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Sample records for sigma ligand 11c-sa4503

  1. In vivo evaluation of [11C]SA4503 as a PET ligand for mapping CNS sigma1 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Tajima, Hisashi; Ishii, Shin-Ichi; Matsuno, Kiyoshi; Homma, Yoshio; Senda, Michio

    2000-01-01

    The potential of the 11 C-labeled selective sigma 1 receptor ligand 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ([ 11 C]SA4503) was evaluated in vivo as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for mapping sigma 1 receptors in rats. SA4503 is known to have a high affinity (IC 50 17.4 nM) and a higher selectivity (sigma 1 /sigma 2 =103) for the sigma 1 receptor. A high and increasing brain uptake of [ 11 C]SA4503 was found. Pre-, co- and postinjection of cold SA4503 significantly decreased uptake of [ 11 C]SA4503 in the brain, spleen, heart, lung, and kidney in which sigma receptors are present as well as in the skeletal muscle. In the blocking study with one of four sigma receptor ligands including haloperidol, (+)-pentazocine, SA4503, and (-)-pentazocine (in the order of their affinity for sigma 1 receptor subtype), SA4503 and haloperidol significantly reduced the brain uptake of [ 11 C]SA4503 to approximately 30% of the control, but the other two benzomorphans did not. A high specific uptake of [ 11 C]SA4503 by the brain was also confirmed by ex vivo autoradiography (ARG) and PET. Ex vivo ARG showed a higher uptake in the vestibular nucleus, temporal cortex, cingulate cortex, inferior colliculus, thalamus, and frontal cortex, and a moderate uptake in the parietal cortex and caudate putamen. Peripherally, the blocking effects of the four ligands depended on their affinity for sigma 1 receptors. No 11 C-labeled metabolite was detected in the brain 30 min postinjection, whereas approximately 20% of the radioactivity was found as 11 C-labeled metabolites in plasma. These results have demonstrated that the 11 C-labeled sigma 1 receptor ligand [ 11 C]SA4503 has a potential for mapping sigma 1 receptors in the central nervous system and peripheral organs

  2. Evaluation of (+)-p-[11C]methylvesamicol for mapping sigma1 receptors: a comparison with [11C]SA4503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yajima, Kazuyoshi; QingGeLeTu; Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Vesamicol is a leading compound for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers for mapping the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Recently, we found that (+)-p-methylvesamicol ((+)-PMV) has low affinity for VAChT (K i =199 nM), but has moderate to high affinity for sigma receptors: K i =3.0 nM for sigma 1 and K i =40.7 nM for sigma 2 , and that sigma 1 -selective SA4503 (K i =4.4 nM for sigma 1 and K i =242 nM for sigma 2 ) has moderate affinity for VAChT (K i =50.2 nM). In the present study, we examined the potential of (+)-[ 11 C]PMV as a PET radioligand for mapping sigma 1 receptors as compared with [ 11 C]SA4503. In rat brain, similar regional distribution patterns of (+)-[ 11 C]PMV and [ 11 C]SA4503 were shown by tissue dissection and by ex vivo autoradiography. Blocking experiments using (±)-PMV (-)-vesamicol, SA4503, haloperidol and (±)-pentazocine showed that the two tracers specifically bound to sigma 1 receptors, and that [ 11 C]SA4503 exhibited greater specific binding than (+)-[ 11 C]PMV. No sign of VAChT-specific binding by [ 11 C]SA4503 was observed in the striatum, which is rich in VAChT sites. In conclusion, (+)-[ 11 C]PMV specifically bound to sigma 1 receptors in the brain, but to a lesser extent than [ 11 C]SA4503, suggesting that (+)-[ 11 C]PMV is a less preferable PET ligand than [ 11 C]SA4503. On the other hand, the moderate affinity of [ 11 C]SA4503 for VAChT is negligible in vivo

  3. Evaluation of (+)-p-[{sup 11}C]methylvesamicol for mapping sigma{sub 1} receptors: a comparison with [{sup 11}C]SA4503

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan)]. E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.jp; Kawamura, Kazunori [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service Ltd., Tokyo 141-0032 (Japan); Yajima, Kazuyoshi [The Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Hakui 920-0631 (Japan); QingGeLeTu [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi [Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-8640 (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro [Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-8640 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Vesamicol is a leading compound for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers for mapping the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Recently, we found that (+)-p-methylvesamicol ((+)-PMV) has low affinity for VAChT (K {sub i}=199 nM), but has moderate to high affinity for sigma receptors: K {sub i}=3.0 nM for sigma{sub 1} and K {sub i}=40.7 nM for sigma{sub 2}, and that sigma{sub 1}-selective SA4503 (K {sub i}=4.4 nM for sigma{sub 1} and K {sub i}=242 nM for sigma{sub 2}) has moderate affinity for VAChT (K {sub i}=50.2 nM). In the present study, we examined the potential of (+)-[{sup 11}C]PMV as a PET radioligand for mapping sigma{sub 1} receptors as compared with [{sup 11}C]SA4503. In rat brain, similar regional distribution patterns of (+)-[{sup 11}C]PMV and [{sup 11}C]SA4503 were shown by tissue dissection and by ex vivo autoradiography. Blocking experiments using ({+-})-PMV (-)-vesamicol, SA4503, haloperidol and ({+-})-pentazocine showed that the two tracers specifically bound to sigma{sub 1} receptors, and that [{sup 11}C]SA4503 exhibited greater specific binding than (+)-[{sup 11}C]PMV. No sign of VAChT-specific binding by [{sup 11}C]SA4503 was observed in the striatum, which is rich in VAChT sites. In conclusion, (+)-[{sup 11}C]PMV specifically bound to sigma{sub 1} receptors in the brain, but to a lesser extent than [{sup 11}C]SA4503, suggesting that (+)-[{sup 11}C]PMV is a less preferable PET ligand than [{sup 11}C]SA4503. On the other hand, the moderate affinity of [{sup 11}C]SA4503 for VAChT is negligible in vivo.

  4. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand 11C-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Jong, Johan R. de; Vries, Erik F. de; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Waarde, Aren van; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2009-01-01

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined changes in binding of the sigma-1 agonist 11 C-SA4503 in C6 glioma cells and in living rats after modification of endogenous steroid levels. 11 C-SA4503 binding was assessed in C6 monolayers by gamma counting and in anaesthetized rats by microPET scanning. C6 cells were either repeatedly washed and incubated in steroid-free medium or exposed to five kinds of exogenous steroids (1 h or 5 min before tracer addition, respectively). Tumour-bearing male rats were repeatedly treated with pentobarbital (a condition known to result in reduction of endogenous steroid levels) or injected with progesterone. Binding of 11 C-SA4503 to C6 cells was increased (∝50%) upon removal and decreased (∝60%) upon addition of steroid hormones (rank order of potency: progesterone > allopregnanolone = testosterone = androstanolone > dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulphate, IC 50 progesterone 33 nM). Intraperitoneally administered progesterone reduced tumour uptake and tumour-to-muscle contrast (36%). Repeated treatment of animals with pentobarbital increased the PET standardized uptake value of 11 C-SA4503 in tumour (16%) and brain (27%), whereas the kinetics of blood pool radioactivity was unaffected. The binding of 11 C-SA4503 is sensitive to steroid competition. Since not only increases but also decreases of steroid levels affect ligand binding, a considerable fraction of the sigma-1 receptor population in cultured tumour cells or tumour-bearing animals is normally occupied by endogenous steroids. (orig.)

  5. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand {sup 11}C-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Jong, Johan R. de; Vries, Erik F. de; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Waarde, Aren van [University of Groningen, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Ishiwata, Kiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Positron Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined changes in binding of the sigma-1 agonist {sup 11}C-SA4503 in C6 glioma cells and in living rats after modification of endogenous steroid levels. {sup 11}C-SA4503 binding was assessed in C6 monolayers by gamma counting and in anaesthetized rats by microPET scanning. C6 cells were either repeatedly washed and incubated in steroid-free medium or exposed to five kinds of exogenous steroids (1 h or 5 min before tracer addition, respectively). Tumour-bearing male rats were repeatedly treated with pentobarbital (a condition known to result in reduction of endogenous steroid levels) or injected with progesterone. Binding of {sup 11}C-SA4503 to C6 cells was increased ({proportional_to}50%) upon removal and decreased ({proportional_to}60%) upon addition of steroid hormones (rank order of potency: progesterone > allopregnanolone = testosterone = androstanolone > dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulphate, IC{sub 50} progesterone 33 nM). Intraperitoneally administered progesterone reduced tumour uptake and tumour-to-muscle contrast (36%). Repeated treatment of animals with pentobarbital increased the PET standardized uptake value of {sup 11}C-SA4503 in tumour (16%) and brain (27%), whereas the kinetics of blood pool radioactivity was unaffected. The binding of {sup 11}C-SA4503 is sensitive to steroid competition. Since not only increases but also decreases of steroid levels affect ligand binding, a considerable fraction of the sigma-1 receptor population in cultured tumour cells or tumour-bearing animals is normally occupied by endogenous steroids. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of sigma receptors in tumors by PET with [C-11]SA4503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Oda, K.; Ishiwata, K.; Kubota, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Sigma receptors are implicated in some diseases in the central nervous system (CNS), such as schizophrenia, depression, dementia and ischemia, and are also expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as melanoma, carcinoma of the breast, lung and prostate, and the brain tumor. Therefore, several radioligands have been proposed for imaging of sigma receptors by positron emission tomography (PET) and by single photon emission computed tomography. Recently, we have applied [C-11]labeled 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ([C-11]SA4503) to mapping sigma1 receptors in the brain of monkeys and human. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of the [C-11]SA4503 PET for imaging of sigma receptors using the AH109A bearing rats, and the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits. Materials and Methods: [C-11]SA4503 was injected i.v. into AH109A bearing rats, and the tissue distribution was measured by tissue dissection. To determine the receptor-specific uptake, cold SA4503 or haloperidol was co-injected into the other group of rats. The PET scanning were performed in the rats in the baseline condition and after pretreatment with haloperidol. In the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits, PET scanning was also performed in the baseline and blockade conditions. The sigma receptors in the AH109A and VX-2 were measured in vitro by the standard membrane binding assays. Results: The sigma receptors were found in AH109A and VX-2. The density was much higher in VX-2 than in AH109A. In the tissue dissection study, the AH109A uptake of [C-11]SA4503 increased for 60 min after injection. By the co-injection of SA4503 or haloperidol, the AH109A uptake was enhanced. The PET study also confirmed that the radioactivity level in the AH109A was enhanced by the pretreatment with haloperidol. On the other hand, In the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits, the radioactivity level of in VX-2 remained constant after initial uptake in the baseline PET measurement, but the VX-2 uptake was

  7. Tumor imaging with 2 sigma-receptor ligands, F-18-FE-SA5845 and C-11-SA4503 : A feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, A; Buursma, AR; Hospers, GAP; Kawamura, K; Kobayashi, T; Ishii, K; Oda, K; Ishiwata, K; Vaalburg, W; Elsinga, PH

    Our objective was to study 2 radioligands for visualization of sigma-receptors with PET. Methods: Two radioligands--sigma(1)-selective C-11-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (C-11-SA4503) and nonsubtype-selective

  8. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [11C]SA6298 as a PET sigma1 receptor ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Tajima, Hisashi; Ishii, Shin-Ichi; Shimada, Yuhei; Matsuno, Kiyoshi; Homma, Yoshio; Senda, Michio

    1999-01-01

    The potential of a 11 C-labeled selective sigma 1 receptor ligand, 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-[3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)propyl]piperazine ([ 11 C]SA6298), was evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for mapping sigma 1 receptors in the central nervous system and peripheral organs. [ 11 C]SA6298 was synthesized by methylation of the desmethyl SA6298 with [ 11 C]CH 3 I, with the decay-corrected radiochemical yield of 39±5% based on [ 11 C]CH 3 I and with the specific activity of 53±17 TBq/mmol within 20 min from end of bombardment (EOB). In mice, the uptake of [ 11 C]SA6298 was significantly decreased by carrier loading in the brain, liver, spleen, heart, lung, small intestine, and kidney in which sigma receptors are present as well as in the skeletal muscle. Pretreatment with SA6298 also blocked the uptake of [ 11 C]SA6298 by these organs except for the small intestine, but significant displacement of [ 11 C]SA6298 by posttreatment with SA6298 was observed only in the heart, lung, and muscle. In the blocking study with one of the eight sigma receptor ligands, including haloperidol, SA6298, NE-100, (+)-pentazocine, SA4503, (-)-pentazocine, (+)-3-PPP, and (+)-SKF 10,047 (in the order of the affinity for sigma 1 receptor subtype), only SA6298 and an analog SA4503 significantly reduced the brain uptake of [ 11 C]SA6298 to approximately 80% of the control, but the other six ligands did not. Peripherally, the uptake of [ 11 C]SA6298 by the organs described above was decreased predominantly by SA6298 or SA4503, but the blocking effects of the other five ligands except for NE-100 depended on their affinity for sigma 1 receptors. The saturable brain uptake of [ 11 C]SA6298, approximately 20%, was also observed by tissue dissection method in rats and by PET in a cat. Ex vivo autoradiography of the rat brain showed a high uptake in the cortex and thalamus. In the cat brain a relatively high uptake was found in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, and cerebellum

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled SA4503 as a selective sigma1 receptor ligand for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Tsukada, Hideo; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Tsuji, Chieko; Harada, Norihiro; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2007-01-01

    The [ 18 F]fluoromethyl analog of the sigma 1 selective ligand 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride (SA4503) ([ 18 F]FM-SA4503) was prepared and its potential evaluated for the in vivo measurement of sigma 1 receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). FM-SA4503 had selective affinity for the sigma 1 receptor ( K i for sigma 1 receptor, 6.4 nM; K i for sigma 2 receptor, 250 nM) that was compatible with the affinity of SA4503 ( K i for sigma 1 receptor, 4.4 nM; K i for sigma 2 receptor, 242 nM). [ 18 F]FM-SA4503 was synthesized by 18 F-fluoromethylation of O-demethyl SA4503 in the radiochemical yield of 2.9-16.6% at the end of bombardment with a specific activity of 37.8-283 TBq/mmol at the end of synthesis. In mice, the uptake of [ 18 F]FM-SA4503 in the brain was gradually increased for 30 min after injection, and then decreased. In the blocking study, brain uptake was significantly decreased by co-injection of haloperidol to 32% of control, and FM-SA4503 to 52% of control. In PET study of the monkey brain, high uptake was found in the cerebral cortex, thalamus and striatum. The radioactivity level of [ 18 F]FM-SA4503 in the brain regions gradually increased over a period of 120 min after injection, followed by a stable plateau phase until 180 min after injection. In pretreatment with haloperidol measurement of the monkey brain, the radioactivity level was 22-32% and 11-25% of the baseline at 60 and 180 min, respectively, after injection, suggesting high receptor-specific binding. [ 18 F]FM-SA4503 showed specific binding to sigma 1 receptors in mice and monkeys; therefore, [ 18 F]FM-SA4503 has the potential for mapping sigma 1 receptors in the brain

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorine-18-labeled SA4503 as a selective sigma{sub 1} receptor ligand for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Kazunori [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan) and Center for Integrated Human Brain Science, Brain Research Institute, University of Niigata, Niigata, Niigata 951-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawamurak@bri.niigata-u.ac.jp; Tsukada, Hideo [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics, K.K., Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro [Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8640 (Japan); Tsuji, Chieko [NARD Institute, Ltd., Amagasaki, Hyogo 660-0805 (Japan); Harada, Norihiro [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics, K.K., Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 434-8601 (Japan); Kimura, Yuichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    The [{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl analog of the sigma{sub 1} selective ligand 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride (SA4503) ([{sup 18}F]FM-SA4503) was prepared and its potential evaluated for the in vivo measurement of sigma{sub 1} receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). FM-SA4503 had selective affinity for the sigma{sub 1} receptor ( K {sub i} for sigma{sub 1} receptor, 6.4 nM; K {sub i} for sigma{sub 2} receptor, 250 nM) that was compatible with the affinity of SA4503 ( K {sub i} for sigma{sub 1} receptor, 4.4 nM; K {sub i} for sigma{sub 2} receptor, 242 nM). [{sup 18}F]FM-SA4503 was synthesized by {sup 18}F-fluoromethylation of O-demethyl SA4503 in the radiochemical yield of 2.9-16.6% at the end of bombardment with a specific activity of 37.8-283 TBq/mmol at the end of synthesis. In mice, the uptake of [{sup 18}F]FM-SA4503 in the brain was gradually increased for 30 min after injection, and then decreased. In the blocking study, brain uptake was significantly decreased by co-injection of haloperidol to 32% of control, and FM-SA4503 to 52% of control. In PET study of the monkey brain, high uptake was found in the cerebral cortex, thalamus and striatum. The radioactivity level of [{sup 18}F]FM-SA4503 in the brain regions gradually increased over a period of 120 min after injection, followed by a stable plateau phase until 180 min after injection. In pretreatment with haloperidol measurement of the monkey brain, the radioactivity level was 22-32% and 11-25% of the baseline at 60 and 180 min, respectively, after injection, suggesting high receptor-specific binding. [{sup 18}F]FM-SA4503 showed specific binding to sigma{sub 1} receptors in mice and monkeys; therefore, [{sup 18}F]FM-SA4503 has the potential for mapping sigma{sub 1} receptors in the brain.

  11. Shortened protocol in practical [11C]SA4503-PET studies for sigma1 receptor quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Muneyuki; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Masatomo; Oda, Keiichi; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Naganawa, Mika; Hashimoto, Kenji; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2008-01-01

    In practical positron emission tomography (PET) diagnosis, a shortened protocol is preferred for patients with brain disorders. In this study, the applicability of a shortened protocol as an alternative to the 90-min PET scan with [ 11 C]SA4503 for quantitative sigma 1 receptor measurement was investigated. Tissue time-activity curves of 288 regions of interest in the brain from 32 [ 11 C]SA4503-PET scans of 16 healthy subjects prior to and following administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluvoxamine or paroxetine) were applied to two algorithms of quantitative analysis; binding potential (BP) was derived from compartmental analysis based on nonlinear estimation, and total distribution volume (tDV) was derived from Logan plot analysis. As a result, although both BP and tDV tended to be underestimated by the shortened method, the estimates from the shortened protocol had good linear relationships with those of the full-length protocol. In conclusion, if approximately 10% differences in the estimated results are acceptable for a specific purpose, then a 60-min measurement protocol is capable of providing reliable results. (author)

  12. Population pharmacokinetics of cutamesine in rats using NONMEM, 11C-SA4503, and microPET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakrishnan, N.K.; Pilla Reddy, V.; Proost, J.H.; Nyakas, C.J.; Kwizera, C.; Sijbesma, J.W.A.; Elsinga, P.H.; Ishiwata, K.; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Van Waarde, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cutamesine (SA4503) is a selective sigma-1 receptor agonist, currently in Phase II clinical trials for depression and post stroke neurological disturbances. Cutamesine has been found to be effective in several rodent models of amnesia and depression. We used data obtained with carbon-11-labeled

  13. Sigma1 and dopamine D2 receptor occupancy in the mouse brain after a single administration of haloperidol and two dopamine D2-like receptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Tadayuki; Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    We investigated sigma 1 and dopamine D 2 receptor occupancy in mouse brain after a single injection of haloperidol, nemonapride, or spiperone using [ 11 C]SA4503 and [ 11 C]raclopride, respectively. Co-injection of the three compounds significantly blocked the uptake of each radioligand. Six hours later, only haloperidol blocked [ 11 C]SA4503 uptake, while all three reduced [ 11 C]raclopride uptake. Sigma 1 receptor occupancy by haloperidol was reduced to 19% at day 2 when D 2 receptor occupancy disappeared. [ 11 C]SA4503 would be applicable to the investigation of sigma 1 receptor occupancy of antispychotic drugs using PET

  14. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, K; Senda, M

    1999-08-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D2-like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11C-labeled analog ([11C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [11C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [11C]NEM and one of six dopamine D2-like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [11C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [11C]NEM was reduced by D2-like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D2-like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [11C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [11C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D2-like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum.

  15. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Senda, Michio

    1999-01-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11 C-labeled analog ([ 11 C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [ 11 C]NEM and one of six dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D 4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [ 11 C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D 2 -like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum

  16. In vivo binding of [{sup 11}C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.jp; Senda, Michio

    1999-08-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and {sup 11}C-labeled analog ([{sup 11}C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [{sup 11}C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [{sup 11}C]NEM and one of six dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [{sup 11}C]NEM was reduced by D{sub 2}-like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D{sub 4} receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D{sub 2}-like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [{sup 11}C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [{sup 11}C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum.

  17. Effects of sigma(1) receptor ligand MS-377 on D(2) antagonists-induced behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Shinji; Takagi, Kaori; Horikomi, Kazutoshi

    2002-10-01

    (R)-(+)-1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377) is a novel antipsychotic agent with selective and high affinity for sigma(1) receptor. The present study was carried out to clarify the interaction of MS-377 with dopamine D(2) receptor antagonists (D(2) antagonists) in concurrent administration, and then the involvement of sigma receptors in the interaction. The effects of MS-377 on haloperidol- or sultopride-induced inhibition of apomorphine-induced climbing behavior and catalepsy were investigated in mice and rats, respectively. In addition, the effects of (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503, both of which are sigma receptor agonists, and WAY-100,635, which is a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, on the interaction due to the concurrent use were also investigated. MS-377 potentiated the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, MS-377 did not affect the catalepsy induction by these drugs. The potentiation of the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior by MS-377 was not inhibited by WAY-100,635, but was inhibited by (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503. These findings showed that MS-377 potentiates the efficacy of D(2) antagonists, but it does not deteriorate the adverse effect. Moreover, sigma(1) receptors are involved in this potentiation of the efficacy of D(2) antagonists by MS-377.

  18. A change of in vivo characteristics depending on specific activity of radioiodinated (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-pIV] as a ligand for sigma receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Nasima; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kazuma; Tsuji, Shiro; Kinuya, Seigo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Mori, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    The radioiodinated (+)-p-iodovesamicol [(+)-pIV], which shows a high binding affinity for sigma-1 (σ-1) receptors, is prepared by an exchange reaction. The specific activity (SA) is fairly low and therefore is insufficient for clinical use. In this study, we prepared (+)-[ 125 I]pIV with a high SA from tributylstannyl precursor and compared the in vivo characteristics between high and low SA by imaging σ-1 receptors in the central nervous system. In the biodistribution study, a difference in brain accumulation was observed between the two methods. At 30 min postinjection, the brain accumulation (1.58%ID/g) of low SA [0.6-1.1 TBq/mmol (16-30 Ci/mmol)] (+)-[ 125 I]pIV was higher than that (1.34%ID/g) of high SA [>88.8 TBq/mmol (>2400 Ci/mmol)] (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. In the blocking study, the brain uptake of high SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV was reduced more significantly by the coadministration of sigma ligands such as pentazocine, haloperidol or SA4503 than that of low SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. These results showed that nonspecific binding of high SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV in the brain was lower than that of low SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV, and high SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV bound more specifically to σ-1 receptors in the brain than low SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. In contrast, in the blood-binding study, high SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV (58.4%) bound to blood cells with higher affinity than low SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV (46.0%). In metabolite studies, blood metabolites of high SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV (57.3±3.5%) were higher than those of low SA (+)-[ 125 I]pIV (45.5±4.1%) at 30 min postinjection. Higher SA may be apt to bind to blood cells with higher affinity and to be metabolized faster

  19. Possible involvement of the Sigma-1 receptor chaperone in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomohisa, Mori; Junpei, Ohya; Aki, Masumoto; Masato, Harumiya; Mika, Fukase; Kazumi, Yoshizawa; Teruo, Hayashi; Tsutomu, Suzuki

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that ligands of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone (Sig-1R) regulate pain-related behaviors. Clinical use of chemotherapeutics is often compromised due to their adverse side effects, particularly those related to neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that repeated administration of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel produces neuropathy in rodents. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the involvement of the Sig-1R in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy by examining the effects of oxaliplatin and paclitaxel on the Sig-1R levels in the spinal cord, and by examining the effects of Sig-1R agonist and antagonist on oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced neuropathy in rats. Chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathic pain was accompanied by a significant reduction of the Sig-1R level in the spinal cord. Furthermore, the administration of paclitaxel to CHO cells that stably overexpressed Sig-1Rs induced the clustering of Sig-1Rs. We also found that the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 potently inhibited the neuropathy induced by oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel, whereas this action was abolished by the Sig-1R antagonist NE-100. These results suggest that the reduction of Sig-1R activity is involved in chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy, and the Sig-1R agonist SA4503 could serve as a potential candidate for the treatment of chemotherapeutic-induced neuropathy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. ► Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. ► Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  1. Sigma-2 receptor ligands QSAR model dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rescifina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data have been obtained from the Sigma-2 Receptor Selective Ligands Database (S2RSLDB and refined according to the QSAR requirements. These data provide information about a set of 548 Sigma-2 (σ2 receptor ligands selective over Sigma-1 (σ1 receptor. The development of the QSAR model has been undertaken with the use of CORAL software using SMILES, molecular graphs and hybrid descriptors (SMILES and graph together. Data here reported include the regression for σ2 receptor pKi QSAR models. The QSAR model was also employed to predict the σ2 receptor pKi values of the FDA approved drugs that are herewith included.

  2. In-vivo characteristics of high and low specific activity radioiodinated (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperidino] cyclohexanol [(+)-pIV] for imaging sigma-1 receptor in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Nasima; Kinuya, Seigo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kazuma; Mori, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In this study, (+)-enantiomer of radioiodinated 2-[4-(4- iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-[ 125 I]-p- iodovesamicol) [(+)-[ 125 I]pIV], which is reported to bind with high affinity to the sigma-1 receptor both in vitro and in vivo, was tested to compare the in vivo characteristics between high and low specific activity (+)-[ 125 I]pIV to image sigma-1 receptor in the central nervous system. In the biodistribution study, no significant difference was observed between two methods. Accumulation of (+)- [ 125 I]pIV in rat brain was significant (approximately 3% of the injected dose) and its retention was prolonged. In the blocking study, the accumulation of (+)-[ 125 I] pIV in the rat brain was significantly reduced by the co-administration of sigma ligands such as pentazocine, haloperidol or SA4503 in both methods. But the blocking effect was relatively stronger in the study using high specific activity radioiodinated (+)pIV. Though, the distribution of high and low specific activity (+)-[ 125 I] pIV was more or less similar to bind to sigma-1 receptor in the central nervous system in vivo, high specific activity radioiodinated (+) pIV might have a better specificity to bind sigma-1 receptor in brain. (author)

  3. 5D-QSAR for spirocyclic sigma1 receptor ligands by Quasar receptor surface modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas J; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Based on a contiguous and structurally as well as biologically diverse set of 87 sigma(1) ligands, a 5D-QSAR study was conducted in which a quasi-atomistic receptor surface modeling approach (program package Quasar) was applied. The superposition of the ligands was performed with the tool Pharmacophore Elucidation (MOE-package), which takes all conformations of the ligands into account. This procedure led to four pharmacophoric structural elements with aromatic, hydrophobic, cationic and H-bond acceptor properties. Using the aligned structures a 3D-model of the ligand binding site of the sigma(1) receptor was obtained, whose general features are in good agreement with previous assumptions on the receptor structure, but revealed some novel insights since it represents the receptor surface in more detail. Thus, e.g., our model indicates the presence of an H-bond acceptor moiety in the binding site as counterpart to the ligands' cationic ammonium center, rather than a negatively charged carboxylate group. The presented QSAR model is statistically valid and represents the biological data of all tested compounds, including a test set of 21 ligands not used in the modeling process, with very good to excellent accuracy [q(2) (training set, n=66; leave 1/3 out) = 0.84, p(2) (test set, n=21)=0.64]. Moreover, the binding affinities of 13 further spirocyclic sigma(1) ligands were predicted with reasonable accuracy (mean deviation in pK(i) approximately 0.8). Thus, in addition to novel insights into the requirements for binding of spirocyclic piperidines to the sigma(1) receptor, the presented model can be used successfully in the rational design of new sigma(1) ligands. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple pathways of sigma(1) receptor ligand uptakes into primary cultured neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Karasawa, J; Sagi, N; Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Okuyama, S; Nukada, T; Sora, I; Yamamoto, T

    2001-08-03

    Although many antipsychotics have affinities for sigma receptors, the transportation pathway of exogenous sigma(1) receptor ligands to intracellular type-1 sigma receptors are not fully understood. In this study, sigma(1) receptor ligand uptakes were studied using primary cultured neuronal cells. [(3)H](+)-pentazocine and [(3)H](R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), used as a selective sigma(1) receptor ligands, were taken up in a time-, energy- and temperature-dependent manner, suggesting that active transport mechanisms were involved in their uptakes. sigma(1) receptor ligands taken up into primary cultured neuronal cells were not restricted to agonists, but also concerned antagonists. The uptakes of these ligands were mainly Na(+)-independent. Kinetic analysis of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine and [(3)H]MS-377 uptake showed K(m) values (microM) of 0.27 and 0.32, and V(max) values (pmol/mg protein/min) of 17.4 and 9.4, respectively. Although both ligands were incorporated, the pharmacological properties of these two ligands were different. Uptake of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine was inhibited in the range 0.4-7.1 microM by all the sigma(1) receptor ligands used, including N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE-100), a selective sigma(1) receptor ligand. In contrast, the inhibition of [(3)H]MS-377 uptake was potently inhibited by haloperidol, characterized by supersensitivity (IC(50), approximately 2 nM) and was inhibited by NE-100 with low sensitivity (IC(50), 4.5 microM). Moreover, kinetic analysis revealed that NE-100 inhibited [(3)H]MS-377 uptake in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that NE-100 acted at a site different from the uptake sites of [(3)H]MS-377. These findings suggest that there are at least two uptake pathways for sigma(1) receptor ligands in primary cultured neuronal cells (i.e. a haloperidol-sensitive pathway and another, unclear, pathway). In

  5. sigma receptor ligands attenuate N-methyl-D-aspartate cytotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons of mesencephalic slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, S; Katsuki, H; Takenaka, C; Tomita, M; Kume, T; Kaneko, S; Akaike, A

    2000-01-28

    We investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of several sigma receptor ligands in organotypic midbrain slice cultures as an excitotoxicity model system. When challenged with 100-microM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) for 24 h, dopaminergic neurons in midbrain slice cultures degenerated, and this was prevented by (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,b]-cyclohepten-5, 10-imine (MK-801; 1-10 microM). Concomitant application of ifenprodil (1-10 microM) or haloperidol (1-10 microM), both of which are high-affinity sigma receptor ligands, significantly attenuated the neurotoxicity of 100 microM NMDA. The sigma(1) receptor-selective ligand (+)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)-SKF 10047; 1-10 microM) was also effective in attenuating the toxicity of NMDA. The effect of R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ((-)-PPAP), a sigma receptor ligand with negligible affinity for the phencyclidine site of NMDA receptors, was also examined. (-)-PPAP (3-100 microM) caused a concentration-dependent reduction of NMDA cytotoxicity, with significant protection at concentrations of 30 and 100 microM. In contrast, (+)-SKF 10047 (10 microM) and (-)-PPAP (100 microM) showed no protective effects against cell death induced by the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin (1-3 microM). These results indicate that sigma receptor ligands attenuate the cytotoxic effects of NMDA on midbrain dopaminergic neurons, possibly via inhibition of NMDA receptor functions.

  6. Sigma-1 receptor agonist increases axon outgrowth of hippocampal neurons via voltage-gated calcium ions channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Shu-Zhuo; Yao, Yu-Hong; Xiang, Yun; Ma, Xiao-Yun; Wei, Xiao-Li; Yan, Hai-Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan

    2017-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that have been implicated in both neurodegenerative and ischemic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Accumulating evidence has suggested that Sig-1R plays a role in neuroprotection and axon outgrowth. The underlying mechanisms of Sig-1R-mediated neuroprotection have been well elucidated. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of Sig-1R on axon outgrowth are not fully understood. To clarify this issue, we utilized immunofluorescence to compare the axon lengths of cultured naïve hippocampal neurons before and after the application of the Sig-1R agonist, SA4503. Then, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence were used to examine voltage-gated calcium ion channel (VGCCs) currents in the cell membranes and growth cones. We found that Sig-1R activation dramatically enhanced the axonal length of the naïve hippocampal neurons. Application of the Sig-1R antagonist NE100 and gene knockdown techniques both demonstrated the effects of Sig-1R. The growth-promoting effect of SA4503 was accompanied by the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca 2+ influx and was recapitulated by incubating the neurons with the L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type VGCC blockers, nimodipine, MVIIA and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively. This effect was unrelated to glial cells. The application of SA4503 transformed the growth cone morphologies from complicated to simple, which favored axon outgrowth. Sig-1R activation can enhance axon outgrowth and may have a substantial influence on neurogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effects of a novel, selective, sigma1-ligand, MS-377, on phencyclidine-induced behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Takagi, K; Horikomi, K

    2001-07-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP)-induced head-weaving is inhibited by a novel selective sigma1-ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), but not by dopamine D2 antagonists. In the present study, we examined the effects of two potent and selective sigma1-ligands, MS-377 and N,N-dipropyl-2-(4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl) ethylamine (NE-100), on PCP-induced rearing behaviour, hyperlocomotion and ataxia in comparison with the currently available antipsychotic agents with affinity for D2 receptors, haloperidol, sultopride and risperidone. Male Wistar rats or ddY mice were administered MS-377, NE-100, haloperidol, sultopride or risperidone, and PCP was administered 60 min later (in the case of NE-100 10 min later). Rearing behaviour, hyperlocomotion and ataxia were examined 10 min after PCP administration. MS-377, haloperidol, sultopride and risperidone dose-dependently inhibited PCP-induced rearing and hyperlocomotion, but did not antagonize PCP-induced ataxia. In contrast, the other selective sigma1-ligand, NE-100, did not affect any of the PCP-induced behaviour patterns in this study. These results suggest that there are at least two types of ligands for sigma1-receptors and that some sigma1-ligands, including MS-377, have more comprehensive effects against PCP-induced abnormal behaviour than other sigma1-ligands or D2 antagonists.

  8. Synthesis of two potential NK1-receptor ligands using [1-11C]ethyl iodide and [1-11C]propyl iodide and initial PET-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genchel Tove

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The previously validated NK1-receptor ligand [O-methyl-11C]GR205171 binds with a high affinity to the NK1-receptor and displays a slow dissociation from the receptor. Hence, it cannot be used in vivo for detecting concentration changes in substance P, the endogenous ligand for the NK1-receptor. A radioligand used for monitoring these changes has to enable displacement by the endogenous ligand and thus bind reversibly to the receptor. Small changes in the structure of a receptor ligand can lead to changes in binding characteristics and also in the ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The aim of this study was to use carbon-11 labelled ethyl and propyl iodide with high specific radioactivity in the synthesis of two new and potentially reversible NK1-receptor ligands with chemical structures based on [O-methyl-11C]GR205171. Methods [1-11C]Ethyl and [1-11C]propyl iodide with specific radioactivities of 90 GBq/μmol and 270 GBq/μmol, respectively, were used in the synthesis of [O-methyl-11C]GR205171 analogues by alkylation of O-desmethyl GR205171. The brain uptake of the obtained (2S,3S-N-(1-(2- [1-11C]ethoxy-5-(3-(trifluoromethyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-ylphenylethyl-2-phenylpiperidin-3-amine (I and (2S,3S-2-phenyl-N-(1-(2- [1-11C]propoxy-5-(3-(trifluoromethyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-ylphenylethylpiperidin-3-amine (II was studied with PET in guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys and compared to the uptake of [O-methyl-11C]GR205171. Results All ligands had similar uptake distribution in the guinea pig brain. The PET-studies in rhesus monkeys showed that (II had no specific binding in striatum. Ligand (I had moderate specific binding compared to the [O-methyl-11C]GR205171. The ethyl analogue (I displayed reversible binding characteristics contrary to the slow dissociation rate shown by [O-methyl-11C]GR205171. Conclusion The propyl-analogue (II cannot be used for detecting changes in NK1-ligand levels, while further studies should be

  9. Sigma-1 receptor chaperones regulate the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Urfer, Roman; Mita, Shiro; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a novel endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone that regulates protein folding and degradation. The Sig-1R activation by agonists is known to improve memory, promote cell survival, and exert an antidepressant-like action in animals. Cutamesine (SA4503), a selective Sig-1R ligand, was shown to increase BDNF in the hippocampus of rats. How exactly the intracellular chaperone Sig-1R or associated ligand causes the increase of BDNF or any other neurotrophins is unknown. We examined here whether the action of Sig-1Rs may relate to the post-translational processing and release of BDNF in neuroblastoma cell lines. We used in vitro assays and confirmed that cutamesine possesses the bona fide Sig-1R agonist property by causing the dissociation of BiP from Sig-1Rs. The C-terminus of Sig-1Rs exerted robust chaperone activity by completely blocking the aggregation of BDNF and GDNF in vitro. Chronic treatment with cutamesine in rat B104 neuroblastoma caused a time- and dose-dependent potentiation of the secretion of BDNF without affecting the mRNA level of BDNF. Cutamesine decreased the intracellular level of pro-BDNF and mature BDNF whereas increased the extracellular level of mature BDNF. The pulse-chase experiment indicated that the knockdown of Sig-1Rs decreased the secreted mature BDNF in B104 cells without affecting the synthesis of BDNF. Our findings indicate that, in contrast to clinically used antidepressants that promote the transcriptional upregulation of BDNF, the Sig-1R agonist cutamesine potentiates the post-translational processing of neurotrophins. This unique pharmacological profile may provide a novel therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 30 CFR 57.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 57.4503 Section 57.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. (a) Surface belt conveyors...) Underground belt conveyors shall be equipped with a detection system capable of automatically stopping the...

  11. 30 CFR 56.4503 - Conveyor belt slippage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyor belt slippage. 56.4503 Section 56.4503... Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 56.4503 Conveyor belt slippage. Belt conveyors within... shall attend the belt at the drive pulley when it is necessary to operate the conveyor while temporarily...

  12. Sigma-2 ligands and PARP inhibitors synergistically trigger cell death in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Mankoff, Julia; Makvandi, Mehran; Chu, Wenhua; Chu, Yunxiang; Mach, Robert H.; Zeng, Chenbo

    2017-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor is overexpressed in proliferating cells compared to quiescent cells and has been used as a target for imaging solid tumors by positron emission tomography. Recent work has suggested that the sigma-2 receptor may also be an effective therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a family of enzymes involved in DNA damage response. In this study, we looked for potential synergy of cytotoxicity between PARP inhibitors and sigma-2 receptor ligands in breast cancer cell lines. We showed that the PARP inhibitor, YUN3-6, sensitized mouse breast cancer cell line, EMT6, to sigma-2 receptor ligand (SV119, WC-26, and RHM-138) induced cell death determined by cell viability assay and colony forming assay. The PARP inhibitor, olaparib, sensitized tumor cells to a different sigma-2 receptor ligand SW43-induced apoptosis and cell death in human triple negative cell line, MDA-MB-231. Olaparib inhibited PARP activity and cell proliferation, and arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle in MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequently cells became sensitized to SW43 induced cell death. In conclusion, the combination of sigma-2 receptor ligands and PARP inhibitors appears to hold promise for synergistically triggering cell death in certain types of breast cancer cells and merits further investigation. - Highlights: • PARPi, YUN3-6 and olaparib, and σ2 ligands, SV119 and SW43, were evaluated. • Mouse and human breast cancer cells, EMT6 and MDA-MB-231 respectively, were used. • YUN3-6 and SV119 synergistically triggered cell death in EMT6 cells. • Olaparib and SW43 additively triggered cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells. • Olaparib arrested cells in G2/M in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  13. (-)PPAP: a new and selective ligand for sigma binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Battaglia, G; Smith, J D

    1990-11-01

    Most agents employed for the investigation of sigma (sigma) binding sites display relatively low affinity for these sites, bind both at sigma sites and at either phencyclidine (PCP) sites or dopamine receptors with similar affinity, and/or produce some dopaminergic activity in vivo. We describe a new agent, (-)PPAP or R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-n-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, that binds with high affinity and selectivity at sigma (IC50 = 24 nM) versus either PCP sites (IC50 greater than 75,000 nM) or D1 and D2 dopamine receptors (IC50 greater than 5,000 nM). The sigma affinity of this agent is comparable to that of the standard ligands (+)-3-PPP and DTG. Furthermore, although (-)PPAP is structurally related to amphetamine, it neither produces nor antagonizes amphetamine-like stimulus effect in rats trained to discriminate 1 mg/kg of S(+)amphetamine from saline.

  14. Involvement of direct inhibition of NMDA receptors in the effects of sigma-receptor ligands on glutamate neurotoxicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, H; Hashino, A; Kume, T; Katsuki, H; Kaneko, S; Akaike, A

    2000-09-15

    This study was performed to examine the roles of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/phencyclidine (PCP) channel complex in the protective effects of sigma-receptor ligands against glutamate neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons derived from fetal rats. A 1-h exposure of cultures to glutamate caused a marked loss of viability, as determined by Trypan blue exclusion. This acute neurotoxicity of glutamate was prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists. Expression of sigma(1) receptor mRNA in cortical cultures was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). sigma Receptor ligands with affinity for NMDA receptor channels including the PCP site, such as (+)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)-SKF10,047), haloperidol, and R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane ((-)-PPAP), prevented glutamate neurotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, other sigma-receptor ligands without affinity for NMDA receptors, such as carbetapentane and R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine ((+)-3-PPP), did not show neuroprotective effects. Putative endogenous sigma receptor ligands such as pregnenolone, progesterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone did not affect glutamate neurotoxicity. The protective effects of (+)-SKF10,047, haloperidol, and (-)-PPAP were not affected by the sigma(1) receptor antagonist rimcazole. These results suggested that a direct interaction with NMDA receptors but not with sigma receptors plays a crucial role in the neuroprotective effects of sigma receptor ligands with affinity for NMDA receptors.

  15. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization is an early event in Sigma-2 receptor ligand mediated cell death in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornick, John R; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Spitzer, Dirk; Abate, Carmen; Berardi, Francesco; Goedegebuure, Peter; Mach, Robert H; Hawkins, William G

    2012-05-02

    Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282) localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco). Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a caspase-dependent death following LMP protected by DEVD

  16. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization is an Early Event in Sigma-2 Receptor Ligand Mediated Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornick John R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Results Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282 localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco. Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Conclusions Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a

  17. G-LoSA for Prediction of Protein-Ligand Binding Sites and Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput structure determination and computational protein structure prediction have significantly enriched the universe of protein structure. However, there is still a large gap between the number of available protein structures and that of proteins with annotated function in high accuracy. Computational structure-based protein function prediction has emerged to reduce this knowledge gap. The identification of a ligand binding site and its structure is critical to the determination of a protein's molecular function. We present a computational methodology for predicting small molecule ligand binding site and ligand structure using G-LoSA, our protein local structure alignment and similarity measurement tool. All the computational procedures described here can be easily implemented using G-LoSA Toolkit, a package of standalone software programs and preprocessed PDB structure libraries. G-LoSA and G-LoSA Toolkit are freely available to academic users at http://compbio.lehigh.edu/GLoSA . We also illustrate a case study to show the potential of our template-based approach harnessing G-LoSA for protein function prediction.

  18. Sigma receptor ligand N,N'-di-(ortho-tolyl)guanidine inhibits release of acetylcholine in the guinea pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, B G; Keana, J F; Weber, E

    1991-11-26

    The inhibition of stimulated contractions of the guinea pig ileum longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus preparation by sigma receptor ligands has been previously described. In this study, the stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in this same preparation was monitored in the presence and absence of sigma receptor ligands. N,N'-Di-(orthotolyl)guanidine (DTG) and other compounds selective for the sigma receptor inhibited stimulated [3H]acetylcholine release. These results suggest that their inhibition of stimulated contractions in this preparation was mediated by inhibition of acetylcholine release.

  19. A useful PET probe [11C]BU99008 with ultra-high specific radioactivity for small animal PET imaging of I2-imidazoline receptors in the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazunori; Shimoda, Yoko; Yui, Joji; Zhang, Yiding; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Kumata, Katsushi; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Kurihara, Yusuke; Nengaki, Nobuki; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A positron emission tomography (PET) probe with ultra-high specific radioactivity (SA) enables measuring high receptor specific binding in brain regions by avoiding mass effect of the PET probe itself. It has been reported that PET probe with ultra-high SA can detect small change caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand. Recently, Kealey et al. developed [ 11 C]BU99008, a more potent PET probe for I 2 -imidazoline receptors (I 2 Rs) imaging, with a conventional SA (mean 76 GBq/μmol) showed higher specific binding in the brain. Here, to detect small change of specific binding for I 2 Rs caused by endogenous or exogenous ligand in an extremely small region, such as hypothalamus in the brain, we synthesized and evaluated [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA as a useful PET probe for small-animal PET imaging of I 2 Rs. Methods: [ 11 C]BU99008 was prepared by [ 11 C]methylation of N-desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. Biodistribution, metabolite analysis, and brain PET studies were conducted in rats. Results: [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA in the range of 5400–16,600 GBq/μmol were successfully synthesized (n = 7), and had appropriate radioactivity for in vivo study. In the biodistribution study, the mean radioactivity levels in all investigated tissues except for the kidney did not show significant difference between [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA and that with conventional SA. In the metabolite analysis, the percentage of unchanged [ 11 C]BU99008 at 30 min after the injection of probes with ultra-high and conventional SA was similar in rat brain and plasma. In the PET study of rats' brain, radioactivity level (AUC 30–60 min ) in the hypothalamus of rats injected with [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (64 [SUV ∙ min]) was significantly higher than that observed for that with conventional SA (50 [SUV ∙ min]). The specific binding of [ 11 C]BU99008 with ultra-high SA (86% of total binding) for I 2 R was higher than that of

  20. Sigma-1 and Sigma-2 receptor ligands induce apoptosis and autophagy but have opposite effect on cell proliferation in uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhitano, Lucia; Castracani, Carlo Castruccio; Tibullo, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Viola, Maria; Russo, Giuliano; Prezzavento, Orazio; Marrazzo, Agostino; Amata, Emanuele; Reibaldi, Michele; Longo, Antonio; Russo, Andrea; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Volti, Giovanni Li

    2017-10-31

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular tumor in adults, with about 1200-1500 new cases occurring per year in the United States. Metastasis is a frequent occurrence in uveal melanoma, and outcomes are poor once distant spread occurs and no clinically significant chemotherapeutic protocol is so far available. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of various σ 1 and σ 2 receptor ligands as a possible pharmacological strategy for this rare tumor. Human uveal melanoma cells (92.1) were treated with various concentrations of different σ 2 ligands (haloperidol and haloperidol metabolite II) and σ 1 ligand ((+)-pentazocine) at various concentrations (1, 10 and 25 μM) and time points (0, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h and 48 h). Cell proliferation and migration were evaluated respectively by continuous cell monitoring by xCELLigence analysis, clonogenic assay and wound healing. Apoptosis and autophagy were also measured by cytofluorimetric and microscopy analysis. Our results showed that σ 2 receptor ligands significantly reduced cell proliferation whereas (+)-pentazocine exhibited opposite results. All tested ligands showed significant decrease in cell migration. Interestingly, both σ 1 and σ 2 receptor ligands showed significant increase of autophagy and apoptosis at all concentrations. Taken all together these results suggest that sigma receptors mediates opposite biological effects but they also share common pharmacological effect on apoptosis and autophagy in uveal melanoma. In conclusion, these data provide the first evidence that sigma receptors may represent a "druggable" target to develop new chemotherapic agent for uveal melanoma.

  1. The determination of unchanged [11C]diprenorphine, [11C]L-deprenyl and [11C]raclopride in plasma by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthra, S.K.; Turton, D.R.; Price, G.; Ahier, R.; Martin, F.; Hume, S.; Cremer, J.

    1990-01-01

    In PET studies a knowledge of the fraction of radioactivity in plasma representing unchanged 11 C-labelled ligand/tracer is essential for correction of the arterial plasma input curve. A number of different approaches (e.g. HPLC and TLC/OPTLC) to the determination of unchanged radio-ligand/tracer have been reported for 11 C-labelled carfentanil, raclopride and L-deprenyl and for 76 Br-labelled bromolisuride. The authors report here how they have applied the simple work-up and analytical procedure, originally reported for [ 11 C]carfentanil, to establish the percentage of unmchanged 11 C-labelled diprenorphine, L-deprenyl and raclopride in human and animal plasma as a function of time

  2. Sigma phases in an 11%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel with the normalized and tempered condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yinzhong, E-mail: shenyz@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhou, Xiaoling; Shi, Tiantian; Huang, Xi [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shang, Zhongxia [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Wenwen; Ji, Bo; Xu, Zhiqiang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-12-15

    At the present time 9–12% Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels with target operating temperatures up to 650 °C and higher are being developed in order to further increase thermal efficiency so as to reduce coal consumption and air pollution. An 11% Cr F/M steel was prepared by reference to the nominal chemical composition of SAVE12 steel with an expected maximum use temperature of 650 °C. The precipitate phases of the 11% Cr F/M steel normalized at 1050 °C for 0.5 h and tempered at 780 °C for 1.5 h were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Except for Cr-/Cr-Fe-Co-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, Nb-/V-/Ta-Nb-/Nd-rich MX, Fe-rich M{sub 5}C{sub 2}, Co-rich M{sub 3}C and Fe-Co-rich M{sub 6}C phases previously identified in the steel, two types of sigma phases consisting of σ-FeCr and σ-FeCrW were found to be also present in the normalized and tempered steel. Identified σ-FeCr and σ-FeCrW phases have a simple tetragonal crystal structure with estimated lattice parameters a/c = 0.8713/0.4986 and 0.9119/0.5053 nm, respectively. The compositions in atomic pct of the observed sigma phases were determined to be approximately 50Fe-50Cr for the σ-FeCr, and 30Fe-55Cr-10W in addition to a small amount of Ta, Co and Mn for the σ-FeCrW. The sigma phases in the steel exhibit various blocky morphologies, and appear to have a smaller amount compared with the dominant phases Cr-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and Nb-/V-/Ta-Nb-rich MX of the steel. The σ-FeCr phase in the steel was found to precipitate at δ-ferrite/martensite boundaries, suggesting that δ-ferrite may rapidly induce the formation of sigma phase at δ-ferrite/martensite boundaries in high Cr F/M steels containing δ-ferrite. The formation mechanism of sigma phases in the steel is also discussed in terms of the presence of δ-ferrite, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation, precipitation/dissolution of M{sub 2}X, and steel composition. - Highlights: •Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered 11%Cr F/M steel are

  3. Measurement of sigma chi c2 B(chi c2-->J/psi gamma)/sigma chi c1 B(chi c1 -->J/psi gamma) in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-06-08

    We measure the ratio of cross section times branching fraction, Rp=sigma chi c2 B(chi c2-->J/psi gamma)/sigma chi c1 B(chi c1-->J/psi gamma), in 1.1 fb(-1) of pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV. This measurement covers the kinematic range pT(J/psi)>4.0 GeV/c, |eta(J/psi)1.0 GeV/c. For events due to prompt processes, we find Rp=0.395+/-0.016(stat)+/-0.015(syst). This result represents a significant improvement in precision over previous measurements of prompt chi c1,2 hadro production.

  4. Observation of the Heavy Baryons Sigma b and Sigma b*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-16

    We report an observation of new bottom baryons produced in pp collisions at the Tevatron. Using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four Lambda b 0 pi+/- resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode Lambda b 0-->Lambda c + pi-, where Lambda c+-->pK* pi+. We interpret these states as the Sigma b(*)+/- baryons and measure the following masses: m Sigma b+=5807.8 -2.2 +2.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, m Sigma b- =5815.2+/-1.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, and m(Sigma b*)-m(Sigma b)=21.2-1.9 +2.0(stat.)-0.3+0.4(syst.) MeV/c2.

  5. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated 131 I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[ 131 I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[ 131 I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV, an 211 At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Methods: The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1 h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. Conclusion: These results indicate that (+)-[ 211 At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of an astatine-211-labeled sigma receptor ligand for alpha radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mizuno, Yoshiaki; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Naruto; Kozaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Odani, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Sigma receptors are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, making them potential targets for radionuclide receptor therapy. We have previously synthesized and evaluated (131)I-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[(131)I]pIV], which has a high affinity for sigma receptors. Therefore, (+)-[(131)I]pIV significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we report the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo characterization of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV, an (211)At-labeled sigma receptor ligand, that has potential use in alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. The radiolabeled sigma receptor ligand (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was prepared using a standard halogenation reaction generating a 91% radiochemical yield with 98% purity after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was measured. Cellular uptake experiments and in vivo biodistribution experiments were performed using a mixed solution of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV; the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145, which expresses high levels of the sigma receptors, and DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(211)At]pAtV was similar to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. DU-145 cellular uptake and the biodistribution patterns in DU-145 tumor-bearing mice at 1h post-injection were also similar between (+)-[(211)At]pAtV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV. Namely, (+)-[(211)At]pAtV demonstrated high uptake and retention in tumor via binding to sigma receptors. These results indicate that (+)-[(211)At]pAtV could function as an new agent for alpha-radionuclide receptor therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of the $\\Sigma^0_c$ and $\\Sigma^{++}_c$ by High-Energy Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, Raymond, Jr. [Colorado U.

    1988-01-01

    We present the first observation of hadroproduction of the $\\Sigma^{++}_C$ and $\\Sigma^0_c$ , decaying into $\\Lambda_{c\\pi}$. The daughter $\\Lambda_c$ is observed in the decay modes $pK \\pi$ and $pK_s\\pi\\pi$. The Experiment was conducted at a broadband neutron beam in the Proton East area of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. A two - magnet multiparticle spectrometer equipped with proportional wire chambers and a high resolution MWPC vertex detector was used to momentum analyze charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrons on targets of beryllium, silicon and tungsten. Particles were identified using three Cerenkov counters. The beam energy for each event was reconstructed using hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry....

  8. Commutative $C^*$-algebras and $\\sigma$-normal morphisms

    OpenAIRE

    de Jeu, Marcel

    2003-01-01

    We prove in an elementary fashion that the image of a commutative monotone $\\sigma$-complete $C^*$-algebra under a $\\sigma$-normal morphism is again monotone $\\sigma$-complete and give an application of this result in spectral theory.

  9. Labeling by [3H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C.

    1991-01-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand [ 3 H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine ([ 3 H]DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. [Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)]. Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that [ 3 H]DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of [ 3 H]DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of [ 3 H]DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels

  10. Synthesis of a [sup 11]C-labeled novel, quinuclidine based ligand for the 5-HT[sub 3] receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, S; Diksic, M [Montreal Neurological Inst., PQ (Canada); Francis, B; Burns, H D [Merck Research Labs., West Point, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiopharmacology; Swain, C J [Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., Harlow (United Kingdom). Neuroscience Research Centre

    1992-11-01

    L-683,877, a high affinity, 5-HT[sub 3] selective receptor ligand has been labeled with [sup 11]C for use in PET studies to measure regional brain kinetics of L-683,877 and to determine if [[sup 11]C]L-683,877 can be used for serotonin 5-HT[sub 3] receptor imaging. [[sup 11]C]L-683,877 was prepared by reacting [[sup 11]C]methyl iodide with the desmethyl, borane-protected precursor, L-686,472, in DMF in the presence of tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide. The average specific activity of [[sup 11]C]L-683,877 was 2700 Ci/mmol and the average radiochemical yield (decay corrected)was 20% at the end of synthesis. (Author).

  11. Labeling by ( sup 3 H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. (Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)). Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that ({sup 3}H)DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels.

  12. N-(N-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzamide: A potential ligand for PET imaging of {sigma} receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyngyann, Shiue; Shiue, Grace G; Zhang, Sue X; Wilder, Susan; Greenberg, Joel H; Benard, Francois; Wortman, Jeffrey A; Alavi, Abass A

    1997-10-01

    Four nitro- and fluorobenzamides (1-4) have been synthesized in good yields from nitro- and fluoro-substituted benzoyl chloride with 4-amino-1-benzylpiperidine. In vitro studies showed that these compounds have high affinities to {sigma} receptors. N-(N-Benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-fluorobenzamide (3), in particular, bound to {sigma} receptors with high affinity (K{sub i} = 3.4 nM, guinea pig brain membranes) and high selectivity ({sigma}-2/{sigma}-1 = 120). It was, therefore, labeled with {sup 18}F and evaluated as a {sigma} receptor radioligand. N-(N-Benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-2-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzamide (3a) was synthesized in one step by nucleophilic substitution of the 2-nitro precursor (1) with [{sup 18}F]fluoride in DMSO at 140 deg. C for 20 min followed by purification with HPLC in 4-10% yield (decay corrected). The synthesis time was 90 min and the specific activity was 0.4-1.0 Ci/{mu}mol. Tissue distribution in mice revealed that the uptakes of 3a in the brain, heart, liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys and small intestine were high, and the radioactivity in these organs remained constant from 60 to 120 min post-injection. The radioactivity in the bone did not significantly increase, suggesting in vivo defluorination may not be the major route of metabolism of 3a in mice. Blocking studies with haloperidol in rats indicated that the uptake of compound 3a in the rat brain was selective to haloperidol-sensitive {sigma} sites. These results suggest that compound 3a is a potent {sigma} receptor radioligand and may be a potential ligand for PET imaging of {sigma} receptors in humans.

  13. Synthesis of the sup 11 C-labelled. beta. -adrenergic receptor ligands atenolol, metoprolol and propanolol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, G.; Ulin, J.; Laangstroem, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Organic Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    The {sup 11}C-labelled {beta}-adrenergic receptor ligands atenolol 1, metoprolol 2 and propranolol 3 have been synthesized by an N-alkylation reaction using (2-{sup 11}C)isopropyl iodide. The labelled isopropyl iodide was prepared in a one-pot reactor system from ({sup 11}C)carbon dioxide and obtained in 40% radiochemical yield within 14 min reaction time. The total reaction times for compounds 1-3, counted from the start of the isopropyl iodide synthesis and including purification were 45-55 min. The products were obtained in 5-15% radiochemical yields and with radiochemical purities higher than 98%. The specific activity ranged from 0.4 to 4 GBq/{mu}mol. In a typical experiment starting with 4 GBq around 75 MBq of product was obtained. (author).

  14. Preclinical Activity of the Vascular Disrupting Agent OXi4503 against Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn D. Bothwell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs represent a relatively distinct class of agents that target established blood vessels in tumors. In this study, we examined the preclinical activity of the second-generation VDA OXi4503 against human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Studies were performed in subcutaneous and orthotopic FaDu-luc HNSCC xenografts established in immunodeficient mice. In the subcutaneous model, bioluminescence imaging (BLI along with tumor growth measurements was performed to assess tumor response to therapy. In mice bearing orthotopic tumors, a dual modality imaging approach based on BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was utilized. Correlative histologic assessment of tumors was performed to validate imaging data. Dynamic BLI revealed a marked reduction in radiance within a few hours of OXi4503 administration compared to baseline levels. However, this reduction was transient with vascular recovery observed at 24 h post treatment. A single injection of OXi4503 (40 mg/kg resulted in a significant (p < 0.01 tumor growth inhibition of subcutaneous FaDu-luc xenografts. MRI revealed a significant reduction (p < 0.05 in volume of orthotopic tumors at 10 days post two doses of OXi4503 treatment. Corresponding histologic (H&E sections of Oxi4503 treated tumors showed extensive areas of necrosis and hemorrhaging compared to untreated controls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report, on the activity of Oxi4503 against HNSCC. These results demonstrate the potential of tumor-VDAs in head and neck cancer. Further examination of the antivascular and antitumor activity of Oxi4503 against HNSCC alone and in combination with chemotherapy and radiation is warranted.

  15. [11C]TASP457, a novel PET ligand for histamine H3 receptors in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Seki, Chie; Ikoma, Yoko; Ichise, Masanori; Kawamura, Kazunori; Takahata, Keisuke; Moriguchi, Sho; Nagashima, Tomohisa; Ishii, Tatsuya; Kitamura, Soichiro; Niwa, Fumitoshi; Endo, Hironobu; Yamada, Makiko; Higuchi, Makoto; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The histamine H 3 receptors are presynaptic neuroreceptors that inhibit the release of histamine and other neurotransmitters. The receptors are considered a drug target for sleep disorders and neuropsychiatric disorders with cognitive decline. We developed a novel PET ligand for the H 3 receptors, [ 11 C]TASP0410457 ([ 11 C]TASP457), with high affinity, selectivity and favorable kinetic properties in the monkey, and evaluated its kinetics and radiation safety profile for quantifying the H 3 receptors in human brain. Ten healthy men were scanned for 120 min with a PET scanner for brain quantification and three healthy men were scanned for radiation dosimetry after injection of 386 ± 6.2 MBq and 190 ± 7.5 MBq of [ 11 C]TASP457, respectively. For brain quantification, arterial blood sampling and metabolite analysis were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Distribution volumes (V T ) in brain regions were determined by compartment and graphical analyses using the Logan plot and Ichise multilinear analysis (MA1). For dosimetry, radiation absorbed doses were estimated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. [ 11 C]TASP457 PET showed high uptake (standardized uptake values in the range of about 3 - 6) in the brain and fast washout in cortical regions and slow washout in the pallidum. The two-tissue compartment model and graphical analyses estimated V T with excellent identification using 60-min scan data (about 16 mL/cm 3 in the pallidum, 9 - 14 in the basal ganglia, 6 - 9 in cortical regions, and 5 in the pons), which represents the known distribution of histamine H 3 receptors. For parametric imaging, MA1 is recommended because of minimal underestimation with small intersubject variability. The organs with the highest radiation doses were the pancreas, kidneys, and liver. The effective dose delivered by [ 11 C]TASP457 was 6.9 μSv/MBq. [ 11 C]TASP457 is a useful novel PET ligand for the investigation of the density of histamine H 3

  16. The role of human cytochrome P4503A4 in biotransformation of tissue-specific derivatives of 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mesárošová, M.; Valovičová, Z.; Srančíková, A.; Krajčovičová, Z.; Milcová, Alena; Sokolová, Romana; Schmuczerová, Jana; Topinka, Jan; Gábelová, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 255, č. 3 (2011), s. 307-315 ISSN 0041-008X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : cytochrome P4503A4 * 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole * Hprt gene mutations Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.447, year: 2011

  17. In vivo positron emission tomography studies on the novel nicotinic receptor agonist [11C]MPA compared with [11C]ABT-418 and (S)(-)[11C]nicotine in Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihver, Wiebke; Fasth, Karl-Johan; Oegren, Matthias; Lundqvist, Hans; Bergstroem, Mats; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Laangstroem, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    1999-01-01

    The novel 11 C-labeled nicotinic agonist (R,S)-1-[ 11 C]methyl-2(3-pyridyl)azetidine ([ 11 C]MPA) was evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for in vivo characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of Rhesus monkeys in comparison with the nicotinic ligands (S)-3-methyl-5-(1-[ 11 C]methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)isoxazol ([ 11 C]ABT-418) and (S)(-)[ 11 C]nicotine. The nicotinic receptor agonist [ 11 C]MPA demonstrated rapid uptake into the brain to a similar extent as (S)(-) [ 11 C]nicotine and [ 11 C]ABT-418. When unlabeled (S)(-)nicotine (0.02 mg/kg) was administered 5 min before the radioactive tracers, the uptake of [ 11 C]MPA was decreased by 25% in the thalamus, 19% in the temporal cortex, and 11% in the cerebellum, whereas an increase was found for the uptake of (S)(-)[ 11 C]nicotine and [ 11 C]ABT-418. This finding indicates specific binding of [ 11 C]MPA to nicotinic receptors in the brain in a simple classical displacement study. [ 11 C]MPA seems to be a more promising radiotracer than (S)(-)[ 11 C]nicotine or [ 11 C]ABT-418 for PET studies to characterize nicotinic receptors in the brain

  18. Therapeutic potential of using the vascular disrupting agent OXi4503 to enhance mild temperature thermoradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    period (simultaneous treatment) or at 1 or 4 h prior to starting the heating (sequential treatments). Response was the percentage of mice showing local tumour control at 90 days or skin moist desquamation between days 11-23. From the radiation dose response curves the dose producing tumour control (TCD......(50)) or moist desquamation (MDD50) in 50% of mice was calculated. RESULTS: The TCD(50) and MDD50 values for radiation alone were 54 Gy and 29 Gy, respectively. Simultaneously heating the tissues enhanced radiation response, the respective TCD(50) and MDD50 values being significantly (chi-square test......, p sequential treatment in both tissues. OXi4503 enhanced the radiation response of tumour and skin. Combined with radiation and heat, the only effect was in tumours where OXi4503 prevented the decrease in sensitisation...

  19. Synthesis, radiolabelling, and evaluation of [11C]PB212 as a radioligand for imaging sigma-1 receptors using PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Francesco; Haider, Ahmed; Toscano, Annamaria; Pati, Maria Laura; Keller, Claudia; Berardi, Francesco; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Abate, Carmen; Ametamey, Simon M

    2018-01-01

    The Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) has been described as a pluripotent modulator of distinct physiological functions and its involvement in various central and peripheral pathological disorders has been demonstrated. However, further investigations are required to understand the complex role of the Sig-1R as a molecular chaperon. A specific PET radioligand would provide a powerful tool in Sig-1R related studies. As part of our efforts to develop a Sig-1R PET radioligand that shows antagonistic properties, we investigated the suitability of 1-(4-(6-methoxynaphthalen-1-yl)butyl)-4-methylpiperidine (designated PB212) for imaging Sig-1R. PB212 is a Sig-1R antagonist and exhibits subnanomolar affinity ( K i = 0.030 nM) towards Sig-1R as well as good to excellent selectivity over Sig-2R. The radiolabelling of [ 11 C]PB212 was accomplished by O-methylation of the phenolic precursor using [ 11 C]MeI. In vitro autoradiography with [ 11 C]PB212 on WT and Sig-1R KO mouse brain tissues revealed high non-specific binding, however using rat spleen tissues from CD1 mice and Wistar rats, high specific binding was observed. The spleen is known to have a high expression of Sig-1R. In vivo PET experiments in Wistar rats also showed high accumulation of [ 11 C]PB212 in the spleen. Injection of Sig-1R binding compounds, haloperidol (1 mg/kg) or fluspidine (1 mg/kg) shortly before [ 11 C]PB212 administration induced a drastic reduction of radiotracer accumulation, confirming the specificity of [ 11 C]PB212 towards Sig-1R in the spleen. The results obtained herein indicate that although [ 11 C]PB212 is not suitable for imaging Sig-1R in the brain, it is a promising candidate for the detection and quantification of Sig-1Rs in the periphery.

  20. Study of the reactions $\\bar{p}p \\rightarrow \\bar{\\Lambda} \\Lambda , \\bar{\\Lambda} \\Sigma^{0}$ or $\\bar{\\Sigma^{0}} \\Lambda , \\bar{\\Sigma^{+}} \\Sigma^{+}$ at 3.6 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Atherton, Henry W; Moebes, J P; Quercigh, Emanuele

    1974-01-01

    The reactions $\\bar{p}p \\rightarrow \\bar{\\Lambda} \\Lambda , \\bar{\\Lambda} \\Sigma^{0}$ or $\\bar{\\Sigma^{0}} \\Lambda , \\bar{\\Sigma^{+}} \\Sigma^{+}$ are studied at an incident momentum of 3.6 GeV/c in a 35.4 event/$\\mu$ b experiment performed in the CERN 2m HBC. Total and differential cross sections are presented. The polarization of the hyperons is measured as a function of $t$ and for the reaction $\\bar{p}p \\rightarrow \\bar{\\Lambda} \\Lambda$ the complete spin correlation matrix is given. (23 refs).

  1. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of [{sup 3}H]ANSTO-14 binding to the {sigma}{sub 1} binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu H. E-mail: V.H.Nguyen@ansto.gov.au; Mardon, Karine; Kassiou, Michael; Christie, MacDonald J

    1999-02-01

    ABSTRACT. N-(4-phenylbutyl)-3-hydroxy-4-azahexacyclo[5.4.1.0{sup 2,6}.0{sup 3,10}.0{sup 5,9}.0{sup 8}= {sup ,11}]dodecane (ANSTO-14) showed the highest activity for the {sigma}{sub 1} site ( K{sub i}=9.4 nM) and 19-fold {sigma}{sub 1}/{sigma}{sub 2} selectivity. The present study showed that [{sup 3}H]ANSTO-14 binds to a single high-affinity site in guinea pig brain membranes with an equilibrium K{sub d} of 8.0 {+-} 0.3 nM, in good agreement with the kinetic studies ( K{sub d}=13.3{+-}5.4 nM, n=4), and a B{sub max} of 3,199 {+-} 105 fmol/mg protein ( n=4). The in vivo biodistribution of [{sup 3}H]ANSTO-14 showed a high uptake in the diencephalon. Pretreatment of rats with {sigma} ligands including (+)-pentazocine ({sigma}{sub 1}), ANSTO-14 ({sigma}{sub 1}), and DTG ({sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 2}) did not significantly reduce radiotracer uptake in the brain, but did in the spleen. A labelled metabolite was found in the liver and brain. Due to its insensitivity to {sigma} ligands, the accumulation of [{sup 3}H]ANSTO-14 in the brain indicates high nonspecific binding. Therefore, [{sup 3}H]ANSTO-14 is a suitable ligand for labelling {sigma}{sub 1} sites in vitro but is not suitable for brain imaging of {sigma} binding sites in vivo.

  2. Sigma-1 receptor: The novel intracellular target of neuropsychotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sigma-1 receptor ligands have been long expected to serve as drugs for treatment of human diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, depression, idiopathic pain, drug abuse, and cancer. Recent research exploring the molecular function of the sigma-1 receptor started unveiling underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic activity of those ligands. Via the molecular chaperone activity, the sigma-1 receptor regulates protein folding/degradation, ER/oxidative stress, and cell survival. The chaperone activity is activated or inhibited by synthetic sigma-1 receptor ligands in an agonist-antagonist manner. Sigma-1 receptors are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes that are physically associated with the mitochondria (MAM: mitochondria-associated ER membrane. In specific types of neurons (e.g., those at the spinal cord, sigma-1 receptors are also clustered at ER membranes that juxtapose postsynaptic plasma membranes. Recent studies indicate that sigma-1 receptors, partly in sake of its unique subcellular localization, regulate the mitochondria function that involves bioenergetics and free radical generation. The sigma-1 receptor may thus provide an intracellular drug target that enables controlling ER stress and free radical generation under pathological conditions.

  3. Automated radiochemical synthesis and biodistribution of [11C]l-α-acetylmethadol ([11C]LAAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai, Kiran Kumar Solingapuram; Fan, Jinda; Tu, Zhude; Zerkel, Patrick; Mach, Robert H.; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2014-01-01

    Long-acting opioid agonists methadone and l-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) prevent withdrawal in opioid-dependent persons. Attempts to synthesize [ 11 C]-methadone for PET evaluation of brain disposition were unsuccessful. Owing, however, to structural and pharmacologic similarities, we aimed to develop [ 11 C]LAAM as a PET ligand to probe the brain exposure of long-lasting opioids in humans. This manuscript describes [ 11 C]LAAM synthesis and its biodistribution in mice. The radiochemical synthetic strategy afforded high radiochemical yield, purity and specific activity, thereby making the synthesis adaptable to automated modules. - Highlights: • Radiochemical synthesis of opioid [ 11 C]l-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) described for the first time. • High radiochemical yield, purity and specific activity. • Easily reproducible and adaptable synthesis to any C-11 automated modules. • [ 11 C]LAAM utility as a PET radiopharmaceutical for assessing brain penetration

  4. Sigma opioid receptor: characterization and co-identity with the phencyclidine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kalra, V.; Johnson, B.G.; Kerchner, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of the sigma opioid receptor of rat brain cortex have been characterized using the prototypic ligand (+)-[ 3 H] SKF 10,047. Binding to this receptor was rapid, and equilibrium was obtained within 30 min at 37 degrees C. Specific binding was linear with protein concentration up to 500 micrograms/2 ml and was dependent upon protein integrity. Denaturation by boiling destroyed over 95% of the specific binding. A high-affinity binding site with a KD of 150 +/- 40 nM and a maximum binding of 2.91 +/- 0.84 pmol/mg of protein was determined from a Scatchard plot of the binding data. The addition of salt, either NaCl or CaCl 2 , to the buffers markedly decreased binding, with CaCl 2 being more potent than NaCl. A broad pH optimum for specific binding was observed; maximum binding was at pH 9.0. The affinity of a number of ligands for the sigma site and the phencyclidine receptor were compared. The binding (IC50) of 13 ligands to the sigma site showed a correlation of 0.86 (P less than .01) with binding to the phencyclidine site. The data demonstrate that the biochemical properties of the sigma and phencyclidine receptors are similar and support the view that these receptors are one and the same site

  5. First observation of the production and decay of the Sigma /sub c//sup +/

    CERN Document Server

    Calicchio, M; Azemoon, T; Baker, N J; Bartley, J H; Baton, Jean-Pierre; Belusevic, R; Bertrand, D; Bingham, H H; Brisson, V; Bullock, F W; Colley, D C; Cooper, A M; Erriquez, O; Fogli-Muciaccia, M T; François, T; Gerbier, G; Guy, J G; Iori, M; Jones, G T; Kochowski, Claude; Leutz, H; Marage, P; Michette, A G; Moreels, J; Natali, S; Neveu, M; Nuzzo, S; O'Neale, S W; Petiau, P; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Sacton, J; Sewell, S J; Tyndel, M; Van Doninck, W K; Vander Velde-Wilquet, C; Venus, W; Votruba, M F; Wenninger, H; Wilquet, G

    1980-01-01

    An event with the decay chain Sigma /sub c//sup +/ to Lambda /sub c //sup +/+ pi /sup 0/, Lambda /sub c//sup +/ to K/sup -/+p+ pi /sup +/, has been observed in an exposure of BEBC, equipped with a track sensitive target, to the wide band neutrino beam from the SPS at CERN. The event has a unique three constraint kinematic fit to the Delta S=- Delta Q reaction nu +p to mu /sup -/+p+K/sup -/+ pi /sup +/+ pi /sup + /+ pi /sup 0/ with both gammas from the pi /sup 0/ decay detected. The proton and other final state particles are identified. The masses are M( Lambda /sub c//sup +/)=2290+or-3 MeV/c/sup 2/, M( Sigma /sub c//sup +/)=2457+or-4 MeV/c/sup 2/ and M( Sigma /sub c//sup +/)-M( Lambda /sub c//sup +/)=168+or-3 MeV/c/sup 2/. Including other data one obtains M( Sigma /sub c//sup ++/)-M( Sigma /sub c//sup +/)=0+or-4 Mev/c/sup 2/. (7 refs).

  6. A PET imaging agent with fast kinetics: synthesis and in vivo evaluation of the serotonin transporter ligand [{sup 11}C]2-[2-dimethylaminomethylphenylthio]-5-fluorophenylamine ([{sup 11}C]AFA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yiyun E-mail: hh285@columbia.edu; Narendran, Raj; Bae, Sung-A; Erritzoe, David; Guo Ningning; Zhu Zhihong; Hwang, D.-R.; Laruelle, Marc

    2004-08-01

    A new serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand, [{sup 11}C]2-[2-(dimethylaminomethylphenylthio)]-5-fluorophenylamine (10, [{sup 11}C]AFA), was synthesized and evaluated as a candidate PET radioligand in pharmacological and pharmacokinetic studies. As a PET radioligand, AFA (8) can be labeled with either C-11 or F-18. In vitro, AFA displayed high affinity for SERT (K{sub i} 1.46{+-}0.15 nM) and lower affinity for norepinephrine transporter (NET, K{sub i} 141.7{+-}47.4 nM) or dopamine transporter (DAT, K{sub i} >10,000 nM). [{sup 11}C]AFA (10) was prepared from its monomethylamino precursor 9 by reaction with high specific activity [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Radiochemical yield was 43{+-}20% based on [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide at end of bombardment (EOB, n = 10) and specific activity was 2,129 {+-} 1,369 Ci/mmol at end of synthesis (EOS, n = 10). Biodistribution studies in rats indicated that [{sup 11}C]AFA accumulated in brain regions known to contain high concentrations of SERT. Binding in SERT-rich brain regions was reduced significantly by pretreatment with either the cold compound 8 or with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram, but not by the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor nisoxetine, thus underlining its in vivo binding selectivity and specificity for SERT. Imaging experiments in baboons demonstrated that the uptake pattern of [{sup 11}C]AFA in the baboon brain is consistent with the known distribution of SERT, with highest activity levels in the midbrain and thalamus, followed by striatum, hippocampus, and cortical regions. Activity levels in the baboon brain peaked at 15-40 min after radioligand injection, indicating a fast uptake kinetics for [{sup 11}C]AFA. Pretreatment of the baboon with citalopram (4 mg/kg) significantly reduced the specific binding of [{sup 11}C]AFA in all SERT-containing brain regions. Kinetic analysis revealed that the regional equilibrium specific to non-specific partition coefficients (V{sub 3}&apos

  7. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of carbon-11 labelled N-((5-(4-fluoro-2-[11C]methoxyphenyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)cyclopentanamine as a PET tracer for NR2B subunit-containing NMDA receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiaans, Johannes A.M.; Klein, Pieter J.; Metaxas, Athanasios; Kooijman, Esther J.M.; Schuit, Robert C.; Leysen, Josée E.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Berckel, Bart N.M. van; Windhorst, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in learning and memory. Overactivation is thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Currently, it is not possible to assess N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) bio-availability in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the NR2B binding site of the NMDA receptor. Methods: N-((5-(4-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)cyclopentanamine was radiolabelled with carbon-11 in the phenyl moiety. Biodistribution and blocking studies were carried out in anaesthetized mice and in non-anaesthetized rats. Results: N-((5-(4-fluoro-2-[ 11 C]methoxyphenyl)pyridin-3-yl)methyl)cyclopentanamine was prepared in 49 ± 3% (decay-corrected) yield, affording 4.1 ± 0.3 GBq of formulated product at the end of synthesis with a radiochemical purity of > 99% and with a specific activity of 78 ± 10 GBq/μmol. Conclusion: A new NR2B PET ligand was developed in high yield. [ 11 C]4 readily enters the brain and binds to the NR2B subunit-containing NMDAr in the rodent brain. High sigma-1 receptor binding may, however, limit its future application as a PET probe for imaging the NR2B subunit-containing NMDAr. Anaesthesia has an effect on NMDAr function and therefore can complicate interpretation of preclinical in vivo results. In addition, effects of endogenous compounds cannot be excluded. Despite these potential limitations, further studies are warranted to investigate the values of [ 11 C]4 as an NR2B PET ligand

  8. Search for structure in sigma(e+e-→hadrons) between √s = 10.34 and 11.6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, E.; Boehringer, T.; Franzini, P.; Han, K.; Herb, S.W.; Mageras, G.; Peterson, D.; Yoh, J.K.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Giannini, G.; Schamberger, R.D. Jr.; Sivertz, M.; Spencer, L.J.; Tuts, P.M.; Imlay, R.; Levman, G.; Metcalf, W.; Sreedhar, V.; Blanar, G.; Dietl, H.; Eigen, G.; Lorenz, E.; Pauss, F.; Vogel, H.

    1982-01-01

    The CUSB detector at the Cornell electron storage ring has been used to measure R-sigma(e + e - →hadrons)/sigma(e + e - →μ + μ - ) in the c.m. energy regions between the UPSILON'' and the UPSILON''', and above the UPSILON''' up to √s = 11.6 GeV, with integrated luminosities of 5000 and 2100 nb -1 , respectively. No narrow resonances are observed, and limits on the leptonic widths are presented. The average value of R increases by 0.31 +- 0.06 across the flavor threshold

  9. Measurement of the cross-section ratio $\\sigma(\\chi_{c2})/\\sigma(\\chi_{c1})$ for prompt $\\chi_c$ production at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Bailey, D.S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Buchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Conti, G.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G.A.; Currie, R.; D'Almagne, B.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Deissenroth, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Bonal, F.Domingo; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Esteve, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Farber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P.F.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R.S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y.M.; Knecht, M.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Raighne, A.Mac; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R.M.D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Mclean, C.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S.K.; Patrick, G.N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D.L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; du Pree, T.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G.J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shao, B.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A.C.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F.J.P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V.K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M.T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M.Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S.A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-07-16

    The prompt production of the charmonium $\\chi_{c1}$ and $\\chi_{c2}$ mesons has been studied in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$~TeV. The $\\chi_c$ mesons are identified through their decays $\\chi_c\\,\\rightarrow\\,J/\\psi\\,\\gamma$ with $J/\\psi\\,\\rightarrow\\,\\mu^+\\,\\mu^-$ using 36~$\\mathrm{pb^{-1}}$ of data collected by the LHCb detector in 2010. The ratio of the prompt production cross-sections for the two $\\chi_c$ spin states, $\\sigma(\\chi_{c2})\\,/\\,\\sigma(\\chi_{c1})$, has been determined as a function of the $J/\\psi$ transverse momentum, $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{J/\\psi}$, in the range from 2 to 15~GeV/$c$. The results are in agreement with the next-to-leading order non-relativistic QCD model at high $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{J/\\psi}$ and lie consistently above the pure leading-order colour singlet prediction.

  10. Automated preparation of the dopamine D{sub 2/3} receptor agonist ligand [{sup 11}C]-(+)-PHNO for human PET imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plisson, Christophe, E-mail: Christophe.2.plisson@gsk.com [GlaxoSmithKline, Clinical Imaging Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Huiban, Mickael; Pampols-Maso, Sabina; Singleton, Goerkem; Hill, Samuel P.; Passchier, Jan [GlaxoSmithKline, Clinical Imaging Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Carbon-11 labelled (+)-4-Propyl-3,4,4a,5,6,10b-hexahydro-2H-naphtho[1,2-b][1,4]oxazin-9-ol ([{sup 11}C]-(+)-PHNO) is used as a high-affinity state, dopamine D{sub 2/3} receptor ligand in clinical PET studies. To facilitate its use, robust, rapid, efficient and GMP compliant methods are required for the manufacturing and QC testing processes. Additionally, to allow for full quantification of the resulting signal in the CNS, a reliable method is required to establish the parent plasma concentration over the course of the scan. This paper provides high-quality methods to support clinical application of [{sup 11}C]-(+)-PHNO. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fully automated synthesis of [{sup 11}C]-(+)-PHNO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid multi-step synthesis and QC analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reproducible synthesis process typically yielding more than 3 GBq of [{sup 11}C]-(+)-PHNO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very low failure rate.

  11. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Evaluation of the Norepinephrine Transporter Ligand [11C]MRB for Brown Adipose Tissue Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shufei; Fan Xiaoning; Yeckel, Catherine Weikart; Weinzimmer, David; Mulnix, Tim; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Carson, Richard E.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Ding Yushin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It has been suggested that brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans may play a role in energy balance and obesity. We conducted ex vivo and in vivo evaluation using [ 11 C]MRB, a highly selective NET (norepinephrine transporter) ligand for BAT imaging at room temperature, which is not achievable with [ 18 F]FDG. Methods: PET images of male Sprague–Dawley rats with [ 18 F]FDG and [ 11 C]MRB were compared. Relative [ 18 F]FDG or [ 11 C]MRB retention at 20, 40 and 60 min post-injection was quantified on awake rats after exposing to cold (4 °C for 4 h) or remaining at room temperature. Rats pretreated with unlabeled MRB or nisoxetine 30 min before [ 11 C]MRB injection were also assessed. The [ 11 C]MRB metabolite profile in BAT was evaluated. Results: PET imaging demonstrated intense [ 11 C]MRB uptake (SUV of 2.9 to 3.3) in the interscapular BAT of both room temperature and cold-exposed rats and this uptake was significantly diminished by pretreatment with unlabeled MRB; in contrast, [ 18 F]FDG in BAT was only detected in rats treated with cold. Ex vivo results were concordant with the imaging findings; i.e. the uptake of [ 11 C]MRB in BAT was 3 times higher than that of [ 18 F]FDG at room temperature (P = 0.009), and the significant cold-stimulated uptake in BAT with [ 18 F]FDG (10-fold, P = 0.001) was not observed with [ 11 C]MRB (P = 0.082). HPLC analysis revealed 94%–99% of total radioactivity in BAT represented unchanged [ 11 C]MRB. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that BAT could be specifically labeled with [ 11 C]MRB at room temperature and under cold conditions, supporting a NET-PET strategy for imaging BAT in humans under basal conditions.

  12. [11C]copper(I) cyanide: a new radioactive precursor or 11C-cyanation and functionalization of haloarenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponchant, M.; Hinnen, F.; Demphel, S.; Crouzel, C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiosyntheses of [cyano- 11 C]benzonitriles, [carboyxyl- 11 C]benzoic acids, [carbonyl- 11 C]benzamides and [tetrazoyl- 11 C]5-biphenyl-1H-tetrazoles are described. [Cyano- 11 C]benzonitriles were prepared using the Rosenmund-von Braun reaction in one step from [ 11 C]hydrogen cyanide via [ 11 C]copper(1) cyanide in 2 min. [Carboxyl- 11 C]benzoic acids and [carbonyl- 11 C]benzamides were prepared from [cyano- 11 C]benzonitrile-complexes using basic hydrogen peroxide for 3 min in N,N-dimethylformamide at 180 and 80 o C, respectively. [Tetrazoyl- 11 C]5-biphenyl-1H-tetrazoles were obtained from [cyano- 11 C]benzonitrile-complexes in 7 min by cyclization with trimethyltin azide followed by acid hydrolysis at 180 o C. These labelled compounds were obtained in a one-pot procedure with good average specific radioactivities [500 mCi/μmol) at the end of synthesis] and in satisfactory average radiochemical yields (24-69%) at 40 min from the end of radionuclide production. This new radioactive precursor, [ 11 C]copper(I) cyanide, should give access to new 11 C-labelled ligands for positron emission tomography. (author)

  13. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  14. Inhibition by sigma receptor ligand, MS-377, of N-methyl- D-aspartate-induced currents in dopamine neurons of the rat ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yuu; Ishioka, Miwa; Matsubayashi, Hiroaki; Amano, Taku; Sasa, Masashi

    2002-04-01

    MS-377 [( R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl) piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate] is a novel anti-psychotic drug candidate with high affinity for sigma receptors but devoid of binding affinity for PCP binding site of NMDA receptor/ion channel complex. The effects of MS-377 on NMDA receptor and/or its ion channel complex were examined to elucidate the antipsychotic properties of MS-377. We examined the effect of MS-377 on NMDA ( N-methyl- D-aspartate)-induced current in acutely dissociated dopamine neurons of rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) using patch clamp whole cell recording. MS-377 applied in a bath inhibited the peak current evoked by NMDA applied via the U-tube method for 2 s in a concentration-dependent manner. Other sigma receptor ligands, BD-1063 (1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine), NE-100 ( N, N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylenoxy)-phenyl]-ethylamine monohydrochloride) and haloperidol also inhibited NMDA-induced current in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, concomitant application of MS-377 with BD-1063, NE-100 or haloperidol at concentrations that had no effects on NMDA-induced current, potentiated the MS-377-induced inhibition. The results suggest that MS-377, as well as other sigma receptor ligands, indirectly acts on the sigma receptor to inhibit glutaminergic transmission mediated by NMDA receptor/ion channel complex in VTA dopamine neurons, thereby inhibiting dopamine release in target VTA areas.

  15. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of [11C]NE-100 labeled in two different positions as a PET σ receptor ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Noguchi, Junko; Ishii, Shin-Ichi; Hatano, Kentaro; Ito, Kengo; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Senda, Michio

    1998-01-01

    N,N-Dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine (NE-100) was labeled with 11 C in two different positions by the alkylation of an N-despropyl precursor with [ 11 C]propyl iodide and of an O-desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide and was evaluated for the potential as a tracer for mapping σ 1 receptors in the CNS and peripheral organs by PET. Following i.v. injection of [N-propyl- 11 C]NE-100 or [O-methyl- 11 C]NE-100 into mice, the two tracers showed similar tissue distribution patterns except for the liver and brain. With the coinjected carrier NE-100 or haloperidol, the uptake of [N-propyl- 11 C]NE-100 by the liver, pancreas and spleen was significantly decreased at 15 min after injection, whereas the effect was not significant for [O-methyl- 11 C]NE-100. The coinjection of NE-100 enhanced the brain uptake of the two tracers. Haloperidol also enhanced the brain uptake of [N-propyl- 11 C]NE-100, but not that of [O-methyl- 11 C]NE-100. The regional brain distribution assessed with [O-methyl- 3 H]NE-100 was consistent with the distribution pattern of the σ receptors. Four σ drugs reduced the regional brain uptake of [O-methyl- 3 H]NE-100 to 70%-90% of the control. In an ex vivo autoradiographic study of the rat brain, the uptake of [O-methyl- 11 C]NE-100 was blocked by carrier NE-100 or haloperidol (53%-59% of the control in the cortex), which suggests a receptor-specific distribution. These results show that [O-methyl- 11 C]NE-100 has limited potential as a PET ligand for mapping σ 1 receptors in the peripheral organs and the CNS because of high nonspecific binding

  16. [11C]CHIBA-1001 as a novel PET ligand for alpha7 nicotinic receptors in the brain: a PET study in conscious monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hashimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play an important role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, there are currently no suitable positron emission tomography (PET radioligands for imaging alpha7 nAChRs in the intact human brain. Here we report the novel PET radioligand [11C]CHIBA-1001 for in vivo imaging of alpha7 nAChRs in the non-human primate brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A receptor binding assay showed that CHIBA-1001 was a highly selective ligand at alpha7 nAChRs. Using conscious monkeys, we found that the distribution of radioactivity in the monkey brain after intravenous administration of [11C]CHIBA-1001 was consistent with the regional distribution of alpha7 nAChRs in the monkey brain. The distribution of radioactivity in the brain regions after intravenous administration of [11C]CHIBA-1001 was blocked by pretreatment with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 (5.0 mg/kg. However, the distribution of [11C]CHIBA-1001 was not altered by pretreatment with the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR agonist A85380 (1.0 mg/kg. Interestingly, the binding of [11C]CHIBA-1001 in the frontal cortex of the monkey brain was significantly decreased by subchronic administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist phencyclidine (0.3 mg/kg, twice a day for 13 days; which is a non-human primate model of schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings suggest that [11C]CHIBA-1001 could be a novel useful PET ligand for in vivo study of the receptor occupancy and pathophysiology of alpha7 nAChRs in the intact brain of patients with neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Rebalance between 7S and 11S globulins in soybean seeds of differing protein content and 11SA4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, A; Yu, X; Zheng, A; James, A T

    2016-11-01

    Protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean seeds affect the quality of soy foods. In this proteomic study, the protein profile of soybean seeds with high (∼45.5%) or low (∼38.6%) protein content and with or without the glycinin (11S) subunit 11SA4 was examined. 44 unique proteins and their homologues were identified and showed that both protein content and 11SA4 influenced the abundance of a number of proteins. The absence of 11SA4 exerted a greater impact than the protein content, and led to a decreased abundance of glycinin G2/A2B1 and G5/A5A4B3 subunits, which resulted in lower total 11S with a concomitant higher total β-conglycinin (7S). Low protein content was associated with higher glycinin G3/A1aB1b and lower glycinin G4/A5A4B3. Using the proteomic approach, it was demonstrated that 11SA4 deficiency induced compensatory accumulation of 7S globulins and led to a similar total abundance for 7S+11S irrespective of protein content or 11SA4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Noninvasive k3 estimation method for slow dissociation PET ligands: application to [11C]Pittsburgh compound B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Hirano, Shigeki; Tanaka, Noriko; Suhara, Tetsuya; Irie, Toshiaki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2013-11-16

    Recently, we reported an information density theory and an analysis of three-parameter plus shorter scan than conventional method (3P+) for the amyloid-binding ligand [11C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) as an example of a non-highly reversible positron emission tomography (PET) ligand. This article describes an extension of 3P + analysis to noninvasive '3P++' analysis (3P + plus use of a reference tissue for input function). In 3P++ analysis for [11C]PIB, the cerebellum was used as a reference tissue (negligible specific binding). Fifteen healthy subjects (NC) and fifteen Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients participated. The k3 (index of receptor density) values were estimated with 40-min PET data and three-parameter reference tissue model and were compared with that in 40-min 3P + analysis as well as standard 90-min four-parameter (4P) analysis with arterial input function. Simulation studies were performed to explain k3 biases observed in 3P++ analysis. Good model fits of 40-min PET data were observed in both reference and target regions-of-interest (ROIs). High linear intra-subject (inter-15 ROI) correlations of k3 between 3P++ (Y-axis) and 3P + (X-axis) analyses were shown in one NC (r2 = 0.972 and slope = 0.845) and in one AD (r2 = 0.982, slope = 0.655), whereas inter-subject k3 correlations in a target region (left lateral temporal cortex) from 30 subjects (15 NC + 15 AD) were somewhat lower (r2 = 0.739 and slope = 0.461). Similar results were shown between 3P++ and 4P analyses: r2 = 0.953 for intra-subject k3 in NC, r2 = 0.907 for that in AD and r2 = 0.711 for inter-30 subject k3. Simulation studies showed that such lower inter-subject k3 correlations and significant negative k3 biases were not due to unstableness of 3P++ analysis but rather to inter-subject variation of both k2 (index of brain-to-blood transport) and k3 (not completely negligible) in the reference region. In [11C]PIB, the applicability of 3

  19. In vivo characterization of radioiodinated (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl) piperidino] cyclohexanol as a potential σ-1 receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, Nasima; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kazuma; Kinuya, Seigo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Mori, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the (+)-enantiomer of radioiodinated 2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol [(+)-[ 125 I]-p-iodovesamicol] [(+)-[ 125 I]pIV], which is reported to bind with high affinity to σ-1 receptors in vitro, was tested for its usefulness in imaging σ-1 receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) in vivo. In biodistribution studies, significant amounts (approximately 3% of the injected dose) of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV accumulated in rat brain, and its retention was prolonged. In blocking studies, the accumulation of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV in the rat brain was significantly reduced by the coadministration of σ-ligands such as pentazocine (5.0 μmol), haloperidol (0.5 μmol) or SA4503 (0.5 μmol). The blocking effect of pentazocine (selective σ-1 ligand) was similar to the blocking effects of SA4503 and haloperidol [nonselective σ (σ-1 and σ-2) ligands]. Ex vivo autoradiography of the rat brain at 45 min following intravenous injection of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV showed high localization in brain areas rich in σ-1 receptors. Thus, the distribution of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV was thought to bind to σ-1 receptors in the CNS in vivo. These results indicate that radioiodinated (+)-pIV may have the potential to image σ-1 receptors in vivo

  20. Measurement of the cross-section ratio {sigma}({chi}{sub c2})/{sigma}({chi}{sub c1}) for prompt {chi}{sub c} production at {radical}(s)=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaij, R. [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Abellan Beteta, C. [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Adinolfi, M. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Adrover, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Affolder, A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Ajaltouni, Z. [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, LPC, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Alexander, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), Gatchina (Russian Federation); Alvarez Cartelle, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves, A.A. [Sezione INFN di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Amato, S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Amhis, Y. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Anderson, J. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Appleby, R.B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Aquines Gutierrez, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik (MPIK), Heidelberg (Germany); Archilli, F. [Laboratori Nazionali dell' INFN di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Arrabito, L. [CC-IN2P3, CNRS/IN2P3, Lyon-Villeurbanne (France); and others

    2012-08-14

    The prompt production of the charmonium {chi}{sub c1} and {chi}{sub c2} mesons has been studied in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV. The {chi}{sub c} mesons are identified through their decays {chi}{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma} with J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} using 36 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the LHCb detector in 2010. The ratio of the prompt production cross-sections for the two {chi}{sub c} spin states, {sigma}({chi}{sub c2})/{sigma}({chi}{sub c1}), has been determined as a function of the J/{psi} transverse momentum, p{sub T}{sup J/{psi}}, in the range from 2 to 15 GeV/c. The results are in agreement with the next-to-leading order non-relativistic QCD model at high p{sub T}{sup J/{psi}} and lie consistently above the pure leading-order colour-singlet prediction.

  1. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p + C --> [Y$^{0}$K$^{+}$] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) --> $\\Sigma$(1385)$^{0}$K$^{+}$ and X(2000) --> $\\Sigma^{0}$K$^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Golovkin, S V; Kozhevnikov, A A; Kubarovskii, V P; Kulyavtsev, A I; Kurshetsov, V F; Kushnirenko, A Yu; Landsberg, G L; Molchanov, V V; Mukkin, V A; Solyanik, V I; Vavilov, D V; Victorov, V A; Balats, M Ya; Dzubenko, G B; Kamenskii, A D; Kliger, G K; Kolganov, V Z; Lakaev, V S; Lomkatsi, G S; Nilov, A P; Smolyankin, V T; Vishniakov, V V

    1994-01-01

    Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p + C --> [Y$^{0}$K$^{+}$] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) --> $\\Sigma$(1385)$^{0}$K$^{+}$ and X(2000) --> $\\Sigma^{0}$K$^{+}$

  2. The complete genome sequence of Eubacterium limosum SA11, a metabolically versatile rumen acetogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J; Henderson, Gemma; Pacheco, Diana M; Li, Dong; Reilly, Kerri; Naylor, Graham E; Janssen, Peter H; Attwood, Graeme T; Altermann, Eric; Leahy, Sinead C

    2016-01-01

    Acetogens are a specialized group of anaerobic bacteria able to produce acetate from CO2 and H2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. In some gut environments acetogens can compete with methanogens for H2, and as a result rumen acetogens are of interest in the development of microbial approaches for methane mitigation. The acetogen Eubacterium limosum SA11 was isolated from the rumen of a New Zealand sheep and its genome has been sequenced to examine its potential application in methane mitigation strategies, particularly in situations where hydrogenotrophic methanogens are inhibited resulting in increased H2 levels in the rumen. The 4.15 Mb chromosome of SA11 has an average G + C content of 47 %, and encodes 3805 protein-coding genes. There is a single prophage inserted in the chromosome, and several other gene clusters appear to have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These include genes for cell wall glycopolymers, a type VII secretion system, cell surface proteins and chemotaxis. SA11 is able to use a variety of organic substrates in addition to H2/CO2, with acetate and butyrate as the principal fermentation end-products, and genes involved in these metabolic pathways have been identified. An unusual feature is the presence of 39 genes encoding trimethylamine methyltransferase family proteins, more than any other bacterial genome. Overall, SA11 is a metabolically versatile organism, but its ability to grow on such a wide range of substrates suggests it may not be a suitable candidate to take the place of hydrogen-utilizing methanogens in the rumen.

  3. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand [11C]CHIBA-1001 in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Muneyuki; Wu, Jin; Toyohara, Jun; Oda, Keiichi; Ishikawa, Masatomo; Ishii, Kenji; Hashimoto, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: 4-[ 11 C]Methylphenyl 2,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonane-2-carboxylate ([ 11 C]CHIBA-1001) is a newly developed positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for mapping α 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We investigated whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [ 11 C]CHIBA-1001 in humans and compared the results with those obtained in mice. Methods: Dynamic whole-body PET was carried out for three human subjects after administering a bolus injection of [ 11 C]CHIBA-1001. Emission scans were collected in two-dimensional mode over five bed positions. Regions of interest were placed over 12 organs. Radiation dosimetry was estimated from the residence times of these source organs using the OLINDA program. Biodistribution data from mice were also used for the prediction of radiation dosimetry in humans, and results with and those without accommodation of different proportions of organ-to-total-body mass were compared with the results from the human PET study. Results: In humans, the highest accumulation was observed in the liver, whereas in mice, the highest accumulation was observed in the urinary bladder. The estimated effective dose from the human PET study was 6.9 μSv/MBq, and that from mice was much underestimated. Conclusion: Effective dose estimates for [ 11 C]CHIBA-1001 were compatible with those associated with other common nuclear medicine tests. Absorption doses among several organs were considerably different between the human and mouse studies. Human dosimetry studies for the investigation of radiation safety are desirable as one of the first clinical trials of new PET probes before their application in subsequent clinical investigations.

  4. Measurement of sigma Lambda b0/sigma B0 x B(Lambda b0-->Lambda c+pi-)/B(B0-->D+pi-) in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-23

    We present the first observation of the baryon decay Lambda b0-->Lambda c+pi- followed by Lambda c+-->pK-pi+ in 106 pb-1 pp collisions at square root s=1.96 TeV in the CDF experiment. In order to reduce systematic error, the measured rate for Lambda b0 decay is normalized to the kinematically similar meson decay B0-->D+pi- followed by D+-->pi+K-pi+. We report the ratio of production cross sections (sigma) times the ratio of branching fractions (B) for the momentum region integrated above pT>6 GeV/c and pseudorapidity range |eta|Lambda b0X)/sigma(pp-->B0X)xB(Lambda b0-->Lambda c+pi-)/B(B0-->D+pi-)=0.82+/-0.08(stat)+/-0.11(syst)+/-0.22[B(Lambda c+-->pK-pi+)].

  5. Small-Molecule Sigma1 Modulator Induces Autophagic Degradation of PD-L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Christina M; Thomas, Jeffrey D; Haas, Derick A; Longen, Charles G; Oyer, Halley M; Tong, Jane Y; Kim, Felix J

    2018-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that Sigma1 ( SIGMAR1 , also known as sigma-1 receptor) is a unique ligand-regulated integral membrane scaffolding protein that contributes to cellular protein and lipid homeostasis. Previously, we demonstrated that some small-molecule modulators of Sigma1 alter endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein homeostasis pathways in cancer cells, including the unfolded protein response and autophagy. Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a type I integral membrane glycoprotein that is cotranslationally inserted into the ER and is processed and transported through the secretory pathway. Once at the surface of cancer cells, PD-L1 acts as a T-cell inhibitory checkpoint molecule and suppresses antitumor immunity. Here, we demonstrate that in Sigma1-expressing triple-negative breast and androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, PD-L1 protein levels were suppressed by RNAi knockdown of Sigma1 and by small-molecule inhibition of Sigma1. Sigma1-mediated action was confirmed by pharmacologic competition between Sigma1-selective inhibitor and activator ligands. When administered alone, the Sigma1 inhibitor decreased cell surface PD-L1 expression and suppressed functional interaction of PD-1 and PD-L1 in a coculture of T cells and cancer cells. Conversely, the Sigma1 activator increased PD-L1 cell surface expression, demonstrating the ability to positively and negatively modulate Sigma1 associated PD-L1 processing. We discovered that the Sigma1 inhibitor induced degradation of PD-L1 via autophagy, by a mechanism distinct from bulk macroautophagy or general ER stress-associated autophagy. Finally, the Sigma1 inhibitor suppressed IFNγ-induced PD-L1. Our data demonstrate that small-molecule Sigma1 modulators can be used to regulate PD-L1 in cancer cells and trigger its degradation by selective autophagy. Implications: Sigma1 modulators sequester and eliminate PD-L1 by autophagy, thus preventing functional PD-L1 expression at the cell surface. This

  6. A prototypical Sigma-1 receptor antagonist protects against brain ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Schetz, John A.; Perez, Evelyn; Liu, Ran; Chen, Shiuhwei; Lee, Ivan; Simpkins, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the Sigma-1 ligand 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects the brain from ischemia. Less clear is whether protection is mediated by agonism or antagonism of the Sigma-1 receptor, and whether drugs already in use for other indications and that interact with the Sigma-1 receptor might also prevent oxidative damage due to conditions such as cerebral ischemic stroke. The antipsychotic drug haloperidol is an antagonist of Sigma-1 receptors and in this s...

  7. Potentiometric studies on mixed-ligand chelates of uranyl ion with carboxylic acid phenolic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandiwadekar, S.P.; Chavar, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mixed ligand complexes of UO 2 2+ with bidentate carboxylic and phenolic acids have been studied potentiometrically at 30 ± 0.1degC and μ=0.2M (NaClO 4 ). 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of UO 2 2+ with phthalic acid (PTHA), maleic acid (MAE), malonic acid (MAL), quinolinic acid (QA), 5-sulphosalicylic acid (5-SSA), salicylic acid (SA), and only 1:1 complexes in the case of mandelic acid (MAD) have been detected. The formation of 1:1:1 mixed ligand complexes has been inferred from simultaneous equilibria in the present study. The values of ΔlogK, Ksub(DAL), Ksub(2LA) or Ksub(2AL) for the ternary complexes have been calculated. The stabilities of mixed ligand complexes depend on the size of the chelate ring and the stabilities of the binary complexes. (author). 15 refs

  8. [{sup 11}C]A-69024: A potent and selective non-benzazepine radiotracer for in vivo studies of dopamine D1 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassiou, Michael; Scheffel, Ursula; Ravert, Hayden T; Mathews, William B; Musachio, John L; Lambrecht, Richard M; Dannals, Robert F

    1995-02-01

    [{sup 11}C]A-69024, ({+-})-1-(2-bromo-4,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-[{sup 11}C]methyl-1,2= ,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline, is a specific and selective dopamine D1 radiotracer. The in vivo biodistribution of this novel radioligand in mice showed a high uptake in the striatum (6.7% ID/g) at 5 min, followed by clearance with a half-life of 16.1 min. As a measure of specificity, the striatal/cerebellar ratio reached a maximum of 7.4 at 30 min post-injection. Radioactivity in the striatum was reduced to the level of the cerebellum by pre-administration of the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg/kg). Pretreatment of mice with spiperone (D2), 7-hydroxydipropylaminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) (D3), clozapine (D4), ketanserin (5-HT2/5-HT2C), mazindol (monoamine reuptake), prazosin ({alpha}{sub 1}), and haloperidol (D2/{sigma}) had no inhibitory effect on [{sup 11}C]A-69024 uptake in the striatum. The dextrotatory enantiomer of the dopamine antagonist butaclamol inhibited striatal uptake, while the less active isomer (-)-butaclamol did not. [{sup 11}C]A-69024 binding was inhibited by unlabeled A-69024 in a dose dependent manner (ED{sub 50} = 0.3 mg/kg) in the striatum while no change occurred in the cerebellum. [{sup 11}C]A-69024 warrants further investigation as a PET ligand for examination of central dopamine D1 receptors in humans.

  9. Dopamine transporter binding in rat striatum: a comparison of [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT and [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, Karmen K.; Hutchins, Gary D.; Mock, Bruce H.; Fei, Xiangshu; Winkle, Wendy L. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, L3-208, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Gitter, Bruce D.; Territo, Paul R. [Lilly Center for Anatomical and Molecular Imaging, Integrative Biology Division, Lilly Research Laboratories, Greenfield, IN 46140 (United States); Zheng Qihuang [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, L3-208, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: qzheng@iupui.edu

    2009-01-15

    Introduction: Positron emission tomography scanning with radiolabeled phenyltropane cocaine analogs is important for quantifying the in vivo density of monoamine transporters, including the dopamine transporter (DAT). [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT is useful for studying DAT as a marker of dopaminergic innervation in animal models of psychiatric and neurological disorders. [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT is commonly labeled at the N-methyl position. However, labeling of [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT at the O-methyl position is a simpler procedure and results in a shorter synthesis time [desirable in small-animal studies, where specific activity (SA) is crucial]. In this study, we sought to validate that the O-methylated form of [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT provides equivalent quantitative results to that of the more commonly reported N-methyl form. Methods: Four female Sprague-Dawley rats were scanned twice on the IndyPET II small-animal scanner, once with [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT and once with [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT. DAT binding potentials (BP{identical_to}B'{sub avail}/K{sub d}) were estimated for right and left striata with a nonlinear least-squares algorithm, using a reference region (cerebellum) as the input function. Results: [N-Methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT and [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT were synthesized with 40-50% radiochemical yields (HPLC purification). Radiochemical purity was >99%. SA at end of bombardment was 258{+-}30 GBq/{mu}mol. Average BP values for right and left striata with [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT were 1.16{+-}0.08 and 1.23{+-}0.14, respectively. BP values for [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT were 1.18{+-}0.08 (right) and 1.22{+-}0.16 (left). Paired t tests demonstrated that labeling position did not affect striatal DAT BP. Conclusions: These results suggest that [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT is quantitatively equivalent to [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]{beta}-CFT in the rat striatum.

  10. In vivo assessment of [11C]MRB as a prospective PET ligand for imaging the norepinephrine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severance, Alin J.; Milak, Matthew S.; Dileep Kumar, J.S.; Arango, Victoria; Parsey, Ramin V.; Prabhakaran, Jaya; Majo, Vattoly J.; Simpson, Norman R.; Van Heertum, Ronald L.; Mann, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Antagonism of norepinephrine reuptake is now an important pharmacological strategy in the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders, and many antidepressants have substantial potential occupancy of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) at recommended dosages. Despite the importance of understanding this transporter's role in psychiatric disease and treatment, a suitable radioligand for studying NET has been slow to emerge. (S,S)-Methylreboxetine (MRB) is among the more promising ligands recently adapted for positron emission tomography (PET), and the present study aimed to evaluate its potential for use in higher primates. Affinities for various brain targets were determined in vitro. PET studies were conducted in baboon under both test-retest and blocking conditions using 1 mg/kg nisoxetine. MRB has sixfold higher affinity for NET than the serotonin transporter, and negligible affinity for other sites. PET studies in baboons showed little regional heterogeneity in binding and were minimally affected by pretreatment with the NET antagonist nisoxetine. Despite improvement over previous ligands for imaging NET in vivo, the low signal to noise ratio indicates [ 11 C]MRB lacks sensitivity and reliability as a PET radiotracer in humans. (orig.)

  11. Superstring sigma models from spin chains: the SU(1,1 vertical bar 1) case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, S.; Casteill, P.-Y.; Morales, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    We derive the coherent state representation of the integrable spin chain Hamiltonian with non-compact supersymmetry group G=SU(1,1 vertical bar 1). By passing to the continuous limit, we find a spin chain sigma model describing a string moving on the supercoset G/H, H being the stabilizer group. The action is written in a manifestly G-invariant form in terms of the Cartan forms and the string coordinates in the supercoset. The spin chain sigma model is shown to agree with that following from the Green-Schwarz action describing two-charged string spinning on AdS 5 xS 5

  12. Development and evaluation of a radiobromine-labeled sigma ligand for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Kiyono, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Kozaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Masanori; Mori, Tetsuya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Sigma receptors are appropriate targets for tumor imaging because they are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with high affinity for sigma receptors, and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. In this study, to develop a radiobromine-labeled vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET, nonradioactive and radiobromine-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-bromophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pBrV) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In these initial studies, 77 Br was used because of its longer half-life. Methods: (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was prepared by a bromodestannylation reaction with radiochemical purity of 98.8% after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was measured. In vitro binding characteristics of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were assayed. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Results: The lipophilicity of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was lower than that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. As a result of in vitro binding assay to sigma receptors, the affinities of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were competitive to those of (+)-pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV and (+)-[ 125 I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor via sigma receptors. The biodistributions of both radiotracers showed similar patterns. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in liver after injection of (+)-[ 77 Br]pBrV was significantly lower compared to that of (+)-[ 125 I]pIV. Conclusion: These results indicate that radiobromine-labeled pBrV possesses great potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET

  13. Development and evaluation of a radiobromine-labeled sigma ligand for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Kiyono, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yoji; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Kozaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Masanori; Mori, Tetsuya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2013-05-01

    Sigma receptors are appropriate targets for tumor imaging because they are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with high affinity for sigma receptors, and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. In this study, to develop a radiobromine-labeled vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET, nonradioactive and radiobromine-labeled (+)-2-[4-(4-bromophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pBrV) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In these initial studies, (77)Br was used because of its longer half-life. (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was prepared by a bromodestannylation reaction with radiochemical purity of 98.8% after HPLC purification. The partition coefficient of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was measured. In vitro binding characteristics of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were assayed. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The lipophilicity of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was lower than that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. As a result of in vitro binding assay to sigma receptors, the affinities of (+)-pBrV to sigma receptors were competitive to those of (+)-pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV and (+)-[(125)I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor via sigma receptors. The biodistributions of both radiotracers showed similar patterns. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in liver after injection of (+)-[(77)Br]pBrV was significantly lower compared to that of (+)-[(125)I]pIV. These results indicate that radiobromine-labeled pBrV possesses great potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent for PET. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of [11C]MPEPy as a potential PET ligand for mGlu5 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severance, Alin J.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Kumar, J.S. Dileep; Underwood, Mark D.; Arango, Victoria; Majo, Vattoly J.; Prabhakaran, Jaya; Simpson, Norman R.; Heertum, Ronald L. van; Mann, J. John

    2006-01-01

    Excessive activation via the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR 5 ) has been implicated in depression, neuropathic pain and other psychiatric, neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. A mGluR 5 radioligand for in vivo quantification by positron emission tomography (PET) would facilitate studies of the role of this receptor in disease and treatment. 3-Methoxy-5-pyridin-2-ylethynylpyridine (MPEPy), a selective and high-affinity antagonist at the mGluR 5 receptor was selected as a candidate ligand; a recent publication by Yu et al. [Nucl Med Biol 32 (2005) 631-640] presented initial micro-PET results for [ 11 C]MPEPy with enthusiasm. Building on their efforts, we report as unique contributions (1) an improved chemical synthesis method, (2) the first data using human tissue, (3) phosphor images for rat brain preparations, (4) a novel comparison of anesthetic agents and (5) in vivo data in baboon. In vitro phosphor imaging studies of this ligand using human and rat brain tissue demonstrated high specific binding in the hippocampus, striatum and cortex with minimal specific binding in the cerebellum. In contrast, in vivo micro-PET studies in rats using urethane anesthesia, PET studies in baboons using isoflurane anesthesia and ex vivo micro-PET studies in unanesthetized rats each showed little specific binding in the brain. Despite the promising in vitro results, the low signal-to-noise ratio found in vivo does not justify the use of [ 11 C]MPEPy as a PET radiotracer in humans

  15. Effects of sigma(1) receptor ligand, MS-377 on apomorphine- or phencyclidine-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, S; Yamauchi, K; Hisatomi, S; Annoh, N; Tanaka, M

    2000-08-25

    To evaluate the antipsychotic property of a sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-¿4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl¿ methyl-2-pyrrolidinone-L-tartrate (MS-377), an antagonistic effect of MS-377 on the disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle by apomorphine or phencyclidine (PCP) was investigated in rats. MS-377 antagonized the PCP-induced disruption of PPI. The ED(50) value of MS-377 for this effect was 0.66 mg/kg. In contrast, apomorphine-induced disruption of PPI was not attenuated by MS-377. These data indicate that the PCP-induced disruption of PPI in rats would be, at least partially, mediated by sigma receptors and MS-377 could be a novel anti-psychotic agent with clinical efficacy for the sensorimotor-gating deficit in schizophrenia.

  16. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of the {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001 in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Muneyuki [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Wu, Jin; Toyohara, Jun [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Oda, Keiichi [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Ishikawa, Masatomo [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Ishii, Kenji [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kenji [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi, E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.j [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, 1-1 Naka-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0022 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: 4-[{sup 11}C]Methylphenyl 2,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonane-2-carboxylate ([{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001) is a newly developed positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for mapping {alpha}{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We investigated whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001 in humans and compared the results with those obtained in mice. Methods: Dynamic whole-body PET was carried out for three human subjects after administering a bolus injection of [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001. Emission scans were collected in two-dimensional mode over five bed positions. Regions of interest were placed over 12 organs. Radiation dosimetry was estimated from the residence times of these source organs using the OLINDA program. Biodistribution data from mice were also used for the prediction of radiation dosimetry in humans, and results with and those without accommodation of different proportions of organ-to-total-body mass were compared with the results from the human PET study. Results: In humans, the highest accumulation was observed in the liver, whereas in mice, the highest accumulation was observed in the urinary bladder. The estimated effective dose from the human PET study was 6.9 {mu}Sv/MBq, and that from mice was much underestimated. Conclusion: Effective dose estimates for [{sup 11}C]CHIBA-1001 were compatible with those associated with other common nuclear medicine tests. Absorption doses among several organs were considerably different between the human and mouse studies. Human dosimetry studies for the investigation of radiation safety are desirable as one of the first clinical trials of new PET probes before their application in subsequent clinical investigations.

  17. Assignment of simian rotavirus SA11 temperature-sensitive mutant groups B and E to genome segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombold, J.L.; Estes, M.K.; Ramig, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Recombinant (reassortant) viruses were selected from crosses between temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of simian rotavirus SA11 and wild-type human rotavirus Wa. The double-stranded genome RNAs of the reassortants were examined by electrophoresis in Tris-glycine-buffered polyacrylamide gels and by dot hybridization with a cloned DNA probe for genome segment 2. Analysis of replacements of genome segments in the reassortants allowed construction of a map correlating genome segments providing functions interchangeable between SA11 and Wa. The reassortants revealed a functional correspondence in order of increasing electrophoretic mobility of genome segments. Analysis of the parental origin of genome segments in ts+ SA11/Wa reassortants derived from the crosses SA11 tsB(339) X Wa and SA11 tsE(1400) X Wa revealed that the group B lesion of tsB(339) was located on genome segment 3 and the group E lesion of tsE(1400) was on segment 8

  18. Assignment of simian rotavirus SA11 temperature-sensitive mutant groups B and E to genome segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombold, J.L.; Estes, M.K.; Ramig, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    Recombinant (reassortant) viruses were selected from crosses between temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of simian rotavirus SA11 and wild-type human rotavirus Wa. The double-stranded genome RNAs of the reassortants were examined by electrophoresis in Tris-glycine-buffered polyacrylamide gels and by dot hybridization with a cloned DNA probe for genome segment 2. Analysis of replacements of genome segments in the reassortants allowed construction of a map correlating genome segments providing functions interchangeable between SA11 and Wa. The reassortants revealed a functional correspondence in order of increasing electrophoretic mobility of genome segments. Analysis of the parental origin of genome segments in ts+ SA11/Wa reassortants derived from the crosses SA11 tsB(339) X Wa and SA11 tsE(1400) X Wa revealed that the group B lesion of tsB(339) was located on genome segment 3 and the group E lesion of tsE(1400) was on segment 8.

  19. Synthesis of a /sup 11/C-labelled neuroleptic drug: pimozide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouzel, C; Mestelan, G; Kraus, E; Lecomte, J M; Comar, D [CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot

    1980-09-01

    Pimozide, a neuroleptic drug which is one of the best ligands for brain dopaminergic receptors in mice in vivo, was labelled with /sup 11/C for eventual investigation in man. This synthesis was carried out in 30 min from phosgene as the /sup 11/C precursor. The synthesis, resulting specific activity and the tissue distribution kinetics in mice are presented and discussed.

  20. Quality control and biophysical characterisation data of VanSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Hughes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This data article presents the results from quality control experiments including N-terminal sequencing, SEC-MALS and Mass Spectrometry for purified VanSA used in experiments described in (Hughes et al., 2017 [1]; in addition to ligand interaction measurements and thermal melting curves of VanSA in the presence of screened ligands from circular dichroism measurements as well as UV–vis absorbance spectra for the binding interaction of VanSA in the presence of screened ligands.

  1. Synthesis, in vitro validation and in vivo pharmacokinetics of [{sup 125}I]N-[2-(4-iodophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-piperidinyl) ethylamine: A high-affinity ligand for imaging sigma receptor positive tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Christy S; Gulden, Mary E; Vilner, Bertold J; Bowen, Wayne D

    1996-08-01

    N-[2-(4-iodophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-piperidinyl)ethylamine, IPEMP, and the corresponding bromo derivative, BrPEMP, have been synthesized and characterized. Both BrPEMP and IPEMP were evaluated for sigma-1 and sigma-2 subtype receptor affinities and found to possess very high affinities for both receptor subtypes. The precursor for radioiodination n-tributylstannylphenylethylpiperidinylethylamine was prepared from its bromo derivative by palladium-catalyzed stannylation reaction. Radioiodinated 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP was readily prepared in high yields and high specific activity by oxidative iododestannylation reaction using chloramine-T as oxidizing agent. Sites labeled by 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP in guinea pig brain membranes showed high affinity for BD1008, haloperidol, and (+)-pentazocine (Ki = 5.06 {+-} 0.40, 32.6 {+-} 2.75, and 48.1 {+-} 8.60 nM, respectively), which is consistent with sigma receptor pharmacology. Competition binding studies of 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP in melanoma (A375) and MCF-7 breast cancer cells showed a high affinity, dose-dependent inhibition of binding with known sigma ligand N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl) ethylamine, BD1008 (Ki = 5, 11 nM, respectively), supporting the labeling of sigma sites in these cells. Haloperidol, however showed a weaker (Ki 100-200 nM) affinity for the sites labeled by 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP in these cells. Biodistribution studies of 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP in rats showed a fast clearance of this radiopharmaceutical from blood, liver, lung, and other organs. A co-injection of 4-IPEMP with 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP resulted in 37%, 69%, and 35% decrease in activity in liver, kidney, and brain (organs possessing sigma receptors), respectively at 1-h postinjection. These results suggest that 4-[{sup 125}I]PEMP is a promising radiopharmaceutical for pursuing further studies in animal models with tumors.

  2. In vivo evaluation of [123I]-4-iodo-N-(4-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-benzamide: a potential sigma receptor ligand for SPECT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staelens, Ludovicus; Oltenfreiter, Ruth; Dumont, Filip; Waterhouse, Rikki N.; Vandenbulcke, Katia; Blanckaert, Peter; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Slegers, Guido

    2005-01-01

    In this study, in vivo evaluation in mice and rabbits of [ 123 I]-4-iodo-N-(4-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-benzamide ([ 123 I]-BPB), a potential radioligand for visualisation of the sigma receptor by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is reported. The compound possesses appropriate lipophilicity (log P=2.2) and binds sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors (pKi=6.51 and 6.79, respectively). In mice, this new radioiodinated tracer exhibited high brain uptake (4.99% ID/g tissue at 10 min postinjection) and saturable binding (3.06% ID/g tissue at 10 min postinjection) as determined by pretreatment with unlabeled [ 123 I]-BPB. A metabolite study demonstrated no (less than 5%) labeled metabolites in the brain. In rabbits, regional brain distribution was investigated and the tracer displayed high, homogeneous central nervous system uptake. Selectivity was assessed by competition experiments with known sigma ligands. Metabolite analysis showed no (less than 8%) labeled metabolites in the rabbit brain. In conclusion, our findings indicate that [ 123 I]-BPB is not a suitable tracer for visualisation of D 3 receptors while its potential for sigma receptor imaging is severely hampered by its affinity for dopamine receptors

  3. MS-377, a novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, reverses phencyclidine-induced release of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Kato, T

    2001-09-21

    A novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), inhibits phencyclidine (1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine; PCP)-induced behaviors in animal models. In this study, we measured extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat brain after treatment with MS-377 alone, using in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the effects of MS-377 on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex after treatment with PCP. MS-377 itself had no significant effects on dopamine release in the striatum (10 mg/kg, p.o.) nor on dopamine or serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). PCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly increased dopamine and serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex. MS-377 (1 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered 60 min prior to PCP, significantly attenuated this effect of PCP. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of MS-377 on PCP-induced behaviors are partly mediated by inhibition of the increase in dopamine and serotonin release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex caused by PCP.

  4. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p+C{yields}[Y{sup 0}{Kappa}{sup +}]+C type and observation of narrow structures in {Sigma}(1385){sup 0}{Kappa}{sup +} and {Sigma}{sup 0}{Kappa}{sup +} effective mass spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovkin, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Kubarovsky, V.P. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)] [and others; SPHINX Collaboration (IHEP-ITEP)

    1995-11-01

    In the experiments at the SPHINX facility in 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator the coherent diffractive production reactions on carbon nuclei p + C {yields} [{Sigma}(1385){sup 0}K{sup +}] + C and p + C {yields} [{Sigma}{sup 0}K{sup +}] + C were investigated. The evidences for new baryon states were obtained in the study of hyperon-kaon effective mass spectra in these two reactions: X(2050) with mass M = (2052 {+-} 6) MeV and width {Gamma} = (35{sup +22}{sub -35}) MeV in M[{Sigma}(1385){sup 0}K{sup +}] and X(2000) with M = 1999 {+-} 6 MeV and {Gamma} = 91 {+-} 17 MeV in M[{Sigma}{sup 0}K{sup +}]. The unusual features of these massive states (small enough decay widths, anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange particles emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. (orig.)

  5. Sigma phase transformation in super duplex steel in the range of 900-1050 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.L; Manheim, R.L; Rios, D

    2012-01-01

    The embrittlement phenomenon observed in duplex stainless steels obeys to the presence of intermediate phases in the microstructure, principally the so-called sigma-phase, which preferently arises by heating over the range of 540 to 850 o C. The present article describes the dissolution of sigma-phase in welded joints of cast super duplex stainless steels (ASTM A890), at temperatures from 900 to 1050 o C. The experimental procedure utilized usual techniques of quantitative metallography and X-ray diffraction. Annealing of the samples at 850 o C yielded starting contents of sigma of 40,4 % (vol) in the fusion zone and 45,4 % (vol) in the heat-affected zone. The dissolution of the compound was observed after annealing of the specimens at 900, 950, 1.000 and 1.050 o C, with a moderate kinetics at lesser temperatures, while the transformation became fully achieved at 1.050 o C

  6. Identification of sigma and OMEGA phases in AA2009/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo, P., E-mail: pilar.rodrigo@urjc.e [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Poza, P.; Utrilla, M.V.; Urena, A. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-08-12

    The microstructure evolution during ageing treatment at 170 and 190 deg. C of AA2009/SiC composites, reinforced with 15 vol.% particulates and whiskers, was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Besides theta' and S' phases, the typical hardening precipitates on Al-Cu-Mg alloys, it was found the presence of OMEGA and sigma (Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 6}Mg{sub 2}) phases in the matrix. sigma phase was only found in the matrix of particulate composite, while OMEGA phase appeared in both. This phase has not been previously observed in Al matrix composites based on conventional Al-Cu-Mg alloys.

  7. Proteomic identification of galectin-11 and 14 ligands from Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanasekaran Sakthivel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Haemonchus contortus is the most pathogenic nematode of small ruminants. Infection in sheep and goats results in anaemia that decreases animal productivity and can ultimately cause death. The involvement of ruminant-specific galectin-11 (LGALS-11 and galectin-14 (LGALS-14 has been postulated to play important roles in protective immune responses against parasitic infection; however, their ligands are unknown. In the current study, LGALS-11 and LGALS-14 ligands in H. contortus were identified from larval (L4 and adult parasitic stages extracts using immobilised LGALS-11 and LGALS-14 affinity column chromatography and mass spectrometry. Both LGALS-11 and LGALS-14 bound more putative protein targets in the adult stage of H. contortus (43 proteins when compared to the larval stage (two proteins. Of the 43 proteins identified in the adult stage, 34 and 35 proteins were bound by LGALS-11 and LGALS-14, respectively, with 26 proteins binding to both galectins. Interestingly, hematophagous stage-specific sperm-coating protein and zinc metalloprotease (M13, which are known vaccine candidates, were identified as putative ligands of both LGALS-11 and LGALS-14. The identification of glycoproteins of H. contortus by LGALS-11 and LGALS-14 provide new insights into host-parasite interactions and the potential for developing new interventions.

  8. MS-377, a selective sigma receptor ligand, indirectly blocks the action of PCP in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ion-channel complex in primary cultured rat neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideko; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Sagi, Naoki; Horikomi, Kazutoshi; Sora, Ichiro

    2002-02-22

    MS-377 ((R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate) is a antipsychotic agent that binds to sigma-1 receptor. MS-377 showed anti-dopaminergic and anti-serotonergic activities and antagonistic action against phencyclidine (PCP)-induced behaviors in an animal model. These anti-psychotic activities of MS-377 are attributable to association with sigma-1 receptor. However, the mechanism by which the sigma-1 receptor ligands exact those numerous effects remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of MS-377 on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor ion-channel complex in primary cultured rat neuronal cells. First, we examined the effect of MS-377 on NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx with fura-2/ AM loaded cells. MS-377 showed no effects on the basal Ca2+ concentration and NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx by itself PCP and SKF-10047 reduced the NMDA-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Pre-incubation of 1 microM MS-377 was found to significantly block the reduction by PCP or SKF-10047 of the NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. Second, the effect of MS-377 on [3H]MK-801 intact cell binding was examined. PCP, haloperidol and (+)-pentazocine inhibited [3H]MK-801 binding, although MS-377 showed no effect by itself Pre-treatment of MS-377 markedly reversed the inhibition of [3H]MK-801 binding by PCP in a dose-dependent manner. These effects of MS-377 may depend on its affinity for the sigma-1 receptor, because MS-377 is a selective sigma-1 receptor ligand without any affinity for NMDA receptor ion-channel complex. These observations suggest that the MS-377 indirectly modulated the NMDA receptor ion-channel complex, and the anti-psychotic activities of MS-377, in part, are attributable to such on action via sigma-1 receptor.

  9. [Crossed renal ectopia in a patient with a complicated sigma neoplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Luis Eduardo; Burneo-Esteves, Mauricio; Rosat-Rodrigo, Adriá; Baz-Figueroa, Caleb; Pérez-Álvarez, Antonio Dámaso; Barrera-Gómez, Manuel Ángel

    2017-12-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is a rare pathology that is often asymptomatic. Intraoperative detection with a sigma complicated neoplasia is more infrequent and requires correct management to avoid a renal ureteral injury. To present a case report of a patient with a sigma complicated neoplasia and a crossed renal ectopia detected incidentally. We present the case of a 62-year-old man that was submitted for emergency surgery for a sigma perforated neoplasm, and who presented with a previously undiagnosed left-side CRE. During surgery there was a need to insert 2-double-J stents as a guide to both ureters and to avoid any injury to them. Crossed renal ectopia is a rare, often asymptomatic entity, the diagnosis of which is usually incidental. In our case, the detection of a concomitant complicated neoplasm, required identification of both ureters due the anatomic doubt of its localization and to avoid them being injured. In conclusion, upon finding a casual crossed renal ectopia during an emergency surgery of sigma, we recommend the identification of the ureters to facilitate its location and to avoid any injury to the ureters. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of the total $c\\overline{c}$ production cross section in 340 GeV/c $\\Sigma^{-}$ - nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M.I.; Barberis, D.; Beck, M.; Berat, C.; Beusch, W.; Boss, M.; Brons, S.; Bruckner, W.; Buenerd, M.; Busch, C.; Buscher, C.; Charignon, F.; Chauvin, J.; Chudakov, E.A.; Dersch, U.; Dropmann, F.; Engelfried, J.; Faller, F.; Fournier, A.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Godbersen, M.; Grafstrom, P.; Haller, T.; Heidrich, M.; Hubbard, E.; Hurst, R.B.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konorov, I.; Keller, N.; Martens, K.; Martin, P.; Masciocchi, S.; Michaels, R.; Muller, U.; Neeb, H.; Newbold, D.; Newsom, C.; Paul, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Potashnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Ransome, R.; Ren, Z.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, L.; Rudolph, H.; Scheel, C.; Schmitt, L.; Siebert, H.W.; Simon, A.; Smith, V.J.; Thilmann, O.; Trombini, A.; Vesin, E.; Volkemer, B.; Vorwalter, K.; Walcher, T.; Walder, G.; Werding, R.; Wittmann, E.; Zavertyaev, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The production of charmed particles by Sigma- of 340 Gev/c momentum was studied in the hyperon beam experiment WA89 at the CERN-SPS, using the Omega-spectrometer. In two data-taking periods in 1993 and 1994 an integrated luminosity of 1600 microb^-1 on copper and carbon targets was recorded. From the reconstruction of 930 +- 90 charm particle decays in 10 decay channels production cross sections for D, antiD, Ds and Lambdac were determined in the region xF>0. Assuming an A^1 dependence of the cross section on the nucleon number, we calculate a total ccbar production cross section of sigma(x_F > 0) = 5.3+- 0.4(stat)+-1.0(syst)+1.0(Xi_c) microb per nucleon. The last term is an upper limit on the unknown contribution from charmed-strange baryon production.

  11. Heterogeneous binding of sigma radioligands in the rat brain and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of four sigma receptor ligands, 3 H-(+)-N-allyl-N-normetazocine ( 3 H-(+)-SKF 10,047), 3 H-(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ( 3 H-(+)-3-PPP), 3 H-haloperidol and 3 H-N,N'-di(o-totyl)guanidine ( 3 H-DTG), and the cytochrome P450IID6 ligand and dopamine uptake inhibitor 3 H-1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ( 3 H-GBR 12935) to membranal preparations of rat liver or whole rat brain was examined regarding kinetical properties and inhibition by various compounds with affinity for sigma binding sites or cytochrome P-450. In rat brain the density of binding sites was increased in order (+)-SKF 10,047 3 H-(+)-SKF 10,047 there were quite marked differences between the ligands studied. Multiple binding sites were also indicated by the low Hill coefficients found for most of the compounds studied. It was found that the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor proadifen (SKF 525A), like haloperidol, was a potent inhibitor of the binding of 3 H-(+)-SKF 10,047, 3 H-(+)-3-PPP and 3 H-haloperidol to the liver and brain preparations, less active in inhibiting the binding of 3 H-DTG and least effective on the binding of 3 H-GBR 12935. Another cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, L-lobeline, was particularly potent in inhibiting the binding of 3 H-DTG but was also quite potent inhibitor of the binding of the other sigma ligands. It was less potent in inhibiting the binding of 3 H-GBR 12935. The binding of the latter ligand was potently inhibited by the analogous compound GBR 12909 but of the other compounds examined only L-lobeline, proadifen, haloperidol, DTG and (+)-3-PPP had IC50 values below 10 μM. The possibility that the sigma binding sites are identical with some subforms of cytochrome P-450 is discussed. (author)

  12. Development of a Tc-99m labeled sigma-2 receptor-specific ligand as a potential breast tumor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seok-Rye; Yang, Biao; Ploessl, Karl; Chumpradit, Sumalee; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Acton, Paul D.; Wheeler, Kenneth; Mach, Robert H.; Kung, Hank F.

    2001-01-01

    A novel in vivo imaging agent, 99m Tc labeled [(N-[2-((3'-N'-propyl-[3,3,1]aza-bicyclononan-3α-yl)(2''-methoxy-5- methyl-phenylcarbamate) (2-mercaptoethyl)amino)acetyl]-2-aminoethanethiolato] technetium(V) oxide), [ 99m Tc]2, displaying specific binding towards sigma-2 receptors was prepared and characterized. In vitro binding assays showed that the rhenium surrogate of [ 99m Tc]2, Re-2, displayed excellent binding affinity and selectivity towards sigma-2 receptors (K i = 2,723 and 22 nM for sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptor, respectively). Preparation of [ 99m Tc]2 was achieved by heating the S-protected starting material, 1, in the presence of acid, reducing agent (stannous glucoheptonate) and sodium [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate. The lipophilic racemic mixture was successfully prepared in 10 to 50% yield and the radiochemical purity was >98%. Separation of the isomers, peak A and peak B, was successfully achieved by using a chiralpak AD column eluted with an isocratic solvent (n-hexane/isopropanol; 3:1; v/v). The peak A and peak B appear to co-elute with the isomers of the surrogate, Re-2, under the same HPLC condition. Biodistribution studies in tumor bearing mice (mouse mammary adenocarcinoma, cell line 66, which is known to over-express sigma-2 receptors) showed that the racemic [ 99m Tc]2 localized in the tumor. Uptake in the tumor was 2.11, 1.30 and 1.11 %dose/gram at 1, 4 and 8 hr post iv injection, respectively, suggesting good uptake and retention in the tumor cells. The tumor uptake was significantly, but incompletely, blocked (about 25-30% blockage) by co-injection of 'cold' (+)pentazocine or haloperidol (1 mg/Kg). A majority of the radioactivity localized in the tumor tissue was extractable (>60%), and the HPLC analysis showed that it is the original compound, racemic [ 99m Tc]2 (>98% pure). The distribution of the purified peak A and peak B was determined in the same tumor bearing mice at 4 hr post iv injection. The tumor uptake was similar for both isomers

  13. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [123I]-4-iodo-N-(4-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-benzamide, a potential sigma receptor ligand for SPECT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staelens, L.; Dumont, F.; Oltenfreiter, R.; Slegers, G.; Vos, F. de; Goethals, I.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Sigma receptors which are expressed in the brain as well as in endocrine and immune systems have been the focus of research in the past few years due to their implicated role in psychosis. Many widely used antipsychotics interact with sigma receptors, some exhibit sigma receptor antagonism as their predominant mode of action. There is evidence that sigma receptors modulate several neuroreceptors, including dopaminergic and other catecholaminergic systems. Furthermore there are indications that a decrease of cortical sigma receptors occurs in schizophrenia. They are also present in high densities in various human and rodent cancer cell lines. In light of these findings we report the synthesis and in vivo evaluation of a 123 I-labelled selective sigma ligand. Materials and Methods: The 123 I-labelled compound was synthesized by electrophilic iododestannylation of the tributyltin derivative. For biodistribution studies 37 kBq of the 123 I-labelled compound dissolved in a mixture water/ethanol (99/1) was injected i.v. into the tail vein of NMRI mice. At various time points p.i. the mice were sacrificed and dissected. Biodistribution studies were performed until 48 hours p.i.. For blocking studies the mice were injected with cold product (1mg/kg) 10 minutes before tracer injection. Regional brain distributions were carried out in New Zealand rabbits, for this study 9,25 MBq of the 123 I-labelled compound dissolved in a mixture water/ethanol (90/10) was injected i.v. into the ear vein. At various time points up to 1 hour post injection the rabbits were sacrificed and their brain was dissected. Subsequently a regional blocking study was preformed in rabbits using the sigma ligand 1-(3-fluoropropyl)-4-(4-cyanophenoxymethyl)-piperidine (FPS)(0,5 mg/kg) which was injected 5 minutes before tracer injection. Results: Radiochemical yield was 70% ± 5%. Radiochemical purity was >95%. Biodistribution studies showed penetration through the blood brain barrier and accumulation

  14. Anti-sigma factor YlaD regulates transcriptional activity of sigma factor YlaC and sporulation via manganese-dependent redox-sensing molecular switch in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Ryu, Han-Bong; Song, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Jin-Won; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2018-05-14

    YlaD, a membrane-anchored anti-sigma factor of Bacillus subtilis , contains a HX 3 CXXC motif that functions as a redox-sensing domain and belongs to one of the zinc-coordinated anti-sigma factor families. Despite previously showing that the YlaC transcription is controlled by YlaD, experimental evidence of how the YlaC-YlaD interaction is affected by active cysteines and/or metal ions is lacking. Here, we showed that the P yla promoter is autoregulated solely by YlaC. Moreover, reduced YlaD contained zinc and iron, while oxidized YlaD did not. Cysteine substitution in YlaD led to changes in its secondary structure; Cys3 had important structural functions in YlaD, and its mutation caused dissociation from YlaC, indicating the essential requirement of a HX 3 CXXC motif for regulating interactions of YlaC with YlaD. Analyses of the far-UV CD spectrum and metal content revealed that the addition of Mn ions to Zn-YlaD changed its secondary structure and that iron was substituted for manganese. The ylaC gene expression using βGlu activity from P yla : gusA was observed at the late-exponential and early-stationary phase and the ylaC -overexpressing mutant constitutively expressed gene transcripts of clpP and sigH , an important alternative sigma factor regulated by ClpXP. Collectively, our data demonstrated that YlaD senses redox changes and elicits increase in manganese ion concentrations and that, in turn, YlaD-mediated transcriptional activity of YlaC regulates sporulation initiation under oxidative stress and manganese-substituted conditions by regulating clpP gene transcripts. This is the first report of the involvement of oxidative stress-responsive B. subtilis extracytoplasmic function sigma factors during sporulation via a manganese-dependent redox-sensing molecular switch. ©2018 The Author(s).

  15. Probing ligand binding modes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MurC ligase by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, C M; Mulakayala, Chaitanya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, Chikati; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Multi drug resistance capacity for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-Mtb) demands the profound need for developing new anti-tuberculosis drugs. The present work is on Mtb-MurC ligase, which is an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, a component of Mtb cell wall. In this paper the 3-D structure of Mtb-MurC has been constructed using the templates 1GQQ and 1P31. Structural refinement and energy minimization of the predicted Mtb-MurC ligase model has been carried out by molecular dynamics. The streochemical check failures in the energy minimized model have been evaluated through Procheck, Whatif ProSA, and Verify 3D. Further torsion angles for the side chains of amino acid residues of the developed model were determined using Predictor. Docking analysis of Mtb-MurC model with ligands and natural substrates enabled us to identify specific residues viz. Gly125, Lys126, Arg331, and Arg332, within the Mtb-MurC binding pocket to play an important role in ligand and substrate binding affinity and selectivity. The availability of Mtb-MurC ligase built model, together with insights gained from docking analysis will promote the rational design of potent and selective Mtb-MurC ligase inhibitors as antituberculosis therapeutics.

  16. Reversible Sigma C-C Bond Formation Between Phenanthroline Ligands Activated by (C5Me5)2Yb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocton, Gr& #233; gory; Lukens, Wayne W.; Booth, Corwin H.; Rozenel, Sergio S.; Medling, Scott A.; Maron, Laurent; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-06-26

    The electronic structure and associated magnetic properties of the 1,10-phenanthroline adducts of Cp*2Yb are dramatically different from those of the 2,2?-bipyridine adducts. The monomeric phenanthroline adducts are ground state triplets that are based upon trivalent Yb(III), f13, and (phen ) that are only weakly exchange coupled, which is in contrast to the bipyridine adducts whose ground states are multiconfigurational, open-shell singlets in which ytterbium is intermediate valent ( J. Am. Chem. Soc 2009, 131, 6480; J. Am. Chem. Soc 2010, 132, 17537). The origin of these different physical properties is traced to the number and symmetry of the LUMO and LUMO+1 of the heterocyclic diimine ligands. The bipy has only one 1 orbital of b1 symmetry of accessible energy, but phen has two orbitals of b1 and a2 symmetry that are energetically accessible. The carbon p-orbitals have different nodal properties and coefficients and their energies, and therefore their populations change depending on the position and number of methyl substitutions on the ring. A chemical ramification of the change in electronic structure is that Cp 2Yb(phen) is a dimer when crystallized from toluene solution, but a monomer when sublimed at 180190 C. When 3,8-Me2phenanthroline is used, the adduct Cp*2Yb(3,8-Me2phen) exists in the solution in a dimer monomer equilibrium in which G is near zero. The adducts with 3-Me, 4-Me, 5-Me, 3,8-Me2, and 5,6-Me2-phenanthroline are isolated and characterized by solid state X-ray crystallography, magnetic susceptibility and LIII-edge XANES spectroscopy as a function of temperature and variable-temperature 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a new PET ligand for the serotonin transporter: [{sup 11}C]5-bromo-2-[2-(dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)]phenylamine ([{sup 11}C]DAPA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yiyun E-mail: hh285@columbia.edu; Hwang, D.-R.; Zhu Zhihong; Bae, S.-A.; Guo Ningning; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Laruelle, Marc

    2002-10-01

    A new PET radioligand for the serotonin transporter (SERT), [{sup 11}C]-5-bromo-2-[2-(dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)]phenylamine ([{sup 11}C]DAPA (10), was synthesized and evaluated in vivo in rats and baboons. [{sup 11}C]DAPA (10) was prepared from its monomethylamino precursor 8 by reaction with high specific activity [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Radiochemical yield was 24{+-}5% based on [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide at end of bombardment (EOB, n=10) and specific activity was 1553{+-}939 Ci/mmol at end of synthesis (EOS, n=10). Binding assays indicated that [{sup 11}C]DAPA displays high affinity (Ki 1.49{+-}0.28 nM for hSERT) and good selectivity for the SERT in vitro. Biodistribution studies in rats indicated that [{sup 11}C]DAPA enters into the brain readily and localizes in brain regions known to contain high concentrations of SERT, such as the thalamus, hypothalamus, frontal cortex and striatum. Moreover, such binding in SERT-rich regions of the brain are blocked by pretreatment with either the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram and by the cold compound itself, demonstrating that [{sup 11}C]DAPA binding in the rat brain is saturable and specific to SERT. Imaging experiments in baboons indicated that [{sup 11}C]DAPA binding is consistent with the known distribution of SERT in the baboon brain, with highest levels of radioactivity detected in the midbrain and thalamus, intermediate levels in the hippocampus and striatum, and lower levels in the cortical regions. Pretreatment of the baboon with citalopram 10 min before radioactivity injection blocked the binding of [{sup 11}C]DAPA in all brain regions that contain SERT. Kinetic analysis revealed that, in all brain regions examined, [{sup 11}C]DAPA specific to nonspecific distribution volume ratios (V{sub 3}'') are higher than [{sup 11}C](+)-McN 5652 and similar to [{sup 11}C]DASB. In summary, [{sup 11}C]DAPA appears to be a promising radioligand suitable for the visualization of SERT

  18. Pion--nucleon sigma-commutator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.; Cammarata, J.B.

    1977-07-01

    The reasons for the large discrepancies in the magnitude of the πN sigma-commutator, sigma(πN), obtained by several authors are discussed using dynamic theory of the πN scattering amplitude. With sigma(πN) approximately 25 MeV this theory reproduces reasonably well both the experimental S-wave phase shifts at low energies and the amplitudes C approximately/sup(+)/(ν=0,t less than or equal to 0) determined by Langbein. In the method of Cheng and Dashen the value of sigma(πN) is obtained from these amplitudes by extrapolation to t = 2m 2 /sub π/. A study of the experimental D-wave ''scattering lengths'' implies that the coefficient of the term quadratic in t in the Hoehler expansion of C approximately/sup(+)/(0,t) is negative. Adding such a term to the results of the S-wave theory will tend to improve the agreement for C approximately/sup (+)/(0,t less than or equal to 0). These results suggest that the large ''world value'' sigma(πN) = 65 +- 5 MeV obtained using the Cheng-Dashen method is a consequence of errors in the extrapolation of amplitudes to the unphysical point ν = 0, t = 2m 2 /sub π/. Only the smaller value sigma(πN) approximately 25 MeV appears to be consistent with the experimental data and theoretical constraints

  19. Differential labeling of dopamine and sigma sites by [3H]nemonapride and [3H]raclopride in postmortem human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S W; Helmeste, D M; Fang, H; Li, M; Vu, R; Bunney, W; Potkin, S; Jones, E G

    1997-08-08

    The difference between the binding of [3H]nemonapride and [3H]raclopride has been used to quantify dopamine D4 receptors in postmortem schizophrenic brain studies. Recent work, however, has suggested that at least part of the differential between [3H]nemonapride and [3H]raclopride binding may represent sigma rather than D4 receptor sites. We applied the nemonapride-raclopride subtraction method to postmortem, non-schizophrenic human striatum to examine the variation in dopaminergic receptor binding labeled by these ligands. Variation in sigma receptor binding labeled by [3H]nemonapride was studied in frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum. Specific binding was defined by sulpiride (dopamine receptor ligand), PPAP (sigma receptor ligand) and haloperidol (mixed dopaminergic/sigma agent), respectively. Haloperidol defined a combination of sites, which were approximately the sum of the dopaminergic and sigma components defined by sulpiride and PPAP, respectively. Significant inter-individual variation in the amount of specific binding for dopaminergic and sigma receptor sites was observed. However, no significant nor consistent observation of striatal dopamine D4 receptors or D4-like binding sites was observed in the striatum even though two independent sets of tissues, with different dissections were used. The inconsistencies in some previous postmortem studies appear to be at least partially explained by the inclusion of both sigma and dopaminergic components in [3H]nemonapride binding and the inherent high inter-individual variability of the different components.

  20. Evaluation of radioiodinated vesamicol analogs for sigma receptor imaging in tumor and radionuclide receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Akhter, Nasima; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Washiyama, Kohshin; Kinuya, Seigo; Kawai, Keiichi; Mori, Hirofumi

    2009-11-01

    It has been reported that sigma receptors are highly expressed in a variety of human tumors. In this study, we selected (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino] cyclohexanol [(+)-pIV] as a sigma receptor ligand and evaluated the potential of radioiodinated (+)-pIV for tumor imaging and therapy. (+)-[(125/131)I]pIV was prepared by an iododestannylation reaction under no-carrier-added conditions with radiochemical purity over 99% after HPLC purification. Biodistribution experiments were performed by the intravenous injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV into mice bearing human prostate tumors (DU-145). Blocking studies were performed by intravenous injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV mixed with an excess amount of unlabeled sigma ligand into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. For therapeutic study, (+)-[(131)I]pIV was injected at a dose of 7.4 MBq followed by measurement of the tumor size. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[(125)I]pIV showed high uptake and long residence in the tumor. High tumor to blood and muscle ratios were achieved because the radioactivity levels of blood and muscle were low. However, the accumulations of radioactivity in non-target tissues, such as liver and kidney, were high. The radioactivity in the non-target tissues slowly decreased over time. Co-injection of (+)-[(125)I]pIV with an excess amount of unlabeled sigma ligand resulted in a significant decrease in the tumor/blood ratio, indicating sigma receptor-mediated tumor uptake. In therapeutic study, tumor growth in mice treated with (+)-[(131)I]pIV was significantly inhibited compared to that of an untreated group. These results indicate that radioiodinated (+)-pIV has a high potential for sigma receptor imaging in tumor and radionuclide receptor therapy.

  1. Thermal isomerizations of ketenimines to nitriles: evaluations of sigma-Dot (sigma(*)) constants for spin-delocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim; Zhu; Lee

    2000-05-19

    Rate constants (k(Y)) of the isomerizations of 11 diphenyl N-(substituted benzyl) ketenimines were measured at 40, 50, 60, and 70 degrees C. Activation parameters DeltaH()(Y) and DeltaS()(Y) were obtained using the Eyring equation. The relative rates (k(Y)/k(H)) were fitted into Hammett single correlations (log k(Y)/k(H) = rhosigma and log k(Y)/k(H) = rho(*)sigma(*)). The single correlations have been compared with Hammett dual correlations (log k(Y)/k(H) = rhosigma + rho(*)sigma(*) ). Separate treatments of para and meta substituents yielded even better correlations. Para substituents control the rates through spin-delocalizations and inductive effects. The former outweighs the latter when the latter exerts a modest but distinct influence on the rates. On the other hand, inductive effects are the "major" or the sole interactions triggered by meta substituents.

  2. Synthesis of [11C]PBR170, a novel imidazopyridine, for imaging the translocator protein with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdier, Thomas; Henderson, David; Fookes, Christopher J.R.; Lam, Peter; Mattner, Filomena; Fulham, Michael; Katsifis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO) ligand 2-(6,8-dichloro-2-(4-ethoxyphenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl) –N-(2-fluoropyridin-3-yl)–N-methylacetamide (PBR170), is a novel imidazopyridineacetamide with high affinity (2.6 nm) and selectivity for the TSPO. The synthesis of [ 11 C]PBR170 was accomplished by N-methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide in the presence of sodium hydroxide in dimethylformamide. [ 11 C]PBR170 was produced in 30–45% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected, based on [ 11 C]methyl iodide) with a radiochemical purity >98% and a specific activity of 90–190 GBq/μmol after 35 min of synthesis time. - Highlights: • Radiosynthesis of a novel ligand PBR170 with carbon-11. • 30–45% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected, based on [ 11 C]methyl iodide). • Radiosynthesis and formulation achieved in 35 min. • High radiochemical purity (>98%) and specific activity (90–190 GBq/µmol). • High affinity and selectivity for the translocator protein (TSPO)

  3. Study of Sigma /sup +or-/(1385) inclusive production in K/sup -/p interactions at 42 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro, F; Blokzijl, R; Engelen, J J; Ganguli, S N; Gavillet, P; Hemingway, R J; Kittel, E W; Kluyver, J C; Shephard, W D; Wolters, G F

    1977-01-01

    Properties of Sigma /sup +or-/(1385) inclusively produced in 4.2 GeV/c K/sup -/p interactions are studied. Inclusive cross sections are presented together with differential cross sections as functions of x and p/sub t//sup 2/ for both Sigma /sup +/(1385) and Sigma /sup - /(1385). The complete density matrix for Sigma /sup +/(1385) production at small momentum transfer is studied as a function of t and of recoil mass MM/sup 2/. Substantial agreement with the predictions of the additive quark model is found. The Sigma /sup + /(1385) production in the target fragmentation region is studied in the framework of the triple-Regge model. (17 refs).

  4. Ligand-controlled, tunable silver-catalyzed C-H amination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Juliet M; Phelps, Alicia M; Scamp, Ryan J; Dolan, Nicholas S; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2014-12-03

    The development of readily tunable and regioselective C-H functionalization reactions that operate solely through catalyst control remains a challenge in modern organic synthesis. Herein, we report that simple silver catalysts supported by common nitrogenated ligands can be used to tune a nitrene transfer reaction between two different types of C-H bonds. The results reported herein represent the first example of ligand-controlled and site-selective silver-promoted C-H amination.

  5. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2017-01-01

    with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. Results In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h...... and remained stable. The 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV uptake displayed progressive increase, and at 120–144 h was nearly at the FDG level. Moderate 11C-donepezil and slightly lower 18F-FEOBV uptake were seen in pig abscesses. PCR analyses suggested that the 11C-donepezil signal in inflammatory cells is derived...... from both acetylcholinesterase and sigma-1 receptors. In humans, very high 11C-donepezil uptake was seen in a lobar pneumonia and in peri-tumoral inflammation surrounding a non-small cell lung carcinoma, markedly superseding the 18F-FDG uptake in the inflammation. In a renal clear cell carcinoma no 11C...

  6. Rapid solid-phase extraction method to quantify [11C]-verapamil, and its [11C]-metabolites, in human and macaque plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Chung, Francisco; Sasongko, Lucy; Whittington, Dale; Eyal, Sara; Mankoff, David; Collier, Ann C.; Muzi, Mark; Link, Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter, is a significant barrier to drug entry into the brain and the fetus. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, [ 11 C]-verapamil, has been used to measure in vivo P-gp activity at various tissue-blood barriers of humans and animals. Since verapamil is extensively metabolized in vivo, it is important to quantify the extent of verapamil metabolism in order to interpret such P-gp activity. Therefore, we developed a rapid solid-phase extraction (SPE) method to separate, and then quantify, verapamil and its radiolabeled metabolites in plasma. Methods: Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we established that the major identifiable circulating radioactive metabolite of [ 11 C]-verapamil in plasma of humans and the nonhuman primate, Macaca nemestrina, was [ 11 C]-D-617/717. Using sequential and differential pH elution on C 8 SPE cartridges, we developed a rapid method to separate [ 11 C]-verapamil and [ 11 C]-D-617/717. Recovery was measured by spiking the samples with the corresponding nonradioactive compounds and assaying these compounds by HPLC. Results: Verapamil and D-617/717 recovery with the SPE method was >85%. When the method was applied to PET studies in humans and nonhuman primates, significant plasma concentration of D-617/717 and unknown polar metabolite(s) were observed. The SPE and the HPLC methods were not significantly different in the quantification of verapamil and D-617/717. Conclusions: The SPE method simultaneously processes multiple samples in less than 5 min. Given the short half-life of [ 11 C], this method provides a valuable tool to rapidly determine the concentration of [ 11 C]-verapamil and its [ 11 C]-metabolites in human and nonhuman primate plasma

  7. [11C]PR04.MZ, a promising DAT ligand for low concentration imaging: synthesis, efficient 11C-O-methylation and initial small animal PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riss, P.J.; Hooker, J.; Alexoff, D.; Kim, Sung-Won; Fowler, J.S.; Roesch, F.

    2009-01-01

    PR04.MZ was designed as a highly selective dopamine transporter inhibitor, derived from natural cocaine. Its binding profile indicates that [ 11 C]PR04.MZ may be suited as a PET radioligand for the non-invasive exploration of striatal and extrastriatal DAT populations. As a key feature, its structural design facilitates both, labelling with fluorine-18 at its terminally fluorinated butynyl moiety and carbon-11 at its methyl ester function. The present report concerns the efficient [ 11 C]MeI mediated synthesis of [ 11 C]PR04.MZ from an O-desmethyl precursor trifluoroacetic acid salt with Rb 2 CO 3 in DMF in up to 95 ± 5% labelling yield. A preliminary μPET-experiment demonstrates the reversible, highly specific binding of [ 11 C]PR04.MZ in the brain of a male Sprague-Dawley rat.

  8. In vivo evaluation of [11C]-3-[2-[(3-methoxyphenylamino)carbonyl]ethenyl]-4,6-dichloroindole- 2-carboxylic acid ([11C]3MPICA) as a PET radiotracer for the glycine site of the NMDA ion channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterhouse, Rikki N.; Sultana, Abida; Laruelle, M.

    2002-01-01

    Alterations in normal NMDA receptor composition, densities and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of certain neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Chorea, schizophrenia, alcoholism and stroke. In our first effort to provide PET ligands for the NMDA/glycine site, we reported the synthesis of a novel high affinity glycine site ligand, 3-[2-[(3-methoxyphenylamino)carbonyl]ethenyl]-4,6-dichloroindole-2 -carboxylic acid ((3MPICA), Ki=4.8±0.9 nM) and the corresponding carbon-11 labeled PET ligand, [ 11 C]3MPICA. We report here the in vivo evaluation of [ 11 C]3MPICA in rats. Biodistribution analysis revealed that [ 11 C]3MPICA exhibited low degree of brain penetration and high blood concentration. The average uptake at two minutes was highest in the cerebellum (0.19±0.04 %ID/g) and thalamus (0.18±0.05 %ID/g) and lower in the hippocampus (0.13±0.03) and frontal cortex (0.11±0.04 %ID/g). The radioactivity cleared quickly from all brain regions examined. Administration of unlabeled 3MPICA (1 mg/kg, i.v.) revealed at 60 minutes a small general reduction in regional brain radioactivity concentrations in treated animals versus controls, however, the blood radioactivity concentration was also lowered, confounding the assessment of the degree of saturable binding. Warfarin co-administration (100 mg/kg, i.v.) significantly lowered blood activity at 5 minutes post-injection (-27%, P 11 C]3MPICA does not appear to be a promising PET radiotracer for in vivo use

  9. Kinetic analysis of [11C]befloxatone in the human brain, a selective radioligand to image monoamine oxidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Leroy, Claire; Roumenov, Dimitri; Trichard, Christian; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Bottlaender, Michel

    2013-11-25

    [11C]Befloxatone measures the density of the enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) in the brain. MAO-A is responsible for the degradation of different neurotransmitters and is implicated in several neurologic and psychiatric illnesses. This study sought to estimate the distribution volume (VT) values of [11C]befloxatone in humans using an arterial input function. Seven healthy volunteers were imaged with positron emission tomography (PET) after [11C]befloxatone injection. Kinetic analysis was performed using an arterial input function in association with compartmental modeling and with the Logan plot, multilinear analysis (MA1), and standard spectral analysis (SA) at both the regional and voxel level. Arterialized venous samples were drawn as an alternative and less invasive input function. An unconstrained two-compartment model reliably quantified VT values in large brain regions. A constrained model did not significantly improve VT identifiability. Similar VT results were obtained using SA; however, the Logan plot and MA1 slightly underestimated VT values (about -10%). At the voxel level, SA showed a very small bias (+2%) compared to compartmental modeling, Logan severely underestimated VT values, and voxel-wise images obtained with MA1 were too noisy to be reliably quantified. Arterialized venous blood samples did not provide a satisfactory alternative input function as the Logan-VT regional values were not comparable to those obtained with arterial sampling in all subjects. Binding of [11C]befloxatone to MAO-A can be quantified using an arterial input function and a two-compartment model or, in parametric images, with SA.

  10. Carbon-11-labelling of a novel, trishomocubane-derived, high affinity and selectivity DAT ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, F.; Le Helleix, St.; Peyronneau, M.A.; Saba, W.; Tournier, N.; Valette, H.; Banister, S.; Kassiou, M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Objectives: Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder and drug abuse are related to abnormalities within the brain's dopaminergic system. The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a key role in regulating the synaptic concentration of dopamine and thus dopamine neurotransmission in the brain. Since the DAT can be considered as a marker of the integrity and number of the presynaptic striatal dopamine-producing neurons, considerable efforts have been spent in recent years on the design and development of DAT-selective radioligands for use in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies. Notably, the tropane PE2I and its fluorinated analogue LBT-999 were identified as having high affinity and selectivity for the DAT over the norepinephrine transporter (NET) and the serotonin transporter (SERT). Besides tropanes, only a few bicyclic frameworks, e.g. bicyclo[2.2.2]octanes, have delivered compounds with high affinity for the DAT. Recently, novel poly-carbocyclic DAT ligands with selectivity over the NET and the SERT were reported. The lead compound of this series (1, N-methyl-N-(3-fluoro) benzyl-pentacyclo[5.4.0.0 2, 6 .0 3, 10 .0 5, 9 ] undec-8-ylamine, Ki = 1.2 nM, ≥ 8300-fold selectivity over NET and SERT) was selected as a potential candidate for imaging the DAT with PET and isotopically labelled with carbon-11 using [ 11 C]methyl triflate. Methods: The trishomocubane derivatives 1 (reference) and 2 (precursor for labelling with carbon-11) were prepared from commercially available Cookson's diketone in 6 and 7 steps, respectively. Carbon-11 labelling of 1 was performed using a TRACERLab FX-C Pro synthesizer (GEMS) and comprises (1) trapping at -10 C of [ 11 C]MeOTf in acetone (0.4 mL) containing the nor-derivative 2 (0.6-0.9 mg, free base) and aq. 3N NaOH (8 μL); (2) heating at 110 C for 2 min; (3) concentration to dryness and taking up the residue in 1.0 mL of the HPLC mobile phase; (4) purification

  11. Opiate receptors in idiopathic generalised epilepsy measured with [11C]diprenorphine and positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevett, M C; Cunningham, V J; Brooks, D J; Fish, D R; Duncan, J S

    1994-09-01

    The neurochemical basis of absence seizures is uncertain. A previous PET study has provided evidence for release of endogenous opioids from cerebral cortex at the time of absence seizures, but it is has not yet been established whether there is an abnormality of opiate receptor numbers interictally. In the present study, the non-specific opiate receptor ligand, [11C]diprenorphine, was used to measure cerebral opiate receptors interictally in patients with childhood and juvenile absence epilepsy. Eight patients and eight normal controls had a single scan after a high specific activity injection of [11C]diprenorphine. The cerebral volume of distribution (Vd) of [11C]diprenorphine relative to plasma was calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis. There were no significant differences in [11C]diprenorphine Vd between patients and control subjects in either cortex or thalamus, structures thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of absence seizures. The results suggest that there is no overall abnormality of opioid receptors in patients with childhood and juvenile absence epilepsy. Studies with specific ligands may provide information about the different receptor subtypes.

  12. Quantification of human opiate receptor concentration and affinity using high and low specific activity ( sup 11 C)diprenorphine and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadzot, B.; Price, J.C.; Mayberg, H.S.; Douglass, K.H.; Dannals, R.F.; Lever, J.R.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Feldman, M.A. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    (11C)Diprenorphine, a weak partial opiate agonist, and positron emission tomography were used to obtain noninvasive regional estimates of opiate receptor concentration (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) in human brain. Different compartmental models and fitting strategies were compared statistically to establish the most reliable method of parameter estimation. Paired studies were performed in six normal subjects using high (769-5,920 Ci/mmol) and low (27-80 Ci/mmol) specific activity (SA) (11C)diprenorphine. Two subjects were studied a third time using high SA (11C)diprenorphine after a pretreatment with 1-1.5 mg/kg of the opiate antagonist naloxone. After the plasma radioactivity was corrected for metabolites, the brain data were analyzed using a three-compartment model and nonlinear least-squares curve fitting. Linear differential equations were used to describe the high SA (low receptor occupancy) kinetics. The k3/k4 ratio varied from 1.0 +/- 0.2 (occipital cortex) to 8.6 +/- 1.6 (thalamus). Nonlinear differential equations were used to describe the low SA (high receptor occupancy) kinetics and the curve fits provided the konf2 product. The measured free fraction of (11C)diprenorphine in plasma (f1) was 0.30 +/- 0.03, the average K1/k2 ratio from the two naloxone studies was 1.1 +/- 0.2, and the calculated free fraction of (11C)diprenorphine in the brain (f2) was 0.3. Using the paired SA studies, the estimated kinetic parameters, and f2, separate estimates of Bmax and Kd were obtained. Bmax varied from 2.3 +/- 0.5 (occipital cortex) to 20.6 +/- 7.3 (cingulate cortex) nM. The average Kd (eight brain regions) was 0.85 +/- 0.17 nM.

  13. In vivo evaluation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists [11C]A-582941 and [11C]A-844606 in mice and conscious monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Toyohara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play an important role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate the two carbon-11-labeled alpha7 nAChR agonists [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 for their potential as novel positron emission tomography (PET tracers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The two tracers were synthesized by methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors using [(11C]methyl triflate. Effects of receptor blockade in mice were determined by coinjection of either tracer along with a carrier or an excess amount of a selective alpha7 nAChR agonist (SSR180711. Metabolic stability was investigated using radio-HPLC. Dynamic PET scans were performed in conscious monkeys with/without SSR180711-treatment. [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 showed high uptake in the mouse brain. Most radioactive compounds in the brain were detected as an unchanged form. However, regional selectivity and selective receptor blockade were not clearly observed for either compound in the mouse brain. On the other hand, the total distribution volume of [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 was high in the hippocampus and thalamus but low in the cerebellum in the conscious monkey brain, and reduced by pretreatment with SSR180711. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A nonhuman primate study suggests that [(11C]A-582941 and [(11C]A-844606 would be potential PET ligands for imaging alpha7 nAChRs in the human brain.

  14. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of N-[11C]methylated imidazopyridineacetamides as PET tracers for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimata, Katsuhiko; Hatano, Kentaro; Ogawa, Mikako; Abe, Junichiro; Magata, Yasuhiro; Biggio, Giovanni; Serra, Mariangela; Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Latrofa, Andrea; Trapani, Giuseppe; Liso, Gaetano; Ito, Kengo

    2008-01-01

    Imidazopyridineacetoamide 5-8, a series of novel and potentially selective peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands with affinities comparable to those of known PBR ligands, was investigated. Radiosyntheses of [ 11 C]5, 6, 7 or 8 was accomplished by N-methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors with [ 11 C]methyl iodide in the presence of NaH in dimethylformamide (DMF), resulting in 25% to 77% radiochemical yield and specific activitiy of 20 to 150 MBq/nmol. Each of the labeled compounds was injected in ddY mice, and the radioactivity and weight of dissected peripheral organs and brain regions were measured. Organ distribution of [ 11 C]7 was consistent with the known PBR distribution. Moreover, [ 11 C]7 showed the best combination of brain uptake and PBR binding, leading to its high retention in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum, areas where PBR density is high in mouse brain. Coinjection of PK11195 or unlabeled 7 significantly reduced the brain uptake of [ 11 C]7. These results suggest that [ 11 C]7 could be a useful radioligand for positron emission tomography imaging of PBRs

  15. Caffeine-11C, ephedrine-11C and methylephedrine-11C: synthesis and distribution in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Hideo; Ido, Tatsuo; Iwata, Ren; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Tamate, Kazuhiko

    1978-01-01

    Caffeine, ephedrine and methylephedrine were labeled with carbon-11 by the action of methyliodide- 11 C on theophylline, norephedrine and ephedrine, respectively. Caffeine- 11 C was prepared in 44 min. with a radiochemical yield of 40%, ephedrine- 11 C in 45 min. with a 11% radiochemical yield and methylephedrine- 11 C in 36 min. with a 43% radiochemical yield. When injected in mice intravenously, these products show a high uptake in the liver, the kidney and the blood for caffeine- 11 C and in the liver and the kidney for ephedrine- 11 C and methylephedrine- 11 C. The brain uptake for these products was found to be 2.4 to 3.9% of the injected dose per gram at 5 min. after injection. These studies in mice have demonstrated that these products are potentially useful agents for the dynamic studies of the brain. (auth.)

  16. Narrow Sigma -hypernuclear states

    CERN Document Server

    Gal, A

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the spin-isospin dependence of low-energy Sigma N to Lambda N conversion leads to substantial quenching of nuclear-matter estimates of the widths of some Sigma -hypernuclear states produced in (K/sup -/, pi ) reactions, to a level below 10 MeV. The estimated widths compare favorably with those of the Sigma -hypernuclear peaks recently observed at CERN for /sup 7/Li, /sup 9/Be, and /sup 12/C. Tentative quantum number assignments are suggested for these states. (10 refs).

  17. Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions; Annual technical report, August 1, 1992--August 1, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysz, J.A.

    1993-08-10

    Achievements are reported for the following 4 areas: {pi}/{sigma} equillibria in aldehyde and ketone complexes; thermodynamic ligand binding affinities ({alpha},{beta} unsaturated organic carbonyl compounds); (a new form of coordinated carbon) an unsupported C{sub 3} chain that spans two different transition metals; and (a new form of coordinated carbon) an C{sub 3} chain that is anchored by a metal on each end and spanned by a third.

  18. In vivo evaluation of carbon-11-labelled non-sarcosine-based glycine transporter 1 inhibitors in mice and conscious monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, Jun; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Sakata, Muneyuki; Wu, Jin; Nishiyama, Shingo; Tsukada, Hideo; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT-1) is an attractive target in positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Here, we report the in vivo evaluation of three carbon-11-labelled non-sarcosine-type GlyT-1 inhibitors - [ 11 C]SA1, [ 11 C]SA2 and [ 11 C]SA3 - as novel PET tracers for GlyT-1. Methods: The regional brain distributions of the three compounds in mice were studied at baseline and under receptor-blockade conditions with co-injection of carrier loading or pretreatment with an excess of selective GlyT-1 inhibitors (ALX-5407 and SSR504734). Metabolic stability was investigated by radio high-performance liquid chromatography. Dynamic PET scans in conscious monkeys were performed with/without selective GlyT-1 inhibitors. Results: The IC 50 values of SA1, SA2 and SA3 were 9.0, 6400 and 39.7 nM, respectively. The regional brain uptakes of [ 11 C]SA1 and [ 11 C]SA3 in mice were heterogeneous and consistent with the known distribution of GlyT-1. [ 11 C]SA2 showed low and homogeneous uptake in the brain. Most radioactivity in the brain was detected in unchanged form, although peripherally these compounds were degraded. Carrier loading decreased the uptake of [ 11 C]SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. However, similar reductions were not observed with [ 11 C]SA3. Pretreatment with ALX-5407 decreased the uptake of [ 11 C]SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. In the monkey at baseline, regional brain uptake of [ 11 C]SA1 was heterogeneous and consistent with the known GlyT-1 distribution. Pretreatment with selective GlyT-1 inhibitors significantly decreased the distribution volume ratio of [ 11 C] SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. Conclusions: [ 11 C]SA1 has the most suitable profile among the three carbon-11-labelled GlyT-1 inhibitors. Lead optimization of [ 11 C]SA1 structure will be required to achieve in vivo selective GlyT-1 imaging.

  19. A simple, versatile, low-cost and remotely operated apparatus for [11C]acetate, [11C]choline, [11C]methionine and [11C]PIB synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung Manki; Ho Chilai

    2009-01-01

    A simple, efficient and remotely operated synthesis apparatus for carrying out routine [ 11 C]carboxylation, on-column and bubbling [ 11 C]methylation was essential for reliable, day-to-day production of [ 11 C]-labelled PET radiopharmaceuticals. We developed an in-house apparatus specifically applied to the synthesis of [ 11 C]acetate, [ 11 C]choline, [ 11 C]methionine and 2-(4'-N-[ 11 C]methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole ([ 11 C]PIB), where high radiochemical purity (≥97%) and moderate radiochemical yields (18% for [ 11 C]PIB, 41-55% for the others) could be achieved. These findings provided evidence that this was a fast, versatile and reliable apparatus suitable for a PET/CT centre with limited financial budget and hot cell space for synthesis of [ 11 C]-labelled radiopharmaceuticals

  20. Cocaine Effects on Dopaminergic Transmission Depend on a Balance between Sigma-1 and Sigma-2 Receptor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaga, David; Medrano, Mireia; Vega-Quiroga, Ignacio; Gysling, Katia; Canela, Enric I; Navarro, Gemma; Franco, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Sigma σ 1 and σ 2 receptors are targets of cocaine. Despite sharing a similar name, the two receptors are structurally unrelated and their physiological role is unknown. Cocaine increases the level of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in CNS motor control and reward areas. While the drug also affects dopaminergic signaling by allosteric modulations exerted by σ 1 R interacting with dopamine D 1 and D 2 receptors, the potential regulation of dopaminergic transmission by σ 2 R is also unknown. We here demonstrate that σ 2 R may form heteroreceptor complexes with D 1 but not with D 2 receptors. Remarkably σ 1 , σ 2 , and D 1 receptors may form heterotrimers with particular signaling properties. Determination of cAMP levels, MAP kinase activation and label-free assays demonstrate allosteric interactions within the trimer. Importantly, the presence of σ 2 R induces bias in signal transduction as σ 2 R ligands increase cAMP signaling whereas reduce MAP kinase activation. These effects, which are opposite to those exerted via σ 1 R, suggest that the D 1 receptor-mediated signaling depends on the degree of trimer formation and the differential balance of sigma receptor and heteroreceptor expression in acute versus chronic cocaine consumption. Although the physiological role is unknown, the heteroreceptor complex formed by σ 1 , σ 2 , and D 1 receptors arise as relevant to convey the cocaine actions on motor control and reward circuits and as a key factor in acquisition of the addictive habit.

  1. Cocaine Effects on Dopaminergic Transmission Depend on a Balance between Sigma-1 and Sigma-2 Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aguinaga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sigma σ1 and σ2 receptors are targets of cocaine. Despite sharing a similar name, the two receptors are structurally unrelated and their physiological role is unknown. Cocaine increases the level of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in CNS motor control and reward areas. While the drug also affects dopaminergic signaling by allosteric modulations exerted by σ1R interacting with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, the potential regulation of dopaminergic transmission by σ2R is also unknown. We here demonstrate that σ2R may form heteroreceptor complexes with D1 but not with D2 receptors. Remarkably σ1, σ2, and D1 receptors may form heterotrimers with particular signaling properties. Determination of cAMP levels, MAP kinase activation and label-free assays demonstrate allosteric interactions within the trimer. Importantly, the presence of σ2R induces bias in signal transduction as σ2R ligands increase cAMP signaling whereas reduce MAP kinase activation. These effects, which are opposite to those exerted via σ1R, suggest that the D1 receptor-mediated signaling depends on the degree of trimer formation and the differential balance of sigma receptor and heteroreceptor expression in acute versus chronic cocaine consumption. Although the physiological role is unknown, the heteroreceptor complex formed by σ1, σ2, and D1 receptors arise as relevant to convey the cocaine actions on motor control and reward circuits and as a key factor in acquisition of the addictive habit.

  2. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using [ 3 H] 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: μ, [D-ala 2 , mePhe 4 , gly-ol 5 ] enkephalin (DAMGE); κ, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; δ, [D-pen 2 , D-pen 5 ] enkephalin (DPDPE) or [D-ala 2 , D-leu 5 ] enkephalin (DADLE) with μ suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. κ opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed

  3. Interaction of sigma factor sigmaN with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase core enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Ferguson, A L; Gallegos, M T; Pitt, M; Buck, M; Hoggett, J G

    2000-12-01

    The equilibrium binding and kinetics of assembly of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) sigma(N)-holoenzyme has been investigated using biosynthetically labelled 7-azatryptophyl- (7AW)sigma(N). The spectroscopic properties of such 7AW proteins allows their absorbance and fluorescence to be monitored selectively, even in the presence of high concentrations of other tryptophan-containing proteins. The 7AWsigma(N) retained its biological activity in stimulating transcription from sigma(N)-specific promoters, and in in vitro gel electrophoresis assays of binding to core RNAP from Escherichia coli. Furthermore, five Trp-->Ala single mutants of sigma(N) were shown to support growth under conditions of nitrogen limitation, and showed comparable efficiency in activating the sigma(N)-dependent nifH promoter in vivo, indicating that none of the tryptophan residues were essential for activity. The equilibrium binding of 7AWsigma(N) to core RNAP was examined by analytical ultracentrifugation. In sedimentation equilibrium experiments, absorbance data at 315 nm (which reports selectively on the distribution of free and bound 7AWsigma(N)) established that a 1:1 complex was formed, with a dissociation constant lower than 2 microM. The kinetics of the interaction between 7AWsigma(N) and core RNAP was investigated using stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry. A biphasic decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed when samples were excited at 280 nm, whereas only the slower of the two phases was observed at 315 nm. The kinetic data were analysed in terms of a mechanism in which a fast bimolecular association of sigma(N) with core RNAP is followed by a relatively slow isomerization step. The consequences of these findings on the competition between sigma(N) and the major sigma factor, sigma(70), in Escherichia coli are discussed.

  4. Rapid solid-phase extraction method to quantify [{sup 11}C]-verapamil, and its [{sup 11}C]-metabolites, in human and macaque plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unadkat, Jashvant D. [Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Box 357610, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)], E-mail: jash@u.washington.edu; Chung, Francisco; Sasongko, Lucy; Whittington, Dale; Eyal, Sara [Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, Box 357610, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Mankoff, David [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Collier, Ann C. [Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Box 359929, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Muzi, Mark; Link, Jeanne [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Introduction: P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux transporter, is a significant barrier to drug entry into the brain and the fetus. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, [{sup 11}C]-verapamil, has been used to measure in vivo P-gp activity at various tissue-blood barriers of humans and animals. Since verapamil is extensively metabolized in vivo, it is important to quantify the extent of verapamil metabolism in order to interpret such P-gp activity. Therefore, we developed a rapid solid-phase extraction (SPE) method to separate, and then quantify, verapamil and its radiolabeled metabolites in plasma. Methods: Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we established that the major identifiable circulating radioactive metabolite of [{sup 11}C]-verapamil in plasma of humans and the nonhuman primate, Macaca nemestrina, was [{sup 11}C]-D-617/717. Using sequential and differential pH elution on C{sub 8} SPE cartridges, we developed a rapid method to separate [{sup 11}C]-verapamil and [{sup 11}C]-D-617/717. Recovery was measured by spiking the samples with the corresponding nonradioactive compounds and assaying these compounds by HPLC. Results: Verapamil and D-617/717 recovery with the SPE method was >85%. When the method was applied to PET studies in humans and nonhuman primates, significant plasma concentration of D-617/717 and unknown polar metabolite(s) were observed. The SPE and the HPLC methods were not significantly different in the quantification of verapamil and D-617/717. Conclusions: The SPE method simultaneously processes multiple samples in less than 5 min. Given the short half-life of [{sup 11}C], this method provides a valuable tool to rapidly determine the concentration of [{sup 11}C]-verapamil and its [{sup 11}C]-metabolites in human and nonhuman primate plasma.

  5. Triosmium cluster compounds containing isocyanide and hydride ligands. Crystal and molecular structure of (μ-H)(μ-eta1-C==N(H)(t-C4H9))Os3(CO)10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.D.; Golembeski, N.M.

    1979-01-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the compound (μ-H)(μ-eta 1 -C==N(H)(t-C 4 H 9 ))Os 3 (CO) 10 has been determined by X-ray crystallographic methods. The compound crystallizes in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P2 1 /n[C/sub 2h/ 5 ]:a = 13.651 (4) A, b = 9.156 (4) A, c = 18.275 (5) A, β = 111.42 (2) 0 , V = 2126.3 (25) A 3 , Z = 4, rho/sub calcd/ = 2.92 g cm -3 . A uniform triangular cluster of three osmium atoms contains ten linear carbonyl groups and a μ-eta 1 -C==N(H)(t-C 4 H 9 ) iminyl ligand. The carbon atom of the iminyl ligand symmetrically bridges one osmium-osmium bond, as is shown by the internuclear separations Os(2)-C(11) = 2.066 (8) A and Os(3)-C(11) = 2.043 (8) A. The iminyl bond, C(11)-N, is double with the C-N distance being 1.298 (10) A

  6. In vivo evaluation of carbon-11-labelled non-sarcosine-based glycine transporter 1 inhibitors in mice and conscious monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyohara, Jun [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan 260-8670 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan 173-0022 (Japan); Ishiwata, Kiichi; Sakata, Muneyuki [Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo, Japan 173-0022 (Japan); Wu, Jin [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan 260-8670 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shingo; Tsukada, Hideo [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Shizuoka, Japan 434-8601 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kenji, E-mail: hashimoto@faculty.chiba-u.j [Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan 260-8670 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Introduction: Glycine transporter 1 (GlyT-1) is an attractive target in positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Here, we report the in vivo evaluation of three carbon-11-labelled non-sarcosine-type GlyT-1 inhibitors - [{sup 11}C]SA1, [{sup 11}C]SA2 and [{sup 11}C]SA3 - as novel PET tracers for GlyT-1. Methods: The regional brain distributions of the three compounds in mice were studied at baseline and under receptor-blockade conditions with co-injection of carrier loading or pretreatment with an excess of selective GlyT-1 inhibitors (ALX-5407 and SSR504734). Metabolic stability was investigated by radio high-performance liquid chromatography. Dynamic PET scans in conscious monkeys were performed with/without selective GlyT-1 inhibitors. Results: The IC{sub 50} values of SA1, SA2 and SA3 were 9.0, 6400 and 39.7 nM, respectively. The regional brain uptakes of [{sup 11}C]SA1 and [{sup 11}C]SA3 in mice were heterogeneous and consistent with the known distribution of GlyT-1. [{sup 11}C]SA2 showed low and homogeneous uptake in the brain. Most radioactivity in the brain was detected in unchanged form, although peripherally these compounds were degraded. Carrier loading decreased the uptake of [{sup 11}C]SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. However, similar reductions were not observed with [{sup 11}C]SA3. Pretreatment with ALX-5407 decreased the uptake of [{sup 11}C]SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. In the monkey at baseline, regional brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]SA1 was heterogeneous and consistent with the known GlyT-1 distribution. Pretreatment with selective GlyT-1 inhibitors significantly decreased the distribution volume ratio of [{sup 11}C] SA1 in GlyT-1-rich regions. Conclusions: [{sup 11}C]SA1 has the most suitable profile among the three carbon-11-labelled GlyT-1 inhibitors. Lead optimization of [{sup 11}C]SA1 structure will be required to achieve in vivo selective GlyT-1 imaging.

  7. Biodistribution and metabolism of the anti-influenza drug [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and its active metabolite [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802 in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatori, Akiko; Arai, Takuya; Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Konno, Fujiko; Nakao, Ryuji; Suzuki, Kazutoshi [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Zhang Mingrong [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.jp

    2009-01-15

    Introduction: Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) is an orally active anti-influenza drug, which is hydrolyzed by esterase to its carboxylate metabolite Ro 64-0802 with potent activity to inhibit the influenza virus. The abnormal behavior and death associated with the use of oseltamivir have developed into a major problem in Japan where Tamiflu is often prescribed for seasonal influenza. It is critical to determine the amount of oseltamivir and Ro 64-0802 in the human brain and to elucidate the relationship between their amounts and neuropsychiatric side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802 in mice as promising positron emission tomography (PET) ligands for measuring their amounts in living brains. Methods: Whole-body biodistribution of [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802 was determined in mice using the dissection method and micro-PET. In vitro and in vivo metabolite assay was performed in the plasma and brain of mice. Results: Between 1 and 60 min after injection of [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802, 0.20-0.06% and 0.39-0.03% ID/g were detected in the mouse brains, respectively (dissection method). Radioactivity concentrations in the living brains between 0 and 90 min after injection were measured at standardized uptake values of 0.25-0.05 for [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and 0.38-0.02 for [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802 (micro-PET). In vivo metabolite assay demonstrated the presence of [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802 in the brains after [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir injection. Conclusion: This study determined the distribution and metabolism of [{sup 11}C]oseltamivir and [{sup 11}C]Ro 64-0802 in mice. PET could be used to measure their amounts in the living brain and to elucidate the relationship between the amounts in the brain and the side effects of Tamiflu in the central nervous system.

  8. 78 FR 39339 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; SA INTL GMBH C/O., Sigma Aldrich Co., LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... Methadone (9250) II Morphine (9300) II Thebaine (9333) II Opium, powdered (9639) II Levo-alphacetylmethadol... treaties, conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971, at this time. DEA has investigated SA INTL...

  9. Measurement of the production cross section ratio $\\sigma(\\chi_{b2}(1\\mathrm{P}))/ \\sigma(\\chi_{b1}(1\\mathrm{P}))$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Song; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Montecassiano, Fabio; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Dujany, Giulio; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Yuldashev, Bekhzod S; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Bahtiyar, Hüseyin; Barlas, Esra; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Yücel, Mete; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-09

    A measurement of the production cross section ratio $\\sigma(\\chi_{b2}(1\\mathrm{P}))/ \\sigma(\\chi_{b1}(1\\mathrm{P}))$ is presented. The $\\chi_{b1}(1\\mathrm{P})$ and $\\chi_{b2}(1\\mathrm{P})$ bottomonium states, promptly produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV, are detected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC through their radiative decays $\\chi_{b1,2}(1\\mathrm{P}) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S}) + \\gamma$. The emitted photons are measured through their conversion to e$^+$e$^-$ pairs, whose reconstruction allows the two states to be resolved. The $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})$ is measured through its decay to two muons. An event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 fb$^{-1}$ is used to measure the cross section ratio in a phase-space region defined by the photon pseudorapidity, |$\\eta^\\gamma$| < 1.0; the $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})$ rapidity, |$y^\\Upsilon$| < 1.5; and the $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})$ transverse momentum, 7 < $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\Upsilon$ < 40 GeV. The cross section ratio sh...

  10. Delta sup(14)C, sigma CO sub(2) salinity of the western Indian Ocean deep waters: Spatial and temporal variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somayajulu, B.L.K.; Bhushan, R.; Narvekar, P.V.

    ppt, as revealed by the GEOSECS data (1977-78). The delta sup(14)C-sigma CO sub(2)-salinity relationships show better correlation in the western sector. High biological productivity induced changes and corrosive deepwaters could account for sigma CO...

  11. Evaluation of the P-glycoprotein- and breast cancer resistance protein-mediated brain penetration of 11C-labeled topotecan using small-animal positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Hatori, Akiko; Yui, Joji; Nengaki, Nobuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Yanamoto, Kazuhiko; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang Mingrong

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Topotecan (TPT) is a camptothecin derivative and is an anticancer drug working as a topoisomerase-I-specific inhibitor. But TPT cannot penetrate through the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we synthesized a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe, [ 11 C]TPT, to evaluate the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)- and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated brain penetration of [ 11 C]TPT using small-animal PET. Methods: [ 11 C]TPT was synthesized by the reaction of a desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]CH 3 I. In vitro study using [ 11 C]TPT was carried out in MES-SA and doxorubicin-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 cells in the presence or absence of elacridar, a specific inhibitor for Pgp and BCRP. The biodistribution of [ 11 C]TPT was determined using small-animal PET and the dissection method in mice. Results: The transport of [ 11 C]TPT to the extracellular side was determined in MES-SA/Dx5 cells exhibiting the expressions of Pgp and BCRP at high levels. This transport was inhibited by coincubation with elacridar. In Mdr1a/b -/- Bcrp1 -/- mice, PET results indicated that the brain uptake of [ 11 C]TPT was about two times higher than that in wild-type mice. Similarly, the brain penetration of [ 11 C]TPT in wild-type mice was increased by treatment with elacridar. The radioactivity in the brain of elacridar-treated mice was maintained at a certain level after the injection of [ 11 C]TPT, although the radioactivity in the blood decreased with time. Conclusions: We demonstrated the increase of brain penetration of [ 11 C]TPT by deficiency and inhibition of Pgp and BCRP functions using small-animal PET in mice.

  12. Two novel mixed-ligand complexes containing organosulfonate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingtian; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Fang, Hua; Ding, Liyun

    2008-07-01

    The structures reported herein, viz. bis(4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato-kappaO)bis(4,5-diazafluoren-9-one-kappa(2)N,N')copper(II), [Cu(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(C(11)H(6)N(2)O)(2)], (I), and poly[[[diaquacadmium(II)]-bis(mu-4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato)-kappa(2)O:N;kappa(2)N:O] dihydrate], {[Cd(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(H(2)O)(2)].2H(2)O}(n), (II), are rare examples of sulfonate-containing complexes where the anion does not fulfill a passive charge-balancing role, but takes an active part in coordination as a monodentate and/or bridging ligand. Monomeric complex (I) possesses a crystallographic inversion center at the Cu(II) atom, and the asymmetric unit contains one-half of a Cu atom, one complete 4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ans) ligand and one 4,5-diazafluoren-9-one (DAFO) ligand. The Cu(II) atom has an elongated distorted octahedral coordination geometry formed by two O atoms from two monodentate ans ligands and by four N atoms from two DAFO molecules. Complex (II) is polymeric and its crystal structure is built up by one-dimensional chains and solvent water molecules. Here also the cation (a Cd(II) atom) lies on a crystallographic inversion center and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. Each ans anion serves as a bridging ligand linking two Cd(II) atoms into one-dimensional infinite chains along the [010] direction, with each Cd(II) center coordinated by four ans ligands via O and N atoms and by two aqua ligands. In both structures, there are significant pi-pi stacking interactions between adjacent ligands and hydrogen bonds contribute to the formation of two- and three-dimensional networks.

  13. Solution of the equations of motion for a super non-Abelian sigma model in curved background by the super Poisson-Lie T-duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghbali, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The equations of motion of a super non-Abelian T-dual sigma model on the Lie supergroup (C_1"1+A) in the curved background are explicitly solved by the super Poisson-Lie T-duality. To find the solution of the flat model we use the transformation of supercoordinates, transforming the metric into a constant one, which is shown to be a supercanonical transformation. Then, using the super Poisson-Lie T-duality transformations and the dual decomposition of elements of Drinfel’d superdouble, the solution of the equations of motion for the dual sigma model is obtained. The general form of the dilaton fields satisfying the vanishing β−function equations of the sigma models is found. In this respect, conformal invariance of the sigma models built on the Drinfel’d superdouble ((C_1"1+A) , I_(_2_|_2_)) is guaranteed up to one-loop, at least.

  14. Production of n-bar's and Sigma-bar+-'s in e+e- annihilations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, T.; Buchanan, C.; Nodulman, L.; Poster, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Morehouse, C.C.; Vannucci, F.

    1979-01-01

    The production of antineutrons and charged Sigma-bar's in e + e - annihilations has been measured at √s +- production between 4 and 7 GeV is consistent with simple expectations for charmed-baryon production. A search for the decays Lambda-bar - /sub c/ → Sigma-bar +- π -+ π - and Sigma-baratsup asteriskat/sub c//Sigma-bar/sub c/ → Lambda-bar - /sub c/π +- yields no significant peaks. An upper limit, at the 90% confidence level, of sigmaatsub Lambda-baratc-italicB (Lambda-bar/sub c/ → Sigma-bar +- π -+ π - ) < 56 pb is set

  15. Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of N-[{sup 11}C]methylated imidazopyridineacetamides as PET tracers for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimata, Katsuhiko [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Hatano, Kentaro [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: hatanok@nils.go.jp; Ogawa, Mikako [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192 Japan (Japan); Abe, Junichiro [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Magata, Yasuhiro [Photon Medical Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192 Japan (Japan); Biggio, Giovanni; Serra, Mariangela [Department of Experimental Biology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari 09100 (Italy); Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Latrofa, Andrea; Trapani, Giuseppe; Liso, Gaetano [Pharmaco-Chemistry Department, University of Bari, Bari 70125 (Italy); Ito, Kengo [Department of Brain Sciences and Molecular Imaging, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Imidazopyridineacetoamide 5-8, a series of novel and potentially selective peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands with affinities comparable to those of known PBR ligands, was investigated. Radiosyntheses of [{sup 11}C]5, 6, 7 or 8 was accomplished by N-methylation of the corresponding desmethyl precursors with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide in the presence of NaH in dimethylformamide (DMF), resulting in 25% to 77% radiochemical yield and specific activitiy of 20 to 150 MBq/nmol. Each of the labeled compounds was injected in ddY mice, and the radioactivity and weight of dissected peripheral organs and brain regions were measured. Organ distribution of [{sup 11}C]7 was consistent with the known PBR distribution. Moreover, [{sup 11}C]7 showed the best combination of brain uptake and PBR binding, leading to its high retention in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum, areas where PBR density is high in mouse brain. Coinjection of PK11195 or unlabeled 7 significantly reduced the brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]7. These results suggest that [{sup 11}C]7 could be a useful radioligand for positron emission tomography imaging of PBRs.

  16. Solution stabilities of some mixed ligand complexes of UO22+ and Th4+ with complexones and salicylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Saxena, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Formation constants (log Ksub(MAL)sup(MA)) of mixed ligands complexes (MAL), where M = UO 2 2+ or Th 4+ , A = IMDA, NTA, HEDTA, EDTA, CDTA or DTPA, L = salicylic acid (SA) or 5-sulphosalicylic acid (SSA), have been determined by pH titrations using Irving-Rossotti approach at 25 o C and at I =0.2 (mol dm -3 , KNO 3 ). The solution stabilities exhibit the sequence (i) Th 4+ >UO 2 2+ , (ii) IMDA>NTA>HEDTA>EDTA>CDTA>DTPA, and (iii) SA>SSA with respect to metal ions, primary ligands and secondary ligands, respectively. The formation constants log Ksub(ML)sup(M) and log Ksub(ML 2 )sup(ML) have also been determined. The Δlog K values have been found to be negative-increasing numerically with the negative charge on the deprotonated primary ligand (A n- ). (author). 17 refs., 1 tab

  17. Evaluation of 11C-BU99008, a positron emission tomography ligand for the Imidazoline2 binding site in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyacke, Robin J; Myers, Jim F M; Venkataraman, Ashwin; Mick, Inge; Turton, Samuel; Passchier, Jan; Husbands, Stephen M; Rabiner, Eugenii Ilan A; Gunn, Roger N; Murphy, Philip S; Parker, Christine A; Nutt, David J

    2018-03-09

    The imidazoline 2 binding site (I 2 BS), are thought to be expressed in glia, and implicated in the regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein. A PET ligand for this target would be important for the investigation of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. 11 C-BU99008 has previously been identified as a putative PET radioligand. Here we present the first in vivo characterisation of this PET radioligand in humans and assess its test-retest reproducibility. Methods 14 healthy male volunteers underwent dynamic PET imaging with 11 C-BU99008 and arterial sampling. Six subjects were used to assess test-retest and eight were used in the pharmacological evaluation, undergoing a second, or third heterologous competition scan with the mixed I 2 BS/α 2 -adrenoceptor drug, idazoxan (n=8; 20, 40, 60 and 80mg) and the mixed irreversible MAO A/B inhibitor, isocarboxazid (n=4; 50mg), respectively. Regional time-activity data were generated from arterial plasma input functions corrected for metabolites using the most appropriate model to derive the outcome measure V T (regional total distribution volume). All image processing and kinetic analysis was performed in MIAKAT™ (www.miakat.org). Results Brain uptake of 11 C-BU99008 was good with reversible kinetics and a heterogeneous distribution consistent with known I 2 BS expression. Model selection criteria indicated that the 2-tissue-compartment was preferred. V T estimates were high in the striatum (113±20 mL·cm -3 ), medium in cortex frontal lobe (55±9 mL·cm -3 ) and low in the cerebellum (47±7 mL·cm -3 ). Test-retest reliability was found to be reasonable. The uptake was dose-dependently reduced by pre-treatment with idazoxan throughout the brain, with an average block across all regions of ~60% ( V T = ~30 mL·cm -3 ) at the highest dose (80 mg). The ED 50 for idazoxan was calculated as 33.1 mg. Uptake was not blocked by pre-treatment with the MAO inhibitor, isocarboxazid. Conclusions In summary, 11 C

  18. Asymmetric synthesis of L-[3-11C]phenylalanine using chiral hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halldin, C.; Langstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    The seven-step synthesis of L-[3- 11 C]phenylalanine using chiral diphosphines as ligands in rhodium catalysts is reported. [ 11 C]Benzaldehyde, prepared in a three-step reaction from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide, as reported elsewhere, was reacted with 2-phenyl-5-oxazolone or 2-(4-chloro)phenyl-5-oxazolone in the presence of the tertiary amine diazabicyclooctane (DABCO). The resultant [α- 11 C]-4-arylene-2-atyl-5-oxazolones were hydrogenated after ring opening, using the chiral rhodium complex of (R)-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane [(R)-PROPHOS] or (+)-2,3-isopropylidene-2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane [(+)-DIOP]. After removal of the amino protecting group, the labelled amino acid was obtained on purification by preparative LC in 10-15% radiochemical yield, and radiochemical purity higher than 95% from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide within 60 min. The optical purity of the products determined by the tRNA method and capillary GC, was 80 and 60% e.e., respectively (i.e. L/D=90/10 and 80/20). (author)

  19. Comparison of {sup 18}F- and {sup 11}C-labeled aryloxyanilide analogs to measure translocator protein in human brain using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickstein, Leah P.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Fujimura, Yota; Imaizumi, Masao; Zhang, Yi; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Fujita, Masahiro [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is a promising biomarker for neuroinflammation. We developed two new PET ligands, {sup 18}F-PBR06 and {sup 11}C-PBR28, to image TSPOs. Although our prior studies suggest that either of the two ligands could be used to quantify TSPOs in human brain, the studies were done in different sets of subjects. In this study, we directly compared {sup 18}F-PBR06 and {sup 11}C-PBR28 in eight human subjects to determine (1) whether either ligand provides more precise measurements of TSPOs and (2) whether the higher in vitro affinity of PBR06 compared to PBR28 led to higher in vivo binding of {sup 18}F-PBR06 compared to {sup 11}C-PBR28. In vivo binding was calculated as total distribution volume (V{sub T}), using an unconstrained two-tissue compartment model. V{sub T} was corrected for plasma free fraction (f{sub P}) to measure ligand binding based on free ligand concentration in brain. Both ligands measured V{sub T} with similar precision, as evidenced by similarly good identifiability. However, V{sub T} for both radioligands increased with increasing lengths of data acquisition, consistent with the accumulation of radiometabolites in brain. Despite its higher lipophilicity and higher in vitro affinity, V{sub T}/f{sub P} of {sup 18}F-PBR06 was similar to that of {sup 11}C-PBR28. Both {sup 18}F-PBR06 and {sup 11}C-PBR28 are similar in terms of precision, sensitivity to accumulation of radiometabolites, and magnitude of in vivo binding. Thus, selection between the two radioligands will be primarily determined by the logistical impact of the different half-lives of the two radionuclides (110 vs 20 min). (orig.)

  20. [11C]β-CIT, a cocaine analogue. Preparation, autoradiography and preliminary PET investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Lars; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Karlsson, Per; Hall, Haakan; Swahn, C.-G.

    1993-01-01

    β-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane) is a cocaine analogue with a high affinity for the dopamine transporter. [ 11 C]β-CIT was prepared by N-methylation of nor-β-CIT with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. The total radiochemical yield of [ 11 C]β-CIT was 40-50% with an overall synthesis time of 35-40 min. The radiochemical purity was > 99% and the specific radioactivity at the time of injection was about 1000 Ci/mmol (37 GBq/μmol). Autoradiographic examination of [ 11 C]β-CIT binding in human brains post-mortem demonstrated a high level of specific binding in the striatum. PET examination of [ 11 C]β-CIT in a Cynomolgus monkey showed a marked accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum. The ratio of radioactivity in the striatum-to-cerebellum approached 5 after 87 min. In a displacement experiment, radioactivity in the striatum but not in the cerebellum, was markedly reduced after injection of unlabelled cocaine. [ 11 C]β-CIT has a potential as ligand for PET examination of cocaine effects in man. (author)

  1. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  2. Uranyl-organic assemblies with the macrocyclic ligand 1, 4, 8, 11-tetra-aza-cyclo-tetradecane-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraacetate (TETA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuery, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Three uranyl ion complexes obtained from the reaction of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and 1, 4, 8, 11-tetra-aza-cyclo-tetradecane-1, 4, 8, 11-tetraacetic acid (H 4 TETA) were characterized by their crystal structure. The centrosymmetric macrocycle, in the [3434] conformation with either carbon or nitrogen atoms as corners, is zwitterionic, with four carboxylate groups and two or four protonated nitrogen atoms. The complexes [(UO 2 ) 2 (H 2 TETA)(C 2 O 4 )(H 2 O) 2 ] (1) and [UO 2 (H 4 TETA)(H 2 O)].NO 3 .Cl (2) were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and 1 includes additional oxalate ligands generated in situ. Both compounds are two-dimensional polymers in which the four-fold monodentate macrocyclic ligand unites either four uranyl oxalate dinuclear species (1) or isolated uranyl ions (2). Complex 3, [UO 2 (H 2 TETA)(H 2 O)].6H 2 O, was obtained at room temperature and, although it displays the same stoichiometry as 2, it differs from it by being a three-dimensional framework. Both 2 and 3 present channels containing either counter-ions or water molecules. As often observed, the water content of the low-temperature species, 3, is higher than that of the high-temperature one, 2. (author)

  3. Activation of the Hg-C Bond of Methylmercury by [S2]-Donor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karri, Ramesh; Banerjee, Mainak; Chalana, Ashish; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Roy, Gouriprasanna

    2017-10-16

    Here we report that [S 2 ]-donor ligands Bmm OH , Bmm Me , and Bme Me bind rapidly and reversibly to the mercury centers of organomercurials, RHgX, and facilitate the cleavage of Hg-C bonds of RHgX to produce stable tetracoordinated Hg(II) complexes and R 2 Hg. Significantly, the rate of cleavage of Hg-C bonds depends critically on the X group of RHgX (X = BF 4 - , Cl - , I - ) and the [S 2 ]-donor ligands used to induce the Hg-C bonds. For instance, the initial rate of cleavage of the Hg-C bond of MeHgI induced by Bme Me is almost 2-fold higher than the initial rate obtained by Bmm OH or Bmm Me , indicating that the spacer between the two imidazole rings of [S 2 ]-donor ligands plays a significant role here in the cleavage of Hg-C bonds. Surprisingly, we noticed that the initial rate of cleavage of the Hg-C bond of MeHgI induced by Bme Me (or Bmm Me ) is almost 10-fold and 100-fold faster than the cleavage of Hg-C bonds of MeHgCl and [MeHg]BF 4 respectively, under identical reaction conditions, suggesting that the Hg-C bond of [MeHg]BF 4 is highly inert at room temperature (21 °C). We also show here that the nature of the final stable cleaved products, i.e. Hg(II) complexes, depends on the X group of RHgX and the [S 2 ]-donor ligands. For instance, the reaction of Bmm Me with MeHgCl (1:1 molar ratio) afforded the formation of the 16-membered metallacyclic dinuclear mercury compound (Bmm Me ) 2 Hg 2 Cl 4 , in which the two Cl atoms are located inside the ring, whereas due to the large size of the I atom, a similar reaction with MeHgI yielded polymeric [(Bmm Me ) 2 HgI 2 ] m ·(MeHgI) n . However, the treatment of Bmm Me with ionic [RHg]BF 4 led to the formation of the tetrathione-coordinated mononuclear mercury compound [(Bmm Me ) 2 Hg](BF 4 ) 2 , where BF 4 - serves as a counteranion.

  4. Evaluation of the P-glycoprotein- and breast cancer resistance protein-mediated brain penetration of {sup 11}C-labeled topotecan using small-animal positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Kawamura, Kazunori; Hatori, Akiko; Yui, Joji [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nengaki, Nobuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Yoshida, Yuichiro [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); SHI Accelerator Service, Ltd., Tokyo 141-8686 (Japan); Wakizaka, Hidekatsu [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yanamoto, Kazuhiko [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukumura, Toshimitsu [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Zhang Mingrong, E-mail: zhang@nirs.go.jp [Department of Molecular Probes, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Introduction: Topotecan (TPT) is a camptothecin derivative and is an anticancer drug working as a topoisomerase-I-specific inhibitor. But TPT cannot penetrate through the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we synthesized a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe, [{sup 11}C]TPT, to evaluate the P-glycoprotein (Pgp)- and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-mediated brain penetration of [{sup 11}C]TPT using small-animal PET. Methods: [{sup 11}C]TPT was synthesized by the reaction of a desmethyl precursor with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. In vitro study using [{sup 11}C]TPT was carried out in MES-SA and doxorubicin-resistant MES-SA/Dx5 cells in the presence or absence of elacridar, a specific inhibitor for Pgp and BCRP. The biodistribution of [{sup 11}C]TPT was determined using small-animal PET and the dissection method in mice. Results: The transport of [{sup 11}C]TPT to the extracellular side was determined in MES-SA/Dx5 cells exhibiting the expressions of Pgp and BCRP at high levels. This transport was inhibited by coincubation with elacridar. In Mdr1a/b{sup -/-}Bcrp1{sup -/-} mice, PET results indicated that the brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]TPT was about two times higher than that in wild-type mice. Similarly, the brain penetration of [{sup 11}C]TPT in wild-type mice was increased by treatment with elacridar. The radioactivity in the brain of elacridar-treated mice was maintained at a certain level after the injection of [{sup 11}C]TPT, although the radioactivity in the blood decreased with time. Conclusions: We demonstrated the increase of brain penetration of [{sup 11}C]TPT by deficiency and inhibition of Pgp and BCRP functions using small-animal PET in mice.

  5. In vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]-3-[2-[(3-methoxyphenylamino)carbonyl]ethenyl]-4,6-dichloroindole- 2-carboxylic acid ([{sup 11}C]3MPICA) as a PET radiotracer for the glycine site of the NMDA ion channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Sultana, Abida; Laruelle, M

    2002-11-01

    Alterations in normal NMDA receptor composition, densities and function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of certain neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Chorea, schizophrenia, alcoholism and stroke. In our first effort to provide PET ligands for the NMDA/glycine site, we reported the synthesis of a novel high affinity glycine site ligand, 3-[2-[(3-methoxyphenylamino)carbonyl]ethenyl]-4,6-dichloroindole-2 -carboxylic acid ((3MPICA), Ki=4.8{+-}0.9 nM) and the corresponding carbon-11 labeled PET ligand, [{sup 11}C]3MPICA. We report here the in vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]3MPICA in rats. Biodistribution analysis revealed that [{sup 11}C]3MPICA exhibited low degree of brain penetration and high blood concentration. The average uptake at two minutes was highest in the cerebellum (0.19{+-}0.04 %ID/g) and thalamus (0.18{+-}0.05 %ID/g) and lower in the hippocampus (0.13{+-}0.03) and frontal cortex (0.11{+-}0.04 %ID/g). The radioactivity cleared quickly from all brain regions examined. Administration of unlabeled 3MPICA (1 mg/kg, i.v.) revealed at 60 minutes a small general reduction in regional brain radioactivity concentrations in treated animals versus controls, however, the blood radioactivity concentration was also lowered, confounding the assessment of the degree of saturable binding. Warfarin co-administration (100 mg/kg, i.v.) significantly lowered blood activity at 5 minutes post-injection (-27%, P<0.01) but failed to significantly increase the brain uptake of the radiotracer. In view of these results, and especially considering the low brain penetration of this tracer, [{sup 11}C]3MPICA does not appear to be a promising PET radiotracer for in vivo use.

  6. Parametric mapping using spectral analysis for 11C-PBR28 PET reveals neuroinflammation in mild cognitive impairment subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen; Dani, Melanie; Femminella, Grazia D; Wood, Melanie; Calsolaro, Valeria; Veronese, Mattia; Turkheimer, Federico; Gentleman, Steve; Brooks, David J; Hinz, Rainer; Edison, Paul

    2018-07-01

    Neuroinflammation and microglial activation play an important role in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we investigated the spatial distribution of neuroinflammation in MCI subjects, using spectral analysis (SA) to generate parametric maps and quantify 11 C-PBR28 PET, and compared these with compartmental and other kinetic models of quantification. Thirteen MCI and nine healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Subjects underwent 11 C-PBR28 PET scans with arterial cannulation. Spectral analysis with an arterial plasma input function was used to generate 11 C-PBR28 parametric maps. These maps were then compared with regional 11 C-PBR28 V T (volume of distribution) using a two-tissue compartment model and Logan graphic analysis. Amyloid load was also assessed with 18 F-Flutemetamol PET. With SA, three component peaks were identified in addition to blood volume. The 11 C-PBR28 impulse response function (IRF) at 90 min produced the lowest coefficient of variation. Single-subject analysis using this IRF demonstrated microglial activation in five out of seven amyloid-positive MCI subjects. IRF parametric maps of 11 C-PBR28 uptake revealed a group-wise significant increase in neuroinflammation in amyloid-positive MCI subjects versus HC in multiple cortical association areas, and particularly in the temporal lobe. Interestingly, compartmental analysis detected group-wise increase in 11 C-PBR28 binding in the thalamus of amyloid-positive MCI subjects, while Logan parametric maps did not perform well. This study demonstrates for the first time that spectral analysis can be used to generate parametric maps of 11 C-PBR28 uptake, and is able to detect microglial activation in amyloid-positive MCI subjects. IRF parametric maps of 11 C-PBR28 uptake allow voxel-wise single-subject analysis and could be used to evaluate microglial activation in individual subjects.

  7. Comparison of {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA-11 and {sup 11}C-choline in the detection of prostate cancer metastases by PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenck, Johannes [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Rempp, Hansjoerg; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Reischl, Gerald [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Kruck, Stephan; Stenzl, Arnulf [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Urology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center Partner Site, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed ubiquitously on the membrane of most prostate tumors and its metastasis. While PET/CT using {sup 11}C-choline was considered as the gold standard in the staging of prostate cancer, PET with radiolabelled PSMA ligands was introduced into the clinic in recent years. Our aim was to compare the PSMA ligand {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 with {sup 11}C-choline in patients with primary and recurrent prostate cancer. 123 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT examination using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 and {sup 11}C-choline. Suspicious lesions were evaluated visually and semiquantitatively (SUVavg). Out of these, 103 suffered from a confirmed biochemical relapse after prostatectomy and/or radiotherapy (mean PSA level of 4.5 ng/ml), while 20 patients underwent primary staging. In 67 patients with biochemical relapse, we detected 458 lymph nodes suspicious for metastasis. PET using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 showed a significantly higher uptake and detection rate than {sup 11}C-choline PET. Also {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET identified significantly more patients with suspicious lymph nodes as well as affected lymph nodes regions especially at low PSA levels. Bone lesions suspicious for prostate cancer metastasis were revealed in 36 patients' biochemical relapse. Significantly more bone lesions were detected by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, but only 3 patients had only PSMA-positive bone lesions. Nevertheless, we detected also 29 suspicious lymph nodes and 8 bone lesions, which were only positive as per {sup 11}C-choline PET. These findings led to crucial differences in the TNM classification and the identification of oligometastatic patients. In the patients who underwent initial staging, all primary tumors showed uptake of both tracers. Although significantly more suspicious lymph nodes and bone lesions were identified, only 2 patients presented with bone lesions only detected by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET. Thus, PET using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 showed a higher

  8. Kinetics of sigma phase formation in a Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Magnabosco

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This work determines the kinetics of sigma phase formation in UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS, describing the phase transformations that occur in isothermal aging between 700 and 900 ºC for time periods up to 1032 hours, allowing the determination of the Time-Temperature-Precipitation (TTP diagram for sigma phase and proposing a model to predict the kinetics of sigma phase formation using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA type expression. The higher kinetics of sigma phase formation occurs at 850 ºC. However, isothermal aging between 700 and 900 ºC for time periods up to 1032 hours are not sufficient to the establishment of thermodynamic equilibrium. Activation energy for both nucleation and growth of sigma phase is determined (185 kJ.mol-1 and its value is equivalent to the activation energy for Cr diffusion in ferrite, indicating that diffusion of Cr is probably the major thermally activated process involved in sigma phase formation. The determined JMA type expression presents good fit with experimental data between 700 and 850 ºC.

  9. Maturational Patterns of Sigma Frequency Power Across Childhood and Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian G.; Feinberg, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To further evaluate adolescent brain maturation by determining the longitudinal trajectories of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sigma (11–15 Hz) power across childhood-adolescence. Methods: The maturational trend for sigma (11–15 Hz) power was evaluated in an accelerated longitudinal study of three overlapping age cohorts (n = 92) covering ages 6 to 18 y. Semiannually, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from participants sleeping at home in their normal sleep environment while keeping their current school night schedules. Results: Sigma frequencies became faster with age. The frequency of the 11–15 Hz spectral peak increased linearly. Sigma frequency power (SFP) declined with age, but its trajectory was complex (cubic). Power in a group of low sigma subfrequencies declined with age. Power in a group of high sigma frequencies increased with age. Power in subfrequencies within 11–15 Hz also showed different trends across the night, with lower frequencies increasing across NREM periods and higher frequencies decreasing across NREM periods. The upper and lower boundaries for the sigma frequencies that changed across NREMPs shifted upward with age. Conclusions: We hypothesize that these maturational brain changes result from synaptic elimination which decreases sleep depth and streamlines circuits. SFP displays a maturational trajectory different from both delta and theta power. Theories on the function of sigma must be reconciled with its maturational trajectory. These findings further demonstrate the value of sleep EEG for studying noninvasively the complex developmental brain changes of adolescence. Citation: Campbell IG, Feinberg I. Maturational patterns of sigma frequency power across childhood and adolescence: a longitudinal study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):193–201. PMID:26285004

  10. One-pot synthesis and sigma receptor binding studies of novel spirocyclic-2,6-diketopiperazine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandi, Mehdi; Sherafat, Fatemeh; Sadeghzadeh, Masoud; Alirezapour, Behrouz

    2016-06-01

    New spirocyclic-2,6-diketopiperazine derivatives containing benzylpiperidine and cycloalkane moieties were synthesized by a one-pot two-step sequential Ugi/intramolecular N-amidation process in moderate to good yields. The in vitro ligand-binding profile studies performed on the sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors revealed that the σ1 affinities and subtype selectivities of three spirocyclic piperidine derivatives are generally comparable to those of spirocycloalkane analogues. Compared to the low σ1 affinities obtained for cycloalkyl-substituted spirocyclic-2,6-diketopiperazines with n=2, those with n=1 proved to have optimal fitting with σ2 subtype by exhibiting higher affinities. Moreover, the best binding affinity and subtype selectivity was identified for compound 3c with Kiσ1=5.9±0.5nM and Kiσ2=563±21nM as well as 95-fold σ1/σ2 selectivity ratio, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The in vitro comparative cytopathology of a porcine rotavirus and the simian prototype (SA-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonien S.C.H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A citopatologia in vitro de uma cepa de rotavírus porcino adaptado em cultura de células foi comparada à estirpe-protótipo símia (SA-11. O efeito citopático (ECP produzido pelos vírus foi semelhante embora a estirpe porcina tivesse apresentado algumas alterações diferentes, como o acentuado estreitamento do citoplasma, com grande perda do volume citoplasmático. O vírus porcino apresentou menor número de plaques de ECP porém com diâmetro maior em relação ao vírus símio, demonstrando maior capacidade de disseminação célula-célula, quase oito vezes mais, a julgar pelo diâmetro dos plaques de ECP. Os elementos do citoesqueleto das células infectadas revelaram uma reorganização semelhante para ambas as estirpes, não sendo possível observar nenhuma diferença, embora o ECP do vírus porcino tenha sido mais acentuado.

  12. Characterization of five ECF sigma factors in the genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Basu Thakur

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, a bacterial pathogen of bean, utilizes large surface populations and extracellular signaling to initiate a fundamental change from an epiphytic to a pathogenic lifestyle. Extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma (σ factors serve as important regulatory factors in responding to various environmental signals. Bioinformatic analysis of the B728a genome revealed 10 ECF sigma factors. This study analyzed deletion mutants of five previously uncharacterized ECF sigma factor genes in B728a, including three FecI-type ECF sigma factors (ECF5, ECF6, and ECF7 and two ECF sigma factors placed in groups ECF11 and ECF18. Transcriptional profiling by qRT-PCR analysis of ECF sigma factor mutants was used to measure expression of their associated anti-sigma and outer membrane receptor proteins, and expression of genes associated with production of extracellular polysaccharides, fimbriae, glycine betaine and syringomycin. Notably, the B728aΔecf7 mutant displayed reduced swarming and had decreased expression of CupC fimbrial genes. Growth and pathogenicity assays, using a susceptible bean host, revealed that none of the tested sigma factor genes are required for in planta growth and lesion formation.

  13. Measurement of {sup 11}C-raclopride binding in micropig brain with high and low specific activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    In vitro, a saturation hyperbola or Scatchard plot is applied for the determination of receptor density (Bmax) and affinity (Kd). Simillary, Bmax and Kd could be obtained in vivo by performing two or more PET experiments with high and low specific activities (SA). To measure these parameters, the binding potential (BP) of 11C-raclopride for striatal D2 receptor in micropig brain at high and low SA was measured in this study. A normal male PWG micropig (weight: 38 kg, age: 24 months) was used in this study. The animals were anesthetized with ketamine (2 mL/10 kg, i.m.) and xylazine (1mL/10kg, i.m.), and placed in a supine position. Dynamic PET data was acquired for 60 min after injection of 11C-raclopride (2.5 mCi) through the catheter placed in a femoral vein. High SA and low SA (6.8 uCi/nmol) PET and T1 SPGR MRI scans were performed. MR image was co-registered to the static PET images and ROIs were drawn on striatum and cerebellum to obtain the time activity curve. The BP in striatum was computed by both the Lammertsma and Logan reference tissue methods using cerebellum tissue input function. BP parametric images were also generated using the Logan method. The value of striatum BP was 1.46/0.32 (high SA / low SA) and 1.34/0.31 in Lammertsma and Logan methods, respectively. The D2 occupancy by the cold raclopride was approximately 78% in micropig striatum. The Logan BP parametric image visualized well the change of receptor occupancy between the two scans. In this study, BP values at high and low SA and their percent change estimated by the two different methods were correlated well. This preliminary result suggests that the experimental procedures established in this study would be useful for the quantification of the density of D2 receptor and affinity in the micropig brain.

  14. Synthesis of racemic [3-11C]phenylalanine and [3-11C] DOPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halldin, C.; Laangstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesis of racemic [3- 11 C]phenylalanine and [3- 11 C]DOPA is reported. The [ 11 C]benzaldehyde and [ 11 C]veratraldehyde prepared in a two-step reaction from the corresponding [ 11 C]acid salt and [ 11 C]alcohol, by means of selective oxidation with tetrabutylammonium hydrogen chromate, were reacted with 2-phenyl-5-oxazolone or 2-(4-chloro)phenyl-5-oxazolone in the presence of a tertiary amine to give the corresponding [α- 11 C]-4-arylene-2-aryl-5-oxazolones. Ring opening of these olefins, hydrogenation, and removal of protecting groups was carried out in one step using hydroiodic cid/phosphorus, with the production of the racemic [3- 11 C]amino acids in 8-30% radiochemical yield (starting with 11 CO 2 ) within 52-60 min (including LC separation). (author)

  15. Sequence analysis of serum albumins reveals the molecular evolution of ligand recognition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanali, Gabriella; Ascenzi, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Fasano, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is a circulating protein providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds. At least seven major binding sites have been identified by structural and functional investigations mainly in human SA. SA is conserved in vertebrates, with at least 49 entries in protein sequence databases. The multiple sequence analysis of this set of entries leads to the definition of a cladistic tree for the molecular evolution of SA orthologs in vertebrates, thus showing the clustering of the considered species, with lamprey SAs (Lethenteron japonicum and Petromyzon marinus) in a separate outgroup. Sequence analysis aimed at searching conserved domains revealed that most SA sequences are made up by three repeated domains (about 600 residues), as extensively characterized for human SA. On the contrary, lamprey SAs are giant proteins (about 1400 residues) comprising seven repeated domains. The phylogenetic analysis of the SA family reveals a stringent correlation with the taxonomic classification of the species available in sequence databases. A focused inspection of the sequences of ligand binding sites in SA revealed that in all sites most residues involved in ligand binding are conserved, although the versatility towards different ligands could be peculiar of higher organisms. Moreover, the analysis of molecular links between the different sites suggests that allosteric modulation mechanisms could be restricted to higher vertebrates.

  16. Ligand Binding Site Detection by Local Structure Alignment and Its Performance Complementarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Accurate determination of potential ligand binding sites (BS) is a key step for protein function characterization and structure-based drug design. Despite promising results of template-based BS prediction methods using global structure alignment (GSA), there is a room to improve the performance by properly incorporating local structure alignment (LSA) because BS are local structures and often similar for proteins with dissimilar global folds. We present a template-based ligand BS prediction method using G-LoSA, our LSA tool. A large benchmark set validation shows that G-LoSA predicts drug-like ligands’ positions in single-chain protein targets more precisely than TM-align, a GSA-based method, while the overall success rate of TM-align is better. G-LoSA is particularly efficient for accurate detection of local structures conserved across proteins with diverse global topologies. Recognizing the performance complementarity of G-LoSA to TM-align and a non-template geometry-based method, fpocket, a robust consensus scoring method, CMCS-BSP (Complementary Methods and Consensus Scoring for ligand Binding Site Prediction), is developed and shows improvement on prediction accuracy. The G-LoSA source code is freely available at http://im.bioinformatics.ku.edu/GLoSA. PMID:23957286

  17. Inclusive $\\Sigma^{+}$ and $\\Sigma^{0}$ Production in Hadronic Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Campanelli, Mario; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A.P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; Cozzoni, B.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, Emanuele; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Sarakinos, M.E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zoller, M.

    2000-01-01

    We report on measurements of the inclusive production rate of $\\Sigma^+$ and $\\Sigma^0$ baryons in hadronic Z decays collected with the L3 detector at LEP. The $\\Sigma^+$ baryons are detected through the decay $\\Sigma^+ \\rightarrow {\\rm p} \\pi^0$, while the $\\Sigma^0$ baryons are detected via the decay mode $\\Sigma^0 \\rightarrow \\Lambda \\gamma$. The average numbers of $\\Sigma^+$ and $\\Sigma^0$ per hadronic Z decay are measured to be: \\begin{eqnarray*} \\left + \\left & = & 0.114 \\pm 0.011_{\\mbox{\\it \\small stat}} \\pm 0.009_{\\mbox{\\it \\small syst}} \\\\ \\left + \\left & = & 0.095 \\pm 0.015_{\\mbox{\\it \\small stat}} \\pm 0.013_{\\mbox{\\it \\small syst}} \\ \\mbox{.} \\end{eqnarray*} These rates are found to be higher than the predictions from Monte Carlo hadronization models and analytical parameterizations of strange baryon production.

  18. The six sigma program: an empirical study of brazilian companies.

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Marly Monteiro de; Ho, Linda Lee; Pinto, Silvia Helena Boarin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the status of Six Sigma's status in Brazilian companies and understand the integration of this program with other quality management approaches. Additionally, the critical success factors (CSFs) for Six Sigma implementation and primary Six Sigma program characteristics were identified. Finally, the results of the used of Six Sigma were analysed. Design/methodology/approach – An extensive literature review illustrates the primary Six Sigma c...

  19. Compiling the functional data-parallel language SaC for Microgrids of Self-Adaptive Virtual Processors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grelck, C.; Herhut, S.; Jesshope, C.; Joslin, C.; Lankamp, M.; Scholz, S.-B.; Shafarenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present preliminary results from compiling the high-level, functional and data-parallel programming language SaC into a novel multi-core design: Microgrids of Self-Adaptive Virtual Processors (SVPs). The side-effect free nature of SaC in conjunction with its data-parallel foundation make it an

  20. Mapping a2 Adrenoceptors of the Human Brain with 11C-Yohimbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nahimi, Adjmal; Jakobsen, Steen; Munk, Ole

    2015-01-01

    A previous study from this laboratory suggested that 11C-yohimbine, a selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, is an appropriate ligand for PET of α2 adrenoceptors that passes readily from blood to brain tissue in pigs but not in rodents. To test usefulness in humans, we determined blood–brain...... values of VT ranged from 0.82 mL cm−3 in the right frontal cortex to 0.46 mL cm−3 in the corpus callosum, with intermediate VT values in subcortical structures. Binding potentials averaged 0.6–0.8 in the cortex and 0.2–0.5 in subcortical regions. Conclusion: The maps of 11C-yohimbine binding to α2...... adrenoceptors in human brain had the highest values in cortical areas and hippocampus, with moderate values in subcortical structures, as found also in vitro. The results confirm the usefulness of the tracer 11C-yohimbine for mapping α2 adrenoceptors in human brain in vivo....

  1. The synthesis of no-carrier-added [11C]urea from [11C]carbon dioxide and application to [11C]uracil synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, P.K.; Mangner, T.J.; Chugani, H.T.

    1997-01-01

    No-carrier-added [ 11 C]urea has been synthesized by bubbling cyclotron-produced [ 11 C]-carbon dioxide directly into a tetrahydrofuran solution of lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide, followed by hydrolysis of the C-11 labeled adduct with aqueous ammonium chloride. Using this simple, one-pot method, [ 11 C]urea was produced in 55-70% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected) in 16 min following end-of-bombardment (or in 10 min following the introduction of the [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. The [ 11 C]urea thus produced was converted to [ 11 C]uracil (carrier-added) in 40-75% decay-corrected radiochemical yield by condensation with diethyl malate in presence of fuming sulfuric acid. (author)

  2. Threshold hyperon production in proton-proton collisions at COSY-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozek, T.

    2005-10-01

    For the first time the pp{yields}nK{sup +}{sigma}{sup +} reaction has been measured in the threshold region and the cross section was determined. The measurement was performed at the COSY-11 detection system at two beam momenta P{sub beam}=2.6 GeV/c and 2.74 GeV/c, corresponding to excess energies Q=13 MeV and 60 MeV. COSY-11 is an internal magnetic spectrometer experiment at the COoler SYnchrotron and storage ring COSY in Juelich, Germany. It is equipped with scintillator hodoscopes and drift chambers for charged particle detection and a scintillator/lead sandwich detector for neutrons. Experimentally, the {sigma}{sup +} hyperon was identified via the missing mass technique, by detecting the remaining reaction products - K{sup +} meson and neutron. Extensive background studies in the missing mass spectra have been performed and the possible influence of the higher partial waves on the detection efficiency discussed. The investigation on the {sigma}{sup +} production is a part of the long ongoing studies of the hyperons production performed by the COSY-11 collaboration. In the previous analysis of the {lambda} and {sigma}{sup 0} hyperon production in the pp{yields}pK{sup +}{lambda} and pp{yields}pK{sup +}{sigma}{sup 0} reactions, respectively, the unexpectedly high cross section ratio {sigma}({lambda}/{sigma})({sigma}{sup 0}) in the close to threshold region was observed. To explain this behavior, various theoretical scenarios were proposed, but although they differ even in the dominant basic reaction mechanism, all more or less reproduce the data. In order to get more information for disentangling the contributing reaction mechanisms, data from an other isospin channel were taken, namely pp{yields}nK{sup +}{sigma}{sup +}. Within this thesis the method of the measurement and the data analysis is given. The total cross section is presented and the results are discussed in view of available theoretical models. (orig.)

  3. Study of Sigma Phase in Duplex SAF 2507

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellicia, D. M.; Sutarsis; Kurniawan, B. A.; Wulanari, D.; Purniawan, A.; Wibisono, A. T.

    2017-05-01

    Super duplex stainless steel is one of the stainless steel which has a combination between high strength properties and excellent corrosion resistance. However, the resistance can decrease by precipitation of sigma phase which is formed at high temperature, for example after welding processes. A series of experiments has been performed to study the effect of solution annealing to existence of sigma phase on super duplex SAF 2507. Variations of solution-annealing temperatures were 1000 °C, 1065 °C and 1125 °C with holding time of 15 and 30 minutes for each temperature. Effect of solution annealing process was characterized by using XRD, SEM, and Optical Microscopy. The result showed precipitation of sigma phase completely dissolved at 1065 °C and 1125 °C because it reformed to austenite. After it was heated at 1065 °C, chromium carbide appeared in ferrite site and grain boundary. The amount of chromium carbide increased with the increasing of solution annealing temperature.

  4. Improved synthesis and application of [(11) C]benzyl iodide in positron emission tomography radiotracer production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekošak, Aleksandra; Filp, Ulrike; Rotteveel, Lonneke; Poot, Alex J; Windhorst, Albert D

    2015-06-30

    Positron emission tomography has increased the demand for new carbon-11 radiolabeled tracers and building blocks. A promising radiolabeling synthon is [(11) C]benzyl iodide ([(11) C]BnI), because the benzyl group is a widely present functionality in biologically active compounds. Unfortunately, synthesis of [(11) C]BnI has received little attention, resulting in limited application. Therefore, we investigated the synthesis in order to significantly improve, automate, and apply it for labeling of the dopamine D2 antagonist [(11) C]clebopride as a proof of concept. [(11) C]BnI was synthesized from [(11) C]CO2 via a Grignard reaction and purified prior the reaction with desbenzyl clebopride. According to a one-pot procedure, [(11) C]BnI was synthesized in 11 min from [(11) C]CO2 with high yield, purity, and specific activity, 52 ± 3% (end of the cyclotron bombardment), 95 ± 3%, and 123 ± 17 GBq/µmol (end of the synthesis), respectively. Changes in the [(11) C]BnI synthesis are reduced amounts of reagents, a lower temperature in the Grignard reaction, and the introduction of a solid-phase intermediate purification. [(11) C]Clebopride was synthesized within 28 min from [(11) C]CO2 in an isolated decay-corrected yield of 11 ± 3% (end of the cyclotron bombardment) with a purity of >98% and specific activity (SA) of 54 ± 4 GBq/µmol (n = 3) at the end of the synthesis. Conversion of [(11) C]BnI to product was 82 ± 11%. The reliable synthesis of [(11) C]BnI allows the broad application of this synthon in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceutical development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Evidence for the decay sigma+ --> pmu+ mu-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H K; Burnstein, R A; Chakravorty, A; Chen, Y C; Choong, W S; Clark, K; Dukes, E C; Durandet, C; Felix, J; Fu, Y; Gidal, G; Gustafson, H R; Holmstrom, T; Huang, M; James, C; Jenkins, C M; Jones, T; Kaplan, D M; Lederman, L M; Leros, N; Longo, M J; Lopez, F; Lu, L C; Luebke, W; Luk, K B; Nelson, K S; Perroud, J-P; Rajaram, D; Rubin, H A; Volk, J; White, C G; White, S L; Zyla, P

    2005-01-21

    We report the first evidence for the decay Sigma(+)-->pmu(+)mu(-) from data taken by the HyperCP (E871) experiment at Fermilab. Based on three observed events, the branching ratio is B(Sigma(+)-->pmu(+)mu(-))=[8.6(+6.6)(-5.4)(stat)+/-5.5(syst)]x10(-8). The narrow range of dimuon masses may indicate that the decay proceeds via a neutral intermediate state, Sigma(+)-->pP(0),P0-->mu(+)mu(-) with a P0 mass of 214.3+/-0.5 MeV/c(2) and branching ratio B(Sigma(+)-->pP(0),P0-->mu(+)mu(-))=[3.1(+2.4)(-1.9)(stat)+/-1.5(syst)]x10(-8).

  6. Measurements of psi ' -> (p)over-barK(+)Sigma(0) and chi(cJ) -> (p)over-barK(+) Lambda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, M.L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J.P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Friedel, P.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J.S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X.T.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Y.P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L.L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.S.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y.T.; Liao, G.R.; Liao, X. T.; Lin, D.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, Cheng; Liu, C.X.; Liu, F.H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C.L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F.E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J.W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schaefer, B. D.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J.F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y.J.; Sun, Y.Z.; Sun, Z.J.; Sun, Z.T.; Tang, C.J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.Q.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z.Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J.B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L.H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S.X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y. X.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, Q.J.; Xu, Q.N.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, LiLi; Zhang, R.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhao, S.J.; Zhao, T.C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, Z.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X.R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.H.; Zhu, Stuart; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.M.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi' mesons collectedwith the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+)e(-) collider and chi(cJ) mesons produced via radiative transitions from the psi', we report the first observation for psi' -> (p) over barK(+)Sigma(0) + c.c. (charge conjugate), as well as improved

  7. 6 sigma quality performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yeong Hak

    2000-03-01

    This deals with 6 sigma quality performance introducing company which has 6 sigma quality management, 6 sigma quality activity and customer, secret of success of 6 sigma quality management, what 6 sigma is, 6 sigma quality management propel system 5 propel steps of project like point of 6 sigma, flow of problem solution, tool for propel of project, performance of CTQ and total customer satisfaction, and quality management system and 6 sigma quality.

  8. Formation of mixed ligand complexes of UO22+ involving some nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mamta; Ram Nayan

    1996-01-01

    The complexation reactions of UO 2 2+ ion with nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands, 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid, o-aminophenol (ap), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (sa), 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonic acid (ss) and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (ca) have been investigated in aqueous solution employing the pH-titration technique. Analysis of the experimental data recorded at 25 degC and at an ionic strength of 0.10 M KNO 3 indicates formation of binary, hydroxo and ternary complexes of uranium. Formation constant values of the existing species have been evaluated and the results have been discussed. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Identification and Biological Activity of Synthetic Macrophage Inducible C-Type Lectin Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chriselle D. Braganza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The macrophage inducible C-type lectin (Mincle is a pattern recognition receptor able to recognize both damage-associated and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, and in this respect, there has been much interest in determining the scope of ligands that bind Mincle and how structural modifications to these ligands influence ensuing immune responses. In this review, we will present Mincle ligands of known chemical structure, with a focus on ligands that have been synthetically prepared, such as trehalose glycolipids, glycerol-based ligands, and 6-acylated glucose and mannose derivatives. The ability of the different classes of ligands to influence the innate, and consequently, the adaptive, immune response will be described, and where appropriate, structure–activity relationships within each class of Mincle ligands will be presented.

  10. Labeling and preliminary in vivo evaluation of the 5-HT7 receptor selective agonist [(11)C]E-55888

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne D; Andersen, Valdemar L; Lehel, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    E-55888 has been identified as a selective serotonin 7 (5-HT7) receptor agonist. In this study, we describe the synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo evaluation of [(11)C]E-55888 as a radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. [(11)C]E-55888 was obtained by N-methylation of an app...... neither be displaced by the structurally different 5-HT7 receptor ligand SB-269970 nor by self-block with unlabeled E-55888. Based on these data, [(11)C]E-55888 does not show promise as a PET radioligand for imaging the 5-HT7 receptor in vivo....

  11. Energy saving in Bellota Mexico S.A. de C.V.; Ahorro de energia en Bellota Mexico S.A de C.V.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar Lopez, Jose Albeiro [Bellota Mexico S.A. de C.V. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present article intends to make a general description of the different activities that were developed in Bellota Mexico S.A. de C.V. during year 2001 and which lead to obtaining the national prize of energy saving granted by the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and the Fideicomiso para el Ahorro de Energia Electrica (FIDE). In the executed actions stands out an entirely coordinated program that includes: lighting systems, motors, refrigeration systems, transformers, special projects (settling tanks), capacitors, compressed air pipeline, induction furnaces, machinery in general, maximum demand control, preventive maintenance, measuring systems, operational and organizational systems. In all these subjects a fast description is made of the performed actions and the obtained results. It is mentioned in addition the importance of making a power diagnosis and the use of historical data for the planning of the strategies to follow. Also reference is made of the use of appropriate technology that considers the use of high-energy efficiency equipment, such as motors, lamps, compressors, etc. Finally an evaluation is made of the obtained results where the improvement of the electrical parameters stands out such as: reduction of the power index in 35.06%, reduction of the maximum demand in 11.94%, increase of the power factor from 93.53% in 98.21%. The obtained results demonstrate that investing in energy saving it is a good business. [Spanish] El presente trabajo tiene por objeto hacer una descripcion general de las diferentes actividades que se desarrollaron en Bellota Mexico S.A. de C.V. durante el ano 2001 y que condujeron a la obtencion del premio nacional de ahorro de energia otorgado por la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) y el Fideicomiso para el Ahorro de Energia Electrica (FIDE). En las acciones ejecutadas se destaca todo un programa coordinado que abarca: sistemas de iluminacion, motores, sistemas de refrigeracion, transformadores, proyectos

  12. Synthesis of [(11)C]Am80 via Novel Pd(0)-Mediated Rapid [(11)C]Carbonylation Using Arylboronate and [(11)C]Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima-Hirano, Misato; Ishii, Hideki; Suzuki, Masaaki

    2012-10-11

    (11)C-labeled methylbenzoates [(11)C]4a-d were synthesized using Pd(0)-mediated rapid cross-coupling reactions employing [(11)C]carbon monoxide and arylboronic acid neopentyl glycol esters 3a-d under atmospheric pressure in methanol-dimethylformamide (MeOH-DMF), in radiochemical yields of 12 ± 5-26 ± 13% (decay-corrected based on [(11)C]O). The reaction conditions were highly favorable for the synthesis of [(11)C]Am80 ([(11)C]2) and [(11)C]methyl 4-((5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzoate ([(11)C]2-Me) using 4-(5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborinan-2-yl)-N-(5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)benzamide (5), both of which produced a decay-corrected radiochemical yield (RCY) of 26 ± 13%, with >99% radiochemical purity and an average specific radioactivity of 44 GBq/μmol. The yields of [(11)C]4a, [(11)C]2-Me, and [(11)C]2 were improved by the use of a 2-fold excess of the solvents and reagents under the same conditions to give respective yields of 66 ± 8, 65 ± 7, and 48 ± 2%.

  13. Ligand-Controlled Chemoselective C(acyl)–O Bond vs C(aryl)–C Bond Activation of Aromatic Esters in Nickel Catalyzed C(sp2)–C(sp3) Cross-Couplings

    KAUST Repository

    Chatupheeraphat, Adisak

    2018-02-20

    A ligand-controlled and site-selective nickel catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction with aromatic esters and alkyl organoboron reagents as coupling partners was developed. This methodology provides a facile route for C(sp2)-C(sp3) bond formation in a straightforward fashion by successful suppression of the undesired β-hydride elimination process. By simply switching the phosphorus ligand, the ester substrates are converted into the alkylated arenes and ketone products, respectively. The utility of this newly developed protocol was demonstrated by its wide substrate scope, broad functional group tolerance and application in the synthesis of key intermediates for the synthesis of bioactive compounds. DFT studies on the oxidative addition step helped rationalizing this intriguing reaction chemoselectivity: whereas nickel complexes with bidentate ligands favor the C(aryl)-C bond cleavage in the oxidative addition step leading to the alkylated product via a decarbonylative process, nickel complexes with monodentate phosphorus ligands favor activation of the C(acyl)-O bond, which later generates the ketone product.

  14. Crystal structures of bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III complexes containing an acetonitrile or monodentate thyminate(1− ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Sakate

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl]rhodium(III complexes with the metal in an octahedral coordination containing chloride and acetonitrile ligands, namely (OC-6-42-acetonitrilechloridobis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III, [RhCl(C11H8N2(CH3CN] (1, thyminate(1− and methanol, namely (OC-6-42-methanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-1-ido-κN1bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III, [Rh(C11H8N2(C5H5N2O2(CH3OH]·CH3OH·0.5H2O (2, and thyminate(1− and ethanol, namely (OC-6-42-ethanol(5-methyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidin-1-ido-κN1bis[2-(pyridin-2-ylphenyl-κ2N,C1]rhodium(III, [Rh(C11H8N2(C5H5N2O2(C2H5OH]·C2H5OH (3, are reported. The acetonitrile complex, 1, is isostructural with the IrIII analog. In complexes 2 and 3, the monodeprotonated thyminate (Hthym− ligand coordinates to the RhIII atom through the N atom, and the resulting Rh—N(Hthym bond lengths are relatively long [2.261 (2 and 2.252 (2 Å for 2 and 3, respectively] as compared to the Rh—N bonds in the related thyminate complexes. In each of the crystals of 2 and 3, the complexes are linked via a pair of intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds between neighbouring Hthym− ligands, forming an inversion dimer. A strong intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond between the thyminate(1− and alcohol ligands in mutually cis positions to each other is also observed.

  15. Synthesis of a {sup 11}C-labeled NK{sub 1} receptor ligand for PET studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livni, E; Babich, John W; Desai, Manoj C; Godek, Dennis M; Wilkinson, Robert A; Rubin, Robert H; Fischman, Alan J

    1995-01-01

    Changes in substance P (SP) receptor concentration have been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, Parkinson's disease, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. Since, SP and peptide analogs are rapidly metabolized and do not penetrate into the CNS, they are not useful for PET. Recently, a non-peptide SP antagonist, (+)-(2S,3S)-3-(2-methoxybenzylamino)-2-phenylpiperidine (CP-99,994) was developed. As a prelude to PET studies, this compound was radiolabeled with {sup 11}C and biodistribution was determined in hamsters. CP-99,994 was radiolabeled by methylation of tert-Boc, desmethyl CP-99,994 with {sup 11}CH{sub 3}I followed by deprotection and HPLC purification. The time required for the synthesis was 40 min from the end of bombardment. Radiochemical purity of the final product was > 95% and specific activity was routinely > 1000 mCi/{mu}mol [EOS]. The biodistribution of {sup 11}C-CP-99,994 was determined in groups of six Syrian hamsters at 5 and 30 min after injection. The results of these studies demonstrated that significant concentrations (%ID/g {+-} SEM) of CP-99,994 accumulate in most tissues of the hamster. The highest levels of drug were detected in the lung: 21.04 {+-} 1.26 (5 min) and 13.49 {+-} 1.71 (30 min). Brain accumulation was: 1.44 {+-} 0.06 (5 min), 1.32 {+-} 0.05 (30 min). These results indicate that {sup 11}C-CP-99,994 can be prepared in high purity and specific activity. This new radiopharmaceutical may be useful for studying both central and peripheral SP receptors by PET.

  16. The point of 6 sigma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yeong Jin

    2000-07-01

    This book gives descriptions of the point of 6 sigma. These are the titles of this : what 6 sigma is, sigma conception, motor roller 3.4 ppm, centering error, 6 sigma purpose, 6 sigma principle, eight steps of innovation strategy, 6 sigma innovation strategy of easy system step, measurement standard of 6 sigma outcome, the main role of 6 sigma, acknowledgment and reword, 6 sigma characteristic, 6 sigma effect, 6 sigma application and problems which happen when 6 sigma introduces.

  17. New ' Bucky- ligands'. Potentially Monoanionic Terdentate Diamino Aryl Pincer Ligands Anchored to C60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Meijer, M.D.; Gossage, R.A.; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methanofullerenes have been prepared by the reaction of C{6}{0} with diazo substituted, potentially monoanionic, terdentate diamino aryl ligands, yielding a mixture of the open valence [5, 6]- and closed valence [6,6]-isomers. Single isomers of the pure [6,6]-methanofullerenes were obtained

  18. Mixed ligand chelates of rare earths in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhani, S.U.; Thakur, G.S.; Sangal, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    Mixed ligand chelates of the 1:1 trivalent lanthanoids-EDTA, HEDTA and NTA chelates-1, 2-Dihydroxybenzene (Pyrocatechol) have been investigated at 35degC and 0.2 M ionic strength maintained by NaC10 4 . The formation of mixed ligand chelates has been found in all cases. The formation of mixed ligand chelates with EDTA shows the coordination number of lanthanoids to be eight, while the mixed ligand chelates with HEDTA and NTA shows the coordination number to be seven and six respectively. The stability constants of mixed ligand chelates are smaller than the binary complexes. The order of stability constants with respect to primary ligands follows the order NTA>HEDTA>EDTA. With respect to metal ions the stability constants increases with the decrease in ionic radii such as Gd< Er< Yb. (author)

  19. Comparative Analysis between Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Mirela Cristina MUNTEANU

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes the benefits of Lean Six Sigma in comparison with Lean and Six Sigma, traditional improvement methodologies. The introduction highlights the appearance of Lean Six Sigma, early 2000s, as well as the benefits brought by the integrated approach. The following parts of the study emphasize the main differences between methodologies and their commonalities based on their synergy. Finally the advantages of Lean Six Sigma versus Lean and Six Sigma are analyzed and systematized by...

  20. A study of the reactions $\\pi^{-}p\\rightarrow K^{*}X, K^{*}\\Sigma$ and $K^{*}Y1^{*}$ (1385) at 3.93 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Yaffe, D; Chaloupka, V; Ferrando, A; Korkea-Aho, M K; Losty, Michael J; Montanet, Lucien; Paul, E; Zatz, J; Zieminski, Z; Abramovich, M no 1; Chaloupka, V no 1; Ferrando, A no 1; Korkea-Aho, M no 1; Losty, M J no 1; Montanet, L no 1; Paul, E no 1; Zatz, J no 1; Zieminski, Z no 1; Yaffe, D no 1

    1974-01-01

    The authors have investigated the final states K*/sup 0/(890) Lambda , K*/sup 0/(890) Sigma /sup 0/ and K*/sup 0/(890) Y/sub 1/*/sup 0/(1385) produced in pi /sup -/p interactions at 3.93 GeV/c. They present the differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the resonances as functions of momentum transfer, as well as the Lambda and Sigma /sup 0/ polarizations. The Sigma /sup 0/ polarization is found to be positive and maximal. An amplitude analysis is performed for the K* Lambda and K* Sigma /sup 0/ reactions, and it is found that one natural parity transversity amplitude is dominant for the latter. (15 refs).

  1. Patients Lacking a KIR-Ligand of HLA Group C1 or C2 Have a Better Outcome after Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Martínez-Losada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Donor natural killer (NK cells can destroy residual leukemic cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This effect is based on the interaction of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR of donor NK cells with ligands of the major histocompatibility complex found on the surface of the target cells. HLA-C1 subtypes provide the ligand for KIR2DL2 and KIR2DL3 and the HLA-C2 subtypes for KIR2DL1. We have studied the probability of relapse (PR after single-unit unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT in relation to the potential graft-vs.-leukemia effect mediated by NK cells present in the umbilical cord blood (UCB by analyzing KIR-ligand and HLA-C typing of the receptor. Data from 33 consecutive patients given a single unit UCBT were included. We have considered two groups of patients based on the absence or the presence of one of the C-ligands for inhibitory KIR and the incompatibility HLA-C1/2 between UCB and patients. Group 1 (n = 21: the patient lacks a C-ligand for inhibitory KIR present in UCB NK cells, i.e., patients homozygous C1/C1 or C2/C2. Group 2 (n = 12: patients heterozygous C1/C2 in which KIR-mediated graft-vs.-leukemia effect is not expected (presence of both C ligands for inhibitory KIR in the receptor. With a median follow-up post-UCBT of 93 months, patients with absence of a C-ligand for inhibitory KIRs (Group 1 showed a lower actuarial PR than patients with both C-ligands (group 2: 21 ± 10 vs. 68 ± 18% at 2 year and 36 ± 13 vs. 84 ± 14% at 5 years (p = 0.025, respectively. In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the 2-year PR was 36 ± 21% for group 1 and 66 ± 26% for 2 (p = 0.038. Furthermore, group 1 had a lower incidence of grades II–IV acute graft-vs.-host disease (p = 0.04. In the setting of UCBT, the absence of a C-ligand (C1 or C2 of inhibitory KIR in the patient is associated with lower PR, which is probably due to the graft

  2. A study of 11C-acetate production using 11C-choline commercial module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinming; Tian Jiahe; Yao Shulin; Chen Yan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: 11 C-acetate is a useful PET tracer in evaluating myocardial metabolism but more interest has been focused on its application in tumor detection in recent years, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study was designed to evaluate the laboratory, preparation of 11 C-acetate with a modified 11 C-choline commercial module and to investigate its biodistribution in tumor (lung adenocarcinoma)-bearing mice as well as its potential as a tumor imaging agent. Methods: 11 C-acetate was synthesized with a modified 11 C choline module: Methyl magnesium bromide Grignard (0.1 ml of 1.5 mol/L) was load- ed to a Teflon loop before 11 CO 2 was recovered from the target. Cartier acetate solution (2 ml of 1 mmol/L) was pushed through the loop, SPE cartridges (mixed AG50 and IC-Ag) and then the QMA. The loop and cartridges were then rinsed with water. The product 11 C-acetate was then washed out from QMA with 0.9% NaCl solution into a collection vial containing diluted HCl. 11 C-carbonate was removed by nitrogen bubbling for 2 min. After neutralization with trisodium citrate, the injectable 11 C-acetate solution was obtained. The tumor-bearing mice were sacrificed. The percentage activity of injected dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) for tumor and other tissues were calculated. One patient with known diagnosis of moderately differentiated HCC was injected with 11 C-acetate and imaged by PET/CT, followed by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Results: The synthesis yield of 11 C-acetate was (60.5 ± 8.7)% (decay conected, n=10); the radio-chemistry purity was > 98% and the synthesis time was 10 min from 11 CO 2 to 11 C-acetate. The radioactivity ratio for tumor/muscle was 1.76 at 30 min. A patient with known HCC showed positive 11 C-acetate accumulation in the tumor but was negative in 18 F-FDG. Conclusion: The synthesis of 11 C-acetate by modification of an 11 C-choline commercial module was feasible and it could be achieved with high yield, high radiochemical purity

  3. Model studies of the Cu(B) site of cytochrome c oxidase utilizing a Zn(II) complex containing an imidazole-phenol cross-linked ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Russell P; Pratt, Derek A; Jeffers, Jerry; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2006-07-21

    Cytochrome c oxidase, the enzyme complex responsible for the four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O, contains an unusual histidine-tyrosine cross-link in its bimetallic heme a3-CuB active site. We have synthesised an unhindered, tripodal chelating ligand, BPAIP, containing the unusual ortho-imidazole-phenol linkage, which mimics the coordination environment of the CuB center. The ligand was used to investigate the physicochemical (pKa, oxidation potential) and coordination properties of the imidazole-phenol linkage when bound to a dication. Zn(II) coordination lowers the pKa of the phenol by 0.6 log units, and increases the potential of the phenolate/phenoxyl radical couple by approximately 50 mV. These results are consistent with inductive withdrawal of electron density from the phenolic ring. Spectroscopic data and theoretical calculations (DFT) were used to establish that the cationic complex [Zn(BPAIP)Br]+ has an axially distorted trigonal bipyramidal structure, with three coordinating nitrogen ligands (two pyridine and one imidazole) occupying the equatorial plane and the bromide and the tertiary amine nitrogen of the tripod in the axial positions. Interestingly, the Zn-Namine bonding interaction is weak or absent in [Zn(BPAIP)Br]+ and the complex gains stability in basic solutions, as indicated by 1H NMR spectroscopy. These observations are supported by theoretical calculations (DFT), which suggest that the electron-donating capacity of the equatorial imidazole ligand can be varied by modulation of the protonation and/or redox state of the cross-linked phenol. Deprotonation of the phenol makes the equatorial imidazole a stronger sigma-donor, resulting in an increased Zn-Nimd interaction and thereby leading to distortion of the axial ligand axis toward a more tetrahedral geometry.

  4. Comparative Analysis between Lean, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Mirela Cristina MUNTEANU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the benefits of Lean Six Sigma in comparison with Lean and Six Sigma, traditional improvement methodologies. The introduction highlights the appearance of Lean Six Sigma, early 2000s, as well as the benefits brought by the integrated approach. The following parts of the study emphasize the main differences between methodologies and their commonalities based on their synergy. Finally the advantages of Lean Six Sigma versus Lean and Six Sigma are analyzed and systematized by author in order to reveal Lean Six Sigma’s benefits.

  5. (11)C-labeling and preliminary evaluation of pimavanserin as a 5-HT2A receptor PET-radioligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Valdemar L; Hansen, Hanne D; Herth, Matthias M

    2015-01-01

    ]Pimavanserin was obtained by N-methylation of an appropriate precursor using [(11)C]MeOTf in acetone at 60°C giving radiochemical yields in the range of 1-1.7GBq (n=4). In Danish Landrace pigs the radio ligand readily entered the brain and displayed binding in the cortex in accordance with the distribution of 5-HT2ARs...

  6. ANALISIS PENGENDALIAN KUALITAS PRODUKSI BOGIE BARBER S2HD 9C MENGGUNAKAN METODE LEAN SIX SIGMA DENGAN PENDEKATAN DMAIC (DEFINE, MEASURE, ANALYZE, IMPROVE, CONTROL STUDI KASUS DI PT BARATA INDONESIA (PERSERO GRESIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparno Suparno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis pengendalian kualitas dan pemborosan yang terjadi dalam produksi side frame S2HD 9C menggunakan metode lean six sigma dengan pendekatan DMAIC di PT Barata Indonesia (Persero Gresik. Side frame S2HD 9C merupakan bagian dari produk bogie barber S2HD 9C. Penelitian ini pada tahap six sigma difokuskan pada analisis defect dan capaian sigma, sedangkan pada tahap lean six sigma difokuskan pada analisis waste dan capaian sigma. Data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini ada 2 jenis yaitu data primer dan sekunder, yang bersifat kualitatif maupun kuantitatif. Data primer diperoleh dari observasi lapangan, sedangkan data sekunder diperoleh dari telaah dokumen. Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan sesuai dengan pendekatan DMAIC ( define, measure, analyze, improve, control . Setelah dilakukan analisis pada tahap six sigma diketahui terdapat 5 jenis defect yang terjadi pada periode Januari sampai April 2016. Yaitu: defect gas terperangkap 58.18%, defect core patah 21.82%, defect sand drop 12.73%, defect brake mould 5.46% dan defect misplace core 1.82%. Dan nilai capaian tingkat sigma dari masing-masing defect adalah sebagai berikut:  defect gas terperangkap 1235.71 DPMO dengan tingkat sigma 4.52σ, defect core patah 463.392 DPMO dengan tingkat sigma 4.81σ, defect sand drop 270.312 DPMO dengan tingkat sigma 4.96σ, defect brake mould 115.848 DPMO dengan tingkat sigma 5.18σ dan defect misplace core 38.616 DPMO dengan tingkat sigma 5.45σ. Dalam tahap lean six sigma diketahui terdapat 4 jenis waste, yaitu: waste defect product, waste waiting time (delay, waste transportation dan waste excess process. Berikut ini merupakan nilai capaian dari masing-masing waste: waste defect product 6890 DPMO dengan tingkat sigma 3.96σ dan nilai capability process 1.31 dengan tingkat sigma 3.94σ, waste waiting time (delay nilai capability process 1 dengan tingkat sigma 3σ, waste transportation nilai capability process 1.31 dengan tingkat

  7. Reliable set-up for in-loop 11C-carboxylations using Grignard reactions for the preparation of [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 and [11C]-(+)-PHNO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rami-Mark, Christina; Ungersboeck, Johanna; Haeusler, Daniela; Nics, Lukas; Philippe, Cecile; Mitterhauser, Markus; Willeit, Matthaeus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Karanikas, Georgios; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this work was the implementation of a generalized in-loop synthesis for 11 C-carboxylations and subsequent 11 C-acylations on the TRACERlab FxC Pro platform. The set-up was tested using [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and, for the first time, [ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO. Its general applicability could be demonstrated and both [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and [ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO were prepared with high reliability and satisfying outcome. - Highlights: • Generalized method for in-loop 11 C-carboxylations implemented. • Grignard reactions successfully tested. • First in-loop procedure for [ 11 C]-(+)PHNO established. • Satisfactory synthesis outcome for both [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and [ 11 C]-(+)PHNO. • No distillation for purification of intermediate required

  8. Enzymatic synthesis of 11C-pyruvic acid and 11C-L-lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Spolter, L.; Chang, C.C.; Cook, J.S.; Macdonald, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    L-Lactic acid is formed as the end product of glycolysis under anaerobic conditions in all cells, but this reaction is of special significance in the myocardium. L-Lactic acid is reversibly formed from and is in equilibrium with myocardial pyruvic acid, which is its sole metabolic pathway. 11 C-Pyruvic acid is synthesized from 11 C carbon dioxide using pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and coenzymes. The 11 C-pyruvic acid is then converted to 11 -L-lactic acid by lactic acid dehydrogenase. The availability of 11 C-pyruvic acid and 11 C-L-lactic acid will permit the in vivo investigation of lactate metabolism. (author)

  9. In vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]N-(2-chloro-5-thiomethylphenyl)-N'- (3-methoxy-phenyl)-N'-methylguanidine ([{sup 11}C]GMOM) as a potential PET radiotracer for the PCP/NMDA receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Rikki N. E-mail: rnw7@columbia.edu; Slifstein, Mark; Dumont, Filip; Zhao Jun; Chang, Raymond C.; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Sultana, Abida; Balter, Andrew; Laruelle, Marc

    2004-10-01

    The development of imaging methods to measure changes in NMDA ion channel activation would provide a powerful means to probe the mechanisms of drugs and device based treatments (e.g., ECT) thought to alter glutamate neurotransmission. To provide a potential NMDA/PCP receptor PET tracer, we synthesized the radioligand [{sup 11}C]GMOM (K{sub i} = 5.2 {+-}0.3 nM; log P = 2.34) and evaluated this ligand in vivo in awake male rats and isoflurane anesthetized baboons. In rats, the regional brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]GMOM ranged from 0.75{+-}0.13% ID/g in the medulla and pons to 1.15{+-}0.17% ID/g in the occipital cortex. MK801 (1 mg/kg i.v.) significantly reduced (24-28%) [{sup 11}C]GMOM uptake in all regions. D-serine (10 mg/kg i.v.) increased [{sup 11}C]GMOM %ID/g values in all regions (10-24%) reaching significance in the frontal cortex and cerebellum only. The NR2B ligand RO 25-6981 (10 mg/kg i.v.) reduced [{sup 11}C]GMOM uptake significantly (24-38%) in all regions except for the cerebellum and striatum. Blood activity was 0.11{+-}0.03 %ID/g in the controls group and did not vary significantly across groups. PET imaging in isoflurane-anesthetized baboons with high specific activity [{sup 11}C]GMOM provided fairly uniform regional brain distribution volume (V{sub T}) values (12.8-17.1 ml g{sup -1}). MK801 (0.5 mg/kg, i.v., n = 1, and 1.0 mg/kg, i.v., n = 1) did not significantly alter regional V{sub T} values, indicating a lack of saturable binding. However, the potential confounding effects associated with ketamine induction of anesthesia along with isoflurane maintenance must be considered because both agents are known to reduce NMDA ion channel activation. Future and carefully designed studies, presumably utilizing an optimized NMDA/PCP site tracer, will be carried out to further explore these hypotheses. We conclude that, even though [{sup 11}C]GMOM is not an optimized PCP site radiotracer, its binding is altered in vivo in awake rats as expected by modulation of

  10. Rare azido-bridged manganese(II) systems: syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A K; Ghoshal, D; Zangrando, E; Ribas, J; Ray Chaudhuri, N

    2005-03-21

    Two new polymeric azido-bridged manganese complexes of formulas [Mn(N3)2 (bpee)]n (1) and {[Mn(N3)(dpyo)Cl(H2O)2](H2O)}n (2) [bpee, trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene; dpyo, 4,4'-dipyridyl N,N'-dioxide] have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and low-temperature magnetic study. Both the complexes 1 and 2 crystallize in the triclinic system, space group P1, with a = 8.877(3) A, b = 11.036(3) A, c = 11.584(4) A, alpha = 72.62(2) degrees, beta = 71.06(2) degrees, gamma = 87.98(3) degrees, and Z = 1 and a = 7.060(3) A, b = 10.345(3) A, c = 11.697(4) A, alpha = 106.86(2) degrees, beta = 113.33(2) degrees, gamma = 96.39(3) degrees, and Z = 2, respectively. Complex 1 exhibits a 2D structure of [-Mn(N3)2-]n chains, connected by bpee ligands, whose pyridine rings undergo pi-pi and C-H...pi interactions. This facilitates the rare arrangement of doubly bridged azide ligands with one end-on and two end-to-end (EO-EE-EE) sequence. Complex 2 is a neutral 1D polymer built up by [Mn(N3)(dpyo)Cl(H2O)2] units and lattice water molecules. The metals are connected by single EE azide ligands, which are arranged in a cis position to the Mn(II) center. The 1D zipped chains are linked by H-bonds involving lattice water molecules and show pi-pi stacking of dpyo pyridine rings to form a supramolecular 2D layered structure. The magnetic studies were performed in 2-300 K temperature range, and the data were fitted by considering an alternating chain of exchange interactions with S = 5/2 (considered as classical spin) with the spin Hamiltonians H = -Ji sigma(S(3i)S(3i+1) + S(3i+1)S(3i+2)) - J2 sigmaS(3i-1)S(3i) and H = -Ji sigmaS(2i)S(2i+1) - J2 sigmaS(2i+1)S(2i+2) for complexes 1 and 2, respectively. Complex 2 exhibits small antiferromagnetic coupling between the metal centers, whereas 1 exhibits a new case of topological ferromagnetism, which is very unusual.

  11. QUANTIFICATION OF AN C-11 LABELED BETA-ADRENOCEPTOR LIGAND, S-(-)CGP-12177, IN PLASMA OF HUMANS AND RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWAARDE, A; ANTHONIO, RL; ELSINGA, PH; POSTHUMUS, H; WEEMAES, AMA; BLANKSMA, PK; PAANS, AMJ; VAALBURG, W; Visser, Ton J.; Visser, Gerben

    1995-01-01

    beta-Adrenoceptors in human lungs and heart can be imaged with the radioligand 4-[3-[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-C-11-one (CGP 12177, [C-11]I). For quantification of receptor density with compartment models by adjustment of rate constants, an 'input

  12. Simple and rapid preparation of [11C]DASB with high quality and reliability for routine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, D.; Mien, L.-K.; Nics, L.; Ungersboeck, J.; Philippe, C.; Lanzenberger, R.R.; Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R.; Mitterhauser, M.; Wadsak, W.

    2009-01-01

    [ 11 C]DASB combines all major prerequisites for a successful SERT-ligand, providing excellent biological properties and in-vivo behaviour. Thus, we aimed to establish a fully automated procedure for the synthesis and purification of [ 11 C]DASB with a high degree of reliability reducing the overall synthesis time while conserving high yields and purity. The optimized [ 11 C]DASB synthesis was applied in more than 60 applications with a very low failure rate (3.2%). We obtained yields up to 8.9 GBq (average 5.3±1.6 GBq). Radiochemical yields based on [ 11 C]CH 3 I, (corrected for decay) were 66.3±6.9% with a specific radioactivity (A s ) of 86.8±24.3 GBq/μmol (both at the end of synthesis, EOS). Time consumption was kept to a minimum, resulting in 43 min from end of bombardment to release of the product after quality control. Form our data, it is evident that the presented method can be implemented for routine preparations of [ 11 C]DASB with high reliability.

  13. Synthesis of [11C]cyanoalkyltriphenylphosphoranes via [11C]cyanide substitution on haloalkylphosphonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoernfeldt, K.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of the 11 C-labelled bifunctional precursors 3-[ 11 C]cyanoethyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (1'), 4-[ 11 C]cyanopropyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (2'), 5-[ 11 C]cyanobutyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (3'), 4-[ 11 C]cyanopropyltriphenylphosphonium iodide (4') and 5-[ 11 C]cyanobutyltriphenylphosphonium iodide (5') is presented. The label was introduced using [ 11 C]cyanide in a substitution reaction on the ω-halo-alkyltriphenylphosphonium salt (bromide or iodide salt). The phosphonium salts 1'-5' were formed in 33-99% radiochemical yield in 5-10 min reaction time. After addition of epichlorohydrin as generator of base, the precursors 1-3 were formed. The potential of the intermediates 1-3 in Wittig reactions was shown in model reactions with aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. The aromatic olefins obtained from 1'-5' were formed in 85-96% radiochemical yield, with Z/E ratios between 67/33-75/25. The aliphatic olefins were obtained in 60-78% radiochemical yield from 4' and 5'. In the reaction with 1' and an aliphatic aldehyde, the yield decreased to 5-10%. The Z/E ratios were 100/0 for the aliphatic olefins. In an experiment starting with 2,7 GBq (73 mCi) hydrogen [ 11 C]cyanide, 451 MBq (12.2 mCi) olefin from 3' and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde was obtained in 44 min from hydrogen [ 11 C]cyanide production, with a 55% decay corrected radiochemical yield, the radiochemical purity was 96%. (Author)

  14. 11C-ORM-13070, a novel PET ligand for brain α2C-adrenoceptors: radiometabolism, plasma pharmacokinetics, whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry in healthy men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luoto, Pauliina; Oikonen, Vesa; Arponen, Eveliina; Helin, Semi; Virta, Jere; Virtanen, Kirsi; Roivainen, Anne; Suilamo, Sami; Herttuainen, Jukka; Hietamaeki, Johanna; Holopainen, Aila; Rouru, Juha; Sallinen, Jukka; Kailajaervi, Marita; Peltonen, Juha M.; Scheinin, Mika; Volanen, Iina; Rinne, Juha O.

    2014-01-01

    11 C-labelled 1-[(S)-1-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[1,2]dioxin-2-yl)methyl] -4-(3-methoxy-methylpyridin-2- yl)-piperazine ( 11 C-ORM-13070) is a novel PET tracer for imaging of α 2C -adrenoceptors in the human brain. Brain α 2C -adrenoceptors may be therapeutic targets in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. To validate the use of 11 C-ORM-13070 in humans, we investigated its radiometabolism, pharmacokinetics, whole-body distribution and radiation dose. Radiometabolism was studied in a test-retest setting in six healthy men. After intravenous injection of 11 C-ORM-13070, blood samples were drawn over 60 min. Plasma samples were analysed by radio-HPLC for intact tracer and its radioactive metabolites. Metabolite-corrected plasma time-activity curves were used for calculation of pharmacokinetics. In a separate group of 12 healthy men, the whole-body distribution of 11 C-ORM-13070 and radiation exposure were investigated by dynamic PET/CT imaging without blood sampling. Two radioactive metabolites of 11 C-ORM-13070 were detected in human arterial plasma. The proportion of unchanged 11 C-ORM-13070 decreased from 81 ± 4 % of total radioactivity at 4 min after tracer injection to 23 ± 4 % at 60 min. At least one of the radioactive metabolites penetrated into red blood cells, while the parent tracer remained in plasma. The apparent elimination rate constant and corresponding half-life of unchanged 11 C-ORM-13070 in arterial plasma were 0.0117 ± 0.0056 min -1 and 73.6 ± 35.8 min, respectively. The organs with the highest absorbed doses were the liver (12 μSv/MBq), gallbladder wall (12 μSv/MBq) and pancreas (9.1 μSv/MBq). The mean effective dose was 3.9 μSv/MBq, with a range of 3.6 - 4.2 μSv/MBq. 11 C-ORM-13070 was rapidly metabolized in human subjects after intravenous injection. The effective radiation dose of 11 C-ORM-13070 was in the same range as that of other 11 C-labelled brain receptor tracers. An injection

  15. Intuitive Understanding of sigma Delocalization in Loose and sigma Localization in Tight Helical Conformations of an Oligosilane Chain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jovanovic, M.; Antic, D.; Rooklin, D.; Bande, A.; Michl, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2017), s. 1250-1263 ISSN 1861-4728 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron delocalization * electron localization * electronic states * oligosilanes * sigma conjugation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 4.083, year: 2016

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of [11C]Cimbi-806 as a potential PET ligand for 5-HT7 receptor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias Manfred; Hansen, Hanne Demant; Ettrup, Anders Janusz

    2012-01-01

    )-N,N-dimethylethanamine ([(11)C]Cimbi-806) as a radioligand for imaging brain 5-HT(7) receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Precursor and reference compound was synthesized and subsequent (11)C-labelling with [(11)C]methyltriflate produced [(11)C]Cimbi-806 in specific activities ranging from 50 to 300 GBq...... of appropriate in vivo blocking with a 5-HT(7) receptor selective compounds renders the conclusion that [(11)C]Cimbi-806 is not an appropriate PET radioligand for imaging the 5-HT(7) receptor in vivo....

  17. Beta adrenergic receptors in dog heart characterised in vivo by sup 11 C-CGP 12117 and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, Mikito [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1989-06-01

    Beta adrenergic receptors in the dog heart were demonstrated in vivo using a potent antagonist, {sup 11}C-CGP 12117 (Kd=0.2 nmol/kg, in vitro), and positron emission tomography (PET). {sup 11}C-CGP at a high specific radioactivity (approximately 500 Ci/mmol) was intravenously injectd in dogs. Axial transverse slices of the heart were obtained. The concentration of {sup 11}C-CGP 12177 in the myocardium rapidly increased and then remained nearly constant for about 30 minutes, before decreasing slowly. Designing a new method to distinguish specific receptor binding from the total ligand concentration in the heart measured by PET, beta adrenoceptor density in the dog myocardium (Bmax) was found to be 113 pmol/cm{sup 3}. Displacement and pre-saturation studies were performed to demonstrate the specifity of {sup 11}C-CGP 12177 binding for noradrenaline binding sites. The bolus injection of unlabeled CGP 12177 25 min following {sup 11}C-CGP 12177 injection led to a rapid decrease in the myocardial ligand concentration and a rapid fall in the heart rate. Both the pharmacological effect of CGP 12177 and the binding inhibition of radioligand were synchronous with the increasing amount of antagonist injected for displacement. In experiments of presaturation with an excessive dose of unlabeled antagonist injection 10 min before {sup 11}C-CGP 12177 injection, the heart/blood radioligand concentration ratio as a function of time was significantly lower than that in the control study. Thus, specific receptor binding of {sup 11}C-CGP 12177 for noradrenaline binding sites in the living heart was proved by PET, which might be the ideal method to study the physiologically active form of receptors in vivo. (author).

  18. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [11C]DASB in baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belanger, Marie-Jose; Simpson, Norman R.; Wang, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The serotonin transporter has been implicated in a variety of conditions including mood disorders and suicidal behavior. In vivo human brain studies with positron emission tomography and the serotonin transporter antagonist [ 11 C]DASB ([ 11 C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile) are ongoing in several laboratories with the maximum administered activity based on dosimetry collected in rodents. We report on the biodistribution and dosimetry of [ 11 C]DASB in the baboon as this species may be a more reliable surrogate for human dosimetry. Methods: Four baboon studies (two studies in each of two baboons) were acquired in an ECAT ACCEL camera after the bolus injection of 183±5 MBq/2.3±1.0 nmol of [ 11 C]DASB. For each study, six whole-body emission scans were collected in 3D mode over 6/7 bed positions for 2 h. Regions of interest were drawn on brain, lungs, liver, gallbladder, spleen, kidneys, small intestine and bladder. Since no fluid was removed from the animal, total body radioactivity was calculated using the injected dose calibrated to the ACCEL image units. Results: Uptake was greatest in lungs, followed by the urinary bladder, gallbladder, brain and other organs. The ligand was eliminated via the hepato-billiary and renal systems. The largest absorbed dose was found in the lungs (3.6x10 -2 mSv/MBq). The absorbed radiation doses in lungs and gallbladder were four and nine times larger than that previously estimated from rat studies. Conclusion: Based on our baboon biodistribution and dose estimates, the lungs are the critical organs for administration of [ 11 C]DASB. In the United States, the absorbed dose to the lungs would limit [ 11 C]DASB administered with the approval of a Radioactive Drug Research Committee to 1400 MBq (37 mCi) in the adult male and 1100 MBq (30 mCi) in the adult female

  19. Conversion of no-carrier-added [11C]carbon dioxide to [11C]carbon monoxide on molybdenum for the synthesis of 11C-labelled aromatic ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, S.K.; Nader, M.; Theobald, A.; Oberdorfer, F.

    1997-01-01

    A new method for the efficient conversion of no-carrier-added [ 11 C]carbon dioxide into [ 11 C]carbon monoxide is described. [ 11 C]Carbon dioxide produced by proton bombardment of ultra high purity nitrogen is pre-concentrated in a cryo trap and then passed through a quartz tube filled with a mesh of thin molybdenum wire heated to 850 o C. [ 11 C]Carbon dioxide readily reacts with molybdenum to form [ 11 C]carbon monoxide and molybdenum(IV) oxide. The latter also reduces carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and helps improve the performance of the converter. [ 11 C]Carbon monoxide is purified from remaining [ 11 C]carbon dioxide and collected in a small silica trap from which it is eluted into a reaction mixture for the palladium-mediated synthesis of a 11 C-labelled aromatic ketone. Radiochemical yields of up to 81% (decay-corrected) for [ 11 C]carbon monoxide were obtained. Radiochemical purity and specific radioactivity of both [ 11 C]carbon monoxide and the 11 C-labelled ketone are sufficient for nuclear medical studies with PET. (Author)

  20. Measurement of the $\\Sigma \\pi$ photoproduction line shapes near the $\\Lambda(1405)$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bellis, M; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crede, V; D& #x27; Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Dey, B; Djalali, C; Doughty, R; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Fassi, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fersch, R; Fleming, J A; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Ho, D; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McCracken, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Nepali, C S; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, E; Phillips, J J; Pisano, S; Pivnyuk, N; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatio, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, S; Taylor, C E; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Torayev, B; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P

    2013-03-01

    The reaction {gamma} + p -> K{sup +} + {Sigma} + {p}i was used to determine the invariant mass distributions or "line shapes" of the {Sigma}{sup +} {pi}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} and {Sigma}{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0} final states, from threshold at 1328 MeV/c^2 through the mass range of the {Lambda}(1405) and the {Lambda}(1520). The measurements were made with the CLAS system at Jefferson Lab using tagged real photons, for center-of-mass energies 1.95 < W < 2.85 GeV. The three mass distributions differ strongly in the vicinity of the I=0 {Lambda}(1405), indicating the presence of substantial I=1 strength in the reaction. Background contributions to the data from the {Sigma}{sup 0}(1385) and from K* {Sigma} production were studied and shown to have negligible influence. To separate the isospin amplitudes, Breit-Wigner model fits were made that included channel-coupling distortions due to the Nkbar threshold. A best fit to all the data was obtained after including a phenomenological I=1, J{sup P} = 1/2{sup -} amplitude with a centroid at 1394\\pm20 MeV/c^2 and a second I=1 amplitude at 1413\\pm10 MeV/c^2. The centroid of the I=0 {Lambda}(1405) strength was found at the {Sigma} {pi} threshold, with the observed shape determined largely by channel-coupling, leading to an apparent overall peak near 1405 MeV/c^2.

  1. Comparison of standardized uptake values with volume of distribution for quantitation of [11C]PBR28 brain uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, Karmen K.; Territo, Paul R.; Hutchins, Gary D.; Hannestad, Jonas; Morris, Evan D.; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Normandin, Marc D.; Cosgrove, Kelly P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: [ 11 C]PBR28 is a high-affinity ligand for the Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO), which is considered to be a marker for microglial activation. Volume of distribution (V T ) estimated with an arterial plasma input function is the gold standard for quantitation of [ 11 C]PBR28 binding. However, arterial sampling is impractical at many PET sites for multiple reasons. Reference region modeling approaches are not ideal for TSPO tracers, as the existence of a true reference region cannot be assumed. Given that it would be desirable to have a non-invasive index of [ 11 C]PBR28 binding, we elected to study the utility of the semi-quantitative metric, standardized uptake value (SUV) for use in brain [ 11 C]PBR PET studies. The primary goal of this study was to determine the relationship between SUV and V T . Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of data from sixteen [ 11 C]PBR28 PET scans acquired in baboons at baseline and at multiple time points after IV injection of lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin that transiently induces neuroinflammation. For each scan, data from 14 brain regions of interest were studied. V T was estimated with the Logan plot, using metabolite-corrected input functions. SUV was calculated with data from 30 to 60 minutes after [ 11 C]PBR28 injection. Results: Within individual PET studies, SUV tended to correlate well with V T . Across studies, the relationship between SUV and V T was variable. Conclusions: From study to study, there was variability in the degree of correlation between [ 11 C]PBR28 V T and SUV. There are multiple physiological factors that may contribute to this variance. Advances in Knowledge: As currently applied, the non-invasive measurement of SUV does not appear to be a reliable outcome variable for [ 11 C]PBR28. Additional work is needed to discover the source of the discrepancy in SUV between [ 11 C]PBR28 scans. Implications for Patient Care: There is a need to develop alternatives to arterial plasma

  2. Application of Six Sigma Model to Evaluate the Analytical Quality of Four HbA1c Analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesa, Jos Eacute M; Fern Aacute Ndez-Riejos, Patricia; S Aacute Nchez-Mora, Catalina; Toro-Crespo, Mar Iacute A De; Gonz Aacute Lez-Rodriguez, Concepci Oacute N

    2017-01-01

    The Six Sigma Model is a global quality management system applicable to the determination of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In addition, this model can ensure the three characteristics influencing the patient risk: the correct performance of the analytical method with low inaccuracy and bias, the quality control strategy used by the laboratory, and the necessary quality of the analyte. The aim of this study is to use the Six Sigma Model for evaluating quality criteria in the determination of glycated hemoglobin HbA1c and its application to assess four different HbA1c analyzers. Four HbA1c analyzers were evaluated: HA-8180V®, D-100®, G8®, and Variant II Turbo®. For 20 consecutive days, two levels of quality control (high and low) provided by the manufacturers were measured in each of the instruments. Imprecision (CV), bias, and Sigma values (σ) were calculated with the data obtained and a method decision chart was developed considering a range of quality requirements (allowable total error, TEa). For a TEa = 3%, HA-8180V = 1.54 σ, D-100 = 1.63 σ, G8 = 2.20 σ, and Variant II Turbo = -0.08 σ. For a TEa = 4%, HA-8180V = 2.34 σ, D-100 = 2.32 σ, G8 = 3.74 σ, and Variant II Turbo = 0.16 σ. For a TEa = 10%, HA8180V = 7.12 σ, D-100 = 6.46 σ, G8 = 13.0 σ, and Variant II Turbo = 1.56 σ. Applying the Stockholm consensus and its subsequent Milan review to the results: the maximum level in quality requirements for HbA1c is an allowable total error (TEa) = 3%, G8 is located in region 2 σ (2.20), which is a poor result, and HA-8180V and D-100 are both in region 1 σ (1.54 and 1.63, respectively), which is an unacceptable analytical performance.

  3. Reaction of 11 C-benzoyl chlorides with metalloid reagents: 11 C-labeling of benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, and phenyl ketones from [11 C]CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslin, Sara; Dahl, Kenneth; Nordeman, Patrik

    2018-01-26

    In this article, we describe the carbon-11 ( 11 C, t 1/2  = 20.4 minutes) labeling of benzyl alcohols, benzaldehydes, and ketones using an efficient 2-step synthesis in which 11 C-carbon monoxide is used in an initial palladium-mediated reaction to produce 11 C-benzoyl chloride as a key intermediate. In the second step, the obtained 11 C-benzoyl chloride is further treated with a metalloid reagent to furnish the final 11 C-labeled product. Benzyl alcohols were obtained in moderated to high non-isolated radiochemical yields (RCY, 35%-90%) with lithium aluminum hydride or lithium aluminum deuteride as metalloid reagent. Changing the metalloid reagent to either tributyltin hydride or sodium borohydride, allowed for the reliable syntheses of 11 C-benzaldehydes in RCYs ranging from 58% to 95%. Finally, sodium tetraphenylborate were utilized to obtain 11 C-phenyl ketones in high RCYs (77%-95%). The developed method provides a new and efficient route to 3 different classes of compounds starting from aryl iodides or aryl bromides. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Captodiamine, a putative antidepressant, enhances hypothalamic BDNF expression in vivo by synergistic 5-HT2c receptor antagonism and sigma-1 receptor agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Rebecca M; Regan, Ciaran M

    2013-10-01

    The putative antidepressant captodiamine is a 5-HT2c receptor antagonist and agonist at sigma-1 and D3 dopamine receptors, exerts an anti-immobility action in the forced swim paradigm, and enhances dopamine turnover in the frontal cortex. Captodiamine has also been found to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia, reduce the associated elevations of hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and restore the reductions in hypothalamic BDNF expression. Here we demonstrate chronic administration of captodiamine to have no significant effect on hypothalamic CRF expression through sigma-1 receptor agonism; however, both sigma-1 receptor agonism or 5-HT2c receptor antagonism were necessary to enhance BDNF expression. Regulation of BDNF expression by captodiamine was associated with increased phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB and mediated through sigma-1 receptor agonism but blocked by 5-HT2c receptor antagonism. The existence of two separate signalling pathways was confirmed by immunolocalisation of each receptor to distinct cell populations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Increased BDNF induced by captodiamine was also associated with enhanced expression of synapsin, but not PSD-95, suggesting induction of long-term structural plasticity between hypothalamic synapses. These unique features of captodiamine may contribute to its ability to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia as the hypothalamus plays a prominent role in regulating HPA axis activity.

  5. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Sekine, Shinichi; Kataoka, Kosuke; Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko; Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato; Gilbert, Rebekah S.; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c + DCs in mucosal tissues. ► Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c + DCs. ► Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c + dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c + DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c + DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c + DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4 + T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4 + T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch–Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c + DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  6. Ligand-accelerated non-directed C-H functionalization of arenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Verma, Pritha; Xia, Guoqin; Shi, Jun; Qiao, Jennifer X.; Tao, Shiwei; Cheng, Peter T. W.; Poss, Michael A.; Farmer, Marcus E.; Yeung, Kap-Sun; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2017-11-01

    The directed activation of carbon-hydrogen bonds (C-H) is important in the development of synthetically useful reactions, owing to the proximity-induced reactivity and selectivity that is enabled by coordinating functional groups. Palladium-catalysed non-directed C-H activation could potentially enable further useful reactions, because it can reach more distant sites and be applied to substrates that do not contain appropriate directing groups; however, its development has faced substantial challenges associated with the lack of sufficiently active palladium catalysts. Currently used palladium catalysts are reactive only with electron-rich arenes, unless an excess of arene is used, which limits synthetic applications. Here we report a 2-pyridone ligand that binds to palladium and accelerates non-directed C-H functionalization with arene as the limiting reagent. This protocol is compatible with a broad range of aromatic substrates and we demonstrate direct functionalization of advanced synthetic intermediates, drug molecules and natural products that cannot be used in excessive quantities. We also developed C-H olefination and carboxylation protocols, demonstrating the applicability of our methodology to other transformations. The site selectivity in these transformations is governed by a combination of steric and electronic effects, with the pyridone ligand enhancing the influence of sterics on the selectivity, thus providing complementary selectivity to directed C-H functionalization.

  7. Convergent [18]F-labeling and evaluation of N-benzyl-phenethylamines as 5-HT2A receptor PET ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne Demant

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) investigations of the 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) system can be used as a research tool in diseases such as depression, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. We have previously developed a (11)C-labeled agonist PET ligand ([(11)C]Cimbi-36), and the aim of this st......Positron emission tomography (PET) investigations of the 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) system can be used as a research tool in diseases such as depression, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. We have previously developed a (11)C-labeled agonist PET ligand ([(11)C]Cimbi-36), and the aim...... of this study was to identify a (18)F-labeled analogue of this PET-ligand. Thus, we developed a convergent radiochemical approach giving easy access to 5 different (18)F-labeled ligands structurally related to Cimbi-36 from a common (18)F-labeled intermediate. After intravenous injection, all ligands entered...... the pig brain. However, since within-scan intervention with ketanserin, a known orthosteric 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, did not result in significant blocking, the radioligands seem unsuitable for neuroimaging of the 5-HT2AR in vivo....

  8. Characterization of commercial grade Tyranno SA/CVI-SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardi, B.; Trentini, E.; Labanti, M.; Leuchs, M.; Roccella, S.; Visca, E.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to characterize commercial-grade Tyranno SA SiC fiber reinforced chemically vapour infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrix composites (SiC f /SiC) with chemically vapour deposited (CVD) SiC coating. The characterization includes the assessment of the monotonic mechanical properties. Low cycle flexural fatigue behaviour has been investigated at room temperature (RT) and 1000 o C by means of 4-point bending tests. The creep behaviour at 1000 o C was preliminary investigated by means of constant bending stress rupture test. The material showed a pronounced degradation of monotonic mechanical properties at high temperature. Low cycle flexural fatigue behaviour showed excellent and satisfactory results at RT and 1000 o C, respectively. The creep resistance at 1000 o C is significant only at low load level

  9. Influence of alcoholism and cholesterol on TSPO binding in brain: PET [11C]PBR28 studies in humans and rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Wiers, Corinde E; Tyler, Ryan; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Jang, Yeon Joo; Zehra, Amna; Freeman, Clara; Ramirez, Veronica; Lindgren, Elsa; Miller, Gregg; Cabrera, Elizabeth A; Stodden, Tyler; Guo, Min; Demiral, Şükrü B; Diazgranados, Nancy; Park, Luke; Liow, Jeih-San; Pike, Victor; Morse, Cheryl; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Innis, Robert B; Koob, George F; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2018-05-03

    Neuroinflammation appears to contribute to neurotoxicity observed with heavy alcohol consumption. To assess whether chronic alcohol results in neuroinflammation we used PET and [ 11 C]PBR28, a ligand that binds to the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO), to compare participants with an alcohol use disorder (AUD: n = 19) with healthy controls (HC: n = 17), and alcohol-dependent (n = 9) with -nondependent rats (n = 10). Because TSPO is implicated in cholesterol's transport for steroidogenesis, we investigated whether plasma cholesterol levels influenced [ 11 C]PBR28 binding. [ 11 C]PBR28 binding did not differ between AUD and HC. However, when separating by TSPO genotype rs6971, we showed that medium-affinity binders AUD participants showed lower [ 11 C]PBR28 binding than HC in regions of interest (whole brain, gray and white matter, hippocampus, and thalamus), but no group differences were observed in high-affinity binders. Cholesterol levels inversely correlated with brain [ 11 C]PBR28 binding in combined groups, due to a correlation in AUD participants. In rodents, we observed no differences in brain [ 11 C]PBR28 uptake between alcohol-dependent and -nondependent rats. These findings, which are consistent with two previous [ 11 C]PBR28 PET studies, may indicate lower activation of microglia in AUD, whereas failure to observe alcohol effects in the rodent model indicate that species differences do not explain the discrepancy with prior rodent autoradiographic studies reporting increases in TSPO binding with chronic alcohol. However, reduced binding in AUD participants could also reflect competition from endogenous TSPO ligands such as cholesterol; and since the rs6971 polymorphism affects the cholesterol-binding domain of TSPO this could explain why differences were observed only in medium-affinity binders.

  10. SIGMA without effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagedorn, R.; Reinfelds, J.

    1978-01-01

    SIGMA (System for Interactive Graphical Analysis) is an interactive computing language with automatic array handling and graphical facilities. It is designed as a tool for mathematical problem solving. The SIGMA language is simple, almost obvious, yet flexible and powerful. This tutorial introduces the beginner to SIGMA. It is supposed to be used at a graphics terminal having access to SIGMA. The user will learn the language in dialogue with the system in sixteen sessions of about one hour. The first session enables him already to compute and display functions of one or two variables. (Auth.)

  11. Simple and rapid preparation of [{sup 11}C]DASB with high quality and reliability for routine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, D.; Mien, L.-K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nics, L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Ungersboeck, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Philippe, C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Lanzenberger, R.R. [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hospital Pharmacy of the General Hospital of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Wadsak, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: wolfgang.wadsak@meduniwien.ac.at

    2009-09-15

    [{sup 11}C]DASB combines all major prerequisites for a successful SERT-ligand, providing excellent biological properties and in-vivo behaviour. Thus, we aimed to establish a fully automated procedure for the synthesis and purification of [{sup 11}C]DASB with a high degree of reliability reducing the overall synthesis time while conserving high yields and purity. The optimized [{sup 11}C]DASB synthesis was applied in more than 60 applications with a very low failure rate (3.2%). We obtained yields up to 8.9 GBq (average 5.3{+-}1.6 GBq). Radiochemical yields based on [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I, (corrected for decay) were 66.3{+-}6.9% with a specific radioactivity (A{sub s}) of 86.8{+-}24.3 GBq/{mu}mol (both at the end of synthesis, EOS). Time consumption was kept to a minimum, resulting in 43 min from end of bombardment to release of the product after quality control. Form our data, it is evident that the presented method can be implemented for routine preparations of [{sup 11}C]DASB with high reliability.

  12. Precipitation of the sigma-phase in Mo-Re alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freze, N.I.; Levitskij, A.D.; Tyumentsev, A.N.; Korotaev, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Disintegration processes in thin foils and replicas of alloys Mo+(52 - 56) wpc Re and Mo+(52 - 56)% Re+(0.05 - 0.10)% Fe wpc were studied by electronic microscopy. Alloying with iron was conducted to determine the effect of iron atom segregations at the grain boundaries on separation of the sigma-phase in these regions. Since the nature of disintegration in all alloys was identical, the experimental data were considered on the example of alloy Mo + 54 wpc Re. The laminated specimens of 1 - 2 mm in thickness subjected to cold rolling with subsequent tempering at T = 1100 deg C for 15 min were characterized by intensive disintegration. As a result finelydispersed laminated sigma-phase uniformly distributed throughout the entire volume of the material was formed. The non-deformed specimens did not show separation of the sigma-phase. As a result of separation of the finely-dispersed sigma-phase plasticity of the alloys was increased. So that a foil of Δh = 0.2 mm in thickness can be produced by cold rolling of the laminated specimens without intermediate annealing. By changing the initial state of the specimens and temperature of annealing dispersity and spatial distribution of the sigma-phase may be substantially modified. It provides for considerably increasing plasticity of the two-phase alloys. During separation of the sigma-phase hardness of the deformed specimens becomes greater. Therefore the low-temperature disintegration accompanied by separation of the sigma-phase may be employed for disperse strengthening of the Mo-Re alloys. The refractory properties of such alloye will not be high, since it is coagulated the finely-dispersed segregations of the sigma-phase even at T > 1100 deg C

  13. Heterogeneous binding of sigma radioligands in the rat brain and liver; Possible relationship to subforms of cytochrome P-450

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, S B [Research Laboratories, Astra Research Centre AB, Soedertaejle (Sweden)

    1991-01-01

    The binding of four sigma receptor ligands, {sup 3}H-(+)-N-allyl-N-normetazocine ({sup 3}H-(+)-SKF 10,047), {sup 3}H-(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ({sup 3}H-(+)-3-PPP), {sup 3}H-haloperidol and {sup 3}H-N,N'-di(o-totyl)guanidine ({sup 3}H-DTG), and the cytochrome P450IID6 ligand and dopamine uptake inhibitor {sup 3}H-1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ({sup 3}H-GBR 12935) to membranal preparations of rat liver or whole rat brain was examined regarding kinetical properties and inhibition by various compounds with affinity for sigma binding sites or cytochrome P-450. In rat brain the density of binding sites was increased in order (+)-SKF 10,047<(+)-3-PPPligand was similar in brain and liver. With the exception of {sup 3}H-(+)-SKF 10,047 there were quite marked differences between the ligands studied. Multiple binding sites were also indicated by the low Hill coefficients found for most of the compounds studied. It was found that the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor proadifen (SKF 525A), like haloperidol, was a potent inhibitor of the binding of {sup 3}H-(+)-SKF 10,047, {sup 3}H-(+)-3-PPP and {sup 3}H-haloperidol to the liver and brain preparations, less active in inhibiting the binding of {sup 3}H-DTG and least effective on the binding of {sup 3}H-GBR 12935. Another cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, L-lobeline, was particularly potent in inhibiting the binding of {sup 3}H-DTG but was also quite potent inhibitor of the binding of the other sigma ligands. It was less potent in inhibiting the binding of {sup 3}H-GBR 12935. The binding of the latter ligand was potently inhibited by the analogous compound GBR 12909 but of the other compounds examined only L-lobeline, proadifen, haloperidol, DTG and (+)-3-PPP had IC50 values below 10 {mu}M. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. Interleukin-11 Receptor Is a Candidate Target for Ligand-Directed Therapy in Lung Cancer: Analysis of Clinical Samples and BMTP-11 Preclinical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardó-Vila, Marina; Marchiò, Serena; Sato, Masanori; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Smith, Tracey L; Bronk, Julianna K; Yin, Guosheng; Zurita, Amado J; Sun, Menghong; Behrens, Carmen; Sidman, Richard L; Lee, J Jack; Hong, Waun K; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-08-01

    We previously isolated an IL-11-mimic motif (CGRRAGGSC) that binds to IL-11 receptor (IL-11R) in vitro and accumulates in IL-11R-expressing tumors in vivo. This synthetic peptide ligand was used as a tumor-targeting moiety in the rational design of BMTP-11, which is a drug candidate in clinical trials. Here, we investigated the specificity and accessibility of IL-11R as a target and the efficacy of BMTP-11 as a ligand-targeted drug in lung cancer. We observed high IL-11R expression levels in a large cohort of patients (n = 368). In matching surgical specimens (i.e., paired tumors and nonmalignant tissues), the cytoplasmic levels of IL-11R in tumor areas were significantly higher than in nonmalignant tissues (n = 36; P = 0.003). Notably, marked overexpression of IL-11R was observed in both tumor epithelial and vascular endothelial cell membranes (n = 301; P < 0.0001). BMTP-11 induced in vitro cell death in a representative panel of human lung cancer cell lines. BMTP-11 treatment attenuated the growth of subcutaneous xenografts and reduced the number of pulmonary tumors after tail vein injection of human lung cancer cells in mice. Our findings validate BMTP-11 as a pharmacologic candidate drug in preclinical models of lung cancer and patient-derived tumors. Moreover, the high expression level in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is a promising feature for potential translational applications. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of the Translocator Protein Radioligands 11C-DPA-713, 18F-DPA- 714, and 11C-PK11195 in a Rat Model of Acute Neuro-inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, F.; Van Camp, N.; Dolle, F.; Kuhnast, B.; Hinnen, F.; Damont, A.; Boutin, H.; Tavitian, B.; Chauveau, F.; Van Camp, N.; Boutin, H; Tavitian, B.; Chauveau, F.; Boutin, H.; James, M.; Kassiou, M.; Kassiou, M.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the translocator protein, TSPO (18 kDa), formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a hallmark of activation of cells of monocytic lineage (micro-glia and macrophages) during neuro-inflammation. Radiolabeling of TSPO ligands enables the detection of neuro-inflammatory lesions by PET. Two new radioligands, 11 C-labeled N, N-diethyl-2-[2-(4- methoxy-phenyl)-5, 7-dimethylpyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl] acetamide (DPA-713) and 18 F-labeled N, N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2- fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5, 7-dimethylpyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl) acetamide (DPA-714), both belonging to the pyrazolopyrimidine class, were compared in vivo and in vitro using a rodent model of neuro-inflammation. Methods: 11 C-DPA-713 and 18 F-DPA-714, as well as the classic radioligand 11 C-labeled (R)-N-methyl- N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)isoquinoline-3-carboxamide (PK11195), were used in the same rat model, in which intra-striatal injection of (R, S)-a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionique gave rise to a strong neuro-inflammatory response. Comparative endpoints included in vitro autoradiography and in vivo imaging on a dedicated small-animal PET scanner under identical conditions. Results: 11 C-DPA-713 and 18 F-DPA-714 could specifically localize the neuro-inflammatory site with a similar signal-to-noise ratio in vitro. In vivo, 18 F-DPA-714 performed better than 11 C-DPA-713 and 11 C-PK11195, with the highest ratio of ipsilateral to contralateral uptake and the highest binding potential. Conclusion: 18 F-DPA-714 appears to be an attractive alternative to 11 C-PK11195 because of its increased bioavailability in brain tissue and its reduced nonspecific binding. Moreover, its labeling with 18 F, the preferred PET isotope for radiopharmaceutical chemistry, favors its dissemination and wide clinical use. 18 F-DPA-714 will be further evaluated in longitudinal studies of neuro-inflammatory conditions such as are encountered in stroke or neuro

  16. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating and SA Tyrannohex SiC Composites Integration for Improved Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2018-01-01

    The development of 2700 degF capable environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems, particularly, the Rare Earth "Hafnium" Silicon bond coat systems, have significantly improved the temperature capability and environmental stability of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Systems. We have specifically developed the advanced 2700 degF EBC systems, integrating the EBC to the high temperature SA Tyrannohex SiC fiber composites, for comprehensive performance and durability evaluations for potential turbine engine airfoil component applications. The fundamental mechanical properties, environmental stability and thermal gradient cyclic durability performance of the EBC - SA Tyrannohex composites were investigated. The paper will particularly emphasize the high pressure combustion rig recession, cyclic thermal stress resistance and thermomechanical low cycle fatigue testing of uncoated and environmental barrier coated Tyrannohex SiC SA composites in these simulated turbine engine combustion water vapor, thermal gradients, and mechanical loading conditions. We have also investigated high heat flux and flexural fatigue degradation mechanisms, determined the upper limits of operating temperature conditions for the coated SA composite material systems in thermomechanical fatigue conditions. Recent progress has also been made by using the self-healing rare earth-silicon based EBCs, thus enhancing the SA composite hexagonal fiber columns bonding for improved thermomechanical and environmental durability in turbine engine operation environments. More advanced EBC- composite systems based on the new EBC-Fiber Interphases will also be discussed.

  17. G‐LoSA: An efficient computational tool for local structure‐centric biological studies and drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Molecular recognition by protein mostly occurs in a local region on the protein surface. Thus, an efficient computational method for accurate characterization of protein local structural conservation is necessary to better understand biology and drug design. We present a novel local structure alignment tool, G‐LoSA. G‐LoSA aligns protein local structures in a sequence order independent way and provides a GA‐score, a chemical feature‐based and size‐independent structure similarity score. Our benchmark validation shows the robust performance of G‐LoSA to the local structures of diverse sizes and characteristics, demonstrating its universal applicability to local structure‐centric comparative biology studies. In particular, G‐LoSA is highly effective in detecting conserved local regions on the entire surface of a given protein. In addition, the applications of G‐LoSA to identifying template ligands and predicting ligand and protein binding sites illustrate its strong potential for computer‐aided drug design. We hope that G‐LoSA can be a useful computational method for exploring interesting biological problems through large‐scale comparison of protein local structures and facilitating drug discovery research and development. G‐LoSA is freely available to academic users at http://im.compbio.ku.edu/GLoSA/. PMID:26813336

  18. G-LoSA: An efficient computational tool for local structure-centric biological studies and drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2016-04-01

    Molecular recognition by protein mostly occurs in a local region on the protein surface. Thus, an efficient computational method for accurate characterization of protein local structural conservation is necessary to better understand biology and drug design. We present a novel local structure alignment tool, G-LoSA. G-LoSA aligns protein local structures in a sequence order independent way and provides a GA-score, a chemical feature-based and size-independent structure similarity score. Our benchmark validation shows the robust performance of G-LoSA to the local structures of diverse sizes and characteristics, demonstrating its universal applicability to local structure-centric comparative biology studies. In particular, G-LoSA is highly effective in detecting conserved local regions on the entire surface of a given protein. In addition, the applications of G-LoSA to identifying template ligands and predicting ligand and protein binding sites illustrate its strong potential for computer-aided drug design. We hope that G-LoSA can be a useful computational method for exploring interesting biological problems through large-scale comparison of protein local structures and facilitating drug discovery research and development. G-LoSA is freely available to academic users at http://im.compbio.ku.edu/GLoSA/. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  19. A novel beta-adrenoceptor ligand for positron emission tomography : Evaluation in experimental animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, A; Elsinga, PH; Doze, P; Heldoorn, M; Jaeggi, KA; Vaalburg, W

    1998-01-01

    Myocardial and pulmonary beta-adrenoceptors can be imaged and quantified with the antagonist (S)-4-[3[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]-2-hydroxypropoxy]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-[C-11]-one (S-[C-11]CGP-12177). The synthesis of this ligand (based on the reaction of a precursor with [C-11]phosgene) is

  20. [11C]-Flumazenil metabolites: Measurements of unchanged ligand in plasma using thin layer chromatography and rapid liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loc'h, C.; Hantraye, Ph.; Khalili-Varasteh, M.; Maziere, B.; Delforge, J.; Brouillet, E.; Syrota, A.; Maziere, M.

    1990-01-01

    To study in vivo benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors using PET, Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine with selective antagonistic actions, has been labeled with 11 C on its methyl group. The accurate determination of in vivo binding parameters using biomathematical models requires the knowledge of radioligand metabolism and the measurement of the plasmatic concentration of unchanged radioligand is mandatory. The present report describes and compares rapid and simple analytical procedures to measure unchanged [ 11 C]-Flumazenil in plasma

  1. Tamanho ao nascer e problemas de saúde mental aos 11 anos em uma coorte brasileira de nascimentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Alejandra Giraldo Gallo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi avaliar a associação entre tamanho ao nascer e problemas de saúde mental aos 11 anos na Coorte de Nascimentos de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, de 1993. Foram pesados e medidos ao nascer 4.358 recém-nascidos. Avaliou-se problemas de saúde mental com o questionário de capacidades e dificuldades (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire - SDQ. A prevalência de problemas de saúde mental foi de 32% (IC95%: 31-33. Na análise ajustada, os 291 (6,7% recém-nascidos com escorez de peso/idade e os 268 (6,2% com índice de massa corporal (IMC/idade +2 DP tiveram, respectivamente, 34% (IC95%: 6-71 e 19% (IC95%: 1-40 maior risco de apresentar esses problemas se comparados com aqueles com escore normal. Os resultados sugerem que fatores ocorridos na gestação e refletidos nas medidas de tamanho ao nascer podem ocasionar problemas de saúde mental em etapas tardias.

  2. Methoxyphenylethynyl, methoxypyridylethynyl and phenylethynyl derivatives of pyridine: synthesis, radiolabeling and evaluation of new PET ligands for metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Meixiang; Tueckmantel, Werner; Wang, Xukui; Zhu Aijun; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Brownell, Anna-Liisa

    2005-01-01

    We have synthesized three different PET ligands to investigate the physiological function of metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors (mGluR5) in vivo: 2-[ 11 C]methyl-6-(2-phenylethynyl)pyridine ([ 11 C]MPEP), 2-(2-(3-[ 11 C]methoxyphenyl)ethynyl)pyridine ([ 11 C]M-MPEP) and 2-(2-(5-[ 11 C]methoxypyridin-3-yl)ethynyl)pyridine ([ 11 C]M-PEPy). [ 11 C]Methyl iodide was used to label the compounds under basic conditions, and a Pd(0) catalyst was applied to label [ 11 C]MPEP in a Stille coupling reaction. In vivo microPET imaging studies of the functional accumulation of radiolabeled ligands were conducted in 35 rats (Sprague-Dawley, 8 weeks old male, weight of 300 g). Specific binding was tested using pre-administration of unlabeled mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) (10 mg/kg iv 5 min before radioactivity injection). In the radiolabeling of [ 11 C]MPEP, [ 11 C]M-MPEP and [ 11 C]M-PEPy, a specific radioactivity of 700-1200 mCi/μmol and over 97% radiochemical purity were obtained. The microPET studies showed these three radiolabeled mGluR5 antagonists having the highest binding in the olfactory bulb followed by striatum, hippocampus and cortex. Pre-administration of the mGluR5 antagonist MPEP induced a 45.1% decrease in [ 11 C]MPEP binding, a 59.7% decrease in [ 11 C]M-MPEP binding and an 84.6% decrease in [ 11 C]M-PEPy binding in the olfactory bulb at 5 min. The feasibility of synthesizing high-affinity and high-selectivity ligands for mGluR5 receptors and their suitability as PET imaging ligands for mGluR5 receptors in vivo are demonstrated

  3. Active participation of Hsp90 in the biogenesis of the trimeric reovirus cell attachment protein sigma1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, R; Coffey, M C; Lee, P W

    1998-06-12

    The reovirus cell attachment protein, sigma1, is a lollipop-shaped homotrimer with an N-terminal fibrous tail and a C-terminal globular head. Biogenesis of this protein involves two trimerization events: N-terminal trimerization, which occurs cotranslationally and is Hsp70/ATP-independent, and C-terminal trimerization, which occurs posttranslationally and is Hsp70/ATP-dependent. To determine if Hsp90 also plays a role in sigma1 biogenesis, we analyzed sigma1 synthesized in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Coprecipitation experiments using anti-Hsp90 antibodies revealed that Hsp90 was associated with immature sigma1 trimers (hydra-like intermediates with assembled N termini and unassembled C termini) but not with mature trimers. The use of truncated sigma1 further demonstrated that only the C-terminal half of sigma1 associated with Hsp90. In the presence of the Hsp90 binding drug geldanamycin, N-terminal trimerization proceeded normally, but C-terminal trimerization was blocked. Geldanamycin did not inhibit the association of Hsp90 with sigma 1 but prevented the subsequent release of Hsp90 from the immature sigma1 complex. We also examined the status of p23, an Hsp90-associated cochaperone. Like Hsp90, p23 only associated with immature sigma1 trimers, and this association was mapped to the C-terminal half of sigma1. However, unlike Hsp90, p23 was released from the sigma1 complex upon the addition of geldanamycin. These results highlight an all-or-none concept of chaperone involvement in different oligomerization domains within a single protein and suggest a possible common usage of chaperones in the regulation of general protein folding and of steroid receptor activation.

  4. [11C]-MeJDTic: a novel radioligand for κ-opioid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisnel, Geraldine; Oueslati, Farhana; Dhilly, Martine; Delamare, Jerome; Perrio, Cecile; Debruyne, Daniele; Barre, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Radiopharmaceuticals that can bind selectively the κ-opioid receptor may present opportunities for staging clinical brain disorders and evaluating the efficiency of new therapies related to stroke, neurodegenerative diseases or opiate addiction. The N-methylated derivative of JDTic (named MeJDTic), which has been recently described as a potent and selective antagonist of κ-opioid receptor in vitro, was labeled with carbon-11 and evaluated for in vivo imaging the κ-opioid receptor in mice. Methods: [ 11 C]-MeJDTic was prepared by methylation of JDTic with [ 11 C]-methyl triflate. The binding of [ 11 C]-MeJDTic to κ-opioid receptor was investigated ex vivo by biodistribution and competition studies using nonfasted male CD1 mice. Results: [ 11 C]-MeJDTic exhibited a high and rapid distribution in peripheral organs. The uptake was maximal in lung where the κ receptor is largely expressed. [ 11 C]-MeJDTic rapidly crossed the blood-brain barrier and accumulated in the brain regions of interest (hypothalamus). The parent ligand remained the major radioactive compound in brain during the experiment. Chase studies with U50,488 (a κ referring agonist), morphine (a μ agonist) and naltrindole (a δ antagonist) demonstrated that this uptake was the result of specific binding to the κ-opioid receptor. Conclusion: These findings suggested that [ 11 C]-MeJDTic appeared to be a promising selective 'lead' radioligand for κ-opioid receptor PET imaging

  5. Nuclear imaging of neuroinflammation: a comprehensive review of [11C]PK11195 challengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, Fabien; Camp, Nadja van; Tavitian, Bertrand; Boutin, Herve; Dolle, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegenerative, inflammatory and neoplastic brain disorders involve neuroinflammatory reactions, and a biomarker of neuroinflammation would be useful for diagnostic, drug development and therapy control of these frequent diseases. In vivo imaging can document the expression of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)/translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) that is linked to microglial activation and considered a hallmark of neuroinflammation. The prototype positron emission tomography tracer for PBR, [ 11 C]PK11195, has shown limitations that until now have slowed the clinical applications of PBR imaging. In recent years, dozens of new PET and SPECT radioligands for the PBR have been radiolabelled, and several have been evaluated in imaging protocols. Here we review the new PBR ligands proposed as challengers of [ 11 C]PK11195, critically analyze preclinical imaging studies and discuss their potential as neuroinflammation imaging agents. (orig.)

  6. Collisional Removal of O2 (c(sup 1) Sigma(sup-)(sub u), nu=9) by O2, N2, and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Richard A.; Knutsen, Karen; Onishi, Marc E.; Yalcin, Talat

    1996-01-01

    The collisional removal Of 02 molecules in selected vibrational levels of the c state is studied using a two-laser double-resonance technique. The output of the first laser excites the 02 to nu = 9 or 10 of the c Sigma - state, and the ultraviolet output of the second laser monitors specific rovibrational levels via resonance-enhanced ionization. The temporal evolution of the c Sigma u state vibrational level is observed by scanning the time delay between the two pulsed lasers. As the rate constants for 02 and N2 are similar in magnitude, N2 collisions dominate the removal rate in the earth's atmosphere. For v= 10 colliding with 02, we find a removal rate constant that is 2-5 times that for v=9 and that single quantum collision cascade is an important pathway for removal.

  7. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]DASB in baboons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belanger, Marie-Jose [Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York, NY 10032 (United States); Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Pyschiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Simpson, Norman R. [Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Wang, Theodore [Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York State Pyschiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032 (United States)] [and others

    2004-11-01

    Objective: The serotonin transporter has been implicated in a variety of conditions including mood disorders and suicidal behavior. In vivo human brain studies with positron emission tomography and the serotonin transporter antagonist [{sup 11}C]DASB ([{sup 11}C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile) are ongoing in several laboratories with the maximum administered activity based on dosimetry collected in rodents. We report on the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]DASB in the baboon as this species may be a more reliable surrogate for human dosimetry. Methods: Four baboon studies (two studies in each of two baboons) were acquired in an ECAT ACCEL camera after the bolus injection of 183{+-}5 MBq/2.3{+-}1.0 nmol of [{sup 11}C]DASB. For each study, six whole-body emission scans were collected in 3D mode over 6/7 bed positions for 2 h. Regions of interest were drawn on brain, lungs, liver, gallbladder, spleen, kidneys, small intestine and bladder. Since no fluid was removed from the animal, total body radioactivity was calculated using the injected dose calibrated to the ACCEL image units. Results: Uptake was greatest in lungs, followed by the urinary bladder, gallbladder, brain and other organs. The ligand was eliminated via the hepato-billiary and renal systems. The largest absorbed dose was found in the lungs (3.6x10{sup -2} mSv/MBq). The absorbed radiation doses in lungs and gallbladder were four and nine times larger than that previously estimated from rat studies. Conclusion: Based on our baboon biodistribution and dose estimates, the lungs are the critical organs for administration of [{sup 11}C]DASB. In the United States, the absorbed dose to the lungs would limit [{sup 11}C]DASB administered with the approval of a Radioactive Drug Research Committee to 1400 MBq (37 mCi) in the adult male and 1100 MBq (30 mCi) in the adult female.

  8. Design and Synthesis of 11C-Labelled Compound Libraries for the Molecular Imaging of EGFr, VEGFr-2, AT1 and AT2 Receptors: Transition-Metal Mediated Carbonylations Using [11C]Carbon Monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaberg, Ola

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with radiochemistry and new approaches to develop novel PET tracers labelled with the radionuclide 11 C. Two methods for the synthesis of 11 C-labelled acrylamides have been explored. First, [1- 11 C]-acrylic acid was obtained from a palladium(0)-mediated 11 C-carboxylation of acetylene with [ 11 C]carbon monoxide; this could be converted to the corresponding acyl chloride and then combined with benzylamine to form N-benzyl[carbonyl- 11 C]acrylamide. In the second method, the palladium(0)-mediated carbonylation of vinyl halides with [ 11 C]carbon monoxide was explored. This latter method, yielded labelled acrylamides in a single step with retention of configuration at the C=C double bond, and required less amine compared to the acetylene method. The vinyl halide method was used to synthesize a library of 11 C-labelled EGFr-inhibitors in 7-61% decay corrected radiochemical yield via a combinatorial approach. The compounds were designed to target either the active or the inactive form of EGFr, following computational docking studies. The rhodium(I)-mediated carbonylative cross-coupling of an azide and an amine was shown to be a very general reaction and was used to synthesize a library of dual VEGFr-2/PDGFrβ inhibitors that were 11 C-labelled at the urea position in 38-78% dc rcy. The angiotensin II AT 1 receptor antagonist eprosartan was 11 C-labelled at one of the carboxyl groups in one step using a palladium(0)-mediated carboxylation. Autoradiography shows specific binding in rat kidney, lung and adrenal cortex, and organ distribution shows a high accumulation in the intestines, kidneys and liver. Specific binding in frozen sections of human adrenal incidentalomas warrants further investigations of this tracer. Three angiotensin II AT 2 ligands were 11 C-labelled at the amide group in a palladium(0)-mediated aminocarbonylation in 16-36% dc rcy. One of the compounds was evaluated using in vitro using autoradiography, and in vivo using organ

  9. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Division of Mucosal Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Sekine, Shinichi [Department of Preventive Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kataoka, Kosuke [Department of Preventive Dentistry, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gilbert, Rebekah S. [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Fujihashi, Kohtaro, E-mail: kohtarof@uab.edu [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c{sup +} DCs in mucosal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c{sup +} DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c{sup +} dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c{sup +} DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c{sup +} DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c{sup +} DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4{sup +} T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4{sup +} T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch-Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c{sup +} DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  10. Uptake of inflammatory cell marker [{sup 11}C]PK11195 into mouse atherosclerotic plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, Iina; Marjamaeki, Paeivi; Naagren, Kjell; Roivainen, Anne; Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Laine, V.J.O. [Turku University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Turku (Finland); Wilson, Ian [GE Healthcare Biosciences, Medical Diagnostics, London (United Kingdom); Leppaenen, Pia; Ylae-Herttuala, Seppo [University of Kuopio, A.I. Virtanen Institute, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    The ligand [{sup 11}C]PK11195 binds with high affinity and selectivity to peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, expressed in high amounts in macrophages. In humans, [{sup 11}C]PK11195 has been used successfully for the in vivo imaging of inflammatory processes of brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 in imaging inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaques. The presence of PK11195 binding sites in the atherosclerotic plaques was verified by examining the in vitro binding of [{sup 3}H]PK11195 onto mouse aortic sections. Uptake of intravenously administered [{sup 11}C]PK11195 was studied ex vivo in excised tissue samples and aortic sections of a LDLR/ApoB48 atherosclerotic mice. Accumulation of the tracer was compared between the atherosclerotic plaques and non-atherosclerotic arterial sites by autoradiography and histological analyses. The [{sup 3}H]PK11195 was found to bind to both the atherosclerotic plaques and the healthy wall. The autoradiography analysis revealed that the uptake of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 to inflamed regions in plaques was more prominent (p = 0.011) than to non-inflamed plaque regions, but overall it was not higher than the uptake to the healthy vessel wall. Also, the accumulation of {sup 11}C radioactivity into the aorta of the atherosclerotic mice was not increased compared to the healthy control mice. Our results indicate that the uptake of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 is higher in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques containing a large number of inflammatory cells than in the non-inflamed plaques. However, the tracer uptake to other structures of the artery wall was also prominent and may limit the use of [{sup 11}C]PK11195 in clinical imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. (orig.)

  11. Binding of kappa- and sigma-opiates in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolozin, B.L.; Nishimura, S.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed displacements of [ 3 H]dihydromorphine by ketocyclazocine and SKF 10,047, [ 3 H]ethylketocyclazocine by SKF 10,047, and [ 3 H]SKF 10,047 by ketocyclazocine are all multiphasic, suggesting multiple binding sites. After treating brain tissue in vitro with naloxazone, all displacements lose the initial inhibition of 3 H-ligand binding by low concentrations of unlabeled drugs. Together with Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments, these studies suggest a common site which binds mu-, kappa, and sigma-opiates and enkephalins equally well and with highest affinity (KD less than 1 nM). The ability of unlabeled drugs to displace the low affinity binding of [ 3 H]dihydromorphine (KD . 3 nM), [ 3 H]ethylketocyclazocine (KD . 4 nM), [ 3 H]SKF 10,047 (KD . 6 nM), and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-[ 3 H]enkephalin (KD . 5 nM) remaining after treating tissue with naloxazone demonstrates unique pharmacological profiles for each. These results suggest the existence of distinct binding sites for kappa- and sigma-opiates which differ from those sites which selectively bind morphine (mu) and enkephalin

  12. Ab initio calculation of the electronic structures of the (7)Sigma+ ground and A (7)Pi and a (5)Sigma+ excited states of MnH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonari, Mutsumi; Nagashima, Umpei; Hirano, Tsuneo

    2009-04-21

    Electronic structures and molecular constants of the ground (7)Sigma(+) and low-lying A (7)Pi and a (5)Sigma(+) electronic excited states of the MnH molecule were studied by multireference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MR-SDCI) with Davidson's correction (+Q) calculations under exact C(infinity v) symmetry using Slater-type basis sets. To correctly describe the (7)Sigma(+) electronic ground state, X (7)Sigma(+), at the MR-SDCI+Q calculation, we employed a large number of reference configurations in terms of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) orbitals, taking into account the contribution from the B (7)Sigma(+) excited state. The A (7)Pi and a (5)Sigma(+) states can well be described by the MR-SDCI wave functions based on the CASSCF orbitals obtained for the lowest state only. In the MR-SDCI+Q, calculations of the X (7)Sigma(+), A (7)Pi, and a (5)Sigma(+) states required 16, 7, and 17 reference configurations, respectively. Molecular constants, i.e., r(e) and omega(e) of these states and excitation energy from the X (7)Sigma(+) state, obtained at the MR-SDCI+Q level, showed a good agreement with experimental values. The small remaining differences may be accounted for by taking relativistic effects into account.

  13. Synthesis of [11C]-Sarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prenant, C.; Crouzel, C.

    1990-01-01

    [ 11 C]-acetone, prepared from 11 CO 2 and methyllithium, was reduced to [ 11 C]-isopropanol. The latter reacted with methylphosphonic acid difluoride in the presence of diisopropylamine, to yield [11C]-sarin. 3.4 GBq (100 mCi) of [ 11 C]-sarin may be obtained from about 55.5 GBq (1.5 Ci) of 11 CO 2 in 40 minutes. The product purified by HPLC, is obtained with a specific radioactivity ranging from 22.2 to 33.3 GBq (600 to 900 mCi/μmol.). (author)

  14. Enthalpies of ligand substitution for [Mo(η5C5H5)(CO)2(NO)] – The role of π-bonding effects in metal–ligand bond strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Subhojit; Captain, Burjor; Cazin, Catherine S.J.; Nolan, Steven P.; Hoff, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Enthalpies of ligand substitution are measured for Mo(C 5 H 5 )(CO) 2 (NO). • Phosphines and N-heterocyclic carbenes are stronger ligands and displace CO. • Backbonding to π ∗ orbitals is an important part of complex stability. • FTIR studies show shifts to lower wavenumbers of ν-CO and ν-NO. • Structural studies show lengthening of the C-O and N-O bonds. - Abstract: Enthalpies of ligand substitution for [Mo(η 5 -C 5 H 5 )(CO) 2 (NO)] producing [Mo(η 5 -C 5 H 5 )Mo(CO)(L)(NO)] have been measured by solution calorimetry at 30 °C in THF for L = P(OMe) 3 2 2 Ph 3 (SIPr = 1,3-bis(2,6-bis(diisopropylphenyl)imidazolinylidene; IPr = 1,3-bis(2,6-bis(diisopropylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene)). The accepting metal fragment [Mo(η 5 -C 5 H 5 )(CO)(NO)] has a vacant site containing strongly π-accepting carbonyl and nitrosyl ligands and this is shown to influence the stability of the product complex. Infrared studies of both ν CO and ν NO show that metal-to-ligand backbonding increases in the order P(OMe) 3 3 5 -C 5 H 5 )(CO)(IPr)(NO)] and [Mo(η 5 -C 5 H 5 )(CO)(SIPr)(NO)] are reported

  15. The Ligand Substitution Reactions of Hydrophobic Vitamin B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Vitamin B. 12. Derivatives. Reaction of Cobyric Acid. Heptapropyl Ester with Heterocyclic N-donor Ligands. Mohamed S.A. .... RESEARCH ARTICLE. M.S.A. Hamza ..... neutralized with NaHCO3 and treated with excess KCN to give. DCCbs-Pr.

  16. Automated synthesis of 11C-carfentanil with 11C-choline module and micro PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinming; Zhang Xiaojun; Tian Jiahe; Xu Zhihong; Xiang Xiaohui

    2011-01-01

    A simple modified home-made 11 C-choline module enabled to rapid and efficient synthesis 11 C-carfentanil ( 11 C-CFN) as CNS μ-opioid receptor imaging agent. The synthesis of 11 C-CFN was completed in a yield of 14.8 GBq within 18 min from 11 C-CO 2 on the choline module. The methylation took place from 4-piperidinecarboxylic acid, 4-[(1-oxopropyl) phenylamino]-l-(2-phenylethyl), sodium salt as precursor in DMSO solution. The radio- chemical yields were over 80% (n=55, decay-corrected and based on 11 CH 3 -triflate). The radiochemical purity was over 95% and the specific activities was over 1.4 × 10 14 Bq/g. The biologic activity of 11 C-CFN was confirmed with Micro PET/CT imaging. (authors)

  17. Reproducibility of automated simplified voxel-based analysis of PET amyloid ligand [11C]PIB uptake using 30-min scanning data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, Sargo; Scheinin, Noora M.; Naagren, Kjell; Rinne, Juha O.; Kemppainen, Nina M.; Kailajaervi, Marita; Leinonen, Mika; Scheinin, Mika

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 11 C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B ([ 11 C]PIB) enables the quantitation of β-amyloid accumulation in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voxel-based image analysis techniques conducted in a standard brain space provide an objective, rapid and fully automated method to analyze [ 11 C]PIB PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both region- and voxel-level reproducibility of automated and simplified [ 11 C]PIB quantitation when using only 30 min of imaging data. Six AD patients and four healthy controls were scanned twice with an average interval of 6 weeks. To evaluate the feasibility of short scanning (convenient for AD patients), [ 11 C]PIB uptake was quantitated using 30 min of imaging data (60 to 90 min after tracer injection) for region-to-cerebellum ratio calculations. To evaluate the reproducibility, a test-retest design was used to derive absolute variability (VAR) estimates and intraclass correlation coefficients at both region-of-interest (ROI) and voxel level. The reproducibility both at the region level (VAR 0.9-5.5%) and at the voxel level (VAR 4.2-6.4%) was good to excellent. Based on the variability estimates obtained, power calculations indicated that 90% power to obtain statistically significant difference can be achieved using a sample size of five subjects per group when a 15% change from baseline (increase or decrease) in [ 11 C]PIB accumulation in the frontal cortex is anticipated in one group compared to no change in another group. Our results showed that an automated analysis method based on an efficient scanning protocol provides reproducible results for [ 11 C]PIB uptake and appears suitable for PET studies aiming at the quantitation of amyloid accumulation in the brain of AD patients for the evaluation of progression and treatment effects. (orig.)

  18. The SigmaR1 chaperone drives breast and colorectal cancer cell migration by tuning SK3-dependent Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguinou, M; Crottès, D; Chantôme, A; Rapetti-Mauss, R; Potier-Cartereau, M; Clarysse, L; Girault, A; Fourbon, Y; Jézéquel, P; Guérin-Charbonnel, C; Fromont, G; Martin, P; Pellissier, B; Schiappa, R; Chamorey, E; Mignen, O; Uguen, A; Borgese, F; Vandier, C; Soriani, O

    2017-06-22

    The remodeling of calcium homeostasis contributes to the cancer hallmarks and the molecular mechanisms involved in calcium channel regulation in tumors remain to be characterized. Here, we report that SigmaR1, a stress-activated chaperone, is required to increase calcium influx by triggering the coupling between SK3, a Ca 2+ -activated K + channel (KCNN3) and the voltage-independent calcium channel Orai1. We show that SigmaR1 physically binds SK3 in BC cells. Inhibition of SigmaR1 activity, either by molecular silencing or by the use of sigma ligand (igmesine), decreased SK3 current and Ca 2+ entry in breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Interestingly, SigmaR1 inhibition diminished SK3 and/or Orai1 levels in lipid nanodomains isolated from BC cells. Analyses of tissue microarray from CRC patients showed higher SigmaR1 expression levels in cancer samples and a correlation with tumor grade. Moreover, the exploration of a cohort of 4937 BC patients indicated that high expression of SigmaR1 and Orai1 channels was significantly correlated to a lower overall survival. As the SK3/Orai1 tandem drives invasive process in CRC and bone metastasis progression in BC, our results may inaugurate innovative therapeutic approaches targeting SigmaR1 to control the remodeling of Ca 2+ homeostasis in epithelial cancers.

  19. Automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-11C]-labeled D- and L-enantiomers of lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drandarov, Konstantin; Schubiger, P. August; Westera, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    The first purely chemical method for automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1- 11 C]-labeled D(R)- and L(S)-2-hydroxypropanoic acid (lactic acid) was developed for experimental neurophysiology studies and position emission tomography (PET) diagnosis. Starting from sodium 1-hydroxyethanesulfonate and [ 11 C]HCN (trapped as [ 11 C]KCN) the intermediate DL-(R,S)-[1- 11 C]-2-hydroxypropanenitrile was prepared. Its rapid acid hydrolysis gave DL-(R,S)-[1- 11 C]lactic acid, which was isolated by preparative reversed phase HPLC and automatically injected on a second preparative C 18 HPLC column coated with a chiral selector, where both [1- 11 C]lactic acid enantiomers were separated by chiral ligand-exchange chromatography. Two novel chiral selectors for HPLC enantiomeric separation of α-hydroxy acids, namely D(R)- or L(S)-2-amino-3-methyl-3-(5-phenylpentylsulfanyl)-butanoic acid were utilized for the preparative HPLC separation of the [1- 11 C]lactic acid enantiomers. The preparation of the selectors and the coating procedure for the manufacturing of the preparative chiral HPLC columns are described. A highly efficient trap for [ 11 C]HCN is presented. The whole radiosynthesis is automated, takes about 45 min and leads to more than 80% decay corrected overall radiochemical yield of each enantiomer (up to 2.5 GBq) with over 99% radiochemical, chemical and enantiomeric purity. The specific activity at the end of the synthesis is about 400 GBq/μmol

  20. Ligand-Enabled γ-C(sp(3))-H Olefination of Amines: En Route to Pyrrolidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Heng; He, Jian; Liu, Tao; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2016-02-17

    Pd(II)-catalyzed olefination of γ-C(sp(3))-H bonds of triflyl (Tf) and 4-nitrobenzenesulfonyl (Ns) protected amines is achieved. Subsequent aza-Wacker oxidative cyclization or conjugate addition of the olefinated intermediates provides a variety of C-2 alkylated pyrrolidines. Three pyridine- and quinoline-based ligands are developed to match different classes of amine substrates, demonstrating a rare example of ligand-enabled C(sp(3))-H olefination reactions. The use of Ns protecting group to direct C(sp(3))-H activation of alkyl amines is also a significant step toward practical C-H functionalizations of alkyl amines.

  1. The complete genome sequence of Eubacterium limosum SA11, a metabolically versatile rumen acetogen

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, William J.; Henderson, Gemma; Pacheco, Diana M.; Li, Dong; Reilly, Kerri; Naylor, Graham E.; Janssen, Peter H.; Attwood, Graeme T.; Altermann, Eric; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2016-01-01

    Acetogens are a specialized group of anaerobic bacteria able to produce acetate from CO2 and H2 via the Wood?Ljungdahl pathway. In some gut environments acetogens can compete with methanogens for H2, and as a result rumen acetogens are of interest in the development of microbial approaches for methane mitigation. The acetogen Eubacterium limosum SA11 was isolated from the rumen of a New Zealand sheep and its genome has been sequenced to examine its potential application in methane mitigation ...

  2. How the early sporulation sigma factor sigmaF delays the switch to late development in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmazyn-Campelli, Céline; Rhayat, Lamya; Carballido-López, Rut; Duperrier, Sandra; Frandsen, Niels; Stragier, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis is a primitive differentiation process involving two cell types, the forespore and the mother cell. Each cell implements two successive transcription programmes controlled by specific sigma factors. We report that activity of sigma(G), the late forespore sigma factor, is kept in check by Gin, the product of csfB, a gene controlled by sigma(F), the early forespore sigma factor. Gin abolishes sigma(G) transcriptional activity when sigma(G) is artificially synthesized during growth, but has no effect on sigma(F). Gin interacts strongly with sigma(G) but not with sigma(F) in a yeast two-hybrid experiment. The absence of Gin allows sigma(G) to be active during sporulation independently of the mother-cell development to which it is normally coupled. Premature sigma(G) activity leads to the formation of slow-germinating spores, and complete deregulation of sigma(G) synthesis is lethal when combined with gin inactivation. Gin allows sigma(F) to delay the switch to the late forespore transcription programme by preventing sigma(G) to take over before the cell has reached a critical stage of development. A similar strategy, following a completely unrelated route, is used by the mother cell.

  3. Non destructive method to follow the phase sigma in a duplex stainless steel; Metodologia nao destrutiva para acompanhamento da fase sigma, em um aco inoxidavel duplex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, E.M.; Andrade, A.L.S. Souza; Fialho, W.M.L.; Araujo, B.R., E-mail: edgard@ifpb.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologia da Paraiba (IFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Silva, J.H.R.; Leite, Josinaldo P.; Silva, Eloy M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE), CE (Brazil); Leite, Joao P. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), PB (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Duplex stainless steels are subject to embrittlement due to the formation of sigma phase, which is one with the greatest effect of weakening because they are rich in chromium and deplete the matrix of this element. In this paper, a non-destructive methodology based on measurements of Hall voltage, is presented for monitoring the formation of sigma phase at temperatures of 800 deg C and 900 deg C. Different field intensities are generated by an electromagnet and the flow of field lines is detected by a Hall effect sensor. Hall voltage measurements are proportional to the formation of sigma phase generated by different times of aging methods. The results are correlated with results of microscopic, hardness and X-ray diffraction. It was showed that exist a correlation between the Hall voltage and the amount of sigma phase. The formation of this phase influences the signal voltage by reducing the voltage. (author)

  4. C-11 cyanide production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyun; Alexoff, David; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ferrieri, Richard A.

    2017-11-21

    A method for providing .sup.11C-labeled cyanides from .sup.11C labeled oxides in a target gas stream retrieved from an irradiated high pressure gaseous target containing O.sub.2, wherein .sup.11C labeled oxides are reduced with H.sub.2 in the presence of a nickel catalyst under a pressure and a temperature sufficient to form a product stream comprising at least about 95% .sup.11CH.sub.4, the .sup.11CH.sub.4 is then combined with an excess of NH.sub.3 in a carrier/reaction stream flowing at an accelerated velocity and the combined .sup.11CH4 carrier/reaction stream is then contacted with a platinum (Pt) catalyst particulate supported on a substantially-chemically-nonreactive heat-stable support at a temperature of at least about 900.degree. C., whereby a product stream comprising at least about 60% H.sup.11CN is provided in less than 10 minutes from retrieval of the .sup.11C labeled oxide.

  5. Towards the PET radiotracer for p75 neurotrophin receptor: [(11)C]LM11A-24 shows biological activity in vitro, but unfavorable ex vivo and in vivo profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, Julien; Kang, Min Su; Aliaga, Arturo; Sharif, Behrang; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Séguéla, Philippe; Barker, Philip A; Kostikov, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    Mature neurotrophins as well as their pro forms are critically involved in the regulation of neuronal functions. They are signaling through three distinct types of receptors: tropomyosin receptor kinase family (TrkA/B/C), p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and sortilin. Aberrant expression of p75(NTR) in the CNS is implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. The goal of this work was to evaluate one of the very few reported p75(NTR) small molecule ligands as a lead compound for development of novel PET radiotracers for in vivo p75(NTR) imaging. Here we report that previously described ligand LM11A-24 shows significant inhibition of carbachol-induced persistent firing (PF) of entorhinal cortex (EC) pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice via selective interaction with p75(NTR). Based on this electrophysiological assay, the compound has very high potency with an EC50<10nM. We optimized the radiosynthesis of [(11)C]LM11A-24 as the first attempt to develop PET radioligand for in vivo imaging of p75(NTR). Despite some weak interaction with CNS tissues, the radiolabeled compound showed unfavorable in vivo profile presumably due to high hydrophilicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using "1"1C-donepezil and "1"8F-FEOBV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, Nis Pedersen; Hoegsberg Schleimann, Mariane; Alstrup, Aage K.O.; Knudsen, Karoline; Jakobsen, Steen; Bender, Dirk; Gormsen, Lars C.; Borghammer, Per; Mortensen, Frank V.; Madsen, Line Bille; Breining, Peter; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Immune cells utilize acetylcholine as a paracrine-signaling molecule. Many white blood cells express components of the cholinergic signaling pathway, and these are up-regulated when immune cells are activated. However, in vivo molecular imaging of cholinergic signaling in the context of inflammation has not previously been investigated. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analogue 18F-FDG, and 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV, markers of acetylcholinesterase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, respectively. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h and remained stable. The 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV uptake displayed progressive increase, and at 120-144 h was nearly at the FDG level. Moderate 11C-donepezil and slightly lower 18F-FEOBV uptake were seen in pig abscesses. PCR analyses suggested that the 11C-donepezil signal in inflammatory cells is derived from both acetylcholinesterase and sigma-1 receptors. In humans, very high 11C-donepezil uptake was seen in a lobar pneumonia and in peri-tumoral inflammation surrounding a non-small cell lung carcinoma, markedly superseding the 18F-FDG uptake in the inflammation. In a renal clear cell carcinoma no 11C-donepezil uptake was seen. The time course of cholinergic tracer accumulation in murine abscesses was considerably different from 18F-FDG, demonstrating in the 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV image distinct aspects of immune modulation. Preliminary data in humans strongly suggest that 11C-donepezil can exhibit more intense accumulation than 18F-FDG at sites of chronic inflammation. Cholinergic PET imaging may therefore have potential applications for basic research into cholinergic

  7. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using {sup 11}C-donepezil and {sup 18}F-FEOBV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Nis Pedersen; Hoegsberg Schleimann, Mariane [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Aarhus (Denmark); Alstrup, Aage K.O.; Knudsen, Karoline; Jakobsen, Steen; Bender, Dirk; Gormsen, Lars C.; Borghammer, Per [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Aarhus C (Denmark); Mortensen, Frank V. [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Aarhus (Denmark); Madsen, Line Bille [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Histopathology, Aarhus (Denmark); Breining, Peter [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Aarhus (Denmark); Petersen, Mikkel Steen [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Clinical Immunology, Aarhus (Denmark); Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik [Aarhus University, Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Immune cells utilize acetylcholine as a paracrine-signaling molecule. Many white blood cells express components of the cholinergic signaling pathway, and these are up-regulated when immune cells are activated. However, in vivo molecular imaging of cholinergic signaling in the context of inflammation has not previously been investigated. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analogue 18F-FDG, and 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV, markers of acetylcholinesterase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, respectively. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h and remained stable. The 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV uptake displayed progressive increase, and at 120-144 h was nearly at the FDG level. Moderate 11C-donepezil and slightly lower 18F-FEOBV uptake were seen in pig abscesses. PCR analyses suggested that the 11C-donepezil signal in inflammatory cells is derived from both acetylcholinesterase and sigma-1 receptors. In humans, very high 11C-donepezil uptake was seen in a lobar pneumonia and in peri-tumoral inflammation surrounding a non-small cell lung carcinoma, markedly superseding the 18F-FDG uptake in the inflammation. In a renal clear cell carcinoma no 11C-donepezil uptake was seen. The time course of cholinergic tracer accumulation in murine abscesses was considerably different from 18F-FDG, demonstrating in the 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV image distinct aspects of immune modulation. Preliminary data in humans strongly suggest that 11C-donepezil can exhibit more intense accumulation than 18F-FDG at sites of chronic inflammation. Cholinergic PET imaging may therefore have potential applications for basic research into cholinergic

  8. Naloxone-sensitive, haloperidol-sensitive, [3H](+)SKF-10047-binding protein partially purified from rat liver and rat brain membranes: an opioid/sigma receptor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, L I; Su, T P

    1997-02-01

    A naloxone-sensitive, haloperidol-sensitive, [3H](+)SKF-10047-binding protein was partially purified from rat liver and rat brain membranes in an affinity chromatography originally designed to purify sigma receptors. Detergent-solubilized extracts from membranes were adsorbed to Sephadex G-25 resin containing an affinity ligand for sigma receptors: N-(2- 3,4-dichlorophenyl]ethyl)-N-(6-aminohexyl)-(2-[1-pyrrolidinyl]) ethylamine (DAPE). After eluting the resin with haloperidol, a protein that bound [3H](+)SKF-10047 was detected in the eluates. However, the protein was not the sigma receptor. [3H](+)SKF-10047 binding to the protein was inhibited by the following compounds in the order of decreasing potency: (+)pentazocine > (-) pentazocine > (+/-)cyclazocine > (-)morphine > (-)naloxone > haloperidol > (+)SKF-10047 > DADLE > (-)SKF-10047. Further, the prototypic sigma receptor ligands, such as 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), (+)3-PPP, and progesterone, bound poorly to the protein. Tryptic digestion and heat treatment of the affinity-purified protein abolished radioligand binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) of the partially-purified protein from the liver revealed a major diffuse band with a molecular mass of 31 kDa, a polypeptide of 65 kDa, and another polypeptide of > 97 kDa. This study demonstrates the existence of a novel protein in the rat liver and rat brain which binds opioids, benzomorphans, and haloperidol with namomolar affinity. The protein resembles the opioid/sigma receptor originally proposed by Martin et al. [(1976): J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther., 197:517-532.]. A high degree of purification of this protein has been achieved in the present study.

  9. A Polytime Algorithm Based on a Primal LP Model for the Scheduling Problem 1 vertical bar pmtn;p(j)=2;r(j)vertical bar Sigma w(j)C(j)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Harmen W.; Goldengorin, Boris; Lagakos, S; Perlovsky, L; Jha, M; Covaci, B; Zaharim, A; Mastorakis, N

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a Boolean Linear Programming (BLP) model is presented for the single machine scheduling problem 1 vertical bar pmtn; p(j) = 2;r(j)vertical bar Sigma w(j)C(j). The problem is a special case of the open problem 1 vertical bar pmtn; p(j) = p; r(j)vertical bar Sigma wj(g)C(j). We show that

  10. Cloning of cDNA encoding steroid 11β-hydroxylase (P450c11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, S.C.; Szabo, P.; Vitek, A.; Grzeschik, K.H.; John, M.; White, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated bovine and human adrenal cDNA clones encoding the adrenal cytochrome P-450 specific for 11β-hydroxylation (P450c11). A bovine adrenal cDNA library constructed in the bacteriophage λ vector gt10 was probed with a previously isolated cDNA clone corresponding to part of the 3' untranslated region of the 4.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA encoding P450c11. Several clones with 3.2-kb cDNA inserts were isolated. Sequence analysis showed that they overlapped the original probe by 300 base pairs (bp). Combined cDNA and RNA sequence data demonstrated a continuous open reading frame of 1509 bases. P450c11 is predicted to contain 479 amino acid residues in the mature protein in addition to a 24-residue amino-terminal mitochondrial signal sequence. A bovine clone was used to isolate a homologous clone with a 3.5-kb insert from a human adrenal cDNA library. A region of 1100 bp was 81% homologous to 769 bp of the coding sequence of the bovine cDNA except for a 400-bp segment presumed to be an unprocessed intron. Hybridization of the human cDNA to DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines and in situ hybridization to metaphase spreads of human chromosomes localized the gene to the middle of the long arm of chromosome 8. These data should be useful in developing reagents for heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis of 11β-hydroxylase deficiency, the second most frequent cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

  11. Solution Phase Measurement of Both Weak Sigma and C-H---X- Hydrogen Bonding Interactions in Synthetic Anion Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, Mr. Orion B. [University of Oregon; Sather, Mr. Aaron C [University of Oregon; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Meisner, Mr. Jeffrey S. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Prof. Darren W. [University of Oregon

    2008-01-01

    A series of tripodal receptors preorganize electron-deficient aromatic rings to bind halides in organic solvents using weak sigma anion-to-arene interactions or C-H---X- hydrogen bonds. 1H NMR spectroscopy proves to be a powerful technique for quantifying binding in solution, and determining the interaction motifs, even in cases of weak binding.

  12. Topological massive sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we construct topological sigma models which include a potential and are related to twisted massive supersymmetric sigma models. Contrary to a previous construction these models have no central charge and do not require the manifold to admit a Killing vector. We use the topological massive sigma model constructed here to simplify the calculation of the observables. Lastly it is noted that this model can be viewed as interpolating between topological massless sigma models and topological Landau-Ginzburg models. ((orig.))

  13. {sup 11}C-ORM-13070, a novel PET ligand for brain α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors: radiometabolism, plasma pharmacokinetics, whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry in healthy men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luoto, Pauliina; Oikonen, Vesa; Arponen, Eveliina; Helin, Semi; Virta, Jere; Virtanen, Kirsi; Roivainen, Anne [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Suilamo, Sami [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku (Finland); Herttuainen, Jukka; Hietamaeki, Johanna; Holopainen, Aila; Rouru, Juha; Sallinen, Jukka [Orion Pharma, Espoo and Turku (Finland); Kailajaervi, Marita [GE Healthcare, Turku Imanet, Turku (Finland); Peltonen, Juha M.; Scheinin, Mika; Volanen, Iina [University of Turku, CRST, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, CRST, Turku (Finland); TYKSLAB, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    {sup 11}C-labelled 1-[(S)-1-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[1,2]dioxin-2-yl)methyl] -4-(3-methoxy-methylpyridin-2- yl)-piperazine ({sup 11}C-ORM-13070) is a novel PET tracer for imaging of α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors in the human brain. Brain α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors may be therapeutic targets in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. To validate the use of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 in humans, we investigated its radiometabolism, pharmacokinetics, whole-body distribution and radiation dose. Radiometabolism was studied in a test-retest setting in six healthy men. After intravenous injection of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070, blood samples were drawn over 60 min. Plasma samples were analysed by radio-HPLC for intact tracer and its radioactive metabolites. Metabolite-corrected plasma time-activity curves were used for calculation of pharmacokinetics. In a separate group of 12 healthy men, the whole-body distribution of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 and radiation exposure were investigated by dynamic PET/CT imaging without blood sampling. Two radioactive metabolites of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 were detected in human arterial plasma. The proportion of unchanged {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 decreased from 81 ± 4 % of total radioactivity at 4 min after tracer injection to 23 ± 4 % at 60 min. At least one of the radioactive metabolites penetrated into red blood cells, while the parent tracer remained in plasma. The apparent elimination rate constant and corresponding half-life of unchanged {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 in arterial plasma were 0.0117 ± 0.0056 min{sup -1} and 73.6 ± 35.8 min, respectively. The organs with the highest absorbed doses were the liver (12 μSv/MBq), gallbladder wall (12 μSv/MBq) and pancreas (9.1 μSv/MBq). The mean effective dose was 3.9 μSv/MBq, with a range of 3.6 - 4.2 μSv/MBq. {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 was rapidly metabolized in human subjects after intravenous injection. The effective radiation dose of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 was in the same range

  14. [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic: a novel radioligand for {kappa}-opioid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisnel, Geraldine; Oueslati, Farhana; Dhilly, Martine; Delamare, Jerome [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France); Perrio, Cecile [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: perrio@cyceron.fr; Debruyne, Daniele [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: debruyne@cyceron.fr; Barre, Louisa [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: Radiopharmaceuticals that can bind selectively the {kappa}-opioid receptor may present opportunities for staging clinical brain disorders and evaluating the efficiency of new therapies related to stroke, neurodegenerative diseases or opiate addiction. The N-methylated derivative of JDTic (named MeJDTic), which has been recently described as a potent and selective antagonist of {kappa}-opioid receptor in vitro, was labeled with carbon-11 and evaluated for in vivo imaging the {kappa}-opioid receptor in mice. Methods: [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic was prepared by methylation of JDTic with [{sup 11}C]-methyl triflate. The binding of [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic to {kappa}-opioid receptor was investigated ex vivo by biodistribution and competition studies using nonfasted male CD1 mice. Results: [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic exhibited a high and rapid distribution in peripheral organs. The uptake was maximal in lung where the {kappa} receptor is largely expressed. [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic rapidly crossed the blood-brain barrier and accumulated in the brain regions of interest (hypothalamus). The parent ligand remained the major radioactive compound in brain during the experiment. Chase studies with U50,488 (a {kappa} referring agonist), morphine (a {mu} agonist) and naltrindole (a {delta} antagonist) demonstrated that this uptake was the result of specific binding to the {kappa}-opioid receptor. Conclusion: These findings suggested that [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic appeared to be a promising selective 'lead' radioligand for {kappa}-opioid receptor PET imaging.

  15. Preparation of [11C]diethyl oxalate and [11C]oxalic acid and demonstration of their use in the synthesis of [11C]-2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorell, J.-O.; Stone-Elander, S.

    1993-01-01

    A method for the production of two new carbon-11 labelled difunctional radiolabelling precursors, [ 11 C]diethyl oxalate,2, and [ 11 C]oxalic acid, 3 is described. Methyl chloroformate was reacted with no-carrier-added [ 11 C]cyanide to generate the intermediate nitrile, methyl [ 11 C]cyanoformate. Alcoholysis with HC1 in ethanol generated 2, which could subsequently be converted to 3 with aqueous acid. The total time of preparation from end-or-trapping of [ 11 C]cyanide was 6-7 min using combined microwave and thermal treatment or, by exclusively thermal treatment, 15 and 20 min for 2 and 3, respectively. The radiochemical conversion of [ 11 C]cyanide to 2 and 3 was ∼ 80% and ∼ 70%, respectively. Both 2 and 3 were used in a model reaction with 1,2-phenylenediamine to synthesize the heterocyclic compound, 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline, a basic structural unit in antagonists for the excitatory amino acid receptor system. (Author)

  16. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J; Fowler, Joanna S; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([(11)C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [(11)C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of (12)C-cyanide ((12)CN¯). The [(11)C]CN¯ is produced from [(11)C]CO2, which is generated by the (14)N(p,α)(11)C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [(11)C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to (12)CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33µA for 1 and 10min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [(11)C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [(11)C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Group 11 Metal Compounds with Tripodal Bis(imidazole Thioether Ligands. Applications as Catalysts in the Oxidation of Alkenes and as Antimicrobial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Varela-Ramírez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available New group 11 metal complexes have been prepared using the previously described tripodal bis(imidazole thioether ligand (N-methyl-4,5-diphenyl-2-imidazolyl2C(OMeC(CH32S(tert-Bu ({BITOMe,StBu}, 2. The pincer ligand offers a N2S donor atom set that can be used to coordinate the group 11 metals in different oxidation states [AuI, AuIII, AgI, CuI and CuII]. Thus the new compounds [Au{BITOMe,StBu}Cl][AuCl4]2 (3, [Au{BITOMe,StBu}Cl] (4, [Ag{BITOMe,StBu}X] (X = OSO2CF3- 5, PF6- 6 and [Cu{BITOMe,StBu}Cl2] (7 have been synthesized from reaction of 2 with the appropriate metal precursors, and characterized in solution. While attempting characterization in the solid state of 3, single crystals of the neutral dinuclear mixed AuIII-AuI species [Au2{BITOMe,S}Cl3] (8 were obtained and its crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The structure shows a AuIII center coordinated to the pincer ligand through one N and the S atom. The soft AuI center coordinates to the ligand through the same S atom that has lost the tert-butyl group, thus becoming a thiolate ligand. The short distance between the AuI-AuIII atoms (3.383 Å may indicate a weak metal-metal interaction. Complexes 2-7 and the previously described CuI compound [Cu{BITOMe,StBu}]PF6 (9 have been evaluated in the oxidation of biphenyl ethylene with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP as the oxidant. Results have shown that the AuI and AgI complexes 4 and 6 (at 10 mol % loading are the more active catalysts in this oxidative cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of compounds 2-5, 7 and 9 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeast has also been evaluated. The new gold and silver compounds display moderate to high antibacterial activity, while the copper derivatives are mostly inactive. The gold and silver complexes were also potent against fungi. Their cytotoxic properties have been analyzed in vitro utilizing HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells. The compounds displayed a

  18. Radiosynthesis of an opiate receptor-binding radiotracer for positron emission tomography: (C-11 methyl)-methyl-4-(N-(1-oxopropyl)-N-phenylamino)-4-piperidine carboxylate (C-11 4-carbomethoxyfentanyl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Frost, J.J.; Wilson, A.A.; Burns, H.D.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high affinity, high specific activity tritium-labeled neurotransmitter receptor ligands has made it possible to determine the spatial distribution and relative regional concentration of several neuroreceptors by means of in vivo receptor labeling techniques in animals. This development made possible the biochemical identification of opiate receptors by autoradiographic visualization in experimental animals. The quantitation and localization of opiate receptors in man using non-invasive methods, such as positron emission tomography, could provide a means of obtaining information about a variety of receptor-linked neuropsychiatric diseases as well as normal brain mechanisms regulating pain and emotions. As part of a continuing program to identify and radiolabel high affinity, highly specific ligands for the opiate receptor, the authors have selected two derivatives of fentanyl, a well-known analgesic, as candidates for radiolabeling: R-31,833 (4-carbomethoxy-fentanyl) and R-34,995 (lofentanil). Carbon-11 labeled R-31,833 was synthesized by the methylation of the appropriate carboxylate with C-11 methyl iodide in dimethylformamide at room temperature and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. The average synthesis time from end-of-bombardment (E.O.B.) was 30 minutes. The average specific activity was determined by ultraviolet spectroscopy to be 890 mCi/..mu..mole end-of-synthesis (approx. 2500 mCi/..mu..mole E.O.B.).

  19. Radiosynthesis of an opiate receptor-binding radiotracer for positron emission tomography: [C-11 methyl]-methyl-4-[N-(1-oxopropyl)-N-phenylamino]-4-piperidine carboxylate (C-11 4-carbomethoxyfentanyl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Frost, J.J.; Wilson, A.A.; Burns, H.D.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high affinity, high specific activity tritium-labeled neurotransmitter receptor ligands has made it possible to determine the spatial distribution and relative regional concentration of several neuroreceptors by means of in vivo receptor labeling techniques in animals. This development made possible the biochemical identification of opiate receptors by autoradiographic visualization in experimental animals. The quantitation and localization of opiate receptors in man using non-invasive methods, such as positron emission tomography, could provide a means of obtaining information about a variety of receptor-linked neuropsychiatric diseases as well as normal brain mechanisms regulating pain and emotions. As part of a continuing program to identify and radiolabel high affinity, highly specific ligands for the opiate receptor, the authors have selected two derivatives of fentanyl, a well-known analgesic, as candidates for radiolabeling: R-31,833 (4-carbomethoxy-fentanyl) and R-34,995 (lofentanil). Carbon-11 labeled R-31,833 was synthesized by the methylation of the appropriate carboxylate with C-11 methyl iodide in dimethylformamide at room temperature and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. The average synthesis time from end-of-bombardment (E.O.B.) was 30 minutes. The average specific activity was determined by ultraviolet spectroscopy to be 890 mCi/μmole end-of-synthesis (approx. 2500 mCi/μmole E.O.B.)

  20. Radiosynthesis of the D2/3 agonist [3-11C]-(+)-PHNO using [11C]iodomethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco Garcia-Arguello, Segundo; Fortt, Robin; Steel, Colin J.; Brickute, Diana; Glaser, Matthias; Turton, David R.; Robins, Edward G.; Årstad, Erik; Luthra, Sajinder K.

    2013-01-01

    We report here a radiosynthesis for the D 2/3 agonist (+)-4-([3- 11 C]propyl)-3,4,4a,5,6,10b-hexahydro-2H-naphtho[1,2-b][1,4] oxazin-9-ol (3-[ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO) labelled at the terminal carbon of the N-propyl chain. The protocol is based on 11 C-methylation of an N-acetyl precursor. This initial step is followed by a reduction with LiAlH 4 to give ([3- 11 C]-(+)-PHNO). We first applied the method for the synthesis of a model compound, N-3-([ 11 C]propyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline, which we obtained in 77–97% analytical radiochemical yield (n=6) in 20 min. Similarly, we prepared ([3- 11 C]-(+)-PHNO) in 55–60% analytical radiochemical yield (n=5) using a one-pot procedure. We have also been able to implement the complete process on a semi-automated module. This platform delivered purified and formulated [3- 11 C]PHNO with an average radiochemical yield of 9% (n=13, range 2–30%, non-decay corrected), a radiochemical purity >95%, and a specific radioactivity of 26.8–81.1 GBq/μmol in a total time of 63–65 min. - Highlights: ► We report an alternative method to obtain carbon-11 labelled PHNO. ► The method is based on readily available [ 11 C]methyl iodide as starting material. ► We have automated the alkylation/reduction protocol including purification and formulation

  1. Zr (IV COMPLEXES OF SOME NITROGEN-OXYGEN DONOR LIGANDS (SEMICARBAZONES & SALICYLALDAZINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z F DAWOOD

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Complexes containing mixed ligands of zirconium (IV have been synthesized by the reaction of zirconium (IV nitrate (Zr(NO34, 5H2O with salicylaldazine (SAH2 and semicarbazone ligands benzaldehyde semicarbazone (BSCH, 4-methoxybenzaldehyde semicarbzone (MBSCH, 2-chlorobenzaldehyde semicrbazone (CISCH and cinnamaldehyde semicarbazone (CinSCH forming complexes of the type [Zr2(SAH2(SCH2](NO38 and [Zr2(SA2 (SC2](NO32 in neutral and basic medium respectively. The ligands and their complexes are characterized physico-chemically.

  2. Synthesis of some 11C-labelled alkaloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laangstroem, B.; Antoni, G.; Halldin, H.; Svaerd, H.; Bergson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Using ( 11 C)-methyl iodide in N-alkylation reactions in dimethylformamide (DMF), the alkaloids N-( 11 C-methyl)-morphine, N-( 11 C-methyl)-codeine, 6-N(methyl)-9, 10-dihydroergotamine, 6-N-( 11 C-methyl)-bromocriptine and N-( 11 C-methyl)-nicotine have been synthesized in radiochemical yields of 50-95%, within 5-10 min of introducing ( 11 C)-methyl iodide into the reaction vial. ( 11 C)-Methyl iodide was obtained within 4-7 min from ( 11 C)-carbon dioxide prepared by the 14 N(p,α) 11 C reaction. (Authors)

  3. Development and evaluation of a novel radioiodinated vesamicol analog as a sigma receptor imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Kanbara, Hiroya; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Yoji; Kozaka, Takashi; Kiwada, Tatsuto; Odani, Akira

    2012-09-28

    Sigma receptors are highly expressed in human tumors and should be appropriate targets for developing tumor imaging agents. Previously, we synthesized a vesamicol analog, (+)-2-[4-(4-iodophenyl)piperidino]cyclohexanol ((+)-pIV), with a high affinity for sigma receptors and prepared radioiodinated (+)-pIV. As a result, (+)-[125I]pIV showed high tumor uptake in biodistribution experiments. However, the accumulation of radioactivity in normal tissues, such as the liver, was high. We supposed that some parts of the accumulation of (+)-pIV in the liver should be because of its high lipophilicity, and prepared and evaluated a more hydrophilic radiolabeled vesamicol analog, (+)-4-[1-(2-hydroxycyclohexyl)piperidine-4-yl]-2-iodophenol ((+)-IV-OH). (+)-[125I]IV-OH was prepared by the chloramine T method from the precursor. The partition coefficient of (+)-[125I]IV-OH was measured. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenous administration of a mixed solution of (+)-[125I]IV-OH and (+)-[131I]pIV into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. Blocking studies were performed by intravenous injection of (+)-[125I]IV-OH mixed with an excess amount of ligand into DU-145 tumor-bearing mice. The hydrophilicity of (+)-[125I]IV-OH was much higher than that of (+)-[125I]pIV. In biodistribution experiments, (+)-[125I]IV-OH and (+)-[131I]pIV showed high uptake in tumor tissues at 10-min post-injection. Although (+)-[131I]pIV tended to be retained in most tissues, (+)-[125I]IV-OH was cleared from most tissues. In the liver, the radioactivity level of (+)-[125I]IV-OH was significantly lower at all time points compared to those of (+)-[131I]pIV. In the blocking studies, co-injection of an excess amount of sigma ligands resulted in significant decreases of tumor/blood uptake ratios after injection of (+)-[125I]IV-OH. The results indicate that radioiodinated (+)-IV-OH holds a potential as a sigma receptor imaging agent.

  4. C-11 production with MC-50 cyclotron and synthesis of L-[11C-methyl] methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Wook; Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Chun, Kweon Soo

    2003-01-01

    L-[ 11 C-methyl] methionine was prepared via no-carrier-added(nca) fast S-alkylation of L-homocysteine with [ 11 C]CH 3 I using solid support (Al 2 O 3 /KF)at room temperature in ethanol. The radiochemical yield of methylation was 90.2%. After reaction, no radiochemical impurity was detected but traces of L-homocysteine precursor were monitored by UV detector. The purification was archived by passing successively through a C 18 and alumina sep-pak. the radiochemical purity of L-[ 11 C-methyl] methionine was over 98% after purification and total elapsed time to prepare was 10min from [ 11 C]CH 3 I delivery

  5. Six Sigma software development

    CERN Document Server

    Tayntor, Christine B

    2002-01-01

    Since Six Sigma has had marked success in improving quality in other settings, and since the quality of software remains poor, it seems a natural evolution to apply the concepts and tools of Six Sigma to system development and the IT department. Until now however, there were no books available that applied these concepts to the system development process. Six Sigma Software Development fills this void and illustrates how Six Sigma concepts can be applied to all aspects of the evolving system development process. It includes the traditional waterfall model and in the support of legacy systems,

  6. Epibatidine-derivatives: ligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westera, G.; Patt, J.T.; Jankowski, K.; Bertrand, D.; Spang, J.; Schubiger, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Epibatidine, isolated from the Ecuadorian frog Epipedobates tricolar, has been synthesized. 11 C-N-methyl derivate is investigated as useful nicotinergic receptor ligand by electrophysiological methods and in vivo mice experiments. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs

  7. Endogenous ligands for C-type lectin receptors: the true regulators of immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2009-07-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) have long been known as pattern-recognition receptors implicated in the recognition of pathogens by the innate immune system. However, evidence is accumulating that many CLRs are also able to recognize endogenous 'self' ligands and that this recognition event often plays an important role in immune homeostasis. In the present review, we focus on the human and mouse CLRs for which endogenous ligands have been described. Special attention is given to the signaling events initiated upon recognition of the self ligand and the regulation of glycosylation as a switch modulating CLR recognition, and therefore, immune homeostasis.

  8. C-C coupling of N-heterocycles at the fac-Re(CO)(3) fragment: synthesis of pyridylimidazole and bipyridine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguri, Maialen Espinal; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía

    2014-05-05

    A new family of cationic rhenium tricarbonyl complexes with either two N-alkylimidazole (N-RIm) and one pyridine (Py) ligand, or two pyridine and one N-RIm ligand, [Re(CO)3 (N-RIm)(3-x) (Py)x ](+) , has been prepared. The reaction of these complexes with a strong base, followed by an oxidant, selectively afforded 2,2'-pyridylimidazole complexes as the result of intramolecular dehydrogenative CC coupling reactions. For tris(pyridine) complexes [Re(CO)3 (Py)3 ](+) the reaction pattern upon a deprotonation/oxidation sequence is maintained, which allows the generation of complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine ligands. In the particular combination of two different types of pyridine ligand in the cationic fac-Re(CO)3 complexes only the cross-coupling products with asymmetric 2,2'-bipyridine ligands were obtained; the homocoupling products were not observed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Carbon-11 labelling of an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase: [11C]physostigmine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnot-Lours, S.; Crouzel, C.; Prenant, C.; Hinnen, F.

    1993-01-01

    Physostigmine, an alkaloid from calabar bean is a strong inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and has been used clinically in the treatment of glaucoma, atropine intoxication, myasthenia gravis and more recently, in experimental trials in Alzheimer's disease. In order to study the AChE activity in the brain by positron emission tomography, we have undertaken the labelling of physostigmine with carbon-11. The synthesis involves the reaction of [ 11 C]methylisocyanate with eseroline. [ 11 C]Methylisocyanate was obtained by heating [ 11 C]acetylchloride with tetrabutylammonium azide in toluene. The synthesis of [ 11 C]CH 3 COC1 involves the carbonation of methylmagnesium bromide in THF with cyclotron produced [ 11 C]carbon dioxide and the addition of phthaloyl dichloride. The [ 11 C]methylisocyanate is distilled into a solution of eseroline in ether with a small piece of sodium. After 10 minutes at 25 o C, the solution is purified by HPLC and the appropriate fraction collected. Starting with 55.5 GBq (1.5 Ci) of [ 11 C]carbon dioxide, 0.92-1.48 GBq (25-40 mCi) of [ 11 C]Physostigmine are obtained 57 minutes after EOB. (author)

  10. α2A- and α2C-Adrenoceptors as Potential Targets for Dopamine and Dopamine Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Soto, Marta; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Yano, Hideaki; Bender, Brian Joseph; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Moreno, Estefanía; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antoni; Meiler, Jens; Casadó, Vicent; Ferré, Sergi

    2018-03-18

    The poor norepinephrine innervation and high density of Gi/o-coupled α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors in the striatum and the dense striatal dopamine innervation have prompted the possibility that dopamine could be an effective adrenoceptor ligand. Nevertheless, the reported adrenoceptor agonistic properties of dopamine are still inconclusive. In this study, we analyzed the binding of norepinephrine, dopamine, and several compounds reported as selective dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligands, such as the D 3 receptor agonist 7-OH-PIPAT and the D 4 receptor agonist RO-105824, to α 2 -adrenoceptors in cortical and striatal tissue, which express α 2A -adrenoceptors and both α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors, respectively. The affinity of dopamine for α 2 -adrenoceptors was found to be similar to that for D 1 -like and D 2 -like receptors. Moreover, the exogenous dopamine receptor ligands also showed high affinity for α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors. Their ability to activate Gi/o proteins through α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors was also analyzed in transfected cells with bioluminescent resonance energy transfer techniques. The relative ligand potencies and efficacies were dependent on the Gi/o protein subtype. Furthermore, dopamine binding to α 2 -adrenoceptors was functional, inducing changes in dynamic mass redistribution, adenylyl cyclase activity, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Binding events were further studied with computer modeling of ligand docking. Docking of dopamine at α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors was nearly identical to its binding to the crystallized D 3 receptor. Therefore, we provide conclusive evidence that α 2A - and α 2C -adrenoceptors are functional receptors for norepinephrine, dopamine, and other previously assumed selective D 2 -like receptor ligands, which calls for revisiting previous studies with those ligands.

  11. Molecular imaging of {sigma} receptors: synthesis and evaluation of the potent {sigma}{sub 1} selective radioligand [{sup 18}F]fluspidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Scheunemann, Matthias; Steinbach, Joerg; Brust, Peter [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Research Site Leipzig, Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany); Wiese, Christian; Grosse Maestrup, Eva; Schepmann, Dirk; Wuensch, Bernhard [Institut fuer Pharmazeutische und Medizinische Chemie der Westfaelischen Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Neuroimaging of {sigma}{sub 1} receptors in the human brain has been proposed for the investigation of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. However, there is a lack of suitable {sup 18}F-labelled PET radioligands for that purpose. The selective {sigma}{sub 1} receptor ligand [{sup 18}F]fluspidine (1'-benzyl-3-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-3H-spiro[[2]benzofuran-1,4'-piperidine]) was synthesized by nucleophilic {sup 18}F{sup -} substitution of the tosyl precursor. In vitro receptor binding affinity and selectivity were assessed by radioligand competition in tissue homogenate and autoradiographic approaches. In female CD-1 mice, in vivo properties of [{sup 18}F]fluspidine were evaluated by ex vivo brain section imaging and organ distribution of intravenously administered radiotracer. Target specificity was validated by organ distribution of [{sup 18}F]fluspidine after treatment with 1 mg/kg i.p. of the {sigma} receptor antagonist haloperidol or the emopamil binding protein (EBP) inhibitor tamoxifen. In vitro metabolic stability and in vivo metabolism were investigated by LC-MS{sup n} and radio-HPLC analysis. [{sup 18}F]Fluspidine was obtained with a radiochemical yield of 35-45%, a radiochemical purity of {>=} 99.6% and a specific activity of 150-350 GBq/{mu}mol (n = 6) within a total synthesis time of 90-120 min. In vitro, fluspidine bound specifically and with high affinity to {sigma}{sub 1} receptors (K{sub i} = 0.59 nM). In mice, [{sup 18}F]fluspidine rapidly accumulated in brain with uptake values of 3.9 and 4.7%ID/g and brain to blood ratios of 7 and 13 at 5 and 30 min after intravenous application of the radiotracer, respectively. By ex vivo autoradiography of brain slices, resemblance between binding site occupancy of [{sup 18}F]fluspidine and the expression of {sigma}{sub 1} receptors was shown. The radiotracer uptake in the brain as well as in peripheral {sigma}{sub 1} receptor expressing organs was significantly

  12. Measurement of the cross section ratio $\\sigma_\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b}} / \\sigma_\\mathrm{t \\bar{t} jj }$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Song; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Fanzago, Federica; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Trapani, Pier Paolo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-30

    The first measurement of the cross section ratio $\\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b}} / \\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} jj }$ is presented using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb$^{-1}$ collected in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events with two leptons ($\\mathrm{e}$ or $\\mu$) and four reconstructed jets, including two identified as b quark jets, in the final state are selected. The ratio is determined for a minimum jet transverse momentum $p_\\mathrm{T}$ of both 20 and 40 GeV/$c$. The measured ratio is 0.022 $\\pm$ 0.003 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.005 (syst) for $p_\\mathrm{T}$ greater than 20 GeV/$c$. The absolute cross sections $\\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} b \\bar{b}}$ and $\\sigma_\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} jj }$ are also measured. The measured ratio for $p_\\mathrm{T}$ greater than 40 GeV/$c$ is compatible with a theoretical quantum chromodynamics calculation at next-to-leading order.

  13. Sigma models in (4,4) harmonic superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.; Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna; Sutulin, A.

    1994-04-01

    We define basics of (4,4) 2D harmonic superspace with two independent sets of SU(2) harmonic variables and apply it to construct new superfield actions of (4,4) supersymmetric two-dimensional sigma models with torsion and mutually commuting left and right complex structures, as well as of their massive deformations. We show that the generic off-shell sigma model action is the general action of constrained analytic superfields q (1,1) representing twisted N=4 multiplets in (4,4) harmonic superspace. The massive term of q (1,1) is shown to be unique; it generates a scalar potential the form of which is determined by the metric on the target bosonic manifold. We discuss in detail (4,4) supersymmetric group manifold SU(2)xU(1) WZNW sigma model and its Liouville deformation. A deep analogy of the relevant superconformally invariant analytic superfield action to that of the improved tensor N=2 4D multiplet is found. We define (4,4) duality transformation and find new off-shell dual representations of the previously constructed actions via unconstrained analytic (4,4) superfields. The main peculiarities of the (4,4) duality transformation are: (i) It preserves manifest (4,4) supersymmetry; (ii) dual actions reveal a gauge invariance needed for the onshell equivalence to the original description; (iii) in the actions dual to the massive ones 2D supersymmetry is modified off shell by SU(2) tensor central charges. The dual representation suggests some hints of how to describe (4,4) models with non-commuting complex structures in the harmonic superspace. (orig.)

  14. Synthesis of O-[11C]acetyl CoA, O-[11C]acetyl-L-carnitine, and L-[11C]carnitine labelled in specific positions, applied in PET studies on rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Gunilla B.; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Valind, Sven; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Laangstroem, Bengt

    1997-01-01

    The syntheses of L-carnitine, O-acetyl CoA, and O-acetyl-L-carnitine labelled with 11 C at the 1- or 2-position of the acetyl group or the N-methyl position of carnitine, using the enzymes acetyl CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase, are described. With a total synthesis time of 45 min, O-[1- 11 C]acetyl CoA and O-[2- 11 C]acetyl CoA was obtained in 60-70% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, and O-[1- 11 C]acetyl-L-carnitine and O-[2- 11 C]acetyl-L-carnitine in 70-80% yield, based on [1- 11 C]acetate or [2- 11 C]acetate, respectively. By an N-methylation reaction with [ 11 C]methyl iodide, L-[methyl- 11 C]carnitine was obtained within 30 min, and O-acetyl-L-[methyl- 11 C]carnitine within 40 min, giving a decay-corrected radiochemical yield of 60% and 40-50%, respectively, based on [ 11 C]methyl iodide. Initial data of the kinetics of the different 11 C-labelled L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitines in renal cortex of anaesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta) are presented

  15. Hadron properties in chiral sigma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Hong

    2005-01-01

    The modification of hadron masses in nuclear medium is studied by using the chiral sigma model, which is extended to generate the omega meson mass by the sigma condensation in the vacuum in the same way as the nucleon mass. The chiral sigma model provides proper equilibrium properties of nuclear matter. It is shown that the effective masses of both nucleons and omega mesons decrease in nuclear medium, while the effective mass of sigma mesons increases oat finite density in the chiral sigma model. The results obtained in the chiral sigma model are compared with those obtained in the Walecka model, which includes sigma and omega mesons in a non-chiral fashion. (author)

  16. Semi-automated preparation of a 11C-labelled antibiotic - [N-methyl-11C]erythromycin A lactobionate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.; Palmer, A.J.; Horlock, P.L.; Liss, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    A fast semi-automated method is described for labelling the antibiotic, erythromycin A (1), with the short-lived positron-emitting radionuclide, 11 C(tsub(1/2)=20.4 min), in order to permit the non-invasive study of its tissue uptake in vivo. Labelling was achieved by the fast reductive methylation of N-demethylerythromycin A (2) with [ 11 C]formaldehyde, itself prepared from cyclotron-produced [ 11 C]-carbon dioxide. Rapid chemical and radiochemical purification of the [N-methyl- 11 C]erythromycin A (3) were achieved by HPLC and verified by TLC with autoradiography. The purified material was formulated for human i.v. injection as a sterile apyrogenic solution of the lactobionate salt. The preparation takes 42 min from the end of radionuclide production and from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide produces [N-methyl- 11 C]erythromycin A lactobionate in 4-12% radiochemical yield, corrected for radioactive decay. (author)

  17. Automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-{sup 11}C]-labeled D- and L-enantiomers of lactic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drandarov, Konstantin [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University Hospital Zuerich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Schubiger, P. August [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University Hospital Zuerich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Westera, Gerrit [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, University Hospital Zuerich, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland) and Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)]. E-mail: gerrit.westera@usz.ch

    2006-12-15

    The first purely chemical method for automated no-carrier-added synthesis of [1-{sup 11}C]-labeled D(R)- and L(S)-2-hydroxypropanoic acid (lactic acid) was developed for experimental neurophysiology studies and position emission tomography (PET) diagnosis. Starting from sodium 1-hydroxyethanesulfonate and [{sup 11}C]HCN (trapped as [{sup 11}C]KCN) the intermediate DL-(R,S)-[1-{sup 11}C]-2-hydroxypropanenitrile was prepared. Its rapid acid hydrolysis gave DL-(R,S)-[1-{sup 11}C]lactic acid, which was isolated by preparative reversed phase HPLC and automatically injected on a second preparative C{sub 18} HPLC column coated with a chiral selector, where both [1-{sup 11}C]lactic acid enantiomers were separated by chiral ligand-exchange chromatography. Two novel chiral selectors for HPLC enantiomeric separation of {alpha}-hydroxy acids, namely D(R)- or L(S)-2-amino-3-methyl-3-(5-phenylpentylsulfanyl)-butanoic acid were utilized for the preparative HPLC separation of the [1-{sup 11}C]lactic acid enantiomers. The preparation of the selectors and the coating procedure for the manufacturing of the preparative chiral HPLC columns are described. A highly efficient trap for [{sup 11}C]HCN is presented. The whole radiosynthesis is automated, takes about 45 min and leads to more than 80% decay corrected overall radiochemical yield of each enantiomer (up to 2.5 GBq) with over 99% radiochemical, chemical and enantiomeric purity. The specific activity at the end of the synthesis is about 400 GBq/{mu}mol.

  18. A molecular dynamics investigation of CDK8/CycC and ligand binding: conformational flexibility and implication in drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholko, Timothy; Chen, Wei; Tang, Zhiye; Chang, Chia-en A.

    2018-05-01

    Abnormal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) along with its partner protein cyclin C (CycC) is a common feature of many diseases including colorectal cancer. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, this study determined the dynamics of the CDK8-CycC system and we obtained detailed breakdowns of binding energy contributions for four type-I and five type-II CDK8 inhibitors. We revealed system motions and conformational changes that will affect ligand binding, confirmed the essentialness of CycC for inclusion in future computational studies, and provide guidance in development of CDK8 binders. We employed unbiased all-atom MD simulations for 500 ns on twelve CDK8-CycC systems, including apoproteins and protein-ligand complexes, then performed principal component analysis (PCA) and measured the RMSF of key regions to identify protein dynamics. Binding pocket volume analysis identified conformational changes that accompany ligand binding. Next, H-bond analysis, residue-wise interaction calculations, and MM/PBSA were performed to characterize protein-ligand interactions and find the binding energy. We discovered that CycC is vital for maintaining a proper conformation of CDK8 to facilitate ligand binding and that the system exhibits motion that should be carefully considered in future computational work. Surprisingly, we found that motion of the activation loop did not affect ligand binding. Type-I and type-II ligand binding is driven by van der Waals interactions, but electrostatic energy and entropic penalties affect type-II binding as well. Binding of both ligand types affects protein flexibility. Based on this we provide suggestions for development of tighter-binding CDK8 inhibitors and offer insight that can aid future computational studies.

  19. Comparative metabolomics reveals endogenous ligands of DAF-12, a nuclear hormone receptor regulating C. elegans development and lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanti, Parag; Bose, Neelanjan; Bethke, Axel; Judkins, Joshua C.; Wollam, Joshua; Dumas, Kathleen J.; Zimmerman, Anna M.; Campbell, Sydney L.; Hu, Patrick J.; Antebi, Adam; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small-molecule ligands of nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) govern the transcriptional regulation of metazoan development, cell differentiation, and metabolism. However, the physiological ligands of many NHRs remain poorly characterized primarily due to lack of robust analytical techniques. Using comparative metabolomics, we identified endogenous steroids that act as ligands of the C. elegans NHR, DAF-12, a vitamin-D and liver-X receptor homolog regulating larval development, fat metabolism, and lifespan. The identified molecules feature unexpected chemical modifications and include only one of two DAF-12 ligands reported earlier, necessitating a revision of previously proposed ligand biosynthetic pathways. We further show that ligand profiles are regulated by a complex enzymatic network including the Rieske oxygenase DAF-36, the short-chain dehydrogenase DHS-16, and the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, HSD-1. Our results demonstrate the advantages of comparative metabolomics over traditional candidate-based approaches and provide a blueprint for the identification of ligands for other C. elegans and mammalian NHRs. PMID:24411940

  20. Ligand-Controlled Chemoselective C(acyl)–O Bond vs C(aryl)–C Bond Activation of Aromatic Esters in Nickel Catalyzed C(sp2)–C(sp3) Cross-Couplings

    KAUST Repository

    Chatupheeraphat, Adisak; Liao, Hsuan-Hung; Srimontree, Watchara; Guo, Lin; Minenkov, Yury; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    step helped rationalizing this intriguing reaction chemoselectivity: whereas nickel complexes with bidentate ligands favor the C(aryl)-C bond cleavage in the oxidative addition step leading to the alkylated product via a decarbonylative process, nickel

  1. Synthesis and preclinical evaluation of [11C]D617, a metabolite of (R)-[11C]verapamil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Joost; Syvänen, Stina; Schuit, Robert C.; Eriksson, Jonas; de Lange, Elizabeth C M; Windhorst, Albert D.; Luurtsema, Gert; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (R)-[(11)C]verapamil is widely used as a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer to evaluate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) functionality at the blood-brain barrier in man. A disadvantage of (R)-[(11)C]verapamil is the fact that its main metabolite, [(11)C]D617, also enters the brain. For

  2. Zirconium and Titanium Propylene Polymerization Precatalysts Supported by a Fluxional C 2 -Symmetric Bis(anilide)pyridine Ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Tonks, Ian A.

    2012-03-12

    Titanium and zirconium complexes supported by a bis(anilide)pyridine ligand (NNN = pyridine-2,6-bis(N-mesitylanilide)) have been synthesized and crystallographically characterized. C 2-symmetric bis(dimethylamide) complexes were generated from aminolysis of M(NMe 2) 4 with the neutral, diprotonated NNN ligand or by salt metathesis of the dipotassium salt of NNN with M(NMe 2) 2Cl 2. In contrast to the case for previously reported pyridine bis(phenoxide) complexes, the ligand geometry of these complexes appears to be dictated by chelate ring strain rather than metal-ligand π bonding. The crystal structures of the five-coordinate dihalide complexes (NNN)MCl 2 (M = Ti, Zr) display a C 1-symmetric geometry with a stabilizing ipso interaction between the metal and the anilido ligand. Coordination of THF to (NNN)ZrCl 2 generates a six-coordinate C 2-symmetric complex. Facile antipode interconversion of the C 2 complexes, possibly via flat C 2v intermediates, has been investigated by variable-temperature 1H NMR spectroscopy for (NNN)MX 2(THF) n (M = Ti, Zr; X = NMe 2, Cl) and (NNN)Zr(CH 2Ph) 2. These complexes were tested as propylene polymerization precatalysts, with most complexes giving low to moderate activities (10 2-10 4 g/(mol h)) for the formation of stereoirregular polypropylene. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Ligand-Enabled γ-C(sp3)–H Olefination of Amines: En Route to Pyrrolidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Heng; He, Jian; Liu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Pd(II)-catalyzed olefination of γ-C(sp3)–H bonds of triflyl (Tf) and 4-nitrobenzenesulfonyl (Ns) protected amines is achieved. Subsequent aza-Wacker oxidative cyclization or conjugate addition of the olefinated intermediates provides a variety of C-2 alkylated pyrrolidines. Three pyridine- and quinoline-based ligands are developed to match different classes of amine substrates, demonstrating a rare example of ligand-enabled C(sp3)–H olefination reaction. The use of Ns protecting group to direct C(sp3)–H activation of alkyl amine is also a significant step towards practical C–H functionalizations of alkyl amines. PMID:26796676

  4. The structure of the .sigma.-ideal of .sigma.-porous sets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelený, M.; Pelant, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2004), s. 37-72 ISSN 0010-2628 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/97/1161; GA ČR GA201/97/0216; GA ČR GA201/00/1466; GA AV ČR KSK1019101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : .sigma. proposity * descriptive set theory * .sigma.-ideal Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  5. Salinity/temperature ranges for application of seawater SA-T-P models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G. M.; Millero, F. J.; Feistel, R.

    2009-01-01

    At the present time, little is known about how broad salinity and temperature ranges are for seawater thermodynamic models that are functions of absolute salinity (SA), temperature (T) and pressure (P). Such models rely on fixed compositional ratios of the major components (e.g. Na/Cl, Mg/Cl, Ca/Cl, SO4/Cl, etc.). As seawater evaporates or freezes, solid phases (e.g. CaCO3(s) or CaSO42H2O(s)) will eventually precipitate. This will change the compositional ratios, and these salinity models will no longer be applicable. A future complicating factor is the lowering of seawater pH as the atmospheric concentrations of CO2 increase. A geochemical model (FREZCHEM) was used to quantify the SA-T boundaries at P=0.1 MPa and the range of these boundaries for future atmospheric CO2 increases. An omega supersaturation model for CaCO3 minerals based on homogeneous nucleation was extended from 25-40°C to 3°C. CaCO3 minerals were the boundary defining minerals (first to precipitate) between 3°C (at SA=104 g kg-1 and 40°C (at SA=66 g kg-1. At 2.82°C, calcite(CaCO3) transitioned to ikaite(CaCO36H2O) as the dominant boundary defining mineral for colder temperatures, which culminated in a low temperature boundary of -4.93°C. Increasing atmospheric CO2 from 385 μatm (in Year 2008) to 550 μatm (in Year 2100) would increase the SA and t boundaries as much as 11 g kg-1 and 0.66°C, respectively. The model-calculated calcite-ikaite transition temperature of 2.82°C is in excellent agreement with ikaite formation in natural environments that occurs at temperatures of 3°C or lower. Furthermore, these results provide a quantitative theoretical explanation (FREZCHEM model calculations) for why ikaite is the solid phase CaCO3 mineral that precipitates during seawater freezing.

  6. Expression of mammalian GPCRs in C. elegans generates novel behavioural responses to human ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Gert

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play a crucial role in many biological processes and represent a major class of drug targets. However, purification of GPCRs for biochemical study is difficult and current methods of studying receptor-ligand interactions involve in vitro systems. Caenorhabditis elegans is a soil-dwelling, bacteria-feeding nematode that uses GPCRs expressed in chemosensory neurons to detect bacteria and environmental compounds, making this an ideal system for studying in vivo GPCR-ligand interactions. We sought to test this by functionally expressing two medically important mammalian GPCRs, somatostatin receptor 2 (Sstr2 and chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 in the gustatory neurons of C. elegans. Results Expression of Sstr2 and CCR5 in gustatory neurons allow C. elegans to specifically detect and respond to somatostatin and MIP-1α respectively in a robust avoidance assay. We demonstrate that mammalian heterologous GPCRs can signal via different endogenous Gα subunits in C. elegans, depending on which cells it is expressed in. Furthermore, pre-exposure of GPCR transgenic animals to its ligand leads to receptor desensitisation and behavioural adaptation to subsequent ligand exposure, providing further evidence of integration of the mammalian GPCRs into the C. elegans sensory signalling machinery. In structure-function studies using a panel of somatostatin-14 analogues, we identified key residues involved in the interaction of somatostatin-14 with Sstr2. Conclusion Our results illustrate a remarkable evolutionary plasticity in interactions between mammalian GPCRs and C. elegans signalling machinery, spanning 800 million years of evolution. This in vivo system, which imparts novel avoidance behaviour on C. elegans, thus provides a simple means of studying and screening interaction of GPCRs with extracellular agonists, antagonists and intracellular binding partners.

  7. 55th MASA congress: challenges for medicine in S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This congress titled C hallenges for medicine in S.A. , is the 55th congress of the Medical Association of South Africa held on 9-11 March 1987 in Cape Town. This publication only contains the abstracts of papers delivered on different medical subjects. One of the abstracts briefly looks at the nuclear magnetic resonance technique in diagnosis

  8. [{sup 11}C]NNC 22-0215, a metabolically stable dopamine D{sub 1} radioligand for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foged, Christian; Halldin, Christer; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Ginovart, Nathalie; Karlsson, Per; Lundkvist, Camilla; Farde, Lars

    1998-07-01

    NNC 22-0215 has been found to be a metabolically stable dopamine D{sub 1} antagonist with high affinity and selectivity for D{sub 1} receptors in vitro. We prepared [{sup 11}C]NNC 22-0215 with a specific radioactivity of about 50 GBq/{mu}mol at time of administration. In PET experiments with [{sup 11}C]NNC 22-0215 there was a rapid uptake of radioactivity in the cynomolgus monkey brain (1.8% of total radioactivity injected). Radioactivity accumulated most markedly in the striatum and the neocortex. The striatum to cerebellum ratio was about 4, with specific binding that remained at a plateau level from 50 min to 100 min after injection. Binding in the striatum and neocortex was markedly displaced by SCH 23390, whereas binding in the cerebellum was not reduced. Metabolite studies showed that about 80% of the radioactivity in the monkey plasma represented unchanged radioligand 30 min after injection. The rate of metabolism in monkey plasma in vivo was also determined for a series of structurally related {sup 11}C-labelled benzazepines, previously used as dopamine D{sub 1} receptor ligands for PET. Results indicate a significantly slower rate of metabolism for [{sup 11}C]NNC 22-0215 than for any of the previously labelled benzazepines. Thus [{sup 11}C]NNC 22-0215 has potential for imaging of selective binding to the dopamine D{sub 1} receptors in the human brain with high count rates at time of equilibrium.

  9. Preparation of [[sup 11]C]diethyl oxalate and [[sup 11]C]oxalic acid and demonstration of their use in the synthesis of [[sup 11]C]-2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorell, J -O; Stone-Elander, S [Karolinska Pharmacy, Stockholm (Sweden) Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology; Elander, N [Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-11-01

    A method for the production of two new carbon-11 labelled difunctional radiolabelling precursors, [[sup 11]C]diethyl oxalate,2, and [[sup 11]C]oxalic acid, 3 is described. Methyl chloroformate was reacted with no-carrier-added [[sup 11]C]cyanide to generate the intermediate nitrile, methyl [[sup 11]C]cyanoformate. Alcoholysis with HC1 in ethanol generated 2, which could subsequently be converted to 3 with aqueous acid. The total time of preparation from end-or-trapping of [[sup 11]C]cyanide was 6-7 min using combined microwave and thermal treatment or, by exclusively thermal treatment, 15 and 20 min for 2 and 3, respectively. The radiochemical conversion of [[sup 11]C]cyanide to 2 and 3 was [approx] 80% and [approx] 70%, respectively. Both 2 and 3 were used in a model reaction with 1,2-phenylenediamine to synthesize the heterocyclic compound, 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline, a basic structural unit in antagonists for the excitatory amino acid receptor system. (Author).

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, solid state d.c. electrical conductivity and biological studies of some lanthanide(III chloride complexes with a heterocyclic Schiff base ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Condensation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde with 2-amino-3-carboxyethyl-4,5-dimethylthiophene in 1:1 molar ratio, yielded a potentially tridentate Schiff base viz. 2-[N-(2′-hydroxy-1-naphthylideneamino]-3-carboxyethyl-4,5-dimethylthiophene (HNAT. This ligand formed complexes with lanthanum(III, cerium(III, praseodymium(III, neodymium(III, samarium(III, europium(III and gadolinium(III chloride under well defined conditions. These complexes were characterized through elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment measurements, IR, UV–Vis, FAB mass and 1H NMR spectral studies. Analytical data showed that all the metal complexes exhibited 1:1 metal–ligand ratio. Molar conductance values adequately confirmed the non-electrolytic nature of the metal complexes. The proton NMR spectral observations supplement the IR spectral assignments. The spectral data revealed that the ligand acted as neutral tridentate, coordinating to the metal ion through azomethine nitrogen, ester carbonyl and naphtholate oxygen without deprotonation. The ligand and its lanthanum(III chloride complex were subjected to XRD studies. The lanthanum(III chloride complex has undergone a facile transesterification reaction. The solid state d.c. electrical conductivity of some selected complexes were measured as a function of temperature, indicating the semiconducting nature of the metal complexes. The antimicrobial activities were examined by disk diffusion method against some pathogenic bacterial and fungal species.

  11. Non destructive method to follow the phase sigma in a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.M.; Andrade, A.L.S. Souza; Fialho, W.M.L.; Araujo, B.R.; Silva, J.H.R.; Leite, Josinaldo P.; Silva, Eloy M.; Leite, Joao P.

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are subject to embrittlement due to the formation of sigma phase, which is one with the greatest effect of weakening because they are rich in chromium and deplete the matrix of this element. In this paper, a non-destructive methodology based on measurements of Hall voltage, is presented for monitoring the formation of sigma phase at temperatures of 800 deg C and 900 deg C. Different field intensities are generated by an electromagnet and the flow of field lines is detected by a Hall effect sensor. Hall voltage measurements are proportional to the formation of sigma phase generated by different times of aging methods. The results are correlated with results of microscopic, hardness and X-ray diffraction. It was showed that exist a correlation between the Hall voltage and the amount of sigma phase. The formation of this phase influences the signal voltage by reducing the voltage. (author)

  12. Carbon-11 labeled stilbene derivatives from natural products for the imaging of Aβ plaques in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Mengchao; Tang, Ruikun; Li, Zijing; Jia, Hongmei; Liu, Boli [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals; Zhang, Jinming; Zhang, Xiaojun [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing (China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-04-01

    Four stilbene derivatives from natural products were screened as novel β-amyloid (Aβ) imaging ligands. In vitro binding assay showed that the methylated ligand, (E)-1-methoxy-4-styrylbenzene (8) displayed high binding affinity to Aβ{sub 1-42} aggregates (K{sub i} = 19.5 nM). Moreover, the {sup 11}C-labeled ligand, [{sup 11}C]8 was prepared through an O-methylation reaction using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}OTf. In vitro autoradiography with sections of transgenic mouse brain also confirmed the high and specific binding of [{sup 11}C]8 to Aβ plaques. In vivo biodistribution experiments in normal mice indicated that [{sup 11}C]8 displayed high initial uptake (9.41 ± 0.51% ID/g at 5 min post-injection) into and rapid washout from the brain, with a brain{sub 5} {sub min}/brain{sub 30} {sub min} ratio of 6.63. These preliminary results suggest that [{sup 11}C]8 may be served as a novel Aβ imaging probe for PET. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of the novel 5-HT4 receptor PET ligand [11C]SB207145 in the Gottingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, B.R.; Lind, N.M.; Gillings, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor binding in the minipig brain with positron emission tomography (PET), tissue homogenate-binding assays, and autoradiography in vitro. The cerebral uptake and binding of the novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 in vivo...... was modelled and the outcome compared with postmortem receptor binding. Different models for quantification of [(11)C]SB207145 binding were evaluated: One-tissue and two-tissue compartment kinetic modelling, Logan arterial input, and three different reference tissue models. We report that the pig...... model provides stable and precise estimates of the binding potential in all regions. The binding potentials calculated for striatum, midbrain, and cortex from the PET data were highly correlated with 5-HT(4) receptor concentrations determined in brain homogenates from the same regions, except...

  14. 26 CFR 11.412(c)-11 - Election with respect to bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amount payable at maturity (or, in the case of a bond which is callable prior to maturity, the earliest... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election with respect to bonds. 11.412(c)-11... OF 1974 § 11.412(c)-11 Election with respect to bonds. (a) In general. Section 412(c)(2)(B) provides...

  15. 11 CFR 100.11 - State (2 U.S.C. 431(12)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State (2 U.S.C. 431(12)). 100.11 Section 100.11 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS (2 U.S.C. 431) General Definitions § 100.11 State (2 U.S.C. 431(12)). State means each State of the United States, the District of...

  16. On-column ligand exchange for structure-based drug design: a case study with human 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Wenying; Judge, Russell A.; Longenecker, Kenton L.; Solomon, Larry R.; Harlan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    An on-column ligand- and detergent-exchange method was developed to obtain ligand–protein complexes for an adamantane series of compounds with 11β-HSD1 after a variety of other complexation methods had failed. An interesting byproduct of the method was the observation of artificial trimers in the crystal structures. Successfully forming ligand–protein complexes with specific compounds can be a significant challenge in supporting structure-based drug design for a given protein target. In this respect, an on-column ligand- and detergent-exchange method was developed to obtain ligand–protein complexes of an adamantane series of compounds with 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) after a variety of other complexation methods had failed. This report describes the on-column exchange method and an unexpected byproduct of the method in which artificial trimers were observed in the structures

  17. Running Head: Implementing Six Sigma Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jamie Eleaitia Mae

    2005-01-01

    Six Sigma is an organization wide program that provides common set of goals, language, and methodology for improving the overall quality of the processes within the organization (Davis & Heineke 2004). Six Sigma main concern is for the customer. What will the customers want? Need? Six Sigma has a model that helps Sigma get implemented DMAIC model…

  18. Carbon-11 labelling of an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase: [[sup 11]C]physostigmine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnot-Lours, S.; Crouzel, C.; Prenant, C.; Hinnen, F. (CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot)

    1993-01-01

    Physostigmine, an alkaloid from calabar bean is a strong inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase and has been used clinically in the treatment of glaucoma, atropine intoxication, myasthenia gravis and more recently, in experimental trials in Alzheimer's disease. In order to study the AChE activity in the brain by positron emission tomography, we have undertaken the labelling of physostigmine with carbon-11. The synthesis involves the reaction of [[sup 11]C]methylisocyanate with eseroline. [[sup 11]C]Methylisocyanate was obtained by heating [[sup 11]C]acetylchloride with tetrabutylammonium azide in toluene. The synthesis of [[sup 11]C]CH[sub 3]COC1 involves the carbonation of methylmagnesium bromide in THF with cyclotron produced [[sup 11]C]carbon dioxide and the addition of phthaloyl dichloride. The [[sup 11]C]methylisocyanate is distilled into a solution of eseroline in ether with a small piece of sodium. After 10 minutes at 25[sup o]C, the solution is purified by HPLC and the appropriate fraction collected. Starting with 55.5 GBq (1.5 Ci) of [[sup 11]C]carbon dioxide, 0.92-1.48 GBq (25-40 mCi) of [[sup 11]C]Physostigmine are obtained 57 minutes after EOB. (author).

  19. PET imaging of focal demyelination and remyelination in a rat model of multiple sclerosis: comparison of [{sup 11}C]MeDAS, [{sup 11}C]CIC and [{sup 11}C]PIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula Faria, Daniele de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Center of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Copray, Sjef [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Neuroscience, Groningen (Netherlands); Sijbesma, Jurgen W.A.; Willemsen, Antoon T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Vries, Erik F.J. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Buchpiguel, Carlos A. [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Center of Nuclear Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, we compared the ability of [{sup 11}C]CIC, [{sup 11}C]MeDAS and [{sup 11}C]PIB to reveal temporal changes in myelin content in focal lesions in the lysolecithin rat model of multiple sclerosis. Pharmacokinetic modelling was performed to determine the best method to quantify tracer uptake. Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotactically injected with either 1 % lysolecithin or saline into the corpus callosum and striatum of the right brain hemisphere. Dynamic PET imaging with simultaneous arterial blood sampling was performed 7 days after saline injection (control group), 7 days after lysolecithin injection (demyelination group) and 4 weeks after lysolecithin injection (remyelination group). The kinetics of [{sup 11}C]CIC, [{sup 11}C]MeDAS and [{sup 11}C]PIB was best fitted by Logan graphical analysis, suggesting that tracer binding is reversible. Compartment modelling revealed that all tracers were fitted best with the reversible two-tissue compartment model. Tracer uptake and distribution volume in lesions were in agreement with myelin status. However, the slow kinetics and homogeneous brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]CIC make this tracer less suitable for in vivo PET imaging. [{sup 11}C]PIB showed good uptake in the white matter in the cerebrum, but [{sup 11}C]PIB uptake in the cerebellum was low, despite high myelin density in this region. [{sup 11}C]MeDAS distribution correlated well with myelin density in different brain regions. This study showed that PET imaging of demyelination and remyelination processes in focal lesions is feasible. Our comparison of three myelin tracers showed that [{sup 11}C]MeDAS has more favourable properties for quantitative PET imaging of demyelinated and remyelinated lesions throughout the CNS than [{sup 11}C]CIC and [{sup 11}C]PIB. (orig.)

  20. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  1. S,O-Ligand-Promoted Palladium-Catalyzed C-H Functionalization Reactions of Nondirected Arenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naksomboon, K.; Valderas, C.; Gomez-Martinez, M.; Alvarez-Casao, Y.; Fernández Ibáñez, M.A.

    Pd(II)-catalyzed C-H functionalization of non directed arenes has been realized using an inexpensive and easily accessible type of bidentate S,O-ligand. The catalytic system shows high efficiency in the C-H olefination reaction of electron-rich and electron-poor arenes. This methodology is

  2. Tripodal (N-alkylated) CMP(O) and malonamide ligands: synthesis, extraction of metal ions, and potentiometric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janczewski, D.; Reinhoudt, D.N.; Verboom, W.; Malinowska, E.; Pietrzak, M.; Hill, C.; Allignol, C.

    2007-01-01

    Tripodal ligands build on the C-pivot (9b-e, 13b-d, and 17a-d) and tri-alkyl-benzene platforms (10a,b, 11, 12, 14a,b, and 18a,b) bearing (N-alkylated) carbamoyl-methyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO), carbamoyl-methyl-phosphonate (CMP), and malonamide moieties were synthesized. Extraction studies with Am 3+ and Eu 3+ show that in general there is a positive influence of the N-alkyl substituents in C-pivot CMP(O) ligands on the D(distribution) coefficients. The tri-alkyl-benzene CMPO ligands 10a,b, 11, and 12 have considerably larger D coefficients than the corresponding C-pivot analogues 9a-e, although hardly having any selectivity, while N-alkylation gives rise to smaller D coefficients. Although less effective the extraction behavior of the C-pivot CMP analogues 13b-d shows more or less the same trend as the corresponding CMPO ligands 9b-e upon substitution of the carboxamide N-atom with different alkyl chains. The different malonamide ligands 17a-d and 18a,b are bad extractants, while N-alkylation makes them even worse. Potentiometric studies of CMP(O) and malonamide ligands in polymeric membranes on Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Na + , and K + salts revealed that N-alkyl substituents increase the stability constants of ion-ionophore complexes compared to unsubstituted ligands. In polymeric membrane electrodes the ligands induce a selectivity pattern that differs significantly from the so-called Hofmeister series, giving the highest selectivity coefficients for UO 2 2+ among all examined cations (Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Na + , K + ). (authors)

  3. The synthesis of [1-11C]-butanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helus, F.; Maier-Borst, W.; Oberdorfer, F.; Silvester, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    11 C-labelled butanol has been synthesised for use as a tracer in the assessment of regional blood supply for substrate utilisation in tumors. 11 CO 2 was produced by the 14 N(p,a) 11 C reactions in a cyclotron. 11 C-butanol was formed by the carboxylation of n-propyl magnesium chlorides with 11 CO 2 , and reduction of the resulting 11 C-butyric acid with LiAlH 4 . (U.K.)

  4. Stability constants of mixed ligand complexes of lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) with complexone and substituted salicylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolhe, Vishnu; Dwivedi, K.

    1996-01-01

    Salicylic acid and substituted salicylic acids are potential antimicrobial agents. Binary complexes of salicylic acid and its substituted derivatives with lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) metal ions have been reported. There are reports on the ternary metal complexing equilibria with some lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) metal ions involving aminopolycarboxylic acid as one ligand and salicylic acid (SA) and other related compounds as the second ligands. Ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethylether)- N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) is an important member of aminopolycarboxylic acid and finds many applications in medicine and biology. Recently, few ternary complexes have been reported using EGTA as ligand. In view of biological importance of simple and mixed ligand complexes EGTA, SA and DNSA (3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid), a systematic study has been undertaken for the determination of stability constant and the results are reported. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  5. Enhanced radiosyntheses of [¹¹C]raclopride and [¹¹C]DASB using ethanolic loop chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xia; Schnau, Paul L; Fawaz, Maria V; Scott, Peter J H

    2013-01-01

    To improve the synthesis and quality control of carbon-11 labeled radiopharmaceuticals, we report the fully automated loop syntheses of [¹¹C]raclopride and [¹¹C]DASB using ethanol as the only organic solvent for synthesis module cleaning, carbon-11 methylation, HPLC purification, and reformulation. Ethanolic loop chemistry is fully automated using a GE TRACERLab FX(C-Pro) synthesis module, and is readily adaptable to any other carbon-11 synthesis apparatus. Precursors (1 mg) were dissolved in ethanol (100 μL) and loaded into the HPLC loop. [¹¹C]MeOTf was passed through the HPLC loop and then the labeled products were purified by semi-preparative HPLC and reformulated into ethanolic saline. Both [¹¹C]raclopride (3.7% RCY; >95% RCP; SA=20831 Ci/mmol; n=64) and [¹¹C]DASB, both with (3.0% RCY; >95% RCP; SA=15152Ci/mmol; n=9) and without (3.0% RCY; >95% RCP; SA=10931 Ci/mmol; n=3) sodium ascorbate, have been successfully prepared using the described methodology. Doses are suitable for human use and the described methods are now employed for routine clinical production of both radiopharmaceuticals at the University of Michigan. Ethanolic loop chemistry is a powerful technique for preparing [¹¹C]raclopride and [¹¹C]DASB, and we are in the process of adapting it for other carbon-11 radiopharmaceuticals prepared in our laboratories ([¹¹C]PMP, [¹¹C]PBR28 etc.). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of [11C]MMTP: a potential PET ligand for mGluR1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhakaran, Jaya; Majo, Vattoly J; Milak, Matthew S

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of [O-methyl-(11)C]dimethylamino-3(4-methoxyphenyl)-3H-pyrido[3',2':4,5]thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one (1), a potential imaging agent for mGluR1 receptors using PET are described. Synthesis of the corresponding desmethyl precursor 2 was achieved...... selectively labeled mGluR1 receptors in slide-mounted sections of postmortem human brain containing cerebellum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and striatum as demonstrated by in vitro autoradiography using phosphor-imaging. PET studies in anesthetized baboon show that [(11)C]1 penetrates the BBB...... and accumulates in cerebellum, a region reported to have higher expression of mGluR1. These findings suggest [(11)C]1 is a promising PET radiotracer candidate for mGluR1....

  7. Targeting interleukin-11 receptor in leukemia and lymphoma: A functional ligand-directed study and hematopathology analysis of patient-derived specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Bover, Laura; Sun, Yan; Kuniyasu, Akihiko; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Rietz, Cecilia; Zurita, Amado J.; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Calin, George A.; Koivunen, Erkki; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The interleukin-11 receptor (IL-11R) is an established molecular target in primary tumors of bone, such as osteosarcoma, and in secondary bone metastases from solid tumors such as prostate cancer. However, its potential role in management of hematopoietic malignancies has not yet been determined. Here we evaluated the IL-11R as a candidate therapeutic target in human leukemia and lymphoma. Experimental Design and Results First, we show that the IL-11R protein is expressed in a variety of human leukemia- and lymphoma derived cell lines and in a large panel of bone marrow samples from leukemia and lymphoma patients, while expression is absent from non-malignant control bone marrow. Moreover, a targeted peptidomimetic prototype (termed BMTP-11) specifically bound to leukemia and lymphoma cell membranes, induced ligand-receptor internalization mediated by the IL-11R, and resulted in a specific dose-dependent cell death induction in these cells. Finally, a pilot drug lead-optimization program yielded a new myristoylated BMTP-11 analog with an apparent improved anti-leukemia cell profile. Conclusion These results indicate (i) that the IL-11R is a suitable cell surface target for ligand-directed applications in human leukemia and lymphoma and (ii) that BMTP-11 and its derivatives have translational potential against this group of malignant diseases. PMID:25779950

  8. Targeting IL11 Receptor in Leukemia and Lymphoma: A Functional Ligand-Directed Study and Hematopathology Analysis of Patient-Derived Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Jaalouk, Diana E; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Bover, Laura; Sun, Yan; Kuniyasu, Akihiko; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Rietz, Cecilia; Zurita, Amado J; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Cortes, Jorge E; Calin, George A; Koivunen, Erkki; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-07-01

    The IL11 receptor (IL11R) is an established molecular target in primary tumors of bone, such as osteosarcoma, and in secondary bone metastases from solid tumors, such as prostate cancer. However, its potential role in management of hematopoietic malignancies has not yet been determined. Here, we evaluated the IL11R as a candidate therapeutic target in human leukemia and lymphoma. First, we show that the IL11R protein is expressed in a variety of human leukemia- and lymphoma-derived cell lines and in a large panel of bone marrow samples from leukemia and lymphoma patients, whereas expression is absent from nonmalignant control bone marrow. Moreover, a targeted peptidomimetic prototype (termed BMTP-11), specifically bound to leukemia and lymphoma cell membranes, induced ligand-receptor internalization mediated by the IL11R, and resulted in a specific dose-dependent cell death induction in these cells. Finally, a pilot drug lead-optimization program yielded a new myristoylated BMTP-11 analogue with an apparent improved antileukemia cell profile. These results indicate (i) that the IL11R is a suitable cell surface target for ligand-directed applications in human leukemia and lymphoma and (ii) that BMTP-11 and its derivatives have translational potential against this group of malignant diseases. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging: Application to [11C]Flumazenil-PET Steady-State Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at developing a simulation system that predicts the optimal study design for attaining tracer steady-state conditions in brain and blood rapidly. Tracer kinetics was determined from bolus studies and used to construct the system. Subsequently, the system was used to design inputs for bolus infusion (BI or programmed infusion (PI experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The GABAA receptor ligand [C11]Flumazenil (FMZ was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus [C11]FMZ-PET scans were conducted, based on which population-based PI and BI schemes were designed and tested in five additional healthy subjects. The design of a PI was assisted by an offline feedback controller. Results. The system could reproduce the measurements in blood and brain. With PI, [C11]FMZ steady state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min. Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be [C11]FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous sampling and a straight-forward quantification. This simulation toolbox is available for other PET-tracers.

  10. Psychedelic N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine modulate innate and adaptive inflammatory responses through the sigma-1 receptor of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szabo

    Full Text Available The orphan receptor sigma-1 (sigmar-1 is a transmembrane chaperone protein expressed in both the central nervous system and in immune cells. It has been shown to regulate neuronal differentiation and cell survival, and mediates anti-inflammatory responses and immunosuppression in murine in vivo models. Since the details of these findings have not been elucidated so far, we studied the effects of the endogenous sigmar-1 ligands N,N-dimethyltryptamine (NN-DMT, its derivative 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT and the synthetic high affinity sigmar-1 agonist PRE-084 hydrochloride on human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDCs activation provoked by LPS, polyI:C or pathogen-derived stimuli to induce inflammatory responses. Co-treatment of moDC with these activators and sigma-1 receptor ligands inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and the chemokine IL-8, while increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The T-cell activating capacity of moDCs was also inhibited, and dimethyltryptamines used in combination with E. coli or influenza virus as stimulators decreased the differentiation of moDC-induced Th1 and Th17 inflammatory effector T-cells in a sigmar-1 specific manner as confirmed by gene silencing. Here we demonstrate for the first time the immunomodulatory potential of NN-DMT and 5-MeO-DMT on human moDC functions via sigmar-1 that could be harnessed for the pharmacological treatment of autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory conditions of the CNS or peripheral tissues. Our findings also point out a new biological role for dimethyltryptamines, which may act as systemic endogenous regulators of inflammation and immune homeostasis through the sigma-1 receptor.

  11. Preparation of no-carrier-added [1-11C]ethylene and [1-11C]1,2-dibromoethane as new labelling agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.; Pike, V.W.; Dowsett, K.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of NCA [1- 11 C] ethylene based on the passage of [1- 11 C]ethanol over heated (550 o C) quartz glass in a stainless steel tube (in preference to dehydration by catalysis on γ-alumina or pyrolysis). The [1- 11 C]ethanol is prepared from cyclotron-produced NCA [ 11 C]carbon dioxide by 11 C-carboxylation of methylmagnesium bromide, freshly prepared in dibutyl ether, and reduction of the adduct with lithium aluminium hydride in diglyme. The use of involatile solvents avoids the formation of carrier ethylene and radioactive and stable diethyl ether by cracking processes over the heated catalyst. The preparation takes 21 min from the end of radionuclide production and has a radiochemical yield of 44%, decay-corrected from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. NCA [1- 11 C] ethylene is converted quantitatively into [1- 11 C]1,2-dibromoethane when collected in a solution of bromine in carbon tetrachloride. The NCA [1- 11 C]ethylene and [1- 11 C]1,2-dibromoethane may serve as new and useful labelling agents. (Author)

  12. Relative equilibrium plot improves graphical analysis and allows bias correction of SUVR in quantitative [11C]PiB PET studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yun; Sojkova, Jitka; Resnick, Susan M.; Wong, Dean F.

    2012-01-01

    Both the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) and the Logan plot result in biased distribution volume ratios (DVR) in ligand-receptor dynamic PET studies. The objective of this study is to use a recently developed relative equilibrium-based graphical plot (RE plot) method to improve and simplify the two commonly used methods for quantification of [11C]PiB PET.

  13. Synthesis of O-[{sup 11}C]acetyl CoA, O-[{sup 11}C]acetyl-L-carnitine, and L-[{sup 11}C]carnitine labelled in specific positions, applied in PET studies on rhesus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Gunilla B.; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Valind, Sven; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Laangstroem, Bengt

    1997-07-01

    The syntheses of L-carnitine, O-acetyl CoA, and O-acetyl-L-carnitine labelled with {sup 11}C at the 1- or 2-position of the acetyl group or the N-methyl position of carnitine, using the enzymes acetyl CoA synthetase and carnitine acetyltransferase, are described. With a total synthesis time of 45 min, O-[1-{sup 11}C]acetyl CoA and O-[2-{sup 11}C]acetyl CoA was obtained in 60-70% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, and O-[1-{sup 11}C]acetyl-L-carnitine and O-[2-{sup 11}C]acetyl-L-carnitine in 70-80% yield, based on [1-{sup 11}C]acetate or [2-{sup 11}C]acetate, respectively. By an N-methylation reaction with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide, L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]carnitine was obtained within 30 min, and O-acetyl-L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]carnitine within 40 min, giving a decay-corrected radiochemical yield of 60% and 40-50%, respectively, based on [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide. Initial data of the kinetics of the different {sup 11}C-labelled L-carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitines in renal cortex of anaesthetized monkey (Macaca mulatta) are presented.

  14. Rib-pillar mining at Sigma Colliery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, J J.S.; Hunter, F; Neethling, A F [Sigma Colliery, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    1991-06-01

    The paper describes the rib-pillar extraction method now used at Sigma Colliery in the Orange Free State. In this method, access roadways (with a high safety factor) are developed into a block of coal suitable for total extraction; pillars that have a low safety factor are then formed and extracted immediately. The method, together with the current practices of labour management, has resulted in better utilization of the coal resources and capital, increased production and labour productivity, and improved safety. 11 figs.

  15. Radiosynthesis of 6-[C-11]-D-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, J.R.; Biskupiak, J.E.; Link, J.M.; Krohn, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    Availability of 6-[C-11]-D-glucose will permit positron emission tomography (PET) investigations of glucose utilization derived from the pentose shunt which supports biosynthesis in tissues. The first radiosynthesis of 6-[C-11]-D-glucose is described. As much as 1 mCi of 6-[C-11]-D-glucose, sufficient for animal studies, is obtained from [C-11]CO 2 after 100 min with a 16% radiochemical yield (EOB). The radiosynthesis has many attractive features. The method uses [C-11]CH 3 I and combines a Wittig reaction and a stereoselective OsO 4 catalyzed alkene hydroxylation. The OsO 4 hydroxylation of the [C-11]-labeled alkene (9) is accomplished in less than 10 min with high stereoselectivity (94:6) in favor of the 6-[C-11]-D-gluco-isomer. HPLC purification (C-18) of the protected labeled sugar removes the undesired 6-[C-11]-L-ido-sugar at an early stage and avoids the use of an expensive low-capacity ion-exchange HPLC column. OsO 4 , a highly toxic reagent, is removed in the process by adsorption and inactivation on polymer-bound triphenylphosphine. (Author)

  16. Squashed Toric Sigma Models and Mock Modular Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Murthy, Sameer

    2018-05-01

    We study a class of two-dimensional N}=(2,2)} sigma models called squashed toric sigma models, using their Gauged Linear Sigma Models (GLSM) description. These models are obtained by gauging the global {U(1)} symmetries of toric GLSMs and introducing a set of corresponding compensator superfields. The geometry of the resulting vacuum manifold is a deformation of the corresponding toric manifold in which the torus fibration maintains a constant size in the interior of the manifold, thus producing a neck-like region. We compute the elliptic genus of these models, using localization, in the case when the unsquashed vacuum manifolds obey the Calabi-Yau condition. The elliptic genera have a non-holomorphic dependence on the modular parameter {τ} coming from the continuum produced by the neck. In the simplest case corresponding to squashed {C / Z_{2 the elliptic genus is a mixed mock Jacobi form which coincides with the elliptic genus of the {N=(2,2)} {SL(2,R) / U(1)} cigar coset.

  17. Lean Six Sigma in financial services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, H.; Does, R.J.M.M.; Bisgaard, S.

    2008-01-01

    Lean Thinking and Six Sigma are typically considered as separate approaches to process innovation, with complementary strengths. When combined as Lean Six Sigma, this approach provides a unified framework for systematically developing innovations. Lean Six Sigma can also bring about significant

  18. [11C]SMe-ADAM, an imaging agent for the brain serotonin transporter: synthesis, pharmacological characterization and microPET studies in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zessin, Joerg; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Kretzschmar, Marion; Wuest, Frank; Pawelke, Beate; Brust, Peter; Steinbach, Joerg; Bergmann, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    N,N-Dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylthiophenylthio)benzylamine (S Me-Adam, 1) is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SPERT). This compound was labeled with carbon-11 by methylation of the S-desmethyl precursor 10 with [ 11 C]methyl iodide to obtain the potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [ 11 C]S Me-Adam. The radiochemical yield was 27±5%, and the specific radioactivity was 26-40 GBq/μmol at the end of synthesis. Ex vivo and in vivo biodistribution experiments in rats demonstrated a rapid accumulation of the radiotracer in brain regions known to be rich in SPERT, such as the thalamus/hypothalamus region (3.59±0.41%ID/g at 5 min after injection). The specific uptake reached a thalamus to cerebellum ratio of 6.74±0.95 at 60 min postinjection. The [ 11 C]SMe-ADAM uptake in the thalamus was significantly decreased by pretreatment with fluoxetine to 38±11% of the control value. Furthermore, no metabolites of [ 11 C]SMe-ADAM could be detected in the SERT-rich regions of the rat brain. It is concluded that [ 11 C]SMe-ADAM may be a suitable PET ligand for SERT imaging in the living brain

  19. [11C]SMe-ADAM, an imaging agent for the brain serotonin transporter: synthesis, pharmacological characterization and microPET studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zessin, Jörg; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Kretzschmar, Marion; Wüst, Frank; Pawelke, Beate; Brust, Peter; Steinbach, Jörg; Bergmann, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    N,N-Dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylthiophenylthio)benzylamine (SMe-ADAM, 1) is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SERT). This compound was labeled with carbon-11 by methylation of the S-desmethyl precursor 10 with [(11)C]methyl iodide to obtain the potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(11)C]SMe-ADAM. The radiochemical yield was 27 +/- 5%, and the specific radioactivity was 26-40 GBq/micromol at the end of synthesis. Ex vivo and in vivo biodistribution experiments in rats demonstrated a rapid accumulation of the radiotracer in brain regions known to be rich in SERT, such as the thalamus/hypothalamus region (3.59 +/- 0.41%ID/g at 5 min after injection). The specific uptake reached a thalamus to cerebellum ratio of 6.74 +/- 0.95 at 60 min postinjection. The [(11)C]SMe-ADAM uptake in the thalamus was significantly decreased by pretreatment with fluoxetine to 38 +/- 11% of the control value. Furthermore, no metabolites of [(11)C]SMe-ADAM could be detected in the SERT-rich regions of the rat brain. It is concluded that [(11)C]SMe-ADAM may be a suitable PET ligand for SERT imaging in the living brain.

  20. Pharmacological evaluation of SN79, a sigma (σ) receptor ligand, against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushal, Nidhi; Seminerio, Michael J.; Robson, Matthew J.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse, causing hyperthermia and neurotoxicity at high doses. Currently, there is no clinically proven pharmacotherapy to treat these effects of methamphetamine, necessitating identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. Earlier studies showed that methamphetamine binds to sigma (σ) receptors in the brain at physiologically relevant concentrations, where it acts in part as an agonist. SN79 (6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-florophenyl)...

  1. Seis Sigma: Fatores Críticos de Sucesso para sua Implantação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cesar Amaru Maximiano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an investigation of critical success factors to implement Six Sigma in organizations operating in the Brazilian market place. Besides that, a secondary objective was to investigate the relationship between aspects like success perception among those companies which implemented Six Sigma, company size, company nationality, time of Six Sigma of implementation, continuous training, communication level between professionals, full-time and part-time Black Belts, project completion, project duration and project savings. Data were collected through an Internet questionnaire, distributed by email and sent to discussion groups involving Six Sigma professionals. Questionnaire development included a literature review and interviews with experienced Six Sigma professionals. The results indicated eight critical success factors for Six Sigma implementation: (a Leadership, (b Projects, (c Training, (d Communication and Review, (e Managerial Process, (f Black Belts Profile, (g Project Teams and (h Previous Quality Initiatives.

  2. Plastic Injection Quality Controlling Using the Lean Six Sigma and FMEA Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, A.; Mu'alim; Sunaryo

    2016-01-01

    PT. Yogya Presisi Teknikatama Industri (PT. YPTI) is a mold, precision part, and plastic injection maker company. One of the obstacles faced by the company is the high level of nonconformity on its production results. The waste on production process can be identified and classified into four types, i.e.: a). during the process of injection molding machines, b). finishing and cutting processes, c). quality control process and d). the packaging process. The objectives of this research are minimizing the defective goods and reducing the waste using Lean Six Sigma and FMEA approaches, especially for Bush product. From the analysis result, defective types on Bush product can be classified into bubble, speckle, short shoot, sunken, sink mark, over-cut, flashing, and discolor. Based on the attributes data on Bush product, the DPMO score is 988.42 or the sigma level is 4.6, While the DPMO score on the variable data on each dimension i.e.: a). Slit width on the bottom side has DPMO score of 30119 (sigma level 3.37), b). Diameter of the circle on the top side has DPMO score of 392294 (sigma level 1.77), c). Product thickness on the top side has DPMO score of 70474 (sigma level 2.97), d). Product height has DPMO score of 82107 (sigma level 2.89), product thickness on the bottom side has DPMO score of 24448 (sigma level 3.47), and f). Diameter of the circle on the bottom side has DPMO score of 24448 (sigma level 3.47). The highest RPN score on the dominant types of product defects which needs improvement are the defective goods of bubble type has RPN score of 729, flashing and the molten material out on the heating channel has RPN score of 384, over cutting has RPN score of 324 and sink mark has RPN score of 270. The recommendations for improvement that can be given from this research are making checklist for maintenance and production monitoring, enhancing work supervision and inspection, as well as improving the environment and work stations.

  3. Correlation holography: imaging of atoms when sigma/sub inelastic//sup >>sigma/elastic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1979-01-01

    Atomic-scale resolution of details is possible with this method, even if protons interact with the atoms overwhelmingly inelastically, i.e. when sigma/sub inelastic/ >>sigma/sub elastic/. Observation of small objects is compatible with quantum mechanics even if the disturbance of the object caused by the observation process is arbitrarily small

  4. PIE of nuclear grade SiC/SiC flexural coupons irradiated to 10 dpa at LWR temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites are being actively investigated for accident-tolerant core structures of light water reactors (LWRs). Owing to the limited number of irradiation studies previously conducted at LWR-coolant temperature, this study examined SiC/SiC composites following neutron irradiation at 230–340°C to 2.0 and 11.8 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The investigated materials are chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composites with three different reinforcement fibers. The fiber materials were monolayer pyrolytic carbon (PyC)-coated Hi-NicalonTM Type-S (HNS), TyrannoTM SA3 (SA3), and SCS-UltraTM (SCS) SiC fibers. The irradiation resistance of these composites was investigated based on flexural behavior, dynamic Young’s modulus, swelling, and microstructures. There was no notable mechanical properties degradation of the irradiated HNS and SA3 SiC/SiC composites except for reduction of the Young’s moduli by up to 18%. The microstructural stability of these composites supported the absence of degradation. In addition, no progressive swelling from 2.0 to 11.8 dpa was confirmed for these composites. On the other hand, the SCS composite showed significant mechanical degradation associated with cracking within the fiber. This study determined that SiC/SiC composites with HNS or SA3 SiC/SiC fibers, a PyC interphase, and a CVI SiC matrix retain their properties beyond the lifetime dose for LWR fuel cladding at the relevant temperature.

  5. Design for six sigma: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouroush Jenab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Sigma is recognized as an essential tool for continuous improvement of quality. A large num-ber of publications by various authors reflect the interest in this technique. Reviews of literature on Six Sigma have been done in the past by a few authors. However, considering the contributions in the recent times, a more comprehensive review is attempted here. The authors have examined vari-ous papers and have proposed a different scheme of classification. In addition, certain gaps that would provide hints for further research in Six Sigma have been identified. As a results the rela-tionship between Six Sigma, Design for Six Sigma (DFSS, and how these two concepts support the quality system for organizational learning and innovation performance have been discussed that would help researchers, academicians and practitioners to take a closer look at the growth, devel-opment and applicability of Six Sigma in Design.

  6. Nucleon mass and sigma term from lattice QCD with two light fermion flavors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bali, G.S.; Bruns, P.C.; Collins, S. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2012-06-15

    We analyze N{sub f}=2 nucleon mass data with respect to their dependence on the pion mass down to m{sub {pi}}=157 MeV and compare it with predictions from covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory (BChPT). A novel feature of our approach is that we fit the nucleon mass data simultaneously with the directly obtained pion-nucleon {sigma}-term. Our lattice data below m{sub {pi}}=435 MeV is well described by O(p{sup 4}) BChPT and we find {sigma} 37(8)(6)MeV for the {sigma}-term at the physical point. Using the nucleon mass to set the scale we obtain a Sommer parameter of r{sub 0}=0.501(10)(11) fm. (orig.)

  7. Tripodal (N-alkylated) CMP(O) and malonamide ligands: synthesis, extraction of metal ions, and potentiometric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janczewski, D.; Reinhoudt, D.N.; Verboom, W. [Twente Univ., Lab. of Supramolecular Chemistry and Technology, Mesa Research Institute for Nanotechnology, Enschede (Netherlands); Malinowska, E.; Pietrzak, M. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Hill, C.; Allignol, C. [CEA Valrho, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2007-01-15

    Tripodal ligands build on the C-pivot (9b-e, 13b-d, and 17a-d) and tri-alkyl-benzene platforms (10a,b, 11, 12, 14a,b, and 18a,b) bearing (N-alkylated) carbamoyl-methyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO), carbamoyl-methyl-phosphonate (CMP), and malonamide moieties were synthesized. Extraction studies with Am{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} show that in general there is a positive influence of the N-alkyl substituents in C-pivot CMP(O) ligands on the D(distribution) coefficients. The tri-alkyl-benzene CMPO ligands 10a,b, 11, and 12 have considerably larger D coefficients than the corresponding C-pivot analogues 9a-e, although hardly having any selectivity, while N-alkylation gives rise to smaller D coefficients. Although less effective the extraction behavior of the C-pivot CMP analogues 13b-d shows more or less the same trend as the corresponding CMPO ligands 9b-e upon substitution of the carboxamide N-atom with different alkyl chains. The different malonamide ligands 17a-d and 18a,b are bad extractants, while N-alkylation makes them even worse. Potentiometric studies of CMP(O) and malonamide ligands in polymeric membranes on Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, and K{sup +} salts revealed that N-alkyl substituents increase the stability constants of ion-ionophore complexes compared to unsubstituted ligands. In polymeric membrane electrodes the ligands induce a selectivity pattern that differs significantly from the so-called Hofmeister series, giving the highest selectivity coefficients for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} among all examined cations (Pb{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}). (authors)

  8. $K^{\\pm}n$ forward dispersion relations and the KN$\\Sigma$ coupling constant

    CERN Document Server

    Baillon, Paul; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Jenni, Peter; Perreau, J M; Tripp, R D; Ypsilantis, Thomas; Déclais, Y; Séguinot, Jacques

    1976-01-01

    Recent measurements of the K/sup -/n forward scattering amplitude at 1.2, 1.4, 2.6 GeV/c are used in a once-subtracted dispersion relation to determine the value of the KN Sigma coupling constant. The result is g/sub Sigma //sup 2/=1.9+or-3.2, in agreement with the prediction of the SU(3) theory.

  9. Getting the sigma in the M_BH - sigma relation right

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Roeland

    2017-08-01

    The relation between the mass of the central supermassive black hole (M_BH) and the velocity dispersion of its host spheroid (sigma) is fundamental for our understanding of galaxy evolution and its relation to their nuclei. Correspondingly many HST orbits have been invested in determining accurate M_BH masses. Surprisingly little has been done on standardizing the other axis, i.e. sigma measurements. These values are often derived from various long-slit datasets at different physical radii of the galaxy and no homogeneous definition has been given. We propose to remedy this situation by using our dataset of MUSE and PPAK kinematic maps out to 1 R_e of galaxies with a secure black hole mass. These data are useful for large scale kinematics, however, obtaining velocity dispersions at small radii is not possible. To measure velocity dispersions at small radii we require high-spatial resolution spectroscopy as provided by HST/STIS. In addtion, high-resolution photometric data is needed to define consistent apertures in each galaxy. We therefore propose to use the unique capabilities of HST and harvest years of efforts to collect archival spectroscopic and imaging data for BH host galaxies. This will allow creating a catalog of sigma values, calculated in various ways and at various radii and to re-calibrate the M_BH - sigma relation.

  10. The reactions K/sup -/p to pi /sup -or+/ Sigma /sup +or-/(1385) at 42 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Holmgren, S O; Barreiro, F; Hemingway, R J; Kittel, E W; Kluyver, J C; Losty, Michael J; Massaro, G G G; Van de Walle, R T; Worden, R P; Zatz, J

    1977-01-01

    The total and differential cross sections are presented. Amplitude analyses are performed and the complete sigma /sup +or-/(1385) helicity spin density matrices are extracted. The results are compared with the predictions of the additive quark model and exchange degeneracy. A substantial cross section is observed for the reaction K /sup -/p to pi /sup +/ Sigma /sup -/(1385) in the forward direction, which implies exotic meson quantum numbers in the t-channel. One possible interpretation of this process provides an explanation for the small but significant violations of the additive quark model predictions observed in the reaction K/sup -/p to pi /sup -/ Sigma /sup +/(1385) at low four-momentum transfer. In the backward direction unnatural parity exchange is shown to give a larger contribution to K /sup -/p to Sigma /sup -/(1385) pi /sup +/ than natural parity exchange. (25 refs).

  11. Reduction in Chemotherapy Mixing Errors Using Six Sigma: Illinois CancerCare Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Bridgette; Miller, Laura; Kumar, Pankaj

    2012-03-01

    Chemotherapy mixing errors (CTMRs), although rare, have serious consequences. Illinois CancerCare is a large practice with multiple satellite offices. The goal of this study was to reduce the number of CTMRs using Six Sigma methods. A Six Sigma team consisting of five participants (registered nurses and pharmacy technicians [PTs]) was formed. The team had 10 hours of Six Sigma training in the DMAIC (ie, Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) process. Measurement of errors started from the time the CT order was verified by the PT to the time of CT administration by the nurse. Data collection included retrospective error tracking software, system audits, and staff surveys. Root causes of CTMRs included inadequate knowledge of CT mixing protocol, inconsistencies in checking methods, and frequent changes in staffing of clinics. Initial CTMRs (n = 33,259) constituted 0.050%, with 77% of these errors affecting patients. The action plan included checklists, education, and competency testing. The postimplementation error rate (n = 33,376, annualized) over a 3-month period was reduced to 0.019%, with only 15% of errors affecting patients. Initial Sigma was calculated at 4.2; this process resulted in the improvement of Sigma to 5.2, representing a 100-fold reduction. Financial analysis demonstrated a reduction in annualized loss of revenue (administration charges and drug wastage) from $11,537.95 (Medicare Average Sales Price) before the start of the project to $1,262.40. The Six Sigma process is a powerful technique in the reduction of CTMRs.

  12. Barriers of six sigma in healthcare organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Deniz

    2018-09-01

    Full Text Available Six Sigma approach is based on decreasing defects and variations in the products and processes, and it provides important benefits to healthcare organizations. This study aims to identify managers’ opinions, who work in private healthcare organizations, about the reasons behind not using Six Sigma in their organizations. The research was performed between December 2016 and March 2018 in private healthcare organizations (private hospitals and medical centers operating in Turkey and not using Six Sigma approach. Data were collected from managers, who have knowledge about Six Sigma, through using surveys. In this study, survey methodology was used to collect data. According to the results, the biggest barrier related to not using Six Sigma is based on the lack of knowledge about Six Sigma. The other important barrier about the diffusion of Six Sigma within this organizations is related to the lack of support from top management and leaders. Another finding about the reasons of not applying Six Sigma approach is that there is not a statistically significant difference among managers in terms of their managerial position. In order to overcome the lack of knowledge about Six Sigma, it is advised that managers should take steps in the direction of promoting Six Sigma within their current organization, and provide necessary support and leadership about the process.

  13. Midbrain serotonin transporter binding potential measured with [11C]DASB is affected by serotonin transporter genotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimold, M.; Bares, R.; Reischl, G.; Solbach, C.; Machulla, H.-J.; Smolka, M.N.; Mann, K.; Schumann, G.; Zimmer, A.; Wrase, J.; Hu, X.-Z.; Goldman, D.; Heinz, A.

    2007-01-01

    Homozygote carriers of two long (L) alleles of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulatory region displayed in vitro a twofold increase in 5-HTT expression compared with carriers of one or two short (S) alleles. However, in vivo imaging studies yielded contradictory results. Recently, an A > G exchange leading to differential transcriptional activation of 5-HTT mRNA in lymphobalstoid cell lines was discovered in the 5-HTT regulatory region. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that [ 11 C]DASB, a new 5-HTT ligand offers some advantages over the ligands used in previous studies in measuring 5-HTT density independent of synaptic levels of serotonin. We assessed 5-HTT binding potential (BP 2) in the midbrain of 19 healthy subjects with positron emission tomography and [ 11 C]DASB. Accounting for the hypothesized functional similarity of L G and S in driving 5-HTT transcription, we assessed whether L A L A homozygotes display increased midbrain BP 2 compared with carriers of at least one S allele. BP 2 in the midbrain was significantly increased in L A L A homozygotes compared with carriers of at least one S allele. Interestingly, the genotype effect on the midbrain was significantly different from that on the thalamus and the amygdala where no group differences were detected. This in vivo study provides further evidence that subjects homozygous for the L A allele display increased expression of 5-HTT in the midbrain, the origin of central serotonergic projections. (author)

  14. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...... degrees C, indicating that sigma 32 adopts a highly flexible structure. At 42 degrees C we observed a slow correlated exchange of 30 additional amide hydrogens and localized it to a helix-loop-helix motif within domain sigma 2 that is responsible for the recognition of the -10 region in heat shock...

  15. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TABLEAU DE BORD AT S.C. TURBOMECANICA S.A.

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Ionut IONESCU

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the positive aspects of the usage of the tableau de bord as a management instrument, being known for having beneficial effects on the efficiency of the managers’ working processes and on the rationalization of the managerial information system. These aspects are highlighted through the creation of the tableau de bord for the general manager of S.C. Turbomecanica S.A.

  16. Synthesis and characteristics in tumor-bearing mice of N-[11C]methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin and N-[11C]methyl-1-deoxymannojirimycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Ishii, Shin-ichi; Senda, Michio; Seki, Hiroyuki; Kitasato Univ.; Nozaki, Tadashi

    1993-01-01

    N-[ 11 C]Methyl-1-deoxynojirimycin ([ 11 C]MDNM) and N-[ 11 C]methyl-1-deoxymannojirimycin ([ 11 C]MDMM) were prepared by 11 C-methylation of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNM) and 1-deoxymannojirimycin (DMM), which are specific inhibitors of glucosidase and mannosidase, respectively. In mice bearing Ehrich ascitic tumor, the highest uptake of the [ 11 C]MDNM was observed in the kidney, followed by the liver and small intestine, while the tumour uptake was moderate. By MDNM loading, saturable uptake was observed in these tissues. In homogenates of the kidney and tumor tissues, a considerable amount of radioactivity was detected in a high-molecular weight fraction. These results demonstrate that the [ 11 C]MDNM has a potential for imaging the glucosidase activity by positron emission tomography. On the other hand, [ 11 C]MDMM showed lower uptake than [ 11 C]MDNM in the kidney, liver and small intestine and no effect of carrier DMM, suggesting that the [ 11 C]MDMM would not reflect mannosidase activity. (Author)

  17. [11C]d-threo-methylphenidate PET in patients with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breit, S.; Reimold, M.; Reischl, G.; Klockgether, T.; Wuellner, U.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, 6 patients with essential tremor and 10 healthy controls were studied with the dopamine transporter ligand [ 11 C]d-threo-methylphenidate ([ 11 C]dMP) and positron emission tomography (PET) to assess dopamine terminal loss in relation to disease duration and motor disability. Dopamine transporter availability was expressed as [11C]dMP binding potential (BP dMP ) in percentage of the mean of healthy controls. In PD patients (age at onset 57.7 ± 8.9 ys; disease duration 5.2 ± 3.3 ys; UPDRS motor score 24.2 ± 9.8; Hoehn and Yahr 2.1 ± 0.8; mean ± SD) BP dMP was reduced to 30 % (range: 11 - 55 %) in the putamen and 52 % (range: 14 - 96 %) in the caudate nucleus. BPdMP in the putamen closely correlated with the UPDRS motor score (r = -0.79, p dMP . Interestingly, when plotted over disease duration, PD patients with severe asymmetry of symptoms showed significantly lower BP dMP in the contralateral putamen (exponential fit: 34 % at onset) than the other PD patients (41 % at onset), indicating a different symptomatic threshold of these subgroups and an even closer correlation with the hypothetical 'true' disease duration. The exponential fit across all patients indicated a mean symptomatic threshold of 37 % contra- and 62 % ipsilateral, corresponding with an observed mean BP dMP of 51 % (average contra- and ipsilateral) in those patients with disease duration less than one year. No differences in BP dMP were observed between patients with essential tremor and healthy controls. [ 11 C]dMP appears to be a useful and sensitive marker of dopaminergic dysfunction in PD and can be used to assess and monitor disease severity. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the novel 5-HT4 receptor PET ligand [11C]SB207145 in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Lind, Nanna M; Gillings, Nic

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor binding in the minipig brain with positron emission tomography (PET), tissue homogenate-binding assays, and autoradiography in vitro. The cerebral uptake and binding of the novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 in vivo...... was modelled and the outcome compared with postmortem receptor binding. Different models for quantification of [(11)C]SB207145 binding were evaluated: One-tissue and two-tissue compartment kinetic modelling, Logan arterial input, and three different reference tissue models. We report that the pig...... model provides stable and precise estimates of the binding potential in all regions. The binding potentials calculated for striatum, midbrain, and cortex from the PET data were highly correlated with 5-HT(4) receptor concentrations determined in brain homogenates from the same regions, except...

  19. Cyanide binding to ferrous and ferric microperoxidase-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Microperoxidase-11 (MP11) is an undecapeptide derived from horse heart cytochrome c (cytc). MP11 is characterized by a covalently linked solvent-exposed heme group, the heme-Fe atom being axially coordinated by a histidyl residue. Here, the reactions of ferrous and ferric MP11 (MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III), respectively) with cyanide have been investigated from the kinetic and thermodynamic viewpoints, at pH 7.0 and 20.0 °C. Values of the second-order rate constant for cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 4.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 8.9 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Values of the first-order rate constant for cyanide dissociation from ligated MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 1.8 × 10(-1) s(-1) and 1.5 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively. Values of the dissociation equilibrium constant for cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 3.7 × 10(-2) and 1.7 × 10(-7) M, respectively, matching very well with those calculated from kinetic parameters so that no intermediate species seem to be involved in the ligand-binding process. The pH-dependence of cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(III) indicates that CN(-) is the only binding species. Present results have been analyzed in parallel with those of several heme-proteins, suggesting that (1) the ligand accessibility to the metal center and cyanide ionization may modulate the formation of heme-Fe-cyanide complexes, and (2) the general polarity of the heme pocket and/or hydrogen bonding of the heme-bound ligand may affect cyanide exit from the protein matrix. Microperoxidase-11 (MP11) is an undecapeptide derived from horse heart cytochrome c. Penta-coordinated MP11 displays a very high reactivity towards cyanide, whereas the reactivity of hexa-coordinated horse heart cytochrome c is very low.

  20. The automated radiosynthesis and purification of the opioid receptor antagonist, [6-O-methyl-11C]diprenorphine on the GE TRACERlab FXFE radiochemistry module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Michael; Prenant, Christian; Brown, Gavin; McMahon, Adam; Lowe, Jonathan; Jones, Anthony

    2014-05-15

    [6-O-Methyl-(11)C]diprenorphine ([(11)C]diprenorphine) is a positron emission tomography ligand used to probe the endogenous opioid system in vivo. Diprenorphine acts as an antagonist at all of the opioid receptor subtypes, that is, μ (mu), κ (kappa) and δ (delta). The radiosynthesis of [(11)C]diprenorphine using [(11)C]methyl iodide produced via the 'wet' method on a home-built automated radiosynthesis set-up has been described previously. Here, we describe a modified synthetic method to [(11)C]diprenorphine performed using [(11)C]methyl iodide produced via the gas phase method on a GE TRACERlab FXFE radiochemistry module. Also described is the use of [(11)C]methyl triflate as the carbon-11 methylating agent for the [(11)C]diprenorphine syntheses. [(11)C]Diprenorphine was produced to good manufacturing practice standards for use in a clinical setting. In comparison to previously reported [(11)C]diprenorphine radiosyntheisis, the method described herein gives a higher specific activity product which is advantageous for receptor occupancy studies. The radiochemical purity of [(11)C]diprenorphine is similar to what has been reported previously, although the radiochemical yield produced in the method described herein is reduced, an issue that is inherent in the gas phase radiosynthesis of [(11)C]methyl iodide. The yields of [(11)C]diprenorphine are nonetheless sufficient for clinical research applications. Other advantages of the method described herein are an improvement to both reproducibility and reliability of the production as well as simplification of the purification and formulation steps. We suggest that our automated radiochemistry route to [(11)C]diprenorphine should be the method of choice for routine [(11)C]diprenorphine productions for positron emission tomography studies, and the production process could easily be transferred to other radiochemistry modules such as the TRACERlab FX C pro. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Early postoperative erythromycin breath test correlates with hepatic cytochrome P4503A activity in liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Olsen, A K; Stentoft, K

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interindividual variation in the pharmacokinetics of the immunosuppressive agents cyclosporine (INN, ciclosporin) and tacrolimus may result from differences in the activity of cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A). The erythromycin breath test is an in vivo assay of hepatic CYP3A activity......, but the method has never been directly validated. The aim of the study was to investigate whether an early postoperative erythromycin breath test correlated with the hepatic CYP3A protein level and catalytic activity in liver transplant recipients. METHODS: In 18 liver transplant recipients, the erythromycin...... breath test was performed within 2 hours after transplantation. A graft biopsy was obtained during surgery and analyzed for the CYP3A protein level by Western blotting and for CYP3A activity with erythromycin demethylation and testosterone 6beta- hydroxylation assays. RESULTS: The erythromycin breath...

  2. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of {sigma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Fei [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang Jianxin, E-mail: jianxin@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu Pan [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Feng Qiang [National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Han Xiaodong; Mao Shengcheng [Institute of Microstructure and Property of Advanced Materials, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Graphical abstract: (a) TEM micrograph of {sigma} phase; (b) HRTEM image of {sigma}/{gamma} interface corresponding to the area of the white frame in (a); (c) an enlarged image of area from the white frame in (b). The combination of {sigma}/{gamma} interface appears very well, and a two-atomic-layer step is shown on the {sigma}/{gamma} interface. In addition, {sigma} phase has the orientation relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elemental characteristic of {sigma} phase is studied by HAADF techniques and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial characteristics of {sigma}/{gamma} interface are revealed by HRTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An atomic structural {sigma}/{gamma} interface with a two-atomic-layer step has been proposed. - Abstract: By means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field image technique (HAADF), morphological of plate-shaped {sigma} phase and interfacial characteristics between plate-shaped {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase in Ni-based single crystal superalloys have been studied. On the basis of HRTEM observations, an atomic structural interface between {sigma} phase and {gamma} phase with a step has been proposed. {sigma} Phase has the relationship of [0 0 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 2{sup Macron }]{sub {sigma}}, (2{sup Macron} 2 0){sub {gamma}}//(1{sup Macron} 1 0){sub {sigma},} (2{sup Macron }2{sup Macron} 0){sub {gamma}}//(1 1 1){sub {sigma}}; [0 1 1]{sub {gamma}}//[1 1 0]{sub {sigma}}, (1 1{sup Macron} 1){sub {gamma}}//(0 0 1{sup Macron }){sub {sigma}} with the {gamma} phase. The compositional characteristics of the {sigma} phase which

  3. Mutual control of axial and equatorial ligands: model studies with [Ni]-bacteriochlorophyll-a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerushalmi, Roie; Noy, Dror; Baldridge, Kim K; Scherz, Avigdor

    2002-07-17

    Modification of the metal's electronic environment by ligand association and dissociation in metalloenzymes is considered cardinal to their catalytic activity. We have recently presented a novel system that utilizes the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) macrocycle as a ligand and reporter. This system allows for charge mobilization in the equatorial plane and experimental estimate of changes in the electronic charge density around the metal with no modification of the metal's chemical environment. The unique spectroscopy, electrochemistry and coordination chemistry of [Ni]-bacteriochlorophyll ([Ni]-BChl) enable us to follow directly fine details and steps involved in the function of the metal redox center. This approach is utilized here whereby electro-chemical reduction of [Ni]-BChl to the monoanion [Ni]-BChl(-) results in reversible dissociation of biologically relevant axial ligands. Similar ligand dissociation was previously detected upon photoexcitation of [Ni]-BChl (Musewald, C.; Hartwich, G.; Lossau, H.; Gilch, P.; Pollinger-Dammer, F.; Scheer, H.; Michel-Beyerle, M. E. J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 7055-7060 and Noy, D.; Yerushalmi, R.; Brumfeld, V.; Ashur, I.; Baldridge, K. K.; Scheer, H.; Scherz, A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 3937-3944). The electrochemical measurements and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations performed here for the neutral, singly reduced, monoligated, and singly reduced, monoligated [Ni]-BChl suggest the following: (a) Electroreduction, although resulting in a pi anion [Ni]-BChl(-) radical, causes electron density migration to the [Ni]-BChl core. (b) Reduction of nonligated [Ni]-BChl does not change the macrocycle conformation, whereas axial ligation results in a dramatic expansion of the metal core and a flattening of the highly ruffled macrocycle conformation. (c) In both the monoanion and singly excited [Ni]-BChl ([Ni]-BChl*), the frontier singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) has a small but nonnegligible metal character. Finally, (d

  4. Synthesis and positron emission tomographic (PET) baboon studies of [{sup 11}C]methadone and R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]methandone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Methadone (MET) maintenance has been used successfully for many years in the rehabilitation of heroin addicts. MET, a typical m{mu}-opioid receptor agonist, exists as two enantiomers and is used clinically as the racemic mixture. However, R-(-)-MET has a 10-fold higher affinity for m{mu} receptors than S-(+)-MET (IC{sub 50}: 3.0 nM and 26.4 nM, respectively) and R-(-)-MET is almost entirely responsible for the therapeutic actions of the racemate. In order to examine the pharmacokinetics and stereoselectivity of the drug, we have synthesized both [{sup 11}C]MET and R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET. Preparing the precursor by one-step approach to the N-demethylated methadone was precluded as other investigators cited problems with intramolecular cyclization. Therefore, a four-step synthesis using MET (or R-(-)-MET) as starting material was required to obtain the precursor, followed by a two-step radiolabeling synthesis (N-methylation followed by oxidation) to obtain [{sup 11}C]MET (or R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET). Comparative PET studies in the same baboon showed peak striatal uptake was 0.022%/cc at 5 minutes with a half time of clearance from peak of 100 minutes for R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET and a peak uptake of 0.013%/cc with a half time of 90 min for [{sup 11}C]MET. R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET also showed a slower disappearance in plasma. Both tracers showed higher C-11 in basal ganglia (BG), thalamus and midbrain relative to the cerebellum (CB) and occipital cortex (OC) but the BG/OC ratio was higher for R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET (1.3 vs 1.1). Pretreatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg, iv) increased R-(-)-[{sup 11}C]MET uptake in all brain regions whereas unlabeled MET slightly increased C-11 clearance in BG, OC and CB. These initial results show higher brain concentration and specificity of the pharmacologically active enantiomer of methadone along with significant non-specific binding.

  5. [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM, an imaging agent for the brain serotonin transporter: synthesis, pharmacological characterization and microPET studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zessin, Joerg [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: j.zessin@fz-rossendorf.de; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie [Institut fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Kretzschmar, Marion [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Wuest, Frank [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, Beate [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institut fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Steinbach, Joerg [Institut fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Bergmann, Ralf [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-01-15

    N,N-Dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylthiophenylthio)benzylamine (S Me-Adam, 1) is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SPERT). This compound was labeled with carbon-11 by methylation of the S-desmethyl precursor 10 with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide to obtain the potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [{sup 11}C]S Me-Adam. The radiochemical yield was 27{+-}5%, and the specific radioactivity was 26-40 GBq/{mu}mol at the end of synthesis. Ex vivo and in vivo biodistribution experiments in rats demonstrated a rapid accumulation of the radiotracer in brain regions known to be rich in SPERT, such as the thalamus/hypothalamus region (3.59{+-}0.41%ID/g at 5 min after injection). The specific uptake reached a thalamus to cerebellum ratio of 6.74{+-}0.95 at 60 min postinjection. The [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM uptake in the thalamus was significantly decreased by pretreatment with fluoxetine to 38{+-}11% of the control value. Furthermore, no metabolites of [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM could be detected in the SERT-rich regions of the rat brain. It is concluded that [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM may be a suitable PET ligand for SERT imaging in the living brain.

  6. Precision measurement of $\\sigma(e^+e^-\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma)/\\sigma(e^+e^-\\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-\\gamma)$ and determination of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ contribution to the muon anomaly with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Babusci, D.; Balwierz-Pytko, I.; Bencivenni, G.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkestahl, L.; Capon, G.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwinski, E.; Dane, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Domenici, D.; Erriquez, O.; Fanizzi, G.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Gonnella, F.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjold, L.; Hoistad, B.; Iafolla, L.; Iarocci, E.; Jacewicz, M.; Johansson, T.; Kluge, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Loddo, F.; Lukin, P.; Mandaglio, G.; Martemianov, M.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Muller, S.; Nguyen, F.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Prado Longhi, I.; Ranieri, A.; Redmer, C.F.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Sciascia, B.; Silarski, M.; Taccini, C.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Versaci, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wolke, M.; Zdebik, J.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the ratio $\\sigma(e^+e^-\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma)/\\sigma(e^+e^-\\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-\\gamma)$, with the KLOE detector at DA$\\Phi$NE for a total integrated luminosity of $\\sim$ 240 pb$^{-1}$. From this ratio we obtain the cross section $\\sigma(e^+e^-\\rightarrow\\pi^+\\pi^-)$. From the cross section we determine the pion form factor $|F_\\pi|^2$ and the two-pion contribution to the muon anomaly $a_\\mu$ for $0.5921.1_{stat}\\pm2.7_{sys+theo}})\\times10^{-10}$. This result confirms the current discrepancy between the Standard Model calculation and the experimental measurement of the muon anomaly.

  7. Six Sigma in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMahieu, Paul G.; Nordstrum, Lee E.; Cudney, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is one of seven in this volume that aims to elaborate different approaches to quality improvement in education. It delineates a methodology called Six Sigma. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the origins, theoretical foundations, core principles and a case study demonstrating an application of Six Sigma in a…

  8. Application of sigma metrics for the assessment of quality control in clinical chemistry laboratory in Ghana: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrifa, Justice; Gyekye, Seth A; Owiredu, William K B A; Ephraim, Richard K D; Essien-Baidoo, Samuel; Amoah, Samuel; Simpong, David L; Arthur, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Sigma metrics provide a uniquely defined scale with which we can assess the performance of a laboratory. The objective of this study was to assess the internal quality control (QC) in the clinical chemistry laboratory of the University of Cape Cost Hospital (UCC) using the six sigma metrics application. We used commercial control serum [normal (L1) and pathological (L2)] for validation of quality control. Metabolites (glucose, urea, and creatinine), lipids [triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (AST)], electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and total protein were assessed. Between-day imprecision (CVs), inaccuracy (Bias) and sigma values were calculated for each control level. Apart from sodium (2.40%, 3.83%), chloride (2.52% and 2.51%) for both L1 and L2 respectively, and glucose (4.82%), cholesterol (4.86%) for L2, CVs for all other parameters (both L1 and L2) were >5%. Four parameters (HDL-C, urea, creatinine and potassium) achieved sigma levels >1 for both controls. Chloride and sodium achieved sigma levels >1 for L1 but sigma levels 1 for L2. Glucose and ALP achieved a sigma level >1 for both control levels whereas TG achieved a sigma level >2 for both control levels. Unsatisfactory sigma levels (six sigma levels for the laboratory.

  9. Quantitative application of sigma metrics in medical biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sunil Kumar; Ray, Lopamudra

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory errors are result of a poorly designed quality system in the laboratory. Six Sigma is an error reduction methodology that has been successfully applied at Motorola and General Electric. Sigma (σ) is the mathematical symbol for standard deviation (SD). Sigma methodology can be applied wherever an outcome of a process has to be measured. A poor outcome is counted as an error or defect. This is quantified as defects per million (DPM). A six sigma process is one in which 99.999666% of the products manufactured are statistically expected to be free of defects. Six sigma concentrates, on regulating a process to 6 SDs, represents 3.4 DPM (defects per million) opportunities. It can be inferred that as sigma increases, the consistency and steadiness of the test improves, thereby reducing the operating costs. We aimed to gauge performance of our laboratory parameters by sigma metrics. Evaluation of sigma metrics in interpretation of parameter performance in clinical biochemistry. The six month internal QC (October 2012 to march 2013) and EQAS (external quality assurance scheme) were extracted for the parameters-Glucose, Urea, Creatinine, Total Bilirubin, Total Protein, Albumin, Uric acid, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Chloride, SGOT, SGPT and ALP. Coefficient of variance (CV) were calculated from internal QC for these parameters. Percentage bias for these parameters was calculated from the EQAS. Total allowable errors were followed as per Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) guidelines. Sigma metrics were calculated from CV, percentage bias and total allowable error for the above mentioned parameters. For parameters - Total bilirubin, uric acid, SGOT, SGPT and ALP, the sigma values were found to be more than 6. For parameters - glucose, Creatinine, triglycerides, urea, the sigma values were found to be between 3 to 6. For parameters - total protein, albumin, cholesterol and chloride, the sigma values were found to be less than 3. ALP was the best

  10. Molecular interactions of agonist and inverse agonist ligands at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: computational ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies validated by experimental mutagenesis results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Liu, Yue; Booth, Raymond G.

    2015-02-01

    To understand molecular determinants for ligand activation of the serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a drug target for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders, a 5-HT2C homology model was built according to an adrenergic β2 GPCR (β2AR) structure and validated using a 5-HT2B GPCR crystal structure. The models were equilibrated in a simulated phosphatidyl choline membrane for ligand docking and molecular dynamics studies. Ligands included (2S, 4R)-(-)-trans-4-(3'-bromo- and trifluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene-2-amine (3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT), a 5-HT2C agonist and inverse agonist, respectively. Distinct interactions of 3'-Br-PAT and 3'-CF3-PAT at the wild-type (WT) 5-HT2C receptor model were observed and experimental 5-HT2C receptor mutagenesis studies were undertaken to validate the modelling results. For example, the inverse agonist 3'-CF3-PAT docked deeper in the WT 5-HT2C binding pocket and altered the orientation of transmembrane helices (TM) 6 in comparison to the agonist 3'-Br-PAT, suggesting that changes in TM orientation that result from ligand binding impact function. For both PATs, mutation of 5-HT2C residues S3.36, T3.37, and F5.47 to alanine resulted in significantly decreased affinity, as predicted from modelling results. It was concluded that upon PAT binding, 5-HT2C residues T3.37 and F5.47 in TMs 3 and 5, respectively, engage in inter-helical interactions with TMs 4 and 6, respectively. The movement of TMs 5 and 6 upon agonist and inverse agonist ligand binding observed in the 5-HT2C receptor modelling studies was similar to movements reported for the activation and deactivation of the β2AR, suggesting common mechanisms among aminergic neurotransmitter GPCRs.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gris, Georgia; Cobos, Enrique José; Zamanillo, Daniel; Portillo-Salido, Enrique

    2015-06-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a unique ligand-regulated molecular chaperone that interacts with several protein targets such as G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels to modulate their activity. Sig-1R is located in areas of the central and peripheral nervous system that are key to pain control. Previous preclinical studies have suggested a potential therapeutic use of Sig-1R antagonists for the management of neuropathic pain. Recent studies using pharmacological and genetic tools have explored the role of Sig-1R in inflammatory pain conditions. Mice lacking the Sig-1R have shown different patterns of phenotypic responses to inflammatory injury. Systemic or peripheral administration of several Sig-1R antagonists, including the selective Sig-1R antagonist S1RA, inhibited both mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in several preclinical models of inflammatory pain. These recent studies are summarized in the present commentary. Central and peripheral pharmacological blockade of Sig-1R could be an effective option to treat inflammatory pain.

  12. Sigma models on supercosets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitev, Vladimir

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this thesis is to deepen our understanding of the fundamental properties and defining features of non-linear sigma models on superspaces. We begin by presenting the major concepts that we have used in our investigation, namely Lie superalgebras and supergroups, non-linear sigma models and two dimensional conformal field theory. We then exhibit a method, called cohomological reduction, that makes use of the target space supersymmetry of non-linear sigma models to compute certain correlation functions. We then show how the target space supersymmetry of Ricci flat Lie supergroups simplifies the perturbation theory of suitable deformed Wess-Zumino-Witten models, making it possible to compute boundary conformal weights to all orders. This is then applied to the OSP (2S+2 vertical stroke 2S) Gross-Neveu Model, leading to a dual description in terms of the sigma model on the supersphere S{sup 2S+1} {sup vertical} {sup stroke} {sup 2S}. With this results in mind, we then turn to the similar, yet more intricate, theory of the non-linear sigma model on the complex projective superspaces CP{sup N-1} {sup vertical} {sup stroke} {sup N}. The cohomological reduction allows us to compute several important quantities non-perturbatively with the help of the system of symplectic fermions. Combining this with partial perturbative results for the whole theory, together with numerical computations, we propose a conjecture for the exact evolution of boundary conformal weights for symmetry preserving boundary conditions. (orig.)

  13. Sigma models on supercosets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitev, Vladimir

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to deepen our understanding of the fundamental properties and defining features of non-linear sigma models on superspaces. We begin by presenting the major concepts that we have used in our investigation, namely Lie superalgebras and supergroups, non-linear sigma models and two dimensional conformal field theory. We then exhibit a method, called cohomological reduction, that makes use of the target space supersymmetry of non-linear sigma models to compute certain correlation functions. We then show how the target space supersymmetry of Ricci flat Lie supergroups simplifies the perturbation theory of suitable deformed Wess-Zumino-Witten models, making it possible to compute boundary conformal weights to all orders. This is then applied to the OSP (2S+2 vertical stroke 2S) Gross-Neveu Model, leading to a dual description in terms of the sigma model on the supersphere S 2S+1 vertical stroke 2S . With this results in mind, we then turn to the similar, yet more intricate, theory of the non-linear sigma model on the complex projective superspaces CP N-1 vertical stroke N . The cohomological reduction allows us to compute several important quantities non-perturbatively with the help of the system of symplectic fermions. Combining this with partial perturbative results for the whole theory, together with numerical computations, we propose a conjecture for the exact evolution of boundary conformal weights for symmetry preserving boundary conditions. (orig.)

  14. Study on the {Sigma}-bar{sup -} {yields} p-bar{gamma}; Estudo do decaimento radiativo {Sigma}-bar{sup -} {yields} p-bar{gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, Jose Roberto Pinheiro

    1993-12-31

    We have measured the branching ratio of the radiative decay of the hyperon {Sigma}{sup -}. This experiment (E761) was performed with a 375 GeV/c charged hyperon beam in the Proton Center at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. We found a value for the branching ratio BR({Sigma}{sup -} -> p{gamma}) = (1,079 {+-} 0,230) x 10{sup -3} where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This result is based on a sample of 213 {+-} 19 events. We have also measured the {delta} parameter for a test of CP violation in hyperon decays. This result is consistent with CP invariance. (author) 79 refs., 42 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Spectra of conformal sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlapak, Vaclav

    2015-04-01

    In this thesis the spectra of conformal sigma models defined on (generalized) symmetric spaces are analysed. The spaces where sigma models are conformal without the addition of a Wess-Zumino term are supermanifolds, in other words spaces that include fermionic directions. After a brief review of the general construction of vertex operators and the background field expansion, we compute the diagonal terms of the one-loop anomalous dimensions of sigma models on semi-symmetric spaces. We find that the results are formally identical to the symmetric case. However, unlike for sigma models on symmetric spaces, off diagonal terms that lead to operator mixing are also present. These are not computed here. We then present a detailed analysis of the one-loop spectrum of the supersphere S 3 vertical stroke 2 sigma model as one of the simplest examples. The analysis illustrates the power and simplicity of the construction. We use this data to revisit a duality with the OSP(4 vertical stroke 2) Gross-Neveu model that was proposed by Candu and Saleur. With the help of a recent all-loop result for the anomalous dimension of (1)/(2)BPS operators of Gross-Neveu models, we are able to recover the entire zero-mode spectrum of the supersphere model. We also argue that the sigma model constraints and its equations of motion are implemented correctly in the Gross-Neveu model, including the one-loop data. The duality is further supported by a new all-loop result for the anomalous dimension of the ground states of the sigma model. However, higher-gradient operators cannot be completely recovered. It is possible that this discrepancy is related to a known instability of the sigma model. The instability of sigma models is due to symmetry preserving high-gradient operators that become relevant at arbitrarily small values of the coupling. This feature has been observed long ago in one-loop calculations of the O(N)-vector model and soon been realized to be a generic property of sigma models

  16. Neuroprotective targets through which 6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one (SN79), a sigma receptor ligand, mitigates the effects of methamphetamine in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Nidhi; Robson, Matthew J.; Rosen, Abagail; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high or repeated doses of methamphetamine can cause hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, which are thought to increase the risk of developing a variety of neurological conditions. Sigma receptor antagonism can prevent methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, but the underlying cellular targets through which the neuroprotection is conveyed remain unknown. Differentiated NG108-15 cells were thus used as a model system to begin elucidating the neuroprotective mechanisms targeted by sigma receptor antagonists to mitigate the effects of methamphetamine. In differentiated NG108-15 cells, methamphetamine caused the generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, an increase in PERK-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9, ultimately resulting in apoptosis at micromolar concentrations, and necrotic cell death at higher concentrations. The sigma receptor antagonist, 6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one (SN79), attenuated methamphetamine-induced increases in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, activation of caspase-3,-8 and-9 and accompanying cellular toxicity. In contrast, 1,3-di(2-tolyl)-guanidine (DTG), a sigma receptor agonist, shifted the dose response curve of methamphetamine-induced cell death towards the left. To probe the effect of temperature on neurotoxicity, NG108-15 cells maintained at an elevated temperature (40 °C) exhibited a significant and synergistic increase in cell death in response to methamphetamine, compared to cells maintained at a normal cell culture temperature (37 °C). SN79 attenuated the enhanced cell death observed in the methamphetamine-treated cells at 40 °C. Together, the data demonstrate that SN79 reduces methamphetamine-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species generation and caspase activation, thereby conveying neuroprotective effects against methamphetamine under regular and elevated temperature conditions. PMID:24380829

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of ligand-exchange reactions of Cd(II) chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivorozhkin, L.E.; Kalabin, G.A.; Nivorozhkin, A.L.; Valeev, R.B.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-03-01

    Tetrahedral Cd(II) bis(5-thio(or seleno)pyrazole-4-carboxaldiminates) of types II and III have been synthesized for the first time. The kin