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Sample records for shrimp aristaeomorpha foliacea

  1. Evidence of lipofuscin accumulation in the deep-water red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827

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    V. MEZZASALMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipofuscin, a non-degradable, degenerative fluorescent pigment which accumulates in post-mitotic cells, represents a promising method for ageing marine crustaceans. The presence and accumulation of lipofuscin has been studied in the deep-water red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827 to assess its use as a tool for ageing larger (i.e., older specimens and thus improve knowledge of the growth and longevity of this species. Specimens, gathered during experimental trawl surveys carried out in the Strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea, were stored directly on-board in 10% buffered formaldehyde solution; their brain was thereafter removed, prepared with various current histological techniques and examined with a binocular microscope. Thin sections of the olfactory lobe cell mass were also analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, and the lipofuscin concentration was measured through image analysis. Various indices were computed for each individual by pooling data from many images: number and coverage of the lipofuscin granules per unit area, and mean individual area of the granules. Lipofuscin was detected in all specimens investigated with characteristics (grain typology and dimension strictly resembling those already described in other crustacean species. The present preliminary results encourage further studies to develop and validate a methodology based on the use of lipofuscin for improving the relative ageing of large A. foliacea shrimps.

  2. Biological condition and trophic ecology of the deep-water shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea in the Levantine Sea (SW Turkey)

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    BAYHAN, K. Y.; CARTES, J. E.; Fanelli, E

    2015-01-01

    The trophic ecology (diets, stable isotope composition) and life cycle (gonado-somatic, GSI, and hepato-somatic, HSI, indices) of Aristaeomorpha foliacea were analysed seasonally (in May, June, and November 2012 and January 2013) off southeast Turkey (Levantine Basin), over the slope at 442-600 m depth. Aristaeomorpha foliacea females were mature in June, suggesting gonad maturity was somewhat delayed off southeast Turkey compared to other areas in the Eastern Mediterranean. The HSI of A. fol...

  3. Spatial variability in the trophic ecology and biology of the deep-sea shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartes, J. E.; Fanelli, E.; Kapiris, K.; Bayhan, Y. K.; Ligas, A.; López-Pérez, C.; Murenu, M.; Papiol, V.; Rumolo, P.; Scarcella, G.

    2014-05-01

    The trophic ecology, energy and reproductive states of the deep-water shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea, widely distributed along the slopes of the Mediterranean Sea Basins, were analysed in eight areas spread along ca. 3000 km in order to identify patterns in the habitat conditions supporting the species. From W to E the areas were situated between the north side of Eivissa (39°12‧N, 1°20‧E, in the Balearic Basin) and off Mersin, Turkey (36°15‧N, 34°19‧E, in the Levantine Sea). Trends identified mainly as a function of longitude from west to east were: (i) higher δ15N, parallel to δ15N shifts in the top 200 m of the water column for particulate organic N (Pantoja et al., 2002). The δ15N trend indicates that the deep trophic web, i.e. A. foliacea at 400-600 m, reflects the δ15N signal of the photic zone; (ii) a similar significant trend of δ13C, related with exploitation of pelagic versus benthic resources by A. foliacea in each area (i.e. by local variability of terrigenous inputs via submarine canyons). More depleted δ13C was found at mid-longitudes (Tyrrhenian Sea and Sicily Channel) linked to higher consumption of macroplankton prey (Pasiphaea spp., euphausiids and mesopelagic fishes). The feeding intensity (gut fullness, F) and prey diversity (J) of A. foliacea were related, according to generalized linear models, with the temperature and salinity of intermediate waters, variables in turn associated with latitude and longitude. Both F and J were higher in areas with greater shrimp density. The optimal ecological habitat of A. foliacea appears to be located in the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Sicily Channel, where we found the highest F, the greatest trophic diversity and A. foliacea in the best biological condition (i.e. with higher hepato-somatic index, HSI). These are also the areas with the highest densities of A. foliacea. In contrast, in the western Mediterranean Sea (Balearic Basin and the southern Balearic Islands), where A. foliacea has low

  4. Biological condition and trophic ecology of the deep-water shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea in the Levantine Sea (SW Turkey

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    K. Y. BAYHAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The trophic ecology (diets, stable isotope composition and life cycle (gonado-somatic, GSI, and hepato-somatic, HSI, indices of Aristaeomorpha foliacea were analysed seasonally (in May, June, and November 2012 and January 2013 off southeast Turkey (Levantine Basin, over the slope at 442-600 m depth. A. foliacea females were mature in June, suggesting gonad maturity was somewhat delayed off southeast Turkey compared to other areas in the Eastern Mediterranean. The HSI of A. foliacea was highest in May and June (8.2% of body weight for males and both immature and mature females, sharply lower in November (3.5% and then increasing again in winter (7.1%. Stomach fullness (F showed a tendency similar to HSI in both females and males, increasing from May to June. A. foliacea had rather low d15N (6.68‰ to 8.26‰ off southeast Turkey, with females having higher d15N with increasing size. The δ13C signal (-14.85 to -14.68‰ indicated that diet was mainly though not exclusively based on zooplankton (pelagic shrimps and small myctophids of 1.3-4.5 mm TL, cnidarians, hyperiids and pteropods. The increase of A. foliacea remains in A. foliacea guts and of some benthic prey (polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods after the reproductive period would explain the moderate depletion of δ13C in spring-summer. The greatest changes in the diet occurred between periods of water mass stratification (June and November and periods of water mass homogeneity (May and January, with greater consumption of zooplankton in the latter season. A. foliacea seems to have lower reproductive capacity (GSI 5.6% than other deep-water species of penaeidae that live shallower (Parapenaues longirostris and deeper (Aristeus antennatus than it does. The species has a more specialized zooplankton diet, exploiting short, more efficient trophic chains, which could be an advantage explaining its dominance in oligotrophic areas of the Central-Eastern Mediterranean, including the Turkish slope.

  5. Multilocus comparative phylogeography of two aristeid shrimps of high commercial interest (Aristeus antennatus and Aristaeomorpha foliacea reveals different responses to past environmental changes.

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    Maria Victoria Fernández

    Full Text Available Phylogeographical studies can reveal hidden patterns in the evolutionary history of species. Comparative analyses of closely related species can further help disentangle the relative contributions of processes responsible for such patterns. In this work, the phylogeography of two aristeid species, Aristeus antennatus and Aristaeomorpha foliacea, was compared through multiple genetic markers. These marine shrimp species are of high commercial importance, and are exploited in the Mediterranean Sea (MED and in Mozambique Channel (MOZ where they occur in partial sympatry. Aristeus antennatus (N = 50 from Western and Eastern Mediterranean (WM and EM, respectively, Atlantic Ocean (AO and MOZ, and Aristaeomorpha foliacea (N = 40 from WM, EM, MOZ North-Western Australia (AUS were analyzed with two nuclear genes (PEPCK and NaK and one mitochondrial (COI gene. Within the study area differences were found between the two species in their phylogeographical patterns, suggesting distinct responses to environmental changes. Monophyly of Aristeus antennatus was found across its distributional range. This pattern contrasted by a deep evolutionary split within Aristaeomorpha foliacea where genetic diversity followed geography distinguishing MED-MOZ and AUS. We propose that the AUS lineage of A. foliacea warrants consideration as a distinct species, with consequent implications in systematics and resource management.

  6. MEDITS-based information on the deep water red shrimps Aristaeomorpha foliacea and Aristeus antennatus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Aristeidae

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    Angelo Cau

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of statistical models on a time series of data arising from the MEDITS International Trawl Survey, an experimental demersal resources survey carried out during six years (1994-1999 in the same season of the year (late spring - early summer using the same fishing gear in a large part of the Mediterranean, has allowed for a study to compare, for the first time, the space-time distribution, abundance, and size structure of the two Aristeids Aristaeomorpha foliacea and Aristeus antennatus throughout most of the Mediterranean Sea. This research has shown a large variability among the six reference areas, that were arbitrarily defined within the basin. In particular the two shrimps do not seem to present any correlation or yield continuity in the years. The same lack of homogeneity was also observed in the time trend of the abundances and frequencies of each of the two species. These data seem to confirm the intrinsic variability of the species, the cause of which is still unknown and undocumented. Nevertheless, a longitudinal gradient of catches has been observed where A. antennatus is more abundant in the west and A. foliacea in the east of the basin.

  7. Comparative Reproduction Aspects of the Deep-water Shrimps Aristaeomorpha foliacea and Aristeus antennatus (Decapoda, Aristeidae in the Greek Ionian Sea (Eastern Mediterranean

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    K. Kapiris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the eastern Ionian Sea, the deep-water shrimps Aristaeomorpha foliacea and Aristeus antennatus constitute a virgin fishing resource, since their maximum abundance depth exceeds commercial exploitation depths. The two sympatric species share a number of common reproductive features, such as summer reproduction. A slight temporal shift in mating activity, ovarian maturation, and spawning period was observed between species. The most notable difference was the more pronounced seasonality in reproductive activity of Aristeus antennatus compared to that of A. foliacea as evidenced by the frequency of inseminated females and functionally mature males, as well as by the shorter ovarian maturation period. Nevertheless, regarding the whole life span, both sexes of Aristeus antennatus exhibit a more extended reproductive activity in comparison to A. foliacea. No notable differentiation of both species existed in comparison to other Mediterranean regions.

  8. A Histological Study of Ovarian Development in the Giant Red Shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Crustacea: Decapoda: Aristeidae from the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean

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    Anna Perdichizzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The reproductive features of the giant red shrimp, Aristaeomorpha foliacea, were investigated in the southern Tyrrhenian sea by experimental trawl sampling. The annual length-frequency distribution showed a multimodal trend in females, ranging between 16 and 67 mm carapace length (CL, and a unimodal trend in males (18–45 mm CL. Mature males occurred in different proportions all year round, while females displayed seasonal maturity (June—September, with a peak in July. Six oocyte developmental stages were identified, the most advanced of which (Pv, postvitellogenic had never been described before in this species. Ovary development followed a group-synchronous pattern, with the yolked oocyte stock clearly separated from the reservoir of unyolked oocytes, suggesting that A. foliacea is a total spawner, with determinate fecundity. Based upon histological findings, a revision of macroscopic maturity staging employed in Mediterranean bottom trawl surveys (MEDITS is proposed.

  9. A Histological Study of Ovarian Development in the Giant Red Shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Crustacea: Decapoda: Aristeidae) from the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdichizzi, Anna; Pirrera, Laura; Micale, Valeria; Muglia, Ugo; Rinelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive features of the giant red shrimp, Aristaeomorpha foliacea, were investigated in the southern Tyrrhenian sea by experimental trawl sampling. The annual length-frequency distribution showed a multimodal trend in females, ranging between 16 and 67 mm carapace length (CL), and a unimodal trend in males (18–45 mm CL). Mature males occurred in different proportions all year round, while females displayed seasonal maturity (June—September), with a peak in July. Six oocyte developmental stages were identified, the most advanced of which (Pv, postvitellogenic) had never been described before in this species. Ovary development followed a group-synchronous pattern, with the yolked oocyte stock clearly separated from the reservoir of unyolked oocytes, suggesting that A. foliacea is a total spawner, with determinate fecundity. Based upon histological findings, a revision of macroscopic maturity staging employed in Mediterranean bottom trawl surveys (MEDITS) is proposed. PMID:22629127

  10. Toward shrimp consumption without chemicals: Combined effects of freezing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on some quality characteristics of Giant Red Shrimp (Aristaeomorpha foliacea) during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Gioacchino; Okpala, Charles Odilichukwu R; Alberio, Giuseppina R A; Messina, Concetta M; Santulli, Andrea; Giacalone, Gabriele; Spagna, Giovanni

    2016-04-15

    The combined effects of freezing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) (100% N2 and 50% N2+50% CO2) on some quality characteristics of Giant Red Shrimp (GRS) (Aristaeomorpha foliacea) was studied during 12-month storage. In particular, the quality characteristics determined proximal and gas compositions, melanosis scores, pH, total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as well as free amino acid (FAA). In addition, the emergent data were compared to those subject to vacuum packaging as well as conventional preservative method of sulphite treatment (SUL). Most determined qualities exhibited quantitative differences with storage. By comparisons, while pH and TVB-N statistically varied between treatments (P<0.05) and TBA that ranged between ∼0.15 and 0.30 mg MDA/kg appeared least at end of storage for 100% N2 treated-group, the latter having decreased melanosis scores showed such treatments with high promise to keep the colour of GRS sample hence, potential replacement for SUL group. By comparisons also, while some individual FAA values showed increases especially at the 100% N2-treated group, the total FAAs statistically differed with storage (P<0.05). The combination of freezing and MAP treatments as preservative treatment method shows high promise to influence some quality characteristics of GRS samples of this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term changes in the abundance and deepening of the deep-sea shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea in the Balearic Basin: Relationships with hydrographic changes at the Levantine Intermediate Water

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    Cartes, J. E.; Maynou, F.; Abelló, P.; Emelianov, M.; de Sola, L. Gil; Solé, M.

    2011-12-01

    We compiled long-term data (from commercial landings and scientific surveys) on the density ( D) and the depth distribution of the deep-living shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea in the Balearic Basin (western Mediterranean) from the 1950s to 2010. We analyzed these data in relation to changes in temperature (T) and salinity (S) of the intermediate water column, where the species inhabits. A. foliacea showed the highest densities in the 1950s-1960s in the northern sector of the Balearic Basin off the central coasts of Catalonia, ca. 0.6-20.7 ind/ha, and to the north of Mallorca, ca. 7.5-43 ind/ha. Later, densities > 1 ind/ha were only found close to Eivissa Channel at the south side of the Balearic Basin: 1.9-11.4 ind/ha in 1992, 2001 and 2005. In the northern Balearic Basin, A. foliacea has almost disappeared since the 1970s. In the same period A. foliacea showed significant deepening (r 2 = 0.90) of its population Center of Gravity ( CoG) from the 1950s-60s ( CoG = 466 m) to 1995-2002 ( CoG = 538 m) and then stabilized during 2003-2010 ( CoG = 535 m). Temperature of the Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) core (at ca. 400 m depth) off the central coasts of Catalonia progressively increased from 12.95 °C in 1957 to 13.31 °C in 1977, reaching 13.44 °C and 13.41 °C in 1998 and 2007 respectively. Salinity showed a similar increase from 38.40 psu in 1957 to 38.43 psu in 1977, then reaching 38.55 psu in 1998 and 38.56 psu in 2007. Estimated D of A. foliacea decreased significantly (Spearman ρ) when the T and S at the LIW core increased ( p < 10 - 6 ), as did T and S at the optimum depth of A. foliacea (p < 0.001). Multiple Linear regression (MLR) models related the decrease of A. foliacea D with increasing T at LIW (up to 55% of explained variance, depending upon the variables included in the MLR model). The optimum depth of A. foliacea was always deeper than the LIW core, with the depth difference between the CoG and the LIW core increasing from 80.6 m in 1957 to 138

  12. Deep-sea Mediterranean biology: the case of Aristaeomorpha foliacea (Risso, 1827 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Aristeidae

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    Chrissi-Yianna Politou

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Data on the distribution, abundance and biological parameters of the giant red shrimp Aristaeomorphafoliacea were collected during a research survey in deep waters (600-4000 m of the Mediterranean Sea at three locations: the Balearic Sea, the western Ionian and the eastern Ionian in early summer 2001. The shrimp was mainly found in the shallower zone (< 1000 m of the eastern Ionian Sea. Few specimens were caught in the deeper waters of this region, with 1100 m being the lower limit of its distribution. This is the maximum depth reported for the species in the Mediterranean. At the other two locations, the species was scarcely caught and only in the shallowest zone (< 1000 m. In the area and depth zone of high abundance, 5 modal groups for females and 3 for males were distinguished using the Bhattacharya method. The recruitment seems to take place at the shallowest stations (600 m. More than 50% of adult females were in advanced maturity stages. The striking abundance differences of the species between the western and eastern locations may be explained by the different exploitation level of the deep waters (almost null in the eastern Ionian Sea and extensive more westwards. However, the distribution and biological characteristics of A.foliacea indicate a higher vulnerability to over-fishing comparing to the other commercial co-occurring deep-water shrimp Aristeusantennatus.

  13. Composition and diversity patterns of megafauna discards in the deep-water shrimp trawl fishery off Brazil.

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    Perez, J A A; Pereira, B N; Pereira, D A; Schroeder, R

    2013-10-01

    Composition and spatial diversity patterns of retained and discarded catches in the deep-water shrimp (family Aristeidae) trawling fishery off Brazil were assessed by observers on-board commercial operations in 2005 and 2006. These trawls caught 19,440 kg and 180,076 individuals of which 76·0 and 65·2%, respectively, were discarded at sea. Finfishes represented 54% of the numerical catch but were almost fully discarded (98%). Crustaceans represented 40% of the numerical catch and were mostly retained (80%). The scarlet shrimp Aristaeopsis edwardsiana comprised approximately half of the retained catch. The remainder of the retained proportion comprised mainly the red giant shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea, the alistado shrimp Aristeus antillensis and small quantities of Argentine hake Merluccius hubbsi and gulf hake Urophycis mystacea. Discards comprised 108 species including 72 fish species, 19 crustaceans and 10 cephalopods. The large-scaled lanternfish Neoscopelus macrolepidotus was dominant in the discards, followed by the benthopelagic fishes Monomitopus agassizii, Synagrops bellus, Dibranchus atlanticus and Gadella imberbis and various macrurid species. This fishery was restricted to a limited bathymetric range (700-800 m), where discrete megafauna assemblages exist and may have been significantly affected. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  14. Nile damming as plausible cause of extinction and drop in abundance of deep-sea shrimp in the western Mediterranean over broad spatial scales

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    Cartes, J. E.; Maynou, F.; Fanelli, E.

    2011-11-01

    Greatly increased retention of flow in Nile River reservoirs was initiated in 1964, after completion of the Aswan High Dam, which induced important oceanographic changes in the Mediterranean Sea, including deep waters (below a depth of 150 m). Based on an analysis of data series starting in the 1940s/1950s, the giant red shrimp Aristaeomorpha foliacea has become locally extinct off of the Catalonian coasts (and elsewhere in the northwestern Mediterranean) at depths of 400-900 m, with a simultaneous and significant drop in the catches of red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus, in the second half of the 1960s. The extinction and sharp decline of deep-shrimp populations off Catalonian coast (at ca. 3200 km westwards from Nile Delta) followed the 1964 drop in Nile discharge with a delay of ca. 3-5 yrs (breakpoint analysis applied to data series). The breakpoints detected in the second half of 1960s both in Nile runoff and shrimps’ abundance were independent of climatic events in the study area (e.g. changes in NAO) and occurred before the increase in fishing effort off Catalonian coasts (breakpoint in 1973-1974). The Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW), inhabited by A. foliacea in the western Basin, had significant temperature (T) and salinity (S) increases in the 1950-1970 period, and Nile damming has contributed about 45% of the total S increase of Western Mediterranean deep-water masses from the 1960s to the late 1990s (Skliris and Lascaratos, 2004). This had to increase, for instance, LIW salinity at its formation site in the eastern Mediterranean. Nile damming was probably a triggering factor for the extinction/drop in abundance of deep-sea shrimp off Catalonian coasts.

  15. A bio-economic evaluation of the potential for establishing a commercial fishery on two newly developed stocks: The Ionian red shrimp fishery

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    Jordi Guillen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that two deep-water red shrimp species (Aristeus antennatus and Aristaeomorpha foliacea have the potential to support a viable fishery in the Greek Ionian Sea (eastern Mediterranean. In this article, we investigate (i the evolution that this newly developed trawl shrimp fishery may undergo when subjected to different management measures, and (ii the most suitable extraction rates considering the uncertainties about the resource. We further analyse the effects that potential future fuel price increases and changes in the market may have on the fishery. Forecasting the biological and economic consequences of management actions, as well as the effects of market changes on inputs and outputs before they are applied, may help managers select the most suitable management options. We approach the problem by means of bio-economic simulation analysis. The results of this study show that fishing effort can increase by 50-100%, increasing the fleet’s profitability without jeopardizing the sustainability of the fishery.

  16. Deep-sea shrimps (Decapoda: Aristeidae: new targets of the deep-water trawling fishery in Brazil

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    Paulo Ricardo Pezzuto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the recent expansion of the Brazilian fishery to slope fishing grounds, a new directed trawl fishery for aristeid shrimps emerged since mid 2002. Aristaeopsis edwardsiana has been the main component of the catches attaining 88.4% of total shrimp production. Aristaeomorpha foliacea and Aristeus antillensis have composed significantly smaller fractions of the landings (9.8 % and 1.8 % respectively. Two main grounds were located in the southeastern region (ca. 19º - 25ºS and one in the northern border of the Brazilian EEZ (ca. 4º30' - 5ºN. Catches have been extremely concentrated between the 700 and 750 m isobaths. Mean catch rates of A. edwardsiana oscillated between 6.5 and 9.7 kg.h-1. The other species have been caught at considerably lower rates (0.1 - 0.6 kg.h-1 and 0.1 - 1.3 kg.h-1, respectively. A seasonal pattern in A. edwardsiana catches is suggested, with maximum values obtained between July and December. While largely directed to the shrimps, incidental catches of the royal crab (Chaceon ramosae attained, on average, 22 % of the total landings.Seguindo a recente expansão da pesca brasileira para o talude continental, uma nova pescaria de camarões da família Aristeidae tem se desenvolvido desde meados de 2002. O camarão "carabineiro", Aristaeopsis edwardsiana, é o principal componente das capturas, alcançando 88,4 % da produção total de camarões. Os camarões "moruno", Aristaeomorpha foliacea e "alistado", Aristeus antillensis, compõem frações menores das descargas (9,8 % e 1,8 % respectivamente. Duas áreas principais de pesca foram descobertas na região Sudeste do Brasil (19º - 25ºS e uma no limite setentrional da ZEE do país (4º - 5ºN. As capturas estiveram concentradas entre as isóbatas de 700 e 750 m. As taxas médias de captura de A. edwardsiana flutuaram entre 6,5 e 9,7 kg.h-1. As outras espécies foram capturadas em taxas consideravelmente menores (0,1 - 0,6 kg.h-1 e 0,1 - 1,3 kg.h-1

  17. Enviromental influences on the spatio-temporal distribution of Aristeus Antennatus (Risso, 1816) and Aristaeomorpha Foliacea (Risso, 1827) in the Central-Western Mediterranean

    OpenAIRE

    Palmas, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    According to the Food and Agriculture of United Nations, almost 80% of the world fish populations are overexploited, depleted or in a state of collapse. In general the Mediterranean Sea is characterized by the 33% of assessed stocks fully exploited, 50% overexploited and the remaining 17% non-fully exploited. Bottom trawling fleets predominate in many Mediterranean fisheries, being responsible for a high share of total catches and, in many cases, yielding the highest earnings among all the fi...

  18. [Ultrastructural characteristics of the vitellaria, uterus and vagina of Amphilina foliacea Rudolphi, 1819 (Cestoda: Amphilinidea)].

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    Poddubnaia, L G

    2013-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of the vitelline follicles, uterus and vagina of the amphilinid cestode Amphilina foliacea from the body cavity of Acipenser ruthenus of the Volga basin are described. Some new distinguishing characters are revealed, including the presence of a single type of the cellular component in the vitelline follicles with sarcoplasmic processes filling the space around and within vitellocytes. The,uterus of this species is recognized by the presence of the syncytial epithelial lining with underlying secretory perikaria and different kinds of luminal projections. The most distal part of the uterus, situated closely to the uterine pore, is characterized by nuclei occupying the syncytial uterine epithelium. Slightly further proximally, they are located basally and then transformed into sunken perikaria. The vaginal epithelium is characterized by the syncytial structure with underlying epithelial perikaria in its distal region, with intraepithelial location of the nuclei slightly further proximally and the absence of the nuclei in its proximal region (the seminal receptacle). The syncytial cytoplasm of the vagina contains numerous vesicles and possesses microvilli-like surface structures. The morphological aspects of the female reproductive system of A. foliacea are compared with those of other Cestoda and Neodermata.

  19. Shrimp Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northern Shrimp Survey was initiated in 1983 by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) and monitors the relative abundance (number of shrimp),...

  20. Effects of nitrogen deposition and soil fertility on cover and physiology of Cladonia foliacea (Huds.) Willd., a lichen of biological soil crusts from Mediterranean Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raul, E-mail: raul.ochoa@ccma.csic.e [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Manrique, Esteban [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Serrano 115 bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    We are fertilizing a thicket with 0, 10, 20 and 50 kg nitrogen (N) ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in central Spain. Here we report changes in cover, pigments, pigment ratios and FvFm of the N-tolerant, terricolous, lichen Cladonia foliacea after 1-2 y adding N in order to study its potential as biomarker of atmospheric pollution. Cover tended to increase. Pigments increased with fertilization independently of the dose supplied but only significantly with soil nitrate as covariate. {beta}-carotene/chlorophylls increased with 20-50 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} (over the background) and neoxanthin/chlorophylls also increased with N. (Neoxanthin+lutein)/carotene decreased with N when nitrate and pH seasonalities were used as covariates. FvFm showed a critical load above 40 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Water-stress, iron and copper also explained variables of lichen physiology. We conclude that this tolerant lichen could be used as biomarker and that responses to N are complex in heterogeneous Mediterranean-type landscapes. - Research highlights: We are providing evidence of the potential use of the crust-forming lichen Cladonia foliacea as biomarker of atmospheric pollution in Mediterranean ecosystems of Europe, which are understudied with regard to this topic. Pigment concentration increased with N addition and FvFm, used as indicator of physiological status, showed a critical load above 20 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. Soil nitrate and pH were important in modulating responses to simulated N pollution and other soil parameters (micro-nutrients, water content...) also explained variables of lichen physiology. We conclude that Cladonia foliacea could be used as biomarker and that responses to N are complex in heterogeneous Mediterranean-type landscapes. - Nitrogen deposition and soil variables affect the physiology of terrestrial Mediterranean lichens.

  1. Handbook of shrimp diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, S.K

    1989-01-01

    .... In addition to descriptions and illustrations of the common parasites and commensals of commercial penaeid shrimp, the publication includes information on the life cycles and general biological...

  2. Brine Shrimp Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, Brynja; Swank, Rebecca; Haefner, Jim; Powell, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Young brine shrimp movements within a petri dish are tracked by students. Students are challenged to determine and verify whether the brine shrimp move in a random walk. From this exercise students gain greater understanding of PDE models, diffusion and parameter estimation.

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF THE GENUS ISHIGE (ISHIGEALES, PHAEOPHYCEAE) IN THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN WITH RECOGNITION OF ISHIGE FOLIACEA BASED ON PLASTID rbcl AND MITOCHONDRIAL cox3 GENE SEQUENCES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Min; Boo, Ga Hun; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; Shin, Jong-Ahm; Boo, Sung Min

    2009-08-01

    The taxonomy and biogeography of a genus with species that occur in geographically isolated regions is interesting. The brown algal genus Ishige Yendo is a good example, with species that apparently inhabit warm regions of both the northwestern and northeastern Pacific Ocean. We determined the sequences of mitochondrial cox3 and plastid rbcL genes from specimens of the genus collected over its distributional range. Analyses of the 86 cox3 and 97 rbcL sequences resulted in congruent trees in which Ishige sinicola (Setch. et N. L. Gardner) Chihara consisted of two distinct clades: one comprising samples from Korea and Japan, and the other comprising samples from the Gulf of California. Additional observations of the morphology and anatomy of the specimens agree with the molecular data. On the basis of results, we reinstated Ishige foliacea S. Okamura (considered a synonym of I. sinicola from the Gulf of California) for plants from the northwest Pacific region and designated a specimen in the Yendo Herbarium (SAP) as the lectotype. I. foliacea is distinguished by large (up to 20 cm) and wide (up to 20 mm) thalli, with a cortex of 4-7 cells, and a medulla composed of long, tangled hyphal cells. Both cox3 and rbcL sequence data strongly support the sister-area relationship between the northwest Pacific region and the Gulf of California. A likely explanation for this pattern would be the presence of a species ancestral to contemporary species of Ishige in both regions during the paleogeological period, with descendants later isolated by distance. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  4. Gulf Shrimp System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Landings - This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by the larger vessels that fish near and offshore for...

  5. South Atlantic Shrimp System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SEFSC, in cooperation with the South Atlantic states, collects South Atlantic shrimp data from dealers and fishermen. These data are collected to provide catch,...

  6. Burrowing behavior of penaeid shrimps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, and white shrimp, Litopenaeus setiferus, were held were held under natural light conditions before experiments. Experiments...

  7. Investigating Brine Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Lena Ballone

    2003-01-01

    Presents a brine shrimp activity designed for students in grades 5-12 to foster authentic scientific inquiry in addition to providing an engaging and exciting avenue for student exploration. Emphasizes that inquiry should be a critical component in the science classroom. (KHR)

  8. Octaphlorethol A, a novel phenolic compound isolated from a brown alga, Ishige foliacea, increases glucose transporter 4-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Kang, Sung-Myung; Ko, Seok-Chun; Lee, Dae-Ho; Jeon, You-Jin

    2012-04-13

    Skeletal muscle is the major site of glucose disposal. Promoting glucose uptake into this tissue may attenuate the insulin resistance that precedes type 2 diabetes. However, the anti-diabetic effect of marine algae on glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle remains poorly understood. Here, we report the glucose uptake effects of octaphlorethol A (OPA), a novel phenolic compound isolated from Ishige foliacea, on skeletal muscle cells. OPA increased glucose uptake in differentiated L6 rat myoblast cells in a dose-dependent manner relative to the control. In addition, we found that OPA increased glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) translocation to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we also demonstrated these OPA effects essentially depended on the protein kinase B (Akt) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In summary, PI3-K/Akt and AMPK activation were involved in mediating the effects of OPA on glucose transport activation and insulin sensitivity. OPA can be further developed as a potential anti-diabetic therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Permit Landings Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data set contains annual shrimp landings at the permit level from 2005-current fishing year. This also contains annual value of permit holders shrimp landings by...

  10. Age estimation of brown shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campos, J.; Bio, A.; Freitas, V.; Moreiro, C.; van der Veer, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 2 methods for age estimation of Crangon crangon were compared: one based on total length, the other based on the number of segments in the antennules, as suggested by Tiews’ findings (1954: Ber Deut Wiss Kommiss 13:235-269). Shrimps from populations near the species’ geographic edges,

  11. Utilization of Black Tiger Shrimp Flesh Waste for Pop Shrimp Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Eko Irianto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on the utilization of black  tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon flesh waste in the processing of pop shrimp has been carried out.  So far, shrimp flesh waste is used for the production of shrimp paste, and shrimp cracker.   The objective of this study was to develop a fomula for pop shrimp production using shrimp flesh waste. Experimental design applied in this study was three-variables mixture design, in which variables observed were shrimp flesh waste, surimi and tapioca flour. Pop shrimp obtained was evaluated for sensory properties. The best product processed using a selected formula was analysed chemically and microbiologically, particularly for proxymate composition and total plate count respectively. Selected formula of pop shrimp consisted of 50.91% shrimp flesh waste, 18.18% surimi, 3.64% tapioca flour, 10.91% onion, 2.18% garlic, 0.73% pepper powder, 1.45% sugar, 0.36% monosodium glutamate, 0.73% ginger, 1.45% salt, 4.44% butter mix, 1.38% corn flour (maizena and 3.64% bread crumb. Proxymate composition of the best pop shrimp was 70.52% moisture, 0.73% ash, 0.39% fat, and 7.44% protein, while microbiological load in terms of total plate count was 3.3x103 colonies/g.

  12. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Bestha Lakshmi; Buddolla Viswanath; D. V. R. Sai Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are ch...

  13. Microbial Diseases in Shrimp Aquaculture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani; Umesha, R.K.

    Diseases in Shrimp Aquaculture Iddya Karunasagar, Indrani Karunasagar and R. K. Umesha Department of Fishery Microbiology, University of Agricultural Sciences, College of Fisheries, Mangalore-575 002, India Introduction Aquaculture is one of the fastest... growing food production sectors in the world (Subasinghe et al. 1998). According to FAO statistics, over 80% of fish produced by aquaculture comes from Asia, with the production valued at $ 38.855 billion (FAO, 1996). However, disease outbreaks have caused...

  14. Protein requirements of Penaeid shrimp.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanazawa, A

    1989-01-01

    Proteins are indispensable nutrients for growth and maintenance of live of all animals. The optimum protein levels in diets for shrimps are different among the various species. Squid meal is an effective protein source for many penaeids. The effects of dietary protein, lipid, and carbohydrate levels on the growth and survival of larvae of Penaeus japonicus were examined by feeding trials using purified diet with carrageenan as a binder. As a result, the effects of protein levels on growth and...

  15. The deep-sea shrimp fishery off Brazil (Decapoda: Aristeidae: development and present status La pesquería de gambas de profundidad en Brasil (Decapoda: Aristeidae: desarrollo y estado actual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Dallagnolo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a deep-sea fishery for aristeid shrimps off Brazil is reviewed from its early days in 2002. Descriptive data were collected by observers on board 75 directed fishing trips conducted in the study period, with a total of over 15,000 monitored trawls. An incipient fishing phase took place between No-vember 2000 and October 2002, when aristeid shrimps were occasionally reported in the bycatch of operations mostly targeting the Argentine hake (Merluccius hubbsi. After that, a directed fishery was established for these resources. All nine vessels involved in this fishery (one national and eight chartered concentrated on 11 limited grounds between 700 and 800 m deep and 18°S and 34°S. The main species caught between November 2002 and May 2007 was the "carabinero" Aristaeopsis edwardsiana (456,710 kg, followed by the "moruno" Aristaeomorpha foliácea (121,497 kg, and then the "alistado" Aristeus antillensis (27,919 kg. The trawlers operate in conjunction, such that the total area of each fishing ground was swept at least twice. This harvest pattern substantially reduced "carabinero" catch rates from 14 kg hour-1 in the first sampled trimester to 4 kg hour-1 in the last. Despite the inferred biomass reduction of this species, the fishery has continued without a formal management plan.Se revisa el desarrollo de una pesquería en aguas profundas dirigida a gambas aristeideas en Brasil. Desde su inicio, en 2002, los datos descriptivos fueron obtenidos por observadores a bordo de 75 viajes de pesca realizadas en ese período que resultaron en más de 15.000 arrastres monitoreados. Una fase incipiente de la pesquería se estableció entre noviembre de 2000 y octubre de 2002, cuando gambas aristeideas fueron registradas en la captura accidental de operaciones de pesca dirigidas principalmente a la merluza-argentina (Merluccius hubbsi. A ésta sobrevino una fase dirigida en que participaron nueve arrastreros (uno nacional y ocho arrendados

  16. Risk factors in pediatric shrimp allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Niti Y; Maskatia, Zahida; Miller, Sarah; Guffey, Danielle; Minard, Charles G; Davis, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of shellfish allergy is ∼1.3% in the United States, with shrimp most commonly reported. Shellfish is one of the top causes of food-induced anaphylactic reactions, yet there are no reported rates of pediatric shrimp anaphylaxis in the literature. In previously reported adults with shrimp allergy, the rate of anaphylaxis to shrimp was 42%. To describe the rate of anaphylaxis among children with shrimp allergy, demographics, clinical presentation, and cross-reactive sensitization. Retrospective chart review of children ≤18 years old who presented with shrimp allergy to Texas Children's Hospital Allergy and Immunology Clinic over 11 years. Sixty-eight patients were identified with shrimp allergy (61% male, 39% female), with a median age of diagnosis at 5.6 years (range, 0.96-16.6 years). The rate of anaphylaxis was 12%, and mucocutaneous symptoms were most common (skin symptoms, 70%; urticaria, 58%; and angioedema, 58%). No factors were positively associated with anaphylaxis, whereas patients without anaphylaxis had a significantly higher rate of eczema compared with those with anaphylaxis (p = 0.02). African Americans and Asian Americans were disproportionately affected (p < 0.001). There were low rates of cross-sensitization for other crustaceans and for mollusks (57% and 26%, respectively). The rate of anaphylaxis to shrimp was significantly lower in children with shrimp allergy than in adults, and anaphylactic reactions were negatively associated with eczema. Cross-reactivity to other crustaceans and mollusks does not uniformly occur. Prospective studies with double blinded placebo-controlled food challenges are needed to further characterize patients with shrimp allergy.

  17. A model for discrimination freshness of shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linong Du

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The shrimp is popular for its nutrition and dainty, however, it is easy to decay, and its freshness degrades, so, it is important to assess its freshness. The shrimp gives off unpleasant odor with its freshness change, detecting its odor difference can evaluate its freshness. The feasibility of using electronic nose for evaluating the freshness of shrimp (Penaeus vanmamei is explored in this paper. The odor of shrimp, stored at 5 °C, was detected by the electronic nose. Combined with the sensory evaluation and TVBN, a model based on the electronic nose was constructed to evaluate the shrimp freshness. In principal components analysis, the first three principal components accounted for 86.97% of total variation, and they are used to establish a model to estimate the shrimp freshness with Fisher Liner Discriminant. The discriminant rates were 98.3% for 120 modeling sample data, and 91.7% for 36 testing sample data. The model could be easily used to evaluate the freshness of shrimp with better accuracy.

  18. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestha Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases.

  19. Sensory quality of frozen shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Maria Barbosa Nunes Queiroga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the sensory quality of the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei grown and stored in a freezer. A sensory analysis consisted of the Quality Index Method (MIQ to review the raw shrimp and Descriptive Analysis (AD in cooked shrimp in samples stored for a period of 90 days, using eight previously trained panelists. Accommodation comprising shrimp filet (100-120 pieces / kg samples were subjected to freezing in liquid nitrogen (- 86 °C, Freezing Tunnel (- 35 °C and Domestic Freezer (- 18 °C. At 0, 30, 60 and 90 days of storage in these freezing systems, determination of pH, water holding capacity (WHC, weight loss during cooking (WLC, shearing force, color, total volatile bases (TVB and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS were performed. The attributes manual firmness and softness showed better results in rapid freezing. The color parameters (a *, b * and L *, WHC and WCL were higher at 90 days of storage, no significant losses were observed. Highlighted the strength of greater shear in slowly frozen samples at 90 days, confirming the results reported by the sensory panel. At 90 days of storage, the frozen shrimp showed good sensory quality and physical and chemistry characteristics. The shelf life of this shrimp could be set at about 90 days.

  20. Penaeid Shrimp Salinity Gradient Tank Study 2005-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We designed an experimental gradient tank to examine salinity preferences of juvenile brown shrimp and white shrimp. Although no strong pattern of salinity avoidance...

  1. 21 CFR 161.175 - Frozen raw breaded shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the sieves under a faucet, preferably with spray attached, and rinse shrimp with no rubbing of flesh... careful to avoid undue pressure or rubbing, and return each shrimp to the sieve. Remove the top sieve and...

  2. HYDRATION IN THE SAND SHRIMP CRANGON SEPTEMSPINOSA: RELATION TO DIET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J Ross; Jeffries, H Perry

    1976-06-01

    Tissue hydration in the estuarine sand shrimp Crangon septemspinosa is correlated with nutritional conditions. Hydration levels of shrimp who are ingesting food remain normal. In starved shrimp or in individuals who are not ingesting adequate amounts of food, hydration levels are high. Presumably, water replaces metabolized tissues.

  3. Adoption of improved aquaculture practices by shrimp farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To achieve eco-friendly and sustainable development of shrimp farming, adoption of improved shrimp farming practices is necessary. An attempt has been made in this study to collect data from shrimp farmers along the south Konkan region of Maharashtra to judge the level of adoption of improved aquaculture practices.

  4. adoption of improved aquaculture practices by shrimp farmers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Adesope

    ABSTRACT. To achieve eco-friendly and sustainable development of shrimp farming, adoption of improved shrimp farming practices is necessary. An attempt has been made in this study to collect data from shrimp farmers along the south Konkan region of Maharashtra to judge the level of adoption of improved aquaculture ...

  5. Neoliberalism and shrimp industry in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Romero Salgado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the effects of the shrimp industry development in the mangrove ecosystem, the socio-environmental conflicts generated and its relationship with neoliberalism and the financial crisis of 1999 in Ecuador. After a review of the importance of the mangrove ecosystem, the stages of the shrimp expansion, its promoters, the mangrove deforestation and the socio-environmental effects caused, I will analyze the shrimp crisis, its parallels with the financial crisis of 1999 and its subsequent recovery. I will show that the shrimp industry expanded in mangrove areas in order to reduce costs, even breaking the law and creating environmental degradation, vulnerability of the costs and loss of natural resources, based on the exploitation and privatization of a public good. This created unemployment, migration and impoverishment to local populations and costs that the State will have to assume. Therefore, it is a process of “accumulation by dispossession” characteristic of neoliberalism.

  6. Quantal Response Of Freshwater Shrimp ( Desmocaris trispinosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quantal-response of freshwater shrimp (Desmocaris trispinosa) to the toxicity of five azo dyes was studied. Generally, increase in percentage mortality of the organisms was obtained with increases in concentration of the toxicants and exposure time. The median lethal concentration50 (LC50) and median lethal ...

  7. Solar Powered Automatic Shrimp Feeding System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dindo T. Ani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available - Automatic system has brought many revolutions in the existing technologies. One among the technologies, which has greater developments, is the solar powered automatic shrimp feeding system. For instance, the solar power which is a renewable energy can be an alternative solution to energy crisis and basically reducing man power by using it in an automatic manner. The researchers believe an automatic shrimp feeding system may help solve problems on manual feeding operations. The project study aimed to design and develop a solar powered automatic shrimp feeding system. It specifically sought to prepare the design specifications of the project, to determine the methods of fabrication and assembly, and to test the response time of the automatic shrimp feeding system. The researchers designed and developed an automatic system which utilizes a 10 hour timer to be set in intervals preferred by the user and will undergo a continuous process. The magnetic contactor acts as a switch connected to the 10 hour timer which controls the activation or termination of electrical loads and powered by means of a solar panel outputting electrical power, and a rechargeable battery in electrical communication with the solar panel for storing the power. By undergoing through series of testing, the components of the modified system were proven functional and were operating within the desired output. It was recommended that the timer to be used should be tested to avoid malfunction and achieve the fully automatic system and that the system may be improved to handle changes in scope of the project.

  8. CO₂ efflux from shrimp ponds in Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Sidik

    Full Text Available The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored 'blue' carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO₂ efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO₂ efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO₂ efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the walls and 1.60 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO₂ emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y⁻¹. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO₂ emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO₂ released to atmosphere.

  9. Is the Dutch shrimp fishery sustainable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welleman, H.C.; Daan, N.

    2001-01-01

    The fishery of the brown shrimp (Crangon crangon LINNEAUS 1758) is a widespread human activity in the coastal zone. Yet management of this fishery has never been implemented. The question is raised whether an uncontrolled fishery is sustainable or the conceivable ecological stress results in

  10. Key Performance Characteristics of Organic Shrimp Aquaculture in Southwest Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Reinhard Vogl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon; Fabricius, 1798 aquaculture has come to be one of the most important sectors in both the rural and national economies. Likewise, organic shrimp aquaculture has emerged as an alternative farming enterprise for farmers especially in the southwestern districts of Bangladesh. The present study aims to show key performance characteristics of organic shrimp farmers and farming in a prototypical shrimp farming area in Bangladesh. Data was collected in 2009 from organic shrimp farmers in the Kaligonj and Shyamnagar sub-districts through questionnaire interviews, transect walks and focus group discussions. The mean productivity of organic shrimp farming in the area is 320 kg ha−1 yr−1 (ranging from 120 to 711 kg ha−1year−1. Organic farmers are more likely to have a higher monthly income and less aquaculture experience. Moreover, suitable landholdings and classified labor distribution have been found to play an important role in the development of organic shrimp aquaculture. The most common assets of organic shrimp aquaculture are high yield, low production cost, available post larvae and high market prices. Small business farmers are likely to earn more income benefits from organic shrimp aquaculture than their larger-scale counterparts. Finally, the paper suggests that more research is needed to stimulate the success of organic shrimp aquaculture.

  11. Spoilage evaluation, shelf-life prediction, and potential spoilage organisms of tropical brackish water shrimp (Penaeus notialis) at different storage temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabade, D.S.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Azokpota, P.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hounhouigan, D.J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the freshness of shrimp is a concern to shrimp stakeholders. To improve shrimp quality management, it is of importance to evaluate shrimp spoilage characteristics. Therefore, microbiological, sensory, and chemical changes of naturally contaminated tropical brackish water shrimp (Penaeus

  12. The impact of shrimp farming on mangrove ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Elizabeth Clare

    2008-01-01

    . Policy to position shrimp farms behind mangroves can be effective but also requires good institutional capacity and coordination, effective enforcement, incentives, land tenure and participation of all stakeholders for success. Better management practices have been identified which reduce impacts......Farmed shrimp production and value continue to increase with Asia producing the global majority of shrimp and the USA, Japan and Europe being the main importers. Shrimp farming systems are very diverse in their management, size and impacts. There are many causes for mangrove loss but the conversion...... of mangroves to shrimp farms has caused considerable attention. The major issues of shrimp farming include the loss of important ecological and socio-economic functions of mangrove ecosystems, changes in hydrology, salinization, introduction of non-native species and diseases, pollution from effluents...

  13. Development of the brine shrimp Artemia is accelerated during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, B. S.; Metcalf, J.; DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Noren, W.; Guikema, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmentally arrested brine shrimp cysts have been reactivated during orbital spaceflight on two different Space Shuttle missions (STS-50 and STS-54), and their subsequent development has been compared with that of simultaneously reactivated ground controls. Flight and control brine shrimp do not significantly differ with respect to hatching rates or larval morphology at the scanning and transmission EM levels. A small percentage of the flight larvae had defective nauplier eye development, but the observation was not statistically significant. However, in three different experiments on two different flights, involving a total of 232 larvae that developed in space, a highly significant difference in degree of flight to control development was found. By as early as 2.25 days after reactivation of development, spaceflight brine shrimp were accelerated, by a full instar, over ground control brine shrimp. Although developing more rapidly, flight shrimp grew as long as control shrimp at each developmental instar or stage.

  14. Shrimp aquaculture in low salinity water feeded with worm flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenceslao Valenzuela Quiñónez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp aquaculture in Sinaloa is one of the top economic enterprises, generating many jobs and earns significant incomes every year. Shrimp feed is an essential part of maintaining healthy production. In this initial approach of shrimp growth in low salinity water, were tested two formulas of animal protein composed of 40% (APL1 and 20% (APL2 worm protein, a commercial diet, and no supplementary feed. Physicochemical parameters did not have a direct influence in shrimpbehavior. After six weeks of experimentation, shrimp fed with commercial diet had a weight gain 20% higher than those feed with worm protein. There were no significantly differences between sizes with respect to 40% animal protein and 20% animal protein with the commercial diet (P  0.05. However, shrimp fed worm protein had lower mortality. The use of worm protein could be an option to maintain a high quantity of shrimp reared in low salinity waters.

  15. Coordinated group response to nest intruders in social shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Tóth, Eva; Duffy, J. Emmett

    2005-01-01

    A key characteristic of highly social animals is collective group response to important stimuli such as invasion by enemies. The marine societies of social snapping shrimp share many convergences with terrestrial eusocial animals, including aggressive reaction to strangers, but no group actions have yet been observed in shrimp. Here we describe ‘coordinated snapping’, during which a sentinel shrimp reacts to danger by recruiting other colony members to snap in concert for several to tens of s...

  16. Seafood consumption habits of South Carolina shrimp baiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Deborah; Vahey, Grace; Faith, Trevor; Vena, John; Williams, Edith M

    2017-01-01

    Shrimp baiting is a fishing technique used by many South Carolinians and has been regulated in the state since the late 1980s. A postcard survey was developed and included with 400 South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) annual surveys of registered shrimp baiters over a two-year period. The survey contained questions concerning frequency, portion size, baiting locations, and preparation techniques for shrimp as well as other species consumed and demographic information. An overall response rate of 37% was received. The majority of respondents were men over the age of 55 years. Charleston and Beaufort counties were the most common locations for shrimp baiting. Almost half (45.9%) of respondents reported eating locally caught shrimp at least 2-3 times per month. The most common portion size was ½ pound (8 oz. or 277 g), with 44.8% of respondents reporting this as their typical amount of shrimp ingested at one meal. Only 3.7% of respondents reported typically eating the whole shrimp, while all other respondents ingested shrimp with the head removed. The most commonly consumed species besides shrimp were blue crab, oysters, and flounder. According to the US Food and Drug Administration mercury (Hg) guidelines, the majority (97%) of our respondents were not at risk for consuming unsafe levels of Hg from locally caught shrimp. However, this does not take into account other local seafood eaten or other contaminants of concern. These consumption results may be used in conjunction with data on contaminant levels in shrimp to determine potential adverse health risks associated with consumption of locally caught shrimp.

  17. Challenges to shrimp production in the Bentre province, Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Khang van

    2008-01-01

    Shrimp world production in the last few years has shows very high growth rates. In Vietnam in general and Bentre in particular, shrimp farming has rapidly developed recently and become an important economic sector, creating employment, increasing farmers’ income and earning foreign currency for the country. However, shrimp farming in Bentre is facing a number of challenges that hinder the sustainable development of the sector. The development has been through unplanned expansion of the number...

  18. Vitamin requirements of juvenile penaeid shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Conklin, D.

    1989-01-01

    The results of supplementing crustacean feeds with vitamins are examined specifically from the standpoint of shrimp culture. Micro-nutrients selected for discussion include: water-soluble vitamins of the B-complex, choline and inositol, vitamin C and the fat-soluble group of vitamins: A, D, E and K. Ways in which utilization of vitamins and ultimately dietary demand are altered by physiological state, conditions of culture, as well as factors which impact on feed levels, are explored.

  19. Dead shrimp blues: a global assessment of extinction risk in freshwater shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy De Grave

    Full Text Available We present the first global assessment of extinction risk for a major group of freshwater invertebrates, caridean shrimps. The risk of extinction for all 763 species was assessed using the IUCN Red List criteria that include geographic ranges, habitats, ecology and past and present threats. The Indo-Malayan region holds over half of global species diversity, with a peak in Indo-China and southern China. Shrimps primarily inhabit flowing water; however, a significant subterranean component is present, which is more threatened than the surface fauna. Two species are extinct with a further 10 possibly extinct, and almost one third of species are either threatened or Near Threatened (NT. Threats to freshwater shrimps include agricultural and urban pollution impact over two-thirds of threatened and NT species. Invasive species and climate change have the greatest overall impact of all threats (based on combined timing, scope and severity of threats.

  20. Abundance of Ohio shrimp (Macrobrachium ohione) and Glass shrimp (Palaemonetes kadiakensis) in the unimpounded Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, V.A.; Hrabik, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Large rivers of the United States have been altered by construction and maintenance of navigation channels, which has resulted in habitat loss and degradation. Using 7 y of Long Term Resource Monitoring Program data collected from the unimpounded upper Mississippi River, we investigated Ohio and Glass Shrimp abundance collected from four physical habitats of the unimpounded upper Mississippi River: main channel border, main channel border with wing dike, open side channel and closed side channel. Our objective was to assess associations between Ohio and Glass Shrimp abundance, environmental measurements and the four habitats to better understand the ecology of these species in a channelized river system. Ohio Shrimp were most abundant in the open side channels, while Glass Shrimp were most abundant in the main channel border wing dike habitat. Thirty-two percent of the variance in Glass Shrimp abundance was explained by year 1995, year 1998, water temperature, depth of gear deployment, Secchi disk transparency and river elevation. Approximately 8% of variation in Ohio Shrimp abundance was explained by Secchi disk transparency. Catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) was greatest in 1998 for Glass Shrimp but lowest in 1997. Conversely, CPUE was greatest in 1996 for Ohio Shrimp and lowest in 2000. Both species exhibited inter-annual variability in CPUE. Long-term impacts of river modifications on aquatic invertebrates have not been well documented in many large, river systems and warrants further study. The findings from this study provide ecological information on Glass and Ohio Shrimp in a channelized river system.

  1. Market integration of cold and warmwater shrimp in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankamah-Yeboah, Isaac; Ståhl, Lisa; Nielsen, Max

    2017-01-01

    This study examines market integration between the cold and warmwater shrimp value chain in the UK, Denmark, Italy, Sweden, and Norway using cointegration methods. For all countries, market integration exists between cold and warmwater unprocessed shrimp imports, where the law of one price (LOP) ...

  2. Defensive enrolment in mantis shrimp larvae (Malacostraca: Stomatopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haug, C.; Haug, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a possible new defensive behaviour of larval stages of mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda). Mantis shrimp larvae are rarely observed in nature, thus the study is based on postures of museum material and functional morphological aspects. Specimens described here are tightly enrolled, their pleon

  3. When and How to Worry about OA: Greenland Shrimp Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks; Ravn-Jonsen, Lars

    We use a bio-economic model of the Greenland shrimp fishery to study potential ocean acidification (OA) impacts in arctic resources. Predicted changes in pH in Baffin Bay describe an anticipated though uncertain drop. Efforts to understand changes in shrimp quantity/ quality from OA reflect signi...

  4. Collections of freshwater shrimps along the southern coast of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collections of freshwater shrimps along the southern coast of South Africa. D.J. Coetzee. Abstract. During the period February 1983 to November 1986 a total of 38 rivers along the south-western, southem and eastern Cape coasts and Ciskei were investigated for the occurrence of freshwater shrimps. Five species were ...

  5. 77 FR 27411 - Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp Trawling Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... the net is fishing, thus preventing shrimp from escaping over the top. Owing to increased shrimp catch... subsequently damaging the gear. The frames are maintained in this position by two or more stays or cables to... falling with the bottom contour. The bottom of the gear includes tickler chains and lead lines. The...

  6. Population dynamics of the seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The population dynamics, including the sex ratio, reproductive period, individual growth and longevity, and population structure of the shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri, are described. The shrimps were collected monthly from July 2005 to June 2007 at four sites in Ubatuba Bay, Brazil. The salinity, temperature, depth, organic ...

  7. Carriage of vibrio species by shrimps harvested from the coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of Vibrio spp in unprocessed shrimps and their susceptibility to antibiotics. Design: A prospective study of Vibrio spp associated with shrimps harvested from the coastal waters of South West Cameroon. Setting: A laboratory based study at the Department of Life Sciences, University ...

  8. Correlation between brine shrimp test (BST) and some bioassays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaves of Neem (Azadirachta indica A.Juss) and Wild custard-apple (Annona senegalensis Pers) were extracted using ethanol and extracts were screened for bioactivity against brine shrimp larvae. The bioactive extracts in the brine shrimp test (BST) were investigated for correlation with aphid nematode and ...

  9. The rediscovery of the freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium crenulatum in Jamaica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunte, Waine

    1979-01-01

    A record of the freshwater shrimps of Jamaica has been provided by Hart (1961b). His study includes taxonomical comments and notes on the locations at which the various species were caught. Since then Holthuis (1963a) has described a new subterranean freshwater shrimp, Troglocubanus jamaicensis,

  10. Northern Shrimp (Pandalus borealis) Recruitment in West Greenland Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S. A.; Storm, L. M.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid class and fatty acid compositions were determined in shrimp larvae (Pandalus borealis and P. montagui) collected along transects across banks on the West Greenland shelf in June 1999, May and July 2000. The lipid class contents were investigated as indices of larval shrimp lipid condition a...

  11. Population structure and recruitment of penaeid shrimps in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study characterizes the population structure and identifies nursery areas and recruitment seasons of penaeid shrimps in the Pungué river estuary of Mozambique. Shrimp samples were obtained from 12 trawl stations at monthly intervals during 2004. Six species were found, two of which (Fenneropenaeus indicus and ...

  12. Immune response of shrimp (Penaeus monodon against Vibrios furnissii pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Subramanian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse experimental infection and immune system of shrimp (Penaeus monodon against Vibrios furnissii (V. furnissii. Methods: Experimental animals were collected and acclimatized by maintaining specific temperature, pH and salinity to avoid mortality. Shrimps were experimentally infected with V. furnissii and their immune responses were monitored. After the infection all the shrimps were monitored for any symptoms, death rate in 0, 12, 24, 36, 48 h. Then haemolymph were collected and tetrahydrocannabinol, phenol oxidase, nitroblue tetrazolium and lysozyme were monitored in every 12 h at the interval of 48 h. Results: Shrimps infected by live V. furnissii had showed gradual increase in tetrahydrocannabinol, phenol oxidase activity, nitro-blue-tetrazolium and lysozyme activity comparing with the killed and control. Conclusions: The live V. furnissii had showed infection in the shrimp immune system. The live V. furnissii shows infection in experimental shrimps comparing with killed V. furnissii. So the V. furnissii in nature cause the infection in shrimp Penaeus monodon immune system. This report could be applied to control of the infection in shrimp hatchery.

  13. Job Satisfaction in the Shrimp Trawl Fisheries of Chennai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavinck, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Shrimp trawling represents an important fishing metier in South India, generating high levels of employment and economic value. It is also a contested metier, ostensibly contributing to environmental degradation and social inequality. This paper investigates the job satisfaction of crew members (captains and workers) on board the shrimp trawlers…

  14. Job Satisfaction in the Shrimp Trawl Fisheries of Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinh, Le Xuan

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the job satisfaction of small-scale shrimp trawl fishers in the vicinity of Camau National Park in southern Vietnam. The research sample consisted of 77 fishers who belong to a growing population of shrimp fishers in the region. The results suggest that 60% would change their fishing metier, 78% would leave fishing for…

  15. Efficient use of shrimp waste: present and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandra, Prameela; Challa, Murali Mohan; Jyothi, Hemalatha Kalangi Padma

    2012-01-01

    The production of shrimp waste from shrimp processing industries has undergone a dramatic increase in recent years. Continued production of this biomaterial without corresponding development of utilizing technology has resulted in waste collection, disposal, and pollution problems. Currently used chemical process releases toxic chemicals such as HCl, acetic acid, and NaOH into aquatic ecosystem as byproducts which will spoil the aquatic flora and fauna. Environmental protection regulations have become stricter. Now, there is a need to treat and utilize the waste in most efficient manner. The shrimp waste contains several bioactive compounds such as chitin, pigments, amino acids, and fatty acids. These bioactive compounds have a wide range of applications including medical, therapies, cosmetics, paper, pulp and textile industries, biotechnology, and food applications. This current review article present the utilization of shrimp waste as well as an alternative technology to replace hazardous chemical method that address the future trends in total utilization of shrimp waste for recovery of bioactive compounds.

  16. A Bioeconomic model of ocean acidification in the Baffin Bay/ Davis Strait Shrimp Fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks; Ravn-Jonsen, Lars

    We examine the case of the shrimp fishery in Baffin Bay/Davis Straight for potential effects of Ocean Acidification (OA), including: 1. the overall productivity of the shrimp fishery, 2. the spatial spread of the shrimp fishery, 3. the quality of the shrimp brought to market, and hence price...

  17. 77 FR 4993 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Initiation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... includes certain warmwater shrimp and prawns, whether frozen, wild-caught (ocean harvested) or farm-raised... shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis... Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico, 75 FR 67685 (November 3, 2010). In accordance with the above...

  18. 75 FR 49460 - Administrative Review of Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... International Trade Administration Administrative Review of Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's... Administrative Review of Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from the People's Republic of China: Issues and Decision... revised the wage rate methodology and the surrogate values for shrimp larvae, diesel fuel, shrimp waste...

  19. 78 FR 33347 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Ecuador: Preliminary Negative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... (Trachypenaeus curvirostris), southern white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian white prawn (Penaeus indicus). Frozen shrimp and... Investigation 3. Injury Test 4. Subsidies Valuation 5. Analysis of Programs 6. Disclosure and Public Comment 7...

  20. 78 FR 33346 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... curvirostris), southern white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian white prawn (Penaeus indicus). Frozen shrimp and prawns that... Investigation 3. Injury Test 4. Subsidies Valuation 5. Use of Facts Otherwise Available and Adverse Inferences 6...

  1. 78 FR 33350 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Preliminary Countervailing Duty Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... curvirostris), southern white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian white prawn (Penaeus indicus). Frozen shrimp and prawns that... Investigation 3. Injury Test 4. Subsidies Valuation 5. Analysis of Programs 6. ITC Notification 7. Disclosure...

  2. 77 FR 36998 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Mandatory Shrimp Vessel and Gear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Information Collection; Comment Request; Mandatory Shrimp Vessel and Gear Characterization Survey AGENCY... for the Gulf Shrimp Vessel and Gear Characterization Form may be found at 50 CFR 622.5(a)(1)(iii)(C... shrimp must complete an annual Gulf Shrimp Vessel and Gear Characterization Form. The form will be...

  3. Social Cost-Benefit Analysis of Scientific Versus Traditional Shrimp Farming: A Case Study from India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi; Ninan, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts a social cost-benefit analysis of scientific versus traditional shrimp farming in West Bengal, India. Using primary data, the paper shows that although intensive or scientific shrimp farming yields high returns as compared to traditional shrimp farming, when the opportunity costs and environmental costs of shrimp farming including disease risk are accounted for, scientific shrimp farming loses its advantage. In fact sensitivity analysis shows that if expected benefits were...

  4. Coordinated group response to nest intruders in social shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Eva; Duffy, J Emmett

    2005-03-22

    A key characteristic of highly social animals is collective group response to important stimuli such as invasion by enemies. The marine societies of social snapping shrimp share many convergences with terrestrial eusocial animals, including aggressive reaction to strangers, but no group actions have yet been observed in shrimp. Here we describe 'coordinated snapping', during which a sentinel shrimp reacts to danger by recruiting other colony members to snap in concert for several to tens of seconds. This distinctive behaviour is a specific response to intrusion by strange shrimp into the colony's sponge and is highly successful at repelling these intruders. Although coordinated snapping apparently functions analogously to alarm responses in other social animals, colony members in social shrimp do not rush to the site of the attack. Coordinated snapping appears instead to be a warning signal to would-be intruders that the sponge is occupied by a cooperative colony ready to defend it. This is the first evidence for coordinated communication in social shrimp and represents yet another remarkable convergence between social shrimp, insects and vertebrates.

  5. ShrimpGPAT: a gene and protein annotation tool for knowledge sharing and gene discovery in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshkari, Parpakron; Vaiwsri, Sirintra; Flegel, Timothy W; Ngamsuriyaroj, Sudsanguan; Sonthayanon, Burachai; Prachumwat, Anuphap

    2014-06-21

    Although captured and cultivated marine shrimp constitute highly important seafood in terms of both economic value and production quantity, biologists have little knowledge of the shrimp genome and this partly hinders their ability to improve shrimp aquaculture. To help improve this situation, the Shrimp Gene and Protein Annotation Tool (ShrimpGPAT) was conceived as a community-based annotation platform for the acquisition and updating of full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs), Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs), transcript contigs and protein sequences of penaeid shrimp and their decapod relatives and for in-silico functional annotation and sequence analysis. ShrimpGPAT currently holds quality-filtered, molecular sequences of 14 decapod species (~500,000 records for six penaeid shrimp and eight other decapods). The database predominantly comprises transcript sequences derived by both traditional EST Sanger sequencing and more recently by massive-parallel sequencing technologies. The analysis pipeline provides putative functions in terms of sequence homologs, gene ontologies and protein-protein interactions. Data retrieval can be conducted easily either by a keyword text search or by a sequence query via BLAST, and users can save records of interest for later investigation using tools such as multiple sequence alignment and BLAST searches against pre-defined databases. In addition, ShrimpGPAT provides space for community insights by allowing functional annotation with tags and comments on sequences. Community-contributed information will allow for continuous database enrichment, for improvement of functions and for other aspects of sequence analysis. ShrimpGPAT is a new, free and easily accessed service for the shrimp research community that provides a comprehensive and up-to-date database of quality-filtered decapod gene and protein sequences together with putative functional prediction and sequence analysis tools. An important feature is its community

  6. Effect of Adding the White Legged Shrimp (Penaeus vannamei on Growth and Survival of Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon in Intensive Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Tarsim

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out in the framework of a project to develop a viable shrimp polyculture technology under intensive farming. The objectives were to assess the effect of adding white legged shrimp (Penaeus vannamei on growth and survival of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon in intensive Farming. Tiger shrimp were stocked in 2800-3400 m2 earthen ponds at 40 individuals/m2 and reared for 133 days. White legged shrimp added at 70 day at 8±2 individuals/m2. Growth rate and total yield affected by addition of this species. Final  affected by white legged shrimp addition. No adding effects were found on the water quality parameters. The results indicate that, at densities tested, white legged shrimp addition to the intensive farming of tiger shrimp polyculture is viable as species increase crop production Key words: Penaeus vannamei, P. monodon, growth, survival, polyculture

  7. Interaction between Penaeid Shrimp and Fish Populations in the Gulf of Mexico: Importance of Shrimp as Forage Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masami; Zhou, Can; Acres, Chelsea; Martinez-Andrade, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of shrimp stocks in supporting the production of valuable predator species. Fishery-independent data on white shrimp, brown shrimp, and selected fish species (spotted seatrout, red drum, and southern flounder) were collected from 1986 to 2014 by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and converted to catch-per-unit effort (CPUE). Here, the associations between the CPUEs of fish species as predators and those of shrimp species as prey in each sampled bay and sampling season were analyzed using co-integration analysis and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Co-integration analysis revealed significant associations between 31 of 70 possible fish/shrimp pairings. The analysis also revealed discernible seasonal and spatial patterns. White shrimp in August and brown shrimp in May were associated with fish CPUEs in bays located along the lower coast of Texas, whereas white shrimp in November was more strongly associated with fish CPUEs in bays located on the upper coast. This suggests the possible influence of latitudinal environmental gradient. The results of the PLSR, on the other hand, were not conclusive. This may reflect the high statistical error rates inherent to the analysis of short non-stationary time series. Co-integration is a robust method when analyzing non-stationary time series, and a majority of time series in this study was non-stationary. Based on our co-integration results, we conclude that the CPUE data show significant associations between shrimp abundance and the three predator fish species in the tested regions.

  8. Development of shrimp in small ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Adolfo Ortega Salas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in small ponds ( 6 m3 in fresh water (2-3‰ and seawater; ponds 3.66 x 1.65 x 1.0 m; availability of fresh water, sea water, aeration and drainage. Two cycles of three months each were made. The postlarvae were acclimated to seawater fresh water in four days. Four hundred postlarvas/m3 were seeded in freshwater pond and 500 in the pool of seawater. First, a culture of Daphnia magna in the freshwater pond, also appeared chyronomid larvae; Artemia cysts were seeded in sea water as a dietary supplement. The shrimp were fed Camaronina (25% protein at libitum, daily; is offered on a tray of food; the temperature ranged between 27 and 30° C, oxygen 4.26 ± 1.43 mg / L , pH between 7 and 8 . Detritus siphoned every third day. Water changes between 10 and 20% are often performed. The feed conversion rate (FCR was 1:1.3 . The shrimp were measured in length and weight to calculate weekly growth by Bertalanffy model. Survival in the first cycle was 95.8 , and 97.9% for the second cycle. In seawater parameters of the population of the first cycle were k = 0.0301, L ∞ = 322.16 and t0 = -0.8852, the second cycle of k = 0.0203, L ∞ = 294.42 and t0 = -5.3771. The biomass of 27 kg was obtained for the first cycle and 16 kg for the second cycle. Freshwater population parameters of the first cycle were k = 0.0957, L ∞ = 146.98 and t0 = - 0.93; in the second cycle of k = 0.0172 , L ∞ = 367.82 and t0 = - 4.60. The biomass of 26 kg was obtained for the first cycle and 16 kg for the second cycle. The results indicate a rapid growth during the first 10 weeks. In small ponds can be handled well aseptic conditions without disease problems, good crop was obtained.

  9. COMPARISON OF CARBON AND NITROGEN FLUXES IN TIDEFLAT FOOD WEBS DOMINATED BY BURROWING SHRIMP OR BY CULTURED OYSTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of indigenous, thalassinid burrowing shrimps are pests to the benthic culture of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) because deposition of sediment excavated by the shrimps buries or smothers the oysters. Carbaryl pesticide is used to reduce burrowing shrimp densitie...

  10. 77 FR 29586 - Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp Trawling Requirements; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... Part 223 RIN 0648-BC10 Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp Trawling Requirements; Correction AGENCY... turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in their nets, and announced five public hearings to be held in Morehead...

  11. Commercially important penaeid shrimp larvae in the estuaries of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Larval stages of the penaeid shrimps, Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers), M. affinis (Milne - Edwards) and Penaeus merguiensis De Man were mostly distributed at the lower reaches of Mandovi and Zuari estuaries. While larvae of M. dobsoni and M. affinis...

  12. 2008 Economic Survey of Gulf State Shrimp License Holders

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This mail survey collected data on the economic performance of active commercial shrimp harvesters who primarily operated in inshore waters of western Florida,...

  13. Physicochemical changes in minimal ozone-treated fresh shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treated fresh shrimp were evaluated tandem with microbiological efficacy of treatment during iced storage of up to 10 days. Safely discharged from commercially available domestic-type ozone facility, a previously defined minimal ozone treatment ...

  14. Genetic diversity and historical demography of Chinese shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity and historical demography of Chinese shrimp Feneropenaeus chinensis in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea based on mitochondrial DNA analysis. YL Li, XY Kong, ZN Yu, J Kong, S Ma, LM Chen ...

  15. Sustainable shrimp farming in India - Prospects and challenges

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Shrimp farming has grown into a multi-crore industry in India. It has vast potential for further expansion. However, this growing industry needs to develop appropriate indigenous technologies in specific areas to make it a sustainable and profitable...

  16. Brine Shrimp Ecology In The Great Salt Lake, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersaline lakes are noted for their simple communities which facilitate understanding ecological interactions (Williams et al. 1990; Wurtsbaugh 1992; Jellison and Melack 1988). Nevertheless, we still cannot easily predict how environmental changes will effect the population dynamics in these lakes, at least in part because even these simple ecosystems may be more complex than we .realize. Many hypersaline lakes are dominated by the brine shrimp Artemia spp. The production of brine shrimp is...

  17. Isolation and purification of calmodulin from the shrimp, Crangon crangon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, R H; Pipkorn, R; Willig, A; Jaros, P P

    1992-01-01

    Calmodulin was isolated and purified from shrimp abdominal muscle by heat precipitation, ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The purified calmodulin was homogeneous when evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A still remaining contaminant was eliminated by high performance liquid chromatography on a phenyl column. The biological and physicochemical properties of shrimp calmodulin such as amino acid composition, molecular weight and the ability to activate calmodulin-deficient bovine heart phosphodiesterase were compared to those of other invertebrate calmodulins.

  18. Detection of virus in shrimp using digital color correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue; Chavez-Sanchez, Cristina; Bueno-Ibarra, Mario A.

    1999-07-01

    Detection of virus in shrimp tissue using digital color correlation is presented. Phase filters in three channels (red, green and blue) were used in order to detect HPV virus like target. These first results obtained showed that is possible to detect virus in shrimp tissue. More research must be made with color correlation in order to consider natural morphology of the virus, color, scale and rotation and noise in the samples.

  19. Consumer method to control Salmonella and Listeria species in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Genevieve; Janes, Marlene; Lampila, Lucina; Supan, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the current consumer method of boiling shrimp until floating and pink in color is adequate for destroying Listeria and Salmonella. Shrimp samples were submerged in bacterial suspensions of Listeria and Salmonella for 30 min and allowed to air dry for 1 h under a biosafety cabinet. Color parameters were then measured with a spectrophotometer programmed with the CIELAB system. Twenty-four shrimp samples were divided into groups (days 0, 1, or 2) and stored at 4°C. The samples were treated by placing them in boiling water (100°C) on days 0, 1, and 2. The shrimp were immediately removed from the boiling water once they floated to the surface, and color parameters were measured. Bacterial counts were determined, and the log CFU per gram was calculated. The effect of sodium tripolyphosphate on the color change of cooked shrimp also was determined. Initial bacterial counts on shrimp after air drying were 5.31 ± 0.14 log CFU/g for Salmonella Enteritidis, 5.24 ± 0.31 log CFU/g for Salmonella Infantis, 5.40 ± 0.16 log CFU/g for Salmonella Typhimurium, 3.91 + 0.11 log CFU/g for Listeria innocua, 4.45 ± 0.11 log CFU/g for Listeria monocytogenes (1/2a), and 3.70 ± 0.22 log CFU/g for Listeria welshimeri. On days 0, 1, and 2, all bacterial counts were reduced to nondetectable levels for shrimp samples that floated. The average time for shrimp to float was 96 ± 8 s. The bacterial counts remained at nondetectable levels (Listeria and Salmonella contamination, but color change is not a good indication of reduction of these pathogens because of the wide natural color variation.

  20. Bacterial Selection from Shrimp Ponds for Degradation of Organic Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powtongsook, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of ammonia, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide in a shrimp pond is generally caused by incomplete degradation of residual organic matters from overfeeding and from organic wastes released by shrimps. The phenomenon affects shrimp growth and survival rate. The objectives of this investigation were to screen for a bacterial strain able to digest organic residues and to evaluate the changes of residues by bacterial activities under natural conditions. The results from this work showed that the isolated strain, Bacillus cereus S1, had the highest protease activity (57.1 U/ml with the presence of glucoamylase and lipase activities (4.5 and 0.13 U/ml, respectively. Under an aseptic condition in 1-L flasks containing seawater with 0.1% shrimp feed, B. cereus S1 degraded organic matters and significantly reduced chemical oxygen demand (COD (70.8%. An amount of ammonia-nitrogen was increased during the first 5 days of incubation due to the degradation of organic compounds in shrimp feed. However, it declined afterward with nitrate-nitrogen increase and unchanged nitrite nitrogen content. Under natural conditions in 10-L glass jars containing seawater with 0.05% shrimp feed and 0.05% sediment, B. cereus S1 and a commercial bacterial product (Inpicin-G could reduce COD (4.5% and 15.8%, respectively and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD (35.1 and 11.4%, respectively. However, similar changes of ammonia-nitrogen, nitrate-nitrogen and nitrite-nitrogen contents in water samples were observed. The results indicate that this selected bacterium could reduce organic compound accumulations on a laboratory scale. In addition, the strain did not produce any enterotoxins compared to a toxin standard. Therefore, the bacterium, Bacillus cereus S1, could be applied to decrease organic matters accumulated in shrimp pond without any harm to shrimps or consumers.

  1. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haug, Carolin; Ahyong, Shane T.; Wiethase, Joris H.

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps) are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages), alima and erichthus (the latt er two representing later larval stages). These categories, however, do not refl ect the existing morphological...... diversity of stomatopod larvae, which is largely unstudied. We describe here four previously unknown larval types with extreme morphologies. All specimens were found in the collections of the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen and were collected during the Danish Dana Expedition round the world...... 1928–30. These new larval types all represent erichthus-type larvae, especially diff ering in their shield morphologies. Th e shield morphology ranges from almost spherical to rather disc-like, with sometimes extremely elongated spines, but only a general systematic assignment of the larvae...

  2. STRATEGIES FOR DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE AND COMPETITIVE CLUSTER FOR SHRIMP INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas M. Fauzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kampung Vannamei as shrimp cluster is being developed since 2004 by PT CP Prima, tbk Surabaya through Shrimp Culture Health Management transformation technology to several traditional farmers in Gresik, Lamongan, Tuban, and Madura areas. The research objectives aims to identify and mapping of stakeholder, to analyze interaction of stakeholders, to formulate strategy from internal and external environment factors and to set priority on strategy to develop sustainable and competitive shrimp cluster in the Kampung vannamei. Primary data was collected through stakeholders’ discussion forums, questionnaires, and interviews with relevant actors. Observations to the business unit also performed to determine the production and business conditions, particularly in capturing information about the threat and challenges. While the secondary data is used in policy documents national and local area statistics, and relevant literature. Analyses were performed by using the SRI International cluster pyramid, diamond porter’s analysis, SWOT and Matrix TOWS analysis, and analytical hierarchy process. Analyses were performed by the methods discussed in qualitative and descriptive. There are 7 strategies could be implemented to develop sustainable and competitive shrimp cluster. However, it is recommended to implement the strategy base on priority, which the first priority is strategy to improve linkages between businesses in the upstream and downstream industries into multi stakeholders’ platform in shrimp industry.Keywords: Shrimp, Cluster, Competitiveness, Diamond Porter, SWOT Analysis, AHP

  3. Production of giant freshwater prawn postlarvae in penaeid prawn (shrimp) hatchery: An experience

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Chatterji, A.; Sripada, R.A.; Desai, U.M.

    on the experience gained in the pilot scale penaeid prawn (shrimp) hatchery at NIO so that other commercial shrimp hatcheries can also follow the protocols and earn additional revenue from sale of freshwater prawn seed during the monsoon season. Protocols...

  4. ENHANCED ORGANIC MATTER REMINERALIZATION AND NUTRIENT TURNOVER BY POPULATIONS OF BURROWING SHRIMP IN YAQUINA BAY, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowing, or thalassinid, shrimp structure large areas of intertidal habitat of Pacific Northwest estuaries. This field study utilized a combination of anoxic incubations, porewater dialysis peepers, and benthic chambers to quantify the role of burrowing shrimp species on OM dec...

  5. Use of slaughter house waste as a feed for shrimps and prawns

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Royan, J.P.; Krishnakumari, L.

    Feeding experiments with some shrimps and fishes (Metapenaeus monoceros, Metapenaeus dobsoni, Sarotherodon mossambicus and Etroplus suratensis) using slaughter house waste as food, showed that the shrimps and arotherodon were able to utilize...

  6. Economic Data Collection for Gulf of Mexico South Atlantic Shrimp Fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Economic Survey of Federal Gulf and Atlantic Shrimp Permit Holders collects data about operating expenses and costs of owning and maintaining shrimp...

  7. Simulating environmental effects on brown shrimp production in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) are a commercially important fishery species of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Young shrimp settle in estuarine salt marsh...

  8. Chronic toxicity of arsenic to the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Kevin V; Cardwell, Rick D; Adams, William J

    2003-02-01

    We determined the chronic toxicity of arsenic (sodium arsenate) to the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana. Chronic toxicity was determined by measuring the adverse effects of arsenic on brine shrimp growth, survival, and reproduction under intermittent flow-through conditions. The study commenced with shrimp growth rather than an arsenic effect. This study represents one of the few full life cycle toxicity tests conducted with brine shrimp.

  9. IMPROVED PRODUCTION OF TIGER SHRIMP (Penaeus monodon THROUGH PROBIOTICS APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irsyaphiani Insan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in Brebes District, the North coast of Java. Tiger shrimp farming in Indonesia, particularly in this area faced some problems which caused by improper pond preparation, disease, and low seed quality. Probiotic was applied in pond to solve this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of tiger shrimp in ponds with probiotic applications. Six experimental ponds (each measuring 0.5 ha were selected of which three were probiotic ponds and three were controlled. Tiger shrimp postlarvae (PL-30 were stocked at density of four shrimps/m2. Tiger shrimps were reared for three months. Shrimps were fed by commercial pellet. In the first month, shrimp were fed about 7%-5% of the total biomass; in the second months, 3.5%-3% of the total biomass; and in the third month, 2.5%-2% of the total biomass. The treatments in this study were the application of probiotics with concentration of 3 mg/L that were given every five days and control (without probiotics. The results showed the rearing period was 92 ± 6 days in probiotic ponds and 76 ± 16 days in controlled pond. The shrimp in controlled pond should be harvest earlier caused by the high mortality. The average final weight was 16.2 ± 0.7 g in probiotic pond and 15.6 ± 1.9 g in controlled pond. The survival rate was 64.13 ± 12.63% in probiotic pond and 44.17 ± 14.15% in controlled pond. Production was 208 ± 46 kg/pond/cycle in probiotic pond and 123 ± 6 kg/pond/cycle in controlled pond. The result showed that probiotic plays an important role in maintaining water quality parameters and health management as well as increases the survival of shrimp.

  10. Effect of eyestalk ablation on moulting and growth in the penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius, 1798)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkitaraman, P.R.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Balasubramanian, T.

    % of that of the lower size group regardless of level of ablation. The UEA shrimps exhibited better protein efficiency ratio. The production rate of UEA shrimps were two to three times more than that of the control, whereas BEA shrimps showed comparatively low production...

  11. Strong population genetic structure and larval dispersal capability of the burrowing ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The burrowing ghost shrimp, Neotrypaea californiensis, is a vital member of the estuarine benthic community. Dense populations of shrimp are found in the major estuaries of Washington and Oregon. Our study determines the genetic structure of shrimp populations in order to gain ...

  12. Global and local governance of shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Thu, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Mekong Delta is one of seven ecological regions in Vietnam where aquaculture and shrimp products are internationally traded and the shrimp farmers are firmly embedded in a global system of production and trade. The growth of shrimp aquaculture, in addition to population growth and higher levels

  13. Management options for brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) fisheries in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, J.; Kooten, van T.; Wolfshaar, van de K.E.; Trapman, B.K.; Reijden, van der K.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fisheries targeting brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) in the North Sea in European waters are largely unregulated in terms of landings and effort. A license system exists, but this did not prevent the current situation of overcapacity of the shrimp fleet. The governments of the North Sea brown shrimp

  14. 75 FR 57501 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam AGENCY: United States... orders on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam. SUMMARY: The... orders on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam would be likely to...

  15. 75 FR 48724 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam AGENCY: United States... orders on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam. SUMMARY: The... orders on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam would be likely to...

  16. 75 FR 1078 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... (Review)] Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam AGENCY: United States... on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam. SUMMARY: The Commission... warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  17. The effects of boiling on the allergenic properties of tropomyosin of shrimp (litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimp play an important role in human nutrition, and is responsible for severe hypersensitivity reactions. The thermal stability of raw and boiled shrimp tropomyosins (TM) has never been reported. The aims of the study were to compare the stability of raw and boiled shrimp TM of Litopenaeus vanname...

  18. Livelihood Capabilities and Pathways of Shrimp Farmers in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Phung Ha, Ha; Dijk, van J.W.M.; Bosma, R.H.; Sinh, L.X.

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is a major livelihood activity in the Mekong Delta in the southernmost part of Vietnam. The Vietnamese government has promoted shrimp farming as a way to reduce poverty, provide employment opportunities and increase exports to support economic development. The shrimp farming system,

  19. Transmission of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) from Dendronereis spp. (Peters) (Nereididae) to penaeid shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haryadi, D.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Vlak, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Dendronereis spp. (Peters) (Nereididae) is a common polychaete in shrimp ponds built on intertidal land and is natural food for shrimp in traditionally managed ponds in Indonesia. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), an important viral pathogen of the shrimp, can replicate in this polychaete (Desrina

  20. 75 FR 52718 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... warmwater shrimp and prawns, whether wild-caught (ocean harvested) or farm-raised (produced by aquaculture...), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian white prawn... Tube From Mexico, 74 FR 41681, 41682 (Aug., 18, 2009). This cash deposit requirement shall remain in...

  1. 76 FR 20318 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Initiation and Preliminary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... warmwater shrimp and prawns, whether wild-caught (ocean harvested) or farm-raised (produced by aquaculture... schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris), western white shrimp (Penaeus occidentalis), and Indian... Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico, 75 FR 67685 (November 3...

  2. Shrimp quality and safety management along the supply chain in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabade, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This thesis focuses on quality and safety management of tropical shrimp (Penaeus spp.) using Benin (West Africa) as an example of a shrimp exporting country. The entire supply chain, from fishing areas (brackish waters) to shrimp processing plants, was investigated. The

  3. 78 FR 40436 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Mandatory Shrimp Vessel and Gear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... Shrimp Vessel and Gear Characterization Survey AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... Shrimp Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The regulations for the Gulf Shrimp Vessel and Gear... Gear Characterization Form. The form will be provided by NMFS at the time of permit application and...

  4. Antibiotic contaminants in coastal wetlands from Vietnamese shrimp farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy, Hoang Thi Thanh; Nga, Le Phi; Loan, Tu Thi Cam

    2011-07-01

    Shrimp culture has been expanded rapidly in recent years in coastal wetland zone of Vietnam due to favorable natural conditions. However, this industry has caused several negative impacts to the environment. One of the critical issues is the excessive application of antibiotics including human medicines. These chemicals could be released from shrimp ponds and then accumulated and contaminated of the ecosystem. This review article discusses a whole range of findings that address various aspects of the usage, occurrence and potentially environmental risks of antibiotics released from shrimp farming, with emphasis on the South Vietnam coastal wetland. The published information on the usage and occurrence of antibiotics in Vietnamese shrimp farming has been reviewed. A global comparison was also carried out. This follows by a brief overview of the transport and fate of these antibiotics in the environment. Several antibiotics commonly used in Vietnamese shrimp culture have been detected in wastewater and sediment of the ponds, as well as in surrounding coastal wetlands, resulting in the existence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. However, their transport and fate could not be clearly defined. The well-documented accumulation of antibiotics in mud and sediments in Vietnamese coastal wetlands potentially poses serious risks for the local wetland ecosystems. Thus, research on the transport and fate of antibiotics' residues from the ponds into the surrounding environment is urgently needed.

  5. Current status of viral diseases in Indian shrimp aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandel, G M; John, K Riji; Rosalind George, M; Prince Jeyaseelan, M J

    The intensification of aquaculture has been unique in showing the overwhelming changes in global food production in the last 100 years. Presently, it is playing a vital role in the economies of several countries. Conversely, it is also to be noted that the progression of aquaculture has been the foundation of anthropogenic alteration of a gigantic hierarchy and hence not astonishingly, it resulted in spread and emergence of an increasing group of new unknown diseases. In India, Penaeus monodon, black tiger shrimp was previously the foremost-cultivated shrimp species. Subsequently in 2008, the American white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei has effectively replaced it. The change in dominant species has affected disease concerns in India as well as in world shrimp aquaculture. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most deleterious for both species. Hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV), Monodon baculovirus (MBV) and Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) are the other significant infectious agents of P. monodon and L. vannamei. An emerging disease of loose shell syndrome (LSS) was already reported from India during late 1998. A more recent disease of L. vannamei in India is monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS), a component of which seems to be Laem-Singh virus (LSNV). Thus, most of the information in this review relates to new emerging pathogens that threaten the cultivation shrimp industry in India.

  6. Brine shrimp cytotoxic activities of Hippophae rhamnoides Linn leaves extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Ali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate brine shrimp lethality assay of solvent extracts (aqueous, methanol, ethanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, chloroform and n-hexane of Hippophae rhamnoides (H. rhamnoides leaves. Methods: Brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay was used to assess the cytotoxic potential of H. rhamnoides leaves extracts. Three vials for concentration of each extract were made and 10 shrimps per vial (30 shrimps per dilution were transferred to specific concentration of each extract. Results: The mortality of aqueous extract was 46.7%, methanol extract was 46.7%, ethanolic extract was 50.0%, ethyl acetate was 26.7%, acetone extract was 33.3%, chloroform extract was 40.0% and n-hexane extract was 33.3%. The lowest LD50 was found in methanol extracts (1199.97 µg/mL. Brine shrimp cytotoxicity of tested extracts of H. rhamnoides showed that mortality rate was concentration dependent. Conclusions: It is concluded that bioactive components are present in all leaves extracts of H. rhamnoides, which could be accounted for its pharmacological effects. Thus, the results support the uses of this plant species in traditional medicine.

  7. Bioaccumulation of animal adenoviruses in the pink shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B. Luz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are among the most promising viral markers of fecal contamination. They are frequently found in the water, sediment and soil of regions impacted by human activity. Studies of the bioaccumulation of enteric viruses in shrimp are scarce. The cities located in the northern coast of the lake systems in Southern Brazil have high urbanization and intensive farming rates, and poor sewage collection and treatment. One hundred (n = 100 Farfantepenaeus paulensis pink-shrimp specimens and 48 water samples were collected from coastal lagoons between June 2012 and May 2013. Water samples were concentrated and the shrimp, mashed. After DNA extraction, samples were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in order to detect and quantify viral genomes. Thirty-five percent of shrimp samples were positive for contamination, predominantly by avian adenoviruses. A total of 91.7% of water samples contained adenoviruses DNA, with the human form being the most frequent. Our results provided evidence of significant bioaccumulation of adenoviruses in shrimp, showing the extent of the impact of fecal pollution on aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Interactions between invasive crayfish and native river shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banha F.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the south of Portugal there are only two species of strictly freshwater decapods: the native freshwater shrimp Atyaephyra desmarestii and the exotic crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The aim of this study is to understand if the exotic crayfish acts as river shrimp predator and if both species share the same type of microhabitat. We performed laboratory experiments to study predation and conducted field work in the river Sorraia to verify the microhabitat distribution of both species. Laboratory experiments demonstrated significant predation on river shrimp for crayfish with a cephalothorax length (CT over 24 mm. The average daily consumption increases with crayfish CT to a maximum of 0.8 shrimps at 44 mm. Field work confirmed that both species share the same microhabitats although with small differences e.g. on the water quality variables such as conductivity and the percentage of oxygen saturation. These microhabitats are shallow pools with abundant aquatic vegetation with no preference for the type of substrate. In the field, both crayfish density and its cephalothorax length are negatively correlated with shrimp densities. In conclusion, P. clarkii can predate A. desmarestii and the major impacts are expected at high densities of large sized crayfish.

  9. Shrimp cephalothorax meal in laying hen diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Salas-Durán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to meassure the effect of shrimp meal (SM in commercial laying hen diets. From April to September 2013, in Costa Rica, Pleuroncodes planipes was used to obtain a meal (SM with a yield of 15%, particle size of 256 μg and negative for Salmonella sp. Proximate analysis was performed to the SM: crude protein (40.67%, ether extract (11.05%, crude fiber (7.12%, ash (27.48%, calcium (9.03%, phosphorus (2.66%, amino acid profile, pepsin digestibility (84% and acidity (8.34. Subsequently, a trial was performed with 140 40-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens, fed with four different diets containing increasing levels of inclusion of SM (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% during four weeks; and formulated according to the ideal protein and digestible amino acids concepts; being isocaloric and isoproteic. The variables experimentally evaluated were: production percentage, feed intake, body weight, mortality, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. Only egg weight changed significantly between treatments in the third week (p<0.05. The hens fed with 5% SM laid heavier eggs. It is suggested to evaluate a level of SM inclusion up to 15% in laying hens diets.

  10. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Haug

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages, alima and erichthus (the latter two representing later larval stages. These categories, however, do not reflect the existing morphological diversity of stomatopod larvae, which is largely unstudied. We describe here four previously unknown larval types with extreme morphologies. All specimens were found in the collections of the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen and were collected during the Danish Dana Expedition round the world 1928-30. These new larval types all represent erichthus-type larvae, especially differing in their shield morphologies. The shield morphology ranges from almost spherical to rather disc-like, with sometimes extremely elongated spines, but only a general systematic assignment of the larvae was possible. Further investigations of these larvae are crucial to understand their life habits and ecological impact, especially as stomatopod and other crustacean larvae might have a much more important position in the marine ecosystems than their corresponding adults.

  11. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, James R.; Walker, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change.

  12. Identification of burrowing shrimp food sources along an estuarine gradient using fatty acid analysis and stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of burrowing shrimps occur in high densities in U.S. West Coast estuaries, the ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis) and the blue mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis). Both species of shrimp are considered ecosystem engineers as they bioturbate and irrigate extensive galleries in the sed...

  13. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J.; Mautner, M. N.; Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  14. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)]. E-mail: j.kennedy@gns.cri.nz; Mautner, M.N. [Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University (New Zealand) and Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8001 (New Zealand)]. E-mail: m.mautner@solis1.com; Barry, B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Markwitz, A. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2007-07-15

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of penaeid shrimps inferred from two mitochondrial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloch, Carolina M; Freire, Pablo R; Russo, Claudia A M

    2005-12-30

    Penaeid shrimps are an important resource in crustacean fisheries, representing more than the half of the gross production of shrimp worldwide. In the present study, we used a sample of wide-ranging diversity (41 shrimp species) and two mitochondrial markers (758 bp) to clarify the evolutionary relationships among Penaeidae genera. Three different methodologies of tree reconstruction were employed in the study: maximum likelihood, neighbor joining and Bayesian analysis. Our results suggest that the old Penaeus genus is monophyletic and that the inclusion of the Solenocera genus within the Penaeidae family remains uncertain. With respect to Metapenaeopsis monophyly, species of this genus appeared clustered, but with a nonsignificant bootstrap value. These results elucidate some features of the unclear evolution of Penaeidae and may contribute to the taxonomic characterization of this family.

  16. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelon van de Kerk

    Full Text Available Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp.

  17. PERFORMANCES OF TIGER SHRIMP CULTURE IN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PONDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove ecosystem plays an obvious role in maintaining the biological balance in the coastal environment where shrimp ponds are usually constructed. The removal of mangroves around shrimp ponds has frequently brought about harvest failure. The study evaluated the performance of tiger shrimp culture in ponds provided with water from a water body where there was mangrove vegetation (hereafter mangrove reservoir. Twelve ponds, each measuring 2,500 m2, were filled with seawater from the mangrove reservoir until the water depth of 100 cm and then stocked with 20-40 PL/m2. In the first six ponds, the bottom water was released into the reservoir when the water depth reached 140 cm and then the water depth was maintained at 100 cm. In the second six ponds, the water was released from the ponds until the water depth reached 60 cm and then refilled with reservoir water until a depth of 100 cm. Both treatment ponds received water from the reservoir which also received the wastewater. The feeds for the shrimps were broadcast into the ponds twice a day to meet the 3% shrimp biomass requirement, which adjusted every other week through sampling. The result showed that mangrove  vegetation is capable of removing excessive nutrients, up to 70% for NO3- N and NH4 +-N, reducing PO4 =-P fluctuation, and producing bioactive  compounds. In the second treatment ponds, shrimp mortality started to occur in day 28 and most died by day 54 after stocking due to white spot disease outbreak. Mass mortality took place 54 days after stocking in two out of six of the first treatment ponds.

  18. Rice and shrimp farming in the Xuan Thuy National Park: sustainable and unsustainable practices

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Thi Trang Nhung; Lebailly, Philippe; Tran Huu, Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural and aquaculture patterns in Xuan Thuy National Park mainly consists of rice planting and shrimp aquaculture (intensive and semi-intensive). Currently, there are about 11,899 rice households covering 1,873.07 ha, 215 semi-intensive shrimp households occupying 1,730.7 ha and 40 intensive households amounting to 90 ha in the Ramsar site. The local farmers produce 14,411 ton of rice, 450 ton of intensive shrimp and 516 tonof semi-intensive shrimp. Thus, rice and shrimp contribute sig...

  19. On tidal migration in the shrimp Crangon crangon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, G. M.; Kuipers, B. R.

    The length-frequency distribution of the shrimp population in the tidal flat area Balgzand in the western Wadden Sea shows a spatial separation between the adult shrimps, that inhibit the subtidal, and the juveniles (< 2.5 cm) that are restricted to the tidal zone. Observations in the tidal channel through the tides indicate that the juvenile population does not show migration of any importance from the tidal zone during ebb. Samples on the emerged flats during LW proof the presence of these juveniles in about the same densities as observed during HW.

  20. Emerging viral diseases of fish and shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter J; Winton, James R

    2010-01-01

    The rise of aquaculture has been one of the most profound changes in global food production of the past 100 years. Driven by population growth, rising demand for seafood and a levelling of production from capture fisheries, the practice of farming aquatic animals has expanded rapidly to become a major global industry. Aquaculture is now integral to the economies of many countries. It has provided employment and been a major driver of socio-economic development in poor rural and coastal communities, particularly in Asia, and has relieved pressure on the sustainability of the natural harvest from our rivers, lakes and oceans. However, the rapid growth of aquaculture has also been the source of anthropogenic change on a massive scale. Aquatic animals have been displaced from their natural environment, cultured in high density, exposed to environmental stress, provided artificial or unnatural feeds, and a prolific global trade has developed in both live aquatic animals and their products. At the same time, over-exploitation of fisheries and anthropogenic stress on aquatic ecosystems has placed pressure on wild fish populations. Not surprisingly, the consequence has been the emergence and spread of an increasing array of new diseases. This review examines the rise and characteristics of aquaculture, the major viral pathogens of fish and shrimp and their impacts, and the particular characteristics of disease emergence in an aquatic, rather than terrestrial, context. It also considers the potential for future disease emergence in aquatic animals as aquaculture continues to expand and faces the challenges presented by climate change. © INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010.

  1. A feasibility study of gamma irradiation on Thailand frozen shrimps ( PENEAUS MONODON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, M. L.; Charbonneau, R.; Jobin, M.; Thibault, C.; Nouchpramool, K.; Charoen, S.; Gagnon, M.

    1995-02-01

    Two lots of frozen precooked shrimps from Thaïland "PENAEUS MONODON" Black tiger variety were irradiated at 1.8 to 3.6 kGy. This way, it was hoped to compare the effects of gamma irradiation on the microbiological quality and the organoleptic properties of frozen precooked shrimps after transportation from Thailand to Canada. The results indicated that the extension of shelf-life based on mesophiles content was from 33 days for the control to more than 47 days for the irradiated shrimps stored at 3 ± 1 °C. The results of sensory evaluation gave slightly fresher odor for the control than the irradiated shrimps. On day one, this effect was more apparent. The results of hedonic tests showed that the irradiated shrimps were acceptable during storage. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that the combined treatments (freezing plus irradiation) of precooked shrimps are useful for increasing the storage life of shrimps without affecting consumer acceptability.

  2. Comparing fish bycatch of shrimp trawlers with catches made by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparing fish bycatch of shrimp trawlers with catches made by artisanal fishers in Malindi-Ungwana Bay, Kenya. Cosmas N Munga, Stephen N Mwangi, Harrison Ong'anda, Renison K Ruwa, Julius Manyala, Johan C Groeneveld, Edward N Kimani, Ann Vanreusel ...

  3. Authenticating the Origin of Different Shrimp Products on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and reliable PCR method using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with three restriction enzymes (HpyCH4III/ MboI / AluI) was optimized for unambiguous differentiation of shrimp from 19 commercial market samples (raw and processed products). Results showed that the restriction fragment length ...

  4. Primary Carbon Sources for juvenile Penaeid Shrimps in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract— A study to estimate the relative importance of mangrove primary carbon and nitrogen sources to five commercial penaeid shrimps species was done at Saco da lnhaca, a non-estuarine mangrove-fringed bay on lnhaca Island, southern Mozambique. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a ...

  5. SHORT COMMUNICATION Antimicrobial and brine shrimp activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lmboera

    plants is significant, given the amount of poverty that exists among these remotely located communities. The current study, therefore, aims to demonstrate presence of antimicrobial activity in root extracts which has not been reported before and in addition through the brine shrimp test to obtain preliminary indication of safety ...

  6. 78 FR 9024 - Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp Trawling Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 223 RIN 0648-BC10 Sea Turtle Conservation... Statement (DEIS) to Reduce Incidental Bycatch and Mortality of Sea Turtles in the Southeastern U.S. Shrimp... elevated sea turtle strandings in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, particularly throughout the Mississippi...

  7. Histological characterization of peppermint shrimp ( Lysmata wurdemanni) androgenic gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Dong; Lin, Tingting

    2017-12-01

    The androgenic gland (AG) is an important endocrine gland for male reproductive function in crustaceans. In the present study, we investigated the histological characteristics of the androgenic gland of peppermint shrimp, Lysmata wurdemanni. The peppermint shrimp matures as male first, then some individuals may become euhermaphrodite after several moltings (transitional phase). Euhermaphrodite-phase shrimp acts as male at intermolts. However, it can be fertilized as a female immediately after molting. Considering the male reproductive function acts in its lifespan except for at larval stages, and female reproductive system starts to develop at transitional phase, we hypothesized that AG activity might be reduced to allow and promote vitellogenesis onset in early transitional phase and the following euhermaphrodite phase. So AG cell structure might be different in three phases in L. wurdemanni. The results showed that AG exists in the male in transitional and euhermaphrodite phases. The gland cell clusters surrounding the ejaculatory ducts locate at the roots of the fifth pereopods. The nucleus diameters are similar in the three phases while the nucleus- to-cell ratio is the lowest in euhermaphrodite phase. Our results indicated that for the individuals that will become euhermaphrodite, the cellular structure of AG changes since transitional phase. Male reproductive function which is still available in euhermaphrodite-phase shrimp should be due to the existence of the gland.

  8. Short Communications Collections of freshwater shrimps along the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-03-13

    Mar 13, 1987 ... Shrimps and prawns of the world. An annotated catalogue of species of interest to fisheries. FAD. Fisheries Synopsis No. 125 (FJR/S125) 1: 1-271. JOHNSON, D.S. 1973. Notes on some species of the genus. Macrobrachium (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Palaemonidae). J. Singapore National Acad. Sci.

  9. Fishing methods for sustainable shrimp fisheries in the Canary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the past 20 years, experimental cruises have been conducted around the Canary Islands (North-West Africa) to investigate the biodiversity of the deep-sea ecosystem and to explore new fisheries resources. Although pandalid shrimps were shown to be very abundant in this region, information is lacking regarding ...

  10. Chitosan from shrimp shell ( Crangon crangon ) and fish scales ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chitosan is a naturally available biopolymer. It has been prepared by alkaline N deacetylation process of shrimp (Crangon crangon) chitin and fish (Labeorohita) chitin. The physico-chemical properties such as the degree of deacetylation (DD), solubility, water binding capacity, fat binding capacity and chitosan yield have ...

  11. Scenarios for Resilient Shrimp Aquaculture in Tropical Coastal Areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, S.R.; Zwieten, van P.A.M.; Visser, L.E.; Dijk, van H.; Bosma, R.H.; Boer, de W.F.; Verdegem, M.C.J.

    2010-01-01

    We contend there are currently two competing scenarios for the sustainable development of shrimp aquaculture in coastal areas of Southeast Asia. First, a landscape approach, where farming techniques for small-scale producers are integrated into intertidal areas in a way that the ecological functions

  12. Haemocytic defence in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, van de K.

    2002-01-01

    Tropical shrimp culture is one of the fastest growing aquaculture sectors in the world. Since this production sector is highly affected by infectious pathogens, disease control is nowadays a priority. Effective prevention methods can be developed more efficiently when quantitative assays

  13. Brine Shrimp and Their Habitat, An Environmental Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This environmental unit is one of a series designed for integration within the existing curriculum. The unit is self-contained and students are encouraged to work at their own speed. The philosophy of the unit is based on an experience-oriented process that encourages independent student work. This unit explores the life cycle of brine shrimp and…

  14. Distribution and biology of Indo-Pacific insular hypogeal shrimps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciolek, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Ten species of caridean shrimps, representing nine genera in five families, have been found in exposures of the marine water table at 28 islands from Hawaii to the western Indian Ocean. Synthesis of literature information and personal observations indicate that, as a group, these shrimps are characterized by red body pigment, reduced but pigmented eyes, euryhalinity, a proclivity for interstitial seawater in limestone or lava rock, generalized food requirements, and probable pre-Pleistocene origins. The shrimps have not been found in waters cooler than about 20°C.Species are often solitary, but as many as five are known to coexist. Six of the species have widely scattered populations, some as far apart as Hawaii and the Red Sea. Passive oceanic dispersal is endorsed as a general explanation for such apparently disjunct distributions. On the basis of an assumed primary habitat requirement of interstitial marine water, which could include that in shallow submerged rock as well as that in emergent (insular) rock, I hypothesize a much more cosmopolitan distribution of these shrimps in the Indo-Pacific Tropical Zone.

  15. Physicochemical Characterization of Biopolymer Chitosan Extracted from Shrimp Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezamaddin Mengelizadeh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a deacetylated derivative of chitin, which is a naturally abundant mucopolysaccharide, supporting the matter of crustaceans, insects, and fungi. Because of its unique properties, such as non-toxicity, biodegradability, and biocompatibility, chitosan has a wide range of applications in various fields. The objective of the present work is to extract the polymer chitosan from Persian Gulf shrimp shells. In order to determine the physicochemical characteristics of the extracted chitosan, degree of deacetylation, molecular weight, water and fat binding capacities extraction rate, and apparent viscosity were measured using a variety of techniques including viscometry, weight measurement method and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The results of the study of the physicochemical properties, molecular weight (6.7×105 Da, degree of deacetylation (57%, ash content as well as yield (0.5% of the prepared chitosan indicated that shrimp processing wastes (shrimp shells are a good source of chitosan. The water binding capacity (521% and fat binding capacity (327% of the prepared chitosan are in good agreement with the other studies. The elemental analysis showed the C, H and N contents of 35.92%, 7.02%, and 8.66%, respectively. In this study, the antimicrobial activity of chitosan was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The results indicated the high potential of chitosan as an antibacterial agent. Moreover, the results of the study indicated that shrimp shells are a rich source of chitin as 25.21% of the shell’s dry weight.

  16. On the vaccination of shrimp against white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveldt, J.

    2006-01-01

    More than a decade after its discovery inSouth-East Asia, White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is still the most important (viral) pathogen in the shrimp culture industry. Despite the shift from culturingPenaeusmonodon

  17. Brine shrimp lethality and antimicrobial studies on the seeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garcinia kola (Family, Guttiferae) is employed in a variety of therapies ranging from skin, gastrointestinal, chest to tumour problems. Preparations of the stem and roots are used as antitumour in traditional medicine but the potential of the seeds as antitumour had not yet been investigated hence the brine-shrimp lethality and ...

  18. Talking about Brine Shrimps: Three Ways of Analysing Pupil Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Reiss, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Applies three distinct analyses to recorded and transcribed student conversations (n=240) about brine shrimps. The complementary analytic methods provide information on the content of pupils' conversations in terms of the observations made, the ways in which pupils make sense of their observations, and the ways in which students use conversation…

  19. Brine Shrimp Toxicity Evaluation Of Some Tanzanian Plants Used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plants which are used by traditional healers in Tanzania have been evaluated to obtain preliminary data of their toxicity using the brine shrimps test. The results indicate that 9 out of 44 plant species whose extracts were tested exhibited high toxicity with LC50 values below 20μg/ml. These include Aloe lateritia Engl.

  20. Multilevel analysis of elastic morphology: The mantis shrimp's spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, M V; Patek, S N

    2015-09-01

    Spring systems, whether natural or engineered, are composed of compliant and rigid regions. Biological springs are often similar to monolithic structures that distribute compliance and rigidity across the whole system. For example, to confer different amounts of compliance in distinct regions within a single structure, biological systems typically vary regional morphology through thickening or elongation. Here, we analyze the monolithic spring in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) raptorial appendages to rapidly acquire or process prey. We quantified the shape of cross-sections of the merus segment of the raptorial appendage. We also examined specific regions of the merus that are hypothesized to either store elastic energy or provide structural support to permit energy storage in other regions of the system. We found that while all mantis shrimp contain thicker ventral bars in distal cross-sections, differences in thickness are more pronounced in high-impact "smasher" mantis shrimp than in the slower-striking "spearer" mantis shrimp. We also found that spearer cross-sections are more circular while those of smashers are more eccentric with elongation along the dorso-ventral axis. The results suggest that the regional thickening of ventral bars provides structural support for resisting spring compression and also reduces flexural stiffness along the system's long axis. This multilevel morphological analysis offers a foundation for understanding the evolution and mechanics of monolithic systems in biology. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genetic diversity of intensive cultured and wild tiger shrimp Penaeus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inbreeding as negative factor perhaps promote a significant increase of the genetic similarity of the captive populations, consequently leading to greater disease susceptibility and impairment of both the growth and final size of the shrimps. Therefore evaluating genetic diversity and inbreeding required for improvement of ...

  2. Lunar Cycles, Catchability of Penaeid Shrimps and Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. latisulcatus manifested significant variations in night-time CPUE during the lunar cycle, with full moons yielding the lowest catches. This is thought to be caused by the burrowing behaviour of this nocturnal shrimp which decreases its catchability. The benefits of fishery closure during full moons and from June to the end of ...

  3. DIAGNOSIS OF SHRIMP TRAWLING IN THE STATE OF PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Rangel Andrade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With a technical approach, this diagnosis aims to fill a gap in the overview of the activity, considering its technical aspects that manage the fishing effort of shrimping of Penambuco. From October 2013 to August 2014, the fishing grounds were identified used in this activity, as well as the fishing method, the number of boats and fishermen acting, type of boat and gears used. Analyses were performed with the major communities operating in this fishery (Recife, Jaboatão dos Guararapes, Barra de Sirinhaém and São Jose da Coroa Grande. The analyzes of the catch were tested using one-way ANOVA (α 5%. They observed two traditional types: the beach seining and trawing. It was cataloged about 50 vessels in the activity, with approximately 100 fishermen. They are caught mainly three types of shrimp: pink (Farfantepenaeus spp., Seabob (Xiphopenaeus kroyeri and white (Lithopenaeus schmitii. Statistical data concentrated in the metropolitan area of Recife and Barra de Sirinhaém. There seems to be a direct relationship rainfall with shrimp production because with increased rainfall, there is a higher volume of landing fishery. Barra de Sirinhaém is the main area used in the State. Keywords: ‘mangote’; trawling fishing; pink shrimp; Farfantepenaeus spp.

  4. Emerging and potential technologies for facilitating shrimp peeling: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Tem Thi; Gringer, Nina; Jessen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    Ready-to-eat shrimp processing is challenging due to the complex biological design with the shell tightly connected to the meat. Several techniques have been developed to weaken or loosen this connection, thus facilitating the subsequent peeling. The loosening process is typically undertaken by m...

  5. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-16

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low.

  6. Absorption and retention of selenium from shrimps in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugel, S. H.; Sandstrom, B.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the bioavailability of selenium in shrimps, a possible good source of selenium, by measurements of the absorption and retention of selenium and the effects on plasma selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Twelve healthy young subjects (9F...... of the study, after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The selenium intake increased from 39.4 +/- 15.3 mug/d to 127 +/- 5.5 mug/d with the addition of shrimps. The apparent absorption of selenium from shrimps was 83 +/- 4%, Faecal and urinary selenium excretion was 32.5 +/- 17.0 mug/d and 21.2 +/- 9.0 mug/d, re spectively...... and the total retention of selenium was 3.1 +/- 1.1 mg. Plasma selenium concentrations were 95.2 +/- 9.7 mug/L and 101.5 +/- 9.7 mug/L before and after six weeks of shrimp intake, respectively (p...

  7. Mouse model in food allergy: dynamic determination of shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the method could continuously reflect the variation of allergic symptom and actualize dynamic determination of shrimp allergenicity. Furthermore, it is feasible, sensitive and repeatable. The approach will provide some valuable reference for identifying allergenicity of novel food proteins by using animal model in the future.

  8. Characterization of myosin light chain in shrimp hemocytic phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2010-11-01

    Myosin light chain, a well-known cytoskeleton gene, regulates multiple processes that are involved in material transport, muscle shrink and cell division. However, its function in phagocytosis against invading pathogens in crustacean remains unknown. In this investigation, a myosin light chain gene was obtained from Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp. The full-length cDNA of this gene was of 766 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 462 bp encoding a polypeptide of 153 amino acids. The myosin light chain protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Subsequently the specific antibody was raised using the purified GST fusion protein. As revealed by immuno-electron microscopy, the myosin light chain protein was only expressed in the dark bands of muscle. In the present study, the myosin light chain gene was up-regulated in the WSSV-resistant shrimp as revealed by real-time PCR and western blot. And the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index using FITC-labeled Vibrio parahemolyticus were remarkably increased in the WSSV-resistant shrimp, suggesting that the myosin light chain protein was essential in hemocytic phagocytosis. On the other hand, RNAi assays indicated that the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index were significantly decreased when the myosin light chain gene was silenced by sequence-specific siRNA. These findings suggested that myosin light chain protein was involved in the regulation of hemocytic phagocytosis of shrimp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brine Shrimp Lethality of Alkaloids from Croton sylvaticus Hoechst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Euphorbiaceae) and evaluated for their brine shrimp lethality. Julocrotine, a glutarimide alkaloid, was very toxic in vitro with a LC50 (95% confidence interval) value of 0.074 (0.052-0.105) μg/ml. Lupeol and penduliflaworosin were not toxic. The structures ...

  10. Reducing discards in Shrimp fisheries with the Letterbox

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergen, J.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Leijzer, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    Two gear adjustments for reducing discards in brown shrimp fisheries were compared; the sievenet and the letterbox. Sievenets are already used in the Netherlands since 2002 and are cone-shaped nets inserted into standard trawls, which direct unwanted by-catch to an escape hole in the body of the

  11. Juvenile Penaeid Shrimp Density, Spatial Distribution and Size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of habitat characteristics (mangrove creek, sandflat, mudflat and seagrass meadow) water salinity, temperature, and depth on the density, spatial distribution and size distribution of juveniles of five commercially important penaied shrimp species (Metapenaus monoceros, M. stebbingi, Fenneropenaeus indicus, ...

  12. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, including 150 marine, 150 farmed shrimps were selected duringSeptember 2013 to December 2014. Isolation and identification of S. aureus from isolated sampleswere carried out according to conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test wasperformed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method.Results: The results of this study showed that 30% of marine and 20% off armed shrimps werecontaminated with S. aureus. The highest resistance was observed with penicillin and ampicillin,whereas 100% were sensitive to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin.Conclusions: Due to relatively high contamination of shrimp by S. aureus more attention shouldbe given during processing and manufacturing.

  13. Population Structure and Recruitment of Penaeid Shrimps from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eds.). Relatorio Anual. 2004, Maputo, Mozambique. pp 7-9. Palha de Sousa, L., Brito, A., Abdula, S., & Caputi, N. (2006) Research assessment for the management of the industrial shallow-water multi-species shrimp fishery in Sofala Bank in ...

  14. adoption of improved aquaculture practices by shrimp farmers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Adesope

    Even though India is having such a huge potential brackish water area, only 13 per cent (1,56,500 ha) is developed till March 2003. Maharashtra is gifted with 80,000 ha total brackish water area out of which 14,455 ha is suitable for aquaculture and 871 ha is developed for shrimp culture. The south konkan region is blessed.

  15. Shrimp Waste Meal Supplementation Of Cassava Products Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the objective of investigating shrimp waste (SWM) and cassava leaf (CLM) meals as cheap alternatives and protein source mixtures that would best complement cassava root-soybean ration in total replacement for maize in broiler diets, six iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous diets were evaluated using two weeks old ...

  16. Genetic diversity and historical demography of kuruma shrimp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two varieties (I and II) of kuruma shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) were found in the north of South China Sea (SCS) and Taiwan Strait (TS). To estimate the demographic history and genetic diversity of this species complex off China, 141 individuals were collected from the East China Sea (ECS), TS and SCS and 27 variety 2 ...

  17. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, including 150 marine, 150 farmed shrimps were selected duringSeptember 2013 to December 2013. Isolation and identification of S. aureus from isolated sampleswere carried out according to conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test wasperformed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methodResults: The results of this study showed that 30% of marine and 20% off armed shrimps werecontaminated with S. aureus. The highest resistance was observed with penicillin and ampicillin,whereas 100% were sensitive to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin.Conclusions: Due to relatively high contamination of shrimp by S. aureus more attention shouldbe given during processing and manufacturing.

  18. Insecticidal, brine shrimp cytotoxicity, antifungal and nitric oxide free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The crude methanolic extract and various fractions derived from the aerial parts of Myrsine africana were screened in vitro for possible insecticidal, antifungal, brine shrimp lethality and nitric oxide free radical scavenging activities. Low insecticidal activity (20 %) was shown by chloroform (CHCl3) and aqueous fractions ...

  19. Antioxidant, icthyotoxicity and brine shrimp lethality tests of Magonia glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Telma L G; Machado, Luciana L; Souza, João S N; Fonseca, Aluisio M; Maia, Juliana L; Pessoa, Otilia D L

    2006-09-01

    The ethanolic extract of the fruit bark from Magonia glabrata yielded shikimic acid, scopoletin, sitosterol glycoside and 2-O-methyl-l-inositol. Antioxidant, icthyotoxicity and brine shrimp lethality activities were observed in this extract. The major constituent, 2-O-methyl-l-inositol, was found to be inactive in two assays but showed moderate activity as a radical scavenger.

  20. Primary carbon sources for juvenile penaeid shrimps in a mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a variety of primary producers (mangroves, epiphytes, phytoplankton and seagrasses), sediments and in five penaeid shrimp species (Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) indicus, P. japonicus, P. semisulcatus, Metapenaeus monoceros and M. stebbingi), collected ...

  1. Microbial deproteinization of shrimp shell penaeus merguiensis for chitin extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After cellulose, Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer in nature. The most important derivative of chitin is chitosan, obtained by deacetylation of chitin. Major sources of chitin are the exoskeleton of marine crustaceans such as crab, shrimp, and krill. Chitin extraction from shrimp shells can be carried out chemically or using biological methods. Microbial fermentation as an eco-friendly procedure is a suitable alternative for the chemical and enzymatic processes. In this study, the effect of three protease-producing bacteria species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Bacillus pumilus on the efficiency of microbial demineralization (DM and deproteinization (DP of the shrimp shell penaeus merguiensis, was investigated. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of hydrolysate obtained during the fermentation process was measured. Materials and methods: Demineralization and deproteinization was carried out by incubating shrimp waste inoculated with bacteria at 30°C and 100 rpm for 6 days. Results: Statistical analysis of data showed a significant difference between the percentage of demineralization and deproteinization in different bacteria species (p<0.05. The highest deproteinization (74.76% and demineralization rate (78.46% were obtained with P. aeruginosa, while the lowest was observed for S. marcescens. Antioxidant activity of hydrolysate also showed a significant difference. The highest reducing power and total antioxidant capacity were observed in volumes of 400 µl hydrolysate of S.marcescens and 100 µl hydrolysate of B. pumilus, respectively. Discussion and conclusion: The results indicated that P. aeruginosa in comparison with other bacterial strains, had a higher ability to remove proteins and minerals from shrimp shell waste. Therefore, the use of this bacterium is suitable for protein and minerals removal from marine crustaceans.

  2. Cytokine profile of rats fed a diet containing shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Lage Borges

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Studies have shown that shrimps reduced the tensile strength of scars in rat skin. The aim of the present study was to assess the cytokine profile of rats fed shrimp. METHODS: Group 1 (control received a regular diet and Group 2 (experimental received a diet containing 33% shrimp for nine days. The two diets contained the same amounts of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Serum cytokine levels were determined by ELISA and a segment of the jejunum was taken to investigate its histological morphology and eosinophil infiltrate. RESULTS: The experimental group had lower serum levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 (14.4±1.9 versus 18.11±2.6pg/mL; p<0.05 and IL-10 (5.0±0.98 versus 7.5±1.2pg/mL; p<0.05 and higher levels of IL-6 (17.8±2.3 versus 3.2±0.4pg/mL, p<0.001 than controls. Morphologically, the shrimp-based diet caused an architectural disorganization of the intestinal mucosa and a greater amount of eosinophils in the jejunal villus. CONCLUSION: Our data suggests that shrimp consumption leads to a significant increase in the cytokine IL-6, a decrease in the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 in the serum of rats, and high eosinophil infiltration in the jejunum. The cytokine profile typical of inflammation and the histological aspect of the jejunum are compatible with food allergy.

  3. Detection of shrimp-derived components in food by real-time fluorescent PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jijuan; Yu, Bing; Ma, Lidan; Zheng, Qiuyue; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Junyi

    2011-10-01

    Crustaceans such as shrimp and crabs and their products are important allergens in food, and allergic reactions due to the consumption of shrimp and crabs are frequently reported. However, the chemical properties of shrimp-derived allergens, except for Pen a I, are still unclear. Therefore, it is important to establish a more sensitive and specific method for detecting the composition of foods containing shrimp. In the present study, we developed a real-time fluorescent PCR to identify the specific shrimp-derived components in food. The primers and TaqMan probes for real-time fluorescent PCR were designed based on 16S rRNA genes through comparing a large number of nucleic acid sequences from different species of shrimp that have been published by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. In total, 56 kinds of samples, including different kinds of shrimp, crab, fish, shellfish, and octopus, were subjected to detection by real-time PCR. The results indicated that real-time fluorescent PCR could successfully identify the shrimp-derived components. In order to explore the effect of food processing on detection sensitivity, fish powder containing shrimp powder was treated by heating at 133°C for 30 min. The limit of detection of shrimp-derived components in fish powder was 0.05% (wt/wt).

  4. Financial Feasibility of Green-water Shrimp Farming Associated with Mangrove Compared to Extensive Shrimp Culture in the Mahakam Delta, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, R.H.; Tendencia, E.A.; Bunting, S.W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a post-hoc assessment of the introduction of intensive shrimp farming strategies, with and without green-water (GW) technology, in the Mahakam Delta where extensive systems (ES) dominate. The study also assesses the potential of integrated mangrove GW shrimp production (MGW). The

  5. High rate of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic southern Ontario population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Lana; Tsoulis, Michael William; Milio, Kirolos; Schnittke, Meghan; Kim, Harold

    2017-01-01

    Shrimp and house dust mite (HDM) allergies are common in Canadians. Often, both of these allergies occur in the same patient. This may be due to homology of tropomyosin or other potentially shared proteins. The aim of our study was to assess the frequency of house dust mite sensitization in a shrimp allergic Canadian population. We undertook a retrospective chart review of shrimp allergic patients at an outpatient allergy clinic in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. Our primary endpoint was to assess for presence of HDM sensitization in this population. Patients were categorized into approximate quartiles. We assessed the severity of the shrimp reactions, correlated shrimp skin test size to HDM skin test size, and measured the proportion of patients with atopic symptoms. We identified 95 shrimp allergic patients who were tested for house dust mite. 86 (90.5%) of these patients had a positive skin test to HDM. Patients with a shrimp skin test ≥5 mm were 5.31 times (95% CI, 1.55-18.14; p = 0.008) more likely to exhibit a dust mite skin test ≥5 mm than patients with a shrimp skin test <5 mm. The odds of a patient with a shrimp skin test between 10 and 18 mm having a larger HDM skin test were 3.93 times (95% CI 1.03-14.98, p = 0.045) the odds for a patient with a shrimp skin test size between 3 and 4 mm. We did not find a correlation between shrimp skin test size and shrimp reaction symptom grade (p = 0.301). In our Canadian patients, we found a large majority of shrimp allergic patients to be sensitized to HDM. We found that patients with a large skin test to shrimp were more likely to have a large skin test to HDM compared to those patients with a small skin test to shrimp. We did not find a correlation between shrimp skin test size and shrimp reaction symptom severity. Most of these patients had symptoms of rhinitis and/or asthma that may have been caused by house dust mite allergy.

  6. Vaccination Enhances Early Immune Responses in White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei after Secondary Exposure to Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Chin; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Morni, Wan Zabidii W.; Putra, Dedi Fazriansyah; Huang, Chien-Lun; Li, Chang-Che; Hsieh, Jen-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent work suggested that the presence of specific memory or some form of adaptive immunity occurs in insects and shrimp. Hypervariable pattern recognition molecules, known as Down syndrome cell adhesion molecules, are able to mount specific recognition, and immune priming in invertebrates. In the present study, we attempted to understand the immune response pattern of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei which received primary (PE) and secondary exposure (SE) to Vibrio alginolyticus. Methodology Immune parameters and proliferation of haematopoietic tissues (HPTs) of shrimp which had received PE and SE to V. alginolyticus were measured. In the PE trial, the immune parameters and proliferation of HPTs of shrimp that received heat-killed V. alginolyticus (HVa) and formalin-inactivated V. alginolyticus (FVa) were measured. Mortality, immune parameters and proliferation of HPTs of 7-day-HVa-PE shrimp (shrimp that received primary exposure to HVa after 7 days) and 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp (shrimp that received primary exposure to FVa after 7 days) following SE to live V. alginolyticus (LVa) were measured. Phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency were examined for the 7∼35-day-HVa-PE and FVa-PE shrimp. Results HVa-receiving shrimp showed an earlier increase in the immune response on day 1, whereas FVa-receiving shrimp showed a late increase in the immune response on day 5. The 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp showed enhancement of immunity when encountering SE to LVa, whereas 7-day-HVa-PE shrimp showed a minor enhancement in immunity. 7-day-FVa-PE shrimp showed higher proliferation and an HPT mitotic index. Both phagocytic activity and clearance maintained higher for both HVa-PE and FVa-PE shrimp after 28 days. Conclusions HVa- and FVa-receiving shrimp showed the bacteria agglutinated prior to being phagocytised. FVa functions as a vaccine, whereas HVa functions as an inducer and can be used as an immune adjuvant. A combined mixture of FVa and HVa can serve as a

  7. The Effect of Copper on the Color of Shrimps: Redder Is Not Always Healthier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ana; Romero, Yanet; Castillo, Tania; Mascaró, Maite; López-Rull, Isabel; Simões, Nuno; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor; Gaxiola, Gabriela; Barbosa, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research is to test the effects of copper on the color of pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in vivo. Forty-eight shrimps (L. vannamei) were exposed to a low concentration of copper (1 mg/L; experimental treatment) and forty-eight shrimps were used as controls (no copper added to the water). As a result of this experiment, it was found that shrimps with more copper are significantly redder than those designated as controls (hue (500–700 nm): P = 0.0015; red chroma (625–700 nm): P<0.0001). These results indicate that redder color may result from exposure to copper and challenge the commonly held view that highly pigmented shrimps are healthier than pale shrimps. PMID:25229639

  8. The effect of copper on the color of shrimps: redder is not always healthier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Martínez

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to test the effects of copper on the color of pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei in vivo. Forty-eight shrimps (L. vannamei were exposed to a low concentration of copper (1 mg/L; experimental treatment and forty-eight shrimps were used as controls (no copper added to the water. As a result of this experiment, it was found that shrimps with more copper are significantly redder than those designated as controls (hue (500-700 nm: P=0.0015; red chroma (625-700 nm: P<0.0001. These results indicate that redder color may result from exposure to copper and challenge the commonly held view that highly pigmented shrimps are healthier than pale shrimps.

  9. Effects of Shrimp Meal Fermented with Aspergillus niger On Physical Quality of Broiler Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalal Rosyidi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The research materials were 75 broiler chickens of 1 day old and feeds. The research employed five treatments, namely (P0: feed without addition of fermented shrimp meal, P1: feed with 5 % addition of fermented shrimp meal, P2: feed with 7.5 % addition of fermented shrimp meal, P3: feed with 10 % addition of fermented shrimp meal, P4: feed with 12.5 % addition of fermented shrimp meal. Every treatment was repeated 3 times, with 5 chickens respectively. Variables of this research were Water Holding Capacity (WHC, cooking loss and tenderness of broiler meat. Data were analyzed by completely randomized design, if there was a significant effect, it was followed by Duncan’s Multiple Range Test (DMRT. The result of this research showed that the use of fermented shrimp meal in broiler feed can improve WHC, degrading cooking loss and improving tenderness of broiler meat.   Keywords : Water holding capacity, cooking loss, tenderness

  10. Acquisition of epibiotic bacteria along the life cycle of the hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    OpenAIRE

    Guri, Mathieu; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Zbinden, Magali; Crassous, Philippe; Shillito, Bruce; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    The caridean shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the fauna at several Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites. This shrimp has an enlarged gill chamber, harboring a dense ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with mineral oxide deposits. Until now, their acquisition is not fully understood. At three hydrothermal vent sites, we analyzed the epibionts diversity at different moult stages and also in the first stages of the shrimp life (eggs, hatched eggs (with larva...

  11. Increasing Calcium Oxide (Cao) to Accelerate Moulting and Survival Rate Vannamei Shrimp (Litopenaeus Vannamei))

    OpenAIRE

    Erlando, Gito; ', Rusliadi; Mulyadi,

    2016-01-01

    The research about the increasing Calcium Oxide (CaO) to accelerate moulting and survival rate vannamei shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was conducted from Agustus until September 2015 at Balai Perikanan Budidaya Air Payau, Instalasi Pembenihan Udang (IPU) Gelung, Situbondo Provinsi Jawa Timur. The purpose of this research was to investigate optimum doses calcium oxide to accelerate moulting and the survival rate vannamei shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Vannamei shrimp with size PL25 were used in...

  12. Social and ecological challenges of market-oriented shrimp farming in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Ngo Thi Phuong

    2013-01-01

    Vietnam is one of the largest shrimp exporters in the world. Since 2010, Vietnam has earned about two billion dollars annually through shrimp exports. As a fertile area of greatest potential for agricultural production in Vietnam, the Mekong Delta has been a major contributor to the country’s achievements, especially in the agricultural sector. During recent decades, trade liberation along with various policies in support of aquaculture has accelerated the development of shrimp production in ...

  13. Social and ecological challenges of market-oriented shrimp farming in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ngo Thi Phuong

    2013-01-01

    Vietnam is one of the largest shrimp exporters in the world. Since 2010, Vietnam has earned about two billion dollars annually through shrimp exports. As a fertile area of greatest potential for agricultural production in Vietnam, the Mekong Delta has been a major contributor to the country's achievements, especially in the agricultural sector. During recent decades, trade liberation along with various policies in support of aquaculture has accelerated the development of shrimp production in the Delta. Based on an ethnographic study of shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam, I assert that along with great rewards arising from the expansion of shrimp farming areas, productivity, and export value, the shrimp industry has brought various environmental, economic and social challenges. Consequently, shrimp farming is a risky business and local inhabitants have relied on various strategies to cope with these challenges. Risk mitigation in shrimp production and labor migration are the two important strategies of local inhabitants for securing their livelihoods. Water pollution and poor quality post-larvae shrimp are direct consequences of market-oriented production.

  14. Microbiota from Litopenaeus vannamei: digestive tract microbial community of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzuc, Jaqueline Tuyub; Escalante, Diana Rendíz; Rojas Herrera, Rafael; Gaxiola Cortés, Gabriela; Ortiz, Maria Leticia Arena

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria capable of producing different extracellular enzymes of potential relevance in digestive processes were isolated from the stomach, hepatopancreas and intestine of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei...

  15. Formulation of a fish feed for goldfish with natural astaxanthin extracted from shrimp waste

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weeratunge, W K. O. V; Perera, B G. K

    2016-01-01

    .... An attempt was made towards optimization of astaxanthin extraction conditions using three different extraction conditions and a solvent series, from uncooked, cooked and acid-treated shrimp waste...

  16. Transmission of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) to Litopenaeus vannamei from infected cephalothorax, abdomen, or whole shrimp cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, M A; Shervette, V R; Lotz, J M

    2001-06-20

    Shrimp viruses can remain infectious in frozen shrimp tissue and have been found in frozen commodity shrimp. Therefore, the threat of viral outbreaks in wild and cultured shrimp via frozen commodity shrimp exists. Because frozen shrimp are imported with and without the cephalothorax, more knowledge is needed concerning the infectivity of a cephalothorax relative to that of an abdomen. We compared the mortality rates from shrimp exposed to a WSSV-infected cephalothorax, abdomen, or whole shrimp cadaver. Estimates of transmission coefficients from the exposures to the infected cephalothorax, abdomen, or whole shrimp were also calculated because the transmission coefficients account for differences in the initial doses. In addition, we compared the variability in infectivity of pieces of shrimp by feeding 24 equal-sized pieces of cephalothorax and abdomen to 24 individually isolated shrimp. In Expt 1, susceptible shrimp did not completely consume the infected abdomen, and a significant difference was detected among shrimp exposed to the abdomen (mortality rate = 0.40), cephalothorax (mortality rate = 0.75), and whole shrimp cadaver (mortality rate = 0.67). The calculated transmission coefficients were 0.95 from an infected cephalothorax, 0.59 from an infected abdomen, and 0.69 from an infected whole shrimp cadaver. In Expt 2, susceptible shrimp were starved to ensure complete ingestion of each dose. No significant difference was observed in the estimated mortality rates from an infected cephalothorax (0.58), abdomen (0.63), or whole shrimp (0.67). The calculated transmission coefficients were 0.84 from an infected cephalothorax, 0.83 from an infected abdomen, and 0.60 from an infected whole shrimp cadaver. In Expt 3, no difference was observed in the mortality rates resulting from exposures to pieces of infected cephalothorax (0.57) or abdomen (0.58). Our results suggested that there was no difference in the viral loads of a WSSV-infected cephalothorax or abdomen, but

  17. Shrimp Lipids: A Source of Cancer Chemopreventive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Burgos-Hernández

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp is one of the most popular seafoods worldwide, and its lipids have been studied for biological activity in both, muscle and exoskeleton. Free fatty acids, triglycerides, carotenoids, and other lipids integrate this fraction, and some of these compounds have been reported with cancer chemopreventive activities. Carotenoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids have been extensively studied for chemopreventive properties, in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Their mechanisms of action depend on the lipid chemical structure and include antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-mutagenic, and anti-inflammatory activities, among others. The purpose of this review is to lay groundwork for future research about the properties of the lipid fraction of shrimp.

  18. Evolution of Neural Computations: Mantis Shrimp and Human Color Decoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim Zaidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mantis shrimp and primates both possess good color vision, but the neural implementation in the two species is very different, a reflection of the largely unrelated evolutionary lineages of these creatures. Mantis shrimp have scanning compound eyes with 12 classes of photoreceptors, and have evolved a system to decode color information at the front-end of the sensory stream. Primates have image-focusing eyes with three classes of cones, and decode color further along the visual-processing hierarchy. Despite these differences, we report a fascinating parallel between the computational strategies at the color-decoding stage in the brains of stomatopods and primates. Both species appear to use narrowly tuned cells that support interval decoding color identification.

  19. Guiding brine shrimp through mazes by solving reaction diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Krishma; Fenton, Flavio

    Excitable systems driven by reaction diffusion equations have been shown to not only find solutions to mazes but to also to find the shortest path between the beginning and the end of the maze. In this talk we describe how we can use the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, a generic model for excitable media, to solve a maze by varying the basin of attraction of its two fixed points. We demonstrate how two dimensional mazes are solved numerically using a Java Applet and then accelerated to run in real time by using graphic processors (GPUs). An application of this work is shown by guiding phototactic brine shrimp through a maze solved by the algorithm. Once the path is obtained, an Arduino directs the shrimp through the maze using lights from LEDs placed at the floor of the Maze. This method running in real time could be eventually used for guiding robots and cars through traffic.

  20. Selective preservation of chitin during the decay of shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, M.; Briggs, D. E. G.; Van Heemst, J. D. H.; Kear, A. J.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-03-01

    The preservation potential of chitin in the marine environment is a matter of debate. To determine the relative survival of chitin and other organic components, the shrimp Crangon was decayed under different laboratory conditions. Solid state 13C NMR and Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry demonstrated that slightly transformed chitin represents the major component of the remaining biomass after only eight weeks. This selective preservation confirms that the resistance of chitin to decay may be a major factor in accounting for the extensive fossil record of arthropods lacking a biomineralized skeleton. It also suggests that chitin is likely to be an important contributor to the organic content of recent marine sediments. The pyrolysate of the preserved cuticle of fossil shrimps reveals a homologous series of alkanes and alkenes indicating a substitution of chitin by more resistant organic matter derived from other sources.

  1. Quantification of Organic Acids in Fermented Shrimp Waste by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Isabel Sánchez-Machado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a simple, rapid, and reliable HPLC method for the determination of organic acids in fermented shrimp waste. Lactic, acetic and citric acids were quantified by HPLC with UV detection, on a 250×4.6 mm Extrasil ODS 5-μm column, mobile phase was ultrapure water adjusted with metaphosphoric acid to pH=2.1, flow rate 0.6 mL/min, column temperature 30 °C, and detection wavelength 210 nm. Under these conditions, the recovery (97.5 % and the method repeatability (RSD=6.2 % for lactic acid were of satisfying quality. Organic acids can preserve the quality and nutritive value of fermented shrimp waste.

  2. Comparative Brine Shrimp Toxicity of Withenia somnifera and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lethality test at serial dilutions of 1000 μg/ml, 100 μg/ ml and 10 μg/ml. The median lethal concentration (LC50) for each extract was determined. Both plant extracts were found to be toxic to brine shrimp with LC50 of 110.3 μg/ml and 106.6 μg/ml for W. somnifera and C. cinerarieafolium respectively. Kenya Veterinarian Vol.

  3. Water Diagnosis in Shrimp Aquaculture based on Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal Hernández, J. J.; Sánchez Fernández, L. P.

    2007-05-01

    In many countries, the shrimp aquaculture has not advanced computational systems to supervise the artificial habitat of the farms and laboratories. A computational system of this type helps significantly to improve the environmental conditions and to elevate the production and its quality. The main idea of this study is the creation of a system using an artificial neural network (ANN), which can help to recognize patterns of problems and their evolution in shrimp aquaculture, and thus to respond with greater rapidity against the negative effects. Bad control on the shrimp artificial habitat produces organisms with high stress and as consequence losses in their defenses. It generate low nutrition, low reproduction or worse still, they prearrange to acquire lethal diseases. The proposed system helps to control this problem. Environmental variables as pH, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and turbidity have an important effect in the suitable growth of the shrimps and influence in their health. However, the exact mathematical model of this relationship is unspecified; an ANN is useful for establishing a relationship between these variables and to classify a status that describes a problem into the farm. The data classification is made to recognize and to quantify two states within the pool: a) Normal: Everything is well. b) Risk: One, some or all environmental variables are outside of the allowed interval, which generates problems. The neural network will have to recognize the state and to quantify it, in others words, how normal or risky it is, which allows finding trend of the water quality. A study was developed for designing a software tool that allows recognizing the status of the water quality and control problems for the environment into the pond.

  4. Enhancing Ecoefficiency in Shrimp Farming through Interconnected Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Héctor Barraza-Guardado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The future development of shrimp farming needs to improve its ecoefficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate water quality, flows, and nitrogen balance and production parameters on a farm with interconnected pond design to improve the efficiency of the semi-intensive culture of Litopenaeus vannamei ponds. The study was conducted in 21 commercial culture ponds during 180 days at densities of 30–35 ind m−2 and daily water exchange <2%. Our study provides evidence that by interconnecting ponds nutrient recycling is favored by promoting the growth of primary producers of the pond as chlorophyll a. Based on the mass balance and flow of nutrients this culture system reduces the flow of solid, particulate organic matter, and nitrogen compounds to the environment and significantly increases the efficiency of water (5 to 6.5 m3 kg−1 cycle−1, when compared with traditional culture systems. With this culture system it is possible to recover up to 34% of the total nitrogen entering the system, with production in excess of 4,000 kg ha−1 shrimp. We believe that the production system with interconnected ponds is a technically feasible model to improve ecoefficiency production of shrimp farming.

  5. Shrimp pond wastewater treatment using pyrolyzed chicken feather as adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Wei Chek; Jbara, Mohamad Hasan; Palaniandy, Puganeshwary; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian

    2017-10-01

    In this study, chicken feather fiber was used as a raw material to prepare a non-expensive adsorbent by pyrolysis without chemical activation. The main pollutants treated in this study were chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N) from shrimp pond wastewater containing high concentrations of nutrients, which caused the eutrophication phenomenon in adjacent water. Batch adsorption studies were performed to investigate the effect of pH (5-8), mass of adsorbent (0.5-3 g), and shaking time (0.5-2 h) on the removal efficiency of COD and NH3- N. Experimental results showed that the optimum conditions were as follows: pH 5, 0.5 g of adsorbent, and 0.5 h of shaking. Under these conditions, 34.01% and 40.47% of COD and NH3-N were removed, respectively, from shrimp pond wastewater. The adsorption processes were best described by the Langmuir isotherm model for COD and NH3-N removal, with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 36.9 and 7.24 mg/g for COD and NH3-N, respectively. The results proved that chicken feather could remove COD and NH3-N from shrimp pond wastewater. However, further studies on thermal treatment should be carried out to increase the removal efficiency of pyrolyzed chicken feather fiber.

  6. Enhancing Ecoefficiency in Shrimp Farming through Interconnected Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Guardado, Ramón Héctor; Arreola-Lizárraga, José Alfredo; Miranda-Baeza, Anselmo; Juárez-García, Manuel; Juvera-Hoyos, Antonio; Casillas-Hernández, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The future development of shrimp farming needs to improve its ecoefficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate water quality, flows, and nitrogen balance and production parameters on a farm with interconnected pond design to improve the efficiency of the semi-intensive culture of Litopenaeus vannamei ponds. The study was conducted in 21 commercial culture ponds during 180 days at densities of 30-35 ind m(-2) and daily water exchange balance and flow of nutrients this culture system reduces the flow of solid, particulate organic matter, and nitrogen compounds to the environment and significantly increases the efficiency of water (5 to 6.5 m(3) kg(-1) cycle(-1)), when compared with traditional culture systems. With this culture system it is possible to recover up to 34% of the total nitrogen entering the system, with production in excess of 4,000 kg ha(-1) shrimp. We believe that the production system with interconnected ponds is a technically feasible model to improve ecoefficiency production of shrimp farming.

  7. Enhancing Ecoefficiency in Shrimp Farming through Interconnected Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Guardado, Ramón Héctor; Arreola-Lizárraga, José Alfredo; Juárez-García, Manuel; Juvera-Hoyos, Antonio; Casillas-Hernández, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The future development of shrimp farming needs to improve its ecoefficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate water quality, flows, and nitrogen balance and production parameters on a farm with interconnected pond design to improve the efficiency of the semi-intensive culture of Litopenaeus vannamei ponds. The study was conducted in 21 commercial culture ponds during 180 days at densities of 30–35 ind m−2 and daily water exchange <2%. Our study provides evidence that by interconnecting ponds nutrient recycling is favored by promoting the growth of primary producers of the pond as chlorophyll a. Based on the mass balance and flow of nutrients this culture system reduces the flow of solid, particulate organic matter, and nitrogen compounds to the environment and significantly increases the efficiency of water (5 to 6.5 m3 kg−1 cycle−1), when compared with traditional culture systems. With this culture system it is possible to recover up to 34% of the total nitrogen entering the system, with production in excess of 4,000 kg ha−1 shrimp. We believe that the production system with interconnected ponds is a technically feasible model to improve ecoefficiency production of shrimp farming. PMID:26525070

  8. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas, E-mail: tomar@purdue.edu

    2015-04-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 80 °C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26 ± 0.89 GPa at 25 °C that reduces to 7.61 ± 0.65 GPa at 80 °C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38 ± 2.3 GPa at 25 °C to 24.58 ± 1.71 GPa at 80 °C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. - Highlights: • Shrimp species Pandalus platyceros and Rimicaris exoculata exoskeletons are analyzed. • Temperature dependent properties of shrimp exoskeleton are compared. • Mechanical properties are correlated with structure and composition of exoskeleton. • Mechanical properties reduce with increase in temperature. • Presence of biominerals gives better thermal stability to structure.

  9. Proteasome properties of hemocytes differ between the whiteleg shrimp Penaeus vannamei and the brown shrimp Crangon crangon (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Sandra; Saborowski, Reinhard; Martínez-Cruz, Oliviert; Muhlia-Almazán, Adriana; Sánchez-Paz, Arturo

    2017-11-01

    Crustaceans are intensively farmed in aquaculture facilities where they are vulnerable to parasites, bacteria, or viruses, often severely compromising the rearing success. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for the maintenance of cellular integrity. Analogous to higher vertebrates, the UPS of crustaceans may also play an important role in stress resistance and pathogen defense. We studied the general properties of the proteasome system in the hemocytes of the whiteleg shrimp, Penaeus vannamei, and the European brown shrimp Crangon crangon. The 20S proteasome was the predominant proteasome population in the hemocytes of both species. The specific activities of the trypsin-like (Try-like), chymotrypsin-like (Chy-like), and caspase-like (Cas-like) enzymes of the shrimp proteasome differed between species. P. vannamei exhibited a higher ratio of Try-like to Chy-like activities and Cas-like to Chy-like activities than C. crangon. Notably, the Chy-like activity of P. vannamei showed substrate or product inhibition at concentrations of more than 25 mmol L-1. The K M values ranged from 0.072 mmol L-1 for the Try-like activity of P. vannamei to 0.309 mmol L-1 for the Cas-like activity of C. crangon. Inhibition of the proteasome of P. vannamei by proteasome inhibitors was stronger than in C. crangon. The pH profiles were similar in both species. The Try-like, Chy-like, and Cas-like sites showed the highest activities between pH 7.5 and 8.5. The proteasomes of both species were sensitive against repeated freezing and thawing losing ~80-90% of activity. This study forms the basis for future investigations on the shrimp response against infectious diseases, and the role of the UPS therein.

  10. These squatters are not innocent: the evidence of parasitism in sponge-inhabiting shrimps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Ďuriš

    Full Text Available Marine sponges are frequently inhabited by a wide range of associated invertebrates, including caridean shrimps. Symbiotic shrimps are often considered to be commensals; however, in most cases, the relationship with sponge hosts remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that sponge-inhabiting shrimps are often parasites adapted to consumption of sponge tissues. First, we provide detailed examination of morphology and stomach contents of Typton carneus (Decapoda: Palaemonidae: Pontoniinae, a West Atlantic tropical shrimp living in fire sponges of the genus Tedania. Remarkable shear-like claws of T. carneus show evidence of intensive shearing, likely the result of crushing siliceous sponge spicules. Examination of stomach contents revealed that the host sponge tissue is a major source of food for T. carneus. A parasitic mode of life is also reflected in adaptations of mouth appendages, in the reproduction strategy, and in apparent sequestration of host pigments by shrimp. Consistent results were obtained also for congeneric species T. distinctus (Western Atlantic and T. spongicola (Mediterranean. The distribution of shrimps among sponge hosts (mostly solitary individuals or heterosexual pairs suggests that Typton shrimps actively prevent colonisation of their sponge by additional conspecifics, thus protecting their resource and reducing the damage to the hosts. We also demonstrate feeding on host tissues by sponge-associated shrimps of the genera Onycocaris, Periclimenaeus, and Thaumastocaris (Pontoniinae and Synalpheus (Alpheidae. The parasitic mode of life appears to be widely distributed among sponge-inhabiting shrimps. However, it is possible that under some circumstances, the shrimps provide a service to the host sponge by preventing a penetration by potentially more damaging associated animals. The overall nature of interspecific shrimp-sponge relationships thus warrants further investigation.

  11. Abundance and size of Gulf shrimp in Louisiana's coastal estuaries following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Joris L; de Mutsert, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted Louisiana's coastal estuaries physically, chemically, and biologically. To better understand the ecological consequences of this oil spill on Louisiana estuaries, we compared the abundance and size of two Gulf shrimp species (Farfantepeneus aztecus and Litopeneus setiferus) in heavily affected and relatively unaffected estuaries, before and after the oil spill. Two datasets were used to conduct this study: data on shrimp abundance and size before the spill were available from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF). Data on shrimp abundance and size from after the spill were independently collected by the authors and by LDWF. Using a Before-After-Control-Impact with Paired sampling (BACIP) design with monthly samples of two selected basins, we found brown shrimp to become more abundant and the mean size of white shrimp to become smaller. Using a BACIP with data on successive shrimp year-classes of multiple basins, we found both species to become more abundant in basins that were affected by the spill, while mean shrimp size either not change after the spill, or increased in both affected and unaffected basins. We conclude that following the oil spill abundances of both species increased within affected estuaries, whereas mean size may have been unaffected. We propose two factors that may have caused these results: 1) exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may have reduced the growth rate of shrimp, resulting in a delayed movement of shrimp to offshore habitats, and an increase of within-estuary shrimp abundance, and 2) fishing closures established immediately after the spill, may have resulted in decreased fishing effort and an increase in shrimp abundance. This study accentuates the complexities in determining ecological effects of oil spills, and the need of studies on the organismal level to reveal cause-and-effect relationships of such events.

  12. Experimental evaluation of co-culture of juvenile sea cucumbers, Holothuria scabra (Jaeger), with juvenile blue shrimp, Litopenaeus stylirostris (Stimpson)

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, S; Patrois, Jacques; Fraisse, N.

    2006-01-01

    The co-culture of juvenile sea cucumber Holothuria scabra (Jaeger), or 'sandfish', with juvenile blue shrimp Litopenaeus stylirostris (Stimpson) was tested by growing groups in co-culture and monoculture for 3 weeks in tanks with enriched sand substratum. Feed was supplied on trays, accessible only to shrimp. Survival of shrimp and sandfish was high in all treatments (73-100%). Growth of shrimp did not differ between monoculture and co-culture, but sandfish grew significantly slower in co-cul...

  13. Distribution of deep sea shrimp (Pandalus borealis Krøyer) in relation to temperature in the Barents Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Nedreaas, Kjell Harald; Øynes, Per

    1987-01-01

    In the years 1980 to 1985 stratided raildom bottom trawl surveys were carried out on the shrimp fields in the Svalbard and Barents Sea regions. The objeetives of the cruises were to study the structure of the shrimp stock and to estimate the abundance of shrimp. On each trawl station the bottom temperature was measured. Only the results from the surveys in the Barents Sea have throroughly been analysed with regard to temperature. In the investigated area the deep sea shrimp ...

  14. Antioxidant Effect of Orange Peel Extract on Chemical Quality, Sensory Properties, and Black Spots of Farmed White Shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Shirin Vakili; Seyyed Ali Yasini Ardakani

    2018-01-01

    Background: Black spots are a major problem in commercial shrimp species and can have negative effects on shrimps' appearance, quality, shelf life, economic value, and product acceptance by consumers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of orange peel extract on chemical and sensory qualities as well as black spots on Litopenaeus vannamei species of white farmed shrimp. Methods: Samples included treated shrimps at concentration of 150 g, orange peel extract for 30 minutes, and ...

  15. Energy Budgets of Eared Grebes on the Great Salt Lake and Implications for Harvest of Brine Shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, Michael R.; Caudell, Joe N.

    2009-01-01

    About 1.5-million eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis), representing half of the North American population, stage on Utah's Great Salt Lake, USA (GSL) during autumn migration to forage on brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana). Indirectly competing with birds for brine shrimp are commercial harvesters who annually collect >1 million kg (dry wt) of shrimp cysts (i.e., hardened eggs), an amount that during some years equals up to half of all brine shrimp cysts produced annually on the GSL. No inform...

  16. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Gulf of Mexico). WHITE SHRIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    detritus, chitin, parts of annelids September 1979. and gastropods, fish parts, bryozoans, sponges , corals, filaments )f algae, The hait shrimp fishery...foods. , and newly hatched brine shrimp to feed the mysis stages. Christmas and White shrimp are an important Etzold (1977) reported that early food for...effort and and marine organisms. Wiley- price-cost trends in the Gulf of Interscience, New York. 868 pp. Mexico shrimp fishery: implications on Mexico’s

  17. 78 FR 28146 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... prevent the waste of brown shrimp that would be discarded in fishing operations because of their small... INFORMATION: The Gulf shrimp fishery is managed under the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council and is...

  18. 75 FR 75965 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Decision Memo can be accessed directly on the Web at http://ia.ita.doc.gov/frn/index.html . The paper copy...-frozen) and peeled shrimp; (2) to which a ``dusting'' layer of rice or wheat flour of at least 95 percent... subjected to IQF freezing immediately after application of the dusting layer. Battered shrimp is a shrimp...

  19. 78 FR 35643 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam..., Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of frozen warmwater shrimp, provided for in subheadings 0306.17.00, 1605.21... found to be subsidized by the Governments of China, India, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam and that are...

  20. 78 FR 764 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam..., Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of frozen warmwater shrimp, provided for in subheadings 0306.17.00, 1605.21... subsidized by the Governments of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. Unless...

  1. 78 FR 64009 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia, and Vietnam Determinations On the... imports from China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia, and Vietnam of frozen warmwater shrimp, provided for in... China, Ecuador, India, Malaysia, and Vietnam.\\2\\ \\1\\ The record is defined in sec. 207.2(f) of the...

  2. MODELING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHRIMP MARICULTURE AND WATER QUALITY IN THE RIO CHONE ESTUARY, ECUADOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Rio Chone estuary in Ecuador has been heavily altered by the conversion of over 90% of the original mangrove forest to shrimp ponds. We carried out computational experiments using both hydrodynamic and shrimp pond models to investigate factors leading to declines in estuarine...

  3. The cluster panacea?: Questioning the role of cooperative shrimp aquaculture in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Thu Ha, Ha; Bush, S.R.; Dijk, van H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of ‘clustering’ as a form of cooperative production to improve the environmental performance of shrimp farmers and facilitating them to upgrade their position in the global value chain. Comparing intensive and extensive shrimp farmer clusters in Ca Mau province, Vietnam,

  4. Investigations of a stock assessment in brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) Part 2: Biomass model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der T.; Poos, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture, Conservation and Food quality, Producer organisations of the Dutch shrimp fisheries and NGO’s (Stichting de Noordzee and Waddenvereniging) have underlined the importance of sustainable harvesting of brown shrimp in the North Sea and Wadden Sea. Also they would like the

  5. Optimal foraging in the thalassinidean shrimp Callianassa subterranea - Improving food quality by grain size selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, EJ; Videler, JJ; de Wilde, PAWJ

    1998-01-01

    The grain size distributions and organic content of habitat sediment, stomach content and faecal pellets of the endobenthic shrimp C. subterranea were analyzed to study food selection and its nutritional yield. Sub-samples of sediment from the shrimps' habitat and the stomach content were fractioned

  6. 76 FR 18782 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam Determinations On the..., India, Thailand, and Vietnam would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to... warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam would not be likely to lead to...

  7. 75 FR 22424 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam AGENCY: United States... Vietnam. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it will proceed with full reviews pursuant to... antidumping duty orders on frozen warmwater shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam would be...

  8. Development and test of Dyneema shrimp trawl; Udvikling og forsoeg med dyneema rejetrawl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results from analysis of test fishing with one shrimp trawl made of standard materials and one shrimp trawl made of the material Dyneema, which is stronger than the standard material. By using the new developed trawl savings of 43 l fuel/hour is obtained. (EHS)

  9. Burrow architecture and turbative activity of the thalassinid shrimp Callianassa subterranea from the central North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, EJ; Schreurs, CE; Videler, JJ

    1997-01-01

    The architecture and development of the burrows of the endobenthic shrimp Callianassa subterranea from the central North Sea were studied in sediment-filled containers and thin cuvettes in the laboratory. Three-dimensional burrows of 81 shrimps were used to describe the 3-dimensional burrow

  10. An investigation on the application of ohmic heating of cold water shrimp and brine mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Juhl; Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Brøkner Kavli, Sissel Therese

    2016-01-01

    Cooking is an important unit-operation in the production of cooked and peeled shrimps. The present study explores the feasibility of using ohmic heating for cooking of shrimps. The focus is on investigating the effects of different process parameters on heating time and quality of ohmic cooked sh...

  11. Effects of cultured shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei consumption on serum lipoproteins of healthy normolipidemic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Yousefi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been suggested that moderate shrimp consumption in normolipidemic subjects will not adversely affect the overall lipoprotein profile. Hence, shrimp consumption can be included in “healthy heart" nutritional guidelines. However, the effects of cultured shrimp on serum lipoproteins of normal subjects have not yet investigated. Material and Methods: Twenty-five healthy normolipidemic men who were workers of a shrimp farm in Bushehr province participated in a quasi-experimental study. In a crossover six weeks trial, the effect of three days per week diet (containing 300 g cultured shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei /day on serum lipid profile was compared with a zero-marine baseline diet. Results: After six weeks trial, serum triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol levels were not significantly changed from the baseline levels (p>0.05. However, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels, total cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratios were significantly increased (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Moderate cultured shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei consumption can increase total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels in normolipidemic men. Although a diet containing native shrimp has many benefits for healthy persons, but we do not recommend cultured shrimp in a healthy heart diet for persons with dyslipidemia or cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Comparison of quality characteristics between belacan from Brunei Darussalam and Korean shrimp paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Boong Kim

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The protein content, pH, water activity Ca, Fe, K, P, Zn, total amino acids, essential amino acids, saturated fatty acids, and cholesterol content tended to be higher in the Korean dried shrimp paste than in Bruneian belacan and Korean fermented Saewoojeot shrimp paste.

  13. 75 FR 51756 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... warmwater shrimp from India to determine whether R.D.R. Exports (RDR) is the successor-in-interest company to Jaya Satya Marine Exports Pvt. Ltd. (Jaya Satya). See Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India... (Penaeus vannemei), banana prawn (Penaeus merguiensis), fleshy prawn (Penaeus chinensis), giant river prawn...

  14. Major shrimp pathogenic virus in america and their relationship with low salinity environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Enrique Godínez Siordia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp aquaculture is an expanding activity in many countries in which the health status is a determining factor for its success. In this review we present world shrimp viral agents, with emphasis in America reported virus and the influence of water salinity.

  15. 75 FR 3446 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Preliminary Intent To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... definitions in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS), are products which are processed... shrimp is a shrimp- based product that, when dusted in accordance with the definition of dusting above... realities surrounding an alleged sale of the subject merchandise.'' See Hebei New Donghua Amino Acid Co...

  16. Effects of decomposing Rhizophora apiculata leaves on larvae of the shrimp Penaeus monodon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nghia, T.T.; Ut, V.N.; Scheffer, M.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of different concentrations of decomposing Rhizophora apiculata leaves and their leachates on larvae of the shrimp Penaeus monodon under laboratory conditions. Shrimp mortality was highly dependent on the concentration of oxygen in the water, which in turn was strongly

  17. Length-weight relationships of the pink shrimp penaeus notialis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred indigenous pink shrimps, Penaeus notialis and 19 exotic giant tiger Shrimps, P. monodon from Buguma Creek were caught in brackish water tidal ponds of the Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research, Buguma in April, May and June 2005. The length-weight relationship of both species ...

  18. Comparison live adult Artemia and squid meat on the growth of Penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.R.S.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Royan, J.P.

    An experiment lasting 14 weeks was conducted to compare the efficiency of live adult Artemia with fresh squid meat on growth of penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus dobsoni. The shrimps were found actively feeding on live Artemia and grew 84% more than those...

  19. The application of bacterial indicator phylotypes to predict shrimp health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinbo; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhang, Demin

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of shrimp disease is closely associated with the microbial composition in surrounding water, but it remains uncertain whether microbial indicator phylotypes are predictive for shrimp health status (healthy or diseased). To test this idea, we combined the data from our previous works, to investigate the feasibility of indicator phylotypes as independent variables to predict the health status during a shrimp culture procedure. The results showed linearly increased dissimilarities (Ptrend when disease occurred. This sudden shift in the bacterial community appears to cause severe mass mortality of the shrimps. In particular, we created a model to identify indicators that discriminated ponds with diseased shrimp populations from these with healthy shrimp populations. As a result, 13 indicative families were screened, in which seven are healthy indicator and six are diseased indictor. An improved logistic regression model additionally revealed that the occurrences of these indicator families could be predictive of the shrimp health status with a high degree of accuracy (>79 %). Overall, this study provides solid evidences that indicator phylotypes could be served as independent variables for predicting the incidences of shrimp disease.

  20. Male claspers in clam shrimps (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) in the light of evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaji, Tomonari; Fritsch, Martin; Schwentner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Male "clam shrimps" possess highly modified first (and second) trunk limbs for clasping the carapace of females during copulation. Claspers are present in all three clam shrimp taxa (Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata, and Cyclestherida) but despite striking similarities in their morphology and function,...

  1. 76 FR 41203 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... building. In addition, a complete version of the Decision Memo can be accessed directly on the Web at http...'' layer of rice or wheat flour of at least 95 percent purity has been applied; (3) with the entire surface... application of the dusting layer. Battered shrimp is a shrimp- based product that, when dusted in accordance...

  2. Little Shrimp, Big Results: A Model of an Integrative, Cross-Curricular Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Nicole; Piser, Carol; Walka, Keith

    2010-01-01

    This integrative, cross-curricular lab engages middle school biology students in an exercise involving ecology, arthropod biology, and mathematics. Students research the anatomy and behavioral patterns of a species of brine shrimp, compare the anatomy of adult and juvenile brine shrimp, and graph and interpret results. In this article, the authors…

  3. Index of molt staging in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpimol Kirirat

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Molting is a phenomenon of shedding the old cuticle and re-generating the new one found in crustaceans including shrimps and many other species of invertebrates. The molting cycle is a dynamic process, composed of pre-ecdysis (premolt, D stage, ecdysis (E stage, postecdysis (postmolt, A-B stages, and intermolting (C stage stages. In healthy shrimp, molting cycles are repeated several times through shrimp life in order to increase body size and mass (growth. In this paper we gather the knowledges and important findings related to the molting cycle of crustaceans from the past until present, and highlight the physical evidence of cuticular tissue that we used for molt staging in the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. At the end of this paper we summarize the easily observed criteria used for molt staging in the black tiger shrimp.

  4. Scanning electron microscope observations of brine shrimp larvae from space shuttle experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Spooner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Brine shrimp are encysted as gastrula stage embryos, and may remain dehydrated and encysted for years without compromising their viability. This aspect of brine shrimp biology is desirable for studying development of animals during space shuttle flight, as cysts placed aboard a spacecraft may be rehydrated at the convenience of an astronaut, guaranteeing that subsequent brine shrimp development occurs only on orbit and not on the pad during launch delays. Brine shrimp cysts placed in 5 ml syringes were rehydrated with salt water and hatched during a 9 day space shuttle mission. Subsequent larvae developed to the 8th larval stage in the sealed syringes. We studied the morphogenesis of the brine shrimp larvae and found the larvae from the space shuttle experiments similar in rate of growth and extent of development, to larvae grown in sealed syringes on the ground. Extensive differentiation and development of embryos and larvae can occur in a microgravity environment.

  5. Analysis of production and environmental effects of Nile tilapia and white shrimp culture in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, J.G.; Falconer, L.; Kittiwanich, J.

    2015-01-01

    Two case studies from Southeast Asia are used to analyse production, environmental effects, and economic optimisation of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) pond culture. A projection of these data is made for the whole of Thailand. The results are analysed...... on a regional scale based on site selection using multi-criteria evaluation (MCE). Farm-scale culture was simulated for (i) tilapia monoculture in Chiang Rai; (ii) shrimp monoculture in Chanthaburi; and (iii) Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) of tilapia and shrimp in Chon Buri. Together...... of shrimp monoculture decreases sharplychlorophyll emissions fall from 0.17 kg to 0.02 kg. A modelled IMTA scenario including the green seaweed Ulva reduced NH4+ outflow to 0.32 kg cycle− 1. Scaling to the national level, for a 2010 production of 158,293 t y− 1 (tilapia), and 553,899 t y− 1 (shrimp), gives...

  6. A multi-biomarker approach to assess the impact of farming systems on black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Huynh Thi; Silvestre, Frederic; Wang, Neil; Thome, Jean-Pierre; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Kestemont, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the advantages of the use of biomarkers as an early warning system by applying it to different shrimp farming systems in Soctrang and Camau provinces, main shrimp producers in Mekong River Delta, Vietnam. Shrimp were collected at 15 different farms divided into four different farming systems: three farms were converted from originally rice paddies into intensive shrimp farming systems (IS1, IS2, IS3); three farms were rice-shrimp integrated farming systems (RS4, RS5, RS6); three farms were intensive farming systems (IS7, IS8, IS9); six farms were extensive shrimp farming systems (From ES1 to ES6). Lipid peroxidation (LPO) and total glutathione (GSH) were measured as well as catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and acetylcholinesterase activities (ACHE). Organ specificity was observed between gills and hepatopancreas with generally higher activity of GST in gills (GSTG) whereas the contrary was observed for LPO level in gills (LPOG). Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis clearly indicated that shrimp reared in extensive culture system formed a distinct group from those reared in intensive or rice-shrimp integrated systems. CAT in gills (CATG), GPX in gills (GPXG) and hepatopancreas (GPXHP) and ACHE in muscle (ACHEM) of shrimp collected in extensive farms showed a general higher level than those in intensively farmed shrimp. On the contrary, we observed clear high levels of GSTG and GST in hepatopancreas (GSTHP) and LPOG and hepatopancreas (LPOHP) of shrimp sampled in intensive and rice-shrimp integrated systems. Thus, we propose that LPO and CAT, GPX, GST and ACHE can be used as a set of biomarkers for the assessment of health condition and can discriminate between shrimp cultivated in different farming systems. These findings provide the usefulness of integrating a set of biomarkers to define the health status of shrimp in different shrimp culture systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Molecular Diagnosis of Shrimp Allergy: Efficiency of Several Allergens to Predict Clinical Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Mariona; Grishina, Galina; Yang, Ariana C; Sánchez-García, Silvia; Lin, Jing; Towle, David; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Sastre, Joaquín; Sampson, Hugh A; Ayuso, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of shellfish allergy remains a challenge for clinicians. Several shellfish allergens have been characterized and their IgE epitopes identified. However, the clinical relevance of this sensitization is still not clear. The objective of this study was to identify allergens and epitopes associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Shrimp-sensitized subjects were recruited and grouped based on the history of shrimp-allergic reactions and challenge outcome. IgE reactivity to recombinant crustacean allergens, and IgE and IgG4 reactivity to peptides were determined. Subjects sensitized to dust mites and/or cockroach without shrimp sensitization or reported allergic reactions, as well as nonatopic individuals, were used as controls. A total of 86 subjects were recruited with a skin prick test to shrimp; 74 reported shrimp-allergic reactions, 58 were allergic (38 positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge and 20 recent anaphylaxis), and 16 were tolerant. All subjects without a history of reactions had negative challenges. The individuals with a positive challenge more frequently recognized tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins than those found tolerant by the challenge. Especially a sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein positive test is very likely to result in a positive challenge, though the frequency of recognition is low. Subjects with dust mite and/or cockroach allergy not sensitized to shrimp recognized arginine kinase and hemocyanin. Several epitopes of these allergens may be important in predicting clinical reactivity. Tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein sensitization is associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Myosin light chain testing may help in the diagnosis of clinical reactivity. Arginine kinase and hemocyanin appear to be cross-reacting allergens between shrimp and arthropods. Detection of IgE to these allergens and some of their epitopes may be better diagnostic tools in the routine workup

  8. Catch rates as indicators of ecosystem health and exploitation status in the shrimp fishery in the South China sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; van Thi, Dang

    2008-01-01

    Based on catch and effort data analyses covering the period 1996-2002, time series of catch rates in the trawl fisheries in the South China Sea along the coasts of Bac Lieu and Ca Mau in South East Vietnam were estimated. The indicators include catch rates for total shrimp catch, five major shrimp...... catch groups and 15 commercial shrimp groups estimated as quarterly averages for trawlers divided into five size groups. The analyses indicated that despite a reduction in catch rates, shrimp is still the principal resource for the trawl fleets in South Vietnam. Seasonality in the shrimp catch rates...

  9. Strike mechanics of an ambush predator: the spearing mantis shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deVries, M S; Murphy, E A K; Patek, S N

    2012-12-15

    Ambush predation is characterized by an animal scanning the environment from a concealed position and then rapidly executing a surprise attack. Mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) consist of both ambush predators ('spearers') and foragers ('smashers'). Spearers hide in sandy burrows and capture evasive prey, whereas smashers search for prey away from their burrows and typically hammer hard-shelled, sedentary prey. Here, we examined the kinematics, morphology and field behavior of spearing mantis shrimp and compared them with previously studied smashers. Using two species with dramatically different adult sizes, we found that strikes produced by the diminutive species, Alachosquilla vicina, were faster (mean peak speed 5.72±0.91 m s(-1); mean duration 3.26±0.41 ms) than the strikes produced by the large species, Lysiosquillina maculata (mean peak speed 2.30±0.85 m s(-1); mean duration 24.98±9.68 ms). Micro-computed tomography and dissections showed that both species have the spring and latch structures that are used in other species for producing a spring-loaded strike; however, kinematic analyses indicated that only A. vicina consistently engages the elastic mechanism. In the field, L. maculata ambushed evasive prey primarily at night while hidden in burrows, striking with both long and short durations compared with laboratory videos. We expected ambush predators to strike with very high speeds, yet instead we found that these spearing mantis shrimp struck more slowly and with longer durations than smashers. Nonetheless, the strikes of spearers occurred at similar speeds and durations to those of other aquatic predators of evasive prey. Although counterintuitive, these findings suggest that ambush predators do not actually need to produce extremely high speeds, and that the very fastest predators are using speed to achieve other mechanical feats, such as producing large impact forces.

  10. Isotopic incorporation rates and discrimination factors in mantis shrimp crustaceans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya S deVries

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis has provided insights into the trophic ecology of a wide diversity of animals. Knowledge about isotopic incorporation rates and isotopic discrimination between the consumer and its diet for different tissue types is essential for interpreting stable isotope data, but these parameters remain understudied in many animal taxa and particularly in aquatic invertebrates. We performed a 292-day diet shift experiment on 92 individuals of the predatory mantis shrimp, Neogonodactylus bredini, to quantify carbon and nitrogen incorporation rates and isotope discrimination factors in muscle and hemolymph tissues. Average isotopic discrimination factors between mantis shrimp muscle and the new diet were 3.0 ± 0.6 ‰ and 0.9 ± 0.3 ‰ for carbon and nitrogen, respectively, which is contrary to what is seen in many other animals (e.g. C and N discrimination is generally 0-1 ‰ and 3-4 ‰, respectively. Surprisingly, the average residence time of nitrogen in hemolymph (28.9 ± 8.3 days was over 8 times longer than that of carbon (3.4 ± 1.4 days. In muscle, the average residence times of carbon and nitrogen were of the same magnitude (89.3 ± 44.4 and 72.8 ± 18.8 days, respectively. We compared the mantis shrimps' incorporation rates, along with rates from four other invertebrate taxa from the literature, to those predicted by an allometric equation relating carbon incorporation rate to body mass that was developed for teleost fishes and sharks. The rate of carbon incorporation into muscle was consistent with rates predicted by this equation. Our findings provide new insight into isotopic discrimination factors and incorporation rates in invertebrates with the former showing a different trend than what is commonly observed in other animals.

  11. Influence of a Trematode Parasite (Microphallus turgidus) on Grass Shrimp ( Palaemonetes pugio ) Response to Refuge and Predator Presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sara T

    2016-12-01

    The grass shrimp ( Palaemonetes pugio ) is a staple prey species in the diet of many ecologically and economically important species such as blue crab and striped bass and is commonly infected with a trematode parasite, Microphallus turgidus. To complete its life cycle, M. turgidus must be consumed as a metacercaria by a bird or mammal definitive host. Previous research has found that infected grass shrimp behave more conspicuously than uninfected shrimp around predators, which include mummichogs ( Fundulus heteroclitus ). In addition, grass shrimp are more likely to avoid predation when they have access to coarse woody debris (CWD). Aquaria experiments revealed that uninfected shrimp significantly reduce the amount of time spent swimming in the presence of a fish predator, whereas infected shrimp did not exhibit this predation avoidance behavior. Uninfected shrimp also increased predator avoidance behavior ("backthrusts") in the absence of CWD, whereas infected shrimp did not. These findings suggest that M. turgidus does not influence grass shrimp usage of CWD, but it alters shrimp swimming and backthrust behavior, thereby rendering infected shrimp more susceptible to predation. The implications of increased predation by a fish (nonhost or possible paratenic host) versus by a bird or mammal (definitive host) for parasite transmission are discussed.

  12. USE OF SPONGE, Callyspongia basilana EXTRACT AS ADDITIVE MATERIAL ON TIGER SHRIMP CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmiati Rosmiati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Blue shrimp disease is one of the main problems in tiger shrimp culture. It reduces shrimp quality which eventually will decrease its market price. Blue shrimp is caused by deficiency of nutrition and additive materials such as carotene and other nutrient which function as vitamin source for important metabolic processes and formation of color profile in shrimp and fish. The aims of this study were to study the application effect of carotenoid extract of sponge Callyspongia basilana, as an additive material on the ability of shrimp to get back to normal state after suffering blue shrimp disease and survival rate of shrimp and to find out the optimal concentration of sponge carotenoid extract to cure the diseased shrimp. This study was consisted of two steps namely; (1. Extraction of sponge carotenoid by maseration and fractionation using acetone and petroleum ether solvents and (2, the application of carotenoid extract on the diseased shrimp. The research was arranged in a complete randomized design with four experiments consisted of (A. Control (without carotenoid extract; (B,(C, and (D carotetoid extract addition of 3 mg/L, 6 mg/L, and 9 mg/L respectively with three replication each. The test animal used were blue diseased tiger shrimp with the density of 15 ind./container having 7.5–9.5 cm in size and the average weight of 5.5–10.0 g. The study showed that Callyspongia basilana carotenoid extract was able to change blue diseased shrimp to be normal within six days at the concentration of 9 mg/L. The highest survival rate was found in the experiment D (93.3%. Meanwhile, the lowest was obtained by the control population (13.3% and the other two treatments were 80.0%(C and 73.3% (B. The average of water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, nitrite, and ammonia were in the suitable range for the growth and survival rate of tiger shrimp.

  13. [Exploitation of the shrimp trawl fishery in the period 1991-1999 at the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabash Blanco, Farid A

    2007-03-01

    In Costa Rica, the Gulf of Nicoya shrimp fishery originated in 1952 and represented one of the most important economic activities in the region. Nevertheless, overfishery reduced the captured volumes to levels that prevent this commercial activity. I analyzed official fishery statistics between 1991 and 1999. These species involved are: two species of white shrimp, (Litopenaeus occidentalis and L. stylirostris), the "titi" shrimp (Xiphopenaeus riveti), the brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus californiensis), the "pinki" shrimp (F. brevirostris) and the "fidel" shrimp (Solenocera agassizi). All the species reached the Maximum Sustainable Yield in the decades of 1970 and 1980 and are now found at over-exploitation levels. I recommend that this shrimp trawl fishery be completely closed down.

  14. Gastrointestinal Immune Response to the Shrimp Allergen Tropomyosin: Histological and Immunological Analysis in an Animal Model of Shrimp Tropomyosin Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yin Fan; Tong, Ka Kui; Kwan, Kin Ming; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Shu, Shang-An; Leung, Patrick S C; Chu, Ka Hou

    2015-01-01

    Shellfish hypersensitivity is among the most common food allergies. A murine model of IgE-mediated shrimp allergy has been established in our laboratory. The aim of this study is to determine the intestinal histological changes and cytokine expression profile of this model sensitized with the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin. Female Balb/c mice orally sensitized and challenged with recombinant tropomyosin were sacrificed. Continuous sections of duodenum, jejunum and ileum were prepared using the Swiss roll technique for histological and immunological analysis. Duodenal epithelial cell apoptosis and migration were examined. mRNA expression of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-18 and IFN-γ in intestinal tissue was measured via RT-PCR. In tropomyosin-sensitized and challenged mice, an increased number of eosinophils, mast cells and goblet cells was found 24 h after challenge. There were also increased mast cell and goblet cell numbers at 72 h after challenge, but the level of eosinophils decreased. Differences compared with control mice are most prominent at the duodenum compared to the distal regions. In addition, TUNEL assay indicates a significantly higher apoptosis rate in sensitized mice sacrificed 72 h after challenge, and mRNA expression showed a biased Th2/Th1 cytokine profile and a higher level of murine mast cell protease 1. This study documented a multitude of histological and immunological changes in the gut in a murine model of shrimp allergy. Even without repetitive intragastric challenge, shrimp tropomyosin induces an increase in the number of inflammatory cells to varying degrees within the small intestine. This model provides an important tool for testing new therapeutic interventions. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Effects of process parameters on quality changes of shrimp during drying in a jet-spouted bed dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamnuy, C; Devahastin, S; Soponronnarit, S

    2007-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of various parameters, that is, concentration of salt solution (2%, 3%, 4%[w/v]), boiling time (3, 5, 7 min), drying air temperature (80, 100, 120 degrees C), and size of shrimp, on the kinetics of drying and various quality attributes of shrimp, namely, shrinkage, rehydration ability, texture, colors, and microstructure, during drying in a jet-spouted bed dryer. In addition, the effects of these processing parameters on the sensory attributes of dried shrimp were also investigated. Small shrimp (350 to 360 shrimp/kg) and large shrimp (150 to 160 shrimp/kg) were boiled and then dried until their moisture content was around 25% (d.b.). It was found that the degree of color changes, toughness, and shrinkage of shrimp increased while the rehydration ability decreased with an increase in the concentration of salt solution and boiling time. Size of shrimp and drying temperature significantly affected all quality attributes of dried shrimp. The conditions that gave the highest hedonic scores of sensory evaluation for small dried shrimp are the concentration of salt solution of 2% (w/v), boiling time of 7 min, and drying air temperature of 120 degrees C. On the other hand, the conditions that gave the highest hedonic scores of sensory evaluation for large dried shrimp are the concentration of salt solution of 4% (w/v), boiling time of 7 min, and drying air temperature of 100 degrees C. The quality attributes of dried shrimp measured by instruments correlated well with the sensory attributes, especially the color of dried shrimp.

  16. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Ghost Shrimp and Blue Mud Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    liters (1) 0.2642 gallons cubic meters (m3 ) 35.31 cubic feet cubic meters (m3) 0.0008110 acre-feet milligrams (mg) 0.00003527 ounces grams ( g ) 0.03527...the fifth pair finding specimens as far south as El somewhat pincerlike as in the ghost Estuario de Punto Banda, Baja Cali- shrimp (Schmitt 1921). The...Project/Task/Work Unit No. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Fishery Research Center 11. conct(c) or Grnt( G )No. Building 204, Naval Station

  17. Quality of shrimp analogue product as affected by addition of modified potato starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remya, S; Basu, S; Venkateshwarlu, G; Mohan, C O

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of addition of modified potato starch on the biochemical and textural properties of shrimp analogue/imitation shrimp, a popular value-added product prepared from surimi. Three batches of shrimp analogues were prepared with 0 % (NPS), 50 % (CPS) and 100 % (MPS) of modified starch incorporation and various quality attributes were monitored at regular intervals during frozen storage (-20 °C). Loss of myofibrillar protein was least for the shrimp analogue sample added with 100 % modified potato starch. The expressible moisture content of MPS (2.48 %) was less affected by long term storage compared to CPS (3.38 %) and NPS (3.99 %). During extended low temperature storage, the textural quality of sea food analogue was highly influenced by the type of starch added to it. The percentage of modified potato starch added to shrimp analogue significantly (p ≤ 0.05) affected its hardness and fracturability. MPS samples did not show significant changes in hardness during storage as compared to other two samples. Springiness of shrimp analogue increased 2.57, 1.5 and 1.77 times with the storage period for samples with NPS, CPS and MPS, respectively. Addition of modified potato starch improved the sensory quality and textural properties of shrimp analogue and reduced the quality degradation during frozen storage as compared to NPS which contained only native potato starch.

  18. Physical and physiological aspects of gear efficiency in North Sea brown shrimp fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghahn, R.; Wiese, K.; Lüdemann, K.

    1995-03-01

    In search of means to reduce the by-catch of juvenile flatfish in the shrimp fishery, vibrations and changes in current velocity caused by shrimp trawls were investigated in the field and in the laboratory. Buried as well as emerged shrimps ( Crangon crangon) exhibit tailflips 5 10 cm before being touched by the rollers of a shrimp gear approaching them at a speed of 0.5 m·sec-1, as was revealed by slow motion video recordings in aquaria under artificial light. Hence, the signal effective in triggering escape must be attenuated strongly with increasing distance. Sediment vibration, commonly assumed to be an important signal in triggering escape of shrimps, was found to decrease by a factor 100·m-1. Signals from the rollers of a commercial shrimp gear in operation (towing speed 1 m·sec-1) were directly recorded with an accelerometer. Their frequency ranged from 50 to 500 Hz and reached an acceleration of 40 m·sec-2 on soft bottom or up to 100 m·sec-2 on hard substrate. Accelerometers, which had been buried right at the surface of a tidal sand flat during low tide, produced only one sharp signal of 100 Hz with an acceleration of 24 m·sec-2, when a shrimp gear swept them on the submerged tidal flats. However, in aquaria short sinusoidal signals (Crangon accessible to the gear.

  19. Hydrostatic pressure affects selective tidal stream transport in the North Sea brown shrimp (Crangon crangon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielmann, Moritz; Reiser, Stefan; Hufnagl, Marc; Herrmann, Jens-Peter; Eckardt, André; Temming, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) is a highly abundant invertebrate in the North Sea, with its life cycle stages ranging from deep offshore spawning to shallow onshore nursery areas. To overcome the long distances between these two habitats, brown shrimp are suspected to use selective tidal stream transport (STST), moving with the cyclic tide currents towards their preferred water depths. However, it is not known which stimulus actually triggers STST behavior in brown shrimp. In this work, we determined the influence of different hyperbaric pressures on STST behavior of juvenile brown shrimp. Brown shrimp activity was recorded in a hyperbaric pressure chamber that supplied constant and dynamic pressure conditions simulating different depths, with and without a tidal cycle. Subsequent wavelet and Fourier analysis were performed to determine the periodicity in the activity data. The results of the experiments show that STST behavior in brown shrimp varies with pressure and therefore with depth. We further show that STST behavior can be initiated by cyclic pressure changes. However, an interaction with one or more other environmental triggers remains possible. Furthermore, a security ebb-tide activity was identified that may serve to avoid potential stranding in shallow waters and is 'remembered' by shrimp for about 1.5 days without contact with tidal triggers. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The effects of Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis) coating on the quality of shrimp during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanizadeh, Nafiseh; Mousavinejad, Mohsen S

    2015-10-01

    Green tiger shrimp (Penaeus semisulcatus) is an important aquaculture species worldwide. Its perishable nature, however, needs preservation methods to ensure its quality and shelf life. In this study, the effects of Aloe vera coating on the quality and shelf life of shrimps during cold storage were investigated. Shrimp samples were dipped in aqueous solutions containing 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% Aloe vera gel before storage at 4 °C for 7 days. Drip loss, pH, TBA, TVB-N, and texture of both the control and treated shrimp samples were analyzed periodically. There were significant differences between coated shrimps and the control group in all parameters evaluated. Aloe vera at 75% and 100% concentrations was able to prevent lipid oxidation and drip loss properly; however, coatings containing 25% Aloe vera did not have the desired effects on these characteristics. Shrimps coated with higher concentrations of Aloe vera had better textural properties during cold storage. Results also indicated the positive effects of Aloe vera coating on the sensory quality of shrimp.

  1. Evaluation of green tea extract as a glazing material for shrimp frozen by cryogenic freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Srijanani; Prudente, Alfredo; Bankston, J David; King, Joan M; Wilson, Paul; Sathivel, Subramaniam

    2011-09-01

    Solutions of green tea (Camellia sinensis) extract (GTE) in distilled water were evaluated as a glazing material for shrimp frozen by cryogenic freezing. Total of 2%, 3%, and/or 5% GTE solutions (2GTE, 3GTE, 5GTE) were used for glazing. Distilled water glazed (GDW) and nonglazed shrimp (NG) served as controls. The GTE was characterized by measuring color, pH, (o) Brix, total phenols, and % antiradical activity. Individual catechins were identified by HPLC. The freezing time, freezing rate, and energy removal rate for freezing shrimp by cryogenic freezing process were estimated. The frozen shrimp samples were stored in a freezer at -21 °C for 180 d. Samples were analyzed for pH, moisture content, glazing yield, thaw yield, color, cutting force, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) after 1, 30, 90, and 180 d. The HPLC analysis of GTE revealed the presence of catechins and their isomers and the total polyphenol content was 148.10 ± 2.49 g/L. The freezing time (min) and energy removal rate (J/s) were 48.67 ± 2.3 and 836.67 ± 78.95, respectively. Glazed samples had higher moisture content compared to NG shrimp after 180 d storage. GTE was effective in controlling the lipid oxidation in shrimp. Glazing with GTE affected a* and b* color values, but had no significant effect on the L* values of shrimp. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Use of probiotic-supplemented diet on a Pacific white shrimp farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe do Nascimento Vieira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of a diet supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum on performance, immunological parameters, and bacterial microbiota of the digestive tract of white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei. We used six earthen ponds (1.2 ha stocked with 14 shrimp m−2 (3 g mean weight. Three ponds received a diet supplemented with L. plantarum and three were maintained as control. The survival and feed efficiency of shrimp fed the supplemented diet were greater than that observed in shrimp fed the control diet, with survival values of 83.02±6.12% and 74.65±9.07% and feed efficiencies of 117.97±4.45% and 104.46±7.30%, respectively. However, we observed no differences in weight gain. The intestines of shrimp fed probiotics had lower counts of Vibrio spp. and higher counts of lactic acid bacteria, compared with those of control shrimp. Diets supplemented with L. plantarum alter the intestinal bacterial microbiota of shrimp, resulting in increased survival and feed efficiency.

  3. Standardization of sodium metabisulfite solution concentrations and immersion time for farmed shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Trigueiro de Andrade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sodium metabisulfite is the main additive used in the prevention of melanosis in shrimp; however, it has currently been employed with great variation in concentration by producers. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the correlation between the concentration of the sodium metabisulfite solution and immersion time of the whole shrimp to obtain the concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO2 in the edible muscle of farmed shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei in accordance with the limit established by law. For this, solutions of sodium metabisulfite at different concentrations (1%, 2 %, 3 %, 4% and 5% were prepared and samples of L. vannamei shrimp (100g were immersed during 10, 20 or 30 minutes at temperature of 7°C. For all treatment assayed the concentration of SO2 was determined in the edible muscle of farmed shrimp (L. vannamei. The results show that for the conditions used in this study, the correlations were linear, with significant increase (P<0.05 in the SO2 concentration in the edible muscle of shrimps both increasing sodium metabisulfite concentration as increasing immersion times, suggesting the immersion of shrimps in a 3% solution for a time of 13 minutes in order to obtain SO2 concentration of 100ppm in its edible muscle in accordance with Brazilian legislation

  4. Utilization of Cinnamon Leaf and Shrimp Flour as an Enhancer of Catfish Meat Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Setiawati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus is a freshwater fish that has been produced in the form of a filet. One of the problems in producing good catfish fillet is compactness and brightness of catfish farmed meat. This research aimed to get feed formulation as enhancer meat quality of striped catfish with added Cinnamon leaves flour (Cinnamomum burmannii and used shrimp head meal. A Fish with a weight of 208.98±25.76 g reared in 12 floating nets cage (2x1x1.5 m3 with density of 15 fish/nets for 60 days. As treatment, fish were fed with feed contains 1% cinnamon leaves, 45% shrimp head meal, and combined of cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal, and as control used feed were formulated without cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal. Fish were fed 2 times a daily with feeding rate 3.5% of average body weight of fish. The test parameters observed were physical, chemical and organoleptic test of catfish meat. The results showed feed with contains cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal could decrease level of body fat 14.7% compared than control (p<0.05. Feed with used cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal gave a texture of fillet fish more compact, elastic and color of fillet fish white. Keywords: Cinnamomum burmannii, fillet, shrimp head meal, feed formulated, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus

  5. Spermatozoal ultrastructure in three Atlantic solenocerid shrimps (Decapoda, Dendrobranchiata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Antonio; Scelzo, Marcelo A; Tudge, Christopher C

    2006-03-01

    The spermatozoal ultrastructure in three solenocerid shrimps (Solenocera membranacea, S. africana, and Pleoticus muelleri) from different Atlantic locations was examined with the aim of increasing understanding of the phylogenetic relationships in the Dendrobranchiata. A considerable structural similarity between the sperm of these species and those of penaeid shrimps supports a close affinity between the Penaeidae and Solenoceridae. However, significant differences in the sperm morphology of the previously investigated sicyoniids (namely, a greater complexity of the acrosomal complex) suggest evolutionary separation of the Sicyoniidae from the assemblage Penaeidae-Solenoceridae. Two ultrastructural features distinguish the spermatozoa of the three studied solenocerids from penaeid sperm: 1) separation of the plasma and acrosome membranes at the base of the spike and anterior region of the cap, and 2) asymmetry of the acrosomal cap, which appears to be a synapomorphy of the group. No striking ultrastructural differences were found between the spermatozoa of the closely related species S. membranacea and S. africana, whereas a great number of morphological differences separate the spermatozoa of Pleoticus from those of Solenocera (e.g., shape of the acrosomal cap, structural arrangement of the contents of the whole acrosome vesicle, thickness and distribution of the cytoplasm, and external shape of the spike).

  6. Control of social monogamy through aggression in a hermaphroditic shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Janine WY

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Sex allocation theory predicts that in small mating groups simultaneous hermaphroditism is the optimal form of gender expression. Under these conditions, male allocation is predicted to be very low and overall per-capita reproductive output maximal. This is particularly true for individuals that live in pairs, but monogamy is highly susceptible to cheating by both partners. However, certain conditions favour social monogamy in hermaphrodites. This study addresses the influence of group size on group stability and moulting cycles in singles, pairs, triplets and quartets of the socially monogamous shrimp Lysmata amboinensis, a protandric simultaneous hermaphrodite. Results The effect of group size was very strong: Exactly one individual in each triplet and exactly two individuals in each quartet were killed in aggressive interactions, resulting in group sizes of two individuals. All killed individuals had just moulted. No mortality occurred in single and pair treatments. The number of moults in the surviving shrimp increased significantly after changing from triplets and quartets to pairs. Conclusion Social monogamy in L. amboinensis is reinforced by aggressive expulsion of supernumerous individuals. We suggest that the high risk of mortality in triplets and quartets results in suppression of moulting in groups larger than two individuals and that the feeding ecology of L. amboinensis favours social monogamy.

  7. An updated checklist of shrimps on the Indian coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Deepak Samuel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports an updated checklist of marine shrimps found along the Indian coast, including the Lakshadweep and the Andaman & Nicobar Islands.  A total of 364 species classified under 128 genera belonging to the order Decapoda is reported, thus adding 27 species to the existing checklist of 337 species.  Marine shrimps are classified under two suborders of the order Decapoda, viz., Dendrobranchiata and Pleocyemata, and the two suborders account for 155 (42.6 % and 209 species (57.4 % of these 364 species, respectively.  Pleocyemata is represented by three infraorders, viz., Axiidea, Caridea and Stenopodidea, while Caridea has a maximum of 199 reported species. Among the 12 superfamilies, Penaeoidea contributed to 38.13% (135 species followed by Paleaemonidea with 18.07% (64 species.  All other superfamilies were found to contribute less than 12%.  Superfamilies, Bresilloidea and Psalidopodoidea had only single species representatives (0.28% each.  The final list was compiled after reviewing all existing literature including monographs, catalogues, checklists, websites and fishery reports. The scientific names were validated with the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS database.  A total of 25 issues were identified from the previous checklist out of which 19 species have been updated with the correct, accepted names and six species have been removed from the previous list.

  8. Structure of Penaeus stylirostris Densovirus, a Shrimp Pathogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Bärbel; Bowman, Valorie D.; Li, Yi; Szelei, Jozsef; Waddell, Peter J.; Tijssen, Peter; Rossmann, Michael G. (INRS); (Purdue)

    2010-11-16

    Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV), a pathogen of penaeid shrimp, causes significant damage to farmed and wild shrimp populations. In contrast to other parvoviruses, PstDNV probably has only one type of capsid protein that lacks the phospholipase A2 activity that has been implicated as a requirement during parvoviral host cell infection. The structure of recombinant virus-like particles, composed of 60 copies of the 37.5-kDa coat protein, the smallest parvoviral capsid protein reported thus far, was determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The structure represents the first near-atomic resolution structure within the genus Brevidensovirus. The capsid protein has a {beta}-barrel 'jelly roll' motif similar to that found in many icosahedral viruses, including other parvoviruses. The N-terminal portion of the PstDNV coat protein adopts a 'domain-swapped' conformation relative to its twofold-related neighbor similar to the insect parvovirus Galleria mellonella densovirus (GmDNV) but in stark contrast to vertebrate parvoviruses. However, most of the surface loops have little structural resemblance to any of the known parvoviral capsid proteins.

  9. Green Approaches to Extract Astaxanthin from Shrimp Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Errico, Massimiliano; El-Houri, Rime Bahij

    2016-01-01

    Sunflower oil and its methyl ester have recently been shown as potential green solvents which could substitute traditional organic solvents. This study investigates the economic feasibility of using these green solvents to extract astaxanthin from shrimp processing waste. The feasibility of comme......Sunflower oil and its methyl ester have recently been shown as potential green solvents which could substitute traditional organic solvents. This study investigates the economic feasibility of using these green solvents to extract astaxanthin from shrimp processing waste. The feasibility...... of commercial use of the green solvents under plausible process conditions is compared to extraction with a mixture of hexane: isopropanol. Process flowsheets describing these processes were created using SuperPro Designer. Although the astaxanthin extraction yield was highest when using hexane: isopropanol......, according to the economic analysis, the green solvents showed lower capital and operating costs. Extraction with methyl ester of sunflower oil was found to be the more efficient green solvent process investigated with respect to production rate and unit cost of concentrated astaxanthin (155 ppm)....

  10. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio spp. in Retail and Farm Shrimps in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, L; Alter, T; Huehn, S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in shrimp at retail and in shrimp farms in Ecuador and to determine the antimicrobial agent resistance patterns of farm isolates. The presence of genes linked to early mortality syndrome (EMS) or acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) also was evaluated. Vibrio spp. were isolated from retail shrimps in Cuenca, Ecuador, and farm shrimps originating from provinces El Oro and Guayas, Ecuador. A total of 229 shrimp samples were collected, of which 71 originated from retail markets in Cuenca and 158 came from shrimp farms. Overall, 219 (95.6%) samples tested positive for Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (80.8%) was the most common species detected, followed by Vibrio alginolyticus (50.2%), Vibrio cholerae (11.3%), and Vibrio vulnificus (3.5%). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the virulence-associated tdh and trh genes. In V. parahaemolyticus shrimp farm isolates, high resistance was found to ampicillin (92.2%), and intermediate resistance was found to tetracycline (51.3%) and amikacin (22.1%). Of the V. parahaemolyticus strains, 68 were resistant to at least three antimicrobial agents, and 2 were resistant to seven antimicrobial agents simultaneously. Up to 18 resistant isolates were found for V. alginolyticus, whereas V. vulnificus and V. cholerae isolates were more susceptible. None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the EMS-AHPND plasmid. The results of this study revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of Vibrio spp. in shrimps at retail and on shrimp farms in Ecuador.

  11. Spirulina elicits the activation of innate immunity and increases resistance against Vibrio alginolyticus in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Yuan; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Tayag, Carina Miranda; Li, Hui-Fang; Putra, Dedi Fazriansyah; Kuo, Yi-Hsuan; Bai, Jia-Chin; Chang, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    The effect of Spirulina dried powder (SDP) on the immune response of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was studied in vitro and in vivo. Incubating shrimp haemocytes in 0.5 mg ml(-1) SDP caused the degranulation of haemocytes and a reduction in the percentage of large cells within 30 min. Shrimp haemocytes incubated in 1 mg ml(-1) SDP significantly increased their phenoloxidase (PO) activity, serine proteinase activity, and respiratory burst activity (RB, release of superoxide anion). A recombinant protein of lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) of the white shrimp was produced, named rLvLGBP, and examined for its binding with SDP. An ELISA binding assay showed that rLvLGBP binds to SDP with a dissociation constant of 0.0507 μM. In another experiment, shrimp fed diets containing SDP at 0 (control), 30, and 60 g kg(-1) after four weeks were examined for LGBP transcript level and lysozyme activity, as well as phagocytic activity, clearance efficiency, and resistance to Vibrio alginolyticus. These parameters were significantly higher in shrimp receiving diets containing SDP at 60 g kg(-1) or 30 g kg(-1) than in controls. In conclusion, shrimp haemocytes receiving SDP provoked the activation of innate immunity as evidenced by the recognition and binding of LGBP, degranulation of haemocytes, reduction in the percentage of large cells, increases in PO activity, serine proteinase activity, superoxide anion levels, and up-regulated LGBP transcript levels. Shrimp receiving diets containing SDP had increased lysozyme activity and resistance against V. alginolyticus infection. This study showed the mechanism underlying the immunostimulatory action of Spirulina and its immune response in shrimp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Social Relation between Businessman and Community in Management of Intensive Shrimp Pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumay Febryano, Indra; Sinurat, James; Lovinia Salampessy, Messalina

    2017-02-01

    Expansion of aquaculture, especially shrimp culture, is the primary cause of deforestation of mangrove along coastal zone. This phenomenon is pretty much related to social relation between businessman of intensive shrimp pond and community around coastal zone. The objective of this research is to explain social relation between businessman and community in managing intensive shrimp pond. This research is a kind of qualitative research and the method used is a case study. The result of this research shows that the behaviour of the majority of businessman of intensive shrimp pond is not accordingly with environmental concerns as they compelled conversion of mangrove and they disposed waste of shrimp pond into the sea. Such kind of behaviour caused degradation of water ecosystem and marginalizing local community. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) which was implemented by businessman of intensive shrimp pond in the area of social, religion, and education can downgrade the coming up of social turbulence. Otherwise, CSR in enabling economic community and environmental management was not conducted yet. CSR in environmental management can be conducted by businessman of intensive shrimp pond by considering the existence of mangrove and pond management and waste in a better way, so that environment around ponds is not polluted and the sustainability of shrimp pond business as well as income of community can be guaranteed. Accordingly with the result of this research, CSR is not only involving businessman of intensive shrimp pond and community, but also involving local government in terms of right and responsibility of citizen as well as management and development of community.

  13. Clinical and immunochemical profiles of food challenge proven or anaphylactic shrimp allergy in tropical Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalayasingam, M; Gerez, I F A; Yap, G C; Llanora, G V; Chia, I P; Chua, L; Lee, C J A O; Ta, L D H; Cheng, Y K; Thong, B Y H; Tang, C Y; Van Bever, H P S; Shek, L P; Curotto de Lafaille, M A; Lee, B W

    2015-03-01

    Shellfish allergy in Singapore is highly prevalent, and shrimp allergy is the most common. This study aims to evaluate the clinical characteristics and immunological phenotype of shellfish allergy in this population. Patients with self-reported shellfish allergy were recruited from outpatient clinics of three large hospitals and from a population survey. Open oral food challenges (OFC) to glass prawn (Litopenaeus vannamei) and tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) were carried out on all patients except for those who had a history of severe anaphylaxis. Skin prick tests (SPT) and specific IgE to crude and recombinant allergens were carried out to evaluate shrimp and dust mite sensitization. Immunoblots were used to assess IgE-binding proteins. The 104 patients recruited were categorized into shellfish allergic (SA) when OFC was positive or had a history of severe anaphylaxis (n = 39), shellfish tolerant (ST) when OFC was negative (n = 27), and house dust mite positive controls (HDM(+) ) who were ST (n = 38). Oral symptoms (87.1%) were the predominant clinical manifestation. Positive challenge doses ranged from 2 to 80 g of cooked shrimp, with 25/52 patients reacting to either one or both shrimps challenged. The presence of specific IgE to shrimp either by SPT and/or ImmunoCAP(®) assay provided diagnostic test sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 22.2%. The inclusion of specific IgE to shrimp tropomyosin and IgE immunoblots with shrimp extracts did not improve the diagnostic proficiency substantially. This study highlights the predominance of oral symptoms in shrimp allergy in tropical Asia and that a high provocation dose may be necessary to reveal shrimp allergy. Furthermore, specific IgE diagnostic tests and immunoblots were of limited use in this population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Index of molt staging in the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon)

    OpenAIRE

    Pornpimol Kirirat; Waraporn Promwikorn; Pinij Thaweethamsewee

    2004-01-01

    Molting is a phenomenon of shedding the old cuticle and re-generating the new one found in crustaceans including shrimps and many other species of invertebrates. The molting cycle is a dynamic process, composed of pre-ecdysis (premolt, D stage), ecdysis (E stage), postecdysis (postmolt, A-B stages), and intermolting (C stage) stages. In healthy shrimp, molting cycles are repeated several times through shrimp life in order to increase body size and mass (growth). In this paper we gather the kn...

  15. On the Shrimp Fauna of Kozima Bay in the Seto Inland Sea

    OpenAIRE

    小川, 泰樹; 角田, 俊平; 高橋, 正雄

    1983-01-01

    A study was carried out to clarify the shrimp fauna of Kozima Bay (brackish water) in the Seto Inland Sea, and to compare it with those of Lake Kozima (fresh water) and the coastal region (salt water) near Kozima Bay. The shrimp specimens were collected 6 times over a period of one year every other month from September of 1976 to August of '77 with a small trawl net. Thc number of shrimps collected was 4,208 and they were classified into 15 species belonging to 3 families. Of these, 5 species...

  16. A Brine Shrimp Bioassay for Measuring Toxicity and Remediation of Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Marya

    1999-12-01

    A bioassay using Artemia franciscana (brine shrimp) was adapted to measure the toxicity of household chemicals. One project is described in which students collect dose-response curves for seven commercial flea-killing products. Next, groups of students researched the insecticidal ingredients of the flea products. On the basis of the structures of the active ingredients, they chose remediation methods to make the flea product less toxic to brine shrimp; procedures included copper-catalyzed hydrolysis, adsorption onto activated charcoal, bleach treatment, and photodegradation. No special equipment or supplies are necessary for the bioassay other than the brine shrimp eggs, which can be obtained at any aquarium store.

  17. USE OF BRINE SHRIMP (ARTEMIA IN THE FEEDING OF STURGEON JUVENILES (ACIPENSERIDAE (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review scientific sources on the technological and biological characteristics of the use of brine shrimp (Artemia in the feeding of sturgeon juvenilse (Acipenseridae. To highlight the common biotechnological bases of the enrichment of brine shrimp with biologically active substances necessary for the full development of sturgeon juveniles. Findings. The review of scientific papers showed that the technology is the use of brine shrimp in the feeding of sturgeon speices not only had not lost its relevance in aquaculture, but also continued to evolve in response to new challenges. The review contains a description of the peculiarities of the biological structure of brine shrimp eggs and methods of their quality assessment in the field. It describes the nutritional characteristics of Artemia. It is shown that brine shrimp is the best food organism for the use in the feeding of sturgeon fingerlings. The calculation scheme for Artemia decapsulation and incubation is provided. The main technological stages of of the preparation of shrimps before their use in feeding – activation, hydration, decapsulation, incubation, dehydration were described. The effect of brine shrimp nauplia enriched with biologically active substances enriched brine shrimp on sturgeon juveniles was highlighted. Practical value. Fish farm owners search for cost-effective, easy to use, and available food that is preferred by sturgeon juveniles (Acipenseridae. Brine shrimp nauplii obtained from cysts can be readil used to feed fish just after one-day incubation. Instar I (the nauplii that just hatched and contain large yolk reserves in their body and instar II nauplii (the nauplii after first moult and with functional digestive tracts are more widely used in aquaculture, because they are easy for operation, rich in nutrients, and small, which makes them suitable for feeding fish larvae as live feed or after drying. The generalized information will be important for

  18. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii food without oregano oil (the control. The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae. The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p <0.05 in tissues from animals whose food was supplemented with oregano oil. We concluded that dietary supplementation of shrimps with oregano oil provides antimicrobial activity into the body of the penaeids.

  19. Improvement of shrimp allergy after sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mites: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellini, G; Spadolini, I; Santucci, A; Cova, V; Conti, C; Corvetta, A; Passalacqua, G

    2011-10-01

    The appropriateness of house dust mite specific immunotherapy in patients allergic to shrimps still remains unclear We present a clinical case as an immunological model for the strong sensitization to tropomyosin with symptoms of anaphylaxis due to shrimps and coexisting asthma due to house dust mite. The improvement in respiratory symptoms for house dust mite and in the food challenge for shrimps during mite immunotherapy with a known and high dosage of tropomyosin suggests the hypothesis that efficacy of mite immunotherapy in food allergy to tropomyosin may be dose dependent.

  20. Feeding behavior of Harlequin Shrimp Hymenocera picta Dana, 1852 (Hymenoceridae on Sea Star Linckia laevigata (Ophidiasteridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prakash

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Caridean shrimps did not display any selective feeding regimes. However, the shrimp belongs the genus Hymenocera (Caridea: Hymenoceridae exclusively feeds on starfish, causes potential crisis to the hobbyists those wish to accommodate them in reef aquaria. The present observation deals with the documentation about the feeding behavior of Harlequin Shrimp Hymenocera picta Dana feeds on its favorite prey Blue Star Linckia laevigata (Ophidiasteridae in captivity. The upliftment continues for 30-60 minutes and feeding was initiated by removing the ambulacral feet and gonadal tissues of the Starfish.

  1. BIOLOGY AND POPULATION DYNAMICS OF BANANA SHRIMP (Penaeus merguiensis) IN THE TARAKAN WATERS, EAST BORNEO

    OpenAIRE

    Duranta D Kembaren; Ali Suman

    2013-01-01

    Study of biology and population dynamic of banana shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) in Tarakan waters, East Borneo was carried out from January to November 2012. The aim of this research was to identify the biological aspects and population dynamics of banana shrimp. For estimating dynamic population, data were analysed using FiSAT II. The result showed that length at first capture (Lc) of banana shrimp by mini trawl (pukat hela) was 35 mm and the size at first maturity (Lm) was 33,86 mm in carapa...

  2. Influence of probiotics on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of white Pacific shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, R. Geovanny D.; Shen, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    The influence of Bacillus probiotics on the digestive enzyme activity and the growth of Litopenaeus vannamei were determined in this study. The shrimp was treated with five percentages (1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 and 7.5) of probiotics ( Bacillus spp.) supplemented to the feed and cultured for 45d. The growth measured as the weight gain at the end of culturing was significantly ( Pprobiotic-treated shrimps than that of the control (without receiving probiotics). Activities of protease and amylase, two digestive enzymes of the midgut gland and the intestine were significantly ( Pprobiotic-treated shrimp than in the control.

  3. CLUSTER MODEL FOR EXTENSIVE GIANT TIGER SHRIMP (Penaeus monodon Fab. TO PREVENT TRANSMISSION OF WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Taslihan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV has become epidemic in Indonesia and affecting shrimp aquaculture interm of its production. White spot syndrome virus is transmitted from one to other ponds, through crustacean, included planktonic copepode as carrier for WSSV and through water from affected shrimp pond. A cluster model, consist of shrimp grow out ponds surrounded by non-shrimp pond as a role of biosecurity has been developed. The model aimed to prevent white spot virus transmission in extensive giant tiger shrimp pond. The study was conducted in two sites at Demak District, Central Java Province. As the treatment, a cluster consist of three shrimp ponds in site I, and two shrimp ponds in site II, each was surrounded by buffer ponds rearing only finfish. As the control, five extensive shrimp grow out ponds in site I and three shrimp grow out ponds in site II, with shrimp pond has neither applied biosecurity nor surrounded by non-shrimp pond as biosecurity as well considered as control ponds. The results found that treatment of cluster shrimp ponds surrounded by non-shrimp ponds could hold shrimp at duration of culture in the grow out pond (DOC 105.6±4.5 days significantly much longer than that of control that harvested at 60.9±16.0 days due to WSSV outbreak. Survival rate in trial ponds was 77.6±3.6%, significantly higher than that of control at 22.6±15.8%. Shrimp production in treatment ponds has total production of 425.1±146.6 kg/ha significantly higher than that of control that could only produced 54.5±47.6 kg/ha. Implementation of Better Management Practices (BMP by arranging shrimp ponds in cluster and surrounding by non-shrimp ponds proven effectively prevent WSSV transmission from traditional shrimp ponds in surrounding area.

  4. Effects of shrimp density on transmission of penaeid acute viremia in Penaeus japonicus by cannibalism and the waterborne route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J L; Namikoshi, A; Nishizawa, T; Mushiak, K; Teruya, K; Muroga, K

    2001-11-08

    To investigate the effects of shrimp density on mortalities of Penaeus japonicus in experimental penaeid acute viremia (= white spot syndrome), shrimp injected intramuscularly with penaeid rod-shaped DNA virus (PRDV) were reared at different densities. In Expt 1, challenged (10(-6) dilution of a PRDV preparation) shrimp were reared collectively in a tank or individually in separate chamber units. A significant difference in cumulative mortalities was found between collectively (75.6%) and individually (1.2%) reared groups after 30 d. In Expt 2, effects of density on mortality were clearly shown when challenged (10(-5) dilution) shrimp were reared collectively in tanks at high (260 shrimp m(-2)), middle (135 shrimp m(-2)) and low densities (73 shrimp m(-2)). The cumulative mortalities for 14 d in the high, middle and low density groups were 72, 46 and 18%, respectively. In Expt 3, challenged (10(-5) dilution) shrimp were reared collectively in 3 tanks (Groups A, B and C) at the same high density (260 shrimp m(-2)): Group A, dead shrimp were immediately removed to avoid transmission of the pathogen through cannibalism and the waterborne route; Group B, dead shrimp were removed at scheduled times but were separated from living shrimp by a net partition to avoid cannibalism; and Group C, dead shrimp were removed twice a day at scheduled times. Resulting cumulative mortalities for 20 d in Groups A, B and C were 4, 24 and 64 %, respectively. These results show that the higher mortalities occur in P. japonicus reared at the higher densities in experimental PRDV infection, and this phenomenon is caused mainly by a higher opportunity of horizontal transmission of the virus through cannibalism and the waterborne route.

  5. An investigation into mechanical strength of exoskeleton of hydrothermal vent shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata) and shallow water shrimp (Pandalus platyceros) at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Devendra; Tomar, Vikas

    2015-04-01

    This investigation reports a comparison of the exoskeleton mechanical strength of deep sea shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata and shallow water shrimp species Pandalus platyceros at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 80°C using nanoindentation experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that both shrimp exoskeletons have the Bouligand structure. Differences in the structural arrangement and chemical composition of both shrimps are highlighted by SEM and EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) analyses. The variation in the elastic moduli with temperature is found to be correlated with the measured compositional differences. The reduced modulus of R. exoculata is 8.26±0.89GPa at 25°C that reduces to 7.61±0.65GPa at 80°C. The corresponding decrease in the reduced modulus of P. platyceros is from 27.38±2.3GPa at 25°C to 24.58±1.71GPa at 80°C. The decrease in reduced moduli as a function of temperature is found to be dependent on the extent of calcium based minerals in exoskeleton of both types of shrimp exoskeletons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute Oral Toxicity and Brine Shrimp Lethality of Methanol Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kidney and lung tissues of the rats. Histopathological examination also did not reveal any toxicity ... Keywords: Mentha spicata, Acute toxicity, Brine shrimp, Histopathology, Haematological. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is ... rheumatism, toothache, muscle pain. Mint possesses antimicrobial and antioxidant.

  7. Water quality management in shrimp aquaculture ponds using remote water quality logging system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreepada, R.A.; Kulkarni, S.; Suryavanshi, U.; Ingole, B.S.; Drensgstig, A.; Braaten, B.

    Currently an institutional co-operation project funded by NORAD is evaluating different environmental management strategies for sustainable aquaculture in India. A brief description of a remote water quality logging system installed in shrimp ponds...

  8. Formulation of cheaper artificial feeds for shrimp culture: preliminary biochemical, physical and biological evaluation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.; Goswami, S.C.

    A compound shrimp diet was prepared making use of the locally available natural food stuffs, slaughter house products and factory by-products. The ingredients, viz: beef liver (discarded for human use on veterinary grounds), coconut oil cake, soya...

  9. Low-input Modified Extensive Shrimp Culture System for Penaeus monodon Restrian Vibriosis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Sreepada, R.A.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Karekar. S.V.; Shirodkar, R.R.; Vogelsang, C.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    in environmental parameters suggesting that the systems maintained TVLO below disease-causing threshold. The Vibrio community was represented mainly by V. metschnikovii, V. fluvialis, V. mimicus and the closely related Aeromonas spp. The vibrios in shrimp...

  10. Brine shrimp lethality and antibacterial activity of extracts from the bark of Schleichera oleosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the antibacterial efficacy and brine shrimp toxicity of extracts (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water obtained from the bark of Schleichera oleosa. Methods: The powdered bark sample was Soxhlet extracted sequentially in hexanes, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antibacterial evaluation was carried out by following the agar diffusion method and amoxicillin disc was used as a reference. Slightly modified Meyer’s method was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts in brine shrimps. Results: Among the nine bacterial strains tested, the methanolic and aqueous extracts showed promising antibacterial efficacy against Serratia marcescens, Escherarichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus. None of the extracts were found significantly toxic to brine shrimps. Conclusions: Strong antibacterial activity and low brine shrimp toxicity of methanolic and aqueous extracts can provide new antibacterial compounds.

  11. Information Seeking Behaviour of Shrimp Farmers and their Perception towards Technology Dissemination through Mobile Phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand PR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted among the shrimp farmers to ascertain their information seeking behaviour and perception concerning extension service through mobile phones. The findings indicate that the farmer respondents were of the perception that mobile phone-aided extension service is a viable, expedient, prompt, cost-effective and novel approach. Further they expressed that a dedicated mobile app on shrimp farming with dynamic content modules on ‘disease diagnosis, calculations for water quality corrections, feed management, pond risk management and post your query ’would be very useful for farmers and extension workers to update their capacity and sharing of field experiences. Therefore, developing a mobile app on shrimp farming, incorporating the above features would enhance the access to quality information and minimise the information gap among the shrimp farmers.

  12. Clonal Occurrence of Salmonella Weltevreden in Cultured Shrimp in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Uddin, Gazi Md.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Barco, Lisa; Minh Phu, Tran; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence, serovar and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. in shrimp samples from intensive and extensive farms located in three different provinces in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Shrimp from 11 of the 48 farms all contained S. Weltevreden, except for one farm yielding S. Agona, with no difference in Salmonella occurrence between the two production systems. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of S. Weltevreden showed closely related XbaI pulse types, suggesting a clonal relationship despite the farms and shrimp samples being epidemiologically unrelated. S. Weltevreden was susceptible to most antimicrobials tested, with a few strains being resistant to florfenicol, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim. Future studies of the ecology of S. Weltevreden should establish if this serovar may survive better and even multiply in warm-water shrimp farm environments compared to other Salmonella serovars. PMID:26222547

  13. Trace metal dynamics in marine shrimps from the southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; Hsu, S-H; Nair, S.M.; Martin, G.D.; Nair, K.K.C.

    Concentrations of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in the muscle tissue of marine shrimps, Penaeus mondon, Penaeus japonicus, Penaeus indicus, Penaeus mergniensis, Parapenaeopsis hardwickii and Parapenaeopsis stylifera, collected from the continental...

  14. Acquisition of epibiotic bacteria along the life cycle of the hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guri, Mathieu; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Zbinden, Magali; Crassous, Philippe; Shillito, Bruce; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    ... in the first stages of the shrimp life (eggs, hatched eggs (with larvae) and juveniles). Hatched eggs associated with young larvae were collected for the first time directly from gravid females at the Logachev vent site during the Serpentine cruise...

  15. Ecology of mysid shrimps in the Bornholm Basin (central Baltic Sea)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barz, Kristina; Hirche, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Mysid shrimps are an important trophic link in the food web of the Baltic Sea. In 2002 and 2003 we investigated species composition, distribution, life cycle and prey in the Bornholm Basin (central Baltic...

  16. Microbial changes and growth of Listeria monocytogenes during chilled storage of brined shrimp ( Pandalus borealis )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlholm, Ole; Kjeldgaard, J.; Modberg, A.

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen storage trials and ten challenge tests were carried out to examine microbial changes, spoilage and the potential growth of Listeria monocytogenes in brined shrimp (Pandalus borealis). Shrimp in brine as well as brined and drained shrimp in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) were produced...... and they included 53 lactic acid bacteria, 6 coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp., 18 Pseudomonas fluorescens and 5 yeast isolates. After storage at 7 degrees C, P. fluorescens, Enterococcus-like isolates, E. malodoratus, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. and Lactobacillus...... conditions. Shrimp in brine with benzoic. citric and sorbic acids prevented growth of L monocytogenes during more than 40 days at 7 degrees C when the preserving parameters resembled those of commercial products. However, small changes in the preserving parameters and, particularly, reduced concentrations...

  17. Use practices of antimicrobials and other compounds by shrimp and fish farmers in Northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thi Kim Chi, Tran; Clausen, Jesper H.; Van, Phan Thi

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture production is increasing in Vietnam, but is hampered by frequent disease outbreaks and widespread use of various compounds used to treat the fish and shrimp. The objective of this study was to analyse factors influencing farmer use practices of antimicrobials and other compounds...... and sold for human use. Chinese traders were the main drug suppliers to the shrimp farmers in Quang Ninh and others provinces. Their products were sold with labels and product information written in Chinese only. Farmers appeared to have little awareness and concern about the disease aetiology when...... extracts were routinely used by mainly shrimp farmers to enhance shrimp immunity. There is an urgent need to provide aquaculture farmers access to diagnostic and independent disease control advisory services and quality medicated feed, since the current indiscriminate use of antimicrobials and other...

  18. Danish experiments with a grid system tested in the North Sea shrimp fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Niels; Hansen, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Grids have been proven successful worldwide as bycatch reducers in shrimp fisheries but have never been tested in the North Sea shrimp fishery. The objectives of this experiment were to develop and test a flexible grid system for the Danish Fladen Ground shrimp (Pandalus borealis) fishery, which...... can retain marketable catches of roundfish and Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus). The grid system was made of polyamide with a fish escape hole at the top and a Norway lobster escape hole at the bottom. Hinges made the grid flexible. The grid system was developed acid tested in a flume tank......) in the first experiment. The grid system was altered in experiment 2 resulting in no significant difference in the catch of cod and saithe above the minimum landing size while the catch of Norway lobster and shrimp improved significantly. Experiments with collecting bags indicated that most fish went through...

  19. THE BRINE SHRIMP (ARTEMIA SALINA) LETHALITY OF Brassica oleracea var. capitata

    OpenAIRE

    O.T. TÜZÜN, E. GÜRKAN, F. HIRLAK,

    2015-01-01

    This work covers up the bio-activities of the five fractions obtained from the ethanolic extract of Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Cruciferae).Key Words: Brassica oleracea var. capitata, Brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

  20. Use of a Brine Shrimp Assay to Study Herbal Teas in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opler, Annette; Mizell, Rebecca; Robert, Alexander; Cervantes-Cervantes, Miguel; Kincaid, Dwight; Kennelly, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a brine shrimp assay to demonstrate the effects of the biological activity of herbal remedies. Describes two protocols, one using aqueous extracts and the other using methanol extracts. (Contains 21 references.) (YDS)

  1. Allergic transfusion reaction caused by the shrimp allergen of donor blood: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lingbao; Sha, Yayun; Yuan, Keyu; Ling, Liu; Ai, Dongqin; Ying, Huang; Xiu, Chen; Peng, Hailin; Chen, Yabao; Li, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to analyze the cause of allergic transfusion reaction. The methods of immunoblot and immunonephelometry were applied to detect the levels of the immunoglobulins of IgA (Immunoglobulin A) and IgE (Immunoglobulin E) and the level of sIgE (specific Immunoglobulin E) to shrimp allergen both in the patient's pre and post transfusion blood samples, respectively. After transfusion, The level of sIgE to shrimp showed "increase" corresponding to the concentration of 0.70-3.5 IU/ml. The allergic transfusion reaction was very likely caused by passive transfer of shrimp antigen to the patient allergic to shrimp. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic improvement of Pacific white shrimp (Penaeus (Litopenaeus vannamei: perspectives for genomic selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor eCastillo-Juárez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of breeding programs for the Pacific white shrimp (Penaeus (Litopenaeus vannamei based on mixed linear models with pedigreed data are described. The application of these classic breeding methods yielded continuous progress of great value to increase the profitability of the shrimp industry in several countries. Recent advances in such areas as genomics in shrimp will allow for the development of new breeding programs in the near future that will increase genetic progress. In particular, these novel techniques may help increase disease resistance to specific emerging diseases, which is today a very important component of shrimp breeding programs. Thanks to increased selection accuracy, simulated genetic advance using genomic selection for survival to a disease challenge was up to 2.6 times that of phenotypic sib selection.

  3. The effect of three culture methods on intensive culture system of pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Wan, Rong; Song, Xiefa; Gao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Different culture methods may affect the intensive culture system of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) regarding water quality and growth and economic performance. This study evaluated the potential effects of three culture methods through cultivation of juvenile shrimps under consistent tank management conditions for 84 d. The three methods involved shrimp cultivation in different tanks, i.e., outdoor tanks with cement bottom (mode-C), greenhouse tanks with cement bottom (mode-G) and outdoor tanks with mud-substrate (mode-M). Results showed that water temperature was significantly higher in mode-G than that in mode-C ( P 0.05), mode-M had significantly higher shrimp yield, survival rate and feed conversion rate ( P vannamei.

  4. Flour production from shrimp by-products and sensory evaluation of flour-based products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Mendes Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the production of flour using by-products (cephalothorax obtained from the shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei industry, and to perform a sensory analysis of shrimp flour-based products. Physicochemical and microbiological analyses on fresh cephalothorax and on manufactured flour were performed, as well as the determination of cholesterol content of this flour, and the sensorial evaluation of soup and pastry made with this flour. By the microbiological analyses, no pathogenic microorganism was detected in the samples. Physicochemical analyses of flour showed high levels of protein (50.05% and minerals (20.97%. Shrimp cephalothorax flour showed high levels of cholesterol. The sensory evaluation indicated a good acceptance of the products, with satisfactory acceptability index (81% for soup, and 83% for pastry, which indicates that shrimp cephalothorax in the form of flour has a potential for developing new products.

  5. 78 FR 5416 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Investigation Initiation Checklist: Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from the People's Republic of China'' (``China Initiation Checklist''), at Attachment II, Analysis of Industry Support for the Petitions Covering...

  6. Penaeoid and sergestoid shrimps from the deep scattering layer (DSL) in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karuppasamy, P.K.; Menon, N.G.

    Results of a preliminary study on the occurrence and distribution of seventeen species of Penaeoid and Sergestoid shrimps from the deep scattering layer (DSL) of the Indian EEZ of Arabian Sea are presented here based on the IKMT samples collected...

  7. Clonal Occurrence of Salmonella Weltevreden in Cultured Shrimp in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Md Noor Uddin

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence, serovar and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. in shrimp samples from intensive and extensive farms located in three different provinces in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Shrimp from 11 of the 48 farms all contained S. Weltevreden, except for one farm yielding S. Agona, with no difference in Salmonella occurrence between the two production systems. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE of S. Weltevreden showed closely related XbaI pulse types, suggesting a clonal relationship despite the farms and shrimp samples being epidemiologically unrelated. S. Weltevreden was susceptible to most antimicrobials tested, with a few strains being resistant to florfenicol, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim. Future studies of the ecology of S. Weltevreden should establish if this serovar may survive better and even multiply in warm-water shrimp farm environments compared to other Salmonella serovars.

  8. Cooling, cryporitectant and hypersaline sensitivity of Penaeid shrimp embryos and nauplii larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfaro Montoya, J.; Komen, J.; Huisman, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    The sensitivity of embryos of the penaeid shrimp, Trachypenaeus byrdi, to cooling, cryoprotectant exposure (dimethyl sulfoxide : DMSO, sucrose, methanol and glycerol), and hypersaline treatment was assessed in order to gain basic knowledge for cryopreservation procedures. In addition, cooling and

  9. 77 FR 40574 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ....38 Earth Food Manufacturing Co., Ltd 1.38 F.A.I.T. Corporation Limited (*) Far East Cold Storage Co... Antidumping Measure on Shrimp from Thailand: Notice of Determination under Section 129 of the Uruguay Round...

  10. Conversion efficiency in the shrimp, Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius), fed on decomposed mangrove leaves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Ramadhas, V.

    Feeding experiments were carried out with Metapenaeus monoceros using mangrove leaves at different stages of decomposition, in combination with rice bran. Maximum conversion efficiency was found in shrimps fed completely decomposed mangrove leaves...

  11. Burrowing shrimps and seagrass dynamics in shallow-water meadows off Bolinao (Nw Philippines)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nacorda, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: sediment gaps, Alpheus macellarius, Thalassinidea, burrows, seagrass canopies, sediment characteristics, Philippines Small-scale disturbance of seagrass meadows by burrowing shrimps was assessed by mapping and quantifying apparent disturbance marks (burrow openings, sand patches, sand

  12. EFFECT OF CHITOSAN COATING ON SHELF LIFE OF BLACK TIGER SHRIMP (PENAEUS MONODONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bhadra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan coating serve as an antioxidant and micro-diffusion barrier and prevents the loss of water, texture, odour, color or overall accessibility in seafood. The preservation of shrimps using chitosan dips seems promising and effective, as demonstrated in this study. The antimicrobial property of chitosan is infhenod by slightly acidic pH. This work also showed that the shelf life of Penaeus monodon coated with chitosan dips extends the shelf life of shrimp.

  13. Experimental transmission of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) from crabs to shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanaphum, P; Wongteerasupaya, C; Sitidilokratana, N; Boonsaeng, V; Panyim, S; Tassanakajon, A; Withyachumnarnkul, B; Flegel, T W

    1998-09-11

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) of the black tiger prawn Penaeus monodon is a recently discovered baculo-like virus disease which is currently the cause of very serious and widespread losses in the shrimp industry in Thailand and elsewhere in Asia. Three suspected crab carriers of this virus commonly found in shrimp-rearing areas were investigated. These were Sesarma sp., Scylla serrata and Uca pugilator. All these crabs could be infected with WSSV by injection and they sustained heavy viral infections for up to 45 d (confirmed by normal histology, specific in situ DNA hybridization and PCR amplification) without visible signs of disease or mortality. All of them also transferred the disease to P. monodon via water while physically separated in aquarium cohabitation tests. Transfer of the virus to the shrimp was monitored using in situ DNA hybridization and PCR assay at 12 h intervals after cohabitation began. With U. pugilator, WSSV could be detected in the shrimp cohabitants after 24 h using PCR amplification and after 60 h using in situ hybridization. With S. serrata, the shrimp were positive for WSSV after 36 h using PCR and after 60 h using DNA in situ hybridization. With Sesarma sp. they were positive after 48 h using PCR and 72 h using in situ hybridization. These laboratory studies demonstrated that crab carriers of WSSV may pose a real threat to cultivated shrimp. However, the studies were carried out in containers with a small volume and with relatively clean sea water as compared to shrimp cultivation ponds. Pond-based studies are now needed to determine whether factors such as pond volume, pond water quality and shrimp and crab behavior can influence the rate and success of transfer.

  14. IDENTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION OF MARINE ACTINOMYCETES FOR THE ENHANCEMENT OF TIGER SHRIMP LARVAE AGAINST WSSV

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman Gosalam; Habson Batubara; Akbar Tahir

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRAK AGROKOMPLEKS 2009 Research was conducted for inventing active substance from marine Actinomycetes having antiviral activities on tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) with particular interest on the White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV). The WSSV (namely: white spot disease) could cause a 100% mortalities in only 3 ??? 10 days post infection, hence, a massive loss for the shrimp farmers. Actinobacteria is a class of microorganism which commonly known as Actinomycetes and belong to the family ...

  15. Systematics, phylogeny, and taphonomy of ghost shrimps (Decapoda): a perspective from the fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompmaker, Adiël A.

    2016-01-01

    Ghost shrimps of Callianassidae and Ctenochelidae are soft-bodied, usually heterochelous decapods representing major bioturbators of muddy and sandy (sub)marine substrates. Ghost shrimps have a robust fossil record spanning from the Early Cretaceous (~ 133 Ma) to the Holocene and their remains are present in most assemblages of Cenozoic decapod crustaceans. Their taxonomic interpretation is in flux, mainly because the generic assignment is hindered by their insufficient preservation and disagreement in the biological classification. Furthermore, numerous taxa are incorrectly classified within the catch-all taxon Callianassa. To show the historical patterns in describing fossil ghost shrimps and to evaluate taphonomic aspects influencing the attribution of ghost shrimp remains to higher level taxa, a database of all fossil species treated at some time as belonging to the group has been compiled: 250 / 274 species are considered valid ghost shrimp taxa herein. More than half of these taxa (160 species, 58.4%) are known only from distal cheliped elements, i.e., dactylus and / or propodus, due to the more calcified cuticle locally. Rarely, ghost shrimps are preserved in situ in burrows or in direct association with them, and several previously unpublished occurrences are reported herein. For generic assignment, fossil material should be compared to living species because many of them have modern relatives. Heterochely, intraspecific variation, ontogenetic changes and sexual dimorphism are all factors that have to be taken into account when working with fossil ghost shrimps. Distal elements are usually more variable than proximal ones. Preliminary results suggest that the ghost shrimp clade emerged not before the Hauterivian (~ 133 Ma). The divergence of Ctenochelidae and Paracalliacinae is estimated to occur within the interval of Hauterivian to Albian (133–100 Ma). Callichirinae and Eucalliacinae likely diverged later during the Late Cretaceous (100–66 Ma

  16. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

    OpenAIRE

    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.; Vergara-Jiménez M.J.; Baez-Flores M.E.; Cabrera-Chavez F.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i) food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii) food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii) food without oregano oil (the control). The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae). The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p

  17. De novo transcriptome assembly of shrimp Palaemon serratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Perina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The shrimp Palaemon serratus is a coastal decapod crustacean with a high commercial value. It is harvested for human consumption. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing technology (HiSeq 2000 to sequence, assemble and annotate the transcriptome of P. serratus. RNA was isolated from muscle of adults individuals and, from a pool of larvae. A total number of 4 cDNA libraries were constructed, using the TruSeq RNA Sample Preparation Kit v2. The raw data in this study was deposited in NCBI SRA database with study accession number of SRP090769. The obtained data were subjected to de novo transcriptome assembly using Trinity software, and coding regions were predicted by TransDecoder. We used Blastp and Sma3s to annotate the identified proteins. The transcriptome data could provide some insight into the understanding of genes involved in the larval development and metamorphosis.

  18. BRINE SHRIMP LETHALITY BIOASSAY OF GLAUCIUM GRANDIFLORUM VAR. GRANDIFLORUM

    OpenAIRE

    A. SARI, Ç. ÜNSAL, İ. SARIOĞLU, A. SARI, Ç. ÜNSAL, İ. SARIOĞLU

    2013-01-01

    Türkiye'nin 3 farklı bölgesinden toplanan Glaucium grandiflorum Boiss. et Huet var. grandiflorum örneklerinin toprak üstü kısımlarından elde edilen alkaloit ekstreleri ve bu ekstrelerden elde edilen majör alkaloitler allokriptopin, protopİn, (+)-izokoridin, (+)-korİdin üzerinde brİne shrimp lethality testi yapılarak sitotoksisiteleri İncelenmiştir. Glaucium grandiflorum var. grandiflorum türünün 3 örneği de önemli oranda sitotoksik aktİvite göstermiştir. Allokriptopin, protopin, (+)-izok...

  19. New electroantennography method on a marine shrimp in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machon, Julia; Ravaux, Juliette; Zbinden, Magali; Lucas, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Antennular chemoreception in aquatic decapods is well studied via the recording of single chemoreceptor neuron activity in the antennule, but global responses of the antennule (or antennae in insects) by electroantennography (EAG) has so far been mainly restricted to aerial conditions. We present here a well-established underwater EAG method to record the global antennule activity in the marine shrimp Palaemon elegans in natural (aqueous) conditions. EAG responses to food extracts, recorded as net positive deviations of the baseline, are reproducible, dose-dependent and exhibit sensory adaptation. This new EAG method opens a large field of possibilities for studying in vivo antennular chemoreception in aquatic decapods, in a global approach to supplement current, more specific techniques. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Knowledge and innovation relationships in the shrimp industry in Thailand and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Louis; Garden, Po; Luers, Amy; Manuel-Navarrete, David; Giap, Dao Huy

    2016-04-26

    Experts, government officials, and industry leaders concerned about the sustainability of shrimp aquaculture believe they know what farmers need to know and should be doing. They have framed sustainability as a technical problem that, at the farm level, is to be solved by better shrimp and management of ponds and businesses. Codes of conduct, standards, and regulations are expected to bring deviant practices into line. Shrimp farmers are often cornered in a challenging game of knowledge in which their livelihoods are at stake. In the commodity chain there are multiple relations with both suppliers and buyers, not all of which are trustworthy. The social networks shrimp farmers belong to are crucial for sifting out misinformation and multiplying insights from personal experience in learning by doing. Successful farmers become part of a learning culture through seminars, workshops, and clubs in which knowledge and practices are continually re-evaluated. The combination of vertical and horizontal relationships creates a set of alternative arenas that together are critical to bridging knowledge and action gaps for shrimp farmers. Government and industry initiatives for improving links between knowledge and practice for sustainability have largely succeeded when incentives are aligned: shrimp grow better in healthy environments, and using fewer resources means higher profits.

  1. The Origin of Large-Bodied Shrimp that Dominate Modern Global Aquaculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Robalino

    Full Text Available Several shrimp species from the clade Penaeidae are farmed industrially for human consumption, and this farming has turned shrimp into the largest seafood commodity in the world. The species that are in demand for farming are an anomaly within their clade because they grow to much larger sizes than other members of Penaeidae. Here we trace the evolutionary history of the anomalous farmed shrimp using combined data phylogenetic analysis of living and fossil species. We show that exquisitely preserved fossils of †Antrimpos speciosus from the Late Jurassic Solnhofen limestone belong to the same clade as the species that dominate modern farming, dating the origin of this clade to at least 145 mya. This finding contradicts a much younger Late Cretaceous age (ca. 95 mya previously estimated for this clade using molecular clocks. The species in the farmed shrimp clade defy a widespread tendency, by reaching relatively large body sizes despite their warm water lifestyles. Small body sizes have been shown to be physiologically favored in warm aquatic environments because satisfying oxygen demands is difficult for large organisms breathing in warm water. Our analysis shows that large-bodied, farmed shrimp have more gills than their smaller-bodied shallow-water relatives, suggesting that extra gills may have been key to the clade's ability to meet oxygen demands at a large size. Our combined data phylogenetic tree also suggests that, during penaeid evolution, the adoption of mangrove forests as habitats for young shrimp occurred multiple times independently.

  2. Towards improved quality benchmarking and shelf life evaluation of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nhat Tam; Doan, Nhu Khue; Nguyen Ba, Thanh; Tran, Thi Van Thi

    2017-11-15

    An improved quality benchmarking and shelf life evaluation of freshly harvested black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) was pursued by combining sensory and chemical methods. This involved developing a quality index method (QIM) to further assess both freshness and shelf life of the studied shrimp samples. The quality index included the use of trimethylamine (TMA-N), total volatile basis nitrogen (TVB-N), histamine, and hypoxanthine, which were performed at scheduled times during the ten days of ice storage (0°C). Shelf life of the studied shrimp was most likely to be 8days, and there were positive linear correlations between quality indices (QI) and storage period. The quality of shrimp decreased over storage time. In fact, significant changes of chemical and sensory characteristics of the shrimp samples would become more obvious from day 5 onwards. Besides, quality classification of black tiger shrimp involved four main levels, namely: excellent, good, moderately acceptable, and just acceptable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An update on mechanism of entry of white spot syndrome virus into shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Arunima Kumar; Gupta, Shipra; Singh, Shivesh Pratap; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao

    2017-08-01

    Host-parasite relationships can be best understood at the level of protein-protein interaction between host and pathogen. Such interactions are instrumental in understanding the important stages of life cycle of pathogen such as adsorption of the pathogen on host surface followed by effective entry of pathogen into the host body, movement of the pathogen across the host cytoplasm to reach the host nucleus and replication of the pathogen within the host. White Spot Disease (WSD) is a havoc for shrimps and till date no effective treatment is available against the disease. Moreover information regarding the mechanism of entry of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) into shrimps, as well as knowledge about the protein interactions occurring between WSSV and shrimp during viral entry are still at very meagre stage. A cumulative and critically assessed information on various viral-shrimp interactions occurring during viral entry can help to understand the exact pathway of entry of WSSV into the shrimp which in turn can be used to device drugs that can stop the entry of virus into the host. In this context, we highlight various WSSV and shrimp proteins that play role in the entry mechanism along with the description of the interaction between host and pathogen proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) play a pivotal trophic role in enhancing Ruppia maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Donna Drury; Rakocinski, Chet F

    2007-03-01

    Coupled trophic-engineer interactions are potentially important for maintaining habitat function and ecosystem services. As ephemeral submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), Ruppia maritima has a short well-defined growth-senescence cycle and should benefit from any ecological interaction that enhances its physical condition and longevity. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) are abundant facultative grazers of epiphytic algae and conveyors of nutrients in tidal marsh and SAV habitats. Grass shrimp addition consistently enhanced Ruppia biomass and shoot density in a series of three field experiments conducted in Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Mississippi, USA. In two experiments, epiphyte grazing by grass shrimp enhanced Ruppia by inhibiting die-back during the mid- and latter stages of the Ruppia life cycle. Despite a nonsignificant epiphyte grazing effect, grass shrimp also enhanced Ruppia during its early growth stage in a third experiment. In that experiment, nutrient addition also significantly increased epiphyte biomass. Grass shrimp may have fostered the early growth of Ruppia through direct deposition of feces to the sediment in the third experiment. Grass shrimp play a pivotal trophic role in the maintenance of Ruppia through context-dependent interactions involving stage of the SAV life cycle, season, and nutrient limitation.

  5. Acquisition of epibiotic bacteria along the life cycle of the hydrothermal shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Mathieu; Durand, Lucile; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Zbinden, Magali; Crassous, Philippe; Shillito, Bruce; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2012-03-01

    The caridean shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the fauna at several Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites. This shrimp has an enlarged gill chamber, harboring a dense ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with mineral oxide deposits. Until now, their acquisition is not fully understood. At three hydrothermal vent sites, we analyzed the epibionts diversity at different moult stages and also in the first stages of the shrimp life (eggs, hatched eggs (with larvae) and juveniles). Hatched eggs associated with young larvae were collected for the first time directly from gravid females at the Logachev vent site during the Serpentine cruise. An approach using 16S rRNA clone libraries, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used. Molecular results and microscope observations indicated a switch in the composition of the bacterial community between early R. exoculata life cycle stage (egg libraries dominated by the Gammaproteobacteria) and later stages (juvenile/adult libraries dominated by the Epsilonproteobacteria). We hypothesized that the epibiotic phylotype composition could vary according to the life stage of the shrimp. Our results confirmed the occurrence of a symbiosis with Gammaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, but more complex than previously assumed. We revealed the presence of active type-I methanotrophic bacteria colonizing the cephalothorax of shrimps from the Rainbow site. They were also present on the eggs from the Logachev site. This could be the first 'epibiotic' association between methanotrophic bacteria and hydrothermal vent crustacean. We discuss possible transmission pathways for epibionts linked to the shrimp life cycle.

  6. PROFILE: "Low-Salt" Shrimp Aquaculture in Thailand: Goodbye Coastline, Hello Khon Kaen!

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLAHERTY; VANDERGEEST

    1998-11-01

    / Intensive shrimp culture has been confined to relatively narrow bands of land along the seashores of tropical developing nations due to the need for large volumes of saltwater for water exchange during the culture period. Recent developments in Thailand suggest, however, that this close association could soon be a thing of the past. Large numbers of Thai farmers are adopting low-salinity culture systems that rely upon sea or salt pan water that is trucked inland. This development greatly increases the potential for establishing shrimp cultivation much further from the coast than previously believed possible. The migration of intensive shrimp farming into freshwater environments, however, raises serious concerns over the disposal of pond effluents and the impact of saltwater intrusion on surrounding agricultural activities. In the absence of effective government regulation of the expansion and operation of the shrimp culture industry, supporting local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and community initiatives may be the only means of minimizing the negative impacts of shrimp farming on rural communities.KEY WORDS: Aquaculture; Shrimp; Salinity; Thailand

  7. Encapsulated Synbiotic Dietary Supplementation at Different Dosages to Prevent Vibriosis in White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Zubaidah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of encapsulated synbiotic (Bacillus sp. NP5 and oligosaccharide dietary at different dosages on growth performance, survival rate, feed conversion ratio, and immune responses of Litopenaeus vannamei against Vibrio infection. The shrimps of the main treatments were fed by the diet that contained three different dosages of encapsulated synbiotic [0.5% (A, 1% (B, and 2% (C (w/w] with feeding rate of 5% of shrimp biomass (4 times a day. The shrimps of two control treatments (negative control and positive control were fed only by commercial feed without supplementation of encapsulated synbiotic. The growth, feed conversion ratio, and survival rate were observed after 30 days of encapsulated synbiotic dietary. The shrimps were then challenged by injection of Vibrio harveyi (6 log colony forming units/mL 0.1 mL/shrimp, excluded the negative control treatment. Afterward, the survival and immune responses were observed for 9 days after experimental infection. The shrimps treated with 2% encapsulated synbiotic (treatment C in the diet showed the highest growth performance (2.98 ± 0.42%, feed conversion ratio (1.26 ± 0.19, and better immune responses i.e. total hemocyte counts, differential hemocyte count, phenoloxidase, and intestine bacteria observation compared to those of positive control treatment.

  8. Black gill disease of Pacific white leg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei by Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Dewangan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the epidemiology of black gill disease in white leg shrimp which is a major problem being faced by the commercial shrimp farmers who are culturing Litopenaeus vannamei (L. vannamei in India. Methods: The normal and infected shrimps were collected from shrimp pond and the gill was preserved in appropriate preservative for histopathological examination and scanning electron microscope analysis. Pathogenic fungus was isolated from black gill of L. vannamei in potato dextrose agar medium. Morphological study and fungal strain identification were done by using light microscopy and scanning electron microscope. Fungal DNA was amplified by ITS4 and ITS5 primers and gene sequencing was done by Macrogen Inc., Korea. Phylogenetic tree was prepared by using MEGA 6 software. Results: Fungal spores and hyphae were observed both in internal and external gill surface of infected shrimps. Fungal spores were round in shape and mature sporangium was observed. The histopathology study showed clearly that infected gill was damaged by the fungi. Scanning electron microscopic study showed adherence of fungi in infected gill. Internal transcribed spacer gene sequencing revealed that it was caused by Aspergillus flavus. Conclusions: The outcome of the present study would help to know the cause of black gill disease and to understand the effect of pathogenic fungi in shrimp culture. This study will initiate researchers for work in field of treatment or prevention of black gill disease in commercial L. vannamei culture.

  9. Effects of gamma irradiation on chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoğlu, Aslı; Sükrü Demirci, Ahmet; Gümüs, Tuncay; Demirci, Mehmet

    2012-12-01

    In the present study the combined effect of gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at two temperatures: refrigeration (+4 °C) and frozen (-18 °C), on the shelf-life extension of fresh shrimp meat was investigated. The study was based on microbiological and physicochemical changes occuring in the shrimp samples. Total volatile base nitrogen values and trimethylamine values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures, and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly higher than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). pH values of shrimp samples were affected significantly by both irradiating dose and storage temperatures (p<0.05). Microbial counts for non-irradiated shrimp samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). The results revealed that irradiation at high dose (5 kGy) might enhance lipid oxidation, although the growth of microorganisms and protein oxidation was inhibited.

  10. Effect of stocking density on extensive production of freshwater shrimp in coal mine reclamation ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, J.H.; Wynne, F.; Coyle, S.D. [Kentucky State Univ., Frankfort, KY (United States). Aquaculture Research Center; Grey, B. [Peabody Coal Co., Rockport, KY (United States); McGuire, J.

    1998-12-31

    The use of post-mining reclamation ponds for the production of freshwater shrimp was evaluated by examining different stocking densities. Juvenile shrimp (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) averaging 0.5g each were stocked into four existing ponds at Peabody`s Ken Surface Mine at 6,175; 12,350; 18,500; and 24,700/ha (2,500, 5,000, 7,500, and 10,000/acre) on June 1, 1995. Shrimp were fed twice a week for 103 days, with harvest conducted September 13, 1995. Survival averaged 40%, overall. Average individual weight size was inversely related to stocking density ranging from 52 g (8.7 shrimp/lb) at 6,175/ha to 20.3 g (22.7 shrimp/lb) at 18,500/acre. Total production was directly related to stocking density ranging from 97 kg/ha (86 lbs/acre) at low density to 211 kg/ha (188 lbs/acre) at 18,500/ha shrimp acre. The major difficulty was at harvest due to difficulty in draining ponds. Construction of designed culture ponds with gravity drains during reclamation could greatly enhance survival, harvestability, and commercial feasibility.

  11. Differential expression of microRNAs in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus in response to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Bao-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Till date numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered from various organisms, including mammals, plants, insects, nematodes and viruses. They are known to have antiviral functions in crustaceans such as shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicas. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs against bacterial infection in this shrimp caused by Vibrio alginolyticus. We performed small RNA sequencing to characterize the differentially expressed microRNAs in V. alginolyticus challenged shrimp, in comparison to that in control uninfected shrimp, at 24 h and 48 h. In total, 55 host miRNAs were differentially expressed in response to the infection and most of these were downregulated at both the time-points. TargetScan and miRanda algorithms showed that the target genes of these down-regulated miRNAs were related to innate immune functions such as production of phenoloxidase enzyme, apoptosis and phagocytosis. Further, gene ontology analysis revealed that many immune signaling pathways were mediated by these miRNAs. This study is one of the earliest attempts at characterizing shrimp miRNAs that respond to V. alginolyticus infection, and will help unravel the miRNA pathways involved in antibacterial action in shrimp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Encapsulated Synbiotic Dietary Supplementation at Different Dosages to Prevent Vibriosis in White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Zubaidah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of encapsulated synbiotic (Bacillus sp. NP5 and oligosaccharide dietary at different dosages on growth performance, survival rate, feed conversion ratio, and immune responses of Litopenaeus vannamei against Vibrio infection. The shrimps of the main treatments were fed by the diet that contained three different dosages of encapsulated synbiotic [0.5% (A, 1% (B, and 2% (C (w/w] with feeding rate of 5% of shrimp biomass (4 times a day. The shrimps of two control treatments (negative control and positive control were fed only by commercial feed without supplementation of encapsulated synbiotic. The growth, feed conversion ratio, and survival rate were observed after 30 days of encapsulated synbiotic dietary. The shrimps were then challenged by injection of Vibrio harveyi (6 log colony forming units/mL 0.1 mL/shrimp, excluded the negative control treatment. Afterward, the survival and immune responses were observed for 9 days after experimental infection. The shrimps treated with 2% encapsulated synbiotic (treatment C in the diet showed the highest growth performance (2.98 ± 0.42%, feed conversion ratio (1.26 ± 0.19, and better immune responses i.e. total hemocyte counts, differential hemocyte count, phenoloxidase, and intestine bacteria observation compared to those of positive control treatment.

  13. Pulsed Ultraviolet Light Reduces Immunoglobulin E Binding to Atlantic White Shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yin Chung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV, a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa, and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract.

  14. Pulsed ultraviolet light reduces immunoglobulin E binding to Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Sandra; Yang, Wade; Chung, Si-Yin; Percival, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa), and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source) for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract.

  15. BIOLOGY AND POPULATION DYNAMICS OF BANANA SHRIMP (Penaeus merguiensis IN THE TARAKAN WATERS, EAST BORNEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duranta D. Kembaren

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of biology and population dynamic of banana shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis in Tarakan waters, East Borneo was carried out from January to November 2012. The aim of this research was to identify the biological aspects and population dynamics of banana shrimp. For estimating dynamic population, data were analysed using FiSAT II. The result showed that length at first capture (Lc of banana shrimp by mini trawl (pukat hela was 35 mm and the size at first maturity (Lm was 33,86 mm in carapace length. Spawning occured all year around and reached it’s peak in March. The growth coefficient (K of banana shrimp was 1,45/year with carapace asymptotic length (CL” of 80 mm. Total mortality rate (Z and natural mortality rate (M were 4,85/year and 1,76/year. While fishing mortality rate (F and exploitation rate (E were 3,09/year and 0,64, respectively. The exploitation rate of banana shrimp in Tarakan waters tended to be overexploited so that it needed to be managed wisely and carefully by reducing the fishing effort and fishing season especially on spawning season. The recruitment peak of banana shrimp occured in May.

  16. Acute Toxicity and Neurotoxicity of Chlorpyrifos in Black Tiger Shrimp, Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassanee Eamkamon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute toxicity and neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos were determined in black tiger shrimp, P. monodon. LC50 values after 24 to 96 h of exposure were between 149.55 and 59.16 nmol/L. To determine the neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was monitored in the gill of the shrimps exposed to lethal (0.019, 0.194, and 1.942 µmol/L and sub-lethal (0.019, 0.194, and 1.942 nmol/L concentrations of chlorpyrifos. In lethal dose exposure, the AChE activities observed in shrimp exposed to 0.194, and 1.942 µmol/L of chlorpyrifos were significantly lower (1.7 and 3.3 times than that of control shrimp after 30 min of exposure (p<0.05. In sub-lethal exposure tests, the AChE activity of shrimp was significantly lower (1.9 times than that of control shrimp after exposure to 1.942 nmol/L of chlorpyrifos for 72 h (p<0.05. The sensitive reduction of AChE activity at the sub-lethal concentration, which was 30 times lower than 96 h LC50 value found in this study, indicates the potential use as a biomarker of chlorpyrifos exposure.

  17. Estimating the effect of burrowing shrimp on deep-sea sediment community oxygen consumption

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    Daniel Leduc

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC is a proxy for organic matter processing and thus provides a useful proxy of benthic ecosystem function. Oxygen uptake in deep-sea sediments is mainly driven by bacteria, and the direct contribution of benthic macro- and mega-infauna respiration is thought to be relatively modest. However, the main contribution of infaunal organisms to benthic respiration, particularly large burrowing organisms, is likely to be indirect and mainly driven by processes such as feeding and bioturbation that stimulate bacterial metabolism and promote the chemical oxidation of reduced solutes. Here, we estimate the direct and indirect contributions of burrowing shrimp (Eucalastacus cf. torbeni to sediment community oxygen consumption based on incubations of sediment cores from 490 m depth on the continental slope of New Zealand. Results indicate that the presence of one shrimp in the sediment is responsible for an oxygen uptake rate of about 40 µmol d−1, only 1% of which is estimated to be due to shrimp respiration. We estimate that the presence of ten burrowing shrimp m−2 of seabed would lead to an oxygen uptake comparable to current estimates of macro-infaunal community respiration on Chatham Rise based on allometric equations, and would increase total sediment community oxygen uptake by 14% compared to sediment without shrimp. Our findings suggest that oxygen consumption mediated by burrowing shrimp may be substantial in continental slope ecosystems.

  18. Utilization of Cinnamon Leaf and Shrimp Flour as an Enhancer of Catfish Meat Quality

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    Mia Setiawati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus is a freshwater fish that has been produced in the form of a filet. One of the problems in producing good catfish fillet is compactness and brightness of catfish farmed meat. This research aimed to get feed formulation as enhancer  meat quality of striped catfish with added Cinnamon leaves flour (Cinnamomum burmannii  and used shrimp head meal. A Fish with a weight of  208.98±25.76 g reared in 12 floating nets cage (2x1x1.5 m3 with density of 15 fish/nets for 60 days. As treatment, fish were fed with feed contains 1% cinnamon leaves,  45% shrimp head meal, and combined of cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal, and as control used feed were formulated without cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal. Fish were fed 2 times a daily with feeding rate 3.5% of average body weight offish. The test parameters observed were physical, chemical and organoleptic test of catfish meat. The results showed feed with contains cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal could decrease level of body fat 14.7% compared than control (p<0.05. Feed with used cinnamon leaves and shrimp head meal gave a texture offillet fish more compact,  elastic and color of fillet fish white.

  19. Recovery of strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus inoculated in marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei exposed to the cooling and freezing temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Dannielle Batista Rolim Sousa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival of Vibrio parahaemolitycus inoculated in meat homogenate of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei at different temperatures of refrigeration (refrigerator, freezer and isothermic box with ice) during ten days and on the 15th, 20th and 25th days. The experiment was repeated six times during October 2005 to March 2006. Shrimps were obtained on fish market located at Praia do Mucuripe, Fortaleza, CearÃ. In the laboratory, the shrimps wer...

  20. Distribution of deep sea shrimp (Pandalus borealis Krøyer) in relation to temperature in the Barents Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Nedreaas, Kjell Harald; Øynes, Per

    1987-01-01

    The effect of oceanographic condition on distribution and population dynamics of commercial fish stocks in the Barents Sea. Proceedings of the third Soviet-Norwegian Symposium. Murmansk, 26-28 May 1986. In the years 1980 to 1985 stratided raildom bottom trawl surveys were carried out on the shrimp fields in the Svalbard and Barents Sea regions. The objeetives of the cruises were to study the structure of the shrimp stock and to estimate the abundance of shrimp. On each trawl stati...

  1. 419 IGE-mediated Responses Towards Fish Parasite Anisakis, Crab and House Dust Mite in Norwegian Shrimp Allergic Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Dooper, Maaike; Myrset, Heidi; Egaas, Eliann; Do, Thien Van; Florvaag, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background The present study investigated to what extent shrimp allergic individuals were IgE-sensitized to anisakis, crab and house dust mite and whether tropomyosin was responsible for IgE cross-reactivity. Methods 29 Individuals with self reported shrimp allergy were recruited by advertisements in local and national news-papers in Norway. Anamnesis was taken, skin prick tests (SPT) were performed and positive responders to shrimp were studied further with basophile activation test (BAT), I...

  2. Using Brine Shrimps as Food and Premix for Domestic Birds, and Issues of the Prophylactics of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Volf

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The brine shrimps of the genus Artemia (Crustacea: Anostraca: Artemiidae is widely used in the poultry farming as the food and premix of domestic birds. In salt lakes many wild bird species are vectors of infectious and parasitic diseases, and the feeding of farming birds with brine shrimp species of Artemia has potential danger of certain diseases. Using the brine shrimps of the genus Artemia in the poultry farming requires measures of disinfection of the raw materials and equipment. The brine shrimps, Artemia may be serving as potential intermediate hosts of the tapeworm, Diphyllobothrium dendriticum , and one of the sources of the infectious diseases of game birds.

  3. MicroRNA-100 is involved in shrimp immune response to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio alginolyticus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Wang; Fei Zhu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we discovered that shrimp miR-100 was up-regulated at 24?h after WSSV or Vibrio alginolyticus infection, confirming its participation in the innate immune system of shrimp. The anti-miRNA oligonucleotide (AMO-miR-100) was applied to inhibit the expression of miR-100. After AMO-miR-100 treatment, the shrimp was challenged with WSSV or V. alginolyticus. The knockdown of miR-100 expression decreased the mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp from 24?h to 72?h post-infection and enhance...

  4. MicroRNA-100 is involved in shrimp immune response to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Fei

    2017-02-09

    In this study, we discovered that shrimp miR-100 was up-regulated at 24 h after WSSV or Vibrio alginolyticus infection, confirming its participation in the innate immune system of shrimp. The anti-miRNA oligonucleotide (AMO-miR-100) was applied to inhibit the expression of miR-100. After AMO-miR-100 treatment, the shrimp was challenged with WSSV or V. alginolyticus. The knockdown of miR-100 expression decreased the mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp from 24 h to 72 h post-infection and enhanced the mortality of V. alginolyticus-infected shrimp significantly. The knockdown of miR-100 affected phenoloxidase (PO) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and total hemocyte count (THC) after the infection with WSSV or V. alginolyticus, indicating a regulative role of miR-100 in the immune potential of shrimp in the response to WSSV or V. alginolyticus infection. The knockdown of miR-100 induced the apoptosis of shrimp hemocytes, and V. alginolyticus + AMO-miR-100 treatment caused more hemocyte apoptosis than V. alginolyticus treatment. The miR-100 influenced also the morphology of shrimp hemocytes and regulated the phagocytosis of WSSV or V. alginolyticus. Thus, we concluded that miR-100 may promote the anti-Vibrio immune response of shrimp through regulating apoptosis, phagocytosis and PO activity and affects the progression of WSSV infection at a certain level.

  5. Drying Characteristics and Physical and Nutritional Properties of Shrimp Meat as Affected by Different Traditional Drying Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akonor, P T; Ofori, H; Dziedzoave, N T; Kortei, N K

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different drying methods on physical and nutritional properties of shrimp meat was investigated in this study. Peeled shrimps were dried separately using an air-oven dryer and a tunnel solar dryer. The drying profile of shrimp meat was determined in the two drying systems by monitoring moisture loss over the drying period. Changes in color, proximate composition, and rehydration capacity were assessed. The rate of moisture removal during solar drying was faster than the air-oven drying. The development of red color during drying was comparable among the two methods, but solar-dried shrimps appeared darker (L (⁎) = 47.4) than the air-oven-dried (L (⁎) = 49.0). Chemical analysis indicated that protein and fat made up nearly 20% and 2% (wb) of the shrimp meat, respectively. Protein and ash content of shrimp meat dried under the two dryer types were comparable but fat was significantly (p solar-dried meat (1.5%). Although rehydration behavior of shrimp from the two drying systems followed a similar pattern, solar-dried shrimp absorbed moisture more rapidly. The results have demonstrated that different approaches to drying may affect the physical and nutritional quality of shrimp meat differently.

  6. Drying Characteristics and Physical and Nutritional Properties of Shrimp Meat as Affected by Different Traditional Drying Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Akonor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different drying methods on physical and nutritional properties of shrimp meat was investigated in this study. Peeled shrimps were dried separately using an air-oven dryer and a tunnel solar dryer. The drying profile of shrimp meat was determined in the two drying systems by monitoring moisture loss over the drying period. Changes in color, proximate composition, and rehydration capacity were assessed. The rate of moisture removal during solar drying was faster than the air-oven drying. The development of red color during drying was comparable among the two methods, but solar-dried shrimps appeared darker (L⁎=47.4 than the air-oven-dried (L⁎=49.0. Chemical analysis indicated that protein and fat made up nearly 20% and 2% (wb of the shrimp meat, respectively. Protein and ash content of shrimp meat dried under the two dryer types were comparable but fat was significantly (p<0.05 higher in oven-dried meat (2.1%, compared to solar-dried meat (1.5%. Although rehydration behavior of shrimp from the two drying systems followed a similar pattern, solar-dried shrimp absorbed moisture more rapidly. The results have demonstrated that different approaches to drying may affect the physical and nutritional quality of shrimp meat differently.

  7. Strategy of Quality Improvement of Pond Shrimp Post Harvest Management (Penaeus monodon Fabricius in Mahakam Delta (Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Noor Asikin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mahakam Delta area, which is situated in Kutai Kartanegara Regency, has become a pond center that gives a significant contribution to shrimp export of East Kalimantan Province. Pond-produced shrimps, however, do not always accord to the intention of cold storage companies at expected price. The companies even sometimes reject the request due to poor quality of the product. The decreasing shrimp quality may be due to maintenance process by the pond farmers as well as the improper collectors. In the other hand, importing countries have decided more and more restricted requirements for the imported fishing products. This study was held in Muara Jawa, Anggana, and Muara Badak Districts using techniques of data collection of in-depth interview with twelve respondents. In order to improve shrimp quality, farmers or the producers have to formulate a strategy towards the improvement of the post harvest shrimps from the pond using an Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP. Results of the AHP consist of as follows: (1 application of pond shrimp post harvest technology and improvement of facilities and accommodation that support the quality improvement of the pond shrimps, (2 human resource quality improvement of pond farmers, collectors, and field instructors, (3 development of pond culture by applying best practices principle and local policies in order to improve the quality of the pond shrimps, and (4 improvement of interagency coordination, monitoring, and evaluation to enhance the pond shrimp quality

  8. 419 IGE-mediated Responses Towards Fish Parasite Anisakis, Crab and House Dust Mite in Norwegian Shrimp Allergic Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooper, Maaike; Myrset, Heidi; Egaas, Eliann; van Do, Thien; Florvaag, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background The present study investigated to what extent shrimp allergic individuals were IgE-sensitized to anisakis, crab and house dust mite and whether tropomyosin was responsible for IgE cross-reactivity. Methods 29 Individuals with self reported shrimp allergy were recruited by advertisements in local and national news-papers in Norway. Anamnesis was taken, skin prick tests (SPT) were performed and positive responders to shrimp were studied further with basophile activation test (BAT), ImmunoCAP analyses and western blotting. Results Of the 29 persons studied, 10 (34%) had positive SPT against shrimp and house dust mite, 9 (31%) against shrimp tropomyosin and 3 (10%) against anisakis. Individuals with positive SPT to shrimp all showed positive basophilic responses to house dust mite, while 43% responded to shrimp, 25% to anisakis and 36% to crab in BAT. Moreover, SPT, BAT as well as ImmunoCAP analyses showed a positive correlation of IgE-reactivity between anisakis and shrimp, house dust mite and crab. Immunoblot studies indicated that these responses are not completely explained by cross-reactivity towards tropomyosin. Conclusions The current study indicates a positive correlation between IgE-mediated reactions to shrimp, anisakis, house dust mite and crab, which may not be completely explained by cross-reactivity against tropomyosin.

  9. Generation of a comprehensive panel of crustacean allergens from the North Sea Shrimp Crangon crangon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Kerstin; Wangorsch, Andrea; Garoffo, Lorenza Perono; Reuter, Andreas; Conti, Amedeo; Taylor, Steve L; Lidholm, Jonas; Dewitt, Asa Marknell; Enrique, Ernesto; Vieths, Stefan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Reese, Gerald

    2011-09-01

    Published data on crustacean allergens are incomplete. The identification of tropomyosin (TM), arginine kinase (AK), sarcoplasmic Ca-binding protein (SCP) and myosin light chain (MLC) as shrimp allergens are all important contributions but additional allergens are required for the development of a complete set of reagents for component resolved diagnosis and the exploration of novel vaccination strategies. The North Sea shrimp (Crangon crangon), which is frequently consumed in Europe, served as a model organism in this study. TM and AK were directly cloned from mRNA based on sequence homology and produced as recombinant proteins. Additional IgE-reactive proteins were isolated by preparative SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry and corresponding cDNAs were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The relevance of the 6 cloned crustacean allergens was confirmed with sera of 31 shrimp-allergic subjects, 12 of which had a positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to shrimp and 19 a convincing history of food allergy to shrimp, including 5 cases of anaphylaxis. Quantitative IgE measurements were performed by ImmunoCAP. Six recombinant crustacean proteins: TM, AK, SCP, a novel MLC, troponin C (TnC), and triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) bound IgE in ImmunoCAP analysis. Specific IgE to at least one of these single shrimp allergens was detected in 90% of the study population, thus the in vitro diagnostic sensitivity was comparable to that of shrimp extract (97%). In 75% of the subjects, the combined technical sensitivity was similar to or greater with single shrimp allergens than with natural shrimp extract. We identified six IgE-binding proteins from C. crangon, three of which have not before been described as allergens in crustaceans. This extensive panel of shrimp allergens forms a valuable asset for future efforts towards the identification of clinically relevant biomarkers and as a basis to approach patient-tailored immunotherapeutic strategies

  10. Salt marsh construction costs and shrimp production in Galveston Bay and Gulf of Mexico from 1999-01-01 to 2005-01-01 (NCEI Accession 0161218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains marsh construction cost in relation to shrimp yield per year. This modeling approach provides estimates of total annual shrimp production from...

  11. Acoustic Characteristics of the Snapping Shrimp Sound Observed in the Coastal Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Nam; Hahn, Jooyoung; Choi, Bok Kyoung; Kim, Bong-Chae; Park, Yosup; Jung, Seom-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Kuk

    2011-07-01

    The typical temporal waveforms, spectra, and water-temperature dependence of the snapping shrimp sound in the coastal sea of Korea were investigated. The peak-to-peak source levels of the snapping shrimp sound at three sites in the coastal sea, at water depths of 8, 10, and 40 m, were also investigated. The waveform and dominant frequency response band of the sound were similar to those observed under laboratory conditions. The broad peak frequency components of the normalized average snapping shrimp sound spectra measured in nine different coastal sea areas were differently determined by superposition of the peak frequency components of individual snapping shrimp spectra for the each area. The sound did not significantly affect the ambient noise level at a low seawater temperature (shrimp sound at the sites with water depths of 8 and 10 m were similar, with estimated values of 176 ±3 and 175 ±3 dB (re 1 µPa at 1 m), respectively. However, the estimated mean peak-to-peak source level at the site with a water depth of 40 m was 184 ±2 dB (re 1 µPa at 1 m). The differences in the mean peak-to-peak source levels at the three sites could be caused by the differences in the ambient pressure at the sea bottoms of the sites. For water depths below 10 m, the mean peak-to-peak source levels of the snapping shrimp sound were much lower than those estimated in a previous study, in which the water depth at the experimental site was 6.1 m. On the other hand, the mean peak-to-peak source level at the site with a water depth of 40 m was similar to that estimated in a previous study. This study shows that the mean peak-to-peak source levels of the snapping shrimp sound may change as water depth is largely varied.

  12. Use practices of antimicrobials and other compounds by shrimp and fish farmers in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Kim Chi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture production is increasing in Vietnam, but is hampered by frequent disease outbreaks and widespread use of various compounds used to treat the fish and shrimp. The objective of this study was to analyse factors influencing farmer use practices of antimicrobials and other compounds by a questionnaire and observational survey conducted with 60 whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei and 25 fish farmers in three coastal provinces in Northern Vietnam. Personnel in 22 shops distributing feed and chemicals for aquaculture were interviewed about their advice on sale to the farmers. Results showed that 20 different antimicrobial products were used for disease prevention and treatment in shrimp and marine fish culture. Banned products used included chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin and malachite green. Cage fish farmers said they purchased antimicrobial tablets readily available at a local pharmacy and sold for human use. Chinese traders were the main drug suppliers to the shrimp farmers in Quang Ninh and others provinces. Their products were sold with labels and product information written in Chinese only. Farmers appeared to have little awareness and concern about the disease aetiology when applying specific antimicrobials. Up to 50% of the shrimp farmers used up to 20 different disinfectants, e.g. chlorine-based compounds, to disinfect water in storage ponds, often without knowledge of the type of disinfectants and their mode of action. A variety of probiotics, vitamins, minerals and herbal extracts were routinely used by mainly shrimp farmers to enhance shrimp immunity. There is an urgent need to provide aquaculture farmers access to diagnostic and independent disease control advisory services and quality medicated feed, since the current indiscriminate use of antimicrobials and other compounds are inefficient, costly, and hazardous to the aquatic animal and farmer’s health, the environment and food safety.

  13. The potential use of constructed wetlands in a recirculating aquaculture system for shrimp culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y.-F.; Jing, S.-R.; Lee, D.-Y

    2003-05-01

    Constructed wetlands improved water qualities and consequently increased the shrimp growth and survival in a recirculating system. - A pilot-scale constructed wetland unit, consisting of free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SF) constructed wetlands arranged in series, was integrated into an outdoor recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for culturing Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). This study evaluated the performance of the wetland unit in treating the recirculating wastewater and examined the effect of improvement in water quality of the culture tank on the growth and survival of shrimp postlarvae. During an 80-day culture period, the wetland unit operated at a mean hydraulic loading rate of 0.3 m/day and effectively reduced the influent concentrations of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}, 24%), suspended solids (SS, 71%), chlorophyll a (chl-a, 88%), total ammonium (TAN, 57%), nitrite nitrogen (NO{sub 2}-N, 90%) and nitrate nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N, 68%). Phosphate (PO{sub 4}-P) reduction was the least efficient (5.4%). The concentrations of SS, Chl-a, turbidity and NO{sub 3}-N in the culture tank water in RAS were significantly (P{<=}0.05) lower than those in a control aquaculture system (CAS) that simulated static pond culture without wetland treatment. However, no significant difference (P{<=}0.05) in BOD{sub 5}, TAN and NO{sub 2}-N was found between the two systems. At the end of the study, the harvest results showed that shrimp weight and survival rate in the RAS (3.8{+-}1.8 g/shrimp and 90%) significantly (P{<=}0.01) exceeded those in the CAS (2.3{+-}1.5 g/shrimp and 71%). This study concludes that constructed wetlands can improve the water quality and provide a good culture environment, consequently increasing the shrimp growth and survival without water exchange, in a recirculating system.

  14. A study on biosorption of copper ions by fungal chitosan: an alternative to shrimp chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Behnam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : One of the main applications of chitosan is for heavy metals removal from waste waters. Industrially, chitosan is produced through deacetylation of chitin present in shellfish waste. Another source of chitosan is the cell wall of zygomycetes fungi with several advantages over shellfish wastes .   Materials and method s: Fungal chitosan purified from biomass of Mucor indicus and shrimp chitosan were applied and compared for removal of copper ions from aqueous solution. The effects of pH (3 to 5.5, copper ion concentration (5 to 52 mg l-1, the amount of chitosan (200 to 3000 mg l-1, adsorption time, temperature, and presence of other metal ions on the biosorption of Cu2+ were investigated .   Results : Maximum adsorption capacities for fungal and shrimp chitosans were 58.5 and 60.7 mg g-1, respectively. T he rate of copper adsorption by the fungal chitosan was significantly higher than that by the shrimp chitosan. Among p seudo-first order, pseudo-second order, intra-particle diffusion, and Elovich models, Ho’s pseudo-second order model was the best model for fitting the kinetic data. The adsorption capacity increased for both types of chitosans by increasing the solution pH. However, temperature and presence of other ions did not show significant effects on the biosorption capacity of copper. The isotherm data were very well described by Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson models .   Discussion and conclusion : Both fungal and shrimp chitosans can effectively be used for removal of copper ions from aqueous solutions. Adsorption process for fungal chitosan is fast, while the process is slower for the shrimp chitosan. Therefore, from the kinetics point of view, the fungal chitosan is preferable compared with the shrimp chitosan . Key words: Biosorption, Copper, Fungal chitosan, Shrimp chitosan, Water treatment .

  15. Northern Shrimp (Pandalus borealis) Recruitment in West Greenland Waters. Part I. Distribution of Pandalus Shrimp Larvae in Relation to Hydrography and Plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S. A.; Storm, L. M.; Simonsen, C. S.

    2002-01-01

    Plankton samples and oceanographic data were obtained during transect studies across fishing banks over the West Greenland shelf areas in June 1999, May, and July 2000. The hypothesis that larval shrimp are linked to the behaviour of hydrographic fronts was tested by determining whether larval sh...

  16. Production of dried shrimp mixed with turmeric and salt by Spouted Bed technique enter the rectangular chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanthong, P.; Mustafa, Y.; Ngamrungroj, D.

    2017-09-01

    Today, dried shrimp in the market were refused food colour and drying until shrimp are colourful and tasty. Meanwhile, Community groups, women’s health trying to produce food products come from herbs. As an alternative to consumers. The production process is also a traditional way to dry. In order to extend the shelf life longer. Sometimes, potential risks, both in quality and quantity of products. As a result, consumers are enormous. Thus, this research aims to study the possibility to produce shrimp dried mixed with turmeric and salt. Then dried shrimp mixed with turmeric and salt to keep up the quality criteria of the Food and Drug Administration-FDA It can reduce the risk of the consumer and can keep up in a kitchen Thailand. When buying shrimp from the fisherman’s boat Will be made clear, clean impurities and shaking the sand to dry. Prepare a mixture of turmeric and salt. The shrimp were dipped into a beef with stirrer for 3 minutes. And scoop up centrifugal shrimp with dried. Measurement of initial moisture content averaging 78%wb. Then drying technique Spouted enter the rectangular chamber a continuous manner. Until average moisture content to 17%wb. The air temperature in the drying chamber at 180 °C and hot air speed 4.5 m/s, a state heat transfer Mass and moisture within the shrimp. In chamber when drying, the shrimp have moved freely behaviour can spit water out faster does not burn. Shaving legs of shrimp shell fragments lightweight is sorting out the top of drying chamber. Private shrimp were dried out to the front of the quad drying chamber. Power consumption 27.5 MJ/kg, divided into electrical energy 12.3 MJ/kg and thermal energy is 15.2 MJ/kg. The hot air comes from burning LPG gas burner with dual automatic. And can adjustable to room temperature drying characteristics modulation setting.

  17. Simulation of Tail Weight Distributions in Biological Year 1986–2006 Landings of Brown Shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Fishery

    OpenAIRE

    Caillouet, Jr. , Charles W.; Hart, Rick A.; Nance, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Size distribution within re- ported landings is an important aspect of northern Gulf of Mexico penaeid shrimp stock assessments. It reflects shrimp population characteristics such as numerical abundance of various sizes, age structure, and vital rates (e.g. recruitment, growth, and mortality), as well as effects of fishing, fishing power, fishing practices, sampling, size-grading, etc. The usual measure of shrimp size in archived landings data is count (C) the number of shrimp tails (ab...

  18. A novel integrase-containing element may interact with Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) to cause slow growth in giant tiger shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Sriurairatana Siriporn; Senapin Saengchan; Panphut Wattana; Withyachumnarnkul Boonsirm; Flegel Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background From 2001-2003 monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS) caused severe economic losses for Thai shrimp farmers who cultivated the native, giant tiger shrimp, and this led them to adopt exotic stocks of the domesticated whiteleg shrimp as the species of cultivation choice, despite the higher value of giant tiger shrimp. In 2008, newly discovered Laem-Singh virus (LSNV) was proposed as a necessary but insufficient cause of MSGS, and this stimulated the search for the additional co...

  19. Direct Nitrous Oxide Emission from the Aquacultured Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterkamp, Ines M; Schramm, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) is widely used in aquaculture, where it is reared at high stocking densities, temperatures, and nutrient concentrations. Here we report that adult L. vannamei shrimp emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) at an average rate of 4.3 nmol N2O/individual × h, which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously measured N2O emission rates for free-living aquatic invertebrates. Dissection, incubation, and inhibitor experiments with specimens from a shrimp farm in Germany indicated that N2O is mainly produced in the animal's gut by microbial denitrification. Microsensor measurements demonstrated that the gut interior is anoxic and nearly neutral and thus is favorable for denitrification by ingested bacteria. Dinitrogen (N2) and N2O accounted for 64% and 36%, respectively, of the nitrogen gas flux from the gut, suggesting that the gut passage is too fast for complete denitrification to be fully established. Indeed, shifting the rearing water bacterial community, a diet component of shrimp, from oxic to anoxic conditions induced N2O accumulation that outlasted the gut passage time. Shrimp-associated N2O production was estimated to account for 6.5% of total N2O production in the shrimp farm studied here and to contribute to the very high N2O supersaturation measured in the rearing tanks (2,099%). Microbial N2O production directly associated with aquacultured animals should be implemented into life cycle assessments of seafood production. The most widely used shrimp species in global aquaculture, Litopenaeus vannamei, is shown to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) at a particularly high rate. Detailed experiments reveal that N2O is produced in the oxygen-depleted gut of the animal by bacteria that are part of the shrimp diet. Upon ingestion, these bacteria experience a shift from oxic to anoxic conditions and therefore switch their metabolism to the anaerobic denitrification process, which produces N

  20. Immunoglobulin E antibody reactivity to the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, in unexposed Orthodox Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J; Reshef, A; Patton, L; Ayuso, R; Reese, G; Lehrer, S B

    2003-07-01

    Assessment of allergic (IgE antibody-mediated) reactions to foods may become complicated by cross-reactivity that can occur among certain food families and between foods and seemingly unrelated allergens. The allergenic properties of tropomyosin (muscle-derived protein) have been recently demonstrated in invertebrates such as cockroaches, dust mites, and shrimp. In view of a possible cross-reactivity between food allergens and related allergens from animal sources, we designed a study to assess IgE antibody reactivity to the major shrimp allergen, Pen a 1, in an unexposed population of Orthodox Jews, who observe Kosher dietary laws that prohibit eating shellfish. Nine subjects, who reacted positively by skin tests to shrimp (Penaeus setiferous), were selected for the study. Subjects (two females, seven males) ranged in age from 14 to 32 years (mean 20.4). All subjects were strictly observant of Jewish tradition and had no prior exposure to seafood (regarded as a non-Kosher food). Serum was obtained from all the subjects and tested for IgE antibody reactivity to shrimp and dust mite. All subjects reported symptoms of perennial allergic rhinitis, five had history of asthma, atopic dermatitis, and/or sinusitis. All had positive skin prick tests to shrimp and house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, or both); 2/7 subjects were positive to cockroach mix (Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana). Sera of 4/9 subjects demonstrated specific IgE antibodies by RAST to shrimp (7.0-20.0%), 3/9 to Pen a 1 (6.3-24.1%), and 3/9 to shrimp or Pen a 1 by immunoblot. IgE binding to Pen a 1 was inhibited with either mite or cockroach extracts as demonstrated by RAST and/or immunoblot inhibition analysis. These studies indicate that IgE antibody reactivity to a major food allergen, shrimp, can occur in an unexposed population of individuals; some subjects allergic to HDM and/or cockroach show substantial IgE antibody reactivity to the major shrimp

  1. Melanosis and quality changes of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) treated with catechin during iced storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, Nilesh Prakash; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2009-05-13

    Melanosis, microbiological, chemical, and physical changes of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) treated with catechin were monitored during iced storage of 10 days. Whole shrimp treated with catechin solution (0.05 or 0.1%) had retarded growth of psychrophilic bacteria and spoilage microorganisms including H(2)S-producing bacteria and enterobacteriaceae throughout storage in comparison with the control and those treated with 1.25% sodium metabisilfite (SMS) (P < 0.05). The lower increases in pH and total volatile base (TVB) content were obtained in the shrimp treated with catechin solution at both levels, compared with those of other samples (P < 0.05). Lipid oxidation, loss in freshness and melanosis were lowered by catechin treatment. In general, the efficacy of catechin in lowering melanosis and quality losses increased with increasing levels used. Additionally, catechin (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1% (w/v)) showed inhibitory activity toward polyphenoloxidase (PPO) of Pacific white shrimp in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, catechin can be used as a promising melanosis inhibitor as well as an antimicrobial and an antioxidant in ice-stored shrimp.

  2. Cytotoxic activities of some mono and bis Mannich bases derived from acetophenone in brine shrimp bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Halise Inci; Gul, Mustafa; Hänninen, Osmo

    2002-01-01

    Some mono Mannich bases (1-phenyl-3-amino-1-propanone salts) and bis Mannich bases (1-phenyl-3-amino-2-amino-methyl-1-propanone salts) derived from acetophenone and a few representative quaternary derivatives were synthesised and their cytotoxicity was tested using the brine shrimp bioassay. This assay may serve as an intermediate test before further in vivo animal experiments in large scale, since brine shrimp nauplii as whole organisms were used in this test. Mono Mannich bases were generally more cytotoxic than their corresponding bis Mannich bases. Mannich bases synthesised were cytotoxic in both brine shrimp bioassay in this study and cell culture tests using Jurkat and Renca cells in a previous study. However, the order of the cytotoxic potency of the compounds were reverse, which may result from faster deamination of bis derivatives than optimal level, and different species and test media used in the two test systems. Faster deamination of bis derivatives might have led to elimination of active metabolites before reaching its target. The cytotoxicity of the compounds might have been altered by amino acids and proteins present in cell culture medium but not in sea water used in brine shrimp bioassay affecting their transport through the cell membrane and metabolism in the cell by binding with the compounds. With higher cytotoxic activity compared with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8) in brine shrimp bioassay, mono Mannich base 1 and its quaternary derivative 4 and quaternary bis derivative 8 seem to be candidate compounds for further drug design.

  3. Physiochemical Changes and Optimization of Phosphate-Treated Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei ) Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Saiah Djebbour; Yang, Je-Eun; Oh, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Dae-Wook; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors responsible for the changed physiochemical properties of unpeeled shrimp treated in cold phosphate solution (2~4°C) with the intervention of 4 factors: phosphate concentration, dipping time, rotation speed, and volume of brine solution. Response surface analysis was used to characterize the effect of the phosphate treatment on shrimps by running 33 treatments for optimizing the experiment. For each treatment, phosphate amount, moisture content, and weight gain were measured. The results showed that phosphate concentration is the most important factor than other factors for facilitating phosphate penetration in the meat of the shrimp and for getting the best result. The optimum condition of phosphate-treated shrimp in this study was 110 to 120 min dipping time, 500 to 550 mL brine solution for 100 g shrimp sample, and 190 to 210 rpm agitation speed. The studied conditions can be applied in fisheries and other food industries for good phosphate treatments. PMID:27069905

  4. Nursery function of an estuarine tidal marsh for the brown shrimp Crangon crangon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattrijsse, André; Dankwa, Hederick R.; Mees, Jan

    1997-12-01

    The brown shrimp Crangon crangon migrates into the brackish part of the Westerschelde estuary (southwest Netherlands) shortly after metamorphosis and uses the tidal marsh habitat as a nursery until reaching a total length of about 15 mm. The importance of the marsh as a nursery was evaluated by estimating foraging activity, predation mortality and residence time. In early postlarval stages, C. crangon utilised the intertidal creeks of an estuarine tidal marsh from early spring (March-April) until late autumn (October-November). Postlarval shrimp leaving the marsh with the ebb tide always had significantly more food in their stomachs than shrimp entering the marsh with the incoming flood water. Predation upon the shrimp population was relatively low during most months, but in increased between August and October when common gobies, Pomatoschistus microps, were present in high densities. There was also predation by the small seabass Dicentrarchus labrax. The marsh creeks function both as foraging areas and as predation refuge. Depending on temperature, postlarval shrimp stayed in the marsh for a period of two to three weeks. Quantitatively, the value of the marsh as a nursery area had changed drastically during a second year of sampling, illustrating high natural year-to-year variability. However, the seasonal pattern remained. Recruitment to the subtidal adult population represents an export of animals from the marsh to the estuary. This export is negligible in terms of biomass (as compared to the total biomass of the estuarine population) but it may be important in terms of numbers of individuals.

  5. Species Profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements (Gulf of Mexico): Brown shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassuy, Dennis R.

    1983-01-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, is the major species in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery, the most valuable $302 million in 1980) commercial fishery in the United States. It is heavily preyed on by many fishes. Spawning occurs offshore from about September to May and most postlarvae move into estuaries from February through April. Within the estuary they occupy shallow water near marshes with soft substrate. Juveniles emigrate from estuaries to offshore areas from May through August. They grow as fast as 3.3 mm per day in estuaries. Adults concentrate around the 55-m contour offshore. Postlarval and juvenile shrimp are normal1y taken in water temperatures above 10?C and rapid growth occurs above 18?C. Few shrimp are collected below 5 ppt salinity. Brown shrimp are benthic feeders and prefer soft substrates. High populatiorls are associated with coastal marshes.

  6. Replacement of fish meal by protein soybean concentrate in practical diets for Pacific white shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Soares

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of this work was to evaluate the performance of Litopenaeus vannameifed different levels (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of soybean protein concentrate (63.07% crude protein, CP to replace fish meal-by product (61.24% CP. The study was conducted in clear water in fifteen 800 L tanks equipped with aeration systems, constant heating (29 ºC, and daily water exchange (30%. Each tank was stocked with 37.5 shrimp/m3 (3.03±0.14 g. Feed was supplied four times a day, at 6% of the initial biomass, adjusted daily. After 42 days, the weight gain of shrimp fed diets with 0 and 25% protein replacement was higher than that observed in shrimp fed 100% replacement, and there were no differences among those fed the other diets. Feed efficiency and survival did not differ among shrimp fed different protein replacements. There was a negative linear trend for growth parameters and feed intake as protein replacement with soybean protein concentrate increased. Fish meal by-product can be replaced by up to 75% of soybean protein concentrate, with no harm to the growth of Pacific white shrimp.

  7. Tropical seascapes as feeding grounds for juvenile penaeid shrimps in southern Mozambique revealed using stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Daniela C.; Paula, José; Macia, Adriano

    2017-11-01

    The feeding grounds for four of the most commercially important penaeid shrimp species (Metapenaeus monoceros, M. stebbingi, Penaeus japonicus and Penaeus indicus) within the mangrove and its adjacent coastal habitats (sand flat, mud flat and seagrass meadows) were investigated at Saco and Sangala bays (Inhaca Island, Mozambique, southern-East Africa). The study used carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios to identify the potential food sources for the different shrimp species within each habitat. Significant differences (p food sources in each habitat in both Saco and Sangala bays (isotopic ratios discriminating habitats), as well as between shrimp species among the different habitats. No ontogenetic dietary shifts were found for the studied penaeid shrimp species. The mangrove habitat did not provide a direct food source for most of the species at Saco and Sangala Bays. The seagrass habitat appeared to be a primary feeding area, mainly through seagrass, sediment, polychaetes and seston. The mud and sand flat habitats contributed with less food items for the shrimp species at Saco Bay, as well as the sand flat habitat at Sangala Bay. The possibility to identify feeding grounds is a fundamental tool to assist conservation of the resources and their habitat and for applying an ecosystem approach to fishery management.

  8. The past, present and future distribution of a deep-sea shrimp in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenatul Basher

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shrimps have a widespread distribution across the shelf, slope and seamount regions of the Southern Ocean. Studies of Antarctic organisms have shown that individual species and higher taxa display different degrees of sensitivity and adaptability in response to environmental change. We use species distribution models to predict changes in the geographic range of the deep-sea Antarctic shrimp Nematocarcinus lanceopes under changing climatic conditions from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present and to the year 2100. The present distribution range indicates a pole-ward shift of the shrimp population since the last glaciation. This occurred by colonization of slopes from nearby refugia located around the northern part of Scotia Arc, southern tip of South America, South Georgia, Bouvet Island, southern tip of the Campbell plateau and Kerguelen plateau. By 2100, the shrimp are likely to expand their distribution in east Antarctica but have a continued pole-ward contraction in west Antarctica. The range extension and contraction process followed by the deep-sea shrimp provide a geographic context of how other deep-sea Antarctic species may have survived during the last glaciation and may endure with projected changing climatic conditions in the future.

  9. The past, present and future distribution of a deep-sea shrimp in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basher, Zeenatul; Costello, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Shrimps have a widespread distribution across the shelf, slope and seamount regions of the Southern Ocean. Studies of Antarctic organisms have shown that individual species and higher taxa display different degrees of sensitivity and adaptability in response to environmental change. We use species distribution models to predict changes in the geographic range of the deep-sea Antarctic shrimp Nematocarcinus lanceopes under changing climatic conditions from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present and to the year 2100. The present distribution range indicates a pole-ward shift of the shrimp population since the last glaciation. This occurred by colonization of slopes from nearby refugia located around the northern part of Scotia Arc, southern tip of South America, South Georgia, Bouvet Island, southern tip of the Campbell plateau and Kerguelen plateau. By 2100, the shrimp are likely to expand their distribution in east Antarctica but have a continued pole-ward contraction in west Antarctica. The range extension and contraction process followed by the deep-sea shrimp provide a geographic context of how other deep-sea Antarctic species may have survived during the last glaciation and may endure with projected changing climatic conditions in the future.

  10. The potential use of constructed wetlands in a recirculating aquaculture system for shrimp culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    A pilot-scale constructed wetland unit, consisting of free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SF) constructed wetlands arranged in series, was integrated into an outdoor recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) for culturing Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). This study evaluated the performance of the wetland unit in treating the recirculating wastewater and examined the effect of improvement in water quality of the culture tank on the growth and survival of shrimp postlarvae. During an 80-day culture period, the wetland unit operated at a mean hydraulic loading rate of 0.3 m/day and effectively reduced the influent concentrations of 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, 24%), suspended solids (SS, 71%), chlorophyll a (chl-a, 88%), total ammonium (TAN, 57%), nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N, 90%) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N, 68%). Phosphate (PO4-P) reduction was the least efficient (5.4%). The concentrations of SS, Chl-a, turbidity and NO3-N in the culture tank water in RAS were significantly (Pwetland treatment. However, no significant difference (PNO2-N was found between the two systems. At the end of the study, the harvest results showed that shrimp weight and survival rate in the RAS (3.8 +/-1.8 g/shrimp and 90%) significantly (Pwetlands can improve the water quality and provide a good culture environment, consequently increasing the shrimp growth and survival without water exchange, in a recirculating system.

  11. INFLUENCE OF FISH MEAL REDUCTION, ALGAE ADDITION, AND ENZYME USE IN SHRIMP FEEDS ON THE TISSUE COMPOSITION OF Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kaspers

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available At the Leibniz-Center for Tropical Marine Ecology in Bremen, Germany, shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei fed feeds with reduced fish meal content, algae and enzyme additions were analysed for their tissue composition. Contents of protein, glycogen, total lipid, linoleic acid (LA, alpha linolenic acid (ALA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA of the shrimp abdomen and of the respective feeds were determined. Reduction of fish meal (FM content in shrimp feed and its substitution with “mash” (grain distillery waste-”Schlempe”, corn gluten, pea or coarse colza meal did not influence the tissue composition. Additional inclusion of an algae mixture out of Spirulina spp., Phaeodactylum spp., and Tetraselmis spp. to shrimp feeds as well as the single inclusions of Phaeodactylum spp. or Spirulina spp. had no effect on the tissue composition. Furthermore no improvement of the quality of the shrimps due to an enhanced digestibility of mash by enzymes (mixture of corolase, phytase, xylanase could be detected. In contrast the quality of shrimps seemed to be negatively affected by enzymes in this study. These findings could contribute to making shrimp aqua farming more economic as reduction of feed costs without reduction of the quality of the shrimps would be a large benefit.

  12. A sulfated galactans supplemented diet enhances the expression of immune genes and protects against Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Boonsri, Nantavadee; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2017-06-01

    A sulfated galactans (SG) supplemented diet was evaluated for the potential to stimulate immune activity in shrimp Penaeus vannamei (P. vannamei). Shrimp given the SG supplemented diet (0.5, 1 and 2% w/w) for 7 days showed enhanced expression of the downstream signaling mediator of lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) and immune related genes including p-NF-κB, IMD, IKKβ and IKKε, antimicrobial peptide PEN-4, proPO-I and II. Following immersion with Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) for 14 days, the shrimp given the SG supplemented diet (1 and 2% w/w) showed a decrease in bacterial colonies and bacterial toxin gene expression, compared to shrimp given a normal diet, and they reached 50% mortality at day 14. However, shrimp given the normal diet and challenged with the bacteria reached 100% mortality at day 6. SG-fed shrimp increased expression of immune genes related to LGBP signaling at day 1 after the bacterial immersion compared to control (no immersion), which later decreased to control levels. Shrimp on the normal diet also increased expression of immune related genes at day 1 after immersion which however decreased below control levels by day 3. Taken together, the results indicate the efficacy of the SG supplemented diet to enhance the immune activity in shrimp which could offer protection from V. parahaemolyticus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PARTICLE REMOVAL RATES BY THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS, ITS BURROW, AND A COMMENSAL CLAM: EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant intertidal inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the bivalve Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities by the shrimp and by its commensal clam, as well as particle se...

  14. Water pollution by intensive brackish shrimp farming in south-east Vietnam: Causes and options for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham Thi Ahn,; Kroeze, C.; Bush, S.R.; Mol, A.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on both the environmental impact of intensive shrimp farming in the coastal region of Vietnam and the identification of options for cleaner production. We investigated water pollution, sediment contamination and the spread of diseases related to shrimp farming in the Can Gio

  15. Antimicrobial effects of vapor phase thymol, modified atmosphere and their combination against Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella contamination of raw shrimp is a food safety concern in the U.S. and other countries. This research evaluated the effects of vapor phase thymol, modified atmosphere (MA) and their combination against Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp. Growth profiles of a Salmonella spp. cocktail (6 strains),...

  16. Replacement of fish meal with black soldier fly meal in practical diets for Pacific whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimp account for 15 percent of the total value of internationally traded fishery products, and currently are the largest single aquaculture commodity in value terms. The Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) generated USD 11 billion from a production volume of 2.7 million metric tons (mm...

  17. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ON SURVIVAL RATE, GROWTH, AND PRODUCTION OF WHITELEG SHRIMP IN TRADITIONAL-PLUS TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharijadi Atmomarsono

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Instead of culturing tiger shrimp that is frequently burdened by mass mortality, whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei is then considered as an alternative commodity in Indonesian brackishwater ponds. To prevent the whiteleg shrimp from diseases, different probiotic bacteria were tested in completely randomized design experiment using nine 250 m2 experimental ponds stocked with 10 PLs of whiteleg shrimp fry/m2. Three treatments were applied, namely A alternate use of probiotic bacteria RICA-1, RICA-2, RICA-3; B alternate use of probiotic bacteria RICA-4, RICA-5, RICA-3, and C control (without probiotic bacteria; each with three replications. After 11-week application, the results showed that the best survival rate of whiteleg shrimp was achieved by treatment B 98.83% and the best production was achieved by treatment A (23.52 kg/250 m2. However, there were no significant differences (P>0.05 among the three treatments tested for the shrimp survival rate. The whiteleg shrimp production in treatment A and B were signicantly better (P<0.05 than that in treatment C (control. These high shrimp production in treatment A and B were mainly caused by the capability of the applied probiotics in controlling some water quality variables and Vibrio numbers.

  18. 76 FR 23972 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Brazil, India, the People's Republic of China, Thailand, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... Vietnam (Vietnam) would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and of material injury... to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a... (Trachypenaeus curvirostris), southern white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti), blue shrimp (Penaeus stylirostris...

  19. Discarding in the shrimp fisheries in Skagerrak and the Norwegian Deep (ICES Divs. IIIa and IVa east)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Sten; Ulmestrand, Mats; Søvik, Guldborg

    In the Pandalus fisheries in Skagerrak, shrimp are discarded because of being non-marketable, either due to poor landing quality or too small size. However, smaller shrimp of low market value are also discarded (so called high-grading). This is mainly the case in the fisheries which are constrained...

  20. 75 FR 60074 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Notice of Correction to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... shrimp from Brazil, India, the People's Republic of China, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. See Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Brazil, India, the People's Republic of China, Thailand....57 Aquatic Products Trading Company \\7\\ 4.57 Bac Lieu Fisheries Company Limited \\8\\ 4.57 Coastal...

  1. Phylogenetics links monster larva to deep-sea shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather D; Felder, Darryl L; Vollmer, Nicole L; Martin, Joel W; Crandall, Keith A

    2012-10-01

    Mid-water plankton collections commonly include bizarre and mysterious developmental stages that differ conspicuously from their adult counterparts in morphology and habitat. Unaware of the existence of planktonic larval stages, early zoologists often misidentified these unique morphologies as independent adult lineages. Many such mistakes have since been corrected by collecting larvae, raising them in the lab, and identifying the adult forms. However, challenges arise when the larva is remarkably rare in nature and relatively inaccessible due to its changing habitats over the course of ontogeny. The mid-water marine species Cerataspis monstrosa (Gray 1828) is an armored crustacean larva whose adult identity has remained a mystery for over 180 years. Our phylogenetic analyses, based in part on recent collections from the Gulf of Mexico, provide definitive evidence that the rare, yet broadly distributed larva, C. monstrosa, is an early developmental stage of the globally distributed deepwater aristeid shrimp, Plesiopenaeus armatus. Divergence estimates and phylogenetic relationships across five genes confirm the larva and adult are the same species. Our work demonstrates the diagnostic power of molecular systematics in instances where larval rearing seldom succeeds and morphology and habitat are not indicative of identity. Larval-adult linkages not only aid in our understanding of biodiversity, they provide insights into the life history, distribution, and ecology of an organism.

  2. Unveiling the physical mechanism behind pistol shrimp cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouvinis, Phoevos; Bruecker, Christoph; Gavaises, Manolis

    2017-10-25

    Snapping shrimps use a special shaped claw to generate a cavitating high speed water jet. Cavitation formed in this way, may be used for hunting/stunning prey and communication. The present work is a novel computational effort to provide insight on the mechanisms of cavitation formation during the claw closure. The geometry of the claw used here is a simplified claw model, based on prior experimental work. Techniques, such as Immersed Boundary and Homogenous Equilibrium Model (HEM), are employed to describe the claw motion and cavitating flow field respectively. The simulation methodology has been validated against prior experimental work and is applied here for claw closure at realistic conditions. Simulations show that during claw closure, a high velocity jet forms, inducing vortex roll-up around it. If the closure speed is high enough, the intensity of the swirling motion is enough to produce strong depressurization in the vortex core, leading to the formation of a cavitation ring. The cavitation ring moves along the jet axis and, soon after its formation, collapses and rebounds, producing high pressure pulses.

  3. Phylogenetic relationships within the snapping shrimp genus Synalpheus (Decapoda: Alpheidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Kristin M; Hurt, Carla; Anker, Arthur

    2014-08-01

    The snapping shrimp genus Synalpheus (Alpheidae) is one of the most speciose decapod genera, with over 160 described species worldwide. Most species live in symbiotic relationships with other marine organisms, such as sponges, corals and crinoids, and some sponge-dwelling species have a highly organized, social structure. The present study is the first worldwide molecular phylogenetic analysis of Synalpheus, based on >2,200 bp of sequence data from two mitochondrial (COI and 16S) and two nuclear (PEPCK and 18S) loci. Our molecular data show strong support for monophyly of three out of six traditionally recognized morphology-based species groups: the S. brevicarpus, S. comatularum and S. gambarelloides groups. The remaining three species groups (S. paulsoni, S. neomeris and S. coutierei groups) are non-monophyletic in their current composition and will need to be either abandoned or taxonomically redefined. We also identified potential cryptic species of Synalpheus in our dataset, using intraspecific and interspecific sequence variation in COI from the taxonomically well-studied S. gambarelloides group to establish a genetic divergence threshold. We then used both genetic divergence and tree-based criteria (reciprocal monophyly) to identify potential cryptic species in the remaining taxa of the genus. Our results suggest the presence of multiple cryptic lineages in Synalpheus, underlining the need for more integrative taxonomic studies-including morphological, ecological, molecular, and color pattern data-in this biologically interesting genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutual assessment during ritualized fighting in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, P A; Patek, S N

    2018-01-31

    Safe and effective conflict resolution is critical for survival and reproduction. Theoretical models describe how animals resolve conflict by assessing their own and/or their opponent's ability (resource holding potential, RHP), yet experimental tests of these models are often inconclusive. Recent reviews have suggested this uncertainty could be alleviated by using multiple approaches to test assessment models. The mantis shrimp Neogonodactylus bredini presents visual displays and ritualistically exchanges high-force strikes during territorial contests. We tested how N. bredini contest dynamics were explained by any of three assessment models-pure self-assessment, cumulative assessment and mutual assessment-using correlations and a novel, network analysis-based sequential behavioural analysis. We staged dyadic contests over burrow access between competitors matched either randomly or based on body size. In both randomly and size-matched contests, the best metric of RHP was body mass. Burrow residency interacted with mass to predict outcome. Correlations between contest costs and RHP rejected pure self-assessment, but could not fully differentiate between cumulative and mutual assessment. The sequential behavioural analysis ruled out cumulative assessment and supported mutual assessment. Our results demonstrate how multiple analyses provide strong inference to tests of assessment models and illuminate how individual behaviours constitute an assessment strategy. © 2018 The Author(s).

  5. Adaptive radiation and ecological diversification of Sulawesi's ancient lake shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Rintelen, Kristina; Glaubrecht, Matthias; Schubart, Christoph D; Wessel, Andreas; Von Rintelen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Ancient lakes are natural laboratories for the study of adaptive radiation. Recently, two lake systems on the Indonesian island Sulawesi have emerged as promising new model systems. A species flock of atyid freshwater shrimps in the Malili lake system comprises 15 colorful endemic taxa. Mitochondrial DNA data suggest two independent colonizations by riverine ancestors. Only one colonization event led to subsequent radiation into 14 species, while the second clade comprises just one species. The vast majority of species (n= 12) are habitat specialists, which are confined to the larger Malili clade and include all taxa with species-specific color patterns and a restricted distribution within the five connected Malili lakes. Morphological, genetic, and ecological data are consistent with the existence of an adaptive radiation in the Malili lakes, involving the habitat-specific diversification of trophic morphology. In addition to testing criteria for the recognition of an adaptive radiation, an ancestral state reconstruction reveals an equal probability for either a riverine generalist or a lacustrine specialist as ancestor of the large Malili clade, which is interpreted as indicative of an early stage of habitat specialization within this radiation. Finally, our results suggest that species diversification may have been primarily driven by ecological specialization and allopatric speciation. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay of selected gymnosperm and angiosperm species

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    Janaćković Peđa T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanol extracts of selected species of flowering plants Anthemis cotula, A. ruthenica, Centaurea dubia (Asteraceae, Ajuga genevensis, A. chamaepitys, A. reptans, Micromeria albanica, M. cristata, M. dalmatica, M. juliana, Thymus tosevii (Lamiaceae and conifers - Abies alba, Picea omorika, Pinus heldreichii (Pinaceae and Taxus baccata (Taxaceae, as well as diethyl ether extracts of ten species Anthemis cotula, A. ruthenica, Centaurea dubia, Ajuga genevensis, A. chamaepitys, A. reptans, Micromeria albanica, M. cristata, M. dalmatica and M. juliana from two flowering plant families (Asteraceae and Lamiaceae were tested for general bioactivity using brine shrimp (Artemia salina lethality test. Lethal concentration (LC50 and 95% confidence intervals were determined by computer program LdP line. Out of fifteen tested methanol extracts, three possessed cytotoxic effect. Taxus baccata methanol extract showed the highest effect (LC50 = 18.60 μg/ml, while Thymus tosevii methanol extract expressed the lowest (LC50 = 842.50 μg/ml. All other analyzed species did not express significant cytotoxicity. Also, diethyl ether extracts of all tested species did not show significant cytotoxicity. The obtained results for methanol extracts which show certain cytotoxic effect could be guide for further phytochemical and pharmacological investigations. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173029

  7. Shrimp cephalothorax meal in laying hen diets: effects on egg.

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    Alejandro Chacón-Villalobos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of shrimp cephalothorax meal Pleuroncodes planipes (HC in laying hen diets over egg quality and yolk color. From April to September 2013 in San José Costa Rica, four inclusion levels of meal were evaluated (0% HC, 5% HC, 10% HC, 15% HC in rations for 140 Hy-Line Brown hens (35 per treatment. There were no significant differences (p>0.05 for Haugh units (M= 90, yolk index (M= 0.41, and pH (M= 6.2. The lowest shell thickness was for 15% HC (M= 0.44 mm (p0.05 among color parameters L* (M= 61.59, b* (M= 57.58 and C* (M = 62.60. The parameter a* was significantly higher (M=72,4 (p<0.05 for 15% HC (M= 29.34. The °h parameter was higher for 0% HC (p<0.05 (M=72.39, and liking for the color of yolk (M= 7.4 was higher as well (p<0.05. Flavor liking generated three clusters: 40% of people preferred 0% HC, 27% preferred 15% HC, and 33% were indifferent. The results show that the inclusions of HC are associated with an acceptable liking of egg, generating a possible market to produce them with inclusions among 10% and 15% HC.

  8. Application of risk perception and communication strategies to manage disease outbreaks of coastal shrimp farming in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan

    2008-01-01

    diseases) is the major concern of shrimp producers of developing countries like Bangladesh, India, Thailand, China and many other countries. The risk of disease outbreaks in shrimp farms could be effectively prevented and managed by early identification of disease occurrence and by rapid communication...... of such a risk to the shrimp farmers. The risk perception and communication concepts could be applied to identify and to manage the disease occurrence in the initial stage. This conceptual paper provides the models to prevent and to manage shrimp diseases in coastal shrimp farming of Bangladesh and other...... developing countries. It is anticipated that the proposed models could successfully help the farmers to predict the occurrence of diseases at the initial stage and to communicate the message of disease risk to the rest of the farmers via a risk management body. As a result, both the infected and non...

  9. Mercury and selenium levels, and their molar ratios in several species of commercial shrimp in Japan regarding the health risk of methylmercury exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van Anh Thi; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2017-01-01

    The Japanese shrimp industry depends on importing shrimp from other countries. However, little information is available on mercury speciation and selenium (Se) concentrations in commercial shrimp available in Japan. The present study determined the concentrations of total mercury (T-Hg), methylmercury (MeHg), and Se in the muscles (wet weight) of imported and domestic commercial shrimp from Kumamoto and Kagoshima prefectures to obtain information for assessing the risk of MeHg exposure. The median concentrations of T-Hg, MeHg and Se in shrimp imported from three different countries were, respectively: black tiger shrimp (n = 18), 15.8, 14.4, and 415 ng/g; Vannamei shrimp (n = 25), 11.4, 11.2, and 292 ng/g; and white shrimp (n = 26), 26.8, 26.1, and 396 ng/g. There were significant differences in T-Hg and MeHg concentrations between shrimp imported from different countries. The median concentrations of T-Hg, MeHg and Se in shrimp of Japanese origin were, respectively: Shiba shrimp (n = 10), 15.9, 15.0, and 270 ng/g; Kuruma shrimp (n = 10), 79.9, 75.9, and 390 ng/g; and Ashiaka shrimp (n = 10), 36.1, 34.1, and 303 ng/g. The percentages of MeHg in T-Hg were between 90% and 99%, with MeHg levels in the imported and domestic commercial shrimp lower than the Japanese regulation of 300 ng/g for fish. The mean Se/T-Hg molar ratios (16-160) were comparatively higher than those previously reported in fish. Overall, this survey suggests that shrimp commercially available in Japan will not pose a particularly high risk regarding MeHg exposure to consumers.

  10. Distribution of hydrothermal Alvinocaridid shrimps: effect of geomorphology and specialization to extreme biotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunina, Anastasia A; Vereshchaka, Alexandr L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review of our knowledge about distribution of recently known species of vent shrimps and to analyze factors influencing distribution patterns. Analyses are based upon (1) original material taken during eight cruises in the Atlantic Ocean (a total of 5861 individuals) and (2) available literature data from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Vent shrimps have two patterns of the species ranges: local (single vent site) and regional (three--six vent sites). Pacific species ranges are mainly of the local type and the Atlantic species ranges are of the regional type. The regional type of species ranges may be associated with channels providing easy larval dispersal (rift valleys, trenches), while the local type is characteristic for other areas. Specialization of a shrimp genus to extreme vent habitats leads to two effects: (1) an increase in the number of vent fields inhabited by the genus and (2) a decrease of species number within the genus.

  11. EFFECT OF DYNAMICAL WATER QUALITY ON SHRIMP CULTURE IN THE INTEGRATED MULTITROPIC AQUACULTURE (IMTA

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    Brata Pantjara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the technologies to improve the productivity of shrimp farms are environmentally friendly shrimp farming multitrophic integrated system known as Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture (IMTA. The aims of the study were to observe the water quality dynamic on the integrated multitrophic aquaculture and the effect on the production. This study was used four plots which each of pond had 4,000 m2 in sizing, located in experiment pond, at Research and Development Institute for Coastal Aquaculture, Maros. The main commodities used were tiger and vannamei shrimp. In the A pond was cultivated the tiger shrimp with density 12 ind./m2, in B pond was tiger shrimp with density 8 ind./m2, C pond was vannamei shrimp with density 50 ind./m2, and D pond was vannamei shrimp with density 25 ind./m2. Other commodities were red tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Each pond had stocking density 2,400 ind./plot which was divided into 5 hapas having a size of (6 m x 4 m x 1.2 m/each, mangrove oysters (Crassostrea iredalei and Saccostrea cucullata with density 7,500 ind./4,000 m2 and seaweed (Gracilaria verrucosa of 500 kg/4,000 m2. The observation of dynamic water quality in the pond was conducted every day i.e. temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, and measured pH, while the total organic matter total (TOM, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate were taken every two weeks. The measurements methods of water quality in laboratory was refered to APHA (2008; and Boyd (1990. During the study, absorption of N and P in seaweed were measured, the obtained plankton was identified and the ratio of carbon and nitrogen during the observation was also calculated. To determine the effect of dominant water quality on production was used the principal component analysis (PCA. The result showed that water quality during the study was suitable for shrimp and red tilapia culture. The dominant water qualities which effected the shrimp production in

  12. TOXICITY TESTING OF RESTORATIVE DENTAL MATERIALS USING BRINE SHRIMP LARVAE (ARTEMIA SALINA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhem, Manar M.; Al-Hiyasat, Ahmad S.; Darmani, Homa

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of extracts of different composites, glass ionomer cement (GIC)s and compomers on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. Ethanolic extracts of four dental composites (Z-100; Solitaire 2; Filtek P60 and Synergy), a conventional GIC (Ketac-Fil), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer), two compomers (F2000; Dyract AP), and a flowable compomer (Dyract Flow) were prepared from each material. Following evaporation of the ethanol, the extracts were resuspended in distilled water, which was then used to test the effects on the viability of brine shrimp larvae. For the composites, the extract of Synergy was the least toxic (88% viability) followed by the extracts of Solitaire 2, Z100 and P60 (75%, 67.5% and 50% viability, respectively). One-way ANOVA revealed highly significant differences between the resin composite materials (pbrine shrimp larvae followed by GICs and then composites. PMID:19089264

  13. Short-term toxicity of polystryrene microplastics on mysid shrimps Neomysis japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Wang, Xiao; Luo, Xianxiang; Zheng, Hao

    2017-04-01

    Plastic debris especially microplastics (MPs) have become a global concern for the aggravating pollution in the oceans. In this study, the physico-chemical properties of fluorescently labeled polystyrene (PS) beads and the effects of PS-MPs on the survival of mysid shrimps (Neomysis japonica) were investigated. PS-MPs were identified to have spherical shape, uniform size and stable green fluorescence. The results showed that PS beads had little effects on the mortality of shrimps under a short-term (72 h) exposure with concentrations of 50 μg L-1 and 500 μg L-1. However, PS-MPs had severe short-term toxicity on the survival of mysid shrimps, resulting in 30% mortality especially in a 72 h exposure with the higher concentration of 1000 μg L-1. These findings provide new insights into the toxic effects of MPs on marine invertebrates.

  14. Snapping shrimp noise mitigation based on statistical detection in underwater acoustic orthogonal frequency division multiplexing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonsu; Seo, Jongpil; Ahn, Jongmin; Chung, Jaehak

    2017-07-01

    We propose a mitigation scheme for snapping shrimp noise when it corrupts an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in underwater acoustic communication systems. The OFDM signal distorted by the snapping shrimp noise is filtered by a band-stop filter. The snapping shrimp noises in the filtered signal are detected by a detector with a constant false alarm rate whose threshold is derived theoretically from the statistics of the background noise. The detected signals are reconstructed by a simple reconstruction method. The proposed scheme has a higher detection capability and a lower mean square error of the channel estimation for simulated data and a lower bit error rate for practical ocean OFDM data collected in northern East China Sea than the conventional noise-mitigating methods.

  15. Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies of Lipidic Extracts from White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Sanchez, Griselda; Moreno-Félix, Carolina; Velazquez, Carlos; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Acosta, Anita; Machi-Lara, Lorena; Aldana-Madrid, María-Lourdes; Ezquerra-Brauer, Josafat-Marina; Robles-Zepeda, Ramón; Burgos-Hernandez, Armando

    2010-01-01

    An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Crude organic extracts obtained from shrimp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxina B1, showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the lipid fraction of the tested species contained compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of a cancer cell line. PMID:21139845

  16. Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies of Lipidic Extracts from White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Moreno-Félix

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9 and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma, respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Crude organic extracts obtained from shrimp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxina B1, showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the lipid fraction of the tested species contained compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of a cancer cell line.

  17. The Use of Crude Shrimp Shell Powder for Chitinase Production by Serratia marcescens WF

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    Jesús E. Mejía-Saulés

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available From 102 Serratia marcescens strains screened, 57 strains showed chitinase activity and Serratia marcescens WF showed the highest chitinolytic activity so this strain was selected for further study on the use of crude shrimp waste for chitinase production. The concentration of crude shrimp shell content at 10–70 g/L, incubation temperature of 28–37 °C, pH=6–9, and time 24–96 h on kinetics of chitinase production by S. marcescens WF were evaluated. The maximal chitinase production related to process variables was obtained with the second order polynomial model: dry shrimp shell powder at 6 %, pH=6.5, temperature of 28 °C during fermentation for up to 72 h.

  18. BAC end sequencing of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: a glimpse into the genome of Penaeid shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Chengzhang; Huan, Pin; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai; Huang, Chao

    2012-05-01

    Little is known about the genome of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei). To address this, we conducted BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) end sequencing of L. vannamei. We selected and sequenced 7 812 BAC clones from the BAC library LvHE from the two ends of the inserts by Sanger sequencing. After trimming and quality filtering, 11 279 BAC end sequences (BESs) including 4 609 pairedends BESs were obtained. The total length of the BESs was 4 340 753 bp, representing 0.18% of the L. vannamei haploid genome. The lengths of the BESs ranged from 100 bp to 660 bp with an average length of 385 bp. Analysis of the BESs indicated that the L. vannamei genome is AT-rich and that the primary repeats patterns were simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and low complexity sequences. Dinucleotide and hexanucleotide repeats were the most common SSR types in the BESs. The most abundant transposable element was gypsy, which may contribute to the generation of the large genome size of L. vannamei. We successfully annotated 4 519 BESs by BLAST searching, including genes involved in immunity and sex determination. Our results provide an important resource for functional gene studies, map construction and integration, and complete genome assembly for this species.

  19. Horizontally transferred genes in the genome of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Cheng-Zhang; Wei, Jian-Kai; Li, Fu-Hua; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2013-08-06

    In recent years, as the development of next-generation sequencing technology, a growing number of genes have been reported as being horizontally transferred from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, most of them involving arthropods. As a member of the phylum Arthropoda, the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei has to adapt to the complex water environments with various symbiotic or parasitic microorganisms, which provide a platform for horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In this study, we analyzed the genome-wide HGT events in L. vannamei. Through homology search and phylogenetic analysis, followed by experimental PCR confirmation, 14 genes with HGT event were identified: 12 of them were transferred from bacteria and two from fungi. Structure analysis of these genes showed that the introns of the two fungi-originated genes were substituted by shrimp DNA fragment, two genes transferred from bacteria had shrimp specific introns inserted in them. Furthermore, around other three bacteria-originated genes, there were three large DNA segments inserted into the shrimp genome. One segment was a transposon that fully transferred, and the other two segments contained only coding regions of bacteria. Functional prediction of these 14 genes showed that 6 of them might be related to energy metabolism, and 4 others related to defense of the organism. HGT events from bacteria or fungi were happened in the genome of L. vannamei, and these horizontally transferred genes can be transcribed in shrimp. This is the first time to report the existence of horizontally transferred genes in shrimp. Importantly, most of these genes are exposed to a negative selection pressure and appeared to be functional.

  20. An integrin from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei mediated microbial agglutination and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Lingling; Wu, Ning; Zhou, Zhi; Song, Linsheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are a family of adhesion receptors which regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, leukocyte migration, and complement receptor-dependent phagocytosis. In invertebrates, as a cell adhesion receptor, β integrins play an important role for the balanced activation of immune defense responses especially during the encounter of infections. The present study attempts to characterize the immune functions of shrimp integrin (LvIntegrin) to have better understanding on the immune system and its regulation mechanisms in shrimps. A shrimp integrin was identified from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (designated as LvIntegrin). Its full-length cDNA was of 2621 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2439 bp encoding a polypeptide of 812 amino acids. The mRNA expression of LvIntegrin was significantly up-regulated at 3, 6 and 12 h after Listonella anguillarum challenge. The cDNA fragment encoding β integrin domains (βA and hybrid domain) of LvIntegrin was recombined and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)-pLysS. The recombinant protein (rLvIntegrin) could significantly agglutinate the tested microbe including E. coli JM109, L. anguillarum, Micrococcus luteus and Candida dattiladattila in the presence of divalent cations. Moreover, when NIH3T3 cells were cultured with rLvIntegrin, the proliferation rate increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. LvIntegrin, a shrimp β integrin was identified from L. vannamei, shared several highly conserved features. LvIntegrin exhibited broad-spectrum agglutination activity towards both bacteria and fungi and could improve the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells, indicating that LvIntegrin is involved in the immune response against microbe challenge and regulation of cell proliferation as a cell adhesion receptor in shrimp.

  1. EXPRESSION OF ANTIVIRAL GENE ON TIGER SHRIMP Penaeus monodon AT DIFFERENT TISSUE AND BODY SIZE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Parenrengi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of tiger shrimp defense against invading pathogen on molecular level such antiviral gene expression is limited to be reported. Gene expression is a process which codes information of genes that is converted to the protein as a phenotype. Distribution of PmAV antivirus gene, that has been reported as an important gene on non-specific response immune, is needed to be observed to several organs/tissues and size of tiger shrimp. The aim of this study is to determine the distribution of gene antiviral expression at several organ/tissue and size of shrimp. The organs/tissues observed in this study were: gill, hepatopancres, muscle tissue, eyes, heart, stomach, gonad, and intestine. While the size of shrimp consisted of three groups, those are: (A 10-20 g/ind., (B 30-40 g/ind., and (C 60-70 g/ind. Analysis of antiviral gene expression was performed by RNA extraction, followed by the cDNA syntesis, and amplification of gene expression by semi-quantitative PCR. The result of PCR optimation showed the optimal concentration of cDNA and primer was 1 μL and 50 mol, respectively for PCR final volume of 25 μL. Antiviral gene was expressed on the hepatopancreas and stomach in percentage of 50.0% and 16.7%, respectively. While the highest percentage of individual expressing the antiviral gene was observed in the shrimp size of C (66.7%, followed by B (50.0% and A (16.7%. The result of study implied that the hepatopancreas has importantly involed in tiger shrimp defense mechanism on viral infection.

  2. Bioaccumulation of Some Metallic Elements in Eddible Textrue of Shrimp Penaeus semisulcatus Collected from Persian Gulf

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    Behrooz Akbari-adergani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today the consequences of taking metal ions especially heavy metals on human health and the environment is of great interest, especially for aquatic food products. The main aim of this scientific and applied research was to measure, some ionic metals’ concentration (i.e. Ni, Fe, V, Co, Cr, Ag, Cd, Li and Ba in Shrimp Penaeus semisulcatus collected from Persian Gulf. Materials and Methods: In this research twenty one samples of Shrimp Penaeus semisulcatus from seven regional fishing ports in Bandar Bushehr, Bandar Mahshahr and Bandar Abbass were collected and transferred to the laboratory in an ice box immediately. After sample preparation according to the AOAC method, each sample was introduced into the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-OES for determination of the metallic elements’ concentration. Results: The results showed that the average concentration of all elements except of vanadium in the muscle of shrimp was higher than the skin. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in the mean of cobalt and lithium accumulation in the skin and muscle of shrimp (P <0/05. Also mean concentration of metals measured in the muscle and skin of shrimps collected from Bushehr have the highest amount of metallic pollution compared to the other two fishing regions which could be a sign of potential contamination of this aquatic area. Conclusion : The comparison of mean concentration in muscle of collected shrimps from Persian Gulf with the WHO recommended guidlines showed that the concentration of metallic elements are lower than the WHO allowable limits and there is no concern regarding consumption of these products.

  3. Shrimp Allergy: Analysis of Commercially Available Extracts for In Vivo Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asero, R; Scala, E; Villalta, D; Pravettoni, V; Arena, A; Billeri, L; Colombo, G; Cortellini, G; Cucinelli, F; De Cristofaro, M L; Farioli, L; Iemoli, E; Lodi Rizzini, F; Longo, R; Losappio, L; Macchia, D; Maietta, G; Minale, P; Murzilli, F; Nebiolo, F; Pastorello, E A; Ventura, M T; Voltolini, S; Amato, S; Mistrello, G

    Skin prick testing (SPT) with commercial extracts is the first step in the diagnosis of shrimp allergy, although its clinical efficiency is unknown. Objective: To analyze the clinical usefulness of all commercial crustacean extracts available for SPT in Italy. We performed a multicenter study of 157 shrimp-allergic patients who underwent SPT with 5 commercial crustacean extracts and with house dust mite (HDM) extract. Commercial extracts were analyzed using SDS-PAGE and compared with a freshly prepared in-house shrimp extract. IgE to Pen a 1/Pen m 1, Pen m 2, and Pen m 4 was determined, and immunoblot analysis was performed on a large number of sera. The skin reactions caused by commercial crustacean extracts were extremely heterogeneous, resulting in 32 clinical profiles, with marked differences in protein content and missing proteins at molecular weights corresponding to those of major shrimp allergens. Only strong Pen a 1/Pen m 1 reactors reacted to both HDM and all 5 commercial extracts in SPT. Most patients, including those who were tropomyosin-negative, reacted to HDM. Patients reacted to a large and variable array of proteins, and IgE reactivity was common at high molecular weights (>50 kDa). The in vivo diagnosis of shrimp allergy must continue to be based on SPT with fresh material. Shrimp-allergic patients frequently react to a number of ill-defined high-molecular-weight allergens, thus leaving currently available materials for component-resolved diagnosis largely insufficient. Mites and crustaceans probably share several allergens other than tropomyosin.

  4. Selection of proteolytic bacteria with ability to inhibit Vibrio harveyi during white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntinanalert, P.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Five isolates of bacteria with high proteolytic activity, isolated from water samples of intensive shrimp ponds in southern Thailand, were selected to test for the ability to control the shrimp pathogen Vibrioharveyi. 70 μl of each culture broth were investigated for their ability to inhibit V. harveyi using an agar well diffusion test but only one isolate W3 gave a reasonable sized inhibition zone of 21.62 mm. This zone wassimilar to that of oxolinic acid (2 μg and sulfamethoxazole (25 μg. The W3 isolate was identified as Pseudomonas sp. Shrimp cultivation in aquaria was conducted to investigate the inhibition of V. harveyi bythe isolate W3. The experiment consisted of a treatment of the shrimp culture with an inoculum of the isolate W3 and V. harveyi (biocontrol set, a positive control set (only inoculation of V. harveyi and a negativecontrol set as without inoculation. No mortality was found in the negative control. Shrimp mortality in the biocontrol set (33% was lower than that in the positive control set (40%; however, it showed no significantdifference (p>0.05. The average numbers of V. harveyi over 12 days of the biocontrol set were lower than those in the positive control set by about 1 log cycle although the numbers were not significantly different(p>0.05. The shrimp growth rate at day 32 of cultivation was in order of the biocontrol treatment (10.17% > the negative control treatment (9.44% > the positive control set (9.28%, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was observed among treatments.

  5. Horizontally transferred genes in the genome of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, as the development of next-generation sequencing technology, a growing number of genes have been reported as being horizontally transferred from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, most of them involving arthropods. As a member of the phylum Arthropoda, the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei has to adapt to the complex water environments with various symbiotic or parasitic microorganisms, which provide a platform for horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Results In this study, we analyzed the genome-wide HGT events in L. vannamei. Through homology search and phylogenetic analysis, followed by experimental PCR confirmation, 14 genes with HGT event were identified: 12 of them were transferred from bacteria and two from fungi. Structure analysis of these genes showed that the introns of the two fungi-originated genes were substituted by shrimp DNA fragment, two genes transferred from bacteria had shrimp specific introns inserted in them. Furthermore, around other three bacteria-originated genes, there were three large DNA segments inserted into the shrimp genome. One segment was a transposon that fully transferred, and the other two segments contained only coding regions of bacteria. Functional prediction of these 14 genes showed that 6 of them might be related to energy metabolism, and 4 others related to defense of the organism. Conclusions HGT events from bacteria or fungi were happened in the genome of L. vannamei, and these horizontally transferred genes can be transcribed in shrimp. This is the first time to report the existence of horizontally transferred genes in shrimp. Importantly, most of these genes are exposed to a negative selection pressure and appeared to be functional. PMID:23914989

  6. Energy metabolism and metabolomics response of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to sulfide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongyu; Li, Erchao; Suo, Yantong; Xu, Zhixin; Jia, Yongyi; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao; Gu, Zhimin

    2017-02-01

    The toxicity and poisoning mechanisms of sulfide were studied in Litopenaeus vannamei from the perspective of energy metabolism and metabolomics. The lethal concentrations of sulfide in L. vannamei (LC50) at 24h, 48h, 72h, and 96h were determined. Sulfide at a concentration of 0, 1/10 (425.5μg/L), and 1/5 (851μg/L) of the LC50 at 96h was used to test the metabolic responses of L. vannamei for 21days. The chronic exposure of shrimp to a higher sulfide concentration of 851μg/L decreased shrimp survival but did not affect weight gain or the hepatopancreas index. The glycogen content in the hepatopancreas and muscle and the activity of hepatopancreas cytochrome C oxidase of the shrimp exposed to all sulfide concentrations were significantly lower, and the serum glucose and lactic acid levels and lactic acid dehydrogenase activity were significantly lower than those in the control. Metabolomics assays showed that shrimp exposed to sulfide had lower amounts of serum pyruvic acid, succinic acid, glycine, alanine, and proline in the 425.5μg/L group and phosphate, succinic acid, beta-alanine, serine, and l-histidine in the 851μg/L group than in the control. Chronic sulfide exposure could disturb protein synthesis in shrimp but enhance gluconeogenesis and substrate absorption for ATP synthesis and tricarboxylic acid cycles to provide extra energy to cope with sulfide stress. Chronic sulfide exposure could adversely affect the health status of L. vannamei, as indicated by the high amounts of serum n-ethylmaleamic acid, pyroglutamic acid, aspartic acid and phenylalanine relative to the control. This study indicates that chronic exposure of shrimp to sulfide can decrease health and lower survival through functional changes in gluconeogenesis, protein synthesis and energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A new RNA virus found in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Apisawetakan, Somjai; Boon-Nat, Anutara; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Flegel, Timothy W

    2006-06-01

    A new, apparently innocuous virus was found while investigating the cause of monodon slow growth syndrome (MSGS) in cultured black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). It was identified via plasmid vector clones of E. coli containing randomly amplified cDNA fragments produced from total nucleic acid extracts of hemolymph from MSGS shrimp. Of 421 clones, 30 that failed to give positive dot blot hybridization with a digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled shrimp DNA probe were sequenced and compared to GenBank records. Of these, 22 corresponded to known shrimp DNA records. Of eight that did not, one (20A) showed significant deduced amino acid sequence similarity to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) of the viruses in the family Luteoviridae and alignment revealed commonly conserved amino acids including a GDD motif believed to be at the enzyme active site. However, phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus sequence did not cluster with the Luteoviridae or other known RNA virus sequences. Thus, in accordance with frequent practice, it was named according to the area where it was first collected as Laem-Singh virus (LSNV). In situ hybridization with a DIG-labeled 20A insert revealed strong cytoplasmic staining confined to the lymphoid organ (LO), the heart and hepatopancreatic connective tissue in both normal and MSGS shrimp. RT-PCR assays based on the 20A clone sequence also gave positive results with both normal and MSGS shrimp. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of LO tissue revealed viral-like particles of approximately 27 nm diameter (within the Luteoviridae size range) in locations that matched those of positive in situ hybridization reactions in parallel samples. Although not directly associated with MSGS in Penaeus monodon, the presence or effect of this virus with other crustacean species is presently unknown.

  8. [Shrimp community structure and its relationships with environmental factors in the Yellow Sea in summer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhi-wei; Li, Xian-sen; Ying, Yi-ping; Wu, Qiang; Luan, Qing-shan

    2015-11-01

    Based on the data collected from the bottom trawl survey in Yellow Sea, August, 2014, the community structure of shrimp assemblage and its relationships with environmental factors in summer was examined by using index of relative importance, ecological diversity indices and multivariate statistical analysis. A total of 20 shrimp species were captured, belonging to 3 orders, 10 families, 16 genera. The relative abundance of shrimp of all stations ranged from 13 to 45047 g · h(-1) and its mean value was 6838 g · h(-1). The dominant species was Crangon affinis, and the common species was Eualus sinensis. The rare species were Metapenaeopsis dalei, Palaemon gravieri and Oratosquilla oratoria. The ranges of Shannon diversity index (H) , Pielou' s evenness index (J) and the Margalef' s species richness index (D) of all stations of the shrimp community structure were 0.007-1.538, 0.101-1.138 and 0.006-0.947, respectively, and the mean values of H, Jand D were 0.391, 0.374 and 0.298, respectively. MDS and Cluster analyses revealed that two clusters of Group I named cold water mass group and Group II named coastal group, which were bounded by the 45 m isobaths, were identified for all the sampling stations. Significant difference was detected by ANOSIM analysis between Group I and Group II. BIOENV analysis indicated that bottom temperature and bottom salinity were the most important environmental factors for structuring the spatial distribution of the shrimp assemblage. Cold water mass group accounted for absolute advantage and Yellow Sea cold mass had a decisive influence on the distribution pattern of the shrimp community in the Yellow Sea in summer.

  9. Natural Hazards, Stock Depletion, and Stock Management in the Southern Gulf of Mexico Pink Shrimp Fishery

    OpenAIRE

    Arreguín Sánchez, Francisco; Ramírez Rodríguez, Mauricio; Zetina Rejón, Manuel Jesús; Cruz Escalona, Víctor Hugo

    2008-01-01

    The southern Gulf of México has historically sustained important fisheries, particularly shrimp. From the mid-I950s to earl 1970s, annual yields of shrimp averaged about 27,000 rnetric tons (rnt), of which the pink shrirnp Farfantepenaeus duorarum contributed more than 80%. At that time, three fleets, from the United States, Cuba, and Mexico, exploited the stock. Pinj shrim captures have declined from the mid-1970s to the present level of about 1,000 mt per year, indicating severe stock deple...

  10. Distribution and abundance of pelagic shrimps from the deep scattering layer of the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karuppasamy, P.K.; Menon, N.G.; Nair, K.K.C.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    cover their role in the productivity of the ocean. The importance of ing the of FORV sampada as part: of a DSL pelagic shrimps as sonic scatters, food for larger animals, and as program in ~~di~ EEZ between M~~ 1998 to ~~~~~b~~ 2000 in agents... shrimps, deep scattering layer, geographical distribution, vertical migration, swarming behavior INTRODUCTION was carried out for understanding their distribution pattern, abun- dance and die1 vertical migrations in the eastern Arabian Sea. Since...

  11. Direct nitrous oxide emission from the aquacultured Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    OpenAIRE

    Heisterkamp, Ines M; Schramm, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) is widely used in aquaculture, where it is reared at high stocking densities, temperatures, and nutrient concentrations. Here we report that adult L. vannamei shrimp emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) at an average rate of 4.3 nmol N2O/individual × h, which is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously measured N2O emission rates for free-living aquatic invertebrates. Dissection, incubation, and inhibitor experiments with specime...

  12. How to embed shrimps in parameter planes of the Lorenz system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Paulo C.

    2017-04-01

    Shrimps are typical periodic islands present in chaotic regions of parameter planes of nonlinear dynamical systems. Such periodic structures have been observed in several different fields including mathematical models simulating lasers, electronic circuits, chemical reactions, neural networks, and biological systems. As far as I know the existence of shrimps in parameter planes of the Lorenz system has never been reported. This paper describes how to display such structures embedded in chaotic regions of parameter planes of the Lorenz system. This is accomplished by considering a shift in the x variable of the \\dot{x} differential equation. Additionally it is shown that these periodic structures may appear organized in period-adding sequences.

  13. Evolution and phylogeny of the mud shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda) revealed from complete mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng-Jiau; Liu, Yuan; Sha, Zhongli; Tsang, Ling Ming; Chu, Ka Hou; Chan, Tin-Yam; Liu, Ruiyu; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2012-11-16

    The evolutionary history and relationships of the mud shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gebiidea and Axiidea) are contentious, with previous attempts revealing mixed results. The mud shrimps were once classified in the infraorder Thalassinidea. Recent molecular phylogenetic analyses, however, suggest separation of the group into two individual infraorders, Gebiidea and Axiidea. Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence and structure can be especially powerful in resolving higher systematic relationships that may offer new insights into the phylogeny of the mud shrimps and the other decapod infraorders, and test the hypothesis of dividing the mud shrimps into two infraorders. We present the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of five mud shrimps, Austinogebia edulis, Upogebia major, Thalassina kelanang (Gebiidea), Nihonotrypaea thermophilus and Neaxius glyptocercus (Axiidea). All five genomes encode a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a putative control region. Except for T. kelanang, mud shrimp mitochondrial genomes exhibited rearrangements and novel patterns compared to the pancrustacean ground pattern. Each of the two Gebiidea species (A. edulis and U. major) and two Axiidea species (N. glyptocercus and N. thermophiles) share unique gene order specific to their infraorders and analyses further suggest these two derived gene orders have evolved independently. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 13 protein-coding genes indicate the possible polyphyly of mud shrimps, supporting the division of the group into two infraorders. However, the infraordinal relationships among the Gebiidea and Axiidea, and other reptants are poorly resolved. The inclusion of mt genome from more taxa, in particular the reptant infraorders Polychelida and Glypheidea is required in further analysis. Phylogenetic analyses on the mt genome sequences and the distinct gene orders provide further

  14. The brine shrimp ( Artemia parthenogenetica) as encapsulation organism for prophylactic chemotherapy of fish and prawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ji-Xiang; Bian, Bo-Zhong; Li, Ming-Ren

    1996-06-01

    Brine shrimp ( Artemia parthenogenetica) which had ingested three water-insoluble antibacterial drugs i.e. sulfadiazine(SD), oxytetracycline (OTC) and erythromycin estolate (ERY-Es) were fed to Tilapia and Mysis III of Penaeus orientalis K. The drug contents in the predators were then determined. After administration of drugs to Tilapia and Mysis III, through the bio-encapsulation of the brine shrimp, efficacious therapeutical concentration of OTC and ERY-Es (but not SD) in the predators could be reached and maintained for more than 8 hours.

  15. Metabolic pathways of ammoniogenesis in the shrimp Crangon crangon L.: possible role of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrel, Y; Regnault, M

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative deamination of glutamate by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was determined in crude homogenates of the shrimp Crangon crangon. The GDH activity of whole shrimps (1.192 +/- 0.164 UI/g wet wt and 0.032 +/- 0.004 UI mg protein) (+/- SD) is probably sufficient to account for all the ammonia excretion of this species. Starvation markedly influenced GDH activity. A 50% decrease of GDH activity was observed following 7 days of fasting but subsequently no further decrease in GDH activity was noticed during starvation up to a maximum of 17 days.

  16. Effect of speciation on uptake and toxicity of cadmium to shrimp Crangon Crangon (L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes Goncalves, M.L.S.; Vilhena, M.F.C.; Machado, L.M.V.F.; Pescada, C.M.R.; Legrand de Moura, M. (Technical Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal))

    1989-08-01

    A study is presented on speciation of seawater with shrimps Crangon Crangon (L.) contaminated with cadmium in the presence and absence of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (a rough model of a chelate group of humic acids). Ultrafiltration and ion exchange Chelex columns were associated with atomic absorption (AA) and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The uptake and toxicity of cadmium were studied and the organs where this heavy metal accumulated were examined. It was noticed that the cadmium complex with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic was not available to the shrimps and that during the 5 days of the experiment cadmium was preferentially accumulated in the hepatopancreas and carapace.

  17. A population study of the shrimp Crangon allmanni in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahudka, Sabine; Türkay, Michael

    2002-09-01

    The only reproducing population of Crangon allmanni within the German Bight is in the Helgoland Trench (HTR), a depression of more than 50 m depth south of Helgoland. In coastal and shallower offshore waters the shrimp is much rarer and is recorded in higher numbers only in early spring when the water is still cold. The life cycle of the HTR population lasts for about 1.5 years maximum. Recruitment takes place in summer, and these recruits form the reproducing population of the next year. The shrimps are sensitive to environmental stress and are therefore good indicators of environmental changes.

  18. Increasing Calcium Carbonate (Caco3) To Growt And Survival Rate Vannamei Shrimp (Litopenaeus Vannamei))

    OpenAIRE

    Heriadi, Unggul Fitrah; ', Mulyadi; Putra, Iskandar

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted in March 2016 - April 2016 for 21 days at the NationalBroodstock Center For Shrimp and Mollusk Karangasem Bali. The purpose of this study todetermine the effect of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) on the growth and survival rate vanameishrimp (Litopeneaus vannamei). Vanamei shrimp size PL25 were used in the research. Thecontainer used fiber tub with capacity 250 liters and the volume of water used is 100 liters.The treatment is giving of calcium carbonate 20 mg, 35mg, 50m...

  19. Optimization of lactic fermentation for extraction of chitin from freshwater shrimp waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Caroline Neves

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater shrimp shells from the shrimp farming activity in tanks, were processed for biological extraction of chitin, by fermentation with Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from meat products, offering an advantageous demineralization and deproteination of the residue, replacing the chemically. Deproteination was obtained approximately 99% and demineralization of up to 87% using batch fermentations with a maximum of 72 hours and the use of simple strategies such as pH adjustment and reinoculation. The performance of chitin was about 40% greater than in the chemical extraction and the results indicate an interesting method in the process of production of chitosan, where the biopolymer chitin is precursor.

  20. Evolution and phylogeny of the mud shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda) revealed from complete mitochondrial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolutionary history and relationships of the mud shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gebiidea and Axiidea) are contentious, with previous attempts revealing mixed results. The mud shrimps were once classified in the infraorder Thalassinidea. Recent molecular phylogenetic analyses, however, suggest separation of the group into two individual infraorders, Gebiidea and Axiidea. Mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence and structure can be especially powerful in resolving higher systematic relationships that may offer new insights into the phylogeny of the mud shrimps and the other decapod infraorders, and test the hypothesis of dividing the mud shrimps into two infraorders. Results We present the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of five mud shrimps, Austinogebia edulis, Upogebia major, Thalassina kelanang (Gebiidea), Nihonotrypaea thermophilus and Neaxius glyptocercus (Axiidea). All five genomes encode a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a putative control region. Except for T. kelanang, mud shrimp mitochondrial genomes exhibited rearrangements and novel patterns compared to the pancrustacean ground pattern. Each of the two Gebiidea species (A. edulis and U. major) and two Axiidea species (N. glyptocercus and N. thermophiles) share unique gene order specific to their infraorders and analyses further suggest these two derived gene orders have evolved independently. Phylogenetic analyses based on the concatenated nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 13 protein-coding genes indicate the possible polyphyly of mud shrimps, supporting the division of the group into two infraorders. However, the infraordinal relationships among the Gebiidea and Axiidea, and other reptants are poorly resolved. The inclusion of mt genome from more taxa, in particular the reptant infraorders Polychelida and Glypheidea is required in further analysis. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses on the mt genome sequences and the

  1. Evaluation of space adequateness of shrimp farms in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R. Freitas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In Rio Grande do Sul State, there are four marine shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei farms in the municipal districts of São José do Norte and Rio Grande, and other four with previous license for operation. Thus, the present study aimed to identify and characterize areas for marine shrimp farming located in the Southern portion of the Patos Lagoon estuary (32º00'S 52º00'W by employing the analysis of satellite remote sensing (Landsat TM and ETM+/Google Earth, airborne remote sensing (35mm system ADAR 1000, terrestrial remote sensing (RICOH 500SE, and field expeditions, integrating data in a Geographical Information System (IDRISI Andes. As a result, the enterprises were built on coastal fields or in obliterated dune areas, which are favorable for cultivation. The proximity of possible consuming markets and local labor, relatively good access roads and local technical support also favor the projects. However, there must be caution in terms of changes in the original projects, which could cause environmental impacts and noncompliance of environmental norms, such as the occupation of salt marsh areas. Based on the obtained information, instruments can be created to help inherent legal decision-making to manage the activity for futures enterprises.No estado do Rio Grande do Sul existem quatro fazendas produtoras de camarões (Litopenaeus vannamei marinhos nos municípios de São José do Norte e Rio Grande, e outras quatro fazendas já possuem licença prévia. Assim, o presente estudo propôs identificar e caracterizar as áreas destinadas a cultivos de camarões marinhos localizadas na porção sul do estuário da lagoa dos Patos (32º00'S 52º00'W, empregando análises de sensoriamento remoto orbital (ETM+/Landsat, Google Earth, aéreo (35mm/sistema ADAR 1000, terrestre (RICOH 500SE e de saídas de campo, integrando os dados num Sistema de Informação Geográfica (IDRISI Andes. Resultados apontaram que os empreendimentos foram construídos sobre

  2. Fucoidan effectively provokes the innate immunity of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and its resistance against experimental Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitikiew, Suwaree; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Putra, Dedi Fazriansyah; Lin, Yong-Chin; Yeh, Su-Tuen; Liou, Chyng-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of fucoidan on the immune response of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei and its resistance against Vibrio alginolyticus infection. Fucoidan induced degranulation, caused changes in the cell morphology, and increased activation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) and the production of superoxide anions in vitro. Shrimp that received fucoidan via immersion at 100, 200, and 400 mg l(-1) after 3 h showed haemocyte proliferation and a higher mitotic index of haematopoietic tissue. In another experiment, the haemocyte count, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and respiratory bursts (RBs) were examined after the shrimp had been fed diets containing fucoidan at 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g kg(-1) for 7-21 days. Results indicated that these parameters directly increased with time. The immune parameters of shrimp fed the 1.0 g kg(-1) diet were significantly higher than those of shrimp fed the 2.0 g kg(-1) diet after 14 and 21 days. Phagocytic activity and the clearance efficiency against V. alginolyticus were significantly higher in shrimp fed the 1.0 g kg(-1) diet compared to those of shrimp fed the 0, 0.5 and 2.0 g kg(-1) diets. In a separate experiment, shrimp that had been fed diets containing fucoidan for 21 days were challenged with V. alginolyticus at 10(6) colony-forming units shrimp(-1). Survival rates of shrimp fed the 1.0 and 2.0 g kg(-1) diets were significantly higher than those of shrimp fed the 0 and 0.5 g kg(-1) diets for 96-120 h. We concluded that fucoidan provokes innate immunity of shrimp as evidenced by haemocyte degranulation, proPO activation, and the mitotic index of haematopoietic tissue, and that dietary administration of fucoidan at 1.0 g kg(-1) enhanced the immune response of shrimp and their resistance against V. alginolyticus infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The brine shrimp Artemia: adapted to critical life conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo M Gajardo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The brine shrimp Artemia is a micro-crustacean, well adapted to the harsh conditions that severely hypersaline environments impose on survival and reproduction. Adaptation to these conditions has taken place at different functional levels or domains, from the individual (molecular-cellular-physiological to the population level. Such conditions are experienced by very few equivalent macro-planktonic organisms; thus, Artemia can be considered a model animal extremophile offering a unique suite of adaptations that are the focus of this review. The most obvious is a highly efficient osmoregulation system to withstand up to 10 times the salt concentration of ordinary seawater. Under extremely critical environmental conditions, for example when seasonal lakes dry out, Artemia takes refuge by producing a highly resistant encysted gastrula embryo (cyst capable of severe dehydration enabling an escape from population extinction. Cysts can be viewed as gene banks that store a genetic memory of historical population conditions. Their occurrence is due to the evolved ability of females to perceive forthcoming unstable environmental conditions expressed by their ability to switch reproductive mode, producing either cysts (oviparity when environmental conditions become deleterious or free-swimming nauplii (ovoviviparity that are able to maintain the population under suitable conditions.At the population level the trend is for conspecific populations to be fragmented into locally adapted populations, whereas species are restricted to salty lakes in particular regions (regional endemism. The Artemia model depicts adaptation as a complex response to critical life conditions, integrating and refining past and present experiences at all levels of organization. Although we consider an invertebrate restricted to a unique environment, the processes to be discussed are of general biological interest. Finally, we highlight the benefits of understanding the stress

  4. [Methods for extracting chitin from shrimp shell waste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli Saavedra, A; Toledo Guillén, A R; Esquerra Brauer, I R; Luviano Silva, A R; Higuera Ciapara, I

    1998-03-01

    Shrimp shell waste obtained from several industrial freezing-purchasing plants of Guaymas, Sonora, Méx., was studied as a source of value-added chitin biopolymers. In part I, the effect of different isolation conditions on the chitin yield and chemical characteristic, was investigated. Protein and mineral matter were removed with alkali and acid treatment respectively. A 2x2x3 factorial a way of a completely randomized design was used in order to evaluate the effect of the process variables, namely, NaOH concentration (0.4 and 2%) during the deproteinization and HCl concentration (3 and 5%) carried out at 40, 50 and 60 degrees C. The best processing conditions were desproteinization with 2% NaOH, and demineralization with 5% HCl at 50 degrees C, in terms of final ash and chitin content and yield. In part II, a selection of methods of isolation of chitin and chitosan was studied in order to establish the best conditions for scaling up a process to pilot plant level. The processing conditions were selected from reported methods as well as from those defined in part I. Purity of chitin samples was determined in terms of residual protein, ash and chitin each one to produce high quality chitin (0.00% protein, 0.01% ash, 99.99% chitin) and standard grade chitin (0.00% protein, 0.09% ash, 99.13% chitin). Both products were considered as of adequate quality and their manufacture process could be scaled up by further optimization of the processing conditions.

  5. The Brine Shrimp Artemia: Adapted to Critical Life Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo, Gonzalo M.; Beardmore, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia is a micro-crustacean, well adapted to the harsh conditions that severely hypersaline environments impose on survival and reproduction. Adaptation to these conditions has taken place at different functional levels or domains, from the individual (molecular-cellular-physiological) to the population level. Such conditions are experienced by very few equivalent macro-planktonic organisms; thus, Artemia can be considered a model animal extremophile offering a unique suite of adaptations that are the focus of this review. The most obvious is a highly efficient osmoregulation system to withstand up to 10 times the salt concentration of ordinary seawater. Under extremely critical environmental conditions, for example when seasonal lakes dry-out, Artemia takes refuge by producing a highly resistant encysted gastrula embryo (cyst) capable of severe dehydration enabling an escape from population extinction. Cysts can be viewed as gene banks that store a genetic memory of historical population conditions. Their occurrence is due to the evolved ability of females to “perceive” forthcoming unstable environmental conditions expressed by their ability to switch reproductive mode, producing either cysts (oviparity) when environmental conditions become deleterious or free-swimming nauplii (ovoviviparity) that are able to maintain the population under suitable conditions. At the population level the trend is for conspecific populations to be fragmented into locally adapted populations, whereas species are restricted to salty lakes in particular regions (regional endemism). The Artemia model depicts adaptation as a complex response to critical life conditions, integrating and refining past and present experiences at all levels of organization. Although we consider an invertebrate restricted to a unique environment, the processes to be discussed are of general biological interest. Finally, we highlight the benefits of understanding the stress response of

  6. Antioxidant Effect of Orange Peel Extract on Chemical Quality, Sensory Properties, and Black Spots of Farmed White Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Vakili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Black spots are a major problem in commercial shrimp species and can have negative effects on shrimps' appearance, quality, shelf life, economic value, and product acceptance by consumers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of orange peel extract on chemical and sensory qualities as well as black spots on Litopenaeus vannamei species of white farmed shrimp. Methods: Samples included treated shrimps at concentration of 150 g, orange peel extract for 30 minutes, and control shrimps. After storage for 10 days at 1 ± 4 °C, the samples’ chemical and sensory evaluations were performed with an interval of 5 days. Results: pH factors, peroxide value, and total volatile network (TVN of treated samples were significantly lower compared to those of the control samples (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference in the moisture content. Black spots did not appear in the treated sample until the end of refrigerated storage, but melanosis appeared in control shrimp 5 days after storage. Conclusion: The results showed that because of having antioxidant and antimicrobial activity, orange peel extract improved shrimps' chemical and sensory qualities and reduced their black spots in the refrigerator temperature.

  7. Shrimp predation on 0-group plaice: contrasts between field data and predictions of an individual-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Michael T.; Gontarek, Steven J.; Nash, Richard D. M.; Gibson, Robin N.

    2001-06-01

    An individual-based model has been used to predict the effects of size-dependent predation by shrimp Crangon crangon on populations of newly settled 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa. The model predicted changes in population size and thus mortality rate of plaice during settlement and the following period until the plaice reached 30 mm in length and were invulnerable to further shrimp predation. Population parameters derived from seven years' catch data for 0-group plaice and shrimp from the west coast of Scotland were supplied to the model for direct comparison of predicted and observed mortality rates for each of the seven years. The contrast of predicted and observed mortality was used to test the hypothesis that predation by shrimp is a major factor regulating populations of juvenile plaice. There was no evidence for control of plaice populations by shrimp predation at the study site, since a negative relationship between plaice mortality and shrimp density was observed. Alternative explanations for the divergence of prediction and observations included (i) a general failure of the model to adequately describe predator and prey populations, (ii) limited effects of consumption of plaice by shrimp, and (iii) responses of both species to a third factor such as temperature producing an apparent association of survival and recruitment in the respective species.

  8. Astaxanthin degradation and lipid oxidation of Pacific white shrimp oil: kinetics study and stability as affected by storage conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirima Takeungwongtrakul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The kinetics of astaxanthin degradation and lipid oxidation in shrimp oil from hepatopancreas of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei as affected by storage temperature were studied. When shrimp oil was incubated at different temperatures (4, 30, 45 and 60 °C for 16 h, the rate constants (k of astaxanthin degradation and lipid oxidation in shrimp oil increased with increasing temperatures (p < 0.05. Thus, astaxanthin degradation and lipid oxidation in shrimp oil were augmented at high temperature. When shrimp oils with different storage conditions (illumination, oxygen availability and temperature were stored for up to 40 days, astaxanthin contents in all samples decreased throughout storage (p < 0.05. All factors were able to enhance astaxanthin degradation during 40 days of storage. With increasing storage time, the progressive formation of primary and secondary oxidation products were found in all samples as evidenced by the increases in both peroxide values (PV and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS (p < 0.05. Light, air and temperatures therefore had the marked effect on astaxanthin degradation and lipid oxidation in shrimp oils during the extended storage.

  9. 78 FR 50110 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam; Commission Determination To Deny a Request To Hold a Portion of a Hearing In Camera AGENCY: U.S...

  10. Prevalence and characterization of Vibrio cholerae isolated from shrimp products imported into Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, A.; Bjergskov, T.; Jeppesen, V.F.

    1996-01-01

    , all originating from shrimp produced in aquaculture. Six isolated strains agglutinated in polyvalent O antisera, but did not agglutinate in Ogawa or Inaba antisera. The six strains were resistant to colistin and sulfisoxazole; three strains also showed resistance to ampicillin. None of the strains...

  11. Typology of shrimp farming in Bac Lieu Province, Mekong Delta, using multivariate statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joffre, O.M.; Bosma, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to update the typology of shrimp farms in a province of the Mekong Delta's coastal area. We analyzed technical and economic characteristics of 170 farms using factor and cluster analysis on the different variables collected during the survey. This allowed us to characterize four

  12. 78 FR 11221 - Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... COMMISSION Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam... States is materially injured by reason of imports from China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia... the Governments of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam.\\2\\ \\1\\ The...

  13. Assessment of nitrogen and sulphur cycle bacteria and shrimp production in ponds treated with biological products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangapalam Jawahar Abraham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of biological products on the levels of nitrogen and sulphur cycle bacteria in shrimp culture systems of West Bengal, India. Methods: The pond water and sediment samples were analyzed for physico-chemical parameters as per standard methods. The bacteria involved in ammonification, nitrification, denitrification, sulphate reduction and sulphur oxidation were enumerated by most probable number technique. Results: The semi-intensive and modified extensive shrimp farms used a variety of biological products during various stages of production. No biological products were used in traditional farms. The water and sediment samples of modified extensive system recorded significantly higher mean heterotrophic bacterial counts. The counts of ammonia, nitrite and sulphur oxidizers, and nitrate and sulphate reducers varied among the systems. The cycling of nitrogen and sulphur appeared to be affected with the intensification of culture practices. Conclusions: The application of biological products in certain systems helped to maintain the bacteria involved in nitrogen and sulphur cycles and safe levels of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. An assessment of these metabolically active bacteria in shrimp culture ponds and the application of right kind microbial products would help ameliorate the organic pollution in shrimp aquaculture.

  14. Virion composition and genomics of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2001-01-01


    Since its first discovery in Taiwan in 1992, White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has caused major economic damage to shrimp culture. The virus has spread rapidly through Asia and reached the Western Hemisphere in 1995 (Texas), where it continued its devastating effect

  15. State of the deep-sea shrimp stock of Angola | Djama | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Cameroon Academy of Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 3 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. State of the deep-sea shrimp stock of Angola. Théodore ...

  16. Antiviral property of marine actinomycetes against white spot syndrome virus in penaeid shrimps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.S.; Philip, R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    and are continually being screened for new compounds. In this communication, the results of a study made to determine the effectiveness of marine actinomycetes against the white spot disease in penaeid shrimps are presented. Twenty-five isolates of actinomycetes were...

  17. Effect of new aeration technology on the bacteriology of shrimp ponds growing Penaeus monodon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karekar, S.V.; Sreepada, R.A.; Shirodkar, R.R.; Kulkarni, S.; Kumar, P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Bergheim, A.; Vogelsang, C.

    , particularly the disease causing bacteria in response to aeration during the cultivation of tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. In HOBAS aerated pond (P1) showed more stable DO levels and the pond sediment was healthier with no visual black sulphur deposits. However...

  18. A review of the use of prebiotic in aquaculture for fish and shrimp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. ... have been evaluated for potential application in the aquacultural production of fish and shrimp. ... are the use of this material to improve the health of their host and increasing growth rate. The application of probiotic and prebiotic in aquaculture have shown posi-.

  19. Purification and identification of a clotting protein from the hemolymph of Chinese shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baojie; Peng, Hongni; Liu, Mei; Jiang, Keyong; Zhang, Guofan; Wang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The clotting protein (CP) plays important and diverse roles in crustaceans, such as coagulation and lipid transportation. A clotting protein was purified from the hemolymph of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis (named as Fc-CP) with Q sepharose HP anion-exchange chromatography and phenyl sepharose HP hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Fc-CP was able to form stable clots in vitro in the presence of hemocyte lysate and Ca2+, suggesting that the clotting reaction is catalyzed by a Ca2+-dependent transglutaminase in shrimp hemocytes. The molecular mass of Fc-CP was 380 kDa under non-reducing conditions and 190 kDa under reducing conditions as was determined with SDS-PAGE. CP exists as disulfide-linked homodimers and oligomers. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of Fc-CP was identical to that of shrimps including Penaeus monodon, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus vannamei; and similar to that of other decapods. The purified Fc-CP was digested with trypsin and verified on an ABI 4700 matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry. Our results will aid to better understanding the coagulation mechanism of shrimp hemolymph.

  20. Size- and shape-dependent effects of microplastic particles on adult daggerblade grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Austin D; Weinstein, John E

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of microplastics in marine environments has been increasing over the past several decades. The objective of the present study was to characterize the size- and shape-dependent effects of microplastic particles (spheres, fibers, and fragments) on the adult daggerblade grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio). Grass shrimp were exposed to 11 sizes of plastic: spheres (30, 35, 59, 75, 83, 116, and 165 μm), fragments (34 and 93 μm), and fibers (34 and 93 μm) at a concentration of 2000 particles/400 mL (= 50 000 particles/L) for 3 h. Following exposure, grass shrimp were monitored for survival, ingested and ventilated microplastics, and residence time. Mortality ranged from 0% to 55%. Spheres and fragments 50 μm ranged from 5% to 40%. Mortality was significantly higher in the exposure to 93-μm fibers than other sizes tested (p microplastic particles of various sizes and shapes can be ingested and ventilated by adult daggerblade grass shrimp, resulting in acute toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3074-3080. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  1. Carideorum catalogus: the recent species of the dendrobranchiate, stenopodidean, procarididean and caridean shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Grave, S.; Fransen, C.H.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    A checklist of recent species of dendrobranchiate, stenopodidean, procarididean and caridean shrimps including synonyms and type localities. Also listed are unavailable names, larval names, nomina dubia and nomina nuda. A complete list of references to original descriptions of taxa listed is

  2. Heteroptera attracted to butterfly traps baited with fish or shrimp carrion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Records of Heteroptera collected at butterfly traps baited with fish or shrimp carrion during collecting trips to Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru are presented. Traps consisted of a cylinder of net fabric (about 35 cm diam, 75 cm length) attached on the top and bottom to square pieces ...

  3. Induction of sperm activation in open and closed thelycum penaeoid shrimps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfaro Montoya, J.; Munoz, N.; Vargas, M.; Komen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A modified egg water (EW) technique for in vitro induction of sperm activation was applied to Trachypenaeus byrdi, Xiphopenaeus riveti (closed thelycum shrimps), and Litopenaeus occidentalis (open thelycum) from a tropical estuary, Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica. The study was designed to investigate

  4. Culturable fungal diversity of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei boone from breeding farms in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Roberta Cruz da Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Litopenaeus vannamei, which is the most common shrimp species cultivated in the northeast of Brazil, is very susceptible to microbial diseases, and this consequently affects productivity. There are reports of bacteria, viruses and protozoa in these shrimp, but not fungi. This study aims to isolate and identify fungi present in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, and in their nursery waters, at two breeding farms in Brazil. The pathogenic potential of the isolates was assessed through the qualitative detection of proteases and aflatoxin B production. The 146 isolated fungi comprised 46 species. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Furarium were the three most relevant genera and Aspergillus flavus was the predominant species with a total of 33 isolates. Most of the isolated species are known as potentially pathogenic to humans and other animals. Eighteen isolates of A. flavus and two of A. parasiticus were able to produce aflatoxin B and 33 out of the 46 species produced protease, indicating that these fungi may also become pathogenic to shrimp and their consumers.

  5. Evolution of mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda, Malacostraca in the light of new Mesozoic fossils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutschera Verena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe new specimens of Mesozoic mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda, Malacostraca that exhibit morphological and developmental information previously unknown. Results Specimens assigned to the taxon Sculda exhibit preserved pleopods, thoracopods including all four raptorial limbs as well as details of antennae and antennulae. The pleopods and the antennulae resemble those of the modern mantis shrimps, but the raptorial limbs are not as differentiated as in the modern species. In some specimens, the first raptorial limb (second thoracopod is not significantly larger than the similar-sized posterior three pairs (as in extant species, but instead these appendages become progressively smaller along the series. In this respect they resemble certain Palaeozoic stomatopods. Another specimen, most likely belonging to another species, has one pair of large anterior raptorial thoracopods, a median-sized pair and two more pairs of small-sized raptorial appendages and, thus, shows a new, previously unknown type of morphology. A single specimen of Pseudosculda laevis also exhibits the size of the raptorial limbs; they are differentiated as in modern species, one large pair and three small pairs. Furthermore, we report additional larval specimens and show also post-larval changes, e.g., of the tail fan. Conclusions These new data are used to reconsider the phylogeny of Stomatopoda. We still need a strict taxonomical revision of the Mesozoic mantis shrimps, but this first examination already demonstrates the importance of these fossils for understanding mantis shrimp evolution and the interpretation of evolutionary pathways of particular features.

  6. Evolution of mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda, Malacostraca) in the light of new Mesozoic fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Joachim T; Haug, Carolin; Maas, Andreas; Kutschera, Verena; Waloszek, Dieter

    2010-09-21

    We describe new specimens of Mesozoic mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda, Malacostraca) that exhibit morphological and developmental information previously unknown. Specimens assigned to the taxon Sculda exhibit preserved pleopods, thoracopods including all four raptorial limbs as well as details of antennae and antennulae. The pleopods and the antennulae resemble those of the modern mantis shrimps, but the raptorial limbs are not as differentiated as in the modern species. In some specimens, the first raptorial limb (second thoracopod) is not significantly larger than the similar-sized posterior three pairs (as in extant species), but instead these appendages become progressively smaller along the series. In this respect they resemble certain Palaeozoic stomatopods. Another specimen, most likely belonging to another species, has one pair of large anterior raptorial thoracopods, a median-sized pair and two more pairs of small-sized raptorial appendages and, thus, shows a new, previously unknown type of morphology. A single specimen of Pseudosculda laevis also exhibits the size of the raptorial limbs; they are differentiated as in modern species, one large pair and three small pairs. Furthermore, we report additional larval specimens and show also post-larval changes, e.g., of the tail fan. These new data are used to reconsider the phylogeny of Stomatopoda. We still need a strict taxonomical revision of the Mesozoic mantis shrimps, but this first examination already demonstrates the importance of these fossils for understanding mantis shrimp evolution and the interpretation of evolutionary pathways of particular features.

  7. 77 FR 31062 - Programs To Reduce Incidental Capture of Sea Turtles in Shrimp Fisheries; Certifications Pursuant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... United Kingdom, and Uruguay. Ten nations and one economy only harvest shrimp using small boats with crews... comparable to the program in effect in the United States. The Department also certified that the fishing environments in 26 other countries and one economy do not pose a threat of the incidental taking of sea turtles...

  8. 50 CFR 622.19 - South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access off Georgia and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Effort Limitations § 622.19 South Atlantic rock shrimp limited access... after the expiration date of the permit. (e) Limitation on permits. A vessel for which a permit for...

  9. A logistic regression of risk factors for disease occurrence on Asian shrimp farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, P; Tran, L T; Fast, A W

    2000-05-25

    Serious shrimp-disease outbreaks have reduced shrimp production and slowed industry growth since 1991. This paper tests factors such as farm sitting and design, and farm-management practices for relationships with disease occurrence. Logistic regression is used to analyze farm-level data from 3951 shrimp farms in 13 Asian countries. Disease occurrence is modeled as a 0-1 variable where 1 = disease loss of > or = 20% to any 1 crop, and 0 = losses of shrimp culture intensity, i.e. extensive, semi-intensive, and intensive. Attempts to apply logistic regression models to each country were not successful due to insufficient data for most countries. Factors affecting disease occurrences were quite different for different farming intensities. Farms that had larger pond production areas, with larger number of farms discharging effluent into their water supply canals, and removed silt had greater disease occurrence. On the other hand, farms that practiced polyculture and took water from the sea through a canal had lower disease occurrence.

  10. Physicochemical properties and characterization of chitosan synthesized from fish scales, crab and shrimp shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Suneeta; Kumar Annamareddy, Sri Hari; Abanti, Sahoo; Kumar Rath, Pradip

    2017-11-01

    Chitosan is derived from different starting materials such as fish scales, shrimp and crab shells by the process of deacetylation of chitin, which is carried out using 40% KOH at 90°C for 6h. Prepared chitosan was characterized by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Scanning electron microscope and Thermogravimetric analysis. Futher the physicochemical properties of chitosan like Fat binding capacity (FBC), water binding capacity (WBC), solubility, average molecular weight, ash content, moisture and degree of deacetylation of chitosan were also studied. Crystalline index (%) values of commercial, shrimp, crab and fish chitosan were found to be 96, 82, 88 and 84% respectively. The presence of amino group was confirmed from the FTIR spectra of chitosan synthesized. TGA results demonstrated the lower thermal stability of chitosan. Relatively smother surface and nano-fiber structures were observed from SEM analysis. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan from different sources such as shells of fish, shrimp and crab were found to be 75%, 78%, and 70% respectively. In a similar way the WBC and FBC of fish, shrimp and crab shells were found to be 492, 358 and 138% and 226, 246 and 138% respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological treatment of shrimp aquaculture wastewater using a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, C; Boopathy, R; Fontenot, Q; Kilgen, M

    2008-12-01

    To improve the water quality in the shrimp aquaculture, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) has been tested for the treatment of shrimp wastewater. A SBR is a variation of the activated sludge biological treatment process. This process uses multiple steps in the same tank to take the place of multiple tanks in a conventional treatment system. The SBR accomplishes equalization, aeration, and clarification in a timed sequence in a single reactor basin. This is achieved in a simple tank, through sequencing stages, which include fill, react, settle, decant, and idle. A laboratory scale SBR and a pilot scale SBR was successfully operated using shrimp aquaculture wastewater. The wastewater contained high concentration of carbon and nitrogen. By operating the reactor sequentially, viz, aerobic and anoxic modes, nitrification and denitrification were achieved as well as removal of carbon in a laboratory scale SBR. To be specific, the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration of 1,593 mg/l was reduced to 44 mg/l within 10 days of reactor operation. Ammonia in the sludge was nitrified within 3 days. The denitrification of nitrate was achieved by the anaerobic process and 99% removal of nitrate was observed. Based on the laboratory study, a pilot scale SBR was designed and operated to remove excess nitrogen in the shrimp wastewater. The results mimicked the laboratory scale SBR.

  12. Caridean shrimps (Crustacea, Decapoda) from seagrass habitats in Hansa Bay, Papua New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grave, de Sammy

    1999-01-01

    Five species of caridean shrimps collected from seagrass habitats at Hansa Bay, on the northern coastline of Papua New Guinea are reported. Four species are new to the fauna of Papua New Guinea. Morphological details of Nikoides danae, Latreutes pymoeus and L. porcinus are discussed and compared to

  13. 75 FR 44229 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... of this order includes certain frozen warmwater shrimp and prawns, whether wild-caught (ocean... Sensitive Plastic Tape from Italy: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review, 75 FR 8925 (Feb. 26, 2010), unchanged in Pressure Sensitive Plastic Tape From Italy: Final Results of...

  14. ENHANCED ORGANIC MATTER REMINERALIZATION AND NUTRIENT TURNOVER BY BURROWING SHRIMP POPULATIONS IN YAQUINA BAY, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowing thalassinid shrimp are major ecological components of Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and where they structure large areas of intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat. These crustaceans occur in dense beds (>250 m-2) and dig extensive burrow systems (>1 m) controlling ...

  15. Bioencapsulation of Two Different Vibrio Species in Nauplii of the Brine Shrimp (Artemia franciscana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Herrera-Vega, Maria A.; Abreu-Grobois, F. Alberto; Roque, Ana

    1998-01-01

    Two groups of nauplii from the brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) were enriched with different bacteria, and the dynamics of bacterial uptake by the nauplii were observed. This study showed that the efficiency of Artemia nauplii in bioencapsulating bacteria strongly depends on the type of bacteria used, time of exposure, and status (live or dead) of the bacteria. PMID:9603861

  16. Relationship between land use classification and grass shrimp Palaemonetes spp. population metrics in coastal watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugomah, James W; Key, P B; West, J B; Shea, N R; McDaniel, S; Pennington, P L; Fulton, M H

    2014-06-01

    Estuaries in the southeastern USA have experienced increased loading of contaminants from nonpoint source runoff as well as changes in habitat (e.g., loss of wetlands) due to urbanization. These changes may pose significant risks to estuarine fauna, including crustaceans. Several studies have shown relationships between land use classification and levels of stress in estuarine populations. The grass shrimp of the genus Palaemonetes is one of the dominant species found in estuarine tidal creeks, accounting for more than 50 % of all macropelagic fauna. Grass shrimp populations were sampled monthly for 3 years at six estuarine creeks on Kiawah Island, SC. Creek watersheds were estimated using National Aerial Photograph Program color infrared and low-altitude true color aerial photography combined with in situ differentially corrected global positioning system mapping of engineered features. Land classifications delineated included water, marsh, buildings, roads, and lawns. Pairwise comparisons for grass shrimp densities among sites showed significant differences on an annual and seasonal basis. Significant relationships (p land class variables and grass shrimp density were identified both annually and seasonally. These findings suggest an influence of land use on Palaemonetes spp. populations.

  17. Treatment of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in penaeid shrimp aquaculture using plant extract

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Desai, U.M.

    The white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is causing a serious concern and threat to the shrimp aquaculture production in India since 1994. In this paper, the result of a successful attempt made in formulating a plant extract for treating the WSSV...

  18. Phylogeography of the common shrimp, Crangon crangon (L.) across its distribution range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Campos, J.; van Bleijswijk, J.; Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.; van der Veer, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    The common or brown shrimp Crangon crangon (L.) is a highly abundant and important taxon, both ecologically and commercially, yet knowledge on its population structure and historical biogeography is limited. We studied population genetic structure across the distribution range of this species by

  19. Shoaling of sergestid shrimp Acetes johni (Crustacea Decapoda: Sergestidae) associated with swarming of gammarid amphipods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    Aggregation of sergestid shrimp Acetes johni and gammarid amphipods was observed at a station (22 degrees 07'N; 67 degrees 03'E) in the northern Arabian Sea during September 1991. Shoaling occurred in the surface layer at night resulting in high...

  20. Antibacterial effect of olive (Olea europaea L. leaves extract in raw peeled undeveined shrimp (Penaeus semisulcatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive (Olea europaea L. leaves are rich in phenolic substances, which exert important antioxidant and antibacterial effects. In this study, the effect of olive leaves extract (OLE on the microbial load of raw peeled undeveined (PUD shrimp (Penaeus semisulcatus was evaluated. Alcoholic OLE extracts were prepared at 0.5%, 1% and 2% (w/v concentrations. Raw PUD shrimp samples were immersed in the treatment solutions for 3 h at 4 °C and samples were taken for determination of total viable count (TVC and total coliforms count (TCC. OLE at concentration of 1% (w/v significantly (p < 0.01 reduced the count of the aerobic and coliforms bacteria at least 1 log cycle CFU/g in reference to the non-treated control group. Such antimicrobial activity was concentration dependent and usage of 2% OLE had the most beneficial effect in controlling microbial load in PUD shrimp stored at 4 °C. This study demonstrates the potential use of OLE formulations to improve the microbial quality of PUD shrimp and OLE might be useful to the seafood industry as a natural preservative.

  1. EXTRACTION OF ASTAXANTHIN ESTERS FROM SHRIMP WASTE BY CHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khanafari, A. Saberi, M. Azar, Gh. Vosooghi, Sh. Jamili, B. Sabbaghzadeh

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoid pigments specifically astaxanthin has many significant applications in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. The goal of this research was the extraction of Astaxanthin from a certain Persian Gulf shrimp species waste (Penaeus semisulcatus, purification and identification of the pigment by chemical and microbial methods. Microbial fermentation was obtained by inoculation of two Lactobacillus species Lb. plantarum and Lb. acidophilus in the medium culture containing shrimp waste powder by the intervention of lactose sugar, yeast extract, the composition of Both and the coolage (-20oC. The carotenoids were extracted by an organic solvent system. After purification of astaxanthin with the thin layer chromatography method by spectrophotometer, NMR and IR analysis the presence of astaxanthin esters was recognized in this specific species of Persian Gulf shrimp. Results obtained from this study showed that the coolage at –20 oC not only does not have an amplifying effect on the production of astaxanthin but also slightly reduces this effect. Also the effect of intervention of lactose sugar showed more effectiveness in producing astaxanthin than yeast extract or more than with the presence of both. The results also indicated that there is not much difference in the ability of producing the pigment by comparing both Lb. plantarum and Lb. acidophillus. Also results showed the microbial method of extraction of astaxanthin is more effective than chemical method. The pigment extracted from certain amount of shrimp powder, 23.128 mg/g, was calculated.

  2. Review of the African distribution of the brine shrimp genus Artemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brine shrimp (genus Artemia) are small (8 to 12 mm long) cosmopolitan crustaceans (Anostraca) found predominately in hypersaline water bodies such as inland salt lakes and pans, coastal lagoons, and salt works at salinity levels above 40 g·ℓ-1. They have been extensively studied due to their high monetary value as ...

  3. Genetic and morphological differentiation in the Sakura shrimp (Sergia lucens) between Japanese and Taiwanese populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imai, H.; Hanamura, Y.; Cheng, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    The Sakura shrimp Sergia lucens is a remarkable meso-pelagic crustacean species, which is harvested for human consumption in restricted geographical areas of Taiwan and Japan in the northwestern Pacific. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region was conducted to

  4. Identification of two major virion protein genes of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Westenberg, M.; Goodall, S.D.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is an invertebrate virus, causing considerable mortality in shrimp. Two structural proteins of WSSV were identified. WSSV virions are enveloped nucleocapsids with a bacilliform morphology with an approximate size of 275 x 120 nm, and a tail-like extension at one end.

  5. Molecular evidence for sequential colonization and taxon cycling in freshwater decapod shrimps on a Caribbean island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin D. Cook; Catherine M. Pringle; Jane M. Hughes

    2008-01-01

    Taxon cycling, i.e. sequential phases of expansions and contractions in species’ distributions associated with ecological or morphological shifts, are postulated to characterize dynamic biogeographic histories in various island faunas. The Caribbean freshwater shrimp assemblage is mostly widespread and sympatric throughout the region, although one species (Atyidae:...

  6. Iron oxide deposits associated with the ectosymbiotic bacteria in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, L.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A.; Long, G. J.; Grandjean, F.; Zbinden, M.; Gaill, F.; Compère, P.

    2008-04-01

    The Rimicaris exoculata shrimp is considered a primary consumer that dominates the fauna of most Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) hydrothermal ecosystems. These shrimps harbour in their gill chambers an important ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with iron oxide deposits. The structure and elemental composition of the minerals associated with these bacteria have been investigated by using X-ray microanalyses, light microscopy, and transmission, environmental scanning and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The nature of the iron oxides in shrimps obtained from the Rainbow vent field at 36°14.0' N, has also been determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed that the three step-levels of mineral crust found in the Rimicaris exoculata shrimps consist of heavy concretions formed by nanoparticles of two-line ferrihydrite intermixed with minor inorganic SiO2, (Ca,Mg)SO4, and (Ca,Mg)3(PO4)2 minerals that may stabilise the ferrihydrite form of iron oxides. Morphological observations on the bacteria have revealed their close interactions with these minerals and, thus, indicate the biogenic origin of the iron oxide deposits. The evolution of the bacterial density in the three mineral crust levels is related to the amount of the iron deposits and it is proposed that the lower crust level is the most likely region for the location of the iron-oxidizing bacteria.

  7. Iron oxide deposits associated with the ectosymbiotic bacteria in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Compère

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rimicaris exoculata shrimp is considered as a primary consumer that dominates the fauna of most Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR hydrothermal ecosystems. These shrimps harbour in their gill chambers an important ectosymbiotic community of chemoautotrophic bacteria associated with iron oxide deposits. The structure and elemental composition of the mineral concretions associated with these bacteria have been investigated by using LM, ESEM, TEM STEM and EDX microanalyses. The nature of the iron oxides in shrimps obtained from the Rainbow vent field has also been determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. This multidisciplinary approach has revealed that the three layers of mineral crust in the Rimicaris exoculata shrimps consist of large concretions formed by aggregated nanoparticles of two-line ferrihydrite and include other minor elements as Si, Ca, Mg, S and P, probably present as silicates cations, sulphates or phosphates respectively that may contribute to stabilise the ferrihydrite form of iron oxides. TEM-observations on the bacteria have revealed their close interactions with these minerals. Abiotic and biotic precipitation could occur within the gill chamber of Rimicaris exoculata, suggesting the biologically-mediated formation of the iron oxide deposits. The difference of the bacterial density in the three-mineral crust layers could be correlated to the importance of the iron oxide concretions and suggest that the first mineral particles precipitates on the lower layer which could be considered as the most likely location of iron-oxidizing bacteria.

  8. Acute toxicity of ten chemicals to fairy shrimp relative to other crustaceans and mollusks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several species of fairy shrimp in the genus Branchinecta (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act due to destruction of seasonal wetland habitats in Oregon and California, making protection of the hydrology and water quality of the limited...

  9. In-vitro anti-microbial and brine-shrimp lethality potential of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The brine-shrimp lethality assay analyzed using the Finney probit method showed that the crude ethanolic extracts of the leaves and stem displayed LD50 values at 192 ppm and 182 ppm respectively. These findings indicate the potential of the plant as panacea for infectious diseases and also reveal a novel potential in the ...

  10. The Potential Use of Electricity to Control Burrowing Shrimp in Oyster Aquaculture Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalassinid shrimp cause significant problems for oyster aquaculture in the Pacific Northwest (USA) where oysters succumb to the physical disruption of the sediment by the burrowing activity of these animals. While electrofishing is a commonly used technique to capture fish and some invertebrates i...

  11. On red coloured shrimps (Decapoda, Caridea) from tropical land-locked saltwater pools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holthuis, L.B.

    1963-01-01

    In a number of widely separated places in the tropics, both in the Atlantic and in the Indo-West Pacific, bright red coloured caridean shrimps have been reported from a most peculiar habitat. This habitat is formed by salt water pools which are seemingly shut off from the sea and are often situated

  12. Study on shrimp waste water and vermicompost as a nutrient source for bell peppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aquaculture industry generates significant nutrient-rich wastewater that is released into streams and rivers causing environmental concern. The objective of this controlled environment study was to evaluate the effect of waste shrimp water (SW), vermicompost (VC), at rates of 10%, 20%, 40%, and ...

  13. 78 FR 50385 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from India: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ....; Smith and Sons Seafood; Tidelands Seafood Co., Inc.; Tommy's Seafood; Vincent Piazza & Sons Seafood, Inc.; Wood's Fisheries; Mariah Jade Shrimp Company, LLC; David Chauvin's Seafood Company, LLC; and Rountree... Schauer or Shane Subler, AD/CVD Operations, Import Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S...

  14. 78 FR 50383 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the Republic of Indonesia: Final Negative Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Co., Inc.; Tommy's Seafood; Vincent Piazza & Sons Seafood, Inc.; Wood's Fisheries; Mariah Jade Shrimp Company, LLC; David Chauvin's Seafood Company, LLC; and Rountree Enterprises, Inc. (dba Leonard & Sons... Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution...

  15. 78 FR 50379 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From Thailand: Final Negative Countervailing Duty Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ...; Tidelands Seafood Co., Inc.; Tommy's Seafood; Vincent Piazza & Sons Seafood, Inc.; Wood's Fisheries; Mariah Jade Shrimp Company, LLC; David Chauvin's Seafood Company, LLC; and Rountree Enterprises, Inc. (dba... Justin Neuman, AD/CVD Operations, Import Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S...

  16. Inhibition effects of vapor phase thymol and modified atmosphere against Salmonella spp. on raw shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella contamination of shrimp is a food safety concern in the U.S. and other countries. Natural antimicrobial compounds (e.g. essential oils) in vapor phase and modified atmosphere (MA) technology can inhibit the growth potential of Salmonella spp. However, each strategy has its limitations, wh...

  17. Characterisation of different morphological features of black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) haemocytes using monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, van de C.B.T.; Taverne, N.; Botterblom, M.H.A.; Knaap, van der W.P.W.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.

    2000-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mabs) specific for Penaeus monodon haemocytes were produced by immunising mice with membrane lysates of shrimp haemocytes. Four mabs (WSH 6, WSH 7, WSH 8 and WSH 16) were characterised using flow cytometry, light microscopy, laser scanning microscopy, electron microscopy and

  18. Antiviral phagocytosis is regulated by a novel Rab-dependent complex in shrimp penaeus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenlin; Zong, Rongrong; Xu, Jianyang; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2008-01-01

    Rab GTPases are involved in phagosome formation and maturation. However, the role of Rab GTPases in phagocytosis against virus infection remains unknown. In this study, it was found that a Rab gene ( PjRab) from marine shrimp was upregulated in virus-resistant shrimp, suggesting that Rab GTPase was involved in the innate response to virus. The RNAi and mRNA assays revealed that the PjRab protein could regulate shrimp hemocytic phagocytosis through a protein complex consisting of the PjRab, beta-actin, tropomyosin, and envelope protein VP466 of shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). It was further demonstrated that the PjRab gene silencing by RNAi caused the increase in the number of WSSV copies, indicating that the PjRab might be an intracellular virus recognition protein employed by a host to increase the phagocytic activity. Therefore, our study presents a novel Rab-dependent signaling complex, in which the Rab GTPase might detect virus infection as an intracellular virus recognition protein and trigger downstream phagocytic defense against virus in crustacean for the first time. This discovery would improve our understanding of the still poorly understood molecular events involved in innate immune response against virus infection of invertebrates.

  19. Concentration of metals in shrimps and crabs from Thane-Bassein creek system, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnamurti, A.J.; Nair, V.R.

    Levels of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Ni in shrimps and crabs from Thane-Bassein creek system, Maharashtra, India were evaluated for a period of one year and reported as baseline for future monitoring of this vital ecosystem. The pattern of concentration...

  20. Drama of the commons in small-scale shrimp aquaculture in northwestern, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eranga Kokila Galappaththi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture, and shrimp aquaculture in particular, can have major social and environmental impacts. However, aquaculture remains an understudied area in commons research. Can aspects of commons theory be applied to solve problems of aquaculture? We examined three coastal community-based shrimp aquaculture operations in northwestern Sri Lanka using a case study approach. These shrimp farms were individually owned by small producers and managed under local-level rules designed by cooperatives (samithis. The common-pool resource of major interest was water for aquaculture ponds, obtained from an interconnected common water body. We evaluated the shrimp farming social-ecological system by using Ostrom’s design principles for collective action. Key elements of the system were: clearly defined boundaries; collaboratively designed crop calendar, bottom-up approach involving community associations, multi-level governance, and farmers-and-government collaborative structures. Together, these elements resolved the excludability and subtractability problems of commons by establishing boundary and membership rules and collective choice rules.

  1. USING ALMOST IDEAL DEMAND SYSTEM TO ANALYZE DEMAND FOR SHRIMP IN US FOOD MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia “Vivian” Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the demand for shrimp along with beef, pork, and chicken in the US food market, which contributes much to predicting supply strategies, consumer preferences and policy making. It focuses on the own and cross elasticity relationship between the expenditure share, price, and expenditure changes. An Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDs model and two alternative specifications (both nonlinear AIDs and LA-AIDs are used to estimate a system of expenditure share equations for ocean shrimp, penaeid shrimp, beef, pork, and chicken. Empirical results from nonlinear AIDs model is compared with those from LA-AIDs model. There are quite a few inconsistency between nonlinear and LA results. Results from nonlinear are more expected and more complied with microeconomic theory than those from LA. Also, results indicated that some insignificant slope coefficients and inappropriate signs of them did not comply with microeconomic theory. This could be caused by heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, a limitation in the data used, or shrimp is a quite different commodity.

  2. Mercury content of shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) reared in a wastewater-seawater aquacultural system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, M.; Pierce, R.

    1986-10-01

    Penaeus vannamei were reared in two ponds, one receiving 10% wastewater in seawater and no feed, and the other receiving only seawater and a prepared commercial feed. The pond receiving the wastewater had significantly more mercury in the sediment, yet shrimp in this pond did not accumulate significant amounts of the mercury in their edible tissue.

  3. Actin genes and their expression in pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Du, Jiangli; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2017-11-30

    Actin is a multi-functional gene family that can be divided into muscle-type actins and non-muscle-type actins. In this study, 37 unigenes encoding actins were identified from RNA-Seq data of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. According to phylogenetic analysis, four and three cDNAs belong to cytoplasmic- and heart-type actins and were named LvActinCT and LvActinHT, respectively. 10 cDNAs belong to the slow-type skeletal muscle actins, and 18 belong to the fast-type skeletal muscle actins; they were designated LvActinSSK and LvActinFSK, respectively. Some muscle actin genes formed gene clusters in the genome. Multiple alternative transcription starts sites (ATSSs) were found for LvActinCT1. Based on the early developmental expression profile, almost all LvActins were highly expressed between the early limb bud and post-larval stages. Using LvActinSSK5 as probes, slow-type muscle was localized in pleopod muscle and superficial ventral muscle. We also found three actin genes that were down-regulated in the hemocytes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)- and Vibrio parahaemolyticus-infected L. vannamei. This study provides valuable information on the actin gene structure of shrimp, furthers our understanding of the shrimp muscle system and helps us develop strategies for disease control and sustainable shrimp farming.

  4. Evaluating a quantitative methionine requirement for juvenile Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 10-wk feeding trial was conducted as a third study (all conducted in our laboratory) to determine a quantitative requirement of juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei for sulfur amino acid methionine. Juvenile shrimp (mean weight 0.61 +/- 0.13 g) were reared in 110-L aquaria in a seawater recirculating sy...

  5. Acerola Fruit as a Possible Antimelanotic Agent in White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Augusto Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to testify acerola’s inhibitory activity on melanosis in farmed white shrimp (L. vannamei. Shrimp samples underwent immersion in different treatments (control group (C, metabisulphite solution group (M, and acerola solution group (A. Quality Index Method (QIM was used to measure the shrimp shelf life, during 21 days, where microbiological, chemical, and sensory analyses were performed at each 3 days. Groups C and A exceeded the limit of mesophilic bacterial count within 15 days of storage, and for M the period was 18 days. As for the psychrophilic bacteria, C and A both crossed the limit on day 12 and M on the 15th day. Group M had the highest TVBN and pH means, followed by A and lastly C. Yet, TMA analysis showed highest values in group C, second A, and finally M. Sensory analysis determined the shelf life of groups C, M, and A as 10.5, 14.6, and 12.3 days, respectively. There were not many significant differences between the groups in all analyses; hence, dipping shrimp in acerola solutions would not suffice to inhibit melanosis formation. Further studies are needed to fully determine acerola’s antimelanosic potential.

  6. Digestibility of glandless cottonseed protein in diets for pacific white shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate digestibility coefficients for protein, energy, and lipid are needed by feed formulators to optimize diets to meet nutritional requirements and to substitute ingredients cost-effectively. Of particular interest is protein, which accounts for the majority of shrimp feed content and expense. ...

  7. Organic Coasts? Regulatory Challenges of Certifying Integrated Shrimp-Mangrove Production Systems in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tran Thi Thu; Bush, Simon R.; Mol, Arthur P. J.; van Dijk, Han

    2012-01-01

    The Vietnamese government aims to expand the scale of Naturland certified organic production in integrated shrimp-mangrove farming systems across the coast of Ca Mau province by 2015. In doing so the division between public and private regulation has become blurred. We analyze the government's goal by examining the regulatory challenges of using…

  8. Monoclonal antibody based immunodot for specific detection of proteins of the shrimp Penaeus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhiman, P B; Shankar, K M; Patil, Rajreddy; Suresh Babu, P P; Sahoo, A K; Shamasundar, B A

    2014-05-01

    Frozen shrimp continued to be the single largest item of export from India in terms of value accounting for about 44% of the total marine export earnings. Headless, peeled frozen shrimp is a common and dominant item in the market and there is need for differentiating peeled Penaeus sp from Metapenaeus, Parapenopsis and Macrobrachium sp as consumer preference and price vary. Furthermore, there is need to find out original species used in value addition of shrimp products. Hence, it is essential for development of simple and consumer friendly technique for the identification of shrimp and their products in the market. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) C-15 (IgG3) and C-52 (IgG2a) reacting with 65 and 47 kD proteins of Penaeus monodon respectively in the Western blot were selected. In epitope analysis by immunodot, the two MAbs reacted and recognized specific proteins of P. monodon, Fenneropenaeus indicus and Littopenaeus vannamei and not that of Metapenaeus, Parapenopsis, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, crabs and fishes. The immunodot required 120 min for completion. The sensitivity of the immunodot to detect proteins of P. monodon was 0.225 mg with MAb C-15 and 0.028 mg with MAb C-52. The MAb based immunodot developed, could be used for identifying and differentiating meat of P. monodon, F. indicus, and L. vannamei from that of Metapenaeus, Parapenopsis, M. rosenbergii, crabs and fishes.

  9. 75 FR 53925 - Sea Turtle Conservation; Shrimp and Summer Flounder Trawling Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... aluminum and steel pipe to prevent bending of the frame. However, some fishers noticed a decrease in shrimp... inches (92.7 cm) and 48 inches (121.9 cm), respectively. The frame must be constructed of steel rod with...) steel rod must be permanently attached to the frame and the rear face of each of the deflector bars...

  10. Is mealworm or shrimp allergy indicative for food allergy to insects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekman, H.C.H.P.; Knulst, A.C.; Jong, G. de; Gaspari, M.; Hartog Jager, C.F. den; Houben, G.F.; Verhoeckx, K.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Scope: The growing world population is a key driver for the exploration of sustainable protein sources to ensure food security. Mealworm and other insects are promising candidates. Previously we found that shrimp allergic patients are at risk for mealworm allergy, and that mealworm can induce a

  11. Biological screening of selected Pacific Northwest forest plants using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette M. Karchesy; Rick G. Kelsey; George Constantine; Joseph J. Karchesy

    2016-01-01

    The brine shrimp (Artemia salina) bioassay was used to screen 211 methanol extracts from 128 species of Pacific Northwest plants in search of general cytotoxic activity. Strong toxicity (LC50 < 100 μg/ml) was found for 17 extracts from 13 species, with highest activity observed for Angelica arguta...

  12. 78 FR 50391 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China: Final Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ...) Exemptions on Imports of Shrimp Fry 4. VAT Refunds for Foreign Invested Enterprises (FIEs) on Purchases of Chinese-Made Equipment 5. VAT and Import Tariff Exemptions for FIEs and Certain Domestic Enterprises Using Imported Equipment in Encouraged Industries 6. Enterprise Income Tax Reduction for High and New Technology...

  13. Acute toxicity of pesticides to the tropical freshwater shrimp Caridina laevis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sucahyo, D.; van Straalen, N.M.; Krave, A.S.; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the potential risk of pesticides frequently used in Indonesia, a new toxicity test was developed using the indigenous freshwater shrimp Caridina laevis, which is representative of tropical ecosystems. The test species could easily be maintained in the laboratory. Acute toxicity tests

  14. Assessment of cyst production potential of a natural population of brine shrimp Artemia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Royan, J.P.; Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Krishnakumari, L.

    Studies on a natural population of Artemia in the salterns of Jamnagar indicated that the population is parthenogenetic. These shrimps reach a maximum size of 9 mm. Number of cysts per brood varies from 10-32. Adults form about 68% of the total...

  15. TROPHIC ACCUMULATION AND DEPURATION OF MERCURY BY BLUE CRABS (CALLINECTES SAPIDUS) AND PINK SHRIMP (PENAEUS DUORARUM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury concentrations in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) collected from an area of mercury-contaminated sediments in Lavaca Bay, TX, USA, are more than an order of magnitude greater than concentrations in penaeid shrimp from the same area. Laboratory feeding experiments using ...

  16. The atyid shrimps of Fiji with description of a new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choy, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Fourteen species of shrimps belonging to four genera of the family Atyidae are reported from the Fiji Islands. Three genera are represented by only one species each: Antecaridina lauensis (Edmondson, 1935), Atyoida pilipes (Newport, 1847) and Atyopsis spinipes (Newport, 1847) while the fourth,

  17. Clonal occurrence of Salmonella Weltevreden in cultured shrimp in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Gazi Md Noor; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Barco, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    . Weltevreden was susceptible to most antimicrobials tested, with a few strains being resistant to florfenicol, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim. Future studies of the ecology of S. Weltevreden should establish if this serovar may survive better and even multiply in warm-water shrimp farm...

  18. 75 FR 54847 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from Thailand: Final Results and Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ...--Antidumping Measure on Shrimp from Thailand: Notice of Determination Under Section 129 of the Uruguay Round...) Co., Ltd. Daiho (Thailand) Co., Ltd. Dynamic Intertransport Co., Ltd. Earth Food Manufacturing Co... Section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act and Partial Revocation of the Antidumping Duty Order on...

  19. Free amino acids and isosmotic intracellular regulation in the shrimp Crangon crangon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, R.E.; Marrewijk, Willibrordus J. A. van

    1972-01-01

    The concentrations of non-protein nitrogenous material and individual free amino acids in muscle tissue of the euryhaline shrimp Crangon grancon are measured. The cellular ninhydrin-positive component closely follows blood osmolarity over a range of ambient salinities and temperatures. The three

  20. Rab from the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: characterization and its regulation upon environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Jin; Chen, Chu-Xian; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-10-01

    With the destruction of the ecological environment, shrimp cultivation in China has been seriously affected by outbreaks of infectious diseases. Rab, which belong to small GTPase Ras superfamily, can regulate multiple steps in eukaryotic vesicle trafficking including vesicle budding, vesicle tethering, and membrane fusion. Knowledge of Rab in shrimp is essential to understanding regulation and detoxification mechanisms of environmental stress. In this study, we analyzed the functions of Rab from the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Full-length cDNA of Rab was obtained, which was 751 bp long, with open reading frame encoding 206 amino acids. In this study, for the first time, the gene expression of Rab of L. vannamei was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR after exposure to five kinds of environmental stresses (bacteria, pH, Cd, salinity and low temperature). The results demonstrate that Rab is sensitive and involved in bacteria, pH, and Cd stress responses and Rab is more sensitive to bacteria than other stresses. Therefore we infer that Rab may have relationship with the anti-stress mechanism induced by environment stress in shrimp and Rab could be used as critical biomarkers for environmental quality assessment.