied to simulated data inspired from real stereo-electroencephalographic (SEEG) signals, then to real data. We show that despiking leads to a better space-time-frequency analysis of the oscillatory part of the signal. Thus, in the real SEEG signals, the spatio-temporal maps show a buildup of gamma oscillations during the preictal period in the despiked signals, whereas in the original signals this activity is masked by spikes. Despiking is thus a promising venue for a better characterization of oscillatory activity in electrophysiology of epilepsy.

  6. [Copper-induced change in the ESR signal of hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes in wound by the action of copper nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodina, L A; Baĭder, L M; Rakhmetova, A A; Bogoslovskaia, O A; Ol'khovskaia, I P; Glushchenko, N N

    2013-01-01

    The results concerning changes in the ESR signal of hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes in wound tissues in the course of healing by the action of ointments with copper nanoparticles (patent N2460532, Russia) are presented. It is shown that the wound healing process modified by the influence of copper nanoparticles demonstrates the increase in the ESR signal amplitude for :hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes as compared with controls (the ointment base without nanoparticles). Planimetric measurements of wound area through reparation course indicate an active process of wound healing for injuries treated with copper nanoparticles in the ointment, resulting in lessening half-reparation time up to 5.0 times as compared with controls (treatment with the ointment base). The paper discusses the role of copper nanoparticles, NO and their potential synergistic effect on the skin wound regeneration.

  7. Determination of strongly overlapping signaling activity from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidaut Ghislain

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous diseases involve errors in signal transduction, modern therapeutics often target proteins involved in cellular signaling. Interpretation of the activity of signaling pathways during disease development or therapeutic intervention would assist in drug development, design of therapy, and target identification. Microarrays provide a global measure of cellular response, however linking these responses to signaling pathways requires an analytic approach tuned to the underlying biology. An ongoing issue in pattern recognition in microarrays has been how to determine the number of patterns (or clusters to use for data interpretation, and this is a critical issue as measures of statistical significance in gene ontology or pathways rely on proper separation of genes into groups. Results Here we introduce a method relying on gene annotation coupled to decompositional analysis of global gene expression data that allows us to estimate specific activity on strongly coupled signaling pathways and, in some cases, activity of specific signaling proteins. We demonstrate the technique using the Rosetta yeast deletion mutant data set, decompositional analysis by Bayesian Decomposition, and annotation analysis using ClutrFree. We determined from measurements of gene persistence in patterns across multiple potential dimensionalities that 15 basis vectors provides the correct dimensionality for interpreting the data. Using gene ontology and data on gene regulation in the Saccharomyces Genome Database, we identified the transcriptional signatures of several cellular processes in yeast, including cell wall creation, ribosomal disruption, chemical blocking of protein synthesis, and, criticially, individual signatures of the strongly coupled mating and filamentation pathways. Conclusion This works demonstrates that microarray data can provide downstream indicators of pathway activity either through use of gene ontology or transcription

  8. Phosphoproteomic profiling of in vivo signaling in liver by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Demirkan

    Full Text Available Our understanding of signal transduction networks in the physiological context of an organism remains limited, partly due to the technical challenge of identifying serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from complex tissue samples. In the present study, we focused on signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which is at the center of a nutrient- and growth factor-responsive cell signaling network. Though studied extensively, the mechanisms involved in many mTORC1 biological functions remain poorly understood.We developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify, enrich and identify phosphopeptides from rat liver homogenates. Using the anticancer drug rapamycin, the only known target of which is mTORC1, we characterized signaling in liver from rats in which the complex was maximally activated by refeeding following 48 hr of starvation. Using protein and peptide fractionation methods, TiO(2 affinity purification of phosphopeptides and mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified and quantified over four thousand phosphopeptides. Along with 5 known rapamycin-sensitive phosphorylation events, we identified 62 new rapamycin-responsive candidate phosphorylation sites. Among these were PRAS40, gephyrin, and AMP kinase 2. We observed similar proportions of increased and reduced phosphorylation in response to rapamycin. Gene ontology analysis revealed over-representation of mTOR pathway components among rapamycin-sensitive phosphopeptide candidates.In addition to identifying potential new mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation events, and providing information relevant to the biology of this signaling network, our experimental and analytical approaches indicate the feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomic profiling of tissue samples to study physiological signaling events in vivo.

  9. Cytokinin signaling stabilizes the response activator ARR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurepa, Jasmina; Li, Yan; Smalle, Jan A

    2014-04-01

    The cytokinins play essential roles in the development and environmental responses of higher plants. Cytokinin signaling leads to the phosphorylation-dependent activation of two classes of Arabidopsis response regulators (RRs): the type-B RR (RRB) transcriptional activators that promote the expression of cytokinin response genes and the type-A RRs (RRAs) that are encoded by primary cytokinin response genes and function as response inhibitors. We show that cytokinin signaling increases the abundance of ARR1, a ubiquitously expressed RRB, by preventing its degradation by the 26S proteasome. We also show that the RRAs act to suppress ARR1 accumulation, thus providing an explanation for their inhibitory action in cytokinin signaling. Collectively, our results reveal an additional regulatory mechanism in the cytokinin response pathway that involves the cytokinin-dependent stability control of a major RRB response activator. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Computational Modeling of Complex Protein Activity Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schivo, Stefano; Leijten, Jeroen; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.; Prignet, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Because of the numerous entities interacting, the complexity of the networks that regulate cell fate makes it impossible to analyze and understand them using the human brain alone. Computational modeling is a powerful method to unravel complex systems. We recently described the development of a

  11. Metformin Inhibits Hepatic mTORC1 Signaling via Dose-Dependent Mechanisms Involving AMPK and the TSC Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Jessica J; Hellberg, Kristina; Turner, Marc; Talbott, George; Kolar, Matthew J; Ross, Debbie S; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Saghatelian, Alan; Shaw, Reuben J; Manning, Brendan D

    2017-02-07

    Metformin is the most widely prescribed drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, knowledge of the full effects of metformin on biochemical pathways and processes in its primary target tissue, the liver, is limited. One established effect of metformin is to decrease cellular energy levels. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) are key regulators of metabolism that are respectively activated and inhibited in acute response to cellular energy depletion. Here we show that metformin robustly inhibits mTORC1 in mouse liver tissue and primary hepatocytes. Using mouse genetics, we find that at the lowest concentrations of metformin that inhibit hepatic mTORC1 signaling, this inhibition is dependent on AMPK and the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) protein complex (TSC complex). Finally, we show that metformin profoundly inhibits hepatocyte protein synthesis in a manner that is largely dependent on its ability to suppress mTORC1 signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  13. Preprotein import into chloroplasts via the Toc and Tic complexes is regulated by redox signals in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Anna; Benz, J Philipp; Buchanan, Bob B; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2009-11-01

    The import of nuclear-encoded preproteins is necessary to maintain chloroplast function. The recognition and transfer of most precursor proteins across the chloroplast envelopes are facilitated by two membrane-inserted protein complexes, the translocons of the chloroplast outer and inner envelope (Toc and Tic complexes, respectively). Several signals have been invoked to regulate the import of preproteins. In our study, we were interested in redox-based import regulation mediated by two signals: regulation based on thiols and on the metabolic NADP+/NADPH ratio. We sought to identify the proteins participating in the regulation of these transport pathways and to characterize the preprotein subgroups whose import is redox-dependent. Our results provide evidence that the formation and reduction of disulfide bridges in the Toc receptors and Toc translocation channel have a strong influence on import yield of all tested preproteins that depend on the Toc complex for translocation. Furthermore, the metabolic NADP+/NADPH ratio influences not only the composition of the Tic complex, but also the import efficiency of most, but not all, preproteins tested. Thus, several Tic subcomplexes appear to participate in the translocation of different preprotein subgroups, and the redox-active components of these complexes likely play a role in regulating transport.

  14. Association of signalment parameters with activity of pet dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Kathryn E; Brown, Dorothy C

    2014-01-01

    Activity monitors are increasingly being used to quantify the activity of pet dogs. The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between signalment and activity of free-living pet dogs. Healthy pet dogs were recruited to wear an Actical activity monitor on their collars continuously for 2 weeks in their home environment. At least fifteen dogs were enrolled in each of the following weight ranges: 40 kg and their age, sex and reproductive status recorded. Each dog's intensity of activity for each minute of recording was classified using the total counts for that minute and our pre-established cut-points. The percentage of time dogs spent in sedentary, light or moderate/vigorous activity each day was calculated. Median total daily activity counts and median percentages of time dogs spent in activities of differing intensity were used for the analysis. Associations between signalment characteristics and activity parameters were evaluated with the Mann-Whitney test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman rank correlations. Ninety-eight dogs were enrolled with ≥17 dogs in each weight category. Time that dogs were sedentary correlated positively with age (r 0·50, uncorrected P < 0·001), while the median total daily activity count (r -0·47, uncorrected P < 0·001), time spent in light (r -0·46, uncorrected P < 0·001) and more vigorous activity (r -0·50, uncorrected P < 0·001) were negatively associated with age. No other significant associations between signalment and activity parameters were found. The lack of differences in activity across weight categories may reflect the impact of lifestyle negating any potential behavioural differences across breeds.

  15. Stochastic effects as a force to increase the complexity of signaling networks

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-29

    Cellular signaling networks are complex and appear to include many nonfunctional elements. Recently, it was suggested that nonfunctional interactions of proteins cause signaling noise, which, perhaps, shapes the signal transduction mechanism. However, the conditions under which molecular noise influences cellular information processing remain unclear. Here, we explore a large number of simple biological models of varying network sizes to understand the architectural conditions under which the interactions of signaling proteins can exhibit specific stochastic effects - called deviant effects - in which the average behavior of a biological system is substantially altered in the presence of molecular noise. We find that a small fraction of these networks does exhibit deviant effects and shares a common architectural feature whereas most of the networks show only insignificant levels of deviations. Interestingly, addition of seemingly unimportant interactions into protein networks gives rise to deviant effects.

  16. CYLD Limits Lys63- and Met1-Linked Ubiquitin at Receptor Complexes to Regulate Innate Immune Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matous Hrdinka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune signaling relies on the deposition of non-degradative polyubiquitin at receptor-signaling complexes, but how these ubiquitin modifications are regulated by deubiquitinases remains incompletely understood. Met1-linked ubiquitin (Met1-Ub is assembled by the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC, and this is counteracted by the Met1-Ub-specific deubiquitinase OTULIN, which binds to the catalytic LUBAC subunit HOIP. In this study, we report that HOIP also interacts with the deubiquitinase CYLD but that CYLD does not regulate ubiquitination of LUBAC components. Instead, CYLD limits extension of Lys63-Ub and Met1-Ub conjugated to RIPK2 to restrict signaling and cytokine production. Accordingly, Met1-Ub and Lys63-Ub were individually required for productive NOD2 signaling. Our study thus suggests that LUBAC, through its associated deubiquitinases, coordinates the deposition of not only Met1-Ub but also Lys63-Ub to ensure an appropriate response to innate immune receptor activation.

  17. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a sedentary lifestyle and excess energy intake has led to an increased prevalence of obesity which constitutes a major risk factor for several co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research during the last two decades has revealed that a characteristic feature of obesity linking it to insulin resistance is the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs), being elevated in many obese subjects, through activation of pattern recognition receptors thereby leading to stimulation of critical inflammatory signaling cascades, like IκBα kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF- κB), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway, that interfere with insulin signaling. Exercise is one of the main prescribed interventions in obesity management improving insulin sensitivity and reducing obesity- induced chronic inflammation. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular recognition mechanisms for FFAs, the inflammatory signaling pathways triggered by excess FFAs in obesity and the counteractive effects of both acute and chronic exercise on obesity-induced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. A deeper understanding of the effects of exercise on inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity is useful to optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing incidence of obesity and its comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Exercise and Immunology. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C),

  19. Deciphering complex dynamics of water counteraction around secondary structural elements of allosteric protein complex: Case study of SAP-SLAM system in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2018-01-01

    The first hydration shell of a protein exhibits heterogeneous behavior owing to several attributes, majorly local polarity and structural flexibility as revealed by solvation dynamics of secondary structural elements. We attempt to recognize the change in complex water counteraction generated due to substantial alteration in flexibility during protein complex formation. The investigation is carried out with the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, and interacting with SLAM-associated protein (SAP), composed of one SH2 domain. All atom molecular dynamics simulations are employed to the aqueous solutions of free SAP and SLAM-peptide bound SAP. We observed that water dynamics around different secondary structural elements became highly affected as well as nicely correlated with the SLAM-peptide induced change in structural rigidity obtained by thermodynamic quantification. A few instances of contradictory dynamic features of water to the change in structural flexibility are explained by means of occluded polar residues by the peptide. For βD, EFloop, and BGloop, both structural flexibility and solvent accessibility of the residues confirm the obvious contribution. Most importantly, we have quantified enhanced restriction in water dynamics around the second Fyn-binding site of the SAP due to SAP-SLAM complexation, even prior to the presence of Fyn. This observation leads to a novel argument that SLAM induced more restricted water molecules could offer more water entropic contribution during the subsequent Fyn binding and provide enhanced stability to the SAP-Fyn complex in the signaling cascade. Finally, SLAM induced water counteraction around the second binding site of the SAP sheds light on the allosteric property of the SAP, which becomes an integral part of the underlying signal transduction mechanism.

  20. Racial differences in B cell receptor signaling pathway activation

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    Longo Diane M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell network profiling (SCNP is a multi-parametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures basal and modulated intracellular signaling activity in multiple cell subpopulations. Previously, SCNP analysis of a broad panel of immune signaling pathways in cell subsets within PBMCs from 60 healthy donors identified a race-associated difference in B cell anti-IgD-induced PI3K pathway activity. Methods The present study extended this analysis to a broader range of signaling pathway components downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR in European Americans and African Americans using a subset of donors from the previously analyzed cohort of 60 healthy donors. Seven BCR signaling nodes (a node is defined as a paired modulator and intracellular readout were measured at multiple time points by SCNP in PBMCs from 10 healthy donors [5 African Americans (36-51 yrs, 5 European Americans (36-56 yrs, all males]. Results Analysis of BCR signaling activity in European American and African American PBMC samples revealed that, compared to the European American donors, B cells from African Americans had lower anti-IgD induced phosphorylation of multiple BCR pathway components, including the membrane proximal proteins Syk and SFK as well as proteins in the PI3K pathway (S6 and Akt, the MAPK pathways (Erk and p38, and the NF-κB pathway (NF-κB. In addition to differences in the magnitude of anti-IgD-induced pathway activation, racial differences in BCR signaling kinetic profiles were observed. Further, the frequency of IgD+ B cells differed by race and strongly correlated with BCR pathway activation. Thus, the race-related difference in BCR pathway activation appears to be attributable at least in part to a race-associated difference in IgD+ B cell frequencies. Conclusions SCNP analysis enabled the identification of statistically significant race-associated differences in BCR pathway activation within PBMC samples from

  1. Racial differences in B cell receptor signaling pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Diane M; Louie, Brent; Mathi, Kavita; Pos, Zoltan; Wang, Ena; Hawtin, Rachael E; Marincola, Francesco M; Cesano, Alessandra

    2012-06-06

    Single-cell network profiling (SCNP) is a multi-parametric flow cytometry-based approach that simultaneously measures basal and modulated intracellular signaling activity in multiple cell subpopulations. Previously, SCNP analysis of a broad panel of immune signaling pathways in cell subsets within PBMCs from 60 healthy donors identified a race-associated difference in B cell anti-IgD-induced PI3K pathway activity. The present study extended this analysis to a broader range of signaling pathway components downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR) in European Americans and African Americans using a subset of donors from the previously analyzed cohort of 60 healthy donors. Seven BCR signaling nodes (a node is defined as a paired modulator and intracellular readout) were measured at multiple time points by SCNP in PBMCs from 10 healthy donors [5 African Americans (36-51 yrs), 5 European Americans (36-56 yrs), all males]. Analysis of BCR signaling activity in European American and African American PBMC samples revealed that, compared to the European American donors, B cells from African Americans had lower anti-IgD induced phosphorylation of multiple BCR pathway components, including the membrane proximal proteins Syk and SFK as well as proteins in the PI3K pathway (S6 and Akt), the MAPK pathways (Erk and p38), and the NF-κB pathway (NF-κB). In addition to differences in the magnitude of anti-IgD-induced pathway activation, racial differences in BCR signaling kinetic profiles were observed. Further, the frequency of IgD+ B cells differed by race and strongly correlated with BCR pathway activation. Thus, the race-related difference in BCR pathway activation appears to be attributable at least in part to a race-associated difference in IgD+ B cell frequencies. SCNP analysis enabled the identification of statistically significant race-associated differences in BCR pathway activation within PBMC samples from healthy donors. Understanding race-associated contrasts in immune

  2. Survey of activated FLT3 signaling in leukemia.

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    Ting-lei Gu

    Full Text Available Activating mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3 are found in approximately 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. FLT3 is therefore an attractive drug target. However, the molecular mechanisms by which FLT3 mutations lead to cell transformation in AML remain unclear. To develop a better understanding of FLT3 signaling as well as its downstream effectors, we performed detailed phosphoproteomic analysis of FLT3 signaling in human leukemia cells. We identified over 1000 tyrosine phosphorylation sites from about 750 proteins in both AML (wild type and mutant FLT3 and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (normal and amplification of FLT3 cell lines. Furthermore, using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC, we were able to quantified over 400 phosphorylation sites (pTyr, pSer, and pThr that were responsive to FLT3 inhibition in FLT3 driven human leukemia cell lines. We also extended this phosphoproteomic analysis on bone marrow from primary AML patient samples, and identify over 200 tyrosine and 800 serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in vivo. This study showed that oncogenic FLT3 regulates proteins involving diverse cellular processes and affects multiple signaling pathways in human leukemia that we previously appreciated, such as Fc epsilon RI-mediated signaling, BCR, and CD40 signaling pathways. It provides a valuable resource for investigation of oncogenic FLT3 signaling in human leukemia.

  3. Allosteric Modulation of Protease-activated Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Isabel; Soh, Unice J. K.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are uniquely activated by proteolysis. PARs mediate hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, embryonic development and progression of certain malignant cancers. The family of PARs include four members: PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4. PARs harbor a cryptic ligand sequence within the N-terminus that is exposed following proteolytic cleavage. The newly formed PAR N-terminus functions as a tethered ligand that binds intramolecularly to the receptor to trigger transmembrane signaling. This unique mechanism of activation would indicate that regardless of the activating protease, cleavage of PARs would unmask a tethered ligand sequence that would induce a similar active receptor conformation and signaling response. However, this is not the case. Recent studies demonstrate that PARs can be differentially activated by synthetic peptide agonists, proteases or through dimerization, that ultimately result in distinct cellular responses. In some cases, allosteric modulation of PARs involves compartmentalization in caveolae, plasma membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that lead to allosteric modulation of PAR signaling. PMID:22681248

  4. TLR signalling augments macrophage bactericidal activity through mitochondrial ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A Phillip; Brodsky, Igor E; Rahner, Christoph; Woo, Dong Kyun; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Walsh, Matthew C; Choi, Yongwon; Shadel, Gerald S; Ghosh, Sankar

    2011-04-28

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential components of the innate immune response against intracellular bacteria and it is thought that professional phagocytes generate ROS primarily via the phagosomal NADPH oxidase machinery. However, recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial ROS (mROS) also contribute to mouse macrophage bactericidal activity, although the mechanisms linking innate immune signalling to mitochondria for mROS generation remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that engagement of a subset of Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4) results in the recruitment of mitochondria to macrophage phagosomes and augments mROS production. This response involves translocation of a TLR signalling adaptor, tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), to mitochondria, where it engages the protein ECSIT (evolutionarily conserved signalling intermediate in Toll pathways), which is implicated in mitochondrial respiratory chain assembly. Interaction with TRAF6 leads to ECSIT ubiquitination and enrichment at the mitochondrial periphery, resulting in increased mitochondrial and cellular ROS generation. ECSIT- and TRAF6-depleted macrophages have decreased levels of TLR-induced ROS and are significantly impaired in their ability to kill intracellular bacteria. Additionally, reducing macrophage mROS levels by expressing catalase in mitochondria results in defective bacterial killing, confirming the role of mROS in bactericidal activity. These results reveal a novel pathway linking innate immune signalling to mitochondria, implicate mROS as an important component of antibacterial responses and further establish mitochondria as hubs for innate immune signalling.

  5. TLR signaling augments macrophage bactericidal activity through mitochondrial ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A. Phillip; Brodsky, Igor E.; Rahner, Christoph; Woo, Dong Kyun; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Walsh, Matthew C.; Choi, Yongwon; Shadel, Gerald S.; Ghosh, Sankar

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential components of the innate immune response against intracellular bacteria, and it is thought that professional phagocytes generate ROS primarily via the phagosomal NADPH oxidase (Phox) machinery1. However, recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial ROS (mROS) also contribute to macrophage bactericidal activity, although the mechanisms linking innate immune signaling to mitochondria for mROS generation remain unclear2-4. Here we demonstrate that engagement of a subset of Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4) results in the recruitment of mitochondria to macrophage phagosomes and augments mROS production. This response involves translocation of the TLR signaling adapter tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to mitochondria where it engages evolutionarily conserved signaling intermediate in Toll pathways (ECSIT), a protein implicated in mitochondrial respiratory chain assembly5. Interaction with TRAF6 leads to ECSIT ubiquitination and enrichment at the mitochondrial periphery, resulting in increased mitochondrial and cellular ROS generation. ECSIT and TRAF6 depleted macrophages exhibit decreased levels of TLR-induced ROS and are significantly impaired in their ability to kill intracellular bacteria. Additionally, reducing macrophage mROS by expressing catalase in mitochondria results in defective bacterial killing, confirming the role of mROS in bactericidal activity. These results therefore reveal a novel pathway linking innate immune signaling to mitochondria, implicate mROS as important components of antibacterial responses, and further establish mitochondria as hubs for innate immune signaling. PMID:21525932

  6. Swelling-activated Ca2+ channels trigger Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Haeberle

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell-neurite complexes are highly sensitive touch receptors comprising epidermal Merkel cells and sensory afferents. Based on morphological and molecular studies, Merkel cells are proposed to be mechanosensory cells that signal afferents via neurotransmission; however, functional studies testing this hypothesis in intact skin have produced conflicting results. To test this model in a simplified system, we asked whether purified Merkel cells are directly activated by mechanical stimulation. Cell shape was manipulated with anisotonic solution changes and responses were monitored by Ca2+ imaging with fura-2. We found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling, but not hypertonic solutions, triggered cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients. Several lines of evidence indicate that these signals arise from swelling-activated Ca2+-permeable ion channels. First, transients were reversibly abolished by chelating extracellular Ca2+, demonstrating a requirement for Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Second, Ca2+ transients were initially observed near the plasma membrane in cytoplasmic processes. Third, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel (VACC antagonists reduced transients by half, suggesting that swelling-activated channels depolarize plasma membranes to activate VACCs. Finally, emptying internal Ca2+ stores attenuated transients by 80%, suggesting Ca2+ release from stores augments swelling-activated Ca2+ signals. To identify candidate mechanotransduction channels, we used RT-PCR to amplify ion-channel transcripts whose pharmacological profiles matched those of hypotonic-evoked Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells. We found 11 amplicons, including PKD1, PKD2, and TRPC1, channels previously implicated in mechanotransduction in other cells. Collectively, these results directly demonstrate that Merkel cells are activated by hypotonic-evoked swelling, identify cellular signaling mechanisms that mediate these responses, and support the hypothesis that Merkel cells contribute

  7. Efficient Tor signaling requires a functional class C Vps protein complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Martinez, Sara A; Puria, Rekha; Pan, Xuewen; Boeke, Jef D; Cardenas, Maria E

    2007-08-01

    The Tor kinases regulate responses to nutrients and control cell growth. Unlike most organisms that only contain one Tor protein, Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses two, Tor1 and Tor2, which are thought to share all of the rapamycin-sensitive functions attributable to Tor signaling. Here we conducted a genetic screen that defined the global TOR1 synthetic fitness or lethal interaction gene network. This screen identified mutations in distinctive functional categories that impaired vacuolar function, including components of the EGO/Gse and PAS complexes that reduce fitness. In addition, tor1 is lethal in combination with mutations in class C Vps complex components. We find that Tor1 does not regulate the known function of the class C Vps complex in protein sorting. Instead class C vps mutants fail to recover from rapamycin-induced growth arrest or to survive nitrogen starvation and have low levels of amino acids. Remarkably, addition of glutamate or glutamine restores viability to a tor1 pep3 mutant strain. We conclude that Tor1 is more effective than Tor2 at providing rapamycin-sensitive Tor signaling under conditions of amino acid limitation, and that an intact class C Vps complex is required to mediate intracellular amino acid homeostasis for efficient Tor signaling.

  8. Complex Inversion of MRT Signals under Different Loop Configurations for Groundwater Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Hu, Xiangyun; Li, Jianhui; Liu, Yajun

    2017-03-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is a relatively new geophysical method for non-invasive groundwater exploration and aquifer characterization. Conventional SNMR surveys based on one-dimensional (1-D) inversion of amplitude data recorded only using coincident loops provide limited or distorted groundwater distribution information, especially in regions with strong lateral heterogeneity and complicated hydrological environments. The simplistic approach limits the applicability and efficiency of SNMR, which was therefore made more effective in this study using a sophisticated signal response formulation. The elliptical polarization parameters of the excitation magnetic fields and 2-D sensitivity kernels (including real and imaginary parts) of three commonly used loop configurations were first calculated. After all the individual complex signals of five simulated measurement series along a profile were incorporated. The 2-D magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) complex inversion scheme was then used to perform high resolution tomography of synthetic models under the three loop configurations, taking full advantage of the different sensitivity distributions offered by the different loop configurations and the high sensitivity of the imaginary parts of signals to deep structures. Contrast analyses of the tomographic results showed that the complex inversions significantly decreased model ambiguities and increased depth resolution even with artificial noise added. Coincident loop measurements usually gave the best vertical resolution, and separated loops provided better lateral resolution. However, various factors would influence phase data, meaning that the complex inversion of field data is neither very reliable nor very common at present. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Klotho Regulates 14-3-3ζ Monomerization and Binding to the ASK1 Signaling Complex in Response to Oxidative Stress.

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    Reynolds K Brobey

    Full Text Available The reactive oxygen species (ROS-sensitive apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 signaling complex is a key regulator of p38 MAPK activity, a major modulator of stress-associated with aging disorders. We recently reported that the ratio of free ASK1 to the complex-bound ASK1 is significantly decreased in Klotho-responsive manner and that Klotho-deficient tissues have elevated levels of free ASK1 which coincides with increased oxidative stress. Here, we tested the hypothesis that: 1 covalent interactions exist among three identified proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex; 2 in normal unstressed cells the ASK1, 14-3-3ζ and thioredoxin (Trx proteins simultaneously engage in a tripartite complex formation; 3 Klotho's stabilizing effect on the complex relied solely on 14-3-3ζ expression and its apparent phosphorylation and dimerization changes. To verify the hypothesis, we performed 14-3-3ζ siRNA knock-down experiments in conjunction with cell-based assays to measure ASK1-client protein interactions in the presence and absence of Klotho, and with or without an oxidant such as rotenone. Our results show that Klotho activity induces posttranslational modifications in the complex targeting 14-3-3ζ monomer/dimer changes to effectively protect against ASK1 oxidation and dissociation. This is the first observation implicating all three proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex in close proximity.

  10. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary proteins, Evc and Evc2, the products of human disease genes responsible for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, act downstream of Smo to transduce the Hh signal. We found that loss of Evc/Evc2 does not affect Sonic Hedgehog-induced Smo phosphorylation and ciliary localization but impedes Hh pathway activation mediated by constitutively active forms of Smo. Evc/Evc2 are dispensable for the constitutive Gli activity in Sufu(-/-) cells, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 act upstream of Sufu to promote Gli activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Hh stimulates binding of Evc/Evc2 to Smo depending on phosphorylation of the Smo C-terminal intracellular tail and that the binding is abolished in Kif3a(-/-) cilium-deficient cells. We propose that Hh activates Smo by inducing its phosphorylation, which recruits Evc/Evc2 to activate Gli proteins by antagonizing Sufu in the primary cilia.

  11. BDCA2/Fc epsilon RI gamma complex signals through a novel BCR-like pathway in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

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    Wei Cao

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are equipped with lectin receptors to sense the extracellular environment and modulate cellular responses. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs uniquely express blood dendritic cell antigen 2 (BDCA2 protein, a C-type lectin lacking an identifiable signaling motif. We demonstrate here that BDCA2 forms a complex with the transmembrane adapter Fc epsilon RI gamma. Through pathway analysis, we identified a comprehensive signaling machinery in human pDCs, similar to that which operates downstream of the B cell receptor (BCR, which is distinct from the system involved in T cell receptor (TCR signaling. BDCA2 crosslinking resulted in the activation of the BCR-like cascade, which potently suppressed the ability of pDCs to produce type I interferon and other cytokines in response to Toll-like receptor ligands. Therefore, by associating with Fc epsilon RI gamma, BDCA2 activates a novel BCR-like signaling pathway to regulate the immune functions of pDCs.

  12. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  13. Activation of Alkanes with Organotransition Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Robert G.

    1984-03-01

    Alkanes, although plentiful enough to be considered for use as feedstocks in large-scale chemical processes, are so unreactive that relatively few chemical reagents have been developed to convert them to molecules having useful functional groups. However, a recently synthesized iridium (lr) complex successfully converts alkanes into hydridoalkylmetal complexes (M + R-H --> R-M-H). This is a dihydride having the formula Cp*(L)IrH2, where Cp* and L are abbreviations for the ligands (CH3)5C5 and (CH3)3P, respectively. Irradiation with ultraviolet light causes the dihydride to lose H2, generating the reactive intermediate Cp*IrL. This intermediate reacts rapidly with C-H bonds in every molecule so far tested (including alkanes) and leads to hydridoalkyliridium complexes Cp*(L)Ir(R)(H). Evidence has been obtained that this C-H insertion, or oxidative addition, reaction proceeds through a simple three-center transition state and does not involve organic free radicals as intermediates. Thus the intermediate Cp*IrL reacts most rapidly with C-H bonds having relatively high bond energies, such as those at primary carbon centers, in small organic rings, and in aromatic rings. This contrasts directly with the type of hydrogen-abstraction selectivity that is characteristic of organic radicals. The hydridoalkyliridium products of the insertion reactions can be converted into functionalized organic molecules--alkyl halides--by treatment with mercuric chloride followed by halogens. Expulsion (reductive elimination) of the hydrocarbon from the hydridoalkyliridium complexes can be induced by Lewis acids or heat, regenerating the reactive intermediate Cp*IrL. Oxidative addition of the corresponding rhodium complexes Cp*RhL to alkane C-H bonds has also been observed, although the products formed in this case are much less stable and undergo reductive elimination at -20 degrees C. These and other recent observations provide an incentive for reexamining the factors that have been

  14. Activity-Induced Synaptic Structural Modifications by an Activator of Integrin Signaling at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Yeun; Geng, Junhua; Lee, Juhyun; Wang, Andrew R; Chang, Karen T

    2017-03-22

    Activity-induced synaptic structural modification is crucial for neural development and synaptic plasticity, but the molecular players involved in this process are not well defined. Here, we report that a protein named Shriveled (Shv) regulates synaptic growth and activity-dependent synaptic remodeling at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Depletion of Shv causes synaptic overgrowth and an accumulation of immature boutons. We find that Shv physically and genetically interacts with βPS integrin. Furthermore, Shv is secreted during intense, but not mild, neuronal activity to acutely activate integrin signaling, induce synaptic bouton enlargement, and increase postsynaptic glutamate receptor abundance. Consequently, loss of Shv prevents activity-induced synapse maturation and abolishes post-tetanic potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity. Our data identify Shv as a novel trans-synaptic signal secreted upon intense neuronal activity to promote synapse remodeling through integrin receptor signaling.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability of neurons to rapidly modify synaptic structure in response to neuronal activity, a process called activity-induced structural remodeling, is crucial for neuronal development and complex brain functions. The molecular players that are important for this fundamental biological process are not well understood. Here we show that the Shriveled (Shv) protein is required during development to maintain normal synaptic growth. We further demonstrate that Shv is selectively released during intense neuronal activity, but not mild neuronal activity, to acutely activate integrin signaling and trigger structural modifications at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work identifies Shv as a key modulator of activity-induced structural remodeling and suggests that neurons use distinct molecular cues to differentially modulate synaptic growth and remodeling to meet synaptic demand. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/373246-18$15.00/0.

  15. Activity-Induced Synaptic Structural Modifications by an Activator of Integrin Signaling at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Activity-induced synaptic structural modification is crucial for neural development and synaptic plasticity, but the molecular players involved in this process are not well defined. Here, we report that a protein named Shriveled (Shv) regulates synaptic growth and activity-dependent synaptic remodeling at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Depletion of Shv causes synaptic overgrowth and an accumulation of immature boutons. We find that Shv physically and genetically interacts with βPS integrin. Furthermore, Shv is secreted during intense, but not mild, neuronal activity to acutely activate integrin signaling, induce synaptic bouton enlargement, and increase postsynaptic glutamate receptor abundance. Consequently, loss of Shv prevents activity-induced synapse maturation and abolishes post-tetanic potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity. Our data identify Shv as a novel trans-synaptic signal secreted upon intense neuronal activity to promote synapse remodeling through integrin receptor signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability of neurons to rapidly modify synaptic structure in response to neuronal activity, a process called activity-induced structural remodeling, is crucial for neuronal development and complex brain functions. The molecular players that are important for this fundamental biological process are not well understood. Here we show that the Shriveled (Shv) protein is required during development to maintain normal synaptic growth. We further demonstrate that Shv is selectively released during intense neuronal activity, but not mild neuronal activity, to acutely activate integrin signaling and trigger structural modifications at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work identifies Shv as a key modulator of activity-induced structural remodeling and suggests that neurons use distinct molecular cues to differentially modulate synaptic growth and remodeling to meet synaptic demand. PMID:28219985

  16. Characterization and Antioxidant Activity of the Complex of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    visible spectrometry (UV), infrared spectrometry (IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD). The antioxidant activity was examined by DPPH and ABTS radical-scavenging activities. Results: Phloridzin in the complex ...

  17. Signal transduction and activation of the NADPH oxidase in eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Lindsay

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the eosinophil NADPH oxidase and the subsequent release of toxic oxygen radicals has been implicated in the mechanism of parasite killing and inflammation. At present, little is known of the signal transduction pathway that govern agonist-induced activation of the respiratory burst and is the subject of this review. In particular, we focus on the ability of leukotrine B4 to activate the NADPH oxidase in guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils which can be obtained in sufficient number and purity for detailed biochemical experiments to be performed.

  18. Mathematical analysis of complex cellular activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Richard; Teka, Wondimu; Vo, Theodore; Wechselberger, Martin; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on mathematical physiology that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. The first article reviews the basic theory of calcium oscillations (common to almost all cell types), including spatio-temporal behaviors such as waves. The second article uses, and expands on, much of this basic theory to show how the interaction of cytosolic calcium oscillators with membrane ion channels can result in highly complex patterns of electrical spiking. Through these examples one can see clearly how multiple oscillatory processes interact within a cell, and how mathematical methods can be used to understand such interactions better. The two reviews provide excellent examples of how mathematics and physiology can learn from each other, and work jointly towards a better understanding of complex cellular processes. Review 1: Richard Bertram, Joel Tabak, Wondimu Teka, Theodore Vo, Martin Wechselberger: Geometric Singular Perturbation Analysis of Burst...

  19. Cherry Valley ducks mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS mediated signaling pathway and antiviral activity research

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    Ning Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLRs-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly up-regulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus. Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8 in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What’s more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (duck Tembusu virus, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks.

  20. Conserved Genetic Interactions between Ciliopathy Complexes Cooperatively Support Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Signaling.

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    Laura E Yee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding cilia proteins cause human ciliopathies, diverse disorders affecting many tissues. Individual genes can be linked to ciliopathies with dramatically different phenotypes, suggesting that genetic modifiers may participate in their pathogenesis. The ciliary transition zone contains two protein complexes affected in the ciliopathies Meckel syndrome (MKS and nephronophthisis (NPHP. The BBSome is a third protein complex, affected in the ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS. We tested whether mutations in MKS, NPHP and BBS complex genes modify the phenotypic consequences of one another in both C. elegans and mice. To this end, we identified TCTN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of vertebrate MKS complex components called Tectonics, as an evolutionarily conserved transition zone protein. Neither disruption of TCTN-1 alone or together with MKS complex components abrogated ciliary structure in C. elegans. In contrast, disruption of TCTN-1 together with either of two NPHP complex components, NPHP-1 or NPHP-4, compromised ciliary structure. Similarly, disruption of an NPHP complex component and the BBS complex component BBS-5 individually did not compromise ciliary structure, but together did. As in nematodes, disrupting two components of the mouse MKS complex did not cause additive phenotypes compared to single mutants. However, disrupting both Tctn1 and either Nphp1 or Nphp4 exacerbated defects in ciliogenesis and cilia-associated developmental signaling, as did disrupting both Tctn1 and the BBSome component Bbs1. Thus, we demonstrate that ciliary complexes act in parallel to support ciliary function and suggest that human ciliopathy phenotypes are altered by genetic interactions between different ciliary biochemical complexes.

  1. Comparison of Excitation Signals in Active Magnetic Bearing System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Vuojolainen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Active magnetic bearings (AMBs offer frictionless suspension, vibration insulation, programmable stiffness, and damping, among other advantages, in levitated rotor applications. However, AMBs are inherently unstable and require accurate system models for the high-performance model-based multi-input multi-output control of rotor position. Control electronics with high calculation capacity and accurate sensors of AMBs provide an opportunity to implement various identification schemes. A variety of artificial excitation signal-based identification methods can thus be achieved with no additional hardware. In this paper, a selection of excitation signals, namely the pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS, chirp signal, multisine, and stepped sine are presented, applied, and compared with the AMB system identification. From the identification experiments, the rotor-bearing system, the inner current control loop, and values of position and current stiffness are identified. Unlike recently published works considering excitation-based identification of AMB rotor systems, it is demonstrated that identification of the rotor system dynamics can be carried out using various well-established excitation signals. Application and feasibility of these excitation signals in AMB rotor systems are analyzed based on experimental results.

  2. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  3. Activation of NFAT signaling in podocytes causes glomerulosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinqiu; Jarad, George; Tripathi, Piyush; Pan, Minggui; Cunningham, Jeanette; Martin, Daniel R; Liapis, Helen; Miner, Jeffrey H; Chen, Feng

    2010-10-01

    Mutant forms of TRPC6 can activate NFAT-dependent transcription in vitro via calcium influx and activation of calcineurin. The same TRPC6 mutants can cause FSGS, but whether this involves an NFAT-dependent mechanism is unknown. Here, we generated mice that allow conditional induction of NFATc1. Mice with NFAT activation in nascent podocytes in utero developed proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis postnatally, resembling FSGS. NFAT activation in adult mice also caused progressive proteinuria and FSGS. Ultrastructural studies revealed podocyte foot process effacement and deposition of extracellular matrix. NFAT activation did not initially affect expression of podocin, synaptopodin, and nephrin but reduced their expression as glomerular injury progressed. In contrast, we observed upregulation of Wnt6 and Fzd9 in the mutant glomeruli before the onset of significant proteinuria, suggesting a potential role for Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of NFAT-induced podocyte injury and FSGS. These results provide in vivo evidence for the involvement of NFAT signaling in podocytes, proteinuria, and glomerulosclerosis. Furthermore, this study suggests that NFAT activation may be a key intermediate step in the pathogenesis of mutant TRPC6-mediated FSGS and that suppression of NFAT activity may contribute to the antiproteinuric effects of calcineurin inhibitors.

  4. Structural basis of arrestin-3 activation and signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiuyan; Perry, Nicole A.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Berndt, Sandra; Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Zhuo, Ya; Singh, Prashant K.; Tholen, Jonas; Ohi, Melanie D.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Klug, Candice S.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Iverson, T. M.

    2017-11-10

    A unique aspect of arrestin-3 is its ability to support both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent signaling. Here, we show that inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is a non-receptor activator of arrestin-3 and report the structure of IP6-activated arrestin-3 at 2.4-Å resolution. IP6-activated arrestin-3 exhibits an inter-domain twist and a displaced C-tail, hallmarks of active arrestin. IP6 binds to the arrestin phosphate sensor, and is stabilized by trimerization. Analysis of the trimerization surface, which is also the receptor-binding surface, suggests a feature called the finger loop as a key region of the activation sensor. We show that finger loop helicity and flexibility may underlie coupling to hundreds of diverse receptors and also promote arrestin-3 activation by IP6. Importantly, we show that effector-binding sites on arrestins have distinct conformations in the basal and activated states, acting as switch regions. These switch regions may work with the inter-domain twist to initiate and direct arrestin-mediated signaling.

  5. Dynorphin activates quorum sensing quinolone signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Zaborina

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488 and endogenous (dynorphin kappa-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to kappa-opioids. The in vivo significance of kappa-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence.

  6. DNA interactions and biocidal activity of metal complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narendrula Vamsikrishna

    Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Klebsiella pneumonia and the results are presented in Table 2 and. Figure 9. All the metal complexes (1 mg/mL in DMSO) showed better activity compared to free ligands. The results are compared with Ampicillin. Increased activity of the complexes is attributed to increase in the ...

  7. Investigation into transmission of complex sound signals in the human respiratory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Nuzhdenko, A. V.; Tagiltsev, A. A.; Kostiv, A. E.

    2010-07-01

    Lumen probing of human lungs with complex acoustic signals in the frequency band from 100 to 1000 Hz made it possible for the first time to explicitly confirm the concurrent existence of two mechanisms differing in propagation velocity behind the transmission of acoustic vibrations from the oral cavity to the thoracic cage surface. The numerical values of propagation time lags allowed one of these mechanisms to be associated with combined aerial-structural transmission and the other, with purely structural transmission.

  8. A Smoothened-Evc2 Complex Transduces the Hedgehog Signal at Primary Cilia

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Karolin V.; Hughes, Casey E.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that...

  9. CaM/BAG5/Hsc70 signaling complex dynamically regulates leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luhua; Xing, Yangfei; Chang, Dong; Fang, Shasha; Cui, Boyang; Li, Qi; Wang, Xuejie; Guo, Shang; Yang, Xue; Men, Shuzhen; Shen, Yuequan

    2016-08-19

    Calcium signaling plays an essential role in plant cell physiology, and chaperone-mediated protein folding directly regulates plant programmed cell death. The Arabidopsis thaliana protein AtBAG5 (Bcl-2-associated athanogene 5) is unique in that it contains both a BAG domain capable of binding Hsc70 (Heat shock cognate protein 70) and a characteristic IQ motif that is specific for Ca(2+)-free CaM (Calmodulin) binding and hence acts as a hub linking calcium signaling and the chaperone system. Here, we determined crystal structures of AtBAG5 alone and in complex with Ca(2+)-free CaM. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that Ca(2+)-free CaM and Hsc70 bind AtBAG5 independently, whereas Ca(2+)-saturated CaM and Hsc70 bind AtBAG5 with negative cooperativity. Further in vivo studies confirmed that AtBAG5 localizes to mitochondria and that its overexpression leads to leaf senescence symptoms including decreased chlorophyll retention and massive ROS production in dark-induced plants. Mutants interfering the CaM/AtBAG5/Hsc70 complex formation leads to different phenotype of leaf senescence. Collectively, we propose that the CaM/AtBAG5/Hsc70 signaling complex plays an important role in regulating plant senescence.

  10. Red wine phenolic complexes and their in vitro antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baoshan; Spranger, Isabel; Yang, Jingyu; Leandro, Conceiço; Guo, Lei; Canário, Sónia; Zhao, Yuqing; Wu, Chunfu

    2009-09-23

    Phenolic complexes are a major group of polyphenols in aged red wine. The objective of this work was to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant activity of the phenolic complexes. Thus, red wine polyphenols were fractionated into various fractions including monomers, oligomers, polymers, anthocyanins, and complexes. The in vitro antioxidant activities of these fractions and other phenolic standards (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, and malvidin 3-glucoside) as well as ascorbic acid were verified by DPPH* test. On the other hand, the variation of antioxidant activities during the reaction between epicatechin and malvidin 3-glucoside mediated by acetaldehyde in a model wine solution was also monitored. The results showed that both the phenolic complex fraction and newly formed condensation products between epicatechin and malvidin 3-glucoside maintain antioxidant activities as strong as those of their compositional phenolics. This work provides, for the first time, direct evidence about the in vitro antioxidant activities of red wine phenolic complexes.

  11. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed-Al-Mahfuz, Md.; Islam, Md. Rabiul; Hirose, Keikichi; Molla, Md. Khademul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component. PMID:25206446

  12. Effect of Schiff base Cu(II) complexes on signaling pathways in HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koňariková, Katarína; Perdikaris, Georgios A; Gbelcova, Helena; Andrezálová, Lucia; Švéda, Martin; Ruml, Tomáš; Laubertová, Lucia; Žitňanová, Ingrid

    2016-11-01

    Schiff base copper (II) complexes are known for their anticancer, antifungal, antiviral and anti‑inflammatory activities. The aim of the current study was to investigate biological effects of Schiff base Cu (II) complexes (0.001‑100 µmol/l)‑[Cu2(sal‑D, L‑glu)2(isoquinoline)2]·2C2H5OH (1), [Cu(sal‑5‑met‑L‑glu)(H2O)].H2O (2), [Cu(ethanol)2(imidazole)4][Cu2(sal‑D, L-glu)2(imidazole)2] (3), [Cu(sal‑D,L‑glu)(2‑methylimidazole)] (4) on the human colon carcinoma cells HT‑29, the mouse noncancerous cell line NIH‑3T3 and the human noncancerous fibroblast cell line VH10. The results suggested that Cu (II) complexes exhibit cytotoxic effects against the HT‑29 cell line, while complexes 3 and 4 were the most effective. Subsequent to 72 h of incubation, apoptosis was observed in the HT‑29 cells induced by Cu (II) complexes 1 (0.1, 1, 10 and 50 µmol/l), 2 (1, 10, 50 and 100 µmol/l), 3 (0.01, 1, 10 and 50 µmol/l) and 4 (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 µmol/l). The apoptotic pathways activated by the Cu (II) complexes were identified. The results indicated that complexes 2, 3 and 4 were able to induce the mitochondria‑dependent pathway of apoptosis in HT‑29 cells, while complex 1 was obsered to activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The levels of the anti‑apoptotic protein Bcl‑2 were reduced and those of the pro‑apoptotic protein Bax increased following treatment with complexes 2, 3 and 4. Complex 1 had no effect on Bax protein expression. Complexes 2 and 3 induced elevation of cytochrome c (cyt c), while complex 4 induced a time‑dependent elevation of cyt c levels. No cyt c was detected in HT‑29 cells exposed to complex 1, suggesting that Cu (II) complexes activated the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The results from the current study in addition to previous studies suggest that Schiff base Cu (II) complexes have potential as novel anticancer drugs.

  13. Activation of MAPK/ERK signaling by Burkholderia pseudomallei cycle inhibiting factor (Cif).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Wang, Mei; Casey, Patrick J; Gan, Yunn-Hwen; Hagen, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are virulence proteins secreted by the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cif is known to function to deamidate Nedd8, leading to inhibition of Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) and consequently induction of cell cycle arrest. Here we show that Cif can function as a potent activator of MAPK/ERK signaling without significant activation of other signaling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Importantly, we found that the ability of Cif to activate ERK is dependent on its deamidase activity, but independent of Cullin E3 ligase inhibition. This suggests that apart from Nedd8, other cellular targets of Cif-dependent deamidation exist. We provide evidence that the mechanism involved in Cif-mediated ERK activation is dependent on recruitment of the Grb2-SOS1 complex to the plasma membrane. Further investigation revealed that Cif appears to modify the phosphorylation status of SOS1 in a region containing the CDC25-H and proline-rich domains. It is known that prolonged Cullin E3 ligase inhibition leads to cellular apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ERK activation is an important mechanism to counter the pro-apoptotic effects of Cif. Indeed, we show that Cif dependent ERK activation promotes phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, thereby potentially conferring a pro-survival signal. In summary, we identified a novel deamidation-dependent mechanism of action of the B. pseudomallei virulence factor Cif/CHBP to activate MAPK/ERK signaling. Our study demonstrates that bacterial proteins such as Cif can serve as useful molecular tools to uncover novel aspects of mammalian signaling pathways.

  14. Activation of MAPK/ERK signaling by Burkholderia pseudomallei cycle inhibiting factor (Cif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ying Ng

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are virulence proteins secreted by the type III secretion system of some Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria including Burkholderia pseudomallei. Cif is known to function to deamidate Nedd8, leading to inhibition of Cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL and consequently induction of cell cycle arrest. Here we show that Cif can function as a potent activator of MAPK/ERK signaling without significant activation of other signaling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases. Importantly, we found that the ability of Cif to activate ERK is dependent on its deamidase activity, but independent of Cullin E3 ligase inhibition. This suggests that apart from Nedd8, other cellular targets of Cif-dependent deamidation exist. We provide evidence that the mechanism involved in Cif-mediated ERK activation is dependent on recruitment of the Grb2-SOS1 complex to the plasma membrane. Further investigation revealed that Cif appears to modify the phosphorylation status of SOS1 in a region containing the CDC25-H and proline-rich domains. It is known that prolonged Cullin E3 ligase inhibition leads to cellular apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesize that ERK activation is an important mechanism to counter the pro-apoptotic effects of Cif. Indeed, we show that Cif dependent ERK activation promotes phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bim, thereby potentially conferring a pro-survival signal. In summary, we identified a novel deamidation-dependent mechanism of action of the B. pseudomallei virulence factor Cif/CHBP to activate MAPK/ERK signaling. Our study demonstrates that bacterial proteins such as Cif can serve as useful molecular tools to uncover novel aspects of mammalian signaling pathways.

  15. TOR Complex 2-Ypk1 Signaling Maintains Sphingolipid Homeostasis by Sensing and Regulating ROS Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Niles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced during normal metabolism and can function as signaling molecules. However, ROS at elevated levels can damage cells. Here, we identify the conserved target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2/Ypk1 signaling module as an important regulator of ROS in the model eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae. We show that TORC2/Ypk1 suppresses ROS produced both by mitochondria as well as by nonmitochondrial sources, including changes in acidification of the vacuole. Furthermore, we link vacuole-related ROS to sphingolipids, essential components of cellular membranes, whose synthesis is also controlled by TORC2/Ypk1 signaling. In total, our data reveal that TORC2/Ypk1 act within a homeostatic feedback loop to maintain sphingolipid levels and that ROS are a critical regulatory signal within this system. Thus, ROS sensing and signaling by TORC2/Ypk1 play a central physiological role in sphingolipid biosynthesis and in the maintenance of cell growth and viability.

  16. Unveiling causal activity of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-García, Rashid V.; Beggs, John M.; Ortiz, Gerardo

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a novel tool for analyzing complex network dynamics, allowing for cascades of causally-related events, which we call causal webs (c-webs), to be separated from other non-causally-related events. This tool shows that traditionally-conceived avalanches may contain mixtures of spatially-distinct but temporally-overlapping cascades of events, and dynamical disorder or noise. In contrast, c-webs separate these components, unveiling previously hidden features of the network and dynamics. We apply our method to mouse cortical data with resulting statistics which demonstrate for the first time that neuronal avalanches are not merely composed of causally-related events. The original version of this article was uploaded to the arXiv on March 17th, 2016 [1].

  17. Human centromedian-parafascicular complex signals sensory cues for goal-oriented behavior selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Inga M; Beck, Anne-Kathrin; Bräuer, Susann; Schwabe, Kerstin; Abdallat, Mahmoud; Sandmann, Pascale; Dengler, Reinhard; Rieger, Jochem W; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-15

    Experimental research has shown that the centromedian-parafascicular complex (CM-Pf) of the intralaminar thalamus is activated in attentional orienting and processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli. These observations resulted in the hypothesis that the CM-Pf plays a pivotal role in goal-oriented behavior selection. We here set out to test this hypothesis with electrophysiological recordings from patients with electrodes implanted in CM-Pf for deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. Six patients participated in (1) an auditory three-class oddball experiment, which required a button press to target tones, but not to standard and deviant tones and in (2) a multi-speaker experiment with a target word that required attention selection and a target image that required response selection. Subjects showed transient neural responses (8-15Hz) to the target tone and the target word. Two subjects additionally showed transient neural responses (15-25Hz) to the target image. All sensory target stimuli were related to an internal goal and required a behavior selection (attention selection, response selection). In group analyses, neural responses were greater to target tones than deviant and standard tones and to target words than other task-relevant words that did not require attention selection. The transient neural responses occurred after the target stimuli but prior to the overt behavioral response. Our results demonstrate that in human subjects the CM-Pf is involved in signaling sensory inputs related to goal-oriented selection of behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 5'-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Moloud; Roy, Richard

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is one of the central regulators of cellular and organismal metabolism in eukaryotes. Once activated by decreased energy levels, it induces ATP production by promoting catabolic pathways while conserving ATP by inhibiting anabolic pathways. AMPK plays a crucial role in various aspects of cellular function such as regulating growth, reprogramming metabolism, autophagy, and cell polarity. In this chapter, we focus on how recent breakthroughs made using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans have contributed to our understanding of AMPK function and how it can be utilized in the future to elucidate hitherto unknown aspects of AMPK signaling.

  19. Hurst Exponent Analysis of Resting-State fMRI Signal Complexity across the Adult Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Dong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exploring functional information among various brain regions across time enables understanding of healthy aging process and holds great promise for age-related brain disease diagnosis. This paper proposed a method to explore fractal complexity of the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI signal in the human brain across the adult lifespan using Hurst exponent (HE. We took advantage of the examined rs-fMRI data from 116 adults 19 to 85 years of age (44.3 ± 19.4 years, 49 females from NKI/Rockland sample. Region-wise and voxel-wise analyses were performed to investigate the effects of age, gender, and their interaction on complexity. In region-wise analysis, we found that the healthy aging is accompanied by a loss of complexity in frontal and parietal lobe and increased complexity in insula, limbic, and temporal lobe. Meanwhile, differences in HE between genders were found to be significant in parietal lobe (p = 0.04, corrected. However, there was no interaction between gender and age. In voxel-wise analysis, the significant complexity decrease with aging was found in frontal and parietal lobe, and complexity increase was found in insula, limbic lobe, occipital lobe, and temporal lobe with aging. Meanwhile, differences in HE between genders were found to be significant in frontal, parietal, and limbic lobe. Furthermore, we found age and sex interaction in right parahippocampal gyrus (p = 0.04, corrected. Our findings reveal HE variations of the rs-fMRI signal across the human adult lifespan and show that HE may serve as a new parameter to assess healthy aging process.

  20. Activation of cutaneous immune responses in complex regional pain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birklein, Frank; Drummond, Peter D.; Li, Wenwu; Schlereth, Tanja; Albrecht, Nahid; Finch, Philip M.; Dawson, Linda F.; Clark, J. David; Kingery, Wade S.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is unresolved, but TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated in experimental skin blister fluid from CRPS affected limbs, as is tryptase, a marker for mast cells. In the rat fracture model of CRPS exaggerated sensory and sympathetic neural signaling stimulate keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation, causing the local production of high levels of inflammatory cytokines leading to pain behavior. The current investigation used CRPS patient skin biopsies to determine whether keratinocyte and mast cell proliferation occur in CRPS skin and to identify the cellular source of the up-regulated TNF-α, IL-6, and tryptase observed in CRPS experimental skin blister fluid. Skin biopsies were collected from the affected skin and the contralateral mirror site in 55 CRPS patients and the biopsy sections were immunostained for keratinocyte, cell proliferation, mast cell markers, TNF-α, and IL-6. In early CRPS keratinocytes were activated in the affected skin, resulting in proliferation, epidermal thickening, and up-regulated TNF-α and IL-6 expression. In chronic CRPS there was reduced keratinocyte proliferation with epidermal thinning in the affected skin. Acute CRPS patients also had increased mast cell accumulation in the affected skin, but there was no increase in mast cell numbers in chronic CRPS. PMID:24462502

  1. Chemical biology tools for regulating RAS signaling complexity in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hattum, Hilde; Waldmann, Herbert

    2014-09-18

    Rat sarcoma (RAS) family members are small GTPases that control a number of signaling pathways important for normal cellular proliferation. Therefore, it is no surprise that a significant portion of human tumors express constitutively active mutated RAS proteins, which leads to deregulation of RAS signaling pathways, resulting in pathological perturbations of cell growth and death. Although the molecular details of RAS signaling cascades are well understood, there is still a largely unmet need for small molecule probes to control RAS signaling in space and time. More broadly, given the prevalence of mutated RAS in cancer, the need to translate the insights obtained from using small molecule probes into clinically useful drugs is also significant. In this review, we introduce RAS proteins and the signaling pathways they are involved in, and discuss some of the innovative chemical biology approaches to regulate RAS signaling, which include the exploitation of newly identified binding pockets, covalent inhibitors for mutated RAS, and RAS localization impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Trace amine associated receptor 1 signaling in activated lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, Michael W; Xie, Zhihua; Panas, Helen N; Hoener, Marius C; Vallender, Eric J; Miller, Gregory M

    2012-12-01

    Although most research to date on Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) has focused on its role in the brain, it has been recognized since its discovery in 2001 that TAAR1 mRNA is expressed in peripheral tissues as well, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in non-neurological pathways. This study reports TAAR1 expression, signaling and functionality in rhesus monkey lymphocytes. We detected a high level of TAAR1 protein in immortalized rhesus monkey B cell lines and a significant upregulation of TAAR1 protein expression in rhesus monkey lymphocytes following PHA treatment. Through screening a wide range of signaling pathways for their upregulation following TAAR1 activation by its potent agonist methamphetamine, we identified two transcription factors, CREB and NFAT, which are commonly associated with immune activation. Furthermore, we observed a TAAR1-dependent phosphorylation of PKA and PKC following treatment with methamphetamine in transfected HEK293 cells, immortalized rhesus monkey B cells and PHA-activated rhesus monkey lymphocytes. Accordingly, the high levels of TAAR1 that we observed on lymphocytes are inducible and fully functional, capable of transmitting a signal likely via PKA and PKC activation following ligand binding. More importantly, an increase in TAAR1 receptor expression is concomitant with lymphocyte immune activation, suggesting a possible role for TAAR1 in the generation or regulation of an immune response. TAAR1 is emerging as a potential therapeutic target, with regard to its ability to modulate brain monoamines. The current data raises the possibility that TAAR1-targeted drugs may also alter immune function.

  3. Physicochemical Properties and Antioxidant Activities of Luteolin-Phospholipid Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxiang Ning

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available luteolin and phospholipid complex was prepared to improve the lipophilic properties of luteolin. The physicochemical properties of the complex were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV, infrared spectrometry (IR, X-ray diffractometry (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results showed that luteolin and phospholipid in the complex were joined by non-covalent-bonds and did not form a new compound. It was found that the complex was an effective scavenger of DPPH radicals, with an IC50 value of 28.33 μg/mL. In the Rancimat antioxidant test using lard oil as substrate, the complex also showed the strong antioxidant activity.

  4. TAK1 regulates caspase 8 activation and necroptotic signaling via multiple cell death checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yin, Haifeng; Chen, Yi; Li, Lei; Li, Jing; Liu, Qinghang

    2016-09-29

    Necroptosis has emerged as a new form of programmed cell death implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as ischemic injury, neurodegenerative disease, and viral infection. Recent studies indicate that TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is nodal regulator of necroptotic cell death, although the underlying molecular regulatory mechanisms are not well defined. Here we reported that TAK1 regulates necroptotic signaling as well as caspase 8-mediated apoptotic signaling through both NFκB-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Inhibition of TAK1 promoted TNFα-induced cell death through the induction of RIP1 phosphorylation/activation and necrosome formation. Further, inhibition of TAK1 triggered two caspase 8 activation pathways through the induction of RIP1-FADD-caspase 8 complex as well as FLIP cleavage/degradation. Mechanistically, our data uncovered an essential role for the adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD) in caspase 8 activation and necrosome formation triggered by TAK1 inhibition. Moreover, ablation of the deubiqutinase CYLD prevented both apoptotic and necroptotic signaling induced by TAK1 inhibition. Finally, blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway prevented the degradation of key pro-survival signaling proteins and necrosome formation. Thus, we identified new regulatory mechanisms underlying the critical role of TAK1 in cell survival through regulation of multiple cell death checkpoints. Targeting key components of the necroptotic pathway (e.g., TRADD and CYLD) and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may represent novel therapeutic strategies for pathological conditions driven by necroptosis.

  5. Disentangling stellar activity from exoplanetary signals with interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligi Roxanne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stellar activity can express as many forms at stellar surfaces: dark spots, convective cells, bright plages. Particularly, dark spots and bright plages add noise on photometric data or radial velocity measurements used to detect exoplanets, and thus lead to false detection or disrupt their derived parameters. Since interferometry provides a very high angular resolution, it may constitute an interesting solution to distinguish the signal of a transiting exoplanet and that of stellar activity. It has also been shown that granulation adds bias in visibility and closure phase measurements, affecting in turn the derived stellar parameters. We analyze the noises generated by dark spots on interferometric observables and compare them to exoplanet signals. We investigate the current interferometric instruments able to measure and disentangle these signals, and show that there is a lack in spatial resolution. We thus give a prospective of the improvements to be brought on future interferometers, which would also significantly extend the number of available targets.

  6. Changes in complex spike activity during classical conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eRasmussen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar cortex is necessary for adaptively timed conditioned responses (CRs in eyeblink conditioning. During conditioning, Purkinje cells acquire pause responses or Purkinje cell CRs to the conditioned stimuli (CS, resulting in disinhibition of the cerebellar nuclei (CN, allowing them to activate motor nuclei that control eyeblinks. This disinhibition also causes inhibition of the inferior olive (IO, via the nucleo-olivary pathway (N-O. Activation of the IO, which relays the unconditional stimulus (US to the cortex, elicits characteristic complex spikes in Purkinje cells. Although Purkinje cell activity, as well as stimulation of the CN, is known to influence IO activity, much remains to be learned about the way that learned changes in simple spike firing affects the IO. In the present study, we analyzed changes in simple and complex spike firing, in extracellular Purkinje cell records, from the C3 zone, in decerebrate ferrets undergoing training in a conditioning paradigm. In agreement with the N-O feedback hypothesis, acquisition resulted in a gradual decrease in complex spike activity during the conditioned stimulus, with a delay that is consistent with the long N-O latency. Also supporting the feedback hypothesis, training with a short interstimulus interval (ISI, which does not lead to acquisition of a Purkinje cell CR, did not cause a suppression of complex spike activity. In contrast, observations that extinction did not lead to a recovery in complex spike activity and the irregular patterns of simple and complex spike activity after the conditioned stimulus are less conclusive.

  7. Loss of Pancreas upon Activated Wnt Signaling Is Concomitant with Emergence of Gastrointestinal Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Bravo, Jose Luis; Flores-Martínez, Alvaro; Herrero-Martin, Griselda; Puri, Sapna; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Rojas, Anabel; Hebrok, Matthias; Cano, David A

    2016-01-01

    Organ formation is achieved through the complex interplay between signaling pathways and transcriptional cascades. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays multiple roles during embryonic development including patterning, proliferation and differentiation in distinct tissues. Previous studies have established the importance of this pathway at multiple stages of pancreas formation as well as in postnatal organ function and homeostasis. In mice, gain-of-function experiments have demonstrated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway results in pancreatic hypoplasia, a phenomenon whose underlying mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that ectopic activation of epithelial canonical Wnt signaling causes aberrant induction of gastric and intestinal markers both in the pancreatic epithelium and mesenchyme, leading to the development of gut-like features. Furthermore, we provide evidence that β -catenin-induced impairment of pancreas formation depends on Hedgehog signaling. Together, our data emphasize the developmental plasticity of pancreatic progenitors and further underscore the key role of precise regulation of signaling pathways to maintain appropriate organ boundaries.

  8. Loss of Pancreas upon Activated Wnt Signaling Is Concomitant with Emergence of Gastrointestinal Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Martin, Griselda; Puri, Sapna; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Rojas, Anabel; Hebrok, Matthias; Cano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Organ formation is achieved through the complex interplay between signaling pathways and transcriptional cascades. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays multiple roles during embryonic development including patterning, proliferation and differentiation in distinct tissues. Previous studies have established the importance of this pathway at multiple stages of pancreas formation as well as in postnatal organ function and homeostasis. In mice, gain-of-function experiments have demonstrated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway results in pancreatic hypoplasia, a phenomenon whose underlying mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that ectopic activation of epithelial canonical Wnt signaling causes aberrant induction of gastric and intestinal markers both in the pancreatic epithelium and mesenchyme, leading to the development of gut-like features. Furthermore, we provide evidence that β -catenin-induced impairment of pancreas formation depends on Hedgehog signaling. Together, our data emphasize the developmental plasticity of pancreatic progenitors and further underscore the key role of precise regulation of signaling pathways to maintain appropriate organ boundaries. PMID:27736991

  9. Symmetric signaling by an asymmetric 1 erythropoietin: 2 erythropoietin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingxin L; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Tidor, Bruce; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-01-30

    Via sites 1 and 2, erythropoietin binds asymmetrically to two identical receptor monomers, although it is unclear how asymmetry affects receptor activation and signaling. Here we report the design and validation of two mutant erythropoietin receptors that probe the role of individual members of the receptor dimer by selectively binding either site 1 or site 2 on erythropoietin. Ba/F3 cells expressing either mutant receptor do not respond to erythropoietin, but cells co-expressing both receptors respond to erythropoietin by proliferation and activation of the JAK2-Stat5 pathway. A truncated receptor with only one cytosolic tyrosine (Y343) is sufficient for signaling in response to erythropoietin, regardless of the monomer on which it is located. Similarly, only one receptor in the dimer needs a juxtamembrane hydrophobic L253 or W258 residue, essential for JAK2 activation. We conclude that despite asymmetry in the ligand-receptor interaction, both sides are competent for signaling, and appear to signal equally.

  10. USING OF COMPLEX HARMONIOUS SIGNALS IN PROBLEMS OF ACOUSTIC SPECTROMETRY OF POLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bitiukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In article features of definition of acoustic properties of polymers with application of ultrasonic fluctuations are considered. The opportunity of definition with single method of such parameters of quality as a relaxation spectra of polymer and function of molecular-mass distribution in a solution that results in increase in time of carrying out of measurements is shown. For reduction of time, may use narrowing of a range of frequencies of the ultrasonic fluctuations rendered on the measured sample, or increase the step of quantization of a registered signal with the oscillograph. Thus both variants result in reduction in reliability of the received information because of a possible extends for limits of an effective frequency range or loss of a high-frequency component of a registered signal at increase in a step of quantization. For the decision of the listed problems it is offered to use the complex harmonious signal being superposition of several signals. Frequency is necessary for choosing proceeding from sensitivity of each determined polymer parameter of quality. On concrete examples it is shown, that sensitivity of such parameters of quality as strength and viscosity on Mooney essentially depends on frequency. For initial research, in a case when properties of a material beforehand are not known and it is necessary to reveal effective ranges of frequencies, for each determined property of a material, it is offered to use a signal such as «white noise» which will allow to reveal ranges of frequencies with the greatest sensitivity each measured parameter of quality. That, it is in turn connected to uniform distribution of spectral making frequencies on all possible frequency range. Necessity for definition of an effective range of time of registration and a step of quantization for a kind of limitation of technical opportunities of means of registration of electric signals (oscillographs is shown.

  11. Multi-Signal Sedimentation Velocity Analysis with Mass Conservation for Determining the Stoichiometry of Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Padrick, Shae B.; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Multi-signal sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (MSSV) is a powerful tool for the determination of the number, stoichiometry, and hydrodynamic shape of reversible protein complexes in two- and three-component systems. In this method, the evolution of sedimentation profiles of macromolecular mixtures is recorded simultaneously using multiple absorbance and refractive index signals and globally transformed into both spectrally and diffusion-deconvoluted component sedimentation coefficient distributions. For reactions with complex lifetimes comparable to the time-scale of sedimentation, MSSV reveals the number and stoichiometry of co-existing complexes. For systems with short complex lifetimes, MSSV reveals the composition of the reaction boundary of the coupled reaction/migration process, which we show here may be used to directly determine an association constant. A prerequisite for MSSV is that the interacting components are spectrally distinguishable, which may be a result, for example, of extrinsic chromophores or of different abundances of aromatic amino acids contributing to the UV absorbance. For interacting components that are spectrally poorly resolved, here we introduce a method for additional regularization of the spectral deconvolution by exploiting approximate knowledge of the total loading concentrations. While this novel mass conservation principle does not discriminate contributions to different species, it can be effectively combined with constraints in the sedimentation coefficient range of uncomplexed species. We show in theory, computer simulations, and experiment, how mass conservation MSSV as implemented in SEDPHAT can enhance or even substitute for the spectral discrimination of components. This should broaden the applicability of MSSV to the analysis of the composition of reversible macromolecular complexes. PMID:23696787

  12. Jasmonate signalling in Arabidopsis involves SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Millet, Yves A; Cheng, Zhenyu; Bush, Jenifer; Ausubel, Frederick M

    Plant hormones play pivotal roles in growth, development and stress responses. Although it is essential to our understanding of hormone signalling, how plants maintain a steady state level of hormone receptors is poorly understood. We show that mutation of the Arabidopsis thaliana co-chaperone SGT1b impairs responses to the plant hormones jasmonate, auxin and gibberellic acid, but not brassinolide and abscisic acid, and that SGT1b and its homologue SGT1a are involved in maintaining the steady state levels of the F-box proteins COI1 and TIR1, receptors for jasmonate and auxin, respectively. The association of SGT1b with COI1 is direct and is independent of the Arabidopsis SKP1 protein, ASK1. We further show that COI1 is a client protein of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes and that the complexes function in hormone signalling by stabilizing the COI1 protein. This study extends the SGT1b-HSP90 client protein list and broadens the functional scope of SGT1b-HSP70-HSP90 chaperone complexes.

  13. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G. Eric

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. PMID:25814663

  14. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeel, Samina N; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; Chen, Yi-Feng; Rai, Muneeza Iqbal; Haq, Noor Ul; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-05-08

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analyses support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Implications of this model for ethylene signaling are discussed. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Distinct conformations of GPCR-β-arrestin complexes mediate desensitization, signaling, and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J; Thomsen, Alex R B; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T; Plouffe, Bianca; Nguyen, Anthony H; Yang, Fan; Huang, Li-Yin; Kahsai, Alem W; Bassoni, Daniel L; Gavino, Bryant J; Lamerdin, Jane E; Triest, Sarah; Shukla, Arun K; Berger, Benjamin; Little, John; Antar, Albert; Blanc, Adi; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Chen, Xin; Kawakami, Kouki; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken; Steyaert, Jan; Sun, Jin-Peng; Bouvier, Michel; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2017-03-07

    β-Arrestins (βarrs) interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to desensitize G protein signaling, to initiate signaling on their own, and to mediate receptor endocytosis. Prior structural studies have revealed two unique conformations of GPCR-βarr complexes: the "tail" conformation, with βarr primarily coupled to the phosphorylated GPCR C-terminal tail, and the "core" conformation, where, in addition to the phosphorylated C-terminal tail, βarr is further engaged with the receptor transmembrane core. However, the relationship of these distinct conformations to the various functions of βarrs is unknown. Here, we created a mutant form of βarr lacking the "finger-loop" region, which is unable to form the core conformation but retains the ability to form the tail conformation. We find that the tail conformation preserves the ability to mediate receptor internalization and βarr signaling but not desensitization of G protein signaling. Thus, the two GPCR-βarr conformations can carry out distinct functions.

  16. Complex patterns of signalling to convey different social goals of sex in bonobos, Pan paniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genty, Emilie; Neumann, Christof; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2015-11-05

    Sexual behaviour in bonobos (Pan paniscus) functions beyond mere reproduction to mediate social interactions and relationships. In this study, we assessed the signalling behaviour in relation to four social goals of sex in this species: appeasement after conflict, tension reduction, social bonding and reproduction. Overall, sexual behaviour was strongly decoupled from its ancestral reproductive function with habitual use in the social domain, which was accompanied by a corresponding complexity in communication behaviour. We found that signalling behaviour varied systematically depending on the initiator's goals and gender. Although all gestures and vocalisations were part of the species-typical communication repertoire, they were often combined and produced flexibly. Generally, gestures and multi-modal combinations were more flexibly used to communicate a goal than vocalisations. There was no clear relation between signalling behaviour and success of sexual initiations, suggesting that communication was primarily used to indicate the signaller's intention, and not to influence a recipient's willingness to interact sexually. We discuss these findings in light of the larger question of what may have caused, in humans, the evolutionary transition from primate-like communication to language.

  17. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E. W.; van der Vleuten, C. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how...

  18. NMDA-mediated activation of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP regulates the duration of ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Surojit; Nairn, Angus C; Wang, Ping; Lombroso, Paul J

    2003-01-01

    The intracellular mechanism(s) by which a cell determines the duration of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is not well understood. We have investigated the role of STEP, a striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase, in the regulation of ERK activity in rat neurons. Glutamate-mediated activation of NMDA receptors leads to the rapid but transient phosphorylation of ERK in cultured neurons. Here we show that activation of NMDA receptors led to activation of STEP, which limited the duration of ERK activity as well as its translocation to the nucleus and its subsequent downstream nuclear signaling. In neurons, STEP is phosphorylated and inactive under basal conditions. NMDA-mediated influx of Ca(2+), but not increased intracellular Ca(2+) from other sources, leads to activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and the dephosphorylation and activation of STEP. We have identified an important mechanism involved in the regulation of ERK activity in neurons that highlights the complex interplay between serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases and phosphatases.

  19. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Sweaty

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  20. A complex symbol signal-to-noise ratio estimator and its performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This article presents an algorithm for estimating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals that contain data on a downconverted suppressed carrier or the first harmonic of a square-wave subcarrier. This algorithm can be used to determine the performance of the full-spectrum combiner for the Galileo S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) mission by measuring the input and output symbol SNR. A performance analysis of the algorithm shows that the estimator can estimate the complex symbol SNR using 10,000 symbols at a true symbol SNR of -5 dB with a mean of -4.9985 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2454 dB, and these analytical results are checked by simulations of 100 runs with a mean of -5.06 dB and a standard deviation of 0.2506 dB.

  1. Loss of the alpha7 integrin promotes extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and altered vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welser, Jennifer V; Lange, Naomi; Singer, Cherie A; Elorza, Margaret; Scowen, Paul; Keef, Kathleen D; Gerthoffer, William T; Burkin, Dean J

    2007-09-28

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration are underlying factors in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that altered expression of vascular integrins and extracellular matrix proteins may contribute to the vascular remodeling observed after arterial injury and during disease. We have recently shown that loss of the alpha7beta1 integrin results in VSMC hyperplasia. To investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying this phenotype, we have examined changes in cell signaling pathways associated with VSMC proliferation. Several studies have demonstrated the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway is activated in response to vascular injury and disease. In this study, we show that loss of the alpha7 integrin in VSMCs results in activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and translocation of the activated kinase to the nucleus. Forced expression of the alpha7 integrin or use of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 inhibitor U0126 in alpha7 integrin-deficient VSMCs suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and restored the differentiated phenotype to alpha7 integrin-null cells in a manner dependent on Ras signaling. Alpha7 integrin-null mice displayed profound vascular remodeling in response to injury with pronounced neointimal formation and reduced vascular compliance. These findings demonstrate that the alpha7beta1 integrin negatively regulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and suggests an important role for this integrin as part of a signaling complex regulating VSMC phenotype switching.

  2. Diminution of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling inhibits vascular permeability and anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hox, Valerie; O'Connell, Michael P; Lyons, Jonathan J; Sackstein, Paul; Dimaggio, Thomas; Jones, Nina; Nelson, Celeste; Boehm, Manfred; Holland, Steven M; Freeman, Alexandra F; Tweardy, David J; Olivera, Ana; Metcalfe, Dean D; Milner, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    During IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions, vascular endothelial cells permeabilize in response to mast cell mediators. We have demonstrated previously that patients and mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations (autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome [AD-HIES]) are partially protected from anaphylaxis. We sought to study the mechanism by which STAT3 contributes to anaphylaxis and determine whether small-molecule inhibition of STAT3 can prevent anaphylaxis. Using unaffected and STAT3-inhibited or genetic loss-of-function samples, we performed histamine skin prick tests, investigated the contribution of STAT3 to animal models of anaphylaxis, and measured endothelial cell permeability, gene and protein expression, and histamine receptor-mediated signaling. Although mouse mast cell degranulation was minimally affected by STAT3 blockade, mast cell mediator-induced anaphylaxis was blunted in Stat3 mutant mice with AD-HIES and in wild-type mice subjected to small-molecule STAT3 inhibition. Histamine skin prick test responses were diminished in patients with AD-HIES. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells derived from patients with AD-HIES or treated with a STAT3 inhibitor did not signal properly through Src or cause appropriate dissolution of the adherens junctions made up of the proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin. Furthermore, we found that diminished STAT3 target microRNA17-92 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells from patients with AD-HIES is associated with increased phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, which inhibits Src, and increased E2F transcription factor 1 expression, which regulates β-catenin cellular dynamics. These data demonstrate that STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity regulates critical components for the architecture and functional dynamics of endothelial junctions, thus permitting vascular permeability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. DNA interactions and biocidal activity of metal complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These studies revealed that the complexes showed an intercalative mode of binding to CT DNA and also effectively cleaved the supercoiledpBR DNA. The synthesised compounds were evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and found that the metal complexes showed ...

  4. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  5. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on

  6. Antibacterial activity of metal complexes of antifolate drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Full Length Research Paper. Antibacterial activity of metal complexes of antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Omoruyi G. Idemudia and Peter A. Ajibade*. Department of Chemistry, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice 5700, South Africa. Accepted 16 March, 2010. Ag(I), Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of ...

  7. Effects of stop-signal probability in the stop-signal paradigm: The N2/P3 complex further validated.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramautar, J.R.; Kok, A.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of frequency of occurrence of stop signals in the stop-signal paradigm. Presenting stop signals less frequently resulted in faster reaction times to the go stimulus and a lower probability of inhibition. Also, go stimuli elicited larger and somewhat

  8. Infection of goats with goatpox virus triggers host antiviral defense through activation of innate immune signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Chen, Shi-long; Huang, Shile; Lin, Qunqun; Xie, Baogui; Chen, Ji-Long

    2016-02-01

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is one of the most serious infectious diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality in goats. However, little is known about involvement of host innate immunity during the GTPV infection. For this, goats were experimentally infected with GTPV. The results showed that GTPV infection significantly induced mRNA expression of type I interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-β in peripheral blood lymphocytes, spleen and lung. In addition, GTPV infection enhanced expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18; and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Strikingly, infection with GTPV activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), a critical cytokine signaling molecule. Interestingly, the virus infection induced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1. Importantly, the infection resulted in an increased expression of some critical interferon-stimulated genes, such as interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) 1, IFITM3, interferon stimulated gene (ISG) 15 and ISG20. Furthermore, we found that infection with GTPV up-regulated expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9. These results revealed that GTPV infection activated host innate immune signaling and thereby triggered antiviral innate immunity. The findings provide novel insights into complex mechanisms underlying GTPV-host interaction and pathogenesis of GTPV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tribotronic Tuning Diode for Active Analog Signal Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-24

    Realizing active interaction with external environment/stimuli is a great challenge for current electronics. In this paper, a tribotronic tuning diode (TTD) is proposed by coupling a variable capacitance diode and a triboelectric nanogenerator in free-standing sliding mode. When the friction layer is sliding on the device surface for electrification, a reverse bias voltage is created and applied to the diode for tuning the junction capacitance. When the sliding distance increases from 0 to 25 mm, the capacitance of the TTD decreases from about 39 to 8 pF. The proposed TTD has been integrated into analog circuits and exhibited excellent performances in frequency modulation, phase shift, and filtering by sliding a finger. This work has demonstrated tunable diode and active analog signal modulation by tribotronics, which has great potential to replace ordinary variable capacitance diodes in various practical applications such as signal processing, electronic tuning circuits, precise tuning circuits, active sensor networks, electronic communications, remote controls, flexible electronics, etc.

  10. Activation of the γ-tubulin complex by the Mto1/2 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Eric M; Groocock, Lynda M; Borek, Weronika E; Sawin, Kenneth E

    2014-04-14

    The multisubunit γ-tubulin complex (γ-TuC) is critical for microtubule nucleation in eukaryotic cells, but it remains unclear how the γ-TuC becomes active specifically at microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) and not more broadly throughout the cytoplasm. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the proteins Mto1 and Mto2 form the Mto1/2 complex, which interacts with the γ-TuC and recruits it to several different types of cytoplasmic MTOC sites. Here, we show that the Mto1/2 complex activates γ-TuC-dependent microtubule nucleation independently of localizing the γ-TuC. This was achieved through the construction of a "minimal" version of Mto1/2, Mto1/2[bonsai], that does not localize to any MTOC sites. By direct imaging of individual Mto1/2[bonsai] complexes nucleating single microtubules in vivo, we further determine the number and stoichiometry of Mto1, Mto2, and γ-TuC subunits Alp4 (GCP2) and Alp6 (GCP3) within active nucleation complexes. These results are consistent with active nucleation complexes containing ∼13 copies each of Mto1 and Mto2 per active complex and likely equimolar amounts of γ-tubulin. Additional experiments suggest that Mto1/2 multimers act to multimerize the fission yeast γ-tubulin small complex and that multimerization of Mto2 in particular may underlie assembly of active microtubule nucleation complexes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal sensor configuration for complex systems with application to signal detection in structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Spall, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of sensor configuration for complex systems. The contribution of the paper is twofold. Firstly, we define an appropriate criterion that is based on maximizing overall sensor responses while minimizing redundant information as measured by correlations between multiple...... by limited experimentation with test sensor configurations. We illustrate the application of the approach to optimal placement of acoustic sensors for signal detection in structures. This includes both a computer simulation study for an aluminum plate, and real experimentations on a steel I-beam....

  12. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  13. The Exon Junction Complex and Srp54 Contribute to Hedgehog Signaling via ci RNA Splicing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Elisa; Little, Jamie C; Kalderon, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) regulates the Cubitus interruptus (Ci) transcription factor in Drosophila melanogaster by activating full-length Ci-155 and blocking processing to the Ci-75 repressor. However, the interplay between the regulation of Ci-155 levels and activity, as well as processing-independent mechanisms that affect Ci-155 levels, have not been explored extensively. Here, we identified Mago Nashi (Mago) and Y14 core Exon Junction Complex (EJC) proteins, as well as the Srp54 splicing factor, as modifiers of Hh pathway activity under sensitized conditions. Mago inhibition reduced Hh pathway activity by altering the splicing pattern of ci to reduce Ci-155 levels. Srp54 inhibition also affected pathway activity by reducing ci RNA levels but additionally altered Ci-155 levels and activity independently of ci splicing. Further tests using ci transgenes and ci mutations confirmed evidence from studying the effects of Mago and Srp54 that relatively small changes in the level of Ci-155 primary translation product alter Hh pathway activity under a variety of sensitized conditions. We additionally used ci transgenes lacking intron sequences or the presumed translation initiation codon for an alternatively spliced ci RNA to provide further evidence that Mago acts principally by modulating the levels of the major ci RNA encoding Ci-155, and to show that ci introns are necessary to support the production of sufficient Ci-155 for robust Hh signaling and may also be important mediators of regulatory inputs. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Ectodysplasin regulates activator-inhibitor balance in murine tooth development through Fgf20 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häärä, Otso; Harjunmaa, Enni; Lindfors, Päivi H; Huh, Sung-Ho; Fliniaux, Ingrid; Åberg, Thomas; Jernvall, Jukka; Ornitz, David M; Mikkola, Marja L; Thesleff, Irma

    2012-09-01

    Uncovering the origin and nature of phenotypic variation within species is the first step in understanding variation between species. Mouse models with altered activities of crucial signal pathways have highlighted many important genes and signal networks regulating the morphogenesis of complex structures, such as teeth. The detailed analyses of these models have indicated that the balanced actions of a few pathways regulating cell behavior modulate the shape and number of teeth. Currently, however, most mouse models studied have had gross alteration of morphology, whereas analyses of more subtle modification of morphology are required to link developmental studies to evolutionary change. Here, we have analyzed a signaling network involving ectodysplasin (Eda) and fibroblast growth factor 20 (Fgf20) that subtly affects tooth morphogenesis. We found that Fgf20 is a major downstream effector of Eda and affects Eda-regulated characteristics of tooth morphogenesis, including the number, size and shape of teeth. Fgf20 function is compensated for by other Fgfs, in particular Fgf9 and Fgf4, and is part of an Fgf signaling loop between epithelium and mesenchyme. We showed that removal of Fgf20 in an Eda gain-of-function mouse model results in an Eda loss-of-function phenotype in terms of reduced tooth complexity and third molar appearance. However, the extra anterior molar, a structure lost during rodent evolution 50 million years ago, was stabilized in these mice.

  15. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-06-01

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Terabit bandwidth-adaptive transmission using low-complexity format-transparent digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Chagnon, Mathieu; Xu, Xian; Qiu, Meng; Plant, David V

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, we propose a low-complexity format-transparent digital signal processing (DSP) scheme for next generation flexible and energy-efficient transceiver. It employs QPSK symbols as the training and pilot symbols for the initialization and tracking stage of the receiver-side DSP, respectively, for various modulation formats. The performance is numerically and experimentally evaluated in a dual polarization (DP) 11 Gbaud 64QAM system. Employing the proposed DSP scheme, we conduct a system-level study of Tb/s bandwidth-adaptive superchannel transmissions with flexible modulation formats including QPSK, 8QAM and 16QAM. The spectrum bandwidth allocation is realized in the digital domain instead of turning on/off sub-channels, which improves the performance of higher order QAM. Various transmission distances ranging from 240 km to 6240 km are demonstrated with a colorless detection for hardware complexity reduction.

  17. Malarial hemozoin is a Nalp3 inflammasome activating danger signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dostert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Characteristic symptoms of malaria include recurrent fever attacks and neurodegeneration, signs that are also found in patients with a hyperactive Nalp3 inflammasome. Plasmodium species produce a crystal called hemozoin that is generated by detoxification of heme after hemoglobin degradation in infected red blood cells. Thus, we hypothesized that hemozoin could activate the Nalp3 inflammasome, due to its particulate nature reminiscent of other inflammasome-activating agents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that hemozoin acts as a proinflammatory danger signal that activates the Nalp3 inflammasome, causing the release of IL-1beta. Similar to other Nalp3-activating particles, hemozoin activity is blocked by inhibiting phagocytosis, K(+ efflux and NADPH oxidase. In vivo, intraperitoneal injection of hemozoin results in acute peritonitis, which is impaired in Nalp3-, caspase-1- and IL-1R-deficient mice. Likewise, the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is dampened in Nalp3-deficient mice infected with Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, while parasitemia remains unchanged. SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS: The potent pro-inflammatory effect of hemozoin through inflammasome activation may possibly be implicated in plasmodium-associated pathologies such as cerebral malaria.

  18. Resolving Early Signaling Events in T-Cell Activation Leading to IL-2 and FOXP3 Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Perley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Signal intensity and feedback regulation are known to be major factors in the signaling events stemming from the T-cell receptor (TCR and its various coreceptors, but the exact nature of these relationships remains in question. We present a mathematical model of the complex signaling network involved in T-cell activation with cross-talk between the Erk, calcium, PKC and mTOR signaling pathways. The model parameters are adjusted to fit new and published data on TCR trafficking, Zap70, calcium, Erk and Isignaling. The regulation of the early signaling events by phosphatases, CD45 and SHP1, and the TCR dynamics are critical to determining the behavior of the model. Additional model corroboration is provided through quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data collected under different stimulating and knockout conditions. The resulting model is analyzed to investigate how signal intensity and feedback regulation affect TCR- and coreceptor-mediated signal transduction and their downstream transcriptional profiles to predict the outcome for a variety of stimulatory and knockdown experiments. Analysis of the model shows that: (1 SHP1 negative feedback is necessary for preventing hyperactivity in TCR signaling; (2 CD45 is required for TCR signaling, but also partially suppresses it at high expression levels; and (3 elevated FOXP3 and reduced IL-2 signaling, an expression profile often associated with T regulatory cells (Tregs, is observed when the system is subjected to weak TCR and CD28 costimulation or a severe reduction in CD45 activity.

  19. Metal complexes of Schiff base: Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Yousif

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A total of five new metal complex derivatives of 2N-salicylidene-5-(p-nitro phenyl-1,3,4-thiadiazole, HL with the metal ions Vo(II, Co(II, Rh(III, Pd(II and Au(III have been successfully prepared in alcoholic medium. The complexes obtained are characterized quantitatively and qualitatively by using micro elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, UV–Vis spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, 1H & 13C NMR, magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements. From the spectral study, all the complexes obtained as monomeric structure and the metals center moieties are four-coordinated with square planar geometry except VO(II and Co complexes which existed as a square pyramidal and tetrahedral geometry respectively. The preliminary in vitro antibacterial screening activity revealed that complexes 1–5 showed moderate activity against tested bacterial strains and slightly higher compared to the ligand, HL.

  20. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hupé, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2 recycling to the plasma membrane, whereas IFNAR1 is sorted to the lysosome for degradation. Depletion of VPS35 leads to abnormally prolonged residency and association of the IFNAR subunits at the early endosome, resulting in increased activation of STAT1- and IFN-dependent gene transcription. These experimental data establish the retromer complex as a key spatiotemporal regulator of IFNAR endosomal sorting and a new factor in type-I IFN-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription. PMID:27917878

  1. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hupé, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-12-05

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2 recycling to the plasma membrane, whereas IFNAR1 is sorted to the lysosome for degradation. Depletion of VPS35 leads to abnormally prolonged residency and association of the IFNAR subunits at the early endosome, resulting in increased activation of STAT1- and IFN-dependent gene transcription. These experimental data establish the retromer complex as a key spatiotemporal regulator of IFNAR endosomal sorting and a new factor in type-I IFN-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription.

  2. Hem-1 complexes are essential for Rac activation, actin polymerization, and myosin regulation during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orion D Weiner

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Migrating cells need to make different actin assemblies at the cell's leading and trailing edges and to maintain physical separation of signals for these assemblies. This asymmetric control of activities represents one important form of cell polarity. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the components involved in generating and maintaining polarity during chemotaxis. Here we characterize a family of complexes (which we term leading edge complexes, scaffolded by hematopoietic protein 1 (Hem-1, that organize the neutrophil's leading edge. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family Verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE2 complex, which mediates activation of actin polymerization by Rac, is only one member of this family. A subset of these leading edge complexes are biochemically separable from the WAVE2 complex and contain a diverse set of potential polarity-regulating proteins. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hem-1-containing complexes in neutrophil-like cells: (a dramatically impairs attractant-induced actin polymerization, polarity, and chemotaxis; (b substantially weakens Rac activation and phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate production, disrupting the (phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate/Rac/F-actin-mediated feedback circuit that organizes the leading edge; and (c prevents exclusion of activated myosin from the leading edge, perhaps by misregulating leading edge complexes that contain inhibitors of the Rho-actomyosin pathway. Taken together, these observations show that versatile Hem-1-containing complexes coordinate diverse regulatory signals at the leading edge of polarized neutrophils, including but not confined to those involving WAVE2-dependent actin polymerization.

  3. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system.

  4. A new inhibitor of the β-arrestin/AP2 endocytic complex reveals interplay between GPCR internalization and signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beautrait, Alexandre; Paradis, Justine S.; Zimmerman, Brandon; Giubilaro, Jenna; Nikolajev, Ljiljana; Armando, Sylvain; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamani, Lama; Namkung, Yoon; Heydenreich, Franziska M.; Khoury, Etienne; Audet, Martin; Roux, Philippe P.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.; Laporte, Stéphane A.; Bouvier, Michel

    2017-04-01

    In addition to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization and endocytosis, β-arrestin recruitment to ligand-stimulated GPCRs promotes non-canonical signalling cascades. Distinguishing the respective contributions of β-arrestin recruitment to the receptor and β-arrestin-promoted endocytosis in propagating receptor signalling has been limited by the lack of selective analytical tools. Here, using a combination of virtual screening and cell-based assays, we have identified a small molecule that selectively inhibits the interaction between β-arrestin and the β2-adaptin subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein AP2 without interfering with the formation of receptor/β-arrestin complexes. This selective β-arrestin/β2-adaptin inhibitor (Barbadin) blocks agonist-promoted endocytosis of the prototypical β2-adrenergic (β2AR), V2-vasopressin (V2R) and angiotensin-II type-1 (AT1R) receptors, but does not affect β-arrestin-independent (transferrin) or AP2-independent (endothelin-A) receptor internalization. Interestingly, Barbadin fully blocks V2R-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and blunts cAMP accumulation promoted by both V2R and β2AR, supporting the concept of β-arrestin/AP2-dependent signalling for both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways.

  5. Application of «Sensor signal analysis network» complex for distributed, time synchronized analysis of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, Vladimir; Mochalova, Anastasia

    2017-10-01

    The paper considers a developing software-hardware complex «Sensor signal analysis network» for distributed and time synchronized analysis of electromagnetic radiations. The areas of application and the main features of the complex are described. An example of application of the complex to monitor natural electromagnetic radiation sources is considered based on the data recorded in VLF range. A generalized functional scheme of stream analysis of signals by a complex functional node is suggested and its application for stream detection of atmospherics, whistlers and tweaks is considered.

  6. Application of «Sensor signal analysis network» complex for distributed, time synchronized analysis of electromagnetic radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochalov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a developing software-hardware complex «Sensor signal analysis network» for distributed and time synchronized analysis of electromagnetic radiations. The areas of application and the main features of the complex are described. An example of application of the complex to monitor natural electromagnetic radiation sources is considered based on the data recorded in VLF range. A generalized functional scheme of stream analysis of signals by a complex functional node is suggested and its application for stream detection of atmospherics, whistlers and tweaks is considered.

  7. Mineralocorticoid receptor inhibits CREB signaling by calcineurin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Claudia; Wuttke, Martin; Ruhs, Stefanie; Seiferth, Anja; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Rabe, Sindy; Schwerdt, Gerald; Gekle, Michael

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of MR with cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and provide a mechanistic explanation and insights into the cellular relevance. MR --> CREB crosstalk was assessed in vascular smooth muscle cells and heterologous expression systems. Experiments were designed in a way that only one variable changed at a time and the respective vehicles served as controls. MR, but not GR, activation (aldosterone or hydrocortisone, IC(50), approximately 0.3 nM) inhibits CREB transcriptional activity induced by stimulation of beta1/2-adrenoceptors and adenylyl cyclase or addition of membrane-permeable cAMP up to 70% within 2 h after addition. The MR DNA-binding domain is not required for this inhibition. cAMP formation is virtually unchanged, whereas MR exerts a robust inhibition of CREB(S133) phosphorylation via calcineurin/PP2B activation without changes in PP2B-Aalpha or beta expression. In parallel, the PP2B-sensitive NFaT-pathway is activated. The inhibitory crosstalk attenuates CREB-induced glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression. Overall, transcriptional relevant MR --> CREB crosstalk occurs at the level of CREB phosphorylation by enhanced calcineurin activity, enables GRE-independent genomic signaling of MR, and is of potential pathophysiological relevance.

  8. Real-time observation of signal recognition particle binding to actively translating ribosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, Thomas R; Chen, Jin; Walter, Peter; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) directs translating ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs) that display a signal sequence to protein translocation channels in target membranes. All previous work on the initial step of the targeting reaction, when SRP binds to RNCs, used stalled and non-translating RNCs. This meant that an important dimension of the co-translational process remained unstudied. We apply single-molecule fluorescence measurements to observe directly and in real-time E. coli SRP binding to actively translating RNCs. We show at physiologically relevant SRP concentrations that SRP-RNC association and dissociation rates depend on nascent chain length and the exposure of a functional signal sequence outside the ribosome. Our results resolve a long-standing question: how can a limited, sub-stoichiometric pool of cellular SRP effectively distinguish RNCs displaying a signal sequence from those that are not? The answer is strikingly simple: as originally proposed, SRP only stably engages translating RNCs exposing a functional signal sequence. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04418.001 PMID:25358118

  9. Redox Signaling as a Therapeutic Target to Inhibit Myofibroblast Activation in Degenerative Fibrotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Sampson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative fibrotic diseases encompass numerous systemic and organ-specific disorders. Despite their associated significant morbidity and mortality, there is currently no effective antifibrotic treatment. Fibrosis is characterized by the development and persistence of myofibroblasts, whose unregulated deposition of extracellular matrix components disrupts signaling cascades and normal tissue architecture leading to organ failure and death. The profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ is considered the foremost inducer of fibrosis, driving myofibroblast differentiation in diverse tissues. This review summarizes recent in vitro and in vivo data demonstrating that TGFβ-induced myofibroblast differentiation is driven by a prooxidant shift in redox homeostasis. Elevated NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 supported by concomitant decreases in nitric oxide (NO signaling and reactive oxygen species scavengers are central factors in the molecular pathogenesis of fibrosis in numerous tissues and organs. Moreover, complex interplay between NOX4-derived H2O2 and NO signaling regulates myofibroblast differentiation. Restoring redox homeostasis via antioxidants or NOX4 inactivation as well as by enhancing NO signaling via activation of soluble guanylyl cyclases or inhibition of phosphodiesterases can inhibit and reverse myofibroblast differentiation. Thus, dysregulated redox signaling represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of wide variety of different degenerative fibrotic disorders.

  10. Mislocalization of the MRN complex prevents ATR signaling during adenovirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carson, Christian T; Orazio, Nicole I; Lee, Darwin V

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinases ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM-Rad3 related (ATR) are activated in response to DNA damage, genotoxic stress and virus infections. Here we show that during infection with wild-type adenovirus, ATR and its cofactors RPA32, ATRIP and TopBP1 accumulate at viral...... during virus infection, which is independent of Mre11 nuclease activity and recruitment of RPA/ATR/ATRIP/TopBP1. Unlike other damage scenarios, we found that ATM and ATR signaling are not dependent on each other during infection. We identify a region of the viral E4orf3 protein responsible...

  11. Demodulation of Vibration Signals Generated by Defects in Rolling Element Bearings Using Complex Shifted Morlet Wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, N. G.; Antoniadis, I. A.

    2002-07-01

    Vibration signals resulting from rolling element bearing defects, present a rich content of physical information, the appropriate analysis of which can lead to the clear identification of the nature of the fault. The envelope detection or demodulation methods have been established as the dominant analysis methods for this purpose, since they can separate the useful part of the signal from its redundant contents. This paper proposes an effective demodulation method, based on the use of a complex shifted Morlet wavelet family. The method is designed in a way that can fully exploit the underlying physical concepts of the modulation mechanism, present in the vibration response of faulty bearings, using a time-frequency representation of the signal. A key element of the proposed method is the systematic introduction of selection criteria for the automated choice of the critical parameters that characterise the Morlet wavelet family used. Experimental results and industrial measurements for two different types of bearing faults confirm the validity of the overall approach.

  12. Mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the kidney: Target for intervention?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borst, M.H.; Wassef, L.; Kelly, D.J.; van Goor, H.; Navis, Ger Jan

    2006-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are intracellular signal transduction molecules, which connect cell-surface receptor signals to intracellular processes. MAPKs regulate a range of cellular activities including cell proliferation, gene expression, apoptosis, cell differentiation and cytokine

  13. Brain activity during complex imagined gait tasks in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Daniel S; Pickett, Kristen A; Duncan, Ryan P; Perlmutter, Joel S; Earhart, Gammon M

    2014-05-01

    Motor imagery during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows assessment of brain activity during tasks, like walking, that cannot be completed in an MRI scanner. We used gait imagery to assess the neural pathophysiology of locomotion in Parkinson disease (PD). Brain activity was measured in five locomotor regions (supplementary motor area (SMA), globus pallidus (GP), putamen, mesencephalic locomotor region, cerebellar locomotor region) during simple (forward) and complex (backward, turning) gait imagery. Brain activity was correlated to overground walking velocity. Across tasks, PD exhibited reduced activity in the globus pallidus compared to controls. People with PD, but not controls, exhibited more activity in the SMA during imagined turning compared to forward or backward walking. In PD, walking speed was correlated to brain activity in several regions. Altered SMA activity in PD during imagined turning may represent compensatory neural adaptations during complex gait. The lowered activity and positive correlation to locomotor function in GP suggests reduced activity in this region may relate to locomotor dysfunction. This study elucidates changes in neural activity during gait in PD, underscoring the importance of testing simple and complex tasks. Results support a positive relationship between activity in locomotor regions and walking ability. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Opposing actions of endocannabinoids on cholangiocarcinoma growth is via the differential activation of Notch signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frampton, Gabriel; Coufal, Monique [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX (United States); Li, Huang [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Ramirez, Jonathan [Digestive Disease Research Center, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX (United States); DeMorrow, Sharon, E-mail: demorrow@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX (United States); Digestive Disease Research Center, Scott and White Hospital, Temple, TX (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) have opposing effects on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Implicated in cancer, Notch signaling requires the {gamma}-secretase complex for activation. The aims of this study were to determine if the opposing effects of endocannabinoids depend on the differential activation of the Notch receptors and to demonstrate that the differential activation of these receptors are due to presenilin 1 containing- and presenilin 2 containing-{gamma}-secretase complexes. Mz-ChA-1 cells were treated with AEA or 2-AG. Notch receptor expression, activation, and nuclear translocation were determined. Specific roles for Notch 1 and 2 on cannabinoid-induced effects were determined by transient transfection of Notch 1 or 2 shRNA vectors before stimulation with AEA or 2-AG. Expression of presenilin 1 and 2 was determined after AEA or 2-AG treatment, and the involvement of presenilin 1 and 2 in the cannabinoid-induced effects was demonstrated in cell lines with low presenilin 1 or 2 expression. Antiproliferative effects of AEA required increased Notch 1 mRNA, activation, and nuclear translocation, whereas the growth-promoting effects induced by 2-AG required increased Notch 2 mRNA expression, activation, and nuclear translocation. AEA increased presenilin 1 expression and recruitment into the {gamma}-secretase complex, whereas 2-AG increased expression and recruitment of presenilin 2. The development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the endocannabinoid system or mimicking the mode of action of AEA on Notch signaling pathways would prove beneficial for cholangiocarcinoma management.

  15. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  16. Binding of Signal Recognition Particle Gives Ribosome/Nascent Chain Complexes a Competitive Advantage in Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhof, Andrea; Rolls, Melissa M.; Jungnickel, Berit; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Rapoport, Tom A.

    1998-01-01

    Most secretory and membrane proteins are sorted by signal sequences to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane early during their synthesis. Targeting of the ribosome-nascent chain complex (RNC) involves the binding of the signal sequence to the signal recognition particle (SRP), followed by an interaction of ribosome-bound SRP with the SRP receptor. However, ribosomes can also independently bind to the ER translocation channel formed by the Sec61p complex. To explain the specificity of membrane targeting, it has therefore been proposed that nascent polypeptide-associated complex functions as a cytosolic inhibitor of signal sequence- and SRP-independent ribosome binding to the ER membrane. We report here that SRP-independent binding of RNCs to the ER membrane can occur in the presence of all cytosolic factors, including nascent polypeptide-associated complex. Nontranslating ribosomes competitively inhibit SRP-independent membrane binding of RNCs but have no effect when SRP is bound to the RNCs. The protective effect of SRP against ribosome competition depends on a functional signal sequence in the nascent chain and is also observed with reconstituted proteoliposomes containing only the Sec61p complex and the SRP receptor. We conclude that cytosolic factors do not prevent the membrane binding of ribosomes. Instead, specific ribosome targeting to the Sec61p complex is provided by the binding of SRP to RNCs, followed by an interaction with the SRP receptor, which gives RNC–SRP complexes a selective advantage in membrane targeting over nontranslating ribosomes. PMID:9436994

  17. PDE8 controls CD4+ T cell motility through the PDE8A-Raf-1 kinase signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basole, Chaitali P; Nguyen, Rebecca K; Lamothe, Katie; Vang, Amanda; Clark, Robert; Baillie, George S; Epstein, Paul M; Brocke, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    The levels of cAMP are regulated by phosphodiesterase enzymes (PDEs), which are targets for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. We have previously shown that PDE8 regulates T cell motility. Here, for the first time, we report that PDE8A exerts part of its control of T cell function through the V-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (Raf-1) kinase signaling pathway. To examine T cell motility under physiologic conditions, we analyzed T cell interactions with endothelial cells and ligands in flow assays. The highly PDE8-selective enzymatic inhibitor PF-04957325 suppresses adhesion of in vivo myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) activated inflammatory CD4+ T effector (Teff) cells to brain endothelial cells under shear stress. Recently, PDE8A was shown to associate with Raf-1 creating a compartment of low cAMP levels around Raf-1 thereby protecting it from protein kinase A (PKA) mediated inhibitory phosphorylation. To test the function of this complex in Teff cells, we used a cell permeable peptide that selectively disrupts the PDE8A-Raf-1 interaction. The disruptor peptide inhibits the Teff-endothelial cell interaction more potently than the enzymatic inhibitor. Furthermore, the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction was identified as a target of disruptor peptide mediated reduction of adhesion, spreading and locomotion of Teff cells under flow. Mechanistically, we observed that disruption of the PDE8A-Raf-1 complex profoundly alters Raf-1 signaling in Teff cells. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that PDE8A inhibition by enzymatic inhibitors or PDE8A-Raf-1 kinase complex disruptors decreases Teff cell adhesion and migration under flow, and represents a novel approach to target T cells in inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shuang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Error signal sensing for active noise control in turbofan engine nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bruce; Hersh, Alan; Rice, Edward

    2002-05-01

    Blade passage harmonic tones are a significant component of turbofan engine noise under approach conditions. Active noise control (ANC) offers a tool for suppression of these tones, with the caveat that interference patterns in the sound field can lead to poor or even negative correlation between in-duct sound pressures and radiated sound power. Various modal decomposition and wavenumber separation schemes have been investigated in attempt to overcome this obstacle. The paper will discuss methods that have been applied to design and implementation of microphone arrays and signal processing techniques to provide unambiguous error signals for ANC systems in these complex acoustical environments and will present results of computer simulations and field tests. [Work sponsored by NASA Glenn and NASA Langley Research Centers.

  20. Innate Immune Signaling Activated by MDR Bacteria in the Airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dane; Ahn, Danielle; Cohen, Taylor; Prince, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Health care-associated bacterial pneumonias due to multiple-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are an important public health problem and are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to antimicrobial resistance, these organisms have adapted to the milieu of the human airway and have acquired resistance to the innate immune clearance mechanisms that normally prevent pneumonia. Given the limited efficacy of antibiotics, bacterial clearance from the airway requires an effective immune response. Understanding how specific airway pathogens initiate and regulate innate immune signaling, and whether this response is excessive, leading to host-induced pathology may guide future immunomodulatory therapy. We will focus on three of the most important causes of health care-associated pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and review the mechanisms through which an inappropriate or damaging innate immune response is stimulated, as well as describe how airway pathogens cause persistent infection by evading immune activation. PMID:26582515

  1. Hydrolytic Activity of Esterase-Antibody Complexes Retained Within Gel Capsules After Complex Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Youji; Miyatsuka, Rino

    2017-07-01

    Delipidation in biological samples is important for some diagnostic tests and protein analyses. Lipids in the samples can be hydrolyzed by native esterases (ESs) within gel capsules after ES, and ES-antibody complexes are specifically trapped, extracted, and separated. Acrylamide and agarose gel capsules containing complexes of ES antibody were produced after the complexes were extracted using protein A-immobilized membranes, separated by non-denaturing electrophoresis, and stained by colloidal silver using glucose as a reductant. ES activity of ES-antibody complexes within the gel capsule was significantly higher than that in the complexes with the control antibodies upon isolation, separation, and detection of the complex. In addition, lipids bound to human serum albumin decreased after human plasma was treated with gel capsules containing ES-antibody complexes. We demonstrate that the gel capsule containing ES-antibody complexes can be successfully isolated using techniques described in this study. Furthermore, delipidation of human plasma is obtained by incubation with the gel capsule. These results indicate that surplus materials such as lipids in biological samples can be removed or reduced by gel capsule containing enzymes.

  2. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Joana F; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-12-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 (TORC2). We show in the present study by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of l-serine:palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  3. Sphingolipid biosynthesis upregulation by TOR Complex 2-Ypk1 signaling during yeast adaptive response to acetic acid stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Joana F.; Muir, Alexander; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Thorner, Jeremy; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid-induced inhibition of yeast growth and metabolism limits the productivity of industrial fermentation processes, especially when lignocellulosic hydrolysates are used as feedstock in industrial biotechnology. Tolerance to acetic acid of food spoilage yeasts is also a problem in the preservation of acidic foods and beverages. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation and tolerance to acetic acid stress is increasingly important in industrial biotechnology and the food industry. Prior genetic screens for S. cerevisiae mutants with increased sensitivity to acetic acid identified loss-of-function mutations in the YPK1 gene, which encodes a protein kinase activated by the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Complex 2 (TORC2). We show here by several independent criteria that TORC2-Ypk1 signaling is stimulated in response to acetic acid stress. Moreover, we demonstrate that TORC2-mediated Ypk1 phosphorylation and activation is necessary for acetic acid tolerance, and occurs independently of Hrk1, a protein kinase previously implicated in the cellular response to acetic acid. In addition, we show that TORC2-Ypk1-mediated activation of L-serine: palmitoyl-CoA acyltransferase, the enzyme complex that catalyzes the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis, is required for acetic acid tolerance. Furthermore, analysis of the sphingolipid pathway using inhibitors and mutants indicates that it is production of certain complex sphingolipids that contributes to conferring acetic acid tolerance. Consistent with that conclusion, promoting sphingolipid synthesis by adding exogenous long-chain base precursor phytosphingosine to the growth medium enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Thus, appropriate modulation of the TORC2-Ypk1-sphingolipid axis in industrial yeast strains may have utility in improving fermentations of acetic acid-containing feedstocks. PMID:27671892

  4. Bovine lactoferrin counteracts Toll-like receptor mediated activation signals in antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Puddu

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (LF, a key element in mammalian immune system, plays pivotal roles in host defence against infection and excessive inflammation. Its protective effects range from direct antimicrobial activities against a large panel of microbes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, to antinflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs generated in the presence of bovine LF (bLF fail to undergo activation by up-modulating CD83, co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules, and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Moreover, these cells are weak activators of T cell proliferation and retain antigen uptake activity. Consistent with an impaired maturation, bLF-MD-DC primed T lymphocytes exhibit a functional unresponsiveness characterized by reduced expression of CD154 and impaired expression of IFN-γ and IL-2. The observed imunosuppressive effects correlate with an increased expression of molecules with negative regulatory functions (i.e. immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death ligand 1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3. Interestingly, bLF-MD-DCs produce IL-6 and exhibit constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Conversely, bLF exposure of already differentiated MD-DCs completely fails to induce IL-6, and partially inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR agonist-induced activation. Cell-specific differences in bLF internalization likely account for the distinct response elicited by bLF in monocytes versus immature DCs, providing a mechanistic base for its multiple effects. These results indicate that bLF exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by skewing monocyte differentiation into DCs with impaired capacity to undergo activation and to promote Th1 responses. Overall, these bLF-mediated effects may represent a strategy to block excessive DC activation upon TLR-induced inflammation, adding

  5. Deconstructing the Complexity of TGFβ Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Quiescence and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinge, Ashwini; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2016-12-01

    The hematopoietic system is highly dynamic and must constantly produce new blood cells every day. Mature blood cells all derive from a pool of rare long-lived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are mostly quiescent but occasionally divide and self-renew in order to maintain the stem cell pool and continuous replenishment of mature blood cells throughout life. A tight control of HSC self-renewal, commitment to differentiation and maintenance of quiescence states is necessary for lifelong blood supply. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a critical regulator hematopoietic cell functions. It is a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic cell growth. However, TGFβ functions are more complex and largely context-dependent. Emerging evidence suggests a role in aging, cell identity and cell fate decisions. Here, we will review the role of TGF-β and downstream signaling in normal HSC functions, in HSC quiescence and beyond.

  6. Antibacterial Activities of Azole Complexes Combined with Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor J. Bello-Vieda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Growing antimicrobial resistance is considered a potential threat for human health security by health organizations, such as the WHO, CDC and FDA, pointing to MRSA as an example. New antibacterial drugs and complex derivatives are needed to combat the development of bacterial resistance. Six new copper and cobalt complexes of azole derivatives were synthesized and isolated as air-stable solids and characterized by melting point analyses, elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA, and infrared and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. The analyses and spectral data showed that the complexes had 1:1 (M:L stoichiometries and tetrahedral geometries, the latter being supported by DFT calculations. The antibacterial activities of the metal complexes by themselves and combined with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs; 2 μg mL−1 were assessed in vitro by broth microdilution assays against eight bacterial strains of clinical relevance. The results showed that the complexes alone exhibited moderate antibacterial activities. However, when the metal complexes were combined with AgNPs, their antibacterial activities increased (up to 10-fold in the case of complex 5, while human cell viabilities were maintained. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values were in the range of 25–500 μg mL−1. This study thus presents novel approaches for the design of materials for fighting bacterial resistance. The use of azole complexes combined with AgNPs provides a new alternative against bacterial infections, especially when current treatments are associated with the rapid development of antibiotic resistance.

  7. Moonlighting kinases with guanylate cyclase activity can tune regulatory signal networks

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2012-02-01

    Guanylate cyclase (GC) catalyzes the formation of cGMP and it is only recently that such enzymes have been characterized in plants. One family of plant GCs contains the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain of leucine rich repeat receptor like kinases such as the phytosulfokine and brassinosteroid receptors. In vitro studies show that both the kinase and GC domain have catalytic activity indicating that these kinase-GCs are examples of moonlighting proteins with dual catalytic function. The natural ligands for both receptors increase intracellular cGMP levels in isolated mesophyll protoplast assays suggesting that the GC activity is functionally relevant. cGMP production may have an autoregulatory role on receptor kinase activity and/or contribute to downstream cell expansion responses. We postulate that the receptors are members of a novel class of receptor kinases that contain functional moonlighting GC domains essential for complex signaling roles.

  8. G Protein Signaling Modulator-3 Inhibits the Inflammasome Activity of NLRP3*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Patrick M.; Gall, Bryan J.; Ezekwe, Ejiofor A. D.; Laroche, Geneviève; Buckley, Brian K.; Kebaier, Chahnaz; Wilson, Justin E.; Ting, Jenny P.; Siderovski, David P.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein complexes that regulate maturation of the interleukin 1β-related cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 through activation of the cysteine proteinase caspase-1. NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) protein is a key component of inflammasomes that assemble in response to a wide variety of endogenous and pathogen-derived danger signals. Activation of the NLRP3-inflammasome and subsequent secretion of IL-1β is highly regulated by at least three processes: transcriptional activation of both NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β genes, non-transcriptional priming of NLRP3, and final activation of NLRP3. NLRP3 is predominantly expressed in cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified the hematopoietic-restricted protein, G protein signaling modulator-3 (GPSM3), as a NLRP3-interacting protein and a negative regulator of IL-1β production triggered by NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activators. In monocytes, GPSM3 associates with the C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain of NLRP3. Bone marrow-derived macrophages lacking GPSM3 expression exhibit an increase in NLRP3-dependent IL-1β, but not TNF-α, secretion. Furthermore, GPSM3-null mice have enhanced serum and peritoneal IL-1β production following Alum-induced peritonitis. Our findings suggest that GPSM3 acts as a direct negative regulator of NLRP3 function. PMID:25271165

  9. Ant queen egg-marking signals: matching deceptive laboratory simplicity with natural complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle S van Zweden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experiments under controlled laboratory conditions can produce decisive evidence for testing biological hypotheses, provided they are representative of the more complex natural conditions. However, whether this requirement is fulfilled is seldom tested explicitly. Here we provide a lab/field comparison to investigate the identity of an egg-marking signal of ant queens. Our study was based on ant workers resolving conflict over male production by destroying each other's eggs, but leaving queen eggs unharmed. For this, the workers need a proximate cue to discriminate between the two egg types. Earlier correlative evidence indicated that, in the ant Pachycondyla inversa, the hydrocarbon 3,11-dimethylheptacosane (3,11-diMeC(27 is more abundant on the surface of queen-laid eggs. METHODOLOGY: We first tested the hypothesis that 3,11-diMeC(27 functions as a queen egg-marking pheromone using laboratory-maintained colonies. We treated worker-laid eggs with synthetic 3,11-diMeC(27 and found that they were significantly more accepted than sham-treated worker-laid eggs. However, we repeated the experiment with freshly collected field colonies and observed no effect of treating worker-laid eggs with 3,11-diMeC(27, showing that this compound by itself is not the natural queen egg-marking pheromone. We subsequently investigated the overall differences of entire chemical profiles of eggs, and found that queen-laid eggs in field colonies are more distinct from worker-laid eggs than in lab colonies, have more variation in profiles, and have an excess of longer-chain hydrocarbons. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that queen egg-marking signals are significantly affected by transfer to the laboratory, and that this change is possibly connected to reduced queen fertility as predicted by honest signaling theory. This change is reflected in the worker egg policing response under field and laboratory conditions.

  10. Ant queen egg-marking signals: matching deceptive laboratory simplicity with natural complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zweden, Jelle S; Heinze, Jürgen; Boomsma, Jacobus J; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Experiments under controlled laboratory conditions can produce decisive evidence for testing biological hypotheses, provided they are representative of the more complex natural conditions. However, whether this requirement is fulfilled is seldom tested explicitly. Here we provide a lab/field comparison to investigate the identity of an egg-marking signal of ant queens. Our study was based on ant workers resolving conflict over male production by destroying each other's eggs, but leaving queen eggs unharmed. For this, the workers need a proximate cue to discriminate between the two egg types. Earlier correlative evidence indicated that, in the ant Pachycondyla inversa, the hydrocarbon 3,11-dimethylheptacosane (3,11-diMeC(27)) is more abundant on the surface of queen-laid eggs. We first tested the hypothesis that 3,11-diMeC(27) functions as a queen egg-marking pheromone using laboratory-maintained colonies. We treated worker-laid eggs with synthetic 3,11-diMeC(27) and found that they were significantly more accepted than sham-treated worker-laid eggs. However, we repeated the experiment with freshly collected field colonies and observed no effect of treating worker-laid eggs with 3,11-diMeC(27), showing that this compound by itself is not the natural queen egg-marking pheromone. We subsequently investigated the overall differences of entire chemical profiles of eggs, and found that queen-laid eggs in field colonies are more distinct from worker-laid eggs than in lab colonies, have more variation in profiles, and have an excess of longer-chain hydrocarbons. Our results suggest that queen egg-marking signals are significantly affected by transfer to the laboratory, and that this change is possibly connected to reduced queen fertility as predicted by honest signaling theory. This change is reflected in the worker egg policing response under field and laboratory conditions.

  11. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mena, Natalia P. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Bulteau, Anne Laure [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Salazar, Julio [Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Etienne C. [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMRS 975 - UMR 7725, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); Inserm, U 975, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences, ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, F-75005 Paris (France); ICM, Therapeutique Experimentale de la Neurodegenerescence, Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris 75013 (France); Nunez, Marco T., E-mail: mnunez@uchile.cl [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago (Chile); Millennium Institute of Cell Dynamics and Biotechnology, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  12. Metformin differentially activates ER stress signaling pathways without inducing apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Quentin

    2012-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling (ERSS plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and heart disease. The latter is a common comorbidity of diabetes and worsens patient outcome. Results from clinical studies suggest beneficial effects of metformin – a widely used oral drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes – on the heart of diabetic patients with heart failure. We therefore analyzed the effect of metformin on ERSS in primary rat cardiomyocytes. We found that metformin activates the PERK-ATF4 but not the ATF6 or IRE1-XBP1 branch in ERSS and leads to a strong upregulation of CHOP mRNA and protein. Surprisingly, long-term induction of CHOP by metformin is not accompanied by apoptosis even though CHOP is regarded to be a mediator of ER-stress-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, metformin induces distinct ER stress pathways in cardiomyocytes and our results indicate that CHOP is not necessarily a mediator of apoptosis. Metformin might exert its cardioprotective effect through selective activation of ERSS pathways in the cardiomyocyte.

  13. Metformin differentially activates ER stress signaling pathways without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michael; Poppe, Andrea; Thoms, Sven

    2012-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling (ERSS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and heart disease. The latter is a common comorbidity of diabetes and worsens patient outcome. Results from clinical studies suggest beneficial effects of metformin - a widely used oral drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes - on the heart of diabetic patients with heart failure. We therefore analyzed the effect of metformin on ERSS in primary rat cardiomyocytes. We found that metformin activates the PERK-ATF4 but not the ATF6 or IRE1-XBP1 branch in ERSS and leads to a strong upregulation of CHOP mRNA and protein. Surprisingly, long-term induction of CHOP by metformin is not accompanied by apoptosis even though CHOP is regarded to be a mediator of ER-stress-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, metformin induces distinct ER stress pathways in cardiomyocytes and our results indicate that CHOP is not necessarily a mediator of apoptosis. Metformin might exert its cardioprotective effect through selective activation of ERSS pathways in the cardiomyocyte.

  14. Changed genome heterochromatinization upon prolonged activation of the Raf/ERK signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Martin

    Full Text Available The Raf/ERK (Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase signal transduction pathway controls numerous cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, cellular transformation and senescence. ERK activation is thought to involve complex spatial and temporal regulation, to achieve a high degree of specificity, though precisely how this is achieved remains to be confirmed. We report here that prolonged activation of a conditional form of c-Raf-1 (BXB-ER leads to profound changes in the level and distribution of a heterochromatic histone mark. In mouse fibroblasts, the heterochromatic trimethylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 (H3K9Me3 is normally confined to pericentromeric regions. However, following ERK activation a genome-wide redistribution of H3K9Me3 correlates with loss of the histone modification from chromocentres and the appearance of numerous punctuate sites throughout the interphase nucleus. These epigenetic changes during interphase correlate with altered chromosome structure during mitosis, where robust H3K9Me3 signals appear within telomeric heterochromatin. This pattern of heterochromatinization is distinct from previously described oncogene induced senescence associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF, which are excluded from telomeres. The H3K9Me3 histone mark is known to bind the major heterochromatin protein HP1 and we show that the alterations in the distribution of this histone epistate correlate with redistribution of HP1β throughout the nucleus. Interestingly while ERK activation is fully reversible, the observed chromatin changes induced by epigenetic modifications are not reversible once established. We describe for the first time a link from prolonged ERK activation to stable changes in genome organization through redistribution of heterochromatic domains involving the telomeres. These epigenetic changes provide a possible mechanism through which prolonged activation of Raf/ERK can lead to growth arrest or the induction of

  15. Simvastatin Impairs Growth Hormone-Activated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Signaling Pathway in UMR-106 Osteosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Usme, María Claudia; Umaña-Pérez, Adriana; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Sánchez-Gómez, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that statins reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. The JAK/STAT pathway plays an important role in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in many tissues, and its deregulation is believed to be involved in tumorigenesis and cancer. The physiological activation of STAT proteins by GH is rapid but transient in nature and its inactivation is regulated mainly by the expression of SOCS proteins. UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells express a GH-responsive JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, providing an experimental model to study the influence of statins on this system. In this study we investigated the actions of simvastatin on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion on UMR-106 cells and examined whether alterations in GH-stimulated JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling may be observed. Results showed that treatment of osteosarcoma cells with simvastatin at 3 to 10 µM doses decreases cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in a time- and dose-dependent manner. At the molecular level, although the mechanisms used by simvastatin are not entirely clear, the effect of the statin on the reduction of JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation levels may partially explain the decrease in the GH-stimulated STAT5 transcriptional activity. This effect correlated with a time- and dose-dependent increase of SOCS-3 expression levels in cells treated with simvastatin, a regulatory role that has not been previously described. Furthermore, the finding that simvastatin is capable of inducing SOCS-3 and CIS genes expression shows the potential of the JAK/STAT pathway as a therapeutic target, reinforcing the efficacy of simvastatin as chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:24489959

  16. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Efficient transmission of subthreshold signals in complex networks of spiking neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin J Torres

    Full Text Available We investigate the efficient transmission and processing of weak, subthreshold signals in a realistic neural medium in the presence of different levels of the underlying noise. Assuming Hebbian weights for maximal synaptic conductances--that naturally balances the network with excitatory and inhibitory synapses--and considering short-term synaptic plasticity affecting such conductances, we found different dynamic phases in the system. This includes a memory phase where population of neurons remain synchronized, an oscillatory phase where transitions between different synchronized populations of neurons appears and an asynchronous or noisy phase. When a weak stimulus input is applied to each neuron, increasing the level of noise in the medium we found an efficient transmission of such stimuli around the transition and critical points separating different phases for well-defined different levels of stochasticity in the system. We proved that this intriguing phenomenon is quite robust, as it occurs in different situations including several types of synaptic plasticity, different type and number of stored patterns and diverse network topologies, namely, diluted networks and complex topologies such as scale-free and small-world networks. We conclude that the robustness of the phenomenon in different realistic scenarios, including spiking neurons, short-term synaptic plasticity and complex networks topologies, make very likely that it could also occur in actual neural systems as recent psycho-physical experiments suggest.

  18. Efficient transmission of subthreshold signals in complex networks of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Joaquin J; Elices, Irene; Marro, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the efficient transmission and processing of weak, subthreshold signals in a realistic neural medium in the presence of different levels of the underlying noise. Assuming Hebbian weights for maximal synaptic conductances--that naturally balances the network with excitatory and inhibitory synapses--and considering short-term synaptic plasticity affecting such conductances, we found different dynamic phases in the system. This includes a memory phase where population of neurons remain synchronized, an oscillatory phase where transitions between different synchronized populations of neurons appears and an asynchronous or noisy phase. When a weak stimulus input is applied to each neuron, increasing the level of noise in the medium we found an efficient transmission of such stimuli around the transition and critical points separating different phases for well-defined different levels of stochasticity in the system. We proved that this intriguing phenomenon is quite robust, as it occurs in different situations including several types of synaptic plasticity, different type and number of stored patterns and diverse network topologies, namely, diluted networks and complex topologies such as scale-free and small-world networks. We conclude that the robustness of the phenomenon in different realistic scenarios, including spiking neurons, short-term synaptic plasticity and complex networks topologies, make very likely that it could also occur in actual neural systems as recent psycho-physical experiments suggest.

  19. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Wicher

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR, we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH: PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage.

  20. The correlation between white-matter microstructure and the complexity of spontaneous brain activity: a difussion tensor imaging-MEG study.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, A; Ríos-Lago, M; Abásolo, D; Hornero, R; Alvarez-Linera, J; Paul, N; Maestú, F; Ortiz, T

    2011-01-01

    The advent of new signal processing methods, such as non-linear analysis techniques, represents a new perspective which adds further value to brain signals' analysis. Particularly, Lempel–Ziv's Complexity (LZC) has proven to be useful in exploring the complexity of the brain electromagnetic activity. However, an important problem is the lack of knowledge about the physiological determinants of these measures. Although acorrelation between complexity and connectivity has been proposed, this hy...

  1. Complex network inference from P300 signals: Decoding brain state under visual stimulus for able-bodied and disabled subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Cai, Qing; Dong, Na; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Bo, Yun; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Distinguishing brain cognitive behavior underlying disabled and able-bodied subjects constitutes a challenging problem of significant importance. Complex network has established itself as a powerful tool for exploring functional brain networks, which sheds light on the inner workings of the human brain. Most existing works in constructing brain network focus on phase-synchronization measures between regional neural activities. In contrast, we propose a novel approach for inferring functional networks from P300 event-related potentials by integrating time and frequency domain information extracted from each channel signal, which we show to be efficient in subsequent pattern recognition. In particular, we construct brain network by regarding each channel signal as a node and determining the edges in terms of correlation of the extracted feature vectors. A six-choice P300 paradigm with six different images is used in testing our new approach, involving one able-bodied subject and three disabled subjects suffering from multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain and spinal-cord injury, respectively. We then exploit global efficiency, local efficiency and small-world indices from the derived brain networks to assess the network topological structure associated with different target images. The findings suggest that our method allows identifying brain cognitive behaviors related to visual stimulus between able-bodied and disabled subjects.

  2. The complexity of targeting EGFR signalling in cancer: from expression to turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Sinto; Settleman, Jeffrey; Reshkin, Stephan J; Azzariti, Amalia; Bellizzi, Antonia; Paradiso, Angelo

    2006-08-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB1 or EGFR) has been found to be altered in a variety of human cancers. A number of agents targeting these receptors, including specific antibodies directed against the ligand-binding domain of the receptor and small molecules that inhibit kinase activity are either in clinical trials or are already approved for clinical treatment. However, identifying patients that are likely to respond to such treatments has been challenging. As a consequence, it still remains important to identify additional alterations of the tumor cell that contribute to the response to EGFR-targeted agents. While EGFR-mediated signalling pathways have been well established, there is still a rather limited understanding of how intracellular protein-protein interactions, ubiquitination, endocytosis and subsequent degradation of EGFR contribute to the determination of sensitivity to EGFR targeting agents and are emerging areas of investigation. This review primarily focuses on the basic signal transduction pathways mediated through activated membrane bound and/or endosomal EGFR and emphasizes the need to co-target additional proteins that function either upstream or downstream of EGFR to improve cancer therapy.

  3. Hydroxyflavone metal complexes - molecular structure, antioxidant activity and biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonowicz, Mariola; Regulska, Ewa; Kalinowska, Monika

    2017-08-01

    High content of hydroxyflavones in fruits, vegetables, cereals and herbs makes them a common component of the human diet. Because of their antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anticancer properties they still pay an attention of many scientific centers. Hydroxyflavones may form complexes with metal cations, and their chelating properties differ significantly depending on the number and position of hydroxyl substituents in the ring. Synthesis of new complexes of hydroxyflavones allows for improvement biological properties, stability, water-solubility, hydrophilicity, bioavailability comparing with the parent hydroxyflavones. It expands the applicability of hydroxyflavones as food additives, diet supplements, preservatives or drug. This paper reviews on the procedures of synthesis of metal complexes with hydroxyflavones, their molecular structure, mode of coordinations, spectroscopic properties and their biological activity. The dependency between the biological activity of these compounds and their molecular structure is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Brown seaweed fucoidan: biological activity and apoptosis, growth signaling mechanism in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-09-01

    Seaweeds, being abundant sources of bioactive components have much interest in recent times. The complex polysaccharides from the brown, red and green seaweeds possess broad spectrum therapeutic properties. The sulfated polysaccharides are routinely used in biomedical research and have known biological activities. Fucoidan, a fucose-rich polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweed has various biological functions including anticancer effects. Cellular damage induces growth arrest and tumor suppression by inducing apoptosis, the mechanism of cell death depends on the magnitude of DNA damage following exposure to anticancer agents. Apoptosis is mainly regulated by cell growth signaling molecules. Number of research studies evidenced that fucoidan shown to induce cytotoxicity of various cancer cells, induces apoptosis, and inhibits invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells. There are few articles discussing on fucoidan biological activity but no specific review on cancer and its signaling mechanism. Hence, this review discusses the brown seaweed fucoidan structure and some biological function and role in apoptosis, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and growth signal mechanism on cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex extreme learning machine applications in terahertz pulsed signals feature sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X-X; Hadjiloucas, S; Zhang, Y

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to the automatic classification of very large data sets composed of terahertz pulse transient signals, highlighting their potential use in biochemical, biomedical, pharmaceutical and security applications. Two different types of THz spectra are considered in the classification process. Firstly a binary classification study of poly-A and poly-C ribonucleic acid samples is performed. This is then contrasted with a difficult multi-class classification problem of spectra from six different powder samples that although have fairly indistinguishable features in the optical spectrum, they also possess a few discernable spectral features in the terahertz part of the spectrum. Classification is performed using a complex-valued extreme learning machine algorithm that takes into account features in both the amplitude as well as the phase of the recorded spectra. Classification speed and accuracy are contrasted with that achieved using a support vector machine classifier. The study systematically compares the classifier performance achieved after adopting different Gaussian kernels when separating amplitude and phase signatures. The two signatures are presented as feature vectors for both training and testing purposes. The study confirms the utility of complex-valued extreme learning machine algorithms for classification of the very large data sets generated with current terahertz imaging spectrometers. The classifier can take into consideration heterogeneous layers within an object as would be required within a tomographic setting and is sufficiently robust to detect patterns hidden inside noisy terahertz data sets. The proposed study opens up the opportunity for the establishment of complex-valued extreme learning machine algorithms as new chemometric tools that will assist the wider proliferation of terahertz sensing technology for chemical sensing, quality control, security screening and clinic diagnosis. Furthermore, the proposed

  6. QRS complex detection in ECG signals using locally adaptive weighted total variation denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tanushree; Sharma, Kamalesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The QRS complex is the most prominent feature in the electrocardiogram (ECG), therefore, its detection is required for delineation of other waves and segments in the ECG and derivation of additional clinically useful information. QRS detection is complicated by factors like varying QRS morphologies, noise, artefacts and interference from tall and pointed P- and T-waves. In this paper, we propose a novel technique for QRS detection by preprocessing the ECG using weighted total variation (WTV) denoising. A local estimate of noise in the signal block under consideration is used to determine the regularization parameter in WTV minimization, which determines the amount of smoothing applied. This makes the denoising locally adaptive. The weights are chosen so as to give preference to preservation of QRS complexes over P- and T-waves while smoothing. Thus, the technique can simultaneously reduce the higher frequency noise as well as the lower frequency interference from P- and T-waves, in spite of the fact that they have overlapping spectra with the QRS complexes. The proposed method is evaluated on the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and gives improved detection accuracy over established and state-of-the-art techniques. The technique has low computational load, therefore, it can be used for fast offline QRS detection in long duration ECG records, as well as real-time QRS detection in block-by-block processing mode. The average values of sensitivity, positive predictivity and detection error rate are 99.90%, 99.88% and 0.23%, for the offline implementation, respectively, and 99.86%, 99.85% and 0.29%, for the real-time mode, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biological activities of some Fluoroquinolones-metal complexes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metal ions play a vital role in the design of more biologically active drugs. Aim: The paper reviewed the antimicrobial, toxicological and DNA cleavage studies of some synthesized metal complexes of fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Literature searches were done using scientific databases.

  8. Local Activity Principle:. the Cause of Complexity and Symmetry Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainzer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The principle of local activity is precisely the missing concept to explain the emergence of complex patterns in a homogeneous medium. Leon O. Chua discovered and defined this principle in the theory of nonlinear electronic circuits in a mathematically rigorous way. The local principle can be generalized and proven at least for the class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems in physics, chemistry, biology and brain research. Recently, it was realized by memristors for nanoelectronic device applications in technical brains. In general, the emergence of complex patterns and structures is explained by symmetry breaking in homogeneous media. The principle of local activity is the cause of symmetry breaking in homogeneous media. We argue that the principle of local activity is really fundamental in science and can even be identified in quantum cosmology as symmetry breaking of local gauge symmetries generating the complexity of matter and forces in our universe. Finally, we consider applications in economic, financial, and social systems with the emergence of equilibrium states, symmetry breaking at critical points of phase transitions and risky acting at the edge of chaos. In any case, the driving causes of symmetry breaking and the emergence of complexity are locally active elements, cells, units, or agents.

  9. Activation of CO2 by phosphinoamide hafnium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgro, Michael J; Stephan, Douglas W

    2013-04-04

    Hf-phosphinoamide cation complexes behave as metal-based frustrated Lewis pairs and bind one or two equivalent of CO2 and in as well can activate CO2 in a bimetallic fashion to give a pseudo-tetrahedral P2CO2 fragment linking two Hf centres.

  10. Cellular signaling events involved in thrombin activation of vascular endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, T.A.; Capasso, E.L.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    Although cytosolic calcium ((Ca))/sub I/), inositol trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacylglycerol (DAG) are important second messengers involved in stimulus-response coupling to certain hormones, little information is available regarding their role in the activation of vascular endothelial cells (EC) during coagulation. The authors have used cultured human umbilical vein EC to examine thrombin effects on (Ca)/sub I/ and on IP/sub 3/ and DAG formation. Thrombin (1 U/ml) induces a rapid (peak < 15 sec) increase in (Ca)/sub I/ (300% basal levels) in suspensions of fura-2 (fluorescent Ca/sup 2 +/ indicator)-loaded EC. In addition thrombin stimulates concentration-dependent (.001-1 U/ml) increases in calcium efflux and IP/sub 3/ formation in EC prelabeled with /sup 45/Ca or /sup 3/H-myoinositol. Peak IP/sub 3/ (182+/-14% control) is rapid (<15 sec) and temporally similar to the rise in (Ca)/sub I/. In /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid-labeled EC, thrombin increases DAG (protein kinase C activator) at 15 sec (133+/-8% control), as well as 5 min (148+/-12% control). EC preincubation with 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10/sup -7/M, 5 min), a potent activator of protein kinase C, blocks thrombin (1 U/ml)-induced increases in (Ca)/sub I/ and IP/sub 3/. Thus, thrombin may trigger at least two distinct signaling pathways (IP/sub 3//calcium; DAG/protein kinase C) in EC. In addition, DAG stimulation of protein kinase C may influence this mediator's action in vascular EC.

  11. Supramolecular structural, thermal properties and biological activity of 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mahmoud, Nessma F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Bindary, Ashraf A.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.

    2015-04-01

    New bi- and trivalent transition metal complexes of ligand 3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol (GFS) were synthesized. The ligand and complexes were characterized via: melting point, UV/Visible, IR, 1H NMR, mass and diffused reflectance spectroscopy. The molecular structure of the investigated ligand (GFS) is optimized theoretically and the quantum chemical parameters are calculated. In addition, the complexes were characterized based on conductivity measurement, thermal analysis and biological activity. The infrared spectral study of GFS and its complexes, act as monobasic tridentate through the oxygen atom of hydroxyl group and two etheric oxygen atoms. Also, coordination to the unprotonated oxygen is evidenced from the disappearance of the OH signal in the 1H NMR spectra after complexation. The thermogravimetric analysis of the complexes shows metal oxide remaining as the final product. The compounds were tested against four bacterial species; two Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as well as antifungal activity against (Candida albicans). The complexes showed significant activities against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. [Cd(GFS)Cl(H2O)2] complex showed remarkable antifungal activity. However, some complexes showed more chemotherapeutic efficiency than the parent GFS drug. The drug and complexes were also screened for their in vitro anticancer activity against the Breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained show that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity.

  12. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  13. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Sengle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that

  14. The Shc family protein adaptor, Rai, negatively regulates T cell antigen receptor signaling by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment and activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Ferro

    Full Text Available Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps--recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade.

  15. Hypoxia activated EGFR signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Misra

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process which requires the conversion of polarized epithelial cells to mesenchymal cells, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. EMT is essential during embryonic morphogenesis and has been implicated in the progression of primary tumors towards metastasis. Hypoxia is known to induce EMT; however the molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Using the A431 epithelial cancer cell line, we show that cells grown under hypoxic conditions migrated faster than cells grown under normal oxygen environment. Cells grown under hypoxia showed reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM probably due to reduced number of Vinculin patches. Growth under hypoxic conditions also led to down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin expression. The increased motility of cells grown under hypoxia could be due to redistribution of Rac1 to the plasma membrane as opposed to increased expression of Rac1. EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor is a known inducer of EMT and growth of A431 cells in the absence of oxygen led to increased expression of EGFR (EGF Receptor. Treatment of A431 cells with EGF led to reduced cell adhesion to ECM, increased cell motility and other EMT characteristics. Furthermore, this transition was blocked by the monoclonal antibody Cetuximab. Cetuximab also blocked the hypoxia-induced EMT suggesting that cell growth under hypoxic conditions led to activation of EGFR signaling and induction of EMT phenotype.

  16. Kurtosis based blind source extraction of complex noncircular signals with application in EEG artifact removal in real-time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush eJavidi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new class of complex domain blind source extraction (BSE algorithms suitable for the extraction of both circular and noncircular complex signals is proposed. This is achieved through sequential extraction based on the degree of kurtosis and in the presence of noncircular measurement noise. The existence and uniqueness analysis of the solution is followed by a study of fast converging variants of the algorithm. The performance is first assessed through simulations on well understood benchmark signals, followed by a case study on real-time artifact removal from EEG signals, verified using both qualitative and quantitative metrics. The results illustrate the power of the proposed approach in real-time blind extraction of general complex-valued sources.

  17. Gosha-jinki-gan (a Herbal Complex Corrects Abnormal Insulin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolin Qin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the traditional herbal complex Gosha-jinki-gan (GJG improves diabetic neuropathy and insulin resistance. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms related with the long-term effects of GJG administration on insulin action in vivo and the early steps of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle in streptozotocin (STZ diabetes. Rats were randomized into five subgroups: (1 saline treated control, (2 GJG treated control, (3 2-unit insulin + saline treated diabetic, (4 saline + GJG treated diabetic and (5 2-unit insulin + GJG treated diabetic groups. After seven days of treatment, euglycemic clamp experiment at an insulin infusion rate of 6 mU/kg/min was performed in overnight fasted rats. Despite the 2-unit insulin treatment, the metabolic clearance rates of glucose (MCR, ml/kg/min in diabetic rats were significantly lower compared with the controls (11.4 ± 1.0 vs 44.1 ± 1.5; P < 0.001, and were significantly improved by insulin combined with GJG or GJG alone (26 ± 3.2 and 24.6 ± 2.2, P < 0.01, respectively. The increased insulin receptor (IR-β protein content in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats was not affected by insulin combined with GJG administration. However, the decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 protein content was significantly improved by treatment with GJG. Additionally, the increased tyrosine phosphorylation levels of IR-β and IRS-1 were significantly inhibited in insulin combined with GJG treated diabetes. The present results suggest that the improvement of the impaired insulin sensitivity in STZ-diabetic rats by administration of GJG may be due, at least in part, to correction in the abnormal early steps of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle.

  18. EFCAB7 and IQCE regulate hedgehog signaling by tethering the EVC-EVC2 complex to the base of primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusapati, Ganesh V; Hughes, Casey E; Dorn, Karolin V; Zhang, Dapeng; Sugianto, Priscilla; Aravind, L; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-03-10

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway depends on primary cilia in vertebrates, but the signaling machinery within cilia remains incompletely defined. We report the identification of a complex between two ciliary proteins, EFCAB7 and IQCE, which positively regulates the Hh pathway. The EFCAB7-IQCE module anchors the EVC-EVC2 complex in a signaling microdomain at the base of cilia. EVC and EVC2 genes are mutated in Ellis van Creveld and Weyers syndromes, characterized by impaired Hh signaling in skeletal, cardiac, and orofacial tissues. EFCAB7 binds to a C-terminal disordered region in EVC2 that is deleted in Weyers patients. EFCAB7 depletion mimics the Weyers cellular phenotype-the mislocalization of EVC-EVC2 within cilia and impaired activation of the transcription factor GLI2. Evolutionary analysis suggests that emergence of these complexes might have been important for adaptation of an ancient organelle, the cilium, for an animal-specific signaling network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Using Photoactivation Light Microscopy (PALM) to construct comprehensive, nanometer precision atlases of signaling complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liphardt, Jan

    2009-03-01

    The E. coli chemotaxis network is a model system for biological signal processing. In E. coli, transmembrane receptors responsible for signal transduction assemble into large clusters containing several thousand proteins. These sensory clusters have been observed at cell poles and future division sites. Despite extensive study, it remains unclear how chemotaxis clusters form, what controls cluster size and density, and how the cellular location of clusters is robustly maintained in growing and dividing cells. Here we use photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to map the cellular locations of three proteins central to bacterial chemotaxis (the Tar receptor, CheY, and CheW) with a precision of 15 nanometers. We find that cluster sizes are approximately exponentially distributed, with no characteristic cluster size. One third of Tar receptors are part of smaller lateral clusters and not the large polar clusters. Analysis of the relative cellular locations of 1.1 million individual proteins (from 326 cells) suggests that clusters form via stochastic self-assembly. The super-resolution PALM maps of E. coli receptors support the notion that stochastic self-assembly can create and maintain approximately periodic structures in biological membranes, without direct cytoskeletal involvement or active transport.

  20. Constitutive activation of CaMKKα signaling is sufficient but not necessary for mTORC1 activation and growth in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferey, Jeremie L A; Brault, Jeffrey J; Smith, Cheryl A S; Witczak, Carol A

    2014-10-15

    Skeletal muscle loading/overload stimulates the Ca²⁺-activated, serine/threonine kinase Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-α (CaMKKα); yet to date, no studies have examined whether CaMKKα regulates muscle growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if constitutive activation of CaMKKα signaling could stimulate muscle growth and if so whether CaMKKα is essential for this process. CaMKKα signaling was selectively activated in mouse muscle via expression of a constitutively active form of CaMKKα using in vivo electroporation. After 2 wk, constitutively active CaMKKα expression increased muscle weight (~10%) and protein content (~10%), demonstrating that activation of CaMKKα signaling can stimulate muscle growth. To determine if active CaMKKα expression stimulated muscle growth via increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and protein synthesis, [³H]phenylalanine incorporation into proteins was assessed with or without the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Constitutively active CaMKKα increased protein synthesis ~60%, and this increase was prevented by rapamycin, demonstrating a critical role for mTORC1 in this process. To determine if CaMKKα is essential for growth, muscles from CaMKKα knockout mice were stimulated to hypertrophy via unilateral ablation of synergist muscles (overload). Surprisingly, compared with wild-type mice, muscles from CaMKKα knockout mice exhibited greater growth (~15%) and phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrate 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (Thr³⁸⁹; ~50%), demonstrating that CaMKKα is not essential for overload-induced mTORC1 activation or muscle growth. Collectively, these results demonstrate that activation of CaMKKα signaling is sufficient but not necessary for activation of mTORC1 signaling and growth in mouse skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Botulinum Toxin Complex Increases Paracellular Permeability in Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYASHITA, Shin-ichiro; SAGANE, Yoshimasa; INUI, Ken; HAYASHI, Shintaro; MIYATA, Keita; SUZUKI, Tomonori; OHYAMA, Tohru; WATANABE, Toshihiro; NIWA, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) that increases paracellular permeability in intestinal epithelial cells by a mechanism that remains unclear. Here, we show that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are involved in this permeability increase. Paracellular permeability was measured by FITC-dextran flux through a monolayer of rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cells, and MAPK activation was estimated from western blots. L-TC of C. botulinum serotype D strain 4947 increased paracellular dextran flux and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in IEC-6 cells. The permeability increase induced by L-TC was abrogated by the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results indicate that L-TC increases paracellular permeability by activating p38, but not JNK and ERK. PMID:23884081

  2. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  3. Active control technique of fractional-order chaotic complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M.; Ahmed, Mansour E.; Abed-Elhameed, Tarek M.

    2016-06-01

    Several kinds of synchronization of fractional-order chaotic complex systems are challenging research topics of current interest since they appear in many applications in applied sciences. Our main goal in this paper is to introduce the definition of modified projective combination-combination synchronization (MPCCS) of some fractional-order chaotic complex systems. We show that our systems are chaotic by calculating their Lyapunov exponents. The fractional Lyapunov dimension of the chaotic solutions of these systems is computed. A scheme is introduced to calculate MPCCS of four different (or identical) chaotic complex systems using the active control technique. Special cases of this type, which are projective and anti C-C synchronization, are discussed. Some figures are plotted to show that MPCCS is achieved and its errors approach zero.

  4. A Active Micromachined Scalp Electrode Array for Eeg Signal Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh-Taheri, Babak

    This thesis describes the design, microfabrication, and testing of an active scalp EEG (electroencephalograph) electrode that has several distinct advantages over existing technologies. These advantages are: (1) no electrolyte used, (2) no skin preparation, (3) significantly reduced sensor size, and (4) compatibility with EEG monitoring systems. The active electrode array is an integrated system made of an array of capacitive sensors with local integrated circuitry housed in a package with batteries to power the circuitry. This level of integration was required to achieve the functional performance obtained by the electrode. The electrode consists of a silicon sensor substrate fabricated at UCD and a custom circuit substrate fabricated at Orbit Semiconductors, using a 2 μm analog CMOS technology. The circuitry was designed for low 1/f noise. One side of the sensor substrate holds four capacitive sensors with rm Si_3N _4 as the dielectric material. The opposite side holds aluminum pads for bonding to the circuit substrate. A via hole technology was developed to make electrical contact to both sides of the sensor substrate. The via holes are 200 μm square openings etched through the silicon by a reactive ion etching (RIE) process using an rm SF_6/O_2 gas mixture, oxidized, and then filled with sputtered aluminum for contacts through the substrate. The via holes have an aspect ratio of 2:1 (length of opening to depth of hole). Silicon RIE etch rates of up to 18 mu/hr were obtained under optimum conditions, using a 0.8 μm aluminum mask. The circuit and sensor substrates were bonded with silver adhesive, and wire bonding was used to make electrical contacts between the substrates. The two substrates were then integrated in a custom package for testing. The electrode was tested on an electrical test bench and on human subjects in four modalities of EEG activity, namely: (1) spontaneous EEG, (2) sensory event-related potentials, (3) brain stem potentials, and (4

  5. Structural Basis for Fc[gamma]RIIa Recognition of Human IgG and Formation of Inflammatory Signaling Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsland, Paul A.; Farrugia, William; Bradford, Tessa M.; Sardjono, Caroline Tan; Esparon, Sandra; Trist, Halina M.; Powell, Maree S.; Tan, Peck Szee; Cendron, Angela C.; Wines, Bruce D.; Scott, Andrew M.; Hogarth, P. Mark (Burnet); (Monash); (LICR); (Melbourne)

    2011-09-20

    The interaction of Abs with their specific FcRs is of primary importance in host immune effector systems involved in infection and inflammation, and are the target for immune evasion by pathogens. Fc{gamma}RIIa is a unique and the most widespread activating FcR in humans that through avid binding of immune complexes potently triggers inflammation. Polymorphisms of Fc{gamma}RIIa (high responder/low responder [HR/LR]) are linked to susceptibility to infections, autoimmune diseases, and the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. In this article, we define the three-dimensional structure of the complex between the HR (arginine, R134) allele of Fc{gamma}RIIa (Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR) and the Fc region of a humanized IgG1 Ab, hu3S193. The structure suggests how the HR/LR polymorphism may influence Fc{gamma}RIIa interactions with different IgG subclasses and glycoforms. In addition, mutagenesis defined the basis of the epitopes detected by FcR blocking mAbs specific for Fc{gamma}RIIa (IV.3), Fc{gamma}RIIb (X63-21), and a pan Fc{gamma}RII Ab (8.7). The epitopes detected by these Abs are distinct, but all overlap with residues defined by crystallography to contact IgG. Finally, crystal structures of LR (histidine, H134) allele of Fc{gamma}RIIa and Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR reveal two distinct receptor dimers that may represent quaternary states on the cell surface. A model is presented whereby a dimer of Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR binds Ag-Ab complexes in an arrangement that possibly occurs on the cell membrane as part of a larger signaling assembly.

  6. Helicobacter pylori CagL dependent induction of gastrin expression via a novel αvβ5-integrin-integrin linked kinase signalling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Tobias; Hofbaur, Stefan; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Huber, Sylwia; Sewald, Norbert; Wessler, Silja; Backert, Steffen; Rieder, Gabriele

    2012-07-01

    One of the most important hormones in the human stomach is the peptide gastrin. It is mainly required for the regulation of gastric pH but is also involved in growth and differentiation of gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori infected patients, gastrin secretion can be upregulated by the pathogen, resulting in hypergastrinaemia. H pylori induced hypergastrinaemia is described as being a major risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. In this study, the upstream receptor complex and bacterial factors involved in H pylori induced gastrin gene expression were investigated, utilising gastric epithelial cells which were stably transfected with a human gastrin promoter luciferase reporter construct. Integrin linked kinase (ILK) and integrin β5, but not integrin β1, played an important role in gastrin promoter activation. Interestingly, a novel CagL/integrin β5/ILK signalling complex was characterised as being important for H pylori induced gastrin expression. On interaction of H pylori with αvβ(5)-integrin and ILK, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)→Raf→mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)→extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk) downstream signalling cascade was identified which plays a central role in H pylori gastrin induction. The newly discovered recognition receptor complex could be a useful target in treating precancerous conditions triggered by H pylori induced hypergastrinaemia.

  7. Identifying influential nodes based on graph signal processing in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Yu, Li; Li, Jing-Ru; Zhou, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Identifying influential nodes in complex networks is of both theoretical and practical importance. Existing methods identify influential nodes based on their positions in the network and assume that the nodes are homogeneous. However, node heterogeneity (i.e., different attributes such as interest, energy, age, and so on) ubiquitously exists and needs to be taken into consideration. In this paper, we conduct an investigation into node attributes and propose a graph signal processing based centrality (GSPC) method to identify influential nodes considering both the node attributes and the network topology. We first evaluate our GSPC method using two real-world datasets. The results show that our GSPC method effectively identifies influential nodes, which correspond well with the underlying ground truth. This is compatible to the previous eigenvector centrality and principal component centrality methods under circumstances where the nodes are homogeneous. In addition, spreading analysis shows that the GSPC method has a positive effect on the spreading dynamics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61231010) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. HUST No. 2012QN076).

  8. A Tight Junction-Associated Merlin-Angiomotin Complex Mediates Merlin’s Regulation of Mitogenic Signaling and Tumor Suppressive Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chunling; Troutman, Scott; Fera, Daniela; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Avila, Jacqueline L.; Christian, Neepa; Persson, Nathalie Luna; Shimono, Akihiko; Speicher, David W.; Marmorstein, Ronen; Holmgren, Lars; Kissil, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Merlin/NF2 tumor suppressor restrains cell growth and tumorigenesis by controlling contact-dependent inhibition of proliferation. We have identified a tight-junction-associated protein complex comprising Merlin, Angiomotin, Patj, and Pals1. We demonstrate that Angiomotin functions downstream of Merlin and upstream of Rich1, a small GTPase Activating Protein, as a positive regulator of Rac1. Merlin, through competitive binding to Angiomotin, releases Rich1 from the Angiomotin-inhibitory complex, allowing Rich1 to inactivate Rac1, ultimately leading to attenuation of Rac1 and Ras-MAPK pathways. Patient-derived Merlin mutants show diminished binding capacities to Angiomotin and are unable to dissociate Rich1 from Angiomotin or inhibit MAPK signaling. Depletion of Angiomotin in Nf2−/− Schwann cells attenuates the Ras-MAPK signaling pathway, impedes cellular proliferation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:21481793

  9. n-Order and maximum fuzzy similarity entropy for discrimination of signals of different complexity: Application to fetal heart rate signals

    OpenAIRE

    Zaylaa, Amira,; Oudjemia, Souad; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents two new concepts for discrimination of signals of different complexity. The first focused initially on solving the problem of setting entropy descriptors by varying the pattern size instead of the tolerance. This led to the search for the optimal pattern size that maximized the similarity entropy. The second paradigm was based on the n-order similarity entropy that encompasses the 1-order similarity entropy. To improve the statistical stability, n-o...

  10. Synergistic effect of signaling from receptors of soluble platelet agonists and outside-in signaling in formation of a stable fibrinogen-integrin αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Ivan; Shenkman, Boris; Savion, Naphtali

    2015-01-01

    Thrombus formation in the injured vessel wall is a highly complex process involving various blood-born components that go through specific temporal and spatial changes as observed by intravital videomicroscopy. Platelets bind transiently to the developing thrombus and may either become stably incorporated into or disengage from the thrombus. The aim of the present study was to reveal the processes involved in the formation of a stable thrombus. Platelet-rich plasma and washed platelets were studied by the aggregometer. The aggregate stability was challenged by eptifibatide. Platelet Triton-insoluble fraction was prepared and the actin and αIIb content in the cytoskeleton was analyzed by western blot. Maximal actin polymerization is achieved 1min after platelet activation while maximal αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton association requires 5 to 10min of activation and fibrinogen-mediated platelet-to-platelet bridging. Thus, actin polymerization is dependent on platelet activation and requires neither αIIbβ3 integrin occupation nor platelet aggregation. Formation of a stable aggregate requires platelet activation for more than 1min, complete increase in actin cytoskeleton fraction and partial association of αIIbβ3 with the actin cytoskeleton. However, direct αIIbβ3 activation is not sufficient for cytoskeleton complex formation. Thus, stable αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interaction, representing stable aggregate, is achieved after more than 1min agonist activation, involving inside-out and outside-in signaling but not after direct integrin activation, involving only outside-in signaling. Formation of a stable fibrinogen-αIIbβ3-actin cytoskeleton complex is the result of the combined effect of platelet stimulation by soluble agonists, activation of αIIbβ3, fibrinogen binding and platelet-to-platelet bridging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the relation between complex brain activity and consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Schartner, Michael Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Why does it feel like something to be awake? I.e. how is consciousness generated by the body, the brain in particular? Seeking to map phenomenological properties of any first person experience to neural activity patterns, theories of consciousness suggest a correlation between a specific type of neural dynamical complexity and the level of consciousness: When awake and aware, all brain regions are to a certain extent connected and there is diversity in the interactions. In support of this, Ca...

  12. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 promotes macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Feng, Ye; Shu, Bingyan; Gui, Yuan; Wei, Wei; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2017-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling controls many essential cellular functions. However, the role of Rictor/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) in regulating macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis remains largely unknown. We report here that Rictor/mTORC2 was activated in macrophages from the fibrotic kidneys of mice. Ablation of Rictor in macrophages reduced kidney fibrosis, inflammatory cell accumulation, macrophage proliferation and polarization after unilateral ureter obstruction or ischaemia/reperfusion injury. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs), deletion of Rictor or blockade of protein kinase Cα inhibited cell migration. Additionally, deletion of Rictor or blockade of Akt abolished interleukin-4-stimulated or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-stimulated macrophage M2 polarization. Furthermore, deletion of Rictor downregulated TGF-β1-stimulated upregulation of multiple profibrotic cytokines, including platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and connective tissue growth factor, in BMMs. Conditioned medium from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor-/- macrophages stimulated fibroblast activation less efficiently than that from TGF-β1-pretreated Rictor+/+ macrophages. These results demonstrate that Rictor/mTORC2 signalling can promote macrophage activation and kidney fibrosis. Targeting this signalling pathway in macrophages may shine light on ways to protect against kidney fibrosis in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Susanne, E-mail: Susanne.Schuster@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gebhardt, Rolf [Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Weiss, Thomas S. [Children' s University Hospital, University of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  14. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  15. In Vivo Characterization of Intracellular Signaling Pathways Activated by the Nerve Agent Sarin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Tsung-Ming A; Snyder, Gretchen L; Hendrick, Joseph P; Fienberg, Allen A; McDonough, John H

    2004-01-01

    ..., an excessive stimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Preliminary evidence using diverse OPs indicates that the DARPP-32/PP-1 signaling pathway is activated by nicotinic receptor stimulation...

  16. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-3 Activates Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Harris, David M.; Li, Ping; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a major role in the pathogenesis of B-cell neoplasms. A broad array of mostly extracellular stimuli has been reported to activate NF-κB, to various degrees, in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Because CLL cells harbor high levels of unphosphorylated (U) signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 protein and U-STAT3 was reported to activate NF-κB, we sought to determine whether U-STAT3 activates NF-κB in CLL. Using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) we studied peripheral blood low-density cells from 15 patients with CLL and found that CLL cell nuclear extracts from all the samples bound to an NF-κB DNA probe, suggesting that NF-κB is constitutively activated in CLL. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that STAT3 bound NF-κB p65, and confocal microscopy studies detected U-STAT3/NF-κB complexes in the nuclei of CLL cells, thereby confirming these findings. Furthermore, infection of CLL cells with retroviral STAT3-shRNA attenuated the binding of NF-κB to DNA, as assessed by EMSA, and downregulated mRNA levels of NF-κB-regulated genes, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, our data suggest that U-STAT3 binds to the NF-κB p50/p65 dimers and that the U-STAT3/NF-κB complexes bind to DNA and activate NF-κB-regulated genes in CLL cells. PMID:21364020

  17. HACE1 Negatively Regulates Virus-Triggered Type I IFN Signaling by Impeding the Formation of the MAVS-TRAF3 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He-Ting Mao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During virus infection, the cascade signaling pathway that leads to the production of proinflammatory cytokines is controlled at multiple levels to avoid detrimental overreaction. HACE1 has been characterized as an important tumor suppressor. Here, we identified HACE1 as an important negative regulator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling. Overexpression of HACE1 inhibited Sendai virus- or poly (I:C-induced signaling and resulted in reduced IFNB1 production and enhanced virus replication. Knockdown of HACE1 expression exhibited the opposite effects. Ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of the dead mutant HACE1/C876A had a comparable inhibitory function as WT HACE1, suggesting that the suppressive function of HACE1 on virus-induced signaling is independent of its E3 ligase activity. Further study indicated that HACE1 acted downstream of MAVS and upstream of TBK1. Mechanistic studies showed that HACE1 exerts its inhibitory role on virus-induced signaling by disrupting the MAVS-TRAF3 complex. Therefore, we uncovered a novel function of HACE1 in innate immunity regulation.

  18. Design of excitation signals for active system monitoring in a performance assessment setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates how the excitation signal should be chosen for a active performance setup. The signal is used in a setup where the main purpose is to detect whether a parameter change of the controller has changed the global performance significantly. The signal has to be able to excite t...

  19. Autocrine CSF-1R signaling drives mesothelioma chemoresistance via AKT activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioce, M; Canino, C; Goparaju, C; Yang, H; Carbone, M; Pass, H I

    2014-04-10

    Clinical management of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is very challenging because of the uncommon resistance of this tumor to chemotherapy. We report here increased expression of macrophage colony-stimulating-factor-1-receptor (M-CSF/CSF-1R) mRNA in mesothelioma versus normal tissue specimens and demonstrate that CSF-1R expression identifies chemoresistant cells of mesothelial nature in both primary cultures and mesothelioma cell lines. By using RNAi or ligand trapping, we demonstrate that the chemoresistance properties of those cells depend on autocrine CSF-1R signaling. At the single-cell level, the isolated CSF-1R(pos) cells exhibit a complex repertoire of pluripotency, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and detoxifying factors, which define a clonogenic, chemoresistant, precursor-like cell sub-population. The simple activation of CSF-1R in untransformed mesothelial cells is sufficient to confer clonogenicity and resistance to pemetrexed, hallmarks of mesothelioma. In addition, this induced a gene expression profile highly mimicking that observed in the MPM cells endogenously expressing the receptor and the ligands, suggesting that CSF-1R expression is mainly responsible for the phenotype of the identified cell sub-populations. The survival of CSF1R(pos) cells requires active AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1) signaling, which contributed to increased levels of nuclear, transcriptionally competent β-catenin. Inhibition of AKT reduced the transcriptional activity of β-catenin-dependent reporters and sensitized the cells to senescence-induced clonogenic death after pemetrexed treatment. This work expands what is known on the non-macrophage functions of CSF-1R and its role in solid tumors, and suggests that CSF-1R signaling may have a critical pathogenic role in a prototypical, inflammation-related cancer such as MPM and therefore may represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention.

  20. TRAF1 Coordinates Polyubiquitin Signaling to Enhance Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1-Mediated Growth and Survival Pathway Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Greenfeld

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 signals through two C-terminal tail domains to drive cell growth, survival and transformation. The LMP1 membrane-proximal TES1/CTAR1 domain recruits TRAFs to activate MAP kinase, non-canonical and canonical NF-kB pathways, and is critical for EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. TRAF1 is amongst the most highly TES1-induced target genes and is abundantly expressed in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. We found that TRAF1 expression enhanced LMP1 TES1 domain-mediated activation of the p38, JNK, ERK and canonical NF-kB pathways, but not non-canonical NF-kB pathway activity. To gain insights into how TRAF1 amplifies LMP1 TES1 MAP kinase and canonical NF-kB pathways, we performed proteomic analysis of TRAF1 complexes immuno-purified from cells uninduced or induced for LMP1 TES1 signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that LMP1 TES1 domain signaling induced an association between TRAF1 and the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC, and stimulated linear (M1-linked polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes. LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes isolated from EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (LCLs were highly modified by M1-linked polyubiqutin chains. The M1-ubiquitin binding proteins IKK-gamma/NEMO, A20 and ABIN1 each associate with TRAF1 in cells that express LMP1. TRAF2, but not the cIAP1 or cIAP2 ubiquitin ligases, plays a key role in LUBAC recruitment and M1-chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, implicating the TRAF1:TRAF2 heterotrimer in LMP1 TES1-dependent LUBAC activation. Depletion of either TRAF1, or the LUBAC ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit HOIP, markedly impaired LCL growth. Likewise, LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes purified from LCLs were decorated by lysine 63 (K63-linked polyubiqutin chains. LMP1 TES1 signaling induced K63-polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, and TRAF2 was identified as K63-Ub chain target. Co-localization of M1- and K63

  1. A potential neural substrate for processing functional classes of complex acoustic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle George

    Full Text Available Categorization is essential to all cognitive processes, but identifying the neural substrates underlying categorization processes is a real challenge. Among animals that have been shown to be able of categorization, songbirds are particularly interesting because they provide researchers with clear examples of categories of acoustic signals allowing different levels of recognition, and they possess a system of specialized brain structures found only in birds that learn to sing: the song system. Moreover, an avian brain nucleus that is analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex (the caudo-medial nidopallium, or NCM has recently emerged as a plausible site for sensory representation of birdsong, and appears as a well positioned brain region for categorization of songs. Hence, we tested responses in this non-primary, associative area to clear and distinct classes of songs with different functions and social values, and for a possible correspondence between these responses and the functional aspects of songs, in a highly social songbird species: the European starling. Our results clearly show differential neuronal responses to the ethologically defined classes of songs, both in the number of neurons responding, and in the response magnitude of these neurons. Most importantly, these differential responses corresponded to the functional classes of songs, with increasing activation from non-specific to species-specific and from species-specific to individual-specific sounds. These data therefore suggest a potential neural substrate for sorting natural communication signals into categories, and for individual vocal recognition of same-species members. Given the many parallels that exist between birdsong and speech, these results may contribute to a better understanding of the neural bases of speech.

  2. Activation of the ADE genes requires the chromatin remodeling complexes SAGA and SWI/SNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Rebecca N; Rachfall, Nicole; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2007-08-01

    The activation of the ADE regulon genes requires the pair of transcription factors Bas1 and Pho2. In a genome-wide screen for additional regulators of the pathway, strains with mutations in multiple subunits of the chromatin remodeling complexes SAGA and SWI/SNF were uncovered. These mutants exhibited decreased expression of an ADE5,7-lacZ reporter and native ADE compared to the wild-type strains, but the expression of the BAS1 and PHO2 genes was not substantially decreased. An unregulated Bas1-Pho2 fusion protein depended upon SAGA and SWI/SNF activity to promote transcription of a reporter. A significant but low-level association of Gcn5-myc and Snf2-myc with the ADE5,7 promoter was independent of adenine growth conditions and independent of the presence of the activator proteins Bas1 and Pho2. However, the increase in occupancy of Bas1 and Pho2 at ADE5,7 depended on both SAGA and SWI/SNF. The loss of catalytic activity of both SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes in the gcn5Delta snf2Delta double mutant was severely detrimental to ADE-lacZ reporter expression and native ADE gene expression, indicating complementary roles for these complexes. We conclude that Bas1 and Pho2 do not recruit the SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes to the ADE5,7 promoter but that the remodeling complexes are necessary to increase the binding of Bas1 and Pho2 in response to the adenine regulatory signal. Our data support the model that the SAGA and SWI/SNF complexes engage in global surveillance that is necessary for the specific response by Bas1 and Pho2.

  3. DDX3 directly regulates TRAF3 ubiquitination and acts as a scaffold to co-ordinate assembly of signalling complexes downstream from MAVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lili; Fullam, Anthony; McCormack, Niamh; Höhn, Yvette; Schröder, Martina

    2017-02-15

    The human DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3) has been shown to contribute to type I interferon (IFN) induction downstream from antiviral pattern recognition receptors. It binds to TANK-binding kinase 1 and IκB-kinase-ε (IKKε), the two key kinases mediating activation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7. We previously demonstrated that DDX3 facilitates IKKε activation downstream from RIG-I and then links the activated kinase to IRF3. In the present study, we probed the interactions between DDX3 and other key signalling molecules in the RIG-I pathway and identified a novel direct interaction between DDX3 and TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) mediated by a TRAF-interaction motif in the N-terminus of DDX3, which was required for TRAF3 ubiquitination. Interestingly, we observed two waves of K63-linked TRAF3 ubiquitination following RIG-I activation by Sendai virus (SeV) infection, both of which were suppressed by DDX3 knockdown. We also investigated the spatiotemporal formation of endogenous downstream signalling complexes containing the mitochondrial antiviral signalling (MAVS) adaptor, DDX3, IκB-kinase-ε (IKKε), TRAF3 and IRF3. DDX3 was recruited to MAVS early after SeV infection, suggesting that it might mediate subsequent recruitment of other molecules. Indeed, knockdown of DDX3 prevented the formation of TRAF3-MAVS and TRAF3-IKKε complexes. Based on our data, we propose that early TRAF3 ubiquitination is required for the formation of a stable MAVS-TRAF3 complex, while the second wave of TRAF3 ubiquitination mediates IRF3 recruitment and activation. Our study characterises DDX3 as a multifunctional adaptor molecule that co-ordinates assembly of different TRAF3, IKKε and IRF3-containing signalling complexes downstream from MAVS. Additionally, it provides novel insights into the role of TRAF3 in RIG-I signalling. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A.; Atanasova, V; Robinson, H; Eisenstein, E; Coleman, J; Pesci, E; Parsons, J

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical 170-residue ????? domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad of PqsD. The C112A mutant is inactive, although it still reversibly binds anthraniloyl-CoA. The covalent complex between anthranilate and Cys112 clearly illuminates the orientation of key elements of the PqsD catalytic machinery and represents a snapshot of a key point in the catalytic cycle.

  5. Complexing Methylene Blue with Phosphorus Dendrimers to Increase Photodynamic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dabrzalska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is limited mainly due to low selectivity, unfavorable biodistribution of photosensitizers, and long-lasting skin sensitivity to light. However, drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles may overcome the limitations mentioned above. Among others, dendrimers are particularly attractive as carriers, because of their globular architecture and high loading capacity. The goal of the study was to check whether an anionic phosphorus dendrimer is suitable as a carrier of a photosensitizer—methylene blue (MB. As a biological model, basal cell carcinoma cell lines were used. We checked the influence of the MB complexation on its singlet oxygen production ability using a commercial fluorescence probe. Next, cellular uptake, phototoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and cell death were investigated. The MB-anionic dendrimer complex (MB-1an was found to generate less singlet oxygen; however, the complex showed higher cellular uptake and phototoxicity against basal cell carcinoma cell lines, which was accompanied with enhanced ROS production. Owing to the obtained results, we conclude that the photodynamic activity of MB complexed with an anionic dendrimer is higher than free MB against basal cell carcinoma cell lines.

  6. Complexing Methylene Blue with Phosphorus Dendrimers to Increase Photodynamic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrzalska, Monika; Janaszewska, Anna; Zablocka, Maria; Mignani, Serge; Majoral, Jean Pierre; Klajnert-Maculewicz, Barbara

    2017-02-23

    The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is limited mainly due to low selectivity, unfavorable biodistribution of photosensitizers, and long-lasting skin sensitivity to light. However, drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles may overcome the limitations mentioned above. Among others, dendrimers are particularly attractive as carriers, because of their globular architecture and high loading capacity. The goal of the study was to check whether an anionic phosphorus dendrimer is suitable as a carrier of a photosensitizer-methylene blue (MB). As a biological model, basal cell carcinoma cell lines were used. We checked the influence of the MB complexation on its singlet oxygen production ability using a commercial fluorescence probe. Next, cellular uptake, phototoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and cell death were investigated. The MB-anionic dendrimer complex (MB-1an) was found to generate less singlet oxygen; however, the complex showed higher cellular uptake and phototoxicity against basal cell carcinoma cell lines, which was accompanied with enhanced ROS production. Owing to the obtained results, we conclude that the photodynamic activity of MB complexed with an anionic dendrimer is higher than free MB against basal cell carcinoma cell lines.

  7. Anticancer Activities of Mononuclear Ruthenium(II Coordination Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Motswainyana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium compounds are highly regarded as potential drug candidates. The compounds offer the potential of reduced toxicity and can be tolerated in vivo. The various oxidation states, different mechanism of action, and the ligand substitution kinetics of ruthenium compounds give them advantages over platinum-based complexes, thereby making them suitable for use in biological applications. Several studies have focused attention on the interaction between active ruthenium complexes and their possible biological targets. In this paper, we review several ruthenium compounds which reportedly possess promising cytotoxic profiles: from the discovery of highly active compounds imidazolium [trans-tetrachloro(dmso(imidazoleruthenate(III] (NAMI-A, indazolium [trans-tetrachlorobis(1H-indazoleruthenate(III](KP1019, and sodium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazoleruthenate(III] (NKP-1339 to the recent work based on both inorganic and organometallic ruthenium(II compounds. Half-sandwich organometallic ruthenium complexes offer the opportunity of derivatization at the arene moiety, while the three remaining coordination sites on the metal centre can be functionalised with various coordination groups of various monoligands. It is clear from the review that these mononuclear ruthenium(II compounds represent a strongly emerging field of research that will soon culminate into several ruthenium based antitumor agents.

  8. Kinase activity profiling reveals active signal transduction pathways in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia : A new approach for target discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sligte, Naomi E.; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Lourens, Harm Jan; ter Elst, Arja; Diks, Sander H.; Guryev, Victor; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Leeuwen, Frank N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Still about 20% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) struggle with relapse, despite intensive chemotherapy. We and others have shown that kinase activity profiling is able to give more insights in active signal transduction pathways and point out interesting signaling hubs as well as

  9. Kinase activity profiling reveals active signal transduction pathways in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A new approach for target discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, N.E. van der; Scherpen, F.J.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, T.G.; Lourens, H.J.; Elst, A. Ter; Diks, S.H.; Guryev, V.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Bont, E.S. de

    2015-01-01

    Still about 20% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) struggle with relapse, despite intensive chemotherapy. We and others have shown that kinase activity profiling is able to give more insights in active signal transduction pathways and point out interesting signaling hubs as well as

  10. Entrainment of vastus medialis complex activity differs between genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Matthew S; Hackney, Anthony C; Griffin, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    That the vastus medialis oblique (VMO) is a functional unit of the vastus medialis (VM) is disputed. Delayed VMO activation predicts patellofemoral pain, which has higher rates in women. Single MUs and surface electromyogram (EMG) were collected from the VMO and VM of 9 men and 9 women. Men were tested once; women were tested during 5 menstrual phases. Coherence was assessed for motor unit (MU) firings within and between the VM and VMO using multilevel logistic models to determine statistical significance. Compared with women, men have 741% (MU pairs) and 256% (MU-EMG pairs) greater odds of common drive (0-5 Hz) coherent oscillations. MU pairs from the VMO and the dual VM/VMO complex have 228% and 212% greater odds of coherent oscillations in the beta band (15-35 Hz) compared with VM pairs. The VM and VMO are neurologically different muscles; control of the VM complex is sexually dimorphic. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. EPR demonstration of iron-nitrosyl complex formation by cytotoxic activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, J R; Hibbs, J B

    1990-02-01

    Activated macrophage cytotoxicity is characterized by loss of intracellular iron and inhibition of certain enzymes that have catalytically active nonheme-iron coordinated to sulfur. This phenomenon involves the oxidation of one of the terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of L-arginine, which results in the production of citrulline and inorganic nitrogen oxides (NO2-, NO3-, and NO). We report here the results of an electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study performed on cytotoxic activated macrophage (CAM) effector cells, which develop the same pattern of metabolic inhibition as their targets. Examination of activated macrophages from mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis (strain bacillus Calmette-Guérin) that were cultured in medium with lipopolysaccharide and L-arginine showed the presence of an axial signal at g = 2.039, which is similar to previously described iron-nitrosyl complexes formed from the destruction of iron-sulfur centers by nitric oxide (NO). Inhibition of the L-arginine-dependent pathway by addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (methyl group on a terminal guanidino nitrogen) inhibits the production of nitrite, nitrate, citrulline, and the g = 2.039 signal. Comparison of the hyperfine structure of the signal from cells treated with L-arginine with terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of natural abundance N14 atoms or labeled with N15 atoms showed that the nitrosyl group in this paramagnetic species arises from one of these two atoms. These results show that loss of iron-containing enzyme function in CAM is a result of the formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes induced by the synthesis of nitric oxide from the oxidation of a terminal guanidino nitrogen atom of L-arginine.

  12. EPR demonstration of iron-nitrosyl complex formation by cytotoxic activated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, J.R. Jr.; Hibbs, J.B. Jr. (Utah State Univ., Logan (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Activated macrophage cytotoxicity is characterized by loss of intracellular iron and inhibition of certain enzymes that have catalytically active nonheme-iron coordinated to sulfur. This phenomenon involves the oxidation of one of the terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of L-arginine, which results in the production of citrulline and inorganic nitrogen oxides (NO2-, NO3-, and NO). We report here the results of an electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic study performed on cytotoxic activated macrophage (CAM) effector cells, which develop the same pattern of metabolic inhibition as their targets. Examination of activated macrophages from mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis (strain bacillus Calmette-Guerin) that were cultured in medium with lipopolysaccharide and L-arginine showed the presence of an axial signal at g = 2.039, which is similar to previously described iron-nitrosyl complexes formed from the destruction of iron-sulfur centers by nitric oxide (NO). Inhibition of the L-arginine-dependent pathway by addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (methyl group on a terminal guanidino nitrogen) inhibits the production of nitrite, nitrate, citrulline, and the g = 2.039 signal. Comparison of the hyperfine structure of the signal from cells treated with L-arginine with terminal guanidino nitrogen atoms of natural abundance N14 atoms or labeled with N15 atoms showed that the nitrosyl group in this paramagnetic species arises from one of these two atoms. These results show that loss of iron-containing enzyme function in CAM is a result of the formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes induced by the synthesis of nitric oxide from the oxidation of a terminal guanidino nitrogen atom of L-arginine.

  13. n-Order and maximum fuzzy similarity entropy for discrimination of signals of different complexity: Application to fetal heart rate signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaylaa, Amira; Oudjemia, Souad; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new concepts for discrimination of signals of different complexity. The first focused initially on solving the problem of setting entropy descriptors by varying the pattern size instead of the tolerance. This led to the search for the optimal pattern size that maximized the similarity entropy. The second paradigm was based on the n-order similarity entropy that encompasses the 1-order similarity entropy. To improve the statistical stability, n-order fuzzy similarity entropy was proposed. Fractional Brownian motion was simulated to validate the different methods proposed, and fetal heart rate signals were used to discriminate normal from abnormal fetuses. In all cases, it was found that it was possible to discriminate time series of different complexity such as fractional Brownian motion and fetal heart rate signals. The best levels of performance in terms of sensitivity (90%) and specificity (90%) were obtained with the n-order fuzzy similarity entropy. However, it was shown that the optimal pattern size and the maximum similarity measurement were related to intrinsic features of the time series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Haploinsufficiency of Def activates p53-dependent TGFβ signalling and causes scar formation after partial hepatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Zhu

    Full Text Available The metazoan liver exhibits a remarkable capacity to regenerate lost liver mass without leaving a scar following partial hepatectomy (PH. Whilst previous studies have identified components of several different signaling pathways that are essential for activation of hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, the mechanisms that enable such regeneration to occur without accompanying scar formation remain poorly understood. Here we use the adult zebrafish liver, which can regenerate within two weeks following PH, as a new genetic model to address this important question. We focus on the role of Digestive-organ-expansion-factor (Def, a nucleolar protein which has recently been shown to complex with calpain3 (Capn3 to mediate p53 degradation specifically in the nucleolus, in liver regeneration. Firstly, we show that Def expression is up-regulated in the wild-type liver following amputation, and that the defhi429/+ heteroozygous mutant (def+/- suffers from haploinsufficiency of Def in the liver. We then show that the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is up-regulated in the def+/- liver, which leads to distortion of the migration and the clearance of leukocytes after PH. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signalling is thus activated in the wound epidermis in def+/- due to a prolonged inflammatory response, which leads to fibrosis at the amputation site. Fibrotic scar formation in def+/- is blocked by the over-expression of Def, by the loss-of-function of p53, and by treatment with anti-inflammation drug dexamethasone or TGFβ-signalling inhibitor SB431542. We finally show that the Def- p53 pathway suppresses fibrotic scar formation, at least in part, through the regulation of the expression of the pro-inflammatory factor, high-mobility group box 1. We conclude that the novel Def- p53 nucleolar pathway functions specifically to prevent a scar formation at the amputation site in a normal amputated liver.

  15. Haploinsufficiency of Def activates p53-dependent TGFβ signalling and causes scar formation after partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhihui; Chen, Jun; Xiong, Jing-Wei; Peng, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    The metazoan liver exhibits a remarkable capacity to regenerate lost liver mass without leaving a scar following partial hepatectomy (PH). Whilst previous studies have identified components of several different signaling pathways that are essential for activation of hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, the mechanisms that enable such regeneration to occur without accompanying scar formation remain poorly understood. Here we use the adult zebrafish liver, which can regenerate within two weeks following PH, as a new genetic model to address this important question. We focus on the role of Digestive-organ-expansion-factor (Def), a nucleolar protein which has recently been shown to complex with calpain3 (Capn3) to mediate p53 degradation specifically in the nucleolus, in liver regeneration. Firstly, we show that Def expression is up-regulated in the wild-type liver following amputation, and that the defhi429/+ heteroozygous mutant (def+/-) suffers from haploinsufficiency of Def in the liver. We then show that the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is up-regulated in the def+/- liver, which leads to distortion of the migration and the clearance of leukocytes after PH. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling is thus activated in the wound epidermis in def+/- due to a prolonged inflammatory response, which leads to fibrosis at the amputation site. Fibrotic scar formation in def+/- is blocked by the over-expression of Def, by the loss-of-function of p53, and by treatment with anti-inflammation drug dexamethasone or TGFβ-signalling inhibitor SB431542. We finally show that the Def- p53 pathway suppresses fibrotic scar formation, at least in part, through the regulation of the expression of the pro-inflammatory factor, high-mobility group box 1. We conclude that the novel Def- p53 nucleolar pathway functions specifically to prevent a scar formation at the amputation site in a normal amputated liver.

  16. Redefining the functional roles of the gastrointestinal migrating motor complex and motilin in small bacterial overgrowth and hunger signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloose, Eveline; Tack, Jan

    2016-02-15

    During the fasting state the upper gastrointestinal tract exhibits a specific periodic migrating contraction pattern that is known as the migrating motor complex (MMC). Three different phases can be distinguished during the MMC. Phase III of the MMC is the most active of the three and can start either in the stomach or small intestine. Historically this pattern was designated to be the housekeeper of the gut since disturbances in the pattern were associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; however, its role in the involvement of hunger sensations was already hinted in the beginning of the 20th century by both Cannon (Cannon W, Washburn A. Am J Physiol 29: 441-454, 1912) and Carlson (Carlson A. The Control of Hunger in Health and Disease. Chicago, IL: Univ. of Chicago Press, 1916). The discovery of motilin in 1973 shed more light on the control mechanisms of the MMC. Motilin plasma levels fluctuate together with the phases of the MMC and induce phase III contractions with a gastric onset. Recent research suggests that these motilin-induced phase III contractions signal hunger in healthy subjects and that this system is disturbed in morbidly obese patients. This minireview describes the functions of the MMC in the gut and its regulatory role in controlling hunger sensations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between −5 °C to −38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about −6 °C to about −10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice

  18. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  19. Characterization of the intracellular signalling capacity of natural FXa mutants with reduced pro-coagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Monia; Borensztajn, Keren S; Pinotti, Mirko; Canella, Alessandro; Branchini, Alessio; Marchetti, Giovanna; Reitsma, Pieter H; Bernardi, Francesco; Spek, C Arnold

    2009-04-01

    Factor X (FX) is a serine-protease playing a crucial role in the blood coagulation pathway and triggering intracellular signalling in a variety of cells via protease-activated receptors (PARs). By exploiting naturally occurring variants (V342A and G381D, catalytic domain; E19A, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA)-rich domain), we investigated the relationship between the pro-coagulant activity and the signal transduction capacity of FX. Recombinant FX (rFX) variants were expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney cells and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. Activated rFX (rFXa) variants were characterized for pro-coagulant, amidolytic and thrombin generation activity. rFXa signalling was assessed through evaluation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in C2C12 myoblasts. rFX variants showed reduced (rFX-342A, 29%; rFX-19A, 12%) or not detectable (rFX-381D) amidolytic activity. Thrombin generation activity in a plasma system was also decreased either upon activation by Russell's viper venom (rFX-342A, 38%; rFX-19A, 7%; rFX-381D, not detectable) or by the extrinsic pathway (rFX-342A, 36%; rFX-19A, rFX-381D, not detectable). The rFXa-381D mutant displayed little or no enzymatic activity, and did not induce any appreciable signal transduction capacity. The rFXa-342A mutant induced a dose-dependent signalling with a 50% reduced signalling capacity. At the highest concentration (174 nM), signalling progressed with a time course similar to that of rFXa-wt. Zymogen rFX-19A showed defective and incomplete activation resulting in strongly reduced enzymatic activity and signalling. Taken together our data are consistent with a close correlation between pro-coagulant activity and intracellular signalling capacity.

  20. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou, E-mail: xinzhou_yang@hotmail.com

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  1. Caffeine Induces Cell Death via Activation of Apoptotic Signal and Inactivation of Survival Signal in Human Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsiung Chan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine consumption is a risk factor for osteoporosis, but the precise regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here, we show that cell viability decreases in osteoblasts treated with caffeine in a dose-dependent manner. This cell death is attributed primarily to apoptosis and to a smaller extent, necrosis. Moreover, caffeine directly stimulates intracellular oxidative stress. Our data support caffeine-induced apoptosis in osteoblasts via a mitochondria-dependent pathway. The apoptotic biochemical changes were effectively prevented upon pretreatment with ROS scavengers, indicating that ROS plays a critical role as an upstream controller in the caffeine-induced apoptotic cascade. Additionally, p21-activated protein kinase 2 (PAK2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK were activated in caffeine-treated osteoblasts. Experiments further found that PAK2 activity is required for caffeine-induced JNK activation and apoptosis. Importantly, our data also show that caffeine triggers cell death via inactivation of the survival signal, including the ERK- and Akt-mediated anti-apoptotic pathways. Finally, exposure of rats to dietary water containing 10~20 μM caffeine led to bone mineral density loss. These results demonstrate for the first time that caffeine triggers apoptosis in osteoblasts via activation of mitochondria-dependent cell death signaling and inactivation of the survival signal, and causes bone mineral density loss in vivo.

  2. Influence of the complex-shape light signal on the neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Leonid A.; Novosselova, Anna V.; Blinova, Nadejda V.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of external signals of different shapes (constant, serrated and others) on the ring neural network modeling the visual perception is investigated numerically. New specific features in the dynamics of the neural network, such as the excitation, the swapping and the depression, were observed. The cooperative amplication of the external signal and the memory effect have been observed.

  3. Recombinant Factor VIIa-Mediated Activation of Prothrombin Complex Concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Nasiredin; Iacobelli, Massimo; Vaziri, Behroz; Kahn, Daniel; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Guler, Nil; Fareed, Jawed

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is used in the management of bleeding in patients with hemophilia. A generic biosimilar version of NovoSeven is also developed (AryoSeven). To compare the activation profile of NovoSeven and AryoSeven, 2 commercially available protein complex concentrates (PCCs) were used. Profilnine activated by RecombiPlasTin 2G resulted in conversions of prothrombin to prethrombin and thrombin at 5 to 30 minutes. However, addition of rFVIIa at final concentration range of 0.25 to 0.5 µg/mL to the same mixture resulted in total conversion of prothrombin to thrombin with a doublet at 36 kDa. Recombinant factor VIIa alone did not generate thrombin in native Beriplex, and the addition of rFVIIa to Beriplex failed to generate thrombin. Beriplex activated by RecombiPlasTin 2G resulted in complete conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. Both NovoSeven and AryoSeven exhibited similar activation profiles. These studies indicate that the activation of PCCs by both rFVIIa preparations results in comparable generation of thrombin.

  4. Superoxide dismutase mimetic activity of cytokinin-copper(II) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Hirobe, M.

    1986-05-29

    Dissociation constants of cytokinins, derivatives of purine which form complexes which cupric ion, were determined by spectrophotometry and the stability constants of their copper complexes by pH titration. The values found for kinetic were 3.76, 9.96, 7.8, and 15.3 for pK/sub 1/ for pK/sub 2/, logk/sub 1/, and log..beta../sub 2/, respectively, and those for 6-benzylaminopurine were, in the same order, 3.90, 9.84, 8.3, and 15.9. The copper(II) complexes with kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine had superoxide dismutase mimetic activity, and the reaction rate constants with superoxide, which were determined by polarography. were 2.3 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ for kinetin and 1.5 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/s/sup -1/ for 6-benzylaminopurine at pH 9.8 and 25/sup 0/C.

  5. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 interacts with and activates TGFβ-activated kinase 1 tyrosine phosphorylation and NFκB signaling in multiple myeloma and bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Salazar

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major public health problem worldwide. In the United States alone, 1 in 4 deaths is due to cancer and for 2013 a total of 1,660,290 new cancer cases and 580,350 cancer-related deaths are projected. Comprehensive profiling of multiple cancer genomes has revealed a highly complex genetic landscape in which a large number of altered genes, varying from tumor to tumor, impact core biological pathways and processes. This has implications for therapeutic targeting of signaling networks in the development of treatments for specific cancers. The NFκB transcription factor is constitutively active in a number of hematologic and solid tumors, and many signaling pathways implicated in cancer are likely connected to NFκB activation. A critical mediator of NFκB activity is TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1. Here, we identify TAK1 as a novel interacting protein and target of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 tyrosine kinase activity. We further demonstrate that activating mutations in FGFR3 associated with both multiple myeloma and bladder cancer can modulate expression of genes that regulate NFκB signaling, and promote both NFκB transcriptional activity and cell adhesion in a manner dependent on TAK1 expression in both cancer cell types. Our findings suggest TAK1 as a potential therapeutic target for FGFR3-associated cancers, and other malignancies in which TAK1 contributes to constitutive NFκB activation.

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 Interacts with and Activates TGFβ-Activated Kinase 1 Tyrosine Phosphorylation and NFκB Signaling in Multiple Myeloma and Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Pavel; Meyer, April N.; Casale, Malcolm; Hallowell, Matthew; Wilcox, William R.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Thompson, Leslie Michels

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a major public health problem worldwide. In the United States alone, 1 in 4 deaths is due to cancer and for 2013 a total of 1,660,290 new cancer cases and 580,350 cancer-related deaths are projected. Comprehensive profiling of multiple cancer genomes has revealed a highly complex genetic landscape in which a large number of altered genes, varying from tumor to tumor, impact core biological pathways and processes. This has implications for therapeutic targeting of signaling networks in the development of treatments for specific cancers. The NFκB transcription factor is constitutively active in a number of hematologic and solid tumors, and many signaling pathways implicated in cancer are likely connected to NFκB activation. A critical mediator of NFκB activity is TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). Here, we identify TAK1 as a novel interacting protein and target of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) tyrosine kinase activity. We further demonstrate that activating mutations in FGFR3 associated with both multiple myeloma and bladder cancer can modulate expression of genes that regulate NFκB signaling, and promote both NFκB transcriptional activity and cell adhesion in a manner dependent on TAK1 expression in both cancer cell types. Our findings suggest TAK1 as a potential therapeutic target for FGFR3-associated cancers, and other malignancies in which TAK1 contributes to constitutive NFκB activation. PMID:24466111

  7. Protease-activated receptor signalling by coagulation proteases in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Alireza R

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial cells express several types of integral membrane protein receptors, which upon interaction and activation by their specific ligands, initiate a signalling network that links extracellular cues in circulation to various biological processes within a plethora of cells in the vascular system. A small family of G-protein coupled receptors, termed protease-activated receptors (PAR1-4), can be specifically activated by coagulation proteases, thereby modulating a diverse array of cellular activities under various pathophysiological conditions. Thrombin and all vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteases, with the exception of factor IXa for which no PAR signalling has been attributed, can selectively activate cell surface PARs on the vasculature. Thrombin can activate PAR1, PAR3 and PAR4, but not PAR2 which can be specifically activated by factors VIIa and Xa. The mechanistic details of the specificity of PAR signalling by coagulation proteases are the subject of extensive investigation by many research groups worldwide. However, analysis of PAR signalling data in the literature has proved to be challenging since a single coagulation protease can elicit different signalling responses through activation of the same PAR receptor in endothelial cells. This article is focused on briefly reviewing the literature with respect to determinants of the specificity of PAR signalling by coagulation proteases with special emphasis on the mechanism of PAR1 signalling by thrombin and activated protein C in endothelial cells.

  8. ASPM regulates Wnt signaling pathway activity in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Joshua J; Durak, Omer; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2011-09-15

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a neural developmental disorder in which patients display significantly reduced brain size. Mutations in Abnormal Spindle Microcephaly (ASPM) are the most common cause of MCPH. Here, we investigate the underlying functions of Aspm in brain development and find that Aspm expression is critical for proper neurogenesis and neuronal migration. The Wnt signaling pathway is known for its roles in embryogenesis, and genome-wide siRNA screens indicate that ASPM is a positive regulator of Wnt signaling. We demonstrate that knockdown of Aspm results in decreased Wnt-mediated transcription, and that expression of stabilized β-catenin can rescue this deficit. Finally, coexpression of stabilized β-catenin can rescue defects observed upon in vivo knockdown of Aspm. Our findings provide an impetus to further explore Aspm's role in facilitating Wnt-mediated neurogenesis programs, which may contribute to psychiatric illness etiology when perturbed.

  9. Markers of sympathetic nervous system activity associate with complex plasma lipids in metabolic syndrome subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Paul J; Khan, Anmar A; Straznicky, Nora E; Mellett, Natalie A; Jayawardana, Kaushala; Mundra, Piyushkumar A; Lambert, Gavin W; Meikle, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Plasma sphingolipids including ceramides, and gangliosides are associated with insulin resistance (IR) through effects on insulin signalling and glucose metabolism. Our studies of subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) showed close relationships between IR and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity including arterial norepinephrine (NE). We have therefore investigated possible associations of IR and SNS activity with complex lipids that are involved in both insulin sensitivity and neurotransmission. We performed a cross-sectional assessment of 23 lipid classes/subclasses (total 339 lipid species) by tandem mass spectrometry in 94 overweight untreated subjects with IR (quantified by HOMA-IR, Matsuda index and plasma insulin). Independently of IR parameters, several circulating complex lipids associated significantly with arterial NE and NEFA (non-esterified fatty acids) and marginally with heart rate (HR). After accounting for BMI, HOMA-IR, systolic BP, age, gender, and correction for multiple comparisons, these associations were significant (p 0.05) with ceramide, GM3 ganglioside, sphingomyelin, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, lysophosphatidylinositol and free cholesterol. Multiple subspecies of these lipids significantly associated with NE and NEFA. None of the IR biomarkers associated significantly with lipid classes/subclasses after correction for multiple comparisons. This is the first demonstration that arterial norepinephrine and NEFA, that reflect both SNS activity and IR, associate significantly with circulating complex lipids independently of IR, suggesting a role for such lipids in neural mechanisms operating in MetS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathway Activation in Keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENGLER, CHRISTOPH; CHAKRAVARTI, SHUKTI; DOYLE, JEFFERSON; EBERHART, CHARLES G.; MENG, HUAN; STARK, WALTER J.; KELLIHER, CLARE; JUN, ALBERT S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the presence of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway markers in the epithelium of keratoconus patient corneas. DESIGN Retrospective, comparative case series of laboratory specimens. METHODS Immunohistochemistry results for TGFβ2, total TGFβ, mothers against decacentaplegic homolog (Smad) 2, and phosphorylated Smad2 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of keratoconus patient corneas and normal corneas from human autopsy eyes. Keratoconus patient corneas were divided in two groups, depending on their severity based on keratometer readings and pachymetry. Autopsy controls were age-matched with the keratoconus cases. Immunohistochemistry signal quantification was performed using automated software. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed on total ribonucleic acid of epithelium of keratoconus patient corneas and autopsy control corneas. RESULTS Immunohistochemistry quantification showed a significant increase in mean signal in the group of severe keratoconus cases compared with normal corneas for TGFβ2 and phosphorylated Smad2 (P keratoconus cases versus the autopsy controls. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction exhibited elevated messenger ribonucleic acid levels of Smad2 and TGFβ2 in severe keratoconus corneal epithelium. CONCLUSIONS This work shows increased TGFβ pathway markers in severe keratoconus cases and provides the rationale for investigating TGFβ signaling further in the pathophysiology of keratoconus. PMID:21310385

  11. EEG activity during the performance of complex mental problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jausovec, N; Jausovec, K

    2000-04-01

    This study investigated differences in cognitive processes related to problem complexity. It was assumed that these differences would be reflected in respondents' EEG activity--spectral power and coherence. A second issue of the study was to compare differences between the lower (alpha(1) = 7.9-10.0 Hz), and upper alpha band (alpha(2) = 10.1-12.9 Hz). In the first experiment two well-defined problems with two levels of complexity were used. Only minor differences in EEG power and coherence measures related to problem complexity were observed. In the second experiment divergent production problems resembling tasks on creativity tests were compared with dialectic problems calling for creative solutions. Differences in EEG power measures were mainly related to the form of problem presentation (figural/verbal). In contrast, coherence was related to the level of creativity needed to solve a problem. Noticeable increased intra- and interhemispheric cooperation between mainly the far distant brain regions was observed in the EEG activity of respondents while solving the dialectic problems. These results are explained by the more intense involvement of the long cortico-cortical fiber system in creative thinking. Differences between the lower and upper alpha band were significant for the power and coherence measures. In Experiment 2, fewer differences were observed in power measures in the upper alpha band than in the lower alpha band. A reverse pattern was observed for the coherence measures. These results hint to a functional independence of the two alpha bands, however, they do not allow to draw firm conclusions about their functional meanings. The study showed that it is unlikely that individuals solve well- and ill-defined problems by employing similar cognitive strategies.

  12. Surface active complexes formed between keratin polypeptides and ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fang; Lu, Zhiming; Tucker, Ian; Hosking, Sarah; Petkov, Jordan; Lu, Jian R

    2016-12-15

    Keratins are a group of important proteins in skin and hair and as biomaterials they can provide desirable properties such as strength, biocompatibility, and moisture regaining and retaining. The aim of this work is to develop water-soluble keratin polypeptides from sheep wool and then explore how their surface adsorption behaves with and without surfactants. Successful preparation of keratin samples was demonstrated by identification of the key components from gel electrophoresis and the reproducible production of gram scale samples with and without SDS (sodium dodecylsulphate) during wool fibre dissolution. SDS micelles could reduce the formation of disulphide bonds between keratins during extraction, reducing inter-molecular crosslinking and improving keratin polypeptide solubility. However, Zeta potential measurements of the two polypeptide batches demonstrated almost identical pH dependent surface charge distributions with isoelectric points around pH 3.5, showing complete removal of SDS during purification by dialysis. In spite of different solubility from the two batches of keratin samples prepared, very similar adsorption and aggregation behavior was revealed from surface tension measurements and dynamic light scattering. Mixing of keratin polypeptides with SDS and C12TAB (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide) led to the formation of keratin-surfactant complexes that were substantially more effective at reducing surface tension than the polypeptides alone, showing great promise in the delivery of keratin polypeptides via the surface active complexes. Neutron reflection measurements revealed the coexistence of surfactant and keratin polypeptides at the interface, thus providing the structural support to the observed surface tension changes associated with the formation of the surface active complexes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N Alagramam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  14. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagramam, Kumar N; Stepanyan, Ruben; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Chen, Daniel H-C; Davis, Rickie R

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control) or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  15. Investigating complex patterns of blocked intestinal artery blood pressure signals by empirical mode decomposition and linguistic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, J-R; Lin, T-Y; Shieh, J-S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, 135 Far-East Road, Chung-Li, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Y [Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Huang, N E [Research Center for Adaptive Data Analysis, National Central University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Z [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (United States); Peng, C-K [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (United States)], E-mail: s939205@ mail.yzu.edu.tw

    2008-02-15

    In this investigation, surgical operations of blocked intestinal artery have been conducted on pigs to simulate the condition of acute mesenteric arterial occlusion. The empirical mode decomposition method and the algorithm of linguistic analysis were applied to verify the blood pressure signals in simulated situation. We assumed that there was some information hidden in the high-frequency part of the blood pressure signal when an intestinal artery is blocked. The empirical mode decomposition method (EMD) has been applied to decompose the intrinsic mode functions (IMF) from a complex time series. But, the end effects and phenomenon of intermittence damage the consistence of each IMF. Thus, we proposed the complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition method (CEEMD) to solve the problems of end effects and the phenomenon of intermittence. The main wave of blood pressure signals can be reconstructed by the main components, identified by Monte Carlo verification, and removed from the original signal to derive a riding wave. Furthermore, the concept of linguistic analysis was applied to design the blocking index to verify the pattern of riding wave of blood pressure using the measurements of dissimilarity. Blocking index works well to identify the situation in which the sampled time series of blood pressure signal was recorded. Here, these two totally different algorithms are successfully integrated and the existence of the existence of information hidden in high-frequency part of blood pressure signal has been proven.

  16. Inhibition of myostatin signaling through Notch activation following acute resistance exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G MacKenzie

    Full Text Available Myostatin is a TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle size. Due to the complexity of the molecular pathway between myostatin mRNA/protein and changes in transcription, it has been difficult to understand whether myostatin plays a role in resistance exercise-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To circumvent this problem, we determined the expression of a unique myostatin target gene, Mighty, following resistance exercise. Mighty mRNA increased by 6 h (82.9 ± 24.21% and remained high out to 48 h (56.5 ± 19.67% after resistance exercise. Further examination of the soleus, plantaris and tibialis anterior muscles showed that the change in Mighty mRNA at 6 h correlated with the increase in muscle size associated with this protocol (R(2 = 0.9996. The increase in Mighty mRNA occurred both independent of Smad2 phosphorylation and in spite of an increase in myostatin mRNA (341.8 ± 147.14% at 3 h. The myostatin inhibitor SKI remained unchanged. However, activated Notch, another potential inhibitor of TGFβ signaling, increased immediately following resistance exercise (83 ± 11.2% and stayed elevated out to 6 h (78 ± 16.6%. Electroportion of the Notch intracellular domain into the tibialis anterior resulted in an increase in Mighty mRNA (63 ± 13.4% that was equivalent to the canonical Notch target HES-1 (94.4 ± 7.32%. These data suggest that acute resistance exercise decreases myostatin signaling through the activation of the TGFβ inhibitor Notch resulting in a decrease in myostatin transcriptional activity that correlates well with muscle hypertrophy.

  17. Activation of Smurf E3 ligase promoted by smoothened regulates hedgehog signaling through targeting patched turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoujun Huang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling plays conserved roles in controlling embryonic development; its dysregulation has been implicated in many human diseases including cancers. Hedgehog signaling has an unusual reception system consisting of two transmembrane proteins, Patched receptor and Smoothened signal transducer. Although activation of Smoothened and its downstream signal transduction have been intensively studied, less is known about how Patched receptor is regulated, and particularly how this regulation contributes to appropriate Hedgehog signal transduction. Here we identified a novel role of Smurf E3 ligase in regulating Hedgehog signaling by controlling Patched ubiquitination and turnover. Moreover, we showed that Smurf-mediated Patched ubiquitination depends on Smo activity in wing discs. Mechanistically, we found that Smo interacts with Smurf and promotes it to mediate Patched ubiquitination by targeting the K1261 site in Ptc. The further mathematic modeling analysis reveals that a bidirectional control of activation of Smo involving Smurf and Patched is important for signal-receiving cells to precisely interpret external signals, thereby maintaining Hedgehog signaling reliability. Finally, our data revealed an evolutionarily conserved role of Smurf proteins in controlling Hh signaling by targeting Ptc during development.

  18. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuiping Yang Wenlin Chen Yongbin Chen Jin Jiang

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary proteins, Evc and Evc2, the products of human disease genes responsible for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, act downstream of Smo to transduce the Hh signal...

  19. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  20. Effect of harmonicity on the detection of a signal in a complex masker and on spatial release from masking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Klinge

    Full Text Available The amount of masking of sounds from one source (signals by sounds from a competing source (maskers heavily depends on the sound characteristics of the masker and the signal and on their relative spatial location. Numerous studies investigated the ability to detect a signal in a speech or a noise masker or the effect of spatial separation of signal and masker on the amount of masking, but there is a lack of studies investigating the combined effects of many cues on the masking as is typical for natural listening situations. The current study using free-field listening systematically evaluates the combined effects of harmonicity and inharmonicity cues in multi-tone maskers and cues resulting from spatial separation of target signal and masker on the detection of a pure tone in a multi-tone or a noise masker. A linear binaural processing model was implemented to predict the masked thresholds in order to estimate whether the observed thresholds can be accounted for by energetic masking in the auditory periphery or whether other effects are involved. Thresholds were determined for combinations of two target frequencies (1 and 8 kHz, two spatial configurations (masker and target either co-located or spatially separated by 90 degrees azimuth, and five different masker types (four complex multi-tone stimuli, one noise masker. A spatial separation of target and masker resulted in a release from masking for all masker types. The amount of masking significantly depended on the masker type and frequency range. The various harmonic and inharmonic relations between target and masker or between components of the masker resulted in a complex pattern of increased or decreased masked thresholds in comparison to the predicted energetic masking. The results indicate that harmonicity cues affect the detectability of a tonal target in a complex masker.

  1. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-g5 activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling and stimulates trophoblast invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YiFan Guo

    Full Text Available Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G is a non-classical class Ib HLA molecule that is secreted from blastocysts. Soluble HLA-G modulates the immune tolerance of the mother and can be used as a prognostic factor for the clinical pregnancy rate. However, the underlying mechanism of how soluble HLA-G5 affects pregnancy remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that soluble HLA-G5 promotes successful implantation and pregnancy by modulating trophoblast invasion through receptor binding and activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK signaling pathway. Recombinant HLA-G5 protein over-expressed in E. coli BL21 was purified to near homogeneity. We studied the expression of HLA-G5 and its receptors, the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B1 (LILRB1 and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor 2DL4 (KIR2DL4, in primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic (JAr and JEG-3 cell lines by florescence-labeled HLA-G5. HLA-G5 was detected in the primary trophoblasts and JEG-3 cells. The LILRB1 and KIR2DL4 receptors were expressed in both primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic cell lines. HLA-G5 stimulated cell invasion (p<0.05 and increased urokinase (uPA and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs transcripts and their activity (p<0.05 in trophoblastic cells. HLA-G5 activated the ERK signaling pathway and induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the trophoblastic cell lines. Addition of ERK inhibitors (U0126 and PD98059 nullified the stimulatory effect of HLA-G5 on trophoblastic cell invasion. Taken together, HLA-G5 induced trophoblast invasion by binding to KIR2DL4 and LILRB1, by increasing uPA and MMPs expressions and by activating the ERK signaling pathway.

  2. Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 Signaling in Activated Lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Panas, Michael W.; Xie, Zhihua; Panas, Helen N.; Hoener, Marius C.; Vallender, Eric J.; Miller, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Although most research to date on Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) has focused on its role in the brain, it has been recognized since its discovery in 2001 that TAAR1 mRNA is expressed in peripheral tissues as well, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in non-neurological pathways. This study reports TAAR1 expression, signaling and functionality in rhesus monkey lymphocytes. We detected a high level of TAAR1 protein in immortalized rhesus monkey B cell lines and a significan...

  3. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 in Liver Diseases: A Novel Therapeutic Target

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua; Lafdil, Fouad; Kong, Xiaoni; Gao, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that is activated by many cytokines and growth factors and plays a key role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. STAT3 activation is detected virtually in all rodent models of liver injury and in human liver diseases. In this review, we highlight recent advances of STAT3 signaling in liver injury, steatosis, inflammation, regeneration, fibrosis, and hepatocarcinogenesis. The cytokines and sma...

  4. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Activates Canonical Notch Signaling To Downregulate TLR2/4 Expression and Promote Intracellular Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taslima T. Lina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia chaffeensis preferentially targets mononuclear phagocytes and survives through a strategy of subverting innate immune defenses, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown E. chaffeensis type 1 secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP effectors are involved in diverse molecular pathogen-host interactions, such as the TRP120 interaction with the Notch receptor-cleaving metalloprotease ADAM17. In the present study, we demonstrate E. chaffeensis, via the TRP120 effector, activates the canonical Notch signaling pathway to promote intracellular survival. We found that nuclear translocation of the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain (NICD occurs in response to E. chaffeensis or recombinant TRP120, resulting in upregulation of Notch signaling pathway components and target genes notch1, adam17, hes, and hey. Significant differences in canonical Notch signaling gene expression levels (>40% were observed during early and late stages of infection, indicating activation of the Notch pathway. We linked Notch pathway activation specifically to the TRP120 effector, which directly interacts with the Notch metalloprotease ADAM17. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against γ-secretase enzyme, Notch transcription factor complex, Notch1, and ADAM17, we demonstrated that Notch signaling is required for ehrlichial survival. We studied the downstream effects and found that E. chaffeensis TRP120-mediated activation of the Notch pathway causes inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways required for PU.1 and subsequent Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4 expression. This investigation reveals a novel mechanism whereby E. chaffeensis exploits the Notch pathway to evade the host innate immune response for intracellular survival.

  5. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  6. Activation of p38 and Erk Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling in Ocular Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wladis, Edward J; Swamy, Supraja; Herrmann, Alyssa; Yang, Jinhong; Carlson, J Andrew; Adam, Alejandro P

    2017-02-01

    Rosacea-related cutaneous inflammation is a common cause of ocular surface disease. Currently, there are no specific pharmacologic therapies to treat ocular rosacea. Here, we aimed at determining the differences in intracellular signaling activity in eyelid skin from patients with and without ocular rosacea. This was an observational, comparative case series including 21 patients undergoing lower lid ectropion surgery at one practice during 2013 and 2014 (18 patients with rosacea, 13 control patients), and 24 paraffin-embedded archival samples from Albany Medical Center, selected randomly (12 patients with rosacea, 12 control patients). Cutaneous biopsies resulting from elective lower lid ectropion surgery were analyzed by Proteome Profiler Human Phospho-Kinase Array, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. Samples derived from ocular rosacea patients showed increased levels of phosphorylated (active) p38 and Erk kinases. Phosphoproteins were mainly localized to the epidermis of affected eyelids. This finding provides a novel potential therapeutic target for treatment of ocular rosacea and possibly other forms of rosacea. Further testing is required to determine if p38 and Erk activation have a causal role in ocular rosacea. The selective activation of keratinocytes in the affected skin suggests that topical pathway inhibition may be an effective treatment that will ultimately prevent ocular surface damage due to ocular rosacea.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of nanosized Ni complexed aminoclay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchani, A. Amala Jeya; Parthasarathy, V.; Devi, A. Anitha; Meenarathi, B.; Anbarasan, R.

    2017-11-01

    A novel Ni complexed aminoclay (AC) catalyst was prepared by complexation method followed by reduction reaction. Various analytical techniques such as FTIR spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, DSC, TGA, SEM, HRTEM, EDX, XPS and WCA measurement are used to characterize the synthesized material. The AC-Ni catalyst system exhibited improved thermal stability and fiber-like morphology. The XPS results declared the formation of Ni nanoparticles. Thus, synthesized catalyst was tested towards the Schiff base formation reaction between various bio-medical polymers and aniline under air atmosphere at 85 °C for 24 h. The catalytic activity of the catalyst was studied by varying the % weight loading of the AC-Ni system towards the Schiff base formation. The Schiff base formation was quantitatively calculated by the 1H-NMR spectroscopy. While increasing the % weight loading of the AC-Ni catalyst, the % yield of Schiff base was also increased. The k app and Ti values were determined for the reduction of indole and α-terpineol in the presence of AC-Ni catalyst system. The experimental results were compared with the literature report.

  8. Natural lecithin promotes neural network complexity and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Shahrzad; Tamayol, Ali; Habibey, Rouhollah; Sabzevari, Reza; Kahn, Cyril; Geny, David; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Annabi, Nasim; Blau, Axel; Linder, Michel; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira

    2016-05-27

    Phospholipids in the brain cell membranes contain different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which are critical to nervous system function and structure. In particular, brain function critically depends on the uptake of the so-called "essential" fatty acids such as omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs that cannot be readily synthesized by the human body. We extracted natural lecithin rich in various PUFAs from a marine source and transformed it into nanoliposomes. These nanoliposomes increased neurite outgrowth, network complexity and neural activity of cortical rat neurons in vitro. We also observed an upregulation of synapsin I (SYN1), which supports the positive role of lecithin in synaptogenesis, synaptic development and maturation. These findings suggest that lecithin nanoliposomes enhance neuronal development, which may have an impact on devising new lecithin delivery strategies for therapeutic applications.

  9. Unraveling the Complex Epigenetic Mechanisms that Regulate Gene Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression has been largely increased in recent years by the development and refinement of different techniques. This has revealed that gene transcription is highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e., those that do not involve changes in the genome sequence, but rather in nuclear architecture, chromosome conformation and histone and DNA modifications. Our understanding of how these different levels of epigenetic regulation interact with each other and with classical transcription-factor based gene regulation to influence gene transcription has just started to emerge. This review discusses the latest advances in unraveling the complex interactions between different types of epigenetic regulation and transcription factor activity, with special attention to the approaches that can be used to study these interactions.

  10. Wing, tail, and vocal contributions to the complex acoustic signals of courting Calliope hummingbirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James CLARK

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-component signals contain multiple signal parts expressed in the same physical modality. One way to identify individual components is if they are produced by different physical mechanisms. Here, I studied the mechanisms generating acoustic signals in the courtship displays of the Calliope hummingbird Stellula calliope. Display dives consisted of three synchronized sound elements, a high-frequency tone (hft, a low frequency tone (lft, and atonal sound pulses (asp, which were then followed by a frequency-modulated fall. Manipulating any of the rectrices (tail-feathers of wild males impaired production of the lft and asp but not the hft or fall, which are apparently vocal. I tested the sound production capabilities of the rectrices in a wind tunnel. Single rectrices could generate the lft but not the asp, whereas multiple rectrices tested together produced sounds similar to the asp when they fluttered and collided with their neighbors percussively, representing a previously unknown mechanism of sound production. During the shuttle display, a trill is generated by the wings during pulses in which the wingbeat frequency is elevated to 95 Hz, 40% higher than the typical hovering wingbeat frequency. The Calliope hummingbird courtship displays include sounds produced by three independent mechanisms, and thus include a minimum of three acoustic signal components. These acoustic mechanisms have different constraints and thus potentially contain different messages. Producing multiple acoustic signals via multiple mechanisms may be a way to escape the constraints present in any single mechanism [Current Zoology 57 (2: 187–196, 2011].

  11. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-g5 activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling and stimulates trophoblast invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, YiFan; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; So, Kam-Hei; Gao, Jing; Yeung, William S B; Yao, YuanQing; Lee, Kai-Fai

    2013-01-01

    Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class Ib HLA molecule that is secreted from blastocysts. Soluble HLA-G modulates the immune tolerance of the mother and can be used as a prognostic factor for the clinical pregnancy rate. However, the underlying mechanism of how soluble HLA-G5 affects pregnancy remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that soluble HLA-G5 promotes successful implantation and pregnancy by modulating trophoblast invasion through receptor binding and activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Recombinant HLA-G5 protein over-expressed in E. coli BL21 was purified to near homogeneity. We studied the expression of HLA-G5 and its receptors, the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B1 (LILRB1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor 2DL4 (KIR2DL4), in primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic (JAr and JEG-3) cell lines by florescence-labeled HLA-G5. HLA-G5 was detected in the primary trophoblasts and JEG-3 cells. The LILRB1 and KIR2DL4 receptors were expressed in both primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic cell lines. HLA-G5 stimulated cell invasion (ptrophoblastic cells. HLA-G5 activated the ERK signaling pathway and induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the trophoblastic cell lines. Addition of ERK inhibitors (U0126 and PD98059) nullified the stimulatory effect of HLA-G5 on trophoblastic cell invasion. Taken together, HLA-G5 induced trophoblast invasion by binding to KIR2DL4 and LILRB1, by increasing uPA and MMPs expressions and by activating the ERK signaling pathway.

  12. Activating and Elucidating Metabolism of Complex Sugars in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seunghyun; Hipp, Julie; Trinh, Cong T

    2015-12-18

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is an industrially important host for production of organic acids, oleochemicals, lipids, and proteins with broad biotechnological applications. Albeit known for decades, the unique native metabolism of Y. lipolytica for using complex fermentable sugars, which are abundant in lignocellulosic biomass, is poorly understood. In this study, we activated and elucidated the native sugar metabolism in Y. lipolytica for cell growth on xylose and cellobiose as well as their mixtures with glucose through comprehensive metabolic and transcriptomic analyses. We identified 7 putative glucose-specific transporters, 16 putative xylose-specific transporters, and 4 putative cellobiose-specific transporters that are transcriptionally upregulated for growth on respective single sugars. Y. lipolytica is capable of using xylose as a carbon source, but xylose dehydrogenase is the key bottleneck of xylose assimilation and is transcriptionally repressed by glucose. Y. lipolytica has a set of 5 extracellular and 6 intracellular β-glucosidases and is capable of assimilating cellobiose via extra- and intracellular mechanisms, the latter being dominant for growth on cellobiose as a sole carbon source. Strikingly, Y. lipolytica exhibited enhanced sugar utilization for growth in mixed sugars, with strong carbon catabolite activation for growth on the mixture of xylose and cellobiose and with mild carbon catabolite repression of glucose on xylose and cellobiose. The results of this study shed light on fundamental understanding of the complex native sugar metabolism of Y. lipolytica and will help guide inverse metabolic engineering of Y. lipolytica for enhanced conversion of biomass-derived fermentable sugars to chemicals and fuels. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Chemical signal activation of an organocatalyst enables control over soft material formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausel, Fanny; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Kouwenberg, D S J; Versluis, Frank; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2017-10-12

    Cells can react to their environment by changing the activity of enzymes in response to specific chemical signals. Artificial catalysts capable of being activated by chemical signals are rare, but of interest for creating autonomously responsive materials. We present an organocatalyst that is activated by a chemical signal, enabling temporal control over reaction rates and the formation of materials. Using self-immolative chemistry, we design a deactivated aniline organocatalyst that is activated by the chemical signal hydrogen peroxide and catalyses hydrazone formation. Upon activation of the catalyst, the rate of hydrazone formation increases 10-fold almost instantly. The responsive organocatalyst enables temporal control over the formation of gels featuring hydrazone bonds. The generic design should enable the use of a large range of triggers and organocatalysts, and appears a promising method for the introduction of signal response in materials, constituting a first step towards achieving communication between artificial chemical systems.Enzymes regulated by chemical signals are common in biology, but few such artificial catalysts exist. Here, the authors design an aniline catalyst that, when activated by a chemical trigger, catalyses formation of hydrazone-based gels, demonstrating signal response in a soft material.

  14. Discovery of novel small molecule activators of β-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folkert Verkaar

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a major role in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance. Reduced activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway underlies neurodegenerative disorders and aberrations in bone formation. Screening of a small molecule compound library with a β-galactosidase fragment complementation assay measuring β-catenin nuclear entry revealed bona fide activators of β-catenin signaling. The compounds stabilized cytoplasmic β-catenin and activated β-catenin-dependent reporter gene activity. Although the mechanism through which the compounds activate β-catenin signaling has yet to be determined, several key regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Frizzled receptors, were excluded as the molecular target. The compounds displayed remarkable selectivity, as they only induced β-catenin signaling in a human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line and not in a variety of other cell lines examined. Our data indicate that differences in cellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling machinery can be exploited to identify cell type-specific activators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  15. Phosphorylation by Cdc28 Activates the Cdc20-Dependent Activity of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Rudner, Adam D.; MURRAY, ANDREW W.

    2000-01-01

    Budding yeast initiates anaphase by activating the Cdc20-dependent anaphase-promoting complex (APC). The mitotic activity of Cdc28 (Cdk1) is required to activate this form of the APC, and mutants that are impaired in mitotic Cdc28 function have difficulty leaving mitosis. This defect can be explained by a defect in APC phosphorylation, which depends on mitotic Cdc28 activity in vivo and can be catalyzed by purified Cdc28 in vitro. Mutating putative Cdc28 phosphorylation sites in three compone...

  16. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 inhibits TRAF6 ubiquitination by interrupting the formation of TAK1-TAB2 complex in TLR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Gyuyoung; Kim, Juhong; Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae Mi; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2015-12-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) plays a key role in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-PDK1-Akt pathway that induces cell survival and cardiovascular protections through anti-apoptosis, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, and anti-oxidative stress activities. Although several reports have proposed the negative role of PDK1 in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, the molecular mechanism is still unknown. Here we show that PDK1 inhibits tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) ubiquitination by interrupting the complex between transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and TAK1 binding protein 2 (TAB2), which negatively regulates TAK1 activity. The overexpression of PDK1 in 293/TLR4 cells resulted in suppressions of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-6 and TNF-α in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Conversely, THP-1 human monocytes transiently cultured in low glucose medium displayed down-regulated PDK1 expression, and significantly enhanced TLR4-mediated signaling for the activation of NF-κB, demonstrating a negative role of PDK1. Biochemical studies revealed that PDK1 significantly interacted with TAK1, resulting in the inhibition of the association of TAB2 with TAK1, which led to the attenuation of TRAF6 ubiquitination. Moreover, PDK1-knockdown THP-1 cells displayed enhancement of downstream signals, activation of NF-κB, and increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, which potentially led to the up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent genes in response to TLR4 stimulation. Collectively, the results demonstrate that PDK1 inhibits the formation of the TAK1-TAB2-TRAF6 complex and leads to the inhibition of TRAF6 ubiquitination, which negatively regulates the TLR4-mediated signaling for NF-κB activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Precise Temporal Profiling of Signaling Complexes in Primary Cells Using SWATH Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Caron

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal organization of protein interactions in cell signaling is a fundamental process that drives cellular functions. Given differential protein expression across tissues and developmental stages, the architecture and dynamics of signaling interaction proteomes is, likely, highly context dependent. However, current interaction information has been almost exclusively obtained from transformed cells. In this study, we applied an advanced and robust workflow combining mouse genetics and affinity purification (AP-SWATH mass spectrometry to profile the dynamics of 53 high-confidence protein interactions in primary T cells, using the scaffold protein GRB2 as a model. The workflow also provided a sufficient level of robustness to pinpoint differential interaction dynamics between two similar, but functionally distinct, primary T cell populations. Altogether, we demonstrated that precise and reproducible quantitative measurements of protein interaction dynamics can be achieved in primary cells isolated from mammalian tissues, allowing resolution of the tissue-specific context of cell-signaling events.

  18. Asphyxia-activated corticocardiac signaling accelerates onset of cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duan; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Liu, Tiecheng; Tian, Fangyun; Xu, Gang; Rengifo, Santiago; Choi, Sarah J.; Mathur, Abhay; Crooks, Charles P.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Wang, Michael M.; Ghanbari, Hamid; Borjigin, Jimo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which the healthy heart and brain die rapidly in the absence of oxygen is not well understood. We performed continuous electrocardiography and electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental asphyxia and analyzed cortical release of core neurotransmitters, changes in brain and heart electrical activity, and brain–heart connectivity. Asphyxia stimulates a robust and sustained increase of functional and effective cortical connectivity, an immediate increase in cortical release of a large set of neurotransmitters, and a delayed activation of corticocardiac functional and effective connectivity that persists until the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Blocking the brain’s autonomic outflow significantly delayed terminal ventricular fibrillation and lengthened the duration of detectable cortical activities despite the continued absence of oxygen. These results demonstrate that asphyxia activates a brainstorm, which accelerates premature death of the heart and the brain. PMID:25848007

  19. Remote activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway using functionalised magnetic particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rotherham

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling pathways play crucial roles in developmental biology, stem cell fate and tissue patterning and have become an attractive therapeutic target in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Wnt signalling has also been shown to play a role in human Mesenchymal Stem Cell (hMSC fate, which have shown potential as a cell therapy in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Previous work has shown that biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles (MNP can be used to stimulate specific mechanosensitive membrane receptors and ion channels in vitro and in vivo. Using this strategy, we determined the effects of mechano-stimulation of the Wnt Frizzled receptor on Wnt pathway activation in hMSC. Frizzled receptors were tagged using anti-Frizzled functionalised MNP (Fz-MNP. A commercially available oscillating magnetic bioreactor (MICA Biosystems was used to mechanically stimulate Frizzled receptors remotely. Our results demonstrate that Fz-MNP can activate Wnt/β-catenin signalling at key checkpoints in the signalling pathway. Immunocytochemistry indicated nuclear localisation of the Wnt intracellular messenger β-catenin after treatment with Fz-MNP. A Wnt signalling TCF/LEF responsive luciferase reporter transfected into hMSC was used to assess terminal signal activation at the nucleus. We observed an increase in reporter activity after treatment with Fz-MNP and this effect was enhanced after mechano-stimulation using the magnetic array. Western blot analysis was used to probe the mechanism of signalling activation and indicated that Fz-MNP signal through an LRP independent mechanism. Finally, the gene expression profiles of stress response genes were found to be similar when cells were treated with recombinant Wnt-3A or Fz-MNP. This study provides proof of principle that Wnt signalling and Frizzled receptors are mechanosensitive and can be remotely activated in vitro. Using magnetic nanoparticle technology it may be possible to modulate

  20. Defining Minimal Binding Regions in Regulator of Presynaptic Morphology 1 (RPM-1) Using Caenorhabditis elegans Neurons Reveals Differential Signaling Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Scott T; Grill, Brock

    2017-02-10

    The intracellular signaling protein regulator of presynaptic morphology 1 (RPM-1) is a conserved regulator of synapse formation and axon termination in Caenorhabditis elegans RPM-1 functions in a ubiquitin ligase complex with the F-box protein FSN-1 and functions through the microtubule binding protein RAE-1. Using a structure-function approach and positive selection for transgenic C. elegans, we explored the biochemical relationship between RPM-1, FSN-1, and RAE-1. This led to the identification of two new domains in RPM-1 that are sufficient for binding to FSN-1, called FSN-1 binding domain 2 (FBD2) and FBD3. Furthermore, we map the RAE-1 binding domain to a much smaller region of RPM-1. Point mutations in RPM-1 that reduce binding to RAE-1 did not affect FSN-1 binding, indicating that RPM-1 utilizes different biochemical mechanisms to bind these molecules. Analysis of RPM-1 protein complexes in the neurons of C. elegans elucidated two further discoveries: FSN-1 binds to RAE-1, and this interaction is not mediated by RPM-1, and RPM-1 binding to FSN-1 and RAE-1 reduces FSN-1·RAE-1 complex formation. These results indicate that RPM-1 uses different mechanisms to recruit FSN-1 and RAE-1 into independent signaling complexes in neurons. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Transition metal complexes of neocryptolepine analogues. Part I: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and invitro anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Sanaa Moustafa; El Sayed, Ibrahim El Tantawy; Nassar, Nagla

    2015-03-01

    New generation of copper(II) complexes with aminoalkylaminoneocryptolepine as bidentate ligands has been synthesized and it is characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moment, spectra (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and ESR) and thermal studies. The IR data suggest the coordination modes for ligands which behave as a bidentate with copper(II) ion. Based on the elemental analysis, magnetic studies, electronic and ESR data, binuclear square planar geometry was proposed for complexes 7a, 7b, square pyramidal for 9a, 9b and octahedral for 8a, 8b, 10a, 10b. The molar conductance in DMF solution indicates that all complexes are electrolyte except 7a and 7b. The ESR spectra of solid copper(II) complexes in powder form showed an axial symmetry with 2B1g as a ground state and hyperfine structure. The thermal stability and degradation of the ligands and their metal complexes were studied employing DTA and TG methods. The metal-free ligands and their copper(II) complexes were tested for their in vitro anticancer activity against human colon carcinoma (HT-29). The results showed that the synthesized copper(II) complexes exhibited higher anticancer activity than their free ligands. Of all the studied copper(II) complexes, the bromo-substituted complex 9b exhibited high anticancer activity at low micromolar inhibitory concentrations (IC50 = 0.58 μM), compared to the other complexes and the free ligands.

  2. The bHLH factors Dpn and members of the E(spl complex mediate the function of Notch signalling regulating cell proliferation during wing disc development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz P. San Juan

    2012-05-01

    The Notch signalling pathway plays an essential role in the intricate control of cell proliferation and pattern formation in many organs during animal development. In addition, mutations in most members of this pathway are well characterized and frequently lead to tumour formation. The Drosophila imaginal wing discs have provided a suitable model system for the genetic and molecular analysis of the different pathway functions. During disc development, Notch signalling at the presumptive wing margin is necessary for the restricted activation of genes required for pattern formation control and disc proliferation. Interestingly, in different cellular contexts within the wing disc, Notch can either promote cell proliferation or can block the G1-S transition by negatively regulating the expression of dmyc and bantam micro RNA. The target genes of Notch signalling that are required for these functions have not been identified. Here, we show that the Hes vertebrate homolog, deadpan (dpn, and the Enhancer-of-split complex (E(splC genes act redundantly and cooperatively to mediate the Notch signalling function regulating cell proliferation during wing disc development.

  3. Accelerometer signal-based human activity recognition using augmented autoregressive model coefficients and artificial neural nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A M; Lee, Y K; Kim, T S

    2008-01-01

    Automatic recognition of human activities is one of the important and challenging research areas in proactive and ubiquitous computing. In this work, we present some preliminary results of recognizing human activities using augmented features extracted from the activity signals measured using a single triaxial accelerometer sensor and artificial neural nets. The features include autoregressive (AR) modeling coefficients of activity signals, signal magnitude areas (SMA), and title angles (TA). We have recognized four human activities using AR coefficients (ARC) only, ARC with SMA, and ARC with SMA and TA. With the last augmented features, we have achieved the recognition rate above 99% for all four activities including lying, standing, walking, and running. With our proposed technique, real time recognition of some human activities is possible.

  4. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis to dissect differences in signal transduction in activating TSH receptor mutations in the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kerstin; Boisnard, Alexandra; Ihling, Christian; Ludgate, Marian; Eszlinger, Markus; Krohn, Knut; Sinz, Andrea; Fuhrer, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    In the thyroid, cAMP controls both thyroid growth and function. Gain-of-function mutations in the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) lead to constitutive cAMP formation and are a major cause of autonomous thyroid adenomas. The impact of activating TSHR mutations on the signal transduction network of the thyrocyte is not fully understood. To gain more insights into constitutive TSHR signaling, rat thyrocytes (FRTL-5 cells) with stable expression of three activating TSHR mutants (mutTSHR: A623I, L629F and Del613-621), which differ in their functional characteristics in vitro, were analyzed by a quantitative proteomic approach and compared to the wild-type TSHR (WT-TSHR). This study revealed (1) differences in the expression of Rab proteins suggesting an increased TSHR internalization in mutTSHR but not in the WT-TSHR; (2) differential stimulation of PI3K/Akt signaling in mutTSHR vs. WT-TSHR cells, (3) activation of Epac, impairing short-time Akt phosphorylation in both, mutTSHR and WT-TSHR cells. Based on the analysis of global changes in protein expression patterns, our findings underline the complexity of gain-of-function TSHR signaling in thyrocytes, which extends beyond pure cAMP and/or IP formation. Moreover, evidence for augmented endocytosis in the mutTSHR, adds to a new concept of TSHR signaling in thyroid autonomy. Further studies are required to clarify whether the observed differences in Rab, PI3K and Epac signaling may contribute to differences in the phenotypic presentation, i.e. stimulation of function and growth of thyroid autonomy in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of Receptor-Associated Protein Complex Assembly in Interleukin (IL)-2- and IL-15-Activated T-Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Sanchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Aloria, Kerman; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2017-01-06

    It remains a paradox that IL-2 and IL-15 can differentially modulate the immune response using the same signaling receptors. We have previously dissected the phosphotyrosine-driven signaling cascades triggered by both cytokines in Kit225 T-cells, unveiling subtle differences that may contribute to their functional dichotomy. In this study, we aimed to decipher the receptor complex assembly in IL-2- and IL-15-activated T-lymphocytes that is highly orchestrated by site-specific phosphorylation events. Comparing the cytokine-induced interactome of the interleukin receptor beta and gamma subunits shared by the two cytokines, we defined the components of the early IL-2 and IL-15 receptor-associated complex discovering novel constituents. Additionally, phosphopeptide-directed analysis allowed us to detect several cytokine-dependent and -independent phosphorylation events within the activated receptor complex including novel phosphorylated sites located in the cytoplasmic region of IL-2 receptor β subunit (IL-2Rβ). We proved that the distinct phosphorylations induced by the cytokines serve for recruiting different types of effectors to the initial receptor/ligand complex. Overall, our study sheds new light into the initial molecular events triggered by IL-2 and IL-15 and constitutes a further step toward a better understanding of the early signaling aspects of the two closely related cytokines in T-lymphocytes.

  7. Inverse relationship between the complexity of midfoot kinematics and muscle activation in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathleff, M S; Samani, A; Olesen, C G; Kersting, U G; Madeleine, P

    2011-08-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is a common overuse injury characterized by pain located on the medial side of the lower leg during weight bearing activities such as gait. The purpose of this study was to apply linear and nonlinear methods to compare the structure of variability of midfoot kinematics and surface electromyographic (SEMG) signals between patients with medial tibial stress syndrome and healthy controls during gait. Fourteen patients diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome and 11 healthy controls were included from an orthopaedic clinic. SEMG from tibialis anterior and the soleus muscles as well as midfoot kinematics were recorded during 20 consecutive gait cycles. Permuted sample entropy and permutation entropy were used as a measure of complexity from SEMG signals and kinematics. SEMG signals in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome were characterized by higher structural complexity compared with healthy controls (pkinematics (p=0.01). Assessing the complexity of midfoot kinematics and SEMG activation pattern enabled a precise characterization of gait in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome. The reported inverse relationship in foot kinematics and SEMG complexity most likely point towards separated control processes governing gait variability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Signal-to-Noise ratio and design complexity based on Unified Loss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taguchi's quality loss function for larger-the-better performance characteristics uses a reciprocal transformation to compute quality loss. This paper suggests that reciprocal transformation unnecessarily complicates and may distort results. Examples of this distortion include the signal-to-noise ratio based on mean squared ...

  9. Influence of multi-microphone signal enhancement algorithms on auditory movement detection in acoustically complex situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbeck, Micha; Hartog, Laura; Grimm, Giso

    The influence of hearing aid (HA) signal processing on the perception of spatially dynamic sounds has not been systematically investigated so far. Previously, we observed that for elderly hearing-impaired (EHI) listeners concurrent distractor sounds impaired the detectability of left-right source...

  10. Conceptualization of the Complex Outcomes of Sexual Abuse: A Signal Detection Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechtel, Pia; Evans, Ian M.; Podd, John V.

    2011-01-01

    Eighty-five New Zealand based practitioners experienced in treating adults with a history of child sexual abuse participated in an online judgment study of child sexual abuse outcomes using signal detection theory methodology. Participants' level of sensitivity was assessed independent of their degree of response bias when discriminating (a) known…

  11. Influence of multi-microphone signal enhancement algorithms on auditory movement detection in acoustically complex situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbeck, Micha; Hartog, Laura; Grimm, Giso

    2017-01-01

    The influence of hearing aid (HA) signal processing on the perception of spatially dynamic sounds has not been systematically investigated so far. Previously, we observed that interfering sounds impaired the detectability of left-right source movements and reverberation that of near-far source mo...

  12. Bioengineered nisin derivatives with enhanced activity in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Susan; Field, Des; Daly, Karen M.; O'Connor, Paula M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nisin A is the best known and most extensively characterized lantibiotic. As it is ribosomally synthesized, bioengineering‐based strategies can be used to generate variants. We have previously demonstrated that bioengineering of the hinge region of nisin A can result in the generation of variants with enhanced anti‐microbial activity against Gram‐positive pathogens. Here we created a larger bank of hinge variant producers and screened for producers that exhibit enhanced bioactivity as assessed by agar‐based assays against a selection of target strains. Further analysis of 12 ‘lead’ variants reveals that in many cases enhanced bioactivity is not attributable to enhanced specific activity but is instead as a consequence of an enhanced ability to diffuse through complex polymers. In the case of two variants, which contain the residues SVA and NAK, respectively, within the hinge region, we demonstrate that this enhanced trait enables the peptides to dramatically outperform nisin A with respect to controlling Listeria monocytogenes in commercially produced chocolate milk that contains carrageenan as a stabilizer. PMID:22260415

  13. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  14. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin-Hua [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C. [Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Kirschenbaum, Alexander [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Qin, Weiping [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Bauman, William A. [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Cardozo, Christopher P., E-mail: chris.cardozo@mssm.edu [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  15. Dynamic clustering in active colloidal suspensions with chemical signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurkauff, I; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Palacci, J; Ybert, C; Bocquet, L

    2012-06-29

    In this Letter, we explore experimentally the phase behavior of a dense active suspension of self-propelled colloids. In addition to a solidlike and gaslike phase observed for high and low densities, a novel cluster phase is reported at intermediate densities. This takes the form of a stationary assembly of dense aggregates-resulting from a permanent dynamical merging and separation of active colloids-whose average size grows with activity as a linear function of the self-propelling velocity. While different possible scenarios can be considered to account for these observations-such as a generic velocity weakening instability recently put forward-we show that the experimental results are reproduced mathematically by a chemotactic aggregation mechanism, originally introduced to account for bacterial aggregation and accounting here for diffusiophoretic chemical interaction between colloidal swimmers.

  16. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B signalling promotes cellular senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovillain, E.; Mansfield, L.; Caetano, C.; Alvarez-Fernandez, M.; Caballero, O. L.; Medema, R. H.; Hummerich, H.; Jat, P. S.

    Cellular senescence is a programme of irreversible cell cycle arrest that normal cells undergo in response to progressive shortening of telomeres, changes in telomeric structure, oncogene activation or oxidative stress. The underlying signalling pathways, of major clinicopathological relevance, are

  17. Bi-Static Active Microwave Remote Sensing of Reflected Signals-of-Opportunity Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate the use of these so-called signals-of-opportunity (SOP) to perform bi-static active microwave remote sensing of land surfaces. Specially,...

  18. Dynamic control and model inference of signal activated gene regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuert, Gregor

    Despite robust efforts over the years, it has proven very difficult to identify mathematical models that would improve biological insight by predicting complex biological responses, as needed to accelerate the design of medical treatments. This problem remains unsolved because large-scale models, with hundreds of unknown reaction rates, may be too complex to be supported by existing experimental techniques or data sets, and therefore provide little quantitative insight. At the other extreme, overly simple models ignore the intricacies of real biological processes and are equally limited in their ability to predict real phenomena. Models are often further limited by the fact that most experimental analyses only probe average equilibrium characteristics of cell populations and ignore potentially useful information contained in measurable fluctuations in space, time and environment, and from one cell to another. This is a fundamental problem in all of biology, because models and parameters that are identified from measurements of population of cells do not capture the variability in biological processes and therefore these models are profoundly misleading. In essence, models inferred from population averages can fit the population data very well but they cannot predict. The key to overcoming these limitations is to generate single-cell and single-molecule experimental data sets of high quality and reproducibility that capture the variability in biological processes. Because single-cell data contain information hidden in population averages, our cellular systems identification methodology of integrating quantitative single-cell experiments with stochastic mathematical models is maximally predictive. Our approach is very broad and may be applied to any measurement that detects variability and any biological process that exhibits variability.

  19. EGF stimulates the activation of EGF receptors and the selective activation of major signaling pathways during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Ping; Shi, Huaiping; Jiang, Jennifer; Wang, Yuluan; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    Mitosis and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are both targets for cancer therapy. The role of EGFR signaling in mitosis has been rarely studied and poorly understood. The limited studies indicate that the activation of EGFR and downstream signaling pathways is mostly inhibited during mitosis. However, we recently showed that EGFR is phosphorylated in response to EGF stimulation in mitosis. Here we studied EGF-induced EGFR activation and the activation of major signaling pathways downstream of EGFR during mitosis. We showed that EGFR was strongly activated by EGF during mitosis as all the five major tyrosine residues including Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 were phosphorylated to a level similar to that in the interphase. We further showed that the activated EGFR is able to selectively activate some downstream signaling pathways while avoiding others. Activated EGFR is able to activate PI3K and AKT2, but not AKT1, which may be responsible for the observed effects of EGF against nocodazole-induced cell death. Activated EGFR is also able to activate c-Src, c-Cbl and PLC-γ1 during mitosis. However, activated EGFR is unable to activate ERK1/2 and their downstream substrates RSK and Elk-1. While it activated Ras, EGFR failed to fully activate Raf-1 in mitosis due to the lack of phosphorylation at Y341 and the lack of dephosphorylation at pS259. We conclude that contrary to the dogma, EGFR is activated by EGF during mitosis. Moreover, EGFR-mediated cell signaling is regulated differently from the interphase to specifically serve the needs of the cell in mitosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Signal Transduction in T Cell Activation and Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Blake , j ,, Aruffo, A. and Ledbetter, j A (1992) CD2/ LFA-3 ligation induces phiosphiolipase-C gamima 1 tyrosine phosphorylation and regulates CD3... Mouton , Y., Capron, A. and Amneisen, J.C. (1992) Activation-induced death by apoptosis in CD-I-i T cells from human immunodeficiencN, viruis-infected

  1. MET signaling in keratinocytes activates EGFR and initiates squamous carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataisson, Christophe; Michalowski, Aleksandra M; Shibuya, Kelly; Ryscavage, Andrew; Klosterman, Mary; Wright, Lisa; Dubois, Wendy; Liu, Fan; Zhuang, Anne; Rodrigues, Kameron B; Hoover, Shelley; Dwyer, Jennifer; Simpson, Mark R; Merlino, Glenn; Yuspa, Stuart H

    2016-06-21

    The receptor tyrosine kinase MET is abundant in many human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), but its functional significance in tumorigenesis is not clear. We found that the incidence of carcinogen-induced skin squamous tumors was substantially increased in transgenic MT-HGF (mouse metallothionein-hepatocyte growth factor) mice, which have increased abundance of the MET ligand HGF. Squamous tumors also erupted spontaneously on the skin of MT-HGF mice that were promoted by wounding or the application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C. Carcinogen-initiated tumors had Ras mutations, but spontaneous tumors did not. Cultured keratinocytes from MT-HGF mice and oncogenic RAS-transduced keratinocytes shared phenotypic and biochemical features of initiation that were dependent on autocrine activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through increased synthesis and release of EGFR ligands, which was mediated by the kinase SRC, the pseudoproteases iRhom1 and iRhom2, and the metallopeptidase ADAM17. Pharmacological inhibition of EGFR caused the regression of MT-HGF squamous tumors that developed spontaneously in orthografts of MT-HGF keratinocytes combined with dermal fibroblasts and implanted onto syngeneic mice. The global gene expression profile in MET-transformed keratinocytes was highly concordant with that in RAS-transformed keratinocytes, and a core RAS/MET coexpression network was activated in precancerous and cancerous human skin lesions. Tissue arrays revealed that many human skin SCCs have abundant HGF at both the transcript and protein levels. Thus, through the activation of EGFR, MET activation parallels a RAS pathway to contribute to human and mouse cutaneous cancers. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Julia M I; Hafen, Ernst; Köhler, Katja

    2012-12-05

    The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC), but not in the germline cells (GCs). However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline) and signal receiving cell (FC), thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  3. CCN2 is required for the TGF-β induced activation of Smad1-Erk1/2 signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sashidhar S Nakerakanti

    Full Text Available Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2 is a multifunctional matricellular protein, which is frequently overexpressed during organ fibrosis. CCN2 is a mediator of the pro-fibrotic effects of TGF-β in cultured cells, but the specific function of CCN2 in the fibrotic process has not been elucidated. In this study we characterized the CCN2-dependent signaling pathways that are required for the TGF-β induced fibrogenic response. By depleting endogenous CCN2 we show that CCN2 is indispensable for the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad1 and Erk1/2, but it is unnecessary for the activation of Smad3. TGF-β stimulation triggered formation of the CCN2/β(3 integrin protein complexes and activation of Src signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrated that signaling through the α(vβ(3 integrin receptor and Src was required for the TGF-β induced Smad1 phosphorylation. Recombinant CCN2 activated Src and Erk1/2 signaling, and induced phosphorylation of Fli1, but was unable to stimulate Smad1 or Smad3 phosphorylation. Additional experiments were performed to investigate the role of CCN2 in collagen production. Consistent with the previous studies, blockade of CCN2 abrogated TGF-β-induced collagen mRNA and protein levels. Recombinant CCN2 potently stimulated collagen mRNA levels and upregulated activity of the COL1A2 promoter, however CCN2 was a weak inducer of collagen protein levels. CCN2 stimulation of collagen was dose-dependent with the lower doses (<50 ng/ml having a stimulatory effect and higher doses having an inhibitory effect on collagen gene expression. In conclusion, our study defines a novel CCN2/α(vβ(3 integrin/Src/Smad1 axis that contributes to the pro-fibrotic TGF-β signaling and suggests that blockade of this pathway may be beneficial for the treatment of fibrosis.

  4. In situ detection of water quality contamination events based on signal complexity analysis using online ultraviolet-visible spectral sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pingjie; Wang, Ke; Hou, Dibo; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Guangxin

    2017-08-01

    The contaminant detection in water distribution systems is essential to protect public health from potentially harmful compounds resulting from accidental spills or intentional releases. As a noninvasive optical technique, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy is investigated for detecting contamination events. However, current methods for event detection exhibit the shortcomings of noise susceptibility. In this paper, a new method that has less sensitivity to noise was proposed to detect water quality contamination events by analyzing the complexity of the UV-Vis spectrum series. The proposed method applied approximate entropy (ApEn) to measure spectrum signals' complexity, which made a distinction between normal and abnormal signals. The impact of noise was attenuated with the help of ApEn's insensitivity to signal disturbance. This method was tested on a real water distribution system data set with various concentration simulation events. Results from the experiment and analysis show that the proposed method has a good performance on noise tolerance and provides a better detection result compared with the autoregressive model and sequential probability ratio test.

  5. Red light activates the σB-mediated general stress response of Bacillus subtilis via the energy branch of the upstream signaling cascade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ávila-Pérez, M.; Steen, J.B. van der; Kort, R.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    The σB-dependent general stress response in the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis can be elicited by a range of stress factors, such as starvation or an ethanol, salt, or heat shock, via a complex upstream signaling cascade. Additionally, σB can be activated by blue light via the

  6. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eMedina-Castellanos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation. During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced by the NADPH oxidase (Nox1/NoxR complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways by eATP, Ca2+ and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP. Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals.

  7. Characterization and Antioxidant Activity of the Complex of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the aqueous solubility of phloridzin by complexing it with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin Methods: The complex of phloridzin with HP-β-CD was prepared by freeze-drying method. The physicochemical properties of the complex were investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV), infrared ...

  8. p190RhoGAP links the β1 integrin/caveolin-1 mechano-signaling complex to RhoA and actin remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baohua; Radel, Chris; Hughes, Dalton; Kelemen, Sheri; Rizzo, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hemodynamic shear stress influences endothelial cell phenotype. Integrins and RhoA are essential components in the process that allow endothelial cells to adapt to flow. However, the signaling mechanisms that relay from integrins to RhoA are not well defined. We hypothesized that the β1 integrin/caveolin-1 signaling complex plays a role in shear stress regulation of RhoA activity through temporal regulation of p190RhoGAP. Methods and Results BAEC were subjected to laminar shear stress (10dynes/cm2) for up to 6 hrs. β1 integrin blockade inhibited Src-family kinases (SFK) and p190RhoGAP tyrosine phosophorylation observed following acute onset of shear stress. Depletion of caveolin-1 blocked the decline in p190RhoGAP tyrosine phosporylation observed at later time points through sustaining SFK activity. Manipulation of β1 integrin and caveolin-1 also altered shear-regulation of RhoA activity. More importantly, cells depleted of p190RhoGAP showed faulty temporal regulation of RhoA activity. Each of these treatments attenuated actin reorganization induced by flow. Similarly, stress fibers failed to form in endothelial cells exposed to enhanced blood flow in caveolin-1 knockout mice. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that p190RhoGAP links integrins, caveolin-1/caveolae to RhoA in a mechanotransduction cascade that participates in endothelial adaptation to flow. PMID:21051664

  9. Mobile phone electromagnetic radiation activates MAPK signaling and regulates viability in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Hong, Sae-Yong; Son, Tae-Ho; Yu, Kweon

    2008-07-01

    Mobile phones are widely used in the modern world. However, biological effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phones are largely unknown. In this report, we show biological effects of the mobile phone 835 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) in the Drosophila model system. When flies were exposed to the specific absorption rate (SAR) 1.6 W/kg, which is the proposed exposure limit by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), more than 90% of the flies were viable even after the 30 h exposure. However, in the SAR 4.0 W/kg strong EMF exposure, viability dropped from the 12 h exposure. These EMF exposures triggered stress response and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. The EMF exposures also activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, but not p38 kinase signaling. Interestingly, SAR 1.6 W/kg activated mainly ERK signaling and expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, whereas SAR 4.0 W/kg strongly activated JNK signaling and expression of apoptotic genes. In addition, SAR 4.0 W/kg amplified the number of apoptotic cells in the fly brain. These findings demonstrate that the exposure limit on electromagnetic radiation proposed by ANSI triggered ERK-survival signaling but the strong electromagnetic radiation activated JNK-apoptotic signaling in Drosophila.

  10. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus depends on ciliary neurotrophic factor and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Chakrapani, Baby P S; Schwegler, Herbert; Hofmann, Hans-Dieter; Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    In the neurogenic areas of the adult rodent brain, neural stem cells (NSCs) proliferate and produce new neurons throughout the lifetime. This requires a permanent pool of NSCs, the size of which needs to be tightly controlled. The gp130-associated cytokines ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) have been implicated in regulating NSC self-renewal and differentiation during embryonic development and in the adult brain. To study the relevance of the two cytokines in vivo, we analyzed precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of CNTF- and LIF-deficient mouse mutants. The number of radial glia-like NSCs, proliferative activity, and generation of new neurons were all reduced in CNTF(-/-) mutants but unaltered in LIF(-/-) animals. Conditional ablation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) gene under the control of the human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter resulted in a reduction of neurogenesis similar to that in CNTF(-/-) mice. The size of the granule cell layer was decreased in both mutants. Treatment of neurosphere cultures prepared from adult forebrain with CNTF inhibited overall proliferative activity but increased the number of NSCs as indicated by enhanced secondary neurosphere formation and upregulated expression of stem cell markers. Knockdown of STAT3 with short interfering RNA inhibited CNTF effects on neurospheres, and knockdown of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) enhanced them. Our results provide evidence that CNTF-induced STAT3 signaling is essential for the formation and/or maintenance of the neurogenic subgranular zone in the adult dentate gyrus and suggest that CNTF is required to keep the balance between NSC self-renewal and the generation of neuronal progenitors.

  11. Nicotine and elevated body temperature reduce the complexity of the genioglossus and diaphragm EMG signals in rats during early maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkurt, David; Akay, Yasemin M.; Akay, Metin

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we examined the effect of nicotine exposure and increased body temperature on the complexity (dynamics) of the genioglossus muscle (EMGg) and the diaphragm muscle (EMGdia) to explore the effects of nicotine and hyperthermia. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of the EMGdia and EMGg signals was performed using the approximate entropy method on 15 (7 saline- and 8 nicotine-treated) juvenile rats (P25-P35) and 19 (11 saline- and 8 nicotine-treated) young adult rats (P36-P44). The mean complexity values were calculated over the ten consecutive breaths using the approximate entropy method during mild elevated body temperature (38 °C) and severe elevated body temperature (39-40 °C) in two groups. In the first (nicotine) group, rats were treated with single injections of nicotine enough to produce brain levels of nicotine similar to those achieved in human smokers (2.5 (mg kg-1)/day) until the recording day. In the second (control) group, rats were treated with injections of saline, beginning at postnatal 5 days until the recording day. Our results show that warming the rat by 2-3 °C and nicotine exposure significantly decreased the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg for the juvenile age group. This reduction in the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg for the nicotine group was much greater than the normal during elevated body temperatures. We speculate that the generalized depressive effects of nicotine exposure and elevated body temperature on the respiratory neural firing rate and the behavior of the central respiratory network could be responsible for the drastic decrease in the complexity of the EMGdia and EMGg signals, the outputs of the respiratory neural network during early maturation.

  12. Nutritive, Post-ingestive Signals Are the Primary Regulators of AgRP Neuron Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwei Su

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The brain regulates food intake by processing sensory cues and peripheral physiological signals, but the neural basis of this integration remains unclear. Hypothalamic, agouti-related protein (AgRP-expressing neurons are critical regulators of food intake. AgRP neuron activity is high during hunger and is rapidly reduced by the sight and smell of food. Here, we reveal two distinct components of AgRP neuron activity regulation: a rapid but transient sensory-driven signal and a slower, sustained calorie-dependent signal. We discovered that nutrients are necessary and sufficient for sustained reductions in AgRP neuron activity and that activity reductions are proportional to the calories obtained. This change in activity is recapitulated by exogenous administration of gut-derived satiation signals. Furthermore, we showed that the nutritive value of food trains sensory systems—in a single trial—to drive rapid, anticipatory AgRP neuron activity inhibition. Together, these data demonstrate that nutrients are the primary regulators of AgRP neuron activity. : Su et al. demonstrate that nutrient content in the GI tract is rapidly signaled to hypothalamic neurons activated by hunger. This rapid effect is mediated by three satiation signals that synergistically reduce the activity of AgRP neurons. These findings uncover how hunger circuits in the brain are regulated and raise the possibility that hunger can be pharmacologically controlled. Keywords: calcium imaging, AgRP neurons, calories, satiation signals, sensory regulation, single trial learning, cholecystokinin, CCK, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, PYY, amylin, homeostasis

  13. New Insights into Glomerular Parietal Epithelial Cell Activation and Its Signaling Pathways in Glomerular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs have aroused an increasing attention recently. The proliferation of PECs is the main feature of crescentic glomerulonephritis; besides that, in the past decade, PEC activation has been identified in several types of noninflammatory glomerulonephropathies, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, diabetic glomerulopathy, and membranous nephropathy. The pathogenesis of PEC activation is poorly understood; however, a few studies delicately elucidate the potential mechanisms and signaling pathways implicated in these processes. In this review we will focus on the latest observations and concepts about PEC activation in glomerular diseases and the newest identified signaling pathways in PEC activation.

  14. The adaptor protein CIN85 assembles intracellular signaling clusters for B cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Julius; Wong, Leo E; Pirkuliyeva, Sona; Schulz, Kathrin; Schwiegk, Claudia; Fünfgeld, Kevser Gencalp; Keppler, Selina; Batista, Facundo D; Urlaub, Henning; Habeck, Michael; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Wienands, Jürgen

    2016-06-28

    The adaptor molecule Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kD (CIN85) regulates signaling from a number of cell surface receptors, such as growth factor receptors and antigen receptors on lymphocytes. Because of its multidomain structure, CIN85 is thought to act as a classical adaptor protein that connects functionally distinct components of a given signaling pathway through diverse protein domains. However, we found that in B lymphocytes, CIN85 functions to oligomerize SLP-65, which is the central effector protein of the B cell receptor (BCR). Therefore, CIN85 trimerizes through a carboxyl-terminal, coiled-coil domain. The multiple Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of trimeric CIN85 molecules associated with multiple SLP-65 molecules, which recruited further CIN85 trimers, thereby perpetuating the oligomerization process. Formation of this oligomeric signaling complex in resting B cells rendered the cells poised for the efficient initiation of intracellular signaling upon BCR stimulation. Our data suggest that the functionality of signaling cascades does not rely solely on the qualitative linkage of their various components but requires a critical number of effectors to become concentrated in signaling complexes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Antioxidant Activity of γ-Oryzanol: A Complex Network of Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Otavio Minatel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available γ-oryzanol (Orz, a steryl ferulate extracted from rice bran layer, exerts a wide spectrum of biological activities. In addition to its antioxidant activity, Orz is often associated with cholesterol-lowering, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and anti-diabetic effects. In recent years, the usefulness of Orz has been studied for the treatment of metabolic diseases, as it acts to ameliorate insulin activity, cholesterol metabolism, and associated chronic inflammation. Previous studies have shown the direct action of Orz when downregulating the expression of genes that encode proteins related to adiposity (CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs, inflammatory responses (nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB, and metabolic syndrome (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. It is likely that this wide range of beneficial activities results from a complex network of interactions and signals triggered, and/or inhibited by its antioxidant properties. This review focuses on the significance of Orz in metabolic disorders, which feature remarkable oxidative imbalance, such as impaired glucose metabolism, obesity, and inflammation.

  16. Solving the phase-retrieval problem of a complex signal in the fractional Fourier domain by nonlinear least-squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Liao, Tian-he; Cui, Yuan-feng

    2008-08-15

    From the viewpoint of unconstrained optimization the phase-retrieval problem of a 1D complex signal in the fractional Fourier domain is formulated as a nonlinear least-squares problem. A definition of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFRFT) constructed by a discrete Hermite-Gaussian function is adopted here. The ill-posedness of the problem is stressed, and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm of Moré's form is used to solve it. In contrast to many published references, this method can reconstruct the phase accurately from the amplitude of the original signal and the one of its DFRFT at any order in the interval (0, 2). For amplitudes with low-level noise this method also works well.

  17. Enterovirus 71 suppresses interferon responses by blocking Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling through inducing karyopherin-α1 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyang; Sun, Menghuai; Yuan, Xinhui; Ji, Lianfu; Jin, Yu; Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng

    2017-06-16

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as one of the most important enteroviruses since the eradication of poliovirus, and it causes severe neurological symptoms for which no effective antiviral drugs are available. Type I interferons (IFN) α/β have been used clinically as antiviral therapy as the first line of defense against virus infections successfully for decades. However, treatment with type I interferons has not been effective in patients with EV71 infection. In this study, we found that in cells pretreated with IFN-β, EV71 infection could still lead to a cytopathic effect, and the viral replication was not affected. The mechanism by which EV71 antagonizes interferon signaling, however, has been controversial. Our study indicated that EV71 infection did not inhibit phosphorylation of STAT1/2 induced by IFN-β stimulation, but p-STAT1/2 transport into the nucleus was significantly blocked. We showed that EV71 infection reduced the formation of STAT/karyopherin-α1 (KPNA1) complex upon interferon stimulation and that the virus down-regulated the expression of KPNA1, a nuclear localization signal receptor for p-STAT1. Using specific caspase inhibitors and siRNA for caspase-3, we demonstrated that EV71 infection induced degradation of cellular KPNA1 in a caspase-3-dependent manner, which led to decreased induction of interferon-inducible genes and IFN response. Viral 2A and 3C proteases did not degrade KPNA1, inhibit the activity of ISRE or suppress the transcription of interferon-inducible genes induced by IFN-β. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which antiviral signaling is suppressed through degradation of KPNA1 by activated caspase-3 induced in an enteroviral infection. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Current Models of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Activation by Growth Factors and Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu; Liang, Yan; He, Qiburi; Yao, Ruiyuan; Bao, Wenlei; Bao, Lili; Wang, Yanfeng; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is now referred to as mechanistic target of rapamycin, integrates many signals, including those from growth factors, energy status, stress, and amino acids, to regulate cell growth and proliferation, protein synthesis, protein degradation, and other physiological and biochemical processes. The mTOR-Rheb-TSC-TBC complex co-localizes to the lysosome and the phosphorylation of TSC-TBC effects the dissociation of the complex from the lysosome and activates Rheb. GTP-bound Rheb potentiates the catalytic activity of mTORC1. Under conditions with growth factors and amino acids, v-ATPase, Ragulator, Rag GTPase, Rheb, hVps34, PLD1, and PA have important but disparate effects on mTORC1 activation. In this review, we introduce five models of mTORC1 activation by growth factors and amino acids to provide a comprehensive theoretical foundation for future research. PMID:25402640

  19. Current Models of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1 Activation by Growth Factors and Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, which is now referred to as mechanistic target of rapamycin, integrates many signals, including those from growth factors, energy status, stress, and amino acids, to regulate cell growth and proliferation, protein synthesis, protein degradation, and other physiological and biochemical processes. The mTOR-Rheb-TSC-TBC complex co-localizes to the lysosome and the phosphorylation of TSC-TBC effects the dissociation of the complex from the lysosome and activates Rheb. GTP-bound Rheb potentiates the catalytic activity of mTORC1. Under conditions with growth factors and amino acids, v-ATPase, Ragulator, Rag GTPase, Rheb, hVps34, PLD1, and PA have important but disparate effects on mTORC1 activation. In this review, we introduce five models of mTORC1 activation by growth factors and amino acids to provide a comprehensive theoretical foundation for future research.

  20. DMPD: Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor 3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12213596 Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regula...(.html) (.csml) Show Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor 3.... PubmedID 12213596 Title Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of

  1. CD163: a signal receptor scavenging haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes from plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Madsen, Mette; Moestrup, Søren K

    2002-01-01

    hemolysis. Besides having a detoxificating effect by removing Hb from plasma, the CD163-mediated endocytosis of the Hp-Hb complex may represent a major pathway for uptake of iron in the tissue macrophages. The novel functional linkage of CD163 and Hp, which both are induced during inflammation, also reveal...

  2. Activation of Symbiosis Signaling by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Legumes and Rice[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jongho; Miller, J. Benjamin; Granqvist, Emma; Wiley-Kalil, Audrey; Gobbato, Enrico; Maillet, Fabienne; Cottaz, Sylvain; Samain, Eric; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Fort, Sébastien; Morris, Richard J.; Ané, Jean-Michel; Dénarié, Jean; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions involves plant recognition of diffusible signals from the fungus, including lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) and chitooligosaccharides (COs). Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that associate with leguminous plants also signal to their hosts via LCOs, the so-called Nod factors. Here, we have assessed the induction of symbiotic signaling by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (Myc) fungal-produced LCOs and COs in legumes and rice (Oryza sativa). We show that Myc-LCOs and tetra-acetyl chitotetraose (CO4) activate the common symbiosis signaling pathway, with resultant calcium oscillations in root epidermal cells of Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus. The nature of the calcium oscillations is similar for LCOs produced by rhizobial bacteria and by mycorrhizal fungi; however, Myc-LCOs activate distinct gene expression. Calcium oscillations were activated in rice atrichoblasts by CO4, but not the Myc-LCOs, whereas a mix of CO4 and Myc-LCOs activated calcium oscillations in rice trichoblasts. In contrast, stimulation of lateral root emergence occurred following treatment with Myc-LCOs, but not CO4, in M. truncatula, whereas both Myc-LCOs and CO4 were active in rice. Our work indicates that legumes and non-legumes differ in their perception of Myc-LCO and CO signals, suggesting that different plant species respond to different components in the mix of signals produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:25724637

  3. Activation of symbiosis signaling by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in legumes and rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jongho; Miller, J Benjamin; Granqvist, Emma; Wiley-Kalil, Audrey; Gobbato, Enrico; Maillet, Fabienne; Cottaz, Sylvain; Samain, Eric; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Fort, Sébastien; Morris, Richard J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Dénarié, Jean; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2015-03-01

    Establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions involves plant recognition of diffusible signals from the fungus, including lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) and chitooligosaccharides (COs). Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that associate with leguminous plants also signal to their hosts via LCOs, the so-called Nod factors. Here, we have assessed the induction of symbiotic signaling by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (Myc) fungal-produced LCOs and COs in legumes and rice (Oryza sativa). We show that Myc-LCOs and tetra-acetyl chitotetraose (CO4) activate the common symbiosis signaling pathway, with resultant calcium oscillations in root epidermal cells of Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus. The nature of the calcium oscillations is similar for LCOs produced by rhizobial bacteria and by mycorrhizal fungi; however, Myc-LCOs activate distinct gene expression. Calcium oscillations were activated in rice atrichoblasts by CO4, but not the Myc-LCOs, whereas a mix of CO4 and Myc-LCOs activated calcium oscillations in rice trichoblasts. In contrast, stimulation of lateral root emergence occurred following treatment with Myc-LCOs, but not CO4, in M. truncatula, whereas both Myc-LCOs and CO4 were active in rice. Our work indicates that legumes and non-legumes differ in their perception of Myc-LCO and CO signals, suggesting that different plant species respond to different components in the mix of signals produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. HAMLET - A protein-lipid complex with broad tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, James C S; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina

    2017-01-15

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex with broad effects against cancer cells of different origin. The therapeutic potential is emphasized by a high degree of specificity for tumor tissue. Here we review early studies of HAMLET, in collaboration with the Orrenius laboratory, and some key features of the subsequent development of the HAMLET project. The early studies focused on the apoptotic response that accompanies death in HAMLET treated tumor cells and the role of mitochondria in this process. In subsequent studies, we have identified a sequence of interactions that starts with the membrane integration of HAMLET and the activation of ion fluxes followed by HAMLET internalization, progressive inhibition of MAPK kinases and GTPases and sorting of HAMLET to different cellular compartments, including the nuclei. Therapeutic efficacy of HAMLET has been demonstrated in animal models of glioblastoma, bladder cancer and intestinal cancer. In clinical studies, HAMLET has been shown to target skin papillomas and bladder cancers. The findings identify HAMLET as a new drug candidate with promising selectivity for cancer cells and a strong therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pterygium epithelium abnormal differentiation related to activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Peng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate whether the abnormal differentiation of the pterygium epithelium is related to the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway in vitro. METHODS: The expression levels of phosphorylated ERK (P-ERK, keratin family members including K19 and K10 and the ocular master control gene Pax-6 were measured in 16 surgically excised pterygium tissues and 12 eye bank conjunctiva. In colony-forming cell assays, the differences in clone morphology and in K10, K19, P-ERK and Pax-6 expression between the head and body were investigated. When cocultured with the ERK signaling pathway inhibitor PD98059, the changes in clone morphology, colony-forming efficiency, differentiated marker K10, K19 and Pax-6 expression and P-ERK protein expression level were examined by immunoreactivity and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: The expression of K19 and Pax-6 decreased in the pterygium, especially in the head. No staining of K10 was found in the normal conjunctiva epithelium, but it was found to be expressed in the superficial cells in the head of the pterygium. Characteristic upregulation of P-ERK was observed by immunohistochemistry. The clone from the head with more differentiated cells in the center expressed more K10, and the clone from the body expressed more K19. The P-ERK protein level increased in the pterygium epithelium compared with conjunctiva and decreased when cocultured with PD98059. The same medium with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 was more effective in promoting clonal growth than conventional medium with 3T3 murine feeder layers. It was observed that the epithelium clone co-cultured with the inhibitor had decreased K10 expression and increased K19 and Pax-6 expression. CONCLUSION: We suggest ERK signaling pathway activation might play a role in the pterygium epithelium abnormal differentiation.

  6. Tumor-secreted LOXL2 activates fibroblasts through FAK signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Holly E; Bird, Demelza; Lang, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    models. Here, we discovered that tumor-derived LOXL2 directly activated stromal fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment. Genetic manipulation or antibody inhibition of LOXL2 in orthotopically grown mammary tumors reduced the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Using a marker for reticular...... fibroblasts, it was determined that expression of α-SMA was localized to fibroblasts recruited from the host tissue. This marker also revealed that the matrix present in tumors with reduced levels of LOXL2 was more scattered compared with control tumors which exhibited matrices with dense, parallel alignments....... Importantly, in vitro assays revealed that tumor-derived LOXL2 and a recombinant LOXL2 protein induced fibroblast branching on collagen matrices, as well as increased fibroblast-mediated collagen contraction and invasion of fibroblasts through extracellular matrix. Moreover, LOXL2 induced the expression of α-SMA...

  7. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex

    OpenAIRE

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris De Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hup?, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-?/?) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2...

  8. Hyperactivated Wnt signaling induces synthetic lethal interaction with Rb inactivation by elevating TORC1 activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a weak allele of axin, which deregulates Wg signaling and increases cell proliferation without obvious effects on cell fate specification, significantly alters metabolic gene expression, causes hypersensitivity to metabolic stress induced by fasting, and induces synergistic apoptosis with mutation of fly Rb ortholog, rbf. Furthermore, hyperactivation of Wg signaling by other components of the Wg pathway also induces synergistic apoptosis with rbf. We show that hyperactivated Wg signaling significantly increases TORC1 activity and induces excessive energy stress with rbf mutation. Inhibition of TORC1 activity significantly suppressed synergistic cell death induced by hyperactivated Wg signaling and rbf inactivation, which is correlated with decreased energy stress and decreased induction of apoptotic regulator expression. Finally the synthetic lethality between Rb and deregulated Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian cells and that inactivation of Rb and APC induces synergistic cell death through a similar mechanism. These results suggest that elevated TORC1 activity and metabolic stress underpin the evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between hyperactivated Wnt signaling and inactivated Rb tumor suppressor.

  9. Growth Factor Midkine Promotes T-Cell Activation through Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Signaling and Th1 Cell Differentiation in Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tomohiro; Maeda, Kayaho; Sato, Waichi; Kosugi, Tomoki; Sato, Yuka; Kojima, Hiroshi; Kato, Noritoshi; Ishimoto, Takuji; Tsuboi, Naotake; Uchimura, Kenji; Yuzawa, Yukio; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kadomatsu, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    Activated T cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including lupus nephritis (LN). The activation of calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and STAT4 signaling is essential for T cells to perform various effector functions. Here, we identified the growth factor midkine (MK; gene name, Mdk) as a novel regulator in the pathogenesis of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane-induced LN via activation of NFAT and IL-12/STAT4 signaling. Wild-type (Mdk +/+ ) mice showed more severe glomerular injury than MK-deficient (Mdk -/- ) mice, as demonstrated by mesangial hypercellularity and matrix expansion, and glomerular capillary loops with immune-complex deposition. Compared with Mdk -/- mice, the frequency of splenic CD69 + T cells and T helper (Th) 1 cells, but not of regulatory T cells, was augmented in Mdk +/+ mice in proportion to LN disease activity, and was accompanied by skewed cytokine production. MK expression was also enhanced in activated CD4 + T cells in vivo and in vitro. MK induced activated CD4 + T cells expressing CD69 through nuclear activation of NFAT transcription and selectively increased in vitro differentiation of naive CD4 + T cells into Th1 cells by promoting IL-12/STAT4 signaling. These results suggest that MK serves an indispensable role in the NFAT-regulated activation of CD4 + T cells and Th1 cell differentiation, eventually leading to the exacerbation of LN. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sexual communication and domestication may give rise to the signal complexity necessary for the emergence of language: An indication from songbird studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanoya, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    For language to be a vehicle of thought, protolanguage must develop a degree of complexity that allows for the syntactic manipulation of symbol sequences. Thus, before language emerged, a process in which signals became complex must have occurred. Here, we submit a scenario describing the process in which courtship songs gained in complexity during the course of domestication of Bengalese finches. By comparing domesticated Bengalese finches with their wild strain, white-rumped munias, we found that female preferences for complex songs were coupled with domesticated relaxed environments to give rise to song complexity. Furthermore, we found that the outcomes of domestication in Bengalese finches include decreased psychological and physiological stress reactions, decreased aggressiveness, and changed plumage colors. These characteristics are consistent with "domestication syndrome," originally proposed for mammals but now possibly applicable to birds. Our finding that domestication was a cause of signal complexity might be helpful in considering the process of signal evolution in human language.

  11. Studying multisite binary and ternary protein interactions by global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data in SEDPHAT: application to adaptor protein complexes in cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Jon C D; Brown, Patrick H; Bowden, Brent; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Appella, Ettore; Samelson, Lawrence E; Schuck, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Multisite interactions and the formation of ternary or higher-order protein complexes are ubiquitous features of protein interactions. Cooperativity between different ligands is a hallmark for information transfer, and is frequently critical for the biological function. We describe a new computational platform for the global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data for the study of binary and ternary multisite interactions, implemented as part of the public domain multimethod analysis software SEDPHAT. The global analysis of titrations performed in different orientations was explored, and the potential for unraveling cooperativity parameters in multisite interactions was assessed in theory and experiment. To demonstrate the practical potential and limitations of global analyses of ITC titrations for the study of cooperative multiprotein interactions, we have examined the interactions of three proteins that are critical for signal transduction after T-cell activation, LAT, Grb2, and Sos1. We have shown previously that multivalent interactions between these three molecules promote the assembly of large multiprotein complexes important for T-cell receptor activation. By global analysis of the heats of binding observed in sets of ITC injections in different orientations, which allowed us to follow the formation of binary and ternary complexes, we observed negative and positive cooperativity that may be important to control the pathway of assembly and disassembly of adaptor protein particles.

  12. bond activation and catalysis by Ru -pac complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (i) nucleophilicity of ROOH and (ii) the lability of. [RuIII(pac)(H2O)] complexes towards aquo-substitution to from [RuIII(pac)(OOR)] intermediate complex in solution. It is noteworthy that the ability of the. [RuIII(pac)(OOR)] intermediate complex to undergo heterolytic cleavage of the O–O bond expressed by the rate constant k1 ...

  13. Methionine Induces LAT1 Expression in Dairy Cow Mammary Gland by Activating the mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyu; Lin, Ye; Lv, He; Yang, Yang; Jiao, Hongtao; Hou, Xiaoming

    2017-12-01

    Methionine is the limiting amino acid for milk protein synthesis in dairy cows. The effect of methionine availability on milk protein synthesis is dependent on its active transport into cells through amino acid transporters. L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), which induces the transport of neutral amino acids, is highly expressed in lactating mammary gland. However, the effect of methionine on LAT1 expression and the mechanism governing this process in dairy cow mammary gland are poorly understood. In this study, we show that treatment of dairy cow mammary epithelial cells with increasing concentrations of methionine for 24 h resulted in increased expression of LAT1 and its associated protein 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc). Maximal expression levels occurred after treatment with 0.6 mM methionine. Methionine treatment also increased cell viability and β-casein synthesis. Western blots showed that methionine induced LAT1 and 4F2hc expression by activating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin or raptor siRNA prevented the upregulation of LAT1 and 4F2hc. These results indicate that methionine may activate the mTORC1 signaling pathway and further increase LAT1 and 4F2hc expression in dairy cow mammary gland, thus affecting milk protein synthesis.

  14. Extracellular cAMP activates molecular signalling pathways associated with sperm capacitation in bovines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carlos Agustín I; Osycka-Salut, Claudia E; Castellano, Luciana; Cesari, Andreína; Di Siervi, Nicolás; Mutto, Adrián; Johannisson, Anders; Morrell, Jane M; Davio, Carlos; Perez-Martinez, Silvina

    2017-08-01

    -AM (intracellular Ca2+ chelator, 50 μM), EGTA (10 μM) and Probenecid (MRPs general inhibitor, 500 μM). In addition, assays for binding to oviductal epithelial cells and IVF were carried out to test the effect of cAMP compared with other known capacitant agents such as heparin (60 μg/ml) and bicarbonate (40 mM). Straws of frozen bovine semen (20-25 × 106 spermatozoa/ml) were kindly provided by Las Lilas, CIALE and CIAVT Artificial Insemination Centers. The methods used in this work include western blot, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, computer-assisted semen analysis, live imaging of Ca2+ and fluorescence scanning. At least three independent assays with bull samples of proven fertility were carried. In the present study, we elucidate the molecular events induced by extracellular cAMP. Our results showed that external cAMP induces sperm capacitation, depending upon the action of PLC. Downstream, this enzyme increased ERK1-2 activation through PKC and elicited a rise in sperm Ca2+ levels (P signalling pathways involved in the acquisition of bull sperm fertilizing capability. The data presented here indicate that not only a rise, but also a regulation of cAMP levels is necessary to ensure sperm fertilizing ability. Thus, exclusion of the nucleotide to the extracellular space might be essential to guarantee the achievement of a cAMP tone, needed for all capacitation-associated events to take place. Moreover, the ability of cAMP to trigger such broad and complex signalling events allows us to hypothesize that cAMP is a self-produced autocrine/paracrine factor, and supports the emerging paradigm that spermatozoa do not compete but, in fact, communicate with each other. A precise understanding of the functional competence of mammalian spermatozoa is essential to generate clinical advances in the treatment of infertility and the development of novel contraceptive strategies. This work was supported by Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas [PIP0 496 to S

  15. The biology of skin wetness perception and its implications in manual function and for reproducing complex somatosensory signals in neuroprosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Ackerley, Rochelle

    2017-04-01

    Our perception of skin wetness is generated readily, yet humans have no known receptor (hygroreceptor) to signal this directly. It is easy to imagine the sensation of water running over our hands or the feel of rain on our skin. The synthetic sensation of wetness is thought to be produced from a combination of specific skin thermal and tactile inputs, registered through thermoreceptors and mechanoreceptors, respectively. The present review explores how thermal and tactile afference from the periphery can generate the percept of wetness centrally. We propose that the main signals include information about skin cooling, signaled primarily by thinly myelinated thermoreceptors, and rapid changes in touch, through fast-conducting, myelinated mechanoreceptors. Potential central sites for integration of these signals, and thus the perception of skin wetness, include the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices and the insula cortex. The interactions underlying these processes can also be modeled to aid in understanding and engineering the mechanisms. Furthermore, we discuss the role that sensing wetness could play in precision grip and the dexterous manipulation of objects. We expand on these lines of inquiry to the application of the knowledge in designing and creating skin sensory feedback in prosthetics. The addition of real-time, complex sensory signals would mark a significant advance in the use and incorporation of prosthetic body parts for amputees in everyday life.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Little is known about the underlying mechanisms that generate the perception of skin wetness. Humans have no specific hygroreceptor, and thus temperature and touch information combine to produce wetness sensations. The present review covers the potential mechanisms leading to the perception of wetness, both peripherally and centrally, along with their implications for manual function. These insights are relevant to inform the design of neuroengineering interfaces, such as sensory

  16. Low-Complexity Iterative Receiver for Space-Time Coded Signals over Frequency Selective Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siala

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a low-complexity turbo-detector scheme for frequency selective multiple-input multiple-output channels. The detection part of the receiver is based on a List-type MAP equalizer which is a state-reduction algorithm of the MAP algorithm using per-survivor technique. This alternative achieves a good tradeoff between performance and complexity provided a small amount of the channel is neglected. In order to induce the good performance of this equalizer, we propose to use a whitened matched filter (WMF which leads to a white-noise “minimum phase” channel model. Simulation results show that the use of the WMF yields significant improvement, particularly over severe channels. Thanks to the iterative turbo processing (detection and decoding are iterated several times, the performance loss due to the use of the suboptimum List-type equalizer is recovered.

  17. The complex tibial organ of the New Zealand ground weta: sensory adaptations for vibrational signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, Johannes; Lomas, Kathryn; Field, Laurence H

    2017-05-17

    In orthopteran insects, a complex tibial organ has evolved to detect substrate vibrations and/or airborne sound. Species of New Zealand weta (Anostostomatidae) with tympanal ears on the foreleg tibia use this organ to communicate by sound, while in atympanate species (which communicate by substrate drumming) the organ is unstudied. We investigated the complex tibial organ of the atympanate ground weta, Hemiandrus pallitarsis, for vibration detection adaptations. This system contains four sensory components (subgenual organ, intermediate organ, crista acustica homolog, accessory organ) in all legs, together with up to 90 scolopidial sensilla. Microcomputed tomography shows that the subgenual organ spans the hemolymph channel, with attachments suggesting that hemolymph oscillations displace the organ in a hinged-plate fashion. Subgenual sensilla are likely excited by substrate oscillations transmitted within the leg. Instead of the usual suspension within the middle of the tibial cavity, we show that the intermediate organ and crista acustica homolog comprise a cellular mass broadly attached to the anterior tibial wall. They likely detect cuticular vibrations, and not airborne sound. This atympanate complex tibial organ shows elaborate structural changes suggesting detection of vibrational stimuli by parallel input pathways, thus correlating well with the burrowing lifestyle and communication by substrate-transmitted vibration.

  18. Dominant negative effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 4 on TRAIL receptor 1 signaling by formation of heteromeric complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Simon; Hasenauer, Jan; Pollak, Nadine; Scheurich, Peter

    2014-06-06

    The cytokine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its cell membrane receptors constitute an elaborate signaling system fulfilling important functions in immune regulation and tumor surveillance. Activation of the death receptors TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 can lead to apoptosis, whereas TRAILR3 and TRAILR4 are generally referred to as decoy receptors, which have been shown to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Alike other members of the TNF receptor superfamily, TRAIL receptors contain a pre-ligand binding assembly domain (PLAD) mediating receptor oligomerization. Still, the stoichiometry of TRAIL receptor oligomers as well as the issue of whether the PLAD mediates only homotypic or also heterotypic interactions remained inconclusive until now. Performing acceptor-photobleaching FRET studies with receptors 1, 2, and 4, we demonstrate interactions in all possible combinations. Formation of dimers was shown by chemical cross-linking experiments for interactions of TRAILR2 and heterophilic interactions between the two death receptors or between either of the death receptors and TRAILR4. Implications of the demonstrated receptor-receptor interactions on signaling were investigated in suitable cellular models. Both apoptosis induction and activation of the transcription factor NFκB were significantly reduced in the presence of TRAILR4. Our experimental data combined with mathematical modeling show that the inhibitory capacity of TRAILR4 is attributable to signaling-independent mechanisms, strongly suggesting a reduction of signaling competent death receptors through formation heteromeric receptor complexes. In summary, we propose a model of TRAIL receptor interference driven by PLAD-mediated formation of receptor heterodimers on the cell membrane. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Estrogen receptor signal in regulation of B cell activation during diverse immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaba, Josaine; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Kindy, Mark; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2015-11-01

    The role of signalling through oestrogen receptors (ERs) in the regulation of B cell activation is an area of growing importance not only in terms protective immunity but also in the determination of the mechanisms of the onset of autoimmune disorders and cancers. The mode of signalling action of this single chain nuclear receptor protein molecule depends on its ability to bind to the promoters of Pax5, HOXC4 and apolipoprotein B RNA-editing enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) genes. ER-mediated transcriptional regulation induces class switch recombination of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (VH) to DH-JH genes and somatic hypermutation in developing B cells. The mode of action of ER is associated with BCR-signal pathways that involve the regulator proteins BAFF and APRIL. Additionally, the plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor-1 (GEPR1) directs diverse cell signalling events in B cells that involve the MAPK pathways. These signals are immensely important during progenitor and precursor B cell activation. We have focused our goals on the medicinal aspects of ER-signalling mechanisms and their effects on polyclonal B cell activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  1. Cardiac preconditioning with sphingosine-1-phosphate requires activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Laubscher, Roisin F; King, Jonathan C; Hacking, Damian; Somers, Sarin; Hastie, Samantha; Stewart, Tessa; Imamdin, Aqeela; Maarman, Gerald; Pedretti, Sarah; Lecour, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aims Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a cardioprotective agent. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3) is a key mediator of many cardioprotective agents. We aimed to explore whether STAT-3 is a key mediator in S1P-induced preconditioning. Methods Langendorff-perfused hearts from Wistar rats and wild-type or cardiomyocyte-specific STAT-3 knockout mice were pre-treated with S1P (10 nmol/l), with or without the STAT-3 pathway inhibitor AG490, before an ischaemia–reperfusion insult. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride and Evans blue staining were used for the determination of infarct size. Western blot analysis was carried out on the S1P pre-treated hearts for detection of cytosolic, nuclear and mitochondrial phosphorylated and total STAT-3 proteins. Results Pre-treatment with S1P decreased the infarct size in isolated rat (5 ± 3% vs control 26 ± 8%, p < 0.01) and wild-type mouse hearts (13 ± 1% vs control 33 ± 3%, p < 0.05). This protective effect was abolished in the rat hearts pre-treated with AG490 (30 ± 10%, p = ns vs control) and in the hearts from STAT-3 knockout mice (35 ± 4% vs control 30 ± 3%, p = ns). Levels of phosphorylated STAT-3 were significantly increased in both the nuclear (p < 0.05 vs control) and mitochondrial (p < 0.05 vs control) fractions in the S1P pre-treated hearts, but remained unchanged in the cytosolic fraction (p = ns vs control). Conclusion These novel results demonstrate that pharmacological preconditioning with S1P in the isolated heart is mediated by activation of mitochondrial and nuclear STAT-3, therefore suggesting that S1P may be a novel therapeutic target to modulate mitochondrial and nuclear function in cardiovascular disease in order to protect the heart against ischaemia–reperfusion. PMID:25000441

  2. Analysis of EMG Signals in Aggressive and Normal Activities by Using Higher-Order Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necmettin Sezgin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and classification of electromyography (EMG signals are very important in order to detect some symptoms of diseases, prosthetic arm/leg control, and so on. In this study, an EMG signal was analyzed using bispectrum, which belongs to a family of higher-order spectra. An EMG signal is the electrical potential difference of muscle cells. The EMG signals used in the present study are aggressive or normal actions. The EMG dataset was obtained from the machine learning repository. First, the aggressive and normal EMG activities were analyzed using bispectrum and the quadratic phase coupling of each EMG episode was determined. Next, the features of the analyzed EMG signals were fed into learning machines to separate the aggressive and normal actions. The best classification result was 99.75%, which is sufficient to significantly classify the aggressive and normal actions.

  3. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  4. Heterolytic activation of dihydrogen by platinum and palladium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida Leñero, K.Q.; Guari, Y.; Kramer, P.C.J.; van Leeuwen, P.W.N.M.; Donnadieu, B.; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Chaudret, B.; Lutz, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828971; Spek, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156517566

    2013-01-01

    Wide bite angle diphosphine ligands were used to prepare [(diphosphine)M(2-(diphenylphosphino)pyridine)]2+ complexes (M = Pd, Pt). Except for the ligand with the largest bite angle, 2-(diphenylphosphino)pyridine coordinates in a bidentate mode leading to bis-chelate complexes. In the case of

  5. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of Southeast Texas, Inc., grantee of FTZ 117, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign...

  6. Outer Membrane Protein 25 of Brucella Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signal Pathway in Human Trophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane protein 25 (OMP25, a virulence factor from Brucella, plays an important role in maintaining the structural stability of Brucella. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal pathway widely exists in eukaryotic cells. In this study, human trophoblast cell line HPT-8 and BALB/c mice were infected with Brucella abortus 2308 strain (S2308 and 2308ΔOmp25 mutant strain. The expression of cytokines and activation of MAPK signal pathway were detected. We found that the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, and interleukin-10 (IL-10 were increased in HPT-8 cells infected with S2308 and 2308ΔOmp25 mutant. S2308 also activated p38 phosphorylation protein, extracellular-regulated protein kinases (ERK, and Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK from MAPK signal pathway. 2308ΔOmp25 could not activate p38, ERK, and JNK branches. Immunohistochemistry experiments showed that S2308 was able to activate phosphorylation of p38 and ERK in BABL/c mice. However, 2308ΔOmp25 could weakly activate phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. These results suggest that Omp25 played an important role in the process of Brucella activation of the MAPK signal pathway.

  7. Dynamic regulation of integrin activation by intracellular and extracellular signals controls oligodendrocyte morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Inger

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelination requires precise control of oligodendrocyte morphology and myelin generation at each of the axons contacted by an individual cell. This control must involve the integration of extracellular cues, such as those on the axon surface, with intrinsic developmental programmes. We asked whether integrins represent one class of oligodendrocyte cell-surface receptors able to provide this integration. Results Integrins signal via a process of activation, a conformational change that can be induced either by "outside-in" signals comprising physiological extracellular matrix ligands (mimicked by the pharmacological use of the divalent cation manganese or "inside-out" signalling molecules such as R-Ras. Increasing levels of outside-in signalling via the laminin receptor α6β1 integrin were found to promote oligodendrocyte processing and myelin sheet formation in culture. Similar results were obtained when inside-out signalling was increased by the expression of a constitutively-active R-Ras. Inhibiting inside-out signalling by using dominant-negative R-Ras reduces processes and myelin sheets; importantly, this can be partially rescued by the co-stimulation of outside-in signalling using manganese. Conclusion The balance of the equilibrium between active and inactive integrins regulates oligodendrocyte morphology, which is itself regulated by extrinsic and intrinsic cues so providing a mechanism of signal integration. As laminins capable of providing outside-in signals are present on axons at the time of myelination, a mechanism exists by which morphology and myelin generation might be regulated independently in each oligodendrocyte process.

  8. Electron density increases due to Lightning activity as deduced from LWPC code and VLF signal perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Nait Amor; Bouderba, Yasmina

    VLF signal perturbations in association with thunderstorm activity appear as changes in the signal amplitude and phase. Several papers reported on the characteristics of thus perturbations and their connection to the lightning strokes amplitude and polarity. In this contribution, we quantified the electrons density increases due to lightning activity by the use of the LWPC code and VLF signal perturbations parameters. The method is similar to what people did in studying the solar eruptions effect. the results showed that the reference height (h') decreased to lower altitudes (between 70 and 80 km). From the LWPC code results the maximum of the electron density was then deduced. Therefore, a numerical simulation of the atmospheric species times dependences was performed to study the recovery times of the electrons density at different heights. The results showed that the recovery time last for several minutes and explain the observation of long recovery Early signal perturbations.

  9. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  10. Design of complete software GPS signal simulator with low complexity and precise multipath channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arul Elango

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The need for GPS data simulators have become important due to the tremendous growth in the design of versatile GPS receivers. Commercial hardware and software based GPS simulators are expensive and time consuming. In this work, a low cost simple novel GPS L1 signal simulator is designed for testing and evaluating the performance of software GPS receiver in a laboratory environment. A typical real time paradigm, similar to actual satellite derived GPS signal is created on a computer generated scenario. In this paper, a GPS software simulator is proposed that may offer a lot of analysis and testing flexibility to the researchers and developers as it is totally software based primarily running on a laptop/personal computer without the requirement of any hardware. The proposed GPS simulator allows provision for re-configurability and test repeatability and is developed in VC++ platform to minimize the simulation time. It also incorporates Rayleigh multipath channel fading model under non-line of sight (NLOS conditions. In this work, to efficiently design the simulator, several Rayleigh fading models viz. Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT, Filtering White Gaussian Noise (FWFN and modified Sum of Sinusoidal (SOS simulators are tested and compared in terms of accuracy of its first and second order statistical metrics, execution time and the later one is found to be as the best appropriate Rayleigh multipath model suitable for incorporating with GPS simulator. The fading model written in ‘MATLAB’ engine has been linked with software GPS simulator module enable to test GPS receiver’s functionality in different fading environments.

  11. Low complexity iterative MLSE equalization of M-QAM signals in extremely long rayleigh fading channels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Myburgh, HC

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available in Section 2 while the the multilevel neuron is discussed in section 3, followed by a discussion on optimization techniques in Section 4. Section 5 presents a computational complexity analysis of the proposed equalizer and the Viterbi MLSE equalizer... of the respective vectors. B. Iterative MLSE Equalization It was shown in [10] that (3) is a Lyapunov function in the high gain limit, where the neuron threshold function approaches a sgn-function, for the dynamic system given by ITsuu ++−= τdt d...

  12. Target-of-rapamycin complex 1 (Torc1) signaling modulates cilia size and function through protein synthesis regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shiaulou; Li, Jade; Diener, Dennis R.; Choma, Michael A.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Sun, Zhaoxia

    2012-01-01

    The cilium serves as a cellular antenna by coordinating upstream environmental cues with numerous downstream signaling processes that are indispensable for the function of the cell. This role is supported by the revelation that defects of the cilium underlie an emerging class of human disorders, termed “ciliopathies.” Although mounting interest in the cilium has demonstrated the essential role that the organelle plays in vertebrate development, homeostasis, and disease pathogenesis, the mechanisms regulating cilia morphology and function remain unclear. Here, we show that the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) growth pathway modulates cilia size and function during zebrafish development. Knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 1a (tsc1a), which encodes an upstream inhibitor of TOR complex 1 (Torc1), increases cilia length. In contrast, treatment of embryos with rapamycin, an inhibitor of Torc1, shortens cilia length. Overexpression of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6k1), which encodes a downstream substrate of Torc1, lengthens cilia. Furthermore, we provide evidence that TOR-mediated cilia assembly is evolutionarily conserved and that protein synthesis is essential for this regulation. Finally, we demonstrate that TOR signaling and cilia length are pivotal for a variety of downstream ciliary functions, such as cilia motility, fluid flow generation, and the establishment of left-right body asymmetry. Our findings reveal a unique role for the TOR pathway in regulating cilia size through protein synthesis and suggest that appropriate and defined lengths are necessary for proper function of the cilium. PMID:22308353

  13. Detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals based on time-frequency and nonlinear analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoljub eGajic

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals. After preprocessing of EEG signals we extract representative features in time, frequency and time-frequency domain as well as using nonlinear analysis. The features are extracted in a few frequency sub-bands of clinical interest since these sub-bands showed much better discriminatory characteristics compared with the whole frequency band. Then we optimally reduce the dimension of feature space to two using scatter matrices. A decision about the presence of epileptiform activity in EEG signals is made by quadratic classifiers designed in the reduced two-dimensional feature space. The accuracy of the technique was tested on three sets of electroencephalographic (EEG signals recorded at the University Hospital Bonn: surface EEG signals from healthy volunteers, intracranial EEG signals from the epilepsy patients during the seizure free interval from within the seizure focus and intracranial EEG signals of epileptic seizures also from within the seizure focus. An overall detection accuracy of 98.7% was achieved.

  14. CD47 signaling regulates the immunosuppressive activity of VEGF in T cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Chang, Tiffany; Singh, Satya P.; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Garfield, Susan H.; Pendrak, Michael L.; Pantoja, David R. Soto; Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Jin, Shelly; Roberts, David D.

    2014-01-01

    Thromobospondin-1 inhibits angiogenesis in part by interacting with the ubiquitous cell surface receptor CD47. In endothelial cells, CD47 interacts directly with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2), and thrombospondin-1 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation and signaling by disrupting this association. We now show that CD47 similarly associates with and regulates VEGFR2 in T cells. Thrombospondin-1 inhibits phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream target Src in wild type but not in CD47-deficient human Jurkat and primary murine T cells. VEGFR2 signaling inhibits proliferation and TCR signaling in wild type T cells. However, ligation of CD47 by thrombospondin-1 or loss of CD47 expression reverses some inhibitory effects of VEGF on proliferation and T cell activation. We further found that VEGF and VEGFR2 expression are up-regulated in CD47-deficient murine CD4+ and human Jurkat T cells, and the resulting autocrine VEGFR2 signaling enhances proliferation and some TCR responses in the absence of CD47. Thus, CD47 signaling modulates the ability of VEGF to regulate proliferation and TCR signaling, and autocrine production of VEGF by T cells contributes to this regulation. This provides a mechanism to understand the context-dependent effects of thrombospondin-1 and VEGF on T cell activation and reveals an important role for CD47 signaling in regulating T cell production of the major angiogenic factor VEGF. PMID:25200950

  15. CD47 signaling regulates the immunosuppressive activity of VEGF in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Chang, Tiffany; Singh, Satya P; Lim, Langston; Mannan, Poonam; Garfield, Susan H; Pendrak, Michael L; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Jin, Shelly; Roberts, David D

    2014-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) inhibits angiogenesis, in part, by interacting with the ubiquitous cell-surface receptor CD47. In endothelial cells, CD47 interacts directly with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, and TSP1 inhibits VEGFR2 phosphorylation and signaling by disrupting this association. We show that CD47 similarly associates with and regulates VEGFR2 in T cells. TSP1 inhibits phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream target Src in wild type but not in CD47-deficient human Jurkat and primary murine T cells. VEGFR2 signaling inhibits proliferation and TCR signaling in wild type T cells. However, ligation of CD47 by TSP1 or loss of CD47 expression reverses some inhibitory effects of VEGF on proliferation and T cell activation. We further found that VEGF and VEGFR2 expression are upregulated in CD47-deficient murine CD4(+) and human Jurkat T cells, and the resulting autocrine VEGFR2 signaling enhances proliferation and some TCR responses in the absence of CD47. Thus, CD47 signaling modulates the ability of VEGF to regulate proliferation and TCR signaling, and autocrine production of VEGF by T cells contributes to this regulation. This provides a mechanism to understand the context-dependent effects of TSP1 and VEGF on T cell activation, and reveals an important role for CD47 signaling in regulating T cell production of the major angiogenic factor VEGF.

  16. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RNF125 Activates Interleukin-36 Receptor Signaling and Contributes to Its Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S; Caviness, Gary; Yi, Guanghui; Raymond, Ernest L; Mbow, M Lamine; Kao, C Cheng

    2017-11-25

    Signaling by the interleukin-36 receptor (IL-36R) is linked to inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. However, the regulation of IL-36R signaling is poorly understood. Activation of IL-36R signaling in cultured cells results in an increased polyubiquitination of the receptor subunit, IL-1Rrp2. Treatment with deubiquitinases shows that the receptor subunit of IL-36R, IL-1Rrp2, is primarily polyubiquitinated at the K63 position, which is associated with endocytic trafficking and signal transduction. A minor amount of ubiquitination is at the K48 position that is associated with protein degradation. A focused siRNA screen identified RNF125, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to ubiquitinate IL-1Rrp2 upon activation of IL-36R signaling while not affecting the activated IL-1 receptor. Knockdown of RNF125 decreases signal transduction by the IL-36R. Overexpression of RNF125 in HEK293T cells activates IL-36R signaling and increases the ubiquitination of IL-1Rrp2 and its subsequent turnover. RNF125 can coimmunoprecipitate with the IL-36R, and it traffics with IL-1Rrp2 from the cell surface to lysosomes. Mutations of Lys568 and Lys569 in the C-terminal tail of IL-1Rrp2 decrease ubiquitination by RNF125 and increase the steady-state levels of IL-1Rrp2. These results demonstrate that RNF125 has multiple regulatory roles in the signaling, trafficking, and turnover of the IL-36R. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The Activity of Surface Electromyographic Signal of Selected Muscles during Classic Rehabilitation Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Jinzhuang Xiao; Jinli Sun; Junmin Gao; Hongrui Wang; Xincai Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Prone bridge, unilateral bridge, supine bridge, and bird-dog are classic rehabilitation exercises, which have been advocated as effective ways to improve core stability among healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of seven selected muscles during rehabilitation exercises through the signal of surface electromyographic. Approaches. We measured the surface electromyographic signals of four lower limb muscles, two ab...

  18. Study of memory deficit in Alzheimer's disease by means of complexity analysis of fNIRS signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpetuini, David; Bucco, Roberta; Zito, Michele; Merla, Arcangelo

    2018-01-01

    Working memory deficit is a signature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The free and cued selective reminding test (FCSRT) is a clinical test that quantifies memory deficit for AD diagnosis. However, the diagnostic accuracy of FCSRT may be increased by accompanying it with neuroimaging. Since the test requires doctor-patient interaction, brain monitoring is challenging. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) could be suited for such a purpose because of the fNIRS flexibility. We investigated whether the complexity, based on sample entropy and multiscale entropy metrics, of the fNIRS signal during FCSRT was correlated with memory deficit in early AD. fNIRS signals were recorded over the prefrontal cortex of healthy and early AD participants. Group differences were tested through Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test ([Formula: see text]). At group level, we found significant differences for Brodmann areas 9 and 46. The results, although preliminary, demonstrate the feasibility of performing ecological studies on early AD with fNIRS. This approach may provide a potential neuroimaging-based method for diagnosis of early AD, viable at the doctor's office level, improving test-based diagnosis. The increased entropy of the fNIRS signal in early AD suggests the opportunity for further research on the neurophysiological status in AD and its relevance for clinical symptoms.

  19. Complexity analysis of EMG signals for patients after stroke during robot-aided rehabilitation training using fuzzy approximate entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Song, Rong; Tong, Kai-yu

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents a novel viewpoint to monitor the motor function improvement during a robot-aided rehabilitation training. Eight chronic poststroke subjects were recruited to attend the 20-session training, and in each session, subjects were asked to perform voluntary movements of elbow flexion and extension together with the robotic system. The robotic system was continuously controlled by the electromyographic (EMG) signal from the affected triceps. Fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) was applied to investigate the complexity of the EMG segment, and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) during elbow flexion and extension was applied to reflect force generating capacity of the affected muscles. The results showed that the group mean fApEn of EMG signals from triceps and biceps increased significantly after the robot-aided rehabilitation training . There was also significant increase in maximum voluntary flexion and extension torques after the robot-aided rehabilitation training . There was significant correlation between fApEn of agonist and MVC , which implied that the increase of motorneuron number is one of factors that may explain the increase in muscle strength. These findings based on fApEn of the EMG signals expand the existing interpretation of training-induced function improvement in patients after stroke, and help us to understand the neurological change induced by the robot-aided rehabilitation training.

  20. Integrin-dependent activation of the JNK signaling pathway by mechanical stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maria Pereira

    Full Text Available Mechanical force is known to modulate the activity of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling cascade. However, the effect of mechanical stresses on JNK signaling activation has previously only been analyzed by in vitro detection methods. It still remains unknown how living cells activate the JNK signaling cascade in response to mechanical stress and what its functions are in stretched cells.We assessed in real-time the activity of the JNK pathway in Drosophila cells by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM, using an intramolecular phosphorylation-dependent dJun-FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer biosensor. We found that quantitative FRET-FLIM analysis and confocal microscopy revealed sustained dJun-FRET biosensor activation and stable morphology changes in response to mechanical stretch for Drosophila S2R+ cells. Further, these cells plated on different substrates showed distinct levels of JNK activity that associate with differences in cell morphology, integrin expression and focal adhesion organization.These data imply that alterations in the cytoskeleton and matrix attachments may act as regulators of JNK signaling, and that JNK activity might feed back to modulate the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion. We found that this dynamic system is highly plastic; at rest, integrins at focal adhesions and talin are key factors suppressing JNK activity, while multidirectional static stretch leads to integrin-dependent, and probably talin-independent, Jun sensor activation. Further, our data suggest that JNK activity has to coordinate with other signaling elements for the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell shape remodeling associated with stretch.

  1. Di-, tri-, and tetranuclear nickel(II) complexes with oximato bridges: magnetism and catecholase-like activity of two tetranuclear complexes possessing rhombic topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Lakshmi Kanta; Biswas, Apurba; Kinyon, Jared S; Dalal, Naresh S; Zhou, Haidong; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2013-10-21

    Oxime-based tridentate Schiff base ligands 3-[2-(diethylamino)ethylimino]butan-2-one oxime (HL(1)) and 3-[3-(dimethylamino)propylimino]butan-2-one oxime (HL(2)) produced the dinuclear complex [Ni2L(1)2](ClO4)2 (1) and trinuclear complex [Ni3(HL(2))3(μ3-O)](ClO4)4·CH3CN (2), respectively, upon reaction with Ni(ClO4)2·6H2O. However, in a slightly alkaline medium, both of the ligands underwent hydrolysis and resulted in tetranuclear complexes [{Ni(deen)(H2O)}2(μ3-OH)2{Ni2(moda)4}](ClO4)2·2CH3CN (3) and [{Ni(dmpn)(CH3CN)2}2(μ3-OH)2{Ni2(moda)4}](ClO4)2·CH3CN (4), where deen = 2-(diethylamino)ethylamine, dmpn = 3-(dimethylamino)-1-propylamine, and modaH = diacetyl monoxime. All four complexes have been structurally characterized. Complex 1 is a centrosymmetric dimer where the square planar nickel(II) atoms are joined solely by the oximato bridges. In complex 2, three square planar nickel atoms form a triangular core through a central oxido (μ3-O) and peripheral oximato bridges. Tetranuclear complexes 3 and 4 consist of four distorted octahedral nickel(II) ions held together in a rhombic chair arrangement by two central μ3-OH and four peripheral oximato bridges. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated that dinuclear 1 and trinuclear 2 exhibited diamagnetic behavior, while tetranuclear complexes 3 and 4 were found to have dominant antiferromagnetic intramolecular coupling with concomitant ferromagnetic interactions. Despite its singlet ground state, both 3 and 4 serve as useful examples of Kahn's model for competing spin interactions. High-frequency EPR studies were also attempted, but no signal was detected, likely due to the large energy gap between the ground and first excited state. Complexes 3 and 4 exhibited excellent catecholase-like activity in the aerial oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol to the corresponding o-quinone, whereas 1 and 2 did not show such catalytic activity. Kinetic data analyses of this oxidation reaction in acetonitrile

  2. Microglia-Induced Activation of Noncanonical Wnt Signaling Aggravates Neurodegeneration in Demyelinating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Ron; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are myelinating cells of the central nervous system. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease characterized by both myelin loss and neuronal degeneration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal degeneration in demyelinating disorders are not fully understood. In the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) demyelinating-mouse model of MS, inflammatory microglia produce cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Since microglia and noncanonical Wnt signaling components in neurons, such as the coreceptor Ror2, were observed in the spinal cords of mice with EAE (EAE mice), we postulated that the interplay between activated microglia and spinal neurons under EAE conditions is mediated through noncanonical Wnt signaling. EAE treatment upregulated in vivo expression of noncanonical Wnt signaling components in spinal neurons through microglial activation. In accordance with the neuronal degeneration detected in the EAE spinal cord in vivo, coculture of spinal neurons with microglia or the application of recombinant IL-1β upregulated noncanonical Wnt signaling and induced neuron death, which was suppressed by the inhibition of the Wnt-Ror2 pathway. Ectopic noncanonical Wnt signaling aggravated the demyelinating pathology in another MS mouse model due to Wnt5a-induced neurodegeneration. The linkage between activated microglia and neuronal Wnt-Ror2 signaling may provide a candidate target for therapeutic approaches to demyelinating disorders. PMID:27550808

  3. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    Science.gov (United