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Sample records for showed good adhesion

  1. Molecular Velcro constructed from polymer loop brushes showing enhanced adhesion force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Han, Biao; Han, Lin; Li, Christopher; Department of Materials Science; Engineering Team; School of Biomedical Engineering, Science; Health Systems Team

    2015-03-01

    Molecular Velcro is commonly seen in biological systems as the formation of strong physical entanglement at molecular scale could induce strong adhesion, which is crucial to many biological processes. To mimic this structure, we designed, and fabricated polymer loop brushes using polymer single crystals with desired surface functionality and controlled chain folding. Compared with reported loop brushes fabricated using triblock copolymers, the present loop bushes have precise loop sizes, loop grafting density, and well controlled tethering locations on the solid surface. Atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy measurements using a polymer chain coated probe reveal that the adhesion force are significantly enhanced on the loop brush surface as compared with its single-strand counterpart. This study directly shows the effect of polymer brush conformation on their properties, and suggests a promising strategy for advanced polymer surface design.

  2. Chapter 9:Wood Adhesion and Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2013-01-01

    The recorded history of bonding wood dates back at least 3000 years to the Egyptians (Skeist and Miron 1990, River 1994a), and adhesive bonding goes back to early mankind (Keimel 2003). Although wood and paper bonding are the largest applications for adhesives, some of the fundamental aspects leading to good bonds are not fully understood. Better understanding of these...

  3. The knowledge and attitude of general dentists toward denture adhesives in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Hamidreza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to generate discussion and communication among a group of general dentists in Tehran on their viewpoints regarding denture adhesives. Have they accepted denture adhesive as a material to enhance denture retention, stability and function? Materials and Methods: In the summer of 2007, a questionnaire was mailed to 300 general dentists who were assigned with a random systematic sampling method from general dentists in Tehran. The questions were arranged in two parts of evaluating knowledge and attitude. In evaluation of knowledge, dentists were classified into groups of good, moderate, weak and lack of knowledge. In evaluation of attitude, dentists were classified into positive, moderate and negative groups. (Evaluating attitude was carried out in good and moderate groups of knowledge. Results: The study showed that 14%, 32% and 37% of the general dentists had respectively good, moderate and weak knowledge toward denture adhesive while 16.3% had no knowledge about this material. In evaluation of attitude through dentists with positive and moderate knowledge toward denture adhesive, 9.3%, 71.3% and 19.4% had respectively positive, moderate and negative attitude toward denture adhesive. The χ2 test showed a significant statistical relation between situation of knowledge and experiences of dentists. Discussion: This study demonstrated that the rate of knowledge of these 300 general dentists in Tehran towards denture adhesives has not been in a good situation. It is believed that denture adhesive be able to enhance the fitness of a denture and provide psychological relief to the patient. Dentists agreed that education, not only for practitioners but also for patients, would raise the advantageous features and reduce the misuse of denture adhesive. Education of the topic "Denture adhesive" should be more concerned in dental universities.

  4. Ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive for piezoelectric composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Liao, Qingwei; Zhou, Xingli; Wang, Likun; Zhong, Chao; Zhang, Di

    2018-01-01

    Limited by the low thermal resistance of composite material, ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive with curing temperature less than 100 °C needed urgently for the surface conduction treatment of piezoelectric composite material. An ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive with high adhesion strength for the applications of piezoelectric composite material was investigated. The crystal structure of cured adhesive, SEM/EDS analysis, thermal analysis, adhesive properties and conductive properties of different content of nano-silver filler or micron-silver doping samples were studied. The results show that with 60 wt.% nano-silver filler the ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive had the relatively good conductivity as volume resistivity of 2.37 × 10-4 Ω cm, and good adhesion strength of 5.13 MPa. Minor micron-doping (below 15 wt.%) could improve conductivity, but would decrease other properties. The ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive could successfully applied to piezoelectric composite material.

  5. Enhancement of CNT/PET film adhesion by nano-scale modification for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yu Jin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Haegeun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Seop [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woong, E-mail: woongkim@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • High integrity supercapacitors are achieved by improving adhesion of CNTs on PET. • Nanostructures on PET substrate significantly enhances the adhesion strength. • A simple RIE process generates the nanostructures on PET surface. • RIE induces hydrophilicity on the PET and further enhances the adhesive strength. • The supercapacitors show good cyclability with high specific capacitance retention. - Abstract: We demonstrate the fabrication of high-integrity flexible supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and ion gels. Although both CNTs and PET films are attractive materials for flexible electronics, they have poor adhesion properties. In this work, we significantly improve interfacial adhesion by introducing nanostructures at the interface of the CNT and PET layers. Simple reactive ion etching (RIE) of the PET substrates generates nano-scale roughness on the PET surface. RIE also induces hydrophilicity on the PET surface, which further enhances adhesive strength. The improved adhesion enables high integrity and excellent flexibility of the fabricated supercapacitors, demonstrated over hundreds of bending cycles. Furthermore, the supercapacitors show good cyclability with specific capacitance retention of 87.5% after 10,000 galvanostatic charge–discharge (GCD) cycles. Our demonstration may be important for understanding interfacial adhesion properties in nanoscale and for producing flexible, high-integrity, high-performance energy storage systems.

  6. Enhancement of CNT/PET film adhesion by nano-scale modification for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yu Jin; Chung, Haegeun; Kim, Min-Seop; Kim, Woong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • High integrity supercapacitors are achieved by improving adhesion of CNTs on PET. • Nanostructures on PET substrate significantly enhances the adhesion strength. • A simple RIE process generates the nanostructures on PET surface. • RIE induces hydrophilicity on the PET and further enhances the adhesive strength. • The supercapacitors show good cyclability with high specific capacitance retention. - Abstract: We demonstrate the fabrication of high-integrity flexible supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and ion gels. Although both CNTs and PET films are attractive materials for flexible electronics, they have poor adhesion properties. In this work, we significantly improve interfacial adhesion by introducing nanostructures at the interface of the CNT and PET layers. Simple reactive ion etching (RIE) of the PET substrates generates nano-scale roughness on the PET surface. RIE also induces hydrophilicity on the PET surface, which further enhances adhesive strength. The improved adhesion enables high integrity and excellent flexibility of the fabricated supercapacitors, demonstrated over hundreds of bending cycles. Furthermore, the supercapacitors show good cyclability with specific capacitance retention of 87.5% after 10,000 galvanostatic charge–discharge (GCD) cycles. Our demonstration may be important for understanding interfacial adhesion properties in nanoscale and for producing flexible, high-integrity, high-performance energy storage systems.

  7. Three-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness....

  8. Tuneable adhesion through novel binder technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, M.E.L.; Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Ingenhut, B.; Timmer, K.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Bots, T.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Fischer, H.R.

    2011-01-01

    A reversible crosslinking mechanism enabling bonding and debonding of adhesives and coatings based on Diels-Alder chemistry is described. The Diels-Alder compounds form a covalently crosslinked network at low temperatures that break at elevated temperatures. As a result, the adhesive exhibits good

  9. Cell adhesion to cathodic arc plasma deposited CrAlSiN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Kyu, E-mail: skim@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Pham, Vuong-Hung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong-Hyun [Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Osteoblast cell response (cell adhesion, actin cytoskeleton and focal contact adhesion as well as cell proliferation) to CrN, CrAlSiN and Ti thin films was evaluated in vitro. Cell adhesion and actin stress fibers organization depended on the film composition significantly. Immunofluorescent staining of vinculin in osteoblast cells showed good focal contact adhesion on the CrAlSiN and Ti thin films but not on the CrN thin films. Cell proliferation was significantly greater on the CrAlSiN thin films as well as on Ti thin films than on the CrN thin films.

  10. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, A R; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M S Abdul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding

  11. Adhesive properties and adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudawska, Anna; Stančeková, Dana; Cubonova, Nadezda; Vitenko, Tetiana; Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of experimental research of the adhesive joints strength of graphite/epoxy composites and the results of the surface free energy of the composite surfaces. Two types of graphite/epoxy composites with different thickness were tested which are used to aircraft structure. The single-lap adhesive joints of epoxy composites were considered. Adhesive properties were described by surface free energy. Owens-Wendt method was used to determine surface free energy. The epoxy two-component adhesive was used to preparing the adhesive joints. Zwick/Roell 100 strength device were used to determination the shear strength of adhesive joints of epoxy composites. The strength test results showed that the highest value was obtained for adhesive joints of graphite-epoxy composite of smaller material thickness (0.48 mm). Statistical analysis of the results obtained, the study showed statistically significant differences between the values of the strength of the confidence level of 0.95. The statistical analysis of the results also showed that there are no statistical significant differences in average values of surface free energy (0.95 confidence level). It was noted that in each of the results the dispersion component of surface free energy was much greater than polar component of surface free energy.

  12. Thin film adhesion modification by MeV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugden, S.

    1991-08-01

    The adhesion of thin films, and in particular the way in which such adhesion may be improved by irradiation, is rather poorly understood. The radiation enhanced adhesion effect has been investigated through the use of Ultra High Vacuum sample preparation, analysis and irradiation techniques, in order to gain control over surface and interface composition. In the systems studied, Au on Ta, Au on Si and Ag on Si, films deposited on atomically clean surfaces show good adhesion, and no evidence of enhancement due to irradiation is observed in the case of such clean interfaces. The results are entirely consistent with radiation enhanced adhesion being due to radiolytic effects on contaminant containing layers at the film/substrate interface. In addition, on silicon substrates the observations highlight the superiority of thermal cleaning over low energy sputtering as a route for producing a clean surface. A model of the radiation enhanced adhesion observations for dirty interface systems is developed, which takes into account the two dimensional nature of the ion energy deposition process. All the observations on such systems are broadly consistent with an activation energy for the process of approximately 5 eV. This value is sufficiently large to bring about chemical bonding rearrangement at the critical film/substrate interface. (Author)

  13. Mechanical pretreatment for improved adhesion of diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toenshoff, H.K.; Mohlfeld, A.; Gey, C.; Winkler, J.

    1999-01-01

    Diamond coatings are mainly used in cutting processes due to their tribological characteristics. They show a high hardness, low friction coefficient, high wear resistance and good chemical inertness. In relation to polycrystalline diamond (PCD)-tipped cutting inserts, especially the advantageous chemical stability of diamond coatings is superior as no binder phases between diamond grains are used. However, the deposition of adherent high-quality diamond coatings has been found difficult. Thus, substrate pretreatment is utilised to improve film adhesion. This investigation is based on water peening of the substrate material before coating. The investigation revealed best results for diamond film adhesion on pretreated substrates compared to conventional diamond coatings on cemented carbide tools applied with the CVD hot-filament process. In final cutting tests with increased film adhesion trough water peened cutting tools an improved wear behavior was detected. (orig.)

  14. Is nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nonoperative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction gives good results in adults but there are scant studies on its outcome in children. This study reports outcomes and experiences with nonoperative and operative management of adhesive intestinal obstruction in children in a resource-poor country.

  15. Multifunctional Hydrogel with Good Structure Integrity, Self-Healing, and Tissue-Adhesive Property Formed by Combining Diels-Alder Click Reaction and Acylhydrazone Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Du, Jie; Wang, Gang; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-04

    Hydrogel, as a good cartilage tissue-engineered scaffold, not only has to possess robust mechanical property but also has to have an intrinsic self-healing property to integrate itself or the surrounding host cartilage. In this work a double cross-linked network (DN) was designed and prepared by combining Diels-Alder click reaction and acylhydrazone bond. The DA reaction maintained the hydrogel's structural integrity and mechanical strength in physiological environment, while the dynamic covalent acylhydrazone bond resulted in hydrogel's self-healing property and controlled the on-off switch of network cross-link density. At the same time, the aldehyde groups contained in hydrogel further promote good integration of the hydrogel to surrounding tissue based on aldehyde-amine Schiff-base reaction. This kind of hydrogel has good structural integrity, autonomous self-healing, and tissue-adhesive property and simultaneously will have a good application in tissue engineering and tissue repair field.

  16. Possibilities of Belzona Adhesive Joints Application for Austenitic Steel Used in Ship Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Jurczak

    2017-12-01

    Adhesive joints of 304 and 2xx steel using Hysol 9466 adhesive made in laboratory conditions showed better durability properties than the ones made with the use of Belzona 1111 composite. However, in case of emergency connections the bonding strength as well as the bonding time (hardening are important factors. The use of the special Belzona 1212 (for wet surfaces gives a relatively good durability of approx. 20MPa with a much shorter (up to 20 minutes hardening time and does not require such an accurate surface preparation as the adhesive joints made with the use of Hysol 9466.

  17. Superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated by femtosecond laser with tunable water adhesion: from lotus leaf to rose petal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jiangyou; Fan, Peixun; Gong, Dingwei; Jiang, Dafa; Zhang, Hongjun; Li, Lin; Zhong, Minlin

    2015-05-13

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable water adhesion have attracted much interest in fundamental research and practical applications. In this paper, we used a simple method to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with tunable water adhesion. Periodic microstructures with different topographies were fabricated on copper surface via femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. The topography of these microstructures can be controlled by simply changing the scanning speed of the laser beam. After surface chemical modification, these as-prepared surfaces showed superhydrophobicity combined with different adhesion to water. Surfaces with deep microstructures showed self-cleaning properties with extremely low water adhesion, and the water adhesion increased when the surface microstructures became flat. The changes in surface water adhesion are attributed to the transition from Cassie state to Wenzel state. We also demonstrated that these superhydrophobic surfaces with different adhesion can be used for transferring small water droplets without any loss. We demonstrate that our approach provides a novel but simple way to tune the surface adhesion of superhydrophobic metallic surfaces for good potential applications in related areas.

  18. Genoa Boat ShowGood Example of Event Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Demirović

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available International Boat Show, a business and tourist event, has been held annually in Italian city of Genoa since 1962. The fair is one of the oldest, largest and best known in the field of boating industry worldwide, primarily due to good management of the event and it can serve as case study for domestic fair organizers to improve the quality of their business and services. Since Belgrade is the city of fairs, but compared to Genoa still underdeveloped in terms of trade shows, the following tasks imposed naturally in this study: to determine the relationship of the organizers of Genoa Boat Show in the sector of preparation and fair offer, in the sector of selection and communication with specific target groups (especially visitors, services during the fair and functioning of the city during the fair. During the research the authors have mostly used historical method, comparison, synthesis and the interview method. The results of theoretical research, in addition, may help not only managers of fair shows and of exhibitions, but also to organizers of other events in our country

  19. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites from acrylic polymer matrices: Interfacial adhesion and physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kishi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic polymers have high potential as matrix polymers for carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers (CFRTP due to their superior mechanical properties and the fact that they can be fabricated at relatively low temperatures. We focused on improving the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers (CFs and acrylic polymers using several functional monomers for co-polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA. The copolymerized acrylic matrices showed good adhesion to the CF surfaces. In particular, an acrylic copolymer with acrylamide (AAm showed high interfacial adhesive strength with CFs compared to pure PMMA, and a hydroxyethyl acrylamide (HEAA copolymer containing both amide and hydroxyl groups showed high flexural strength of the CFRTP. A 3 mol% HEAA-copolymerized CFRTP achieved a flexural strength almost twice that of pure PMMA matrix CFRTP, and equivalent to that of an epoxy matrix CFRP.

  20. A test of the adhesion approximation for gravitational clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei; Weinberg, David H.

    1993-01-01

    We quantitatively compare a particle implementation of the adhesion approximation to fully non-linear, numerical 'N-body' simulations. Our primary tool, cross-correlation of N-body simulations with the adhesion approximation, indicates good agreement, better than that found by the same test performed with the Zel-dovich approximation (hereafter ZA). However, the cross-correlation is not as good as that of the truncated Zel-dovich approximation (TZA), obtained by applying the Zel'dovich approximation after smoothing the initial density field with a Gaussian filter. We confirm that the adhesion approximation produces an excessively filamentary distribution. Relative to the N-body results, we also find that: (a) the power spectrum obtained from the adhesion approximation is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA, (b) the error in the phase angle of Fourier components is worse than that from TZA, and (c) the mass distribution function is more accurate than that from ZA or TZA. It appears that adhesion performs well statistically, but that TZA is more accurate dynamically, in the sense of moving mass to the right place.

  1. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adhesive behaviour of gecko-inspired nanofibrillar arrays: combination of experiments and finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengzhi; Xu Yun; Gu Ping

    2012-01-01

    A polypropylene nanofibrillar array was successfully fabricated by template-assisted nanofabrication strategy. Adhesion properties of this gecko-inspired structure were studied through two parallel and independent approaches: experiments and finite element simulations. Experimental results show relatively good normal adhesion, but accompanied by high preloads. The interfacial adhesion was modelled by effective spring elements with piecewise-linear constitution. The effective elasticity of the fibre-array system was originally calculated from our measured elasticity of single nanowire. Comparisons of the experimental and simulative results reveal quantitative agreement except for some explainable deviations, which suggests the potential applicability of the present models and applied theories. (fast track communication)

  3. Bioinspired dopamine-conjugated polyaspartamide as a novel and versatile adhesive material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic dopamine-conjugated polyaspartamides as novel adhesive materials were synthesized and characterized. These modified polyaspartamides contain three different groups combined with dopamine (DOPA, i.e., γ-amino butyric acid (GABA, ethanolamine (EA and octylamine (OA, which are referred to as PolyAspAm (DOPA/GABA, PolyAspAm(DOPA/EA and PolyAspAm(DOPA/OA, respectively. These three water-swollen polymer glues show good adhesion (0.1~0.4 MPa with various daily-life materials (aluminum foil, glass and paper as well as some plastic substrates (PET and PMMA. Compared to the polymers with more hydrophilic groups (GABA and EA, the polymer glue with the hydrophobic alkyl group (OA exhibited higher adhesive strength values on most substrates. In addition, when applied to biological porcine skin, these glues demonstrated adhesion of values of 15~20 kPa with EA- and OA-conjugated polymers. These results suggest the great potential of dopamine-modified polyaspartamides as versatile and efficient polymeric glues for industrial and biomedical applications.

  4. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, Agnieszka Izabela; Hannink, Gerjon; Janssen, Dennis; Buma, Pieter; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2017-01-01

    Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate the use of an amine cross-linker and addition of catalysts as two strategies to accelerate the curing rates of a recently developed biodegradable reactive isocyanate-terminated hyper-branched adhesive block copolymer prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG), trimethylene carbonate, citric acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The curing kinetics of the hyper-branched adhesive alone and in combination with different concentrations of spermidine solutions, and after addition of 2,2-dimorpholinodiethylether (DMDEE) or 1,4-diazabicyclo [2.2.2] octane (DABCO) were determined using FTIR. Additionally, lap-shear adhesion tests using all compositions at various time points were performed. The two most promising compositions of the fast curing adhesives were evaluated in a meniscus bucket handle lesion model and their performance was compared with that of fibrin glue. The results showed that addition of both spermidine and catalysts to the adhesive copolymer can accelerate the curing rate and that firm adhesion can already be achieved after 2 h. The adhesive strength to meniscus tissue of 3.2-3.7 N was considerably higher for the newly developed compositions than for fibrin glue (0.3 N). The proposed combination of an adhesive component and a cross-linking component or catalyst is a promising way to accelerate curing rates of isocyanate-terminated tissue adhesives.

  5. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ADHESIVE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haricharan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adhesive intestinal obstruction is an inevitable complication of abdominal surgeries. It has high morbidity with associated poor quality of life and predisposition to repeated hospitalization. Commonest cause of bowel obstruction in developed countries is postoperative adhesions with extrinsic compression of the intestine. Most of them can be managed conservatively. METHODS: A retrospective study of 30 patients admitted with the diagnosis of post - operative adhesive partial bowel obstruction was conducted by analyzing their medical records. Demographic data, clinical presentation including duration, previous surgical procedures, treatments received for the condition and successful conservative approach versus requirement of operative intervention were assesse d. RESULTS: The median age was 31yrs, most in their third decade of life. Male predominance was noted. Pelvic surgeries and gynecological surgeries (26% were found to be the most common cause of adhesive bowel obstruction followed by appendectomy (16%. M ore than two third of the patients (76.7% developed symptoms within two years of the initial surgery. Successful conservative treatment was noted in 22 patients (73.3% and discharged on fourth day of admission. Eight patients (26.6% underwent surgery. T hey all underwent adhesiolysis and had good outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The time - honored practice of expectant management of adhesive partial bowel obstruction has equally good outcome, as compared to various interventions practiced

  7. Calcium phosphate coating containing silver shows high antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity and inhibits bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Yoshiki, E-mail: andoy@jmmc.jp [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Miyamoto, Hiroshi [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Noda, Iwao; Sakurai, Nobuko [Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomonori [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Yonekura, Yutaka; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the serious complications of orthopedic implants. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, we developed a novel coating technology of calcium phosphate (CP) containing silver (Ag), designated Ag-CP coating, using a thermal spraying technique. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial efficacy and biological safety of this coating. In vitro antibacterial activity tests showed that the growths of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are completely suppressed on Ag-CP coating. In vitro bacterial adherence tests revealed that the number of adherent bacteria on the surface of this coating is significantly less (p < 0.02) than that on the surface of the CP coating. Moreover, the Ag-CP coating completely inhibits MRSA adhesion [<10 colony-forming units (CFU)] when 10{sup 2} CFU MRSA is inoculated. On the other hand, V79 Chinese hamster lung cells were found to grow on the Ag-CP coating as well as on the CP coating in a cytotoxicity test. These results indicate that the Ag-CP coating on the surface of orthopedic implants exhibits antibacterial activity and inhibits bacterial adhesion without cytotoxicity.

  8. Effects of composition and layer thickness of a butyl acrylate/acrylic acid copolymer on the adhesion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, Deoukchen; Kim, Jung Hyeun [University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesives are synthesized by solution copolymerization using n-butyl acrylate and acrylic acid (AA) in ethyl acetate anhydrous. The copolymer composition is controlled for good adhesive properties by varying AA content. The monomer conversion is measured by the gravimetric method and FTIR technique. The adhesive layer thickness is measured by scanning electron microscopy, and the adhesive properties are evaluated with loop tack, 180 .deg. peel, and holding time measurements. The peel force increases with increasing the AA content up to 3 wt% and decreases at the AA content higher than 3 wt%, but the tack force decreases with increasing the AA content. The holding time increases with increasing the AA content, and it shows a similar trend with the T{sub g} of adhesives. The increase of layer thickness improves tack and peel forces, but it weakens the holding power. A tape thickness of about 20 μm shows well-balanced properties at 3 wt% AA content in the acrylic copolymer system.

  9. Effects of composition and layer thickness of a butyl acrylate/acrylic acid copolymer on the adhesion properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghim, Deoukchen; Kim, Jung Hyeun

    2016-01-01

    Acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesives are synthesized by solution copolymerization using n-butyl acrylate and acrylic acid (AA) in ethyl acetate anhydrous. The copolymer composition is controlled for good adhesive properties by varying AA content. The monomer conversion is measured by the gravimetric method and FTIR technique. The adhesive layer thickness is measured by scanning electron microscopy, and the adhesive properties are evaluated with loop tack, 180 .deg. peel, and holding time measurements. The peel force increases with increasing the AA content up to 3 wt% and decreases at the AA content higher than 3 wt%, but the tack force decreases with increasing the AA content. The holding time increases with increasing the AA content, and it shows a similar trend with the T g of adhesives. The increase of layer thickness improves tack and peel forces, but it weakens the holding power. A tape thickness of about 20 μm shows well-balanced properties at 3 wt% AA content in the acrylic copolymer system.

  10. Soybean glycinin subunits: Characterization of physicochemical and adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaoqun; Zhong, Zhikai; Wang, Donghai; Sun, Xiuzhi

    2006-10-04

    Soybean proteins have shown great potential for applications as renewable and environmentally friendly adhesives. The objective of this work was to study physicochemical and adhesion properties of soy glycinin subunits. Soybean glycinin was extracted from soybean flour and then fractionated into acidic and basic subunits with an estimated purity of 90 and 85%, respectively. Amino acid composition of glycinin subunits was determined. The high hydrophobic amino acid content is a major contributor to the solubility behavior and water resistance of the basic subunits. Acidic subunits and glycinin had similar solubility profiles, showing more than 80% solubility at pH 2.0-4.0 or 6.5-12.0, whereas basic subunits had considerably lower solubility with the minimum at pH 4.5-8.0. Thermal analysis using a differential scanning calorimeter suggested that basic subunits form new oligomeric structures with higher thermal stability than glycinin but no highly ordered structures present in isolated acidic subunits. The wet strength of basic subunits was 160% more than that of acidic subunits prepared at their respective isoelectric points (pI) and cured at 130 degrees C. Both pH and the curing temperature significantly affected adhesive performance. High-adhesion water resistance was usually observed for adhesives from protein prepared at their pI values and cured at elevated temperatures. Basic subunits are responsible for the water resistance of glycinin and are a good starting material for the development of water-resistant adhesives.

  11. Hardness and adhesion performances of nanocoating on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnidawani, J. N.; Azlina, H. N.; Norita, H.; Bonnia, N. N.

    2018-01-01

    Nanocoatings industry has been aggressive in searching for cost-effective alternatives and environmental friendly approaches to manufacture products. Nanocoatings represent an engineering solution to prevent corrosion of the structural parts of ships, insulation and pipelines industries. The adhesion and hardness properties of coating affect material properties. This paper reviews ZnO-SiO2 as nanopowder in nano coating formulation as the agent for new and improved coating performances. Carbon steel on type S50C used as common substrate in nanocoating industry. 3wt% ZnO and 2wt% SiO2 addition of nanoparticles into nanocoating showed the best formulation since hardness and adhesion of nanocoating was good on carbon steel substrate. Incorporation of nanoparticles into coating increased the performances of coating.

  12. Cell-substrate interaction with cell-membrane-stress dependent adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Yang, B

    2012-01-10

    Cell-substrate interaction is examined in a two-dimensional mechanics model. The cell and substrate are treated as a shell and an elastic solid, respectively. Their interaction through adhesion is treated using nonlinear springs. Compared to previous cell mechanics models, the present model introduces a cohesive force law that is dependent not only on cell-substrate distance but also on internal cell-membrane stress. It is postulated that a living cell would establish focal adhesion sites with density dependent on the cell-membrane stress. The formulated mechanics problem is numerically solved using coupled finite elements and boundary elements for the cell and the substrate, respectively. The nodes in the adhesion zone from either side are linked by the cohesive springs. The specific cases of a cell adhering to a homogeneous substrate and a heterogeneous bimaterial substrate are examined. The analyses show that the substrate stiffness affects the adhesion behavior significantly and regulates the direction of cell adhesion, in good agreement with the experimental results in the literature. By introducing a reactive parameter (i.e., cell-membrane stress) linking biological responses of a living cell to a mechanical environment, the present model offers a unified mechanistic vehicle for characterization and prediction of living cell responses to various kinds of mechanical stimuli including local extracellular matrix and neighboring cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-based adhesives containing calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion property (i.e. viscosity, loop tack and peel strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25 and ENR 50 grade-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied in the presence of calcium carbonate. The range of calcium carbonate loaded was from 10 to 50 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr. Coumarone-indene resin was used as the tackifier and its concentration was fixed at 80 phr. Toluene was chosen as the solvent throughout the investigation. The substrates (PET film/paper were coated with the adhesive using a SHEEN hand coater at a coating thickness of 60 µm. Viscosity of the adhesive was measured by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results show that viscosity of ENR-based adhesives increases gradually with increase in calcium carbonate loading due to the concentration effect of the filler. However, for loop tack and peel strength, it passes through a maximum at 30 phr calcium carbonate, an observation which is attributed to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate at this adhesive composition. ENR 25-based adhesive consistently exhibits higher adhesion property than ENR 50 for all calcium carbonate loadings studied.

  14. Evaluation of the adhesive layer of blast tube using ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Soo; Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Cho, Hyun [Dept. of Machanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soo Yong; Yun, Nam Gyun [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ki [Korea Inspection and Engineering Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Joo [Hankuk Fiber Group, Milyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonic testing method has been developed to evaluate adhesive layers in blast tube for the reliability of the rocket. The main objective of the present work was to find debonding and uncharged state between steel and FRP layers. We distinguish the debonding and uncharged state using the resonance method in the adhesive layers. It was found that the higher magnitude of ultrasound is reflected for the uncharged area in frequency domain, and shown good agreements with experimental results. The traditional ultrasonic pulse-echo method offers good implements for the distinction debonding area. The nondestructive testing results were compared with the micrography of destructive testing. As results, ultrasonic testing could be utilized for the evaluation of adhesive layer in the blast tube.

  15. Vaginal epithelial cells regulate membrane adhesiveness to co-ordinate bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Jessica A; Klappe, Karin; Kok, Jan Willem; Busscher, Henk J; Reid, Gregor; van der Mei, Henny C

    2016-04-01

    Vaginal epithelium is colonized by different bacterial strains and species. The bacterial composition of vaginal biofilms controls the balance between health and disease. Little is known about the relative contribution of the epithelial and bacterial cell surfaces to bacterial adhesion and whether and how adhesion is regulated over cell membrane regions. Here, we show that bacterial adhesion forces with cell membrane regions not located above the nucleus are stronger than with regions above the nucleus both for vaginal pathogens and different commensal and probiotic lactobacillus strains involved in health. Importantly, adhesion force ratios over membrane regions away from and above the nucleus coincided with the ratios between numbers of adhering bacteria over both regions. Bacterial adhesion forces were dramatically decreased by depleting the epithelial cell membrane of cholesterol or sub-membrane cortical actin. Thus, epithelial cells can regulate membrane regions to which bacterial adhesion is discouraged, possibly to protect the nucleus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of dentin adhesives containing a new urethane-based trimethacrylate monomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Gu; Ye, Qiang; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Spencer, Paulette

    2009-01-01

    A new trimethacrylate monomer with urethane-linked groups, 1,1,1-tri-[4-(methacryloxyethylamino-carbonyloxy)-phenyl]ethane (MPE), was synthesized, characterized, and used as a co-monomer in dentin adhesives. Dentin adhesives containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA, 45% w/w) and 2,2-bis[4(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy-propyloxy)-phenyl] propane (BisGMA, 30% w/w) in addition to MPE (25% w/w) were formulated with H2O at 0 (MPE0), 8 (MPE8) and 16 wt % water (MPE16) to simulate the wet demineralized dentin matrix and compared with controls [HEMA/BisGMA, 45/55 w/w, at 0 (C0), 8 (C8) and 16 wt% water (C16)]. The new adhesive showed a degree of double bond conversion and mechanical properties comparable with control, with good penetration into the dentin surface and a uniform adhesive/dentin interface. On exposure to porcine liver esterase, the net cumulative methacrylic acid (MAA) release from the new adhesives was dramatically (P < 0.05) decreased relative to the control, suggesting that the new monomer improves esterase resistance. PMID:19582843

  17. Correlation of molecular conformation with adhesion at AlOx/poly (ethylene terephthalate) interface studied by sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamae, Takayuki; Nozoye, Hisakazu

    2004-01-01

    The interface between AlO x and poly(ethylene terephthalate) has been investigated by sum-frequency generation (SFG). A considerable improvement in adhesion strength was achieved by short time Ar plasma modification. The increase of the adhesion strength shows good correlation with the increase of the SFG peak strength. By depositing AlO x , the increase of SFG intensities and appearance of a new peak are observed, indicating the formation of a C=O···Al bond at the interface. Surface-modification and interfacial adhesion property are discussed

  18. Influence of denture adhesives on occlusion and disocclusion times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnabi, Mohamed Hussein; Swelem, Amal Ali; Al-Dharrab, Ayman A

    2016-03-01

    The effectiveness of adhesives in enhancing several functional aspects of complete denture performance has been well established. The direct influence of adhesives on occlusal contact simultaneity has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this crossover clinical trial was to evaluate quantitatively the influence of adhesives on occlusal balance by recording timed occlusal contacts; namely occlusion time (OT) and disocclusion time during right (DT-right) and left (DT-left) excursions by using computerized occlusal analysis. A crossover clinical trial was adopted. Assessments were carried out while participants (n=49) wore their dentures first without then with adhesives. Computerized occlusal analysis using the T-Scan III system was conducted to perform baseline computer-guided occlusal adjustment for conventionally fabricated dentures. Retention and stability assessment using the modified Kapur index and recording of OT and DT-right and DT-left values using the T-Scan III were subsequently carried out for all dentures, first without adhesives and then after application of adhesive. All T-Scan procedures were carried out by the same clinician. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze the Kapur index scores and occlusal parameters (α=.05). Stability and retention of conventional dentures ranged initially from good to very good. However, adhesive application resulted in significant improvement (PAdhesives significantly decreased OT and DT durations in initially well-fitting complete dentures with fairly well balanced occlusion, and further enhanced denture stability and occlusal contact simultaneity. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Design of Xylose-Based Semisynthetic Polyurethane Tissue Adhesives with Enhanced Bioactivity Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Sevgi; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Karaaslan, Merve Goksin; Gulgen, Selam; Taslidere, Elif; Koytepe, Suleyman; Ates, Burhan

    2016-02-01

    Developing biocompatible tissue adhesives with high adhesion properties is a highly desired goal of the tissue engineering due to adverse effects of the sutures. Therefore, our work involves synthesis, characterization, adhesion properties, protein adsorption, in vitro biodegradation, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility properties of xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethane (NPU-PEG-X) bioadhesives. Xylose-based semisynthetic polyurethanes were developed by the reaction among 4,4'-methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) (MCI), xylose and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG). Synthesized polyurethanes (PUs) showed good thermal stability and high adhesion strength. The highest values in adhesion strength were measured as 415.0 ± 48.8 and 94.0 ± 2.8 kPa for aluminum substrate and muscle tissue in 15% xylose containing PUs (NPU-PEG-X-15%), respectively. The biodegradation of NPU-PEG-X-15% was also determined as 19.96 ± 1.04% after 8 weeks of incubation. Relative cell viability of xylose containing PU was above 86%. Moreover, 10% xylose containing NPU-PEG-X (NPU-PEG-X-10%) sample has favorable tissue response, and inflammatory reaction between 1 and 6 weeks implantation period. With high adhesiveness and biocompatibility properties, NPU-PEG-X can be used in the medical field as supporting materials for preventing the fluid leakage after abdominal surgery or wound closure.

  20. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  1. Enhancement of CNT/PET film adhesion by nano-scale modification for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu Jin; Chung, Haegeun; Kim, Min-Seop; Kim, Woong

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of high-integrity flexible supercapacitors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and ion gels. Although both CNTs and PET films are attractive materials for flexible electronics, they have poor adhesion properties. In this work, we significantly improve interfacial adhesion by introducing nanostructures at the interface of the CNT and PET layers. Simple reactive ion etching (RIE) of the PET substrates generates nano-scale roughness on the PET surface. RIE also induces hydrophilicity on the PET surface, which further enhances adhesive strength. The improved adhesion enables high integrity and excellent flexibility of the fabricated supercapacitors, demonstrated over hundreds of bending cycles. Furthermore, the supercapacitors show good cyclability with specific capacitance retention of 87.5% after 10,000 galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) cycles. Our demonstration may be important for understanding interfacial adhesion properties in nanoscale and for producing flexible, high-integrity, high-performance energy storage systems.

  2. [Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting promotes cell adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Yue; Ma, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bu-Ling

    2017-05-20

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and compare the cell adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the biomaterial using two different methods. HDPCs isolated by tissue block culture and enzyme digestion were cultured and passaged. Gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds were printed using a bioplotter, and the cytotoxicity of the aqueous extracts of the scaffold material was tested in the third passage of HDPCs using cell counting kit-8. Scanning electron microscopy and trypan blue were used to assess the adhesion and proliferation of the cells seeded in the scaffold material at a low or high concentration. The aqueous extract of the scaffolds at different concentrations showed no obvious cytotoxicity and promoted the proliferation of HDPCs. The scaffolds had a good biocompatibility and HDPCs seeded in the scaffold showed good cell growth. Cell seeding at a high concentration in the scaffold better promoted the adhesion of HDPCs and resulted in a greater cell number on the scaffold surface compared with low-concentration cell seeding after a 5-day culture (Palginate hydrogel scaffolds prepared by 3D bioprinting has a good biocompatibility and promotes the proliferation of HDPCs, and can be used as a scaffold material for tooth regeneration. Cell seeding at a high concentration can better promote cell adhesion to the scaffold material.

  3. Scalable and continuous fabrication of bio-inspired dry adhesives with a thermosetting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Sung Woo; Kang, Bong Su; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kwak, Moon Kyu

    2018-04-04

    Many research groups have developed unique micro/nano-structured dry adhesives by mimicking the foot of the gecko with the use of molding methods. Through these previous works, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been developed and become the most commonly used material for making artificial dry adhesives. The material properties of PDMS are well suited for making dry adhesives, such as conformal contacts with almost zero preload, low elastic moduli for stickiness, and easy cleaning with low surface energy. From a performance point of view, dry adhesives made with PDMS can be highly advantageous but are limited by its low productivity, as production takes an average of approximately two hours. Given the low productivity of PDMS, some research groups have developed dry adhesives using UV-curable materials, which are capable of continuous roll-to-roll production processes. However, UV-curable materials were too rigid to produce good adhesion. Thus, we established a PDMS continuous-production system to achieve good productivity and adhesion performance. We designed a thermal roll-imprinting lithography (TRL) system for the continuous production of PDMS microstructures by shortening the curing time by controlling the curing temperature (the production speed is up to 150 mm min-1). Dry adhesives composed of PDMS were fabricated continuously via the TRL system.

  4. Evaluation of the adhesive layer of blast tube by using ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Soo; Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Young H.; Cho, Hyun [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soo Yong; Yun, Nam Gyun [Agency Defence Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Ki [Korea Inspection and Engineering Co., LTD, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Joo [Hankuk Fiber Co., LTD, Milyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Ultrasonic testing method has been developed to evaluated adhesive layers in blast tube for the reliability of the rocket. The main objective of the present work was to find debonding and uncharged state between steel and FRP layers. We distinguish the debonding and uncharged state using the resonance method in the adhesive layers. It was found that the higher magnitude of ultrasound is reflected for the uncharged area in frequency domain, and shown good agreements with experimental results. The traditional ultrasonic pulse-echo method offers good implements for the distinction debonding area. The nondestructive testing results were compared with the micrography of destructive testing. As results, ultrasonic testing could be utilized for the evaluation of adhesive layer in the blast tube.

  5. Bio-inspired reversible underwater adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhua; Wu, Yang; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Manman; Chen, Xuan; Liu, Minjie; Fan, Jun; Liu, Junqiu; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Zuankai

    2017-12-20

    The design of smart surfaces with switchable adhesive properties in a wet environment has remained a challenge in adhesion science and materials engineering. Despite intense demands in various industrial applications and exciting progress in mimicking the remarkable wet adhesion through the delicate control of catechol chemistry, polyelectrolyte complex, and supramolecular architectures, the full recapitulation of nature's dynamic function is limited. Here, we show a facile approach to synthesize bioinspired adhesive, which entails the reversible, tunable, and fast regulation of the wet adhesion on diverse surfaces. The smart wet adhesive takes advantage of the host-guest molecular interaction and the adhesive nature of catechol chemistry, as well as the responsive polymer, allowing for screening and activation of the interfacial interaction simply by a local temperature trigger in an on-demand manner. Our work opens up an avenue for the rational design of bioinspired adhesives with performances even beyond nature.

  6. A novel injectable tissue adhesive based on oxidized dextran and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Biji; Soman, Dawlee; Payanam, Umashanker; Laurent, Alexandre; Labarre, Denis; Jayakrishnan, Athipettah

    2017-04-15

    A surgical adhesive that can be used in different surgical situations with or without sutures is a surgeons' dream and yet none has been able to fulfill many such demanding requirements. It was therefore a major challenge to develop an adhesive biomaterial that stops bleeding and bond tissues well, which at the same time is non-toxic, biocompatible and yet biodegradable, economically viable and appealing to the surgeon in terms of the simplicity of application in complex surgical situations. With this aim, we developed an in situ setting adhesive based on biopolymers such as chitosan and dextran. Dextran was oxidized using periodate to generate aldehyde functions on the biopolymer and then reacted with chitosan hydrochloride. Gelation occurred instantaneously upon mixing these components and the resulting gel showed good tissue adhesive properties with negligible cytotoxicity and minimal swelling in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Rheology analysis confirmed the gelation process by demonstrating storage modulus having value higher than loss modulus. Adhesive strength was in the range 200-400gf/cm 2 which is about 4-5 times more than that of fibrin glue at comparable setting times. The adhesive showed burst strength in the range of 400-410mm of Hg which should make the same suitable as a sealant for controlling bleeding in many surgical situations even at high blood pressure. Efficacy of the adhesive as a hemostat was demonstrated in a rabbit liver injury model. Histological features after two weeks were comparable to that of commercially available BioGlue®. The adhesive also demonstrated its efficacy as a drug delivery vehicle. The present adhesive could function without the many toxicity and biocompatibility issues associated with such products. Though there are many tissue adhesives available in market, none are free of shortcomings. The newly developed surgical adhesive is a 2-component adhesive system based on time-tested, naturally occurring polysaccharides

  7. Influence of Application Time and Etching Mode of Universal Adhesives on Enamel Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Keiichi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Ishii, Ryo; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the influence of application time and etching mode of universal adhesives on enamel adhesion. Five universal adhesives, Adhese Universal, Bondmer Lightless, Clearfil Universal Bond Quick, G-Premio Bond, and Scotchbond Universal, were used. Bovine incisors were prepared and divided into four groups of ten teeth each. SBS, Ra, and SFE were determined after the following procedures: 1. self-etch mode with immediate air blowing after application (IA); 2. self-etch mode with prolonged application time (PA); 3. etch-and-rinse mode with IA; 4. etch-and-rinse mode with PA. After 24-h water storage, the bonded assemblies were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) tests. For surface roughness (Ra) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements, the adhesives were simply applied to the enamel and rinsed with acetone and water before the measurements were carried out. Significantly higher SBS and Ra values were obtained with etch-and-rinse mode than with self-etch mode regardless of the application time or type of adhesive. Although most adhesives showed decreased SFE values with increased application time in self-etch mode, SFE values in etch-and-rinse mode were dependent on the adhesive type and application time. Etching mode, application time, and type of adhesive significantly influenced the SBS, Ra, and SFE values.

  8. Protein Modifiers Generally Provide Limited Improvement in Wood Bond Strength of Soy Flour Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Soy flour adhesives using a polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE) polymeric coreactant are used increasingly as wood adhesives for interior products. Although these adhesives give good performance, higher bond strength under wet conditions is desirable. Wet strength is important for accelerated tests involving the internal forces generated by the swelling of wood and...

  9. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  10. ADHESION OF BIOCOMPATIBLE TiNb COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kolegar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of a coating with a high quality requires good adhesion of the film to the substrate. The paper deals with the adhesion of biocompatible TiNb coating with different base materials. Several materials such as titanium CP grade 2, titanium alloys Ti6Al4V and stainless steel AISI 316L were measured. Testing samples were made in the shape of small discs. Those samples were coated with a TiNb layer by using the PVD method (magnetron sputtering. Onto the measured layer of TiNb an assistant cylinder was stuck using a high strength epoxy adhesive E1100S. The sample with the assistant cylinder was fixed into a special fixture and the whole assembly underwent pull-off testing for adhesion. The main result of this experiment was determining the strength needed to peel the layer and morphology and size of the breakaway. As a result, we will be able to determine the best base material and conditions where the coating will be remain intact with the base material.

  11. Tuning adhesion forces between functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles and silicon AFM tips: role of ligands and capillary forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oras, Sven; Vlassov, Sergei; Berholts, Marta; Lõhmus, Rünno; Mougin, Karine

    2018-01-01

    Adhesion forces between functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles (Au NPs) and scanning probe microscope silicon tips were experimentally investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with PeakForce QNM (Quantitative Nanoscale Mechanics) module. Au NPs were synthesized by a seed-mediated process and then functionalized with thiols containing different functional groups: amino, hydroxy, methoxy, carboxy, methyl, and thiol. Adhesion measurements showed strong differences between NPs and silicon tip depending on the nature of the tail functional group. The dependence of the adhesion on ligand density for different thiols with identical functional tail-group was also demonstrated. The calculated contribution of the van der Waals (vdW) forces between particles was in good agreement with experimentally measured adhesive values. In addition, the adhesion forces were evaluated between flat Au films functionalized with the same molecular components and silicon tips to exclude the effect of particle shape on the adhesion values. Although adhesion values on flat substrates were higher than on their nanoparticle counterparts, the dependance on functional groups remained the same.

  12. Measuring Rock-Fluid Adhesion Directly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, R.

    2017-12-01

    We show how to measure directly solid-liquid adhesion. We consider the normal adhesion, the work adhesion, and the lateral adhesion. The technique at the center of the method is Centrifugal Adhesion Balance (CAB) which allows coordinated manipulation of normal and lateral forces. For example: 1. It allows to induce an increase in the normal force which pulls on a liquid drop while keeping zero lateral force. This method mimics a drop that is subjected to a gravitational force that is gradually increasing. 2. It allows to increase the lateral force at zero normal force, mimicking zero gravity. From this one can obtain additional solid-liquid interaction parameters. When performing work of adhesion measurements, the values obtained are independent of drop size and are in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  13. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  14. Physico-mechanical properties of plywood bonded with ecological adhesives from Acacia mollissima tannins and lignosulfonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhazi, Naima; Oumam, Mina; Sesbou, Abdessadek; Hannache, Hassan; Charrier-El Bouhtoury, Fatima

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this research was to develop ecological adhesives for bonding plywood panels using lignosulfonates, a common waste product of the wood pulp industry, and natural tannin extracted from Moroccan bark of Acacia mollissima using different process. Natural tannin and lignin were used in wood adhesives formulation to substitute resins based on phenol and formaldehyde. To achieve this, the lignosulfonates were glyoxalated to enhance their reactivity and the used tannins obtained by three different extraction methods were compared with commercial mimosa tannin. The proportion of Acacia mollissima tannins and lignosulfonates, the pressing time, the pressing temperature, and the pressure used were studied to improve mechanical properties, and bonding quality of plywood panel. The properties of plywood panels produced with these adhesives were tested in accordance with normative tests. Thus, the tensile strength, and the shear strength were measured. The results showed that the performance of the plywood panels made using biobased tannin adhesives was influenced by physical conditions such as pressure, press temperature as well as by chemical conditions, such as the tannin-lignin ratio. It exhibited excellent mechanical properties comparable to commercially available phenol-formaldehyde plywood adhesives. This study showed that biobased adhesives formulations presented good and higher mechanical performance and no formaldehyde emission. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy harvesting, conversion and storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  15. Wood : adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  16. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Palacios-Alquisira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA‑MMA‑EA and (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives.

  17. Rheology and adhesion of poly(acrylic acid)/laponite nanocomposite hydrogels as biocompatible adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Muxian; Li, Li; Sun, Yimin; Xu, Jun; Guo, Xuhong; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2014-02-18

    Biocompatible nanocomposite hydrogels (NC gels) consisting of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and nanosized clay (Laponite) were successfully synthesized by in situ free-radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) in aqueous solutions of Laponite. The obtained NC gels were uniform and transparent. Their viscosity, storage modulus G', and loss modulus G″ increased significantly upon increasing the content of Laponite and the dose of AA, while exhibiting a maximum with increasing the neutralization degree of AA. They showed tunable adhesion by changing the dose of Laponite and monomer as well as the neutralization degree of AA, as determined by 180° peel strength measurement. The maximal adhesion was shown when reaching a balance between cohesion and fluidity. A homemade Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) instrument was employed to study the surface adhesion behavior of the NC gels. The combination of peel strength, rheology, and JKR measurements offers the opportunity of insight into the mechanism of adhesion of hydrogels. The NC gels with tunable adhesion should be ideal candidates for dental adhesive, wound dressing, and tissue engineering.

  18. Nanoscale E-Cadherin ligand patterns show threshold size for cellular adhesion and adherence junction formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine H; Pedersen, Gitte Albinus; Nejsum, Lene Niemann

    2012-01-01

    The role of ligand spatial distribution on the formation of cadherin mediated cell-cell contacts is studied utilizing nanopatterns of E-cadherin ligands. Protein patches ranging in size from 100 nm to 800 nm prepared by colloidal lithography critically influence adhesion, spreading and formation ...

  19. Do uniform tangential interfacial stresses enhance adhesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menga, Nicola; Carbone, Giuseppe; Dini, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    We present theoretical arguments, based on linear elasticity and thermodynamics, to show that interfacial tangential stresses in sliding adhesive soft contacts may lead to a significant increase of the effective energy of adhesion. A sizable expansion of the contact area is predicted in conditions corresponding to such scenario. These results are easily explained and are valid under the assumptions that: (i) sliding at the interface does not lead to any loss of adhesive interaction and (ii) spatial fluctuations of frictional stresses can be considered negligible. Our results are seemingly supported by existing experiments, and show that frictional stresses may lead to an increase of the effective energy of adhesion depending on which conditions are established at the interface of contacting bodies in the presence of adhesive forces.

  20. Micromorphological characterization of adhesive interface of sound dentin and total-etch and self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobac, Milan; Stojanac, Igor; Ramić, Bojana; Premović, Milica; Petrović, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal in restorative dentistry has always been to achieve strong and permanent bond between the dental tissues and filling materials. It is not easy to achieve this task because the bonding process is different for enamel and dentin-dentin is more humid and more organic than enamel. It is moisture and organic nature of dentin that make this hard tissue very complex to achieve adhesive bond. One of the first and most widely used tools for examining the adhesive bond between hard dental tissues and composite restorative materials is scanning electron microscopy. The aim of this study was scanning electron microscopy analyzes the interfacial micro morphology of total-etch and self-etch adhesives. Micro morphological characteristics of interface between total-etch adhesive (Prime & Bond NT) in combination with the corresponding composite (Ceram X Mono) were compared with those of self-etching adhesive (AdheSE One) in, combination with the corresponding composite (Tetric EvoCeram). The specimens were observed under 1000 x magnification of scanning electron microscopy (JEOL, JSM-6460 Low Vacuum). Measurement of the thickness of the hybrid layer of the examined com posite systems was performed with the software of the device used (NIH Image Analyser). Micromorphological analysis of interface showed that the hybrid layer in sound dentin was well formed, its average thickness being 2.68 microm, with a large number of resin tags and a large amount of lateral branches for specimens with a composite system Prime & Bond NT-Ceram X Mono. However, the specimens' with composite systems Adhese One-Tetric EvoCeram did not show the presence of hybrid layer and the resin tags were poorly represented. The results of this study suggest that total-etch adhesives bond better with sound dentin than self-etch adhesive.

  1. Gastrin-releasing peptide induces monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium by upregulating endothelial adhesion molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Yeon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a neuropeptide that plays roles in various pathophysiological conditions including inflammatory diseases in peripheral tissues; however, little is known about whether GRP can directly regulate endothelial inflammatory processes. In this study, we showed that GRP promotes the adhesion of leukocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the aortic endothelium. GRP increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by activating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in endothelial cells. In addition, GRP activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38MAPK, and AKT, and the inhibition of these signaling pathways significantly reduced GRP-induced monocyte adhesion to the endothelium. Overall, our results suggested that GRP may cause endothelial dysfunction, which could be of particular relevance in the development of vascular inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • GRP induces adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium. • GRP increases the expression of endothelial adhesion molecules through the activation of NF-κB. • ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and Akt pathways are involved in the GRP-induced leukocyte adhesiveness to endothelium.

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on properties of acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panta, P.P.; Zimek, Z.A.; Giuszewski, W.; Kowalewski, R.; Wojtynska, E.; Wnuk, A.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives for technical application are widely produced. The biological properties of adhesives depend on the type of monomers used. The available literature data as experience of the authors of this study in the area of pressure-sensitive acrylic adhesive, polymers used in medicine, polymerisation in aqueous media, radiation sterilization, permit to make an assumption that it is possible to elaborate the technology of production of pressure-sensitive adhesives in aqueous emulsion for medical applications. Identification of phenomena influencing the adhesive properties, especially its adhesion, cohesion, tack and durability is of great importance. The control of polymer structure is performed by means of adequate selection of conditions of synthesis and parameters of radiation processing. The authors investigate the influence on the final products of such factors as the type and amount of monomers used, their mutual ratio, as well as the ratio monomers and the dose of ionising radiation. There is no available literature information concerning the investigation of resistance of acrylic emulsion adhesive to sterilisation by electron beam. It is known from unpublished research that some adhesives are resistant to radiation, while others undergo destruction. It probably depends on the composition of emulsion, specifically on the additives which modify adhesives. Simultaneous achievement of good cohesion and adhesion in the case of such types of pressure sensitive adhesives is very difficult pressure sensitive adhesives is very difficult

  3. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  4. Long-term In Vitro Adhesion of Polyalkenoate-based Adhesives to Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezinando, Ana; Perdigão, Jorge; Ceballos, Laura

    2017-01-01

    To study the influence of a polyalkenoate copolymer (VCP) on the immediate (24 h) and 6-month dentin bonding stability of VCP-based adhesives, using microtensile bond strength (μTBS), nanoleakage (NL), and ultramorphological analyses (FE-SEM). Eighty-four caries-free molars were randomly assigned to seven adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray Noritake); Adper Single Bond Plus (SB, 3M ESPE); SB without VCP (SBnoVCP, 3M ESPE); Scotchbond Universal Adhesive applied as a etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBU_ER); SBU without VCP applied as an etch-and-rinse adhesive (SBUnoVCP_ER); SBU applied as a self-etch adhesive (SBU_SE, 3M ESPE); SBU without VCP applied as a self-etch adhesive (SBUnoVCP_SE, 3M ESPE). Half of the beams were tested after 24 h, and the other half was aged in water for 6 months prior to testing. For each tooth/evaluation time, two beams were randomly selected for NL analysis. Statistical analyses of µTBS results were performed using two-way ANOVA, Tukey's post-hoc tests, and Student's t-test for paired data (α = 0.05). Nanoleakage was statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, with Wilcoxon's test for paired data. For FE-SEM, four caries-free molars were assigned to each of the seven groups. Dentin disks were restored and cross sectioned into halves. One half was observed at 24 h, and the other at 6 months. The highest 6-month mean μTBS was obtained with SBU_SE/SBUnoVCP_SE and SBUnoVCP_ER. SBUnoVCP_SE resulted in greater silver deposition at 6 months. FE-SEM observations showed that CSE and SBU_SE specimens resulted in a submicron hybrid layer without signs of degradation at 6 months. VCP may contribute to the long-term bonding stability of VCP-based adhesives.

  5. Structural Insights into Ail-Mediated Adhesion in Yersinia pestis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Felek, Suleyman; Tsang, Tiffany M.; Krukonis, Eric S.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Buchanan, Susan K. (Michigan); (NIH); (Michigan-Med)

    2012-01-30

    Ail is an outer membrane protein from Yersinia pestis that is highly expressed in a rodent model of bubonic plague, making it a good candidate for vaccine development. Ail is important for attaching to host cells and evading host immune responses, facilitating rapid progression of a plague infection. Binding to host cells is important for injection of cytotoxic Yersinia outer proteins. To learn more about how Ail mediates adhesion, we solved two high-resolution crystal structures of Ail, with no ligand bound and in complex with a heparin analog called sucrose octasulfate. We identified multiple adhesion targets, including laminin and heparin, and showed that a 40 kDa domain of laminin called LG4-5 specifically binds to Ail. We also evaluated the contribution of laminin to delivery of Yops to HEp-2 cells. This work constitutes a structural description of how a bacterial outer membrane protein uses a multivalent approach to bind host cells.

  6. Diffusion barrier and adhesion properties of SiO(x)N(y) and SiO(x) layers between Ag/polypyrrole composites and Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2014-06-25

    This paper describes the interface reactions and diffusion between silver/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite and silicon substrate. This composite material can be used as a novel technique for 3D-LSI (large-scale integration) by the fast infilling of through-silicon vias (TSV). By immersion of the silicon wafer with via holes into the dispersed solution of Ag/PPy composite, the holes are filled with the composite. It is important to develop a layer between the composite and the Si substrate with good diffusion barrier and adhesion characteristics. In this paper, SiOx and two types of SiOxNy barrier layers with various thicknesses were investigated. The interface structure between the Si substrate, the barrier, and the Ag/PPy composite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The adhesion and diffusion properties of the layers were established for Ag/PPy composite. Increasing thickness of SiOx proved to permit less Ag to transport into the Si substrate. SiOxNy barrier layers showed very good diffusion barrier characteristics; however, their adhesion depended strongly on their composition. A barrier layer composition with good adhesion and Ag barrier properties has been identified in this paper. These results are useful for filling conductive metal/polymer composites into TSV.

  7. Biocompatibility of a novel cyanoacrylate based tissue adhesive: cytotoxicity and biochemical property evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ju Lee

    Full Text Available Cyanoacrylate (CA is most widely used as a medical and commercial tissue adhesive because of easier wound closure, good cosmetic results and little discomfort. But, CA-based tissue adhesives have some limitations including the release of cytotoxic chemicals during biodegradation. In previous study, we made prepolymerized allyl 2-CA (PACA based tissue adhesive, resulting in longer chain structure. In this study, we investigated a biocompatibility of PACA as alternative tissue adhesive for medical application, comparing with that of Dermabond® as commercial tissue adhesive. The biocompatibility of PACA was evaluated for short-term (24 hr and long-term (3 and 7 days using conventional cytotoxicity (WST, neutral red, LIVE/DEAD and TUNEL assays, hematoxylin-eosin (H&E and Masson trichrome (MT staining. Besides we examined the biochemical changes in cells and DNA induced by PACA and Dermabond® utilizing Raman spectroscopy which could observe the denaturation and conformational changes in protein, as well as disintegration of the DNA/RNA by cell death. In particular, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical methods including principal component analysis (PCA and support vector machine (SVM. As a result, PACA and Dermabond® tissue adhesive treated cells and tissues showed no difference of the cell viability values, histological analysis and Raman spectral intensity. Also, the classification analysis by means of PCA-SVM classifier could not discriminate the difference between the PACA and Dermabond® treated cells and DNA. Therefore we suggest that novel PACA might be useful as potential tissue adhesive with effective biocompatibility.

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of adhesive joints by C-scan ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeighami, Mehdi; Honarvar, Farhang

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of adhesive bonding is an important issue in many industries who incorporate adhesive joints in their products. Over the past few decades, numerous acoustical techniques have been developed for nondestructive testing (NDT) of adhesively bonded joints. Among these techniques, the ultrasonic pulse-echo method is the most promising means for inspection of adhesive bonds. In practice, due to low impedance matching between adhesive and metal, the discrimination of a good bond from a bad bond is difficult. The low impedance matching also results in low contrast between perfect and disbanded zone in a C-scan image. In this paper, the quality of the interface between aluminum and epoxy is investigated by using an in-house built ultrasonic C-scan system. Two adhesion indices are proposed for producing C-scan images. To verify the capability of these indices, an adhesively bonded sample was fabricated using aluminum plates and epoxy. An artificial defect was implanted in the first interface of the specimens. The C-scan measurement prepared based on the proposed indices was able to reveal the defect much better than the C-scan image prepared by conventional approach. (author)

  9. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  10. Functionally Graded Adhesives for Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives with functionally graded material properties are being considered for use in adhesively bonded joints to reduce the peel stress concentrations located near adherend discontinuities. Several practical concerns impede the actual use of such adhesives. These include increased manufacturing complications, alterations to the grading due to adhesive flow during manufacturing, and whether changing the loading conditions significantly impact the effectiveness of the grading. An analytical study is conducted to address these three concerns. An enhanced joint finite element, which uses an analytical formulation to obtain exact shape functions, is used to model the joint. Furthermore, proof of concept testing is conducted to show the potential advantages of functionally graded adhesives. In this study, grading is achieved by strategically placing glass beads within the adhesive layer at different densities along the joint.

  11. Shear bond strength of hydrophilic adhesive systems to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, A T; Amaral, C M; Pimenta, L A; Sinhoreti, M A

    1999-08-01

    To compare the enamel shear bond strength of four hydrophilic adhesive systems: one multiple-bottle (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus), two one-bottle (Stae, Single Bond) and one self-etching (Etch & Prime). 120 bovine incisor teeth were obtained, embedded in polyester resin, polished to 600 grit to form standardized enamel surfaces, and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 30). Each adhesive system was used on enamel according to the manufacturer's instructions, and resin-based composite (Z100) cylinders with 3 mm diameter and 5 mm height were bonded. Specimens were stored in humid environment for 1 week, and bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The mean shear bond strength values (MPa +/- SD) were: Single Bond: 24.28 +/- 5.27 (a); Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus: 21.18 +/- 4.35 (ab); Stae: 19.56 +/- 4.71 (b); Etch & Prime 3.0: 15.13 +/- 4.92 (c). ANOVA revealed significant difference in means (P < 0.01) and Tukey's test showed the statistical differences that are expressed by different letters for each group. It could be concluded that the self-etching adhesive system did not provide as good a bond to enamel surface, as did the one- and multiple-bottle systems.

  12. Comparison of enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives in self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Hosoya, Yumiko; Nojiri, Kie; Nagura, Yuko; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-10-01

    To comparatively evaluate universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives for enamel bond fatigue durability in self-etch mode. Three universal adhesives (Clearfil Universal Bond; G-Premio Bond; Scotchbond Universal Adhesive) and three two-step self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond; Clearfil SE Bond 2; OptiBond XTR) were used. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of the adhesive to enamel in self-etch mode were determined. The initial shear bond strengths of the universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode was significantly lower than those of two-step self-etch adhesives and initial shear bond strengths were not influenced by type of adhesive in each adhesive category. The shear fatigue strengths of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode were significantly lower than that of Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil SE Bond 2, but similar to that OptiBond XTR. Unlike two-step self-etch adhesives, the initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives to enamel in self-etch mode was not influenced by the type of adhesive. This laboratory study showed that the enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives was lower than Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil SE Bond 2, similar to Optibond XTR, and was not influenced by type of adhesive, unlike two-step self-etch adhesives.

  13. Behavior of adhesion forces of silicone adhesive sealants and mastic butyl under the influence of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Wanderley da

    2012-01-01

    Adhesives are products that can keep materials together by bonds between the surfaces. Sealants are products that can keep filled a space between two surfaces, through a barrier that is configured as a 'bridge' between the two surfaces. The mastic is a product made of a mixture of substances with the primary butyl polymer, with the consistency of a mass not dried that can be used as a sealant. The polysiloxane, also known as silicone are the most important synthetic polymers with inorganic structure, and are matrices of silicone adhesive sealants. To demonstrate the behavior of the adhesive forces of these products under different conditions, we used five different techniques. These products were subjected to two different conditions to verify the behavior of adhesion, one at the environmental condition and another under the ionizing radiation. The results showed not only differences between products (silicone and mastic), but also that the adhesive forces have different behaviors under the conditions which the samples were subjected. With this was reached the goal of this study that aspired show the differences between the mastic and silicone, this last one is often considered - erroneously - the same as mastic. Thus it was proven that: 1. silicone can be regarded as an adhesive and a sealant at ambient conditions, 2. mastic improves substantially adhesion in an environment of ionizing radiation and this property can be an excellent alternative to the adhesive market. (author)

  14. Adhesion between coating layers based on epoxy and silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jacob R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The adhesion between a silicon tie-coat and epoxy primers, used in marine coating systems, has been studied in this work. Six epoxy coatings (with varying chain lengths of the epoxy resins), some of which have shown problems with adhesion to the tie-coat during service life, have been considered....... The experimental investigation includes measurements of the surface tension of the tie-coat and the critical surface tensions of the epoxies, topographic investigation of the surfaces of cured epoxy coatings via atomic force microscopy (AFM), and pull-off tests for investigating the strength of adhesion...... to the silicon/epoxy systems. Calculations for determining the roughness factor of the six epoxy coatings (based on the AFM topographies) and the theoretical work of adhesion have been carried out. The coating surfaces are also characterized based on the van Oss-Good theory. Previous studies on the modulus...

  15. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  16. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Adhesion URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001493.htm Adhesion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Adhesions are bands of scar-like tissue that form between two ...

  17. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meli, E.; Ridolfi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  18. An innovative wheel–rail contact model for railway vehicles under degraded adhesion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meli, E., E-mail: enrico.meli@unifi.it; Ridolfi, A., E-mail: a.ridolfi@unifi.it [University of Florence, Department of Industrial Engineering (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    The accurate modelling of the wheel–rail contact plays a fundamental role in the railway field since the contact forces heavily affect the vehicle dynamics, the wear of the contact surfaces and the vehicle safety. Concerning the wheel–rail contact, an important open problem is represented by the degraded adhesion. A realistic adhesion model is quite difficult to obtain because of the complex and highly non-linear behaviour of the adhesion coefficient and the presence of external unknown contaminants (the third body); this is especially true when degraded adhesion and large sliding between the wheel and rail contact surfaces occur.In this work the authors present an adhesion model particularly developed to describe degraded adhesion conditions. The new approach will have to be suitable to be employed within the wheel–rail contact models typical of the multibody applications. In other words, the contact model, comprising the new adhesion model, will have to guarantee a good accuracy and, at the same time, a high numerical efficiency to be implemented directly online inside the general multibody model of the vehicles (e.g. in Matlab-Simulink or Simpack environments) ( www.mathworks.com http://www.mathworks.com , 2012; www.simpack.com http://www.simpack.com , 2012).The model analysed in the paper is based on some of the main phenomena characterising the degraded adhesion, such as large sliding at the contact interface, high energy dissipation, the consequent cleaning effect on the contact surfaces and the final adhesion recovery due to the removal of external unknown contaminants.The adhesion model has been validated because of the experimental data provided by Trenitalia S.p.A. coming from on-track tests performed in Velim (Czech Republic). The tests have been carried out on a straight railway track under degraded adhesion conditions with the railway vehicle UIC-Z1 equipped with a fully-working Wheel Slide Protection (WSP) system.The validation highlighted the

  19. Performance of adhesives base on PU, Epoxy and silane in the Kevlar/alumina interface; Desempenho de adesivos a base de PU, epoxi e silano na interface Kevlar/alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, K.F.; Melo, F.C.L.; Lopes, C.M.A. [Divisao de Materiais, Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Divisao de Engenharia Mecanica-Aeronautica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: cmoniz@iae.cta.br

    2010-07-01

    Hybrid ceramic/polymer composites are used for ballistic protection due to the good high-velocity impact absorption properties. The choice of the proper adhesive used to bond ceramic and polymer layers is one of the major issues for hybrid armor development due to its influence in the ballistic resistance behaviour. This work presents an adhesion study in composites of aramid textile (Kevlar) and alumina. Adhesives of different chemical nature, based on polyurethane, epoxy and silane were evaluated. T-Peel test was performed for the interface characterization and the post- failure surfaces were examined by optical microscopy. In all samples the failure occurred at the interface. The silane-based adhesive showed no interaction with the polymer, while the PU hot melt adhesive presented the highest adhesion strengths. (author)

  20. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-04

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  1. Determination of adhesion forces between smooth and structured solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Hartmut R.; Gelinck, Edwin R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Extension of know data with respect to decency of adhesion from probe radius to 8 decades. ► Use of large interaction surface areas for precision measurement of adhesion forces. ► Deliberated increase of roughness as tool to tune adhesion forces and to suppress spontaneous adhesion. - Abstract: Surfaces tend to be made smoother in order to gain flatness or in order to fulfill the need for more precise and reproducible positioning of parts. Adhesion or even sticking of the surfaces is a major showstopper for these applications. There are several measures that can be taken in order to reduce spontaneous adhesion. Quantification of the effectiveness of the chosen solution is most often done using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with probes varying from 1 nm to 8 μm of contact diameter. A serious disadvantage in measuring adhesion by sharp tips is the wear of the tips. Sharp tips wear easily, resulting in undefined contact areas. When the real area of contact is not well defined, the quantification of the adhesion force is not significant. In the current study results of AFM measurements from literature with different tip diameters of colloidal probes are compared with AFM cantilevers with a plateau tip and using probes from large spheres using an alternative setup in combination with a Universal Nano-mechanical Analyzer (UNAT). Test results are shown. Another part of the study deals with a deliberately roughening of smooth surfaces to minimize (spontaneous) adhesion. Good agreement has been found with existing results.

  2. Study on the production of kanvas shoes adhesive from natural rubber latex grafted with methyl methacrylate (NRL-g PMMA) copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utama, Marga; Sudirman; Setyowati, Penny

    2002-01-01

    The optimation condition of radiation copolymerization of MMA into natural rubber latex at the doses of radiation : 5; 7.5 and 10 kGy with concentration of MMA 25; 50; 75; and 100 phr (Part Hundred Ratio of Rubber) expectially and optimazation condition of the adhesive process all the production of canvas shoes have been carried out. The properties of NRL-g-MMA and its rubber such as total solid contain, viscosity, pH, modulus, tensile, strenght, hardnes, elongation at break, and adhesive strenght for producting canvas shoes where evaluated. The at adhesive results show that NRL-g-MMA with the 75 phr of MMA and iradiation dose 5 kGy is adhesive will good stability during storage. The adhesive strenght of shoes its 16-18 N/6mm, more here than SNI 1-0172-1987 with the value 10N/6mm. Besic there is a tendency that adhesive strengt of product shoes at rome temperature (30-50 o C). stronger than at high temperature (100 o C)

  3. Comparison of enamel bond fatigue durability between universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives: Effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Shunichi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Nojiri, Kie; Nagura, Yuko; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-03-30

    The effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching on enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives was investigated. Four universal adhesives and three two-step self-etch adhesives were used. The initial shear bond strengths and shear fatigue strengths to enamel with and without phosphoric acid pre-etching using the adhesives were determined. SEM observations were also conducted. Phosphoric acid pre-etching of enamel was found to increase the bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives, but its effect on two-step self-etch adhesives was material-dependent. In addition, some universal adhesives with phosphoric acid pre-etching showed similar bond fatigue durability to the two-step self-etch adhesives, although the bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives in self-etch mode was lower than that of the two-step self-etch adhesives. Phosphoric acid pre-etching enhances enamel bond fatigue durability of universal adhesives, but the effect of phosphoric acid pre-etching on the bond fatigue durability of two-step self-etch adhesives was material-dependent.

  4. Effects of Thermal and Humidity Aging on the Interfacial Adhesion of Polyketone Fiber Reinforced Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ki Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyketone fiber is considered as a reinforcement of the mechanical rubber goods (MRG such as tires, automobile hoses, and belts because of its high strength and modulus. In order to apply it to those purposes, the high adhesion of fiber/rubber interface and good sustainability to aging conditions are very important. In this study, polyketone fiber reinforced natural rubber composites were prepared and they were subjected to thermal and humidity aging, to assess the changes of the interfacial adhesion and material properties. Also, the effect of adhesive primer treatment, based on the resorcinol formaldehyde resin and latex (RFL, of polyketone fiber for high interfacial adhesion was evaluated. Morphological and property changes of the rubber composites were analyzed by using various instrumental analyses. As a result, the rubber composite was aged largely by thermal aging at high temperature rather than humidity aging condition. Interfacial adhesion of the polyketone/NR composites was improved by the primer treatment and its effect was maintained in aging conditions.

  5. Adhesion and multi-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.

    1997-01-01

    Adhesion is a multidisciplinary science relevant to many practical fields. The main application of adhesion is bonding by adhesives. This technique is widely used in the industrial world and more specifically in the advanced technical domains. Adhesion is also involved in multi-component materials such as coatings, multilayer materials, polymer blends, composite materials... The multidisciplinary aspect of adhesion is well demonstrated by considering the wide variety of concepts, models and theories proposed for its description. An example of the adhesion between a fiber and a matrix in a composite material will lead to a general model relating the molecular properties of the interface to its capacity of stress transfer and hence to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the composite. This relationship is valid whatever the fiber (glass, carbon, polymeric) or the polymer matrix (thermoplastics, thermosetting). Any deviation from this model can be attributed to the existence of an interfacial zone or interphase exhibiting properties, mainly mechanical properties, different from the bulk matrix. Two examples are examined: the first one deals with the creation of a trans crystalline interphase in a semi-crystalline thermoplastic matrix and the second one is concerned with the formation of a pseudo glassy interphase in an elastomer matrix. These examples stress the need for complementary approaches in the understanding of adhesion phenomena at different levels of knowledge, from molecular to macroscopic. They also show how important it is to understand the mechanisms of formation of inter phases in order to be able to master the performance of multicomponent materials. (Author)

  6. Flotillins Regulate Focal Adhesions by Interacting with α-Actinin and by Influencing the Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Banning

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell–matrix adhesion and cell migration are physiologically important processes that also play a major role in cancer spreading. In cultured cells, matrix adhesion depends on integrin-containing contacts such as focal adhesions. Flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are frequently overexpressed in cancers and are associated with poor survival. Our previous studies have revealed a role for flotillin-2 in cell–matrix adhesion and in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We here show that flotillins are important for cell migration in a wound healing assay and influence the morphology and dynamics of focal adhesions. Furthermore, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar is enhanced by flotillins. In the absence of flotillins, especially flotillin-2, phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and extracellularly regulated kinase is diminished. Flotillins interact with α-actinin, a major regulator of focal adhesion dynamics. These findings are important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of how flotillin overexpression in cancers may affect cell migration and, especially, enhance metastasis formation.

  7. Adhesion in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2014-01-01

    This comprehensive book will provide both fundamental and applied aspects of adhesion pertaining to microelectronics in a single and easily accessible source. Among the topics to be covered include; Various theories or mechanisms of adhesionSurface (physical or chemical) characterization of materials as it pertains to adhesionSurface cleaning as it pertains to adhesionWays to improve adhesionUnraveling of interfacial interactions using an array of pertinent techniquesCharacterization of interfaces / interphasesPolymer-polymer adhesionMetal-polymer adhesion  (metallized polymers)Polymer adhesi

  8. Adhesion science

    CERN Document Server

    Comyn, John

    1997-01-01

    The use of adhesives is widespread and growing, and there are few modern artefacts, from the simple cereal packet, to the jumbo jet, that are without this means of joining. Adhesion Science provides an illuminating account of the science underlying the use of adhesives, a branch of chemical technology which is fundamental to the science of coatings and composite materials and to the performance of all types of bonded structures. This book guides the reader through the essential basic polymer science, and the chemistry of adhesives in use at present. It discusses surface preparation for adhesive bonding, and the use of primers and coupling agents. There is a detailed chapter on contact angles and what can be predicted from them. A simple guide on stress distribution joints and how this relates to testing is included. It also examines the interaction of adhesives and the environment, including an analysis of the resistance of joints to water, oxygen and ultra-violet light. Adhesion Science provides a comprehens...

  9. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, B Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-10-19

    Despite the recent progress in and demand for wet adhesives, practical underwater adhesion remains limited or non-existent for diverse applications. Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require optimization and stabilization. Here we reduced the complexity of a wet adhesive primer to synthetic low-molecular-weight catecholic zwitterionic surfactants that show very strong adhesion (∼50 mJ m(-2)) and retain the ability to coacervate. This catecholic zwitterion adheres to diverse surfaces and self-assembles into a molecularly smooth, thin (adhesive for nanofabrication. This study significantly simplifies bio-inspired themes for wet adhesion by combining catechol with hydrophobic and electrostatic functional groups in a small molecule.

  10. Indentation versus Rolling: Dependence of Adhesion on Contact Geometry for Biomimetic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Nichole; He, Zhenping; Wu, Haibin; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2018-04-03

    Numerous biomimetic structures made from elastomeric materials have been developed to produce enhancement in properties such as adhesion, static friction, and sliding friction. As a property, one expects adhesion to be represented by an energy per unit area that is usually sensitive to the combination of shear and normal stresses at the crack front but is otherwise dependent only on the two elastic materials that meet at the interface. More specifically, one would expect that adhesion measured by indentation (a popular and convenient technique) could be used to predict adhesion hysteresis in the more practically important rolling geometry. Previously, a structure with a film-terminated fibrillar geometry exhibited dramatic enhancement of adhesion by a crack-trapping mechanism during indentation with a rigid sphere. Roughly isotropic structures such as the fibrillar geometry show a strong correlation between adhesion enhancement in indentation versus adhesion hysteresis in rolling. However, anisotropic structures, such as a film-terminated ridge-channel geometry, surprisingly show a dramatic divergence between adhesion measured by indentation versus rolling. We study this experimentally and theoretically, first comparing the adhesion of the anisotropic ridge-channel structure to the roughly isotropic fibrillar structure during indentation with a rigid sphere, where only the isotropic structure shows adhesion enhancement. Second, we examine in more detail the anomalous anisotropic film-terminated ridge-channel structure during indentation with a rigid sphere versus rolling to show why these structures show a dramatic adhesion enhancement for the rolling case and no adhesion enhancement for indentation.

  11. Paks shows the way towards good operating practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The Paks-3 unit in Hungary was the first VVER (Soviet designed Pressurized Water Reactor) to be scrutinized by an International Atomic Energy Agency Operational Safety Analysis Review Team. A number of examples of good operational practice were noted. Those reported here include the cleanliness of the plant, the management attitude to training, early detection of and action to correct problems as they arise, an accident avoidance policy, a back-up research and development programme, and the provision of computer-based assistance to the operator to present operational data in an easily comprehensible form. (U.K.)

  12. Denture Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Denture Adhesives Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Wearers Reporting Problems to the FDA Background Denture adhesives are pastes, powders or adhesive pads that may ...

  13. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    (13.5 %) and nine in the two-step etch-and-rinse group (13.0 %). This resulted in nonsignificant different annual failure rates of 1.69 and 1.63 %, respectively. Fracture of restoration was the main reason for failure. Conclusion: Good clinical performance was shown during the 8-year evaluation....... Results: One hundred and fifty-eight restorations were evaluated after 8 years. Three participants with five restorations (three Xeno III, two Excite) were registered as dropouts. Twenty-one failed restorations (13.3 %) were observed during the follow-up. Twelve in the one-step self-etch adhesive group...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  14. Prevention of intra-abdominal adhesion by bi-layer electrospun membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shichao; Wang, Wei; Yan, Hede; Fan, Cunyi

    2013-06-04

    The aim of this study was to compare the anti-adhesion efficacy of a bi-layer electrospun fibrous membrane consisting of hyaluronic acid-loaded poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous membrane as the inner layer and PCL fibrous membrane as the outer layer with a single-layer PCL electrospun fibrous membrane in a rat cecum abrasion model. The rat model utilized a cecal abrasion and abdominal wall insult surgical protocol. The bi-layer and PCL membranes were applied between the cecum and the abdominal wall, respectively. Control animals did not receive any treatment. After postoperative day 14, a visual semiquantitative grading scale was used to grade the extent of adhesion. Histological analysis was performed to reveal the features of adhesion tissues. Bi-layer membrane treated animals showed significantly lower adhesion scores than control animals (p compared with the PCL membrane. Histological analysis of the bi-layer membrane treated rat rarely demonstrated tissue adhesion while that of the PCL membrane treated rat and control rat showed loose and dense adhesion tissues, respectively. Bi-layer membrane can efficiently prevent adhesion formation in abdominal cavity and showed a significantly decreased adhesion tissue formation compared with the control.

  15. Creep simulation of adhesively bonded joints using modified generalized time hardening model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadigh, Mohammad Ali Saeimi [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Creep behavior of double lap adhesively bonded joints was investigated using experimental tests and numerical analysis. Firstly, uniaxial creep tests were carried out to obtain the creep characteristics and constitutive parameters of the adhesive at different stress and temperature levels. Generalized time hardening model was used to predict the creep behavior of the adhesive. This model was modified to simulate the creep behavior at different stress and temperature levels. Secondly, the developed model was used to simulate the creep behavior of bonded joints using finite element based numerical analysis. Creep deformations of the joints were measured experimentally and good agreement was observed in comparison with the results obtained using numerical simulation. Afterward, stress redistribution due to the creep along the adhesively bonded joint was obtained numerically. It was observed that temperature level had a significant effect on the stress redistribution along the adhesive thickness.

  16. Reversible adhesion switching of porous fibrillar adhesive pads by humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Longjian; Kovalev, Alexander; Dening, Kirstin; Eichler-Volf, Anna; Eickmeier, Henning; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk; Steinhart, Martin; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2013-01-01

    We report reversible adhesion switching on porous fibrillar polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) adhesive pads by humidity changes. Adhesion at a relative humidity of 90% was more than nine times higher than at a relative humidity of 2%. On nonporous fibrillar adhesive pads of the same material, adhesion increased only by a factor of ~3.3. The switching performance remained unchanged in at least 10 successive high/low humidity cycles. Main origin of enhanced adhesion at high humidity is the humidity-induced decrease in the elastic modulus of the polar component P2VP rather than capillary force. The presence of spongelike continuous internal pore systems with walls consisting of P2VP significantly leveraged this effect. Fibrillar adhesive pads on which adhesion is switchable by humidity changes may be used for preconcentration of airborne particulates, pollutants, and germs combined with triggered surface cleaning.

  17. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-05

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  18. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianbing; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin

    2014-03-01

    Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  19. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbing Meng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR, an X-ray diffractometer (XRD, an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  20. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Jianbing, E-mail: jianbingmeng@126.com; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  1. MULTILAYER COATINGS Ti/TiN, Cr/CrN AND W/WN DEPOSITED BY MAGNETRON SPUTTERING FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ADHESION TO BASE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Horník

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with evaluation of single and multilayer layer PVD coatings based on Cr and Ti widely used in tool application. Additionally, W and WN based coating which are not so widespread were designed and deposited as functionally graded material. The coatings properties were evaluated from the point of view of hardness and adhesion. The hardness measuring was carried out using nanoindentation method. The scratch test was performed to test adhesion. Moreover, the presence of metallic interlayer in functionally graded materials further increases the coating adhesion by gradually approaching its composition to the substrate. Coatings consisting of W and WN have showed very good adhesion. With regard to the results of the scratch test, the multilayer coatings of CrN, TiN and WN have increased adhesion and can be assumed to have their protective function improved. Results will be appliedin development of functionally graded layers for functionally graded materials.

  2. Bioactivity and properties of a dental adhesive functionalized with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) and bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marta; Hohlfeld, Lisa; Thanh, Loan Tao; Biehl, Ralf; Lühmann, Nicole; Mohn, Dirk; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of infiltrating a commercial adhesive with nanosized bioactive glass (BG-Bi) particles or methacryl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on material properties and bioactivity. An acetone-based dental adhesive (Solobond Plus adhesive, VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was infiltrated with nanosized bioactive glass particles (0.1 or 1wt%), or with monofunctional or multifunctional POSS particles (10 or 20wt%). Unfilled adhesive served as control. Dispersion and hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering. Set specimens were immersed for 28days in artificial saliva at 37°C, and surfaces were mapped for the formation of calcium phospate (Ca/P) precipitates (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Viscosity (rheometry) and the structural characteristic of the networks were studied, such as degree of conversion (FTIR spectroscopy), sol fraction and water sorption. POSS particles showed a good dispersion of the particles for both types of particles being smaller than 3nm, while the bioactive glass particles had a strong tendency to agglomerate. All nanoparticles induced the formation of Ca/P precipitates. The viscosity of the adhesive was not or only slightly increased by POSS particle addition but strongly increased by the bioactive glass particles. The degree of conversion, water sorption and sol fraction showed a maintained or improved network structure and properties when filled with BG-Bi and multifunctional POSS, however, less polymerization was found when loading a monofunctional POSS. Multifunctional POSS may be incorporated into dental adhesives to provide a bioactive potential without changing material properties adversely. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. an Adhesive Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems  TDDSs containing stimulants, termed as energetic substances, such as caffeine and pantothenic acid, were studied. Caffeine is a white crystalline substance and a stimulant to central nervous system. In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. Pantothenic acid, also recognized as vitamin B5, is a water-soluble vitamin. For many animals, pantothenic acid is an essential nutrient. Animals require pantothenic acid to synthesize and metabolize proteins, carbohydrates and fats. For this purpose caffeine and pantothenic acid were  used  as  drug  components with  6.32%  and  1.12%  loadings,  in  different functional and non-functional acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs of 52.89%, respectively. Ethylene glycol as a chemical enhancer was used in all TDDSs with 39.67%. The effect of PSAs  type on  in vitro  release and adhesion properties  (peel strength and tack values from drug delivery devices were evaluated. It was found that TDDS containing -COOH functional PSA showed  the  lowest steady state fux. The adhesion properties of the samples were improved by addition of functional acrylic PSA in formulations.

  4. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. Effectiveness of clean-up procedures on stain susceptibility of different orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Pundlik Mane

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Chemical-cure adhesive showed higher stain susceptibility than light-cure adhesive in all clean-up procedures. Both adhesives would show less stain susceptibility with polishing step with rubber cup and pumice.

  7. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Miller, David C.

    2016-06-16

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  8. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  9. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  10. Advances in biomaterials for preventing tissue adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Cheng, Ruoyu; das Neves, José; Tang, Jincheng; Xiao, Junyuan; Ni, Qing; Liu, Xinnong; Pan, Guoqing; Li, Dechun; Cui, Wenguo; Sarmento, Bruno

    2017-09-10

    Adhesion is one of the most common postsurgical complications, occurring simultaneously as the damaged tissue heals. Accompanied by symptoms such as inflammation, pain and even dyskinesia in particular circumstances, tissue adhesion has substantially compromised the quality of life of patients. Instead of passive treatment, which involves high cost and prolonged hospital stay, active intervention to prevent the adhesion from happening has been accepted as the optimized strategy against this complication. Herein, this paper will cover not only the mechanism of adhesion forming, but also the biomaterials and medicines used in its prevention. Apart from acting as a direct barrier, biomaterials also show promising anti-adhesive bioactivity though their intrinsic physical and chemical are still not completely unveiled. Considering the diversity of human tissue organization, it is imperative that various biomaterials in combination with specific medicine could be tuned to fit the microenvironment of targeted tissues. With the illustration of different adhesion mechanism and solutions, we hope this review can become a beacon and further inspires the development of anti-adhesion biomedicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A.; Dierks, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by 400 eV methane (CH 4 ) ion bombardment of various smooth and rough ceramics, as well as ceramics coated with a layer of Si or Ti. Adhesion was measured by a bonded-pin method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si 3 N 4 , but adhesion of DLC to smooth Al 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective due to poor bonding between the DLC film and Ti. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface because the interface is two dimensional and the compositions of interfacial phases are generally not known. If the standard enthalpy ΔH degree for the reaction between CH 4 and the substrate material is calculated under the assumption that a carbide phase is produced, a relationship is seen between the reaction enthalpy and the relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. The lack of adhesion to the Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for the reaction with CH 4 positive

  12. Preliminary results on adhesion improvement using Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yonggi; Kim, Bomsok; Lee, Jaesang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Sputtering is an established technique for depositing films with smooth surfaces and interfaces and good thick control. Ejection of articles from a condensed matter due to impingement of high energy particles, termed as sputtering was observed as early as in 1852, however, it is only recently that the complex process of sputtering system. Coating adhesion and environmental stability of the ion beam sputtering deposition coatings performed very well. High-energy high-current ion beam thin film synthesis of adhesion problems can be solved by using. Enhancement of adhesion in thin film synthesis, using high energy and high current ion beam, of mobile phones, car parts and other possible applications in the related industry Alternative technology of wet chrome plating, considering environment and unit cost, for car parts and esthetic improvement on surface of domestic appliances.

  13. Preliminary results on adhesion improvement using Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonggi; Kim, Bomsok; Lee, Jaesang

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering is an established technique for depositing films with smooth surfaces and interfaces and good thick control. Ejection of articles from a condensed matter due to impingement of high energy particles, termed as sputtering was observed as early as in 1852, however, it is only recently that the complex process of sputtering system. Coating adhesion and environmental stability of the ion beam sputtering deposition coatings performed very well. High-energy high-current ion beam thin film synthesis of adhesion problems can be solved by using. Enhancement of adhesion in thin film synthesis, using high energy and high current ion beam, of mobile phones, car parts and other possible applications in the related industry Alternative technology of wet chrome plating, considering environment and unit cost, for car parts and esthetic improvement on surface of domestic appliances

  14. Quantitative wood–adhesive penetration with X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A. (Oregon State U.); (Willamette Valley)

    2015-09-01

    Micro X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was used to analyze the 3D adhesive penetration behavior of different wood–adhesive bondlines. Three adhesives, a phenol formaldehyde (PF), a polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate (pMDI), and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate (PVA), all tagged with iodine for enhanced X-ray attenuation, were used to prepare single-bondline laminates in two softwoods, Douglas-fir and loblolly pine, and one hardwood, a hybrid polar. Adhesive penetration depth was measured with two separate calculations, and results were compared with 2D fluorescent micrographs. A total of 54 XCT scans were collected, representing six replicates of each treatment type; each replicate, however, consisted of approximately 1500 individual, cross-section slices stacked along the specimen length. As these adhesives were highly modified, the presented results do not indicate typical behavior for their broader adhesive classes. Still, clear penetration differences were observed between each adhesive type, and between wood species bonded with both the PF and pMDI adhesives. Furthermore, penetration results depended on the calculation method used. Two adhesive types with noticeably different resin distributions in the cured bondline, showed relatively similar penetration depths when calculated with a traditional effective penetration equation. However, when the same data was calculated with a weighted penetration calculation, which accounts for both adhesive area and depth, the results appeared to better represent the different distributions depicted in the photomicrographs and tomograms. Additionally, individual replicate comparisons showed variation due to specimen anatomy, not easily observed or interpreted from 2D images. Finally, 3D views of segmented 3D adhesive phases offered unique, in-situ views of the cured adhesive structures. In particular, voids formed by CO2 bubbles generated during pMDI cure were clearly visible in penetrated columns of the solidified

  15. A MAM7 peptide-based inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion does not interfere with in vitro host cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Alice Hawley

    Full Text Available Adhesion inhibitors that block the attachment of pathogens to host tissues may be used synergistically with or as an alternative to antibiotics. The wide-spread bacterial adhesin Multivalent Adhesion Molecule (MAM 7 has recently emerged as a candidate molecule for a broad-spectrum adhesion inhibitor which may be used to prevent bacterial colonization of wounds. Here we have tested if the antibacterial properties of a MAM-based inhibitor could be used to competitively inhibit adhesion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to host cells. Additionally, we analyzed its effect on host cellular functions linked to the host receptor fibronectin, such as migration, adhesion and matrix formation in vitro, to evaluate potential side effects prior to advancing our studies to in vivo infection models. As controls, we used inhibitors based on well-characterized bacterial adhesin-derived peptides from F1 and FnBPA, which are known to affect host cellular functions. Inhibitors based on F1 or FnBPA blocked MRSA attachment but at the same time abrogated important cellular functions. A MAM7-based inhibitor did not interfere with host cell function while showing good efficacy against MRSA adhesion in a tissue culture model. These observations provide a possible candidate for a bacterial adhesion inhibitor that does not cause adverse effects on host cells while preventing bacterial infection.

  16. Good Governance in the EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Livioara GOGA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the EU adhesion, good governance has been analyzed from different perspectives, in the judicial literature being an analytic model or a normative concept. Some authors have wondered if this concept is a fashion, comprising some older ideas and principles, while other authors have asserted that the reasons why different methods of governance appear in the EU are based on “the complexity and the uncertainty of the problems on the agenda, an irreducible, the new approaches on public administration and law, hidden competencies, legitimacy and subsidiarity”. At a normative level, the White Paper of European Governance consecrated five principles on which good governance is based upon: openness, participation, responsibility, efficiency and coherence.

  17. Pull-test adhesion measurements of diamondlike carbon films on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, and zirconium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erck, R.A.; Nichols, F.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dierks, J.F. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films or diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were formed by ion-beam deposition of 400 eV methane (CH{sub 4}) ions on several smooth and rough ceramics, as well as on ceramics coated with a layer of Si and Ti. Adhesion was measured by the pin-pull method. Excellent adhesion was measured for smooth SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, but adhesion of DLC to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} was negligible. The use of a Si bonding interlayer produced good adhesion to all the substrates, but a Ti layer was ineffective because bonding between the DLC film and Ti was poor. The presence of surface roughness appeared to greatly increase the measured adhesion in all cases. Bulk thermodynamic calculations are not directly applicable to bonding at the interface. If the standard enthalpy of formation for reaction between CH{sub 4} and substrate is calculated assumpting a carbide or carbon phase is produced, a relation is seen between reaction enthalpy and relative adhesion. Large positive enthalpies are associated with poor adhesion; negative or small positive enthalpies are associated with good adhesion. This relation between enthalpy and adhesion was also observed for DLC deposited on Si. Lack of adhesion to Ti was attributed to inadvertent formation of a surface oxide layer that rendered the enthalpy for reaction with CH{sub 4} strongly positive and similar in magnitude to that for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}.

  18. In vitro adhesion of staphylococci to diamond-like carbon polymer hybrids under dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soininen, Antti; Levon, Jaakko; Katsikogianni, Maria; Myllymaa, Katja; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Kinnari, Teemu J; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Missirlis, Yannis

    2011-03-01

    This study compares the ability of selected materials to inhibit adhesion of two bacterial strains commonly implicated in implant-related infections. These two strains are Staphylococcus aureus (S-15981) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984). In experiments we tested six different materials, three conventional implant metals: titanium, tantalum and chromium, and three diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings: DLC, DLC-polydimethylsiloxane hybrid (DLC-PDMS-h) and DLC-polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid (DLC-PTFE-h) coatings. DLC coating represents extremely hard material whereas DLC hybrids represent novel nanocomposite coatings. The two DLC polymer hybrid films were chosen for testing due to their hardness, corrosion resistance and extremely good non-stick (hydrophobic and oleophobic) properties. Bacterial adhesion assay tests were performed under dynamic flow conditions by using parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC). The results show that adhesion of S. aureus to DLC-PTFE-h and to tantalum was significantly (P DLC-PDMS-h (0.671 ± 0.001 × 10(7)/cm(2) and 0.751 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2) vs. 1.055 ± 0.002 × 10(7)/cm(2), respectively). No significant differences were detected between other tested materials. Hence DLC-PTFE-h coating showed as low susceptibility to S. aureus adhesion as all the tested conventional implant metals. The adherence of S. epidermidis to biomaterials was not significantly (P DLC-PTFE-h films could be used as a biomaterial coating without increasing the risk of implant-related infections.

  19. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    , which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...... tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters...

  20. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz Téllez, J P; Harirchian-Saei, S; Li, Y; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved. (paper)

  1. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  2. Infliximab TNF-alpha antagonist decreases intraabdominal adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurukahvecioglu, O.; Koksal, H.; Yazicioglu, O.; Kerem, M.; Taneri, F.; Gulbahar, O.; Erdem, O.; Engin, D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to evaluate the effect of infliximab on adhesion formation and its associated morbidity and complications. This study was performed in the Faculty of Medicine, Gaze University, Turkey between July 2005 and October 2005. Thirty-five rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. Laparotomy was performed in the Sham group (n=5), whereas cecal abrasion was carried out in all other groups. After cecal abrasion 0.9% sodium chloride was administered in the saline group (n=10), infliximab was administered to the study group (n=10) and nothing was administered to the last group (n=10). Adhesion formation was evaluated with macroscopic adhesion scoring systems. Peritoneal fluid samples and mesenteric lymph node biopsies were taken to rule out bacterial peritonitis. Blood and peritoneal irrigation fluids samples were taken to measure the Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. Macroscopic adhesion scores showed fewer adhesions in the infliximab group. The infliximab group had significantly fewer adhesions than the abrasion control and saline groups. According to the histological findings, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Early blocking of the activity of TNF-alpha after cecal abrasion resulted in lower rates of adhesion formation, macroscopically. The TNF-alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine appears to be an important mediator for postoperative adhesion formation. (author)

  3. Gecko-Inspired Electrospun Flexible Fiber Arrays for Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F.

    The ability of geckos to adhere to vertical solid surfaces comes from their remarkable feet with millions of projections terminating in nanometer spatulae. We present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive dry adhesives. By using electrospun nylon 6 nanofiber arrays, we create gecko-inspired dry adhesives, that are electrically insulating, and that show shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm2 on a glass slide. This measured value is 270% that reported of gecko feet and 97-fold above normal adhesion strength of the same arrays. The data indicate a strong shear binding-on and easy normal lifting-off. This anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to an enhanced shear adhesion strength with decreasing fiber diameter (d) and an optimum performance of nanofiber arrays in the shear direction over a specific range of thicknesses. With use of electrospinning, we report the fabrication of nylon 6 nanofiber arrays that show a friction coefficient (mu) of 11.5. These arrays possess significant shear adhesion strength and low normal adhesion strength. Increasing the applied normal load considerably enhances the shear adhesion strength and mu, irrespective of d and fiber arrays thickness (T). Fiber bending stiffness and fiber surface roughness are considerably decreased with diminishing d while fiber packing density is noticeably increased. These enhancements are proposed to considerably upsurge the shear adhesion strength between nanofiber arrays and a glass slide. The latter upsurge is mainly attributed to a sizeable proliferation in van der Waals (vdW) forces. These nanofiber arrays can be alternatively bound-on and lifted-off over a glass slide with a trivial decrease in the initial mu and adhesion strength. By using selective coating technique, we have also created hierarchical structures having closely packed nanofibers with d of 50 nm. We determine the effects of applied normal load, fiber surface roughness, loading angle, d, T, and repeated

  4. Radiation-curable adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-curable adhesives may be classified into two broad categories. In the first category, adhesive bonding occurs as a direct result of irradiation. The second category includes pressure-sensitive and hot-melt adhesives, which are composed of linear or lightly cross-linked polymers prepared by a radiation-induced polymerization reaction. This chapter is mainly concerned with radiation-curable adhesives of the first category. The various adhesive types are discussed and adhesive performance is examined, particularly in relation to the chemistry and chemical technology which underlies the individual materials. A description of a limited number of representative applications is included as is an outline of recent developments of curing and dispensing equipment. 268 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  5. In vivo qualitative analysis of the biocompatibility of different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Tobias Moretti Neto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanocrylates have been widely used in the medical and dental fields for several years. In Dentistry, cyanoacrylates have been used for suturing, pulp capping, as retrofilling material in endodontic surgeries, and as cervical plug for pulpless teeth bleaching. The biocompatibility of these adhesives has been the topic of many researches and subcutaneous implantation is an effective methodology for these studies. The present study evaluated the biocompatibility of three different cyanoacrylate-based adhesives. Thirty-six Wistar rats were used, divided into four groups of 9 animals each: A (control - distilled water, B - cyanoacrylate ester (Super Bonder, C - n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (Histoacryl and D - alpha-cyanoacrylate (Three Bond. The materials were dispensed in sponges of polyvinyl chloride, the animals were incised and the sponges were inserted in the subcutaneous tissue and sutured. Each group was sub-divided according to the time of sacrifice of the animals: 7, 21 and 45 days. Subjective analysis of the histologic material showed that all groups presented some degree of irritability, but the inflammatory reaction decreased with the experimental time in all groups. Group D showed an inflammatory reaction which was closer to that of the control group and was considered to have good biocompatibility. Groups B and C were similar and presented more aggressive inflammatory reactions when compared to the control group. Based on the results, it was concluded that alpha-cyanoacrylate (Three Bond was the most biocompatible adhesive because it caused the lowest levels of inflammation.

  6. Research on effects of ionizing radiation of human peripheral blood white cell adhesive molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haijun; Cheng Ying; Le Chen; Min Rui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the links between expression and function of adhesive molecule on the surface of irradiated peripheral blood white cells. Methods: Heparinized human peripheral blood was exposed to γ rays with different dose. At the different post-radiation time adhesive molecule expression on cellular surface was determined by double fluorescence labeling antibodies which were against adhesive molecule and special mark of granulocyte or mononuclear cell respectively with flow cytometry, and cellular adhesive ability to different matrixes mediated by adhesive molecule was estimated by commercializing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and crystalviolet dying. Results: A decline pattern of CD11b on surface of mononuclear cells and CD29 on surface of granulocyte with irradiation dose increase was found. The changes of adhesive ability of mononuclear cells to substance of β1-integrin and collagen-I was well related with irradiation dose. Conclusion: Good relationship shown by the changes of adhesive molecule expression and adhesive ability mediated by the molecules on the surface of peripheral blood white cells with radiation dose was primary base of further research on indicting exposure dose by biomarker. (authors)

  7. Gecko-inspired bidirectional double-sided adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Gu, Ping; Wu, Xiaoping

    2014-05-14

    A new concept of gecko-inspired double-sided adhesives (DSAs) is presented. The DSAs, constructed by dual-angled (i.e. angled base and angled tip) micro-pillars on both sides of the backplane substrate, are fabricated by combinations of angled etching, mould replication, tip modification, and curing bonding. Two types of DSA, symmetric and antisymmetric (i.e. pillars are patterned symmetrically or antisymmetrically relative to the backplane), are fabricated and studied in comparison with the single-sided adhesive (SSA) counterparts through both non-conformal and conformal tests. Results indicate that the DSAs show controllable and bidirectional adhesion. Combination of the two pillar-layers can either amplify (for the antisymmetric DSA, providing a remarkable and durable adhesion capacity of 25.8 ± 2.8 N cm⁻² and a high anisotropy ratio of ∼8) or counteract (for the symmetric DSA, generating almost isotropic adhesion) the adhesion capacity and anisotropic level of one SSA (capacity of 16.2 ± 1.7 N cm⁻² and anisotropy ratio of ∼6). We demonstrate that these two DSAs can be utilized as a facile fastener for two individual objects and a small-scale delivery setup, respectively, complementing the functionality of the commonly studied SSA. As such, the double-sided patterning is believed to be a new branch in the further development of biomimetic dry adhesives.

  8. Shear Adhesion of Tapered Nanopillar Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Minsky, Helen K; Jiang, Yijie; Yin, Kaiyang; Turner, Kevin T; Yang, Shu

    2018-04-04

    Tapered nanopillars with various cross sections, including cone-shaped, stepwise, and pencil-like structures (300 nm in diameter at the base of the pillars and 1.1 μm in height), are prepared from epoxy resin templated by nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The effect of pillar geometry on the shear adhesion behavior of these nanopillar arrays is investigated via sliding experiments in a nanoindentation system. In a previous study of arrays with the same geometry, it was shown that cone-shaped nanopillars exhibit the highest adhesion under normal loading while stepwise and pencil-like nanopillars exhibit lower normal adhesion strength due to significant deformation of the pillars that occurs with increasing indentation depth. Contrary to the previous studies, here, we show that pencil-like nanopillars exhibit the highest shear adhesion strength at all indentation depths among three types of nanopillar arrays and that the shear adhesion increases with greater indentation depth due to the higher bending stiffness and closer packing of the pencil-like nanopillar array. Finite element simulations are used to elucidate the deformation of the pillars during the sliding experiments and agree with the nanoindentation-based sliding measurements. The experiments and finite element simulations together demonstrate that the shape of the nanopillars plays a key role in shear adhesion and that the mechanism is quite different from that of adhesion under normal loading.

  9. How do liquids confined at the nanoscale influence adhesion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C; Tartaglino, U; Persson, B N J

    2006-01-01

    Liquids play an important role in adhesion and sliding friction. They behave as lubricants in human bodies, especially in the joints. However, in many biological attachment systems they act like adhesives, e.g. facilitating insects to move on ceilings or vertical walls. Here we use molecular dynamics to study how liquids confined at the nanoscale influence the adhesion between solid bodies with smooth and rough surfaces. We show that a monolayer of liquid may strongly affect the adhesion

  10. Passively stuck: death does not affect gecko adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William J; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Many geckos use adhesive toe pads on the bottom of their digits to attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. Although gecko adhesion has been studied for hundreds of years, gaps exist in our understanding at the whole-animal level. It remains unclear whether the strength and maintenance of adhesion are determined by the animal or are passively intrinsic to the system. Here we show, for the first time, that strong adhesion is produced passively at the whole-animal level. Experiments on both live and recently euthanized tokay geckos (Gekko gecko) revealed that death does not affect the dynamic adhesive force or motion of a gecko foot when pulled along a vertical surface. Using a novel device that applied repeatable and steady-increasing pulling forces to the foot in shear, we found that the adhesive force was similarly high and variable when the animal was alive (mean ± s.d. = 5.4 ± 1.7 N) and within 30 min after death (5.4 ± 2.1 N). However, kinematic analyses showed that live geckos are able to control the degree of toe pad engagement and can rapidly stop strong adhesion by hyperextending the toes. This study offers the first assessment of whole-animal adhesive force under extremely controlled conditions. Our findings reveal that dead geckos maintain the ability to adhere with the same force as living animals, disproving that strong adhesion requires active control. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. TRIM15 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates focal adhesion disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchil, Pradeep D.; Pawliczek, Tobias; Reynolds, Tracy D.; Ding, Siyuan; Hinz, Angelika; Munro, James B.; Huang, Fang; Floyd, Robert W.; Yang, Haitao; Hamilton, William L.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Xiong, Yong; Calderwood, David A.; Mothes, Walther

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Focal adhesions are macromolecular complexes that connect the actin cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Dynamic turnover of focal adhesions is crucial for cell migration. Paxillin is a multi-adaptor protein that plays an important role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics. Here, we identify TRIM15, a member of the tripartite motif protein family, as a paxillin-interacting factor and a component of focal adhesions. TRIM15 localizes to focal contacts in a myosin-II-independent manner by an interaction between its coiled-coil domain and the LD2 motif of paxillin. Unlike other focal adhesion proteins, TRIM15 is a stable focal adhesion component with restricted mobility due to its ability to form oligomers. TRIM15-depleted cells display impaired cell migration and reduced focal adhesion disassembly rates, in addition to enlarged focal adhesions. Thus, our studies demonstrate a cellular function for TRIM15 as a regulatory component of focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. PMID:25015296

  12. Application of tung oil to improve adhesion strength and water resistance of cottonseed meal and protein adhesives on maple veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottonseed meal-based products show promise in serving as environment-friendly wood adhesives. However, their practical utilization is currently limited due to low durability and water resistant properties. In this research, we tested the improvement of adhesion strength and water resistance of cott...

  13. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    2016-06-01

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc) versus the non-adhesive part (the stem), and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue). This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article "Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach" (Lebesgue et al., 2016) [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold), likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  14. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lebesgue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the substratum as a footprint. Recently, a label-free quantitative proteomic approach coupled with the latest mass-spectrometry technology was used to analyze the differential proteome of Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organ, comparing protein expression levels in the tube feet adhesive part (the disc versus the non-adhesive part (the stem, and also to profile the proteome of the secreted adhesive (glue. This data article contains complementary figures and results related to the research article “Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying sea urchin reversible adhesion: a quantitative proteomics approach” (Lebesgue et al., 2016 [1]. Here we provide a dataset of 1384 non-redundant proteins, their fragmented peptides and expression levels, resultant from the analysis of the tube feet differential proteome. Of these, 163 highly over-expressed tube feet disc proteins (>3-fold, likely representing the most relevant proteins for sea urchin reversible adhesion, were further annotated in order to determine the potential functions. In addition, we provide a dataset of 611 non-redundant proteins identified in the secreted adhesive proteome, as well as their functional annotation and grouping in 5 major protein groups related with adhesive exocytosis, and microbial protection. This list was further analyzed to identify the most abundant protein groups and pinpoint putative adhesive proteins, such as Nectin, the most abundant adhesive protein in sea urchin glue. The obtained data uncover the key proteins involved in sea urchins reversible adhesion, representing a step forward to the development of new wet-effective bio-inspired adhesives.

  15. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  16. Adhesive bonding and brazing of nanocrystalline diamond foil onto different substrate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodes, Matthias A.; Sailer, Stefan; Rosiwal, Stefan M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2013-10-01

    Diamond coatings are used in heavily stressed industrial applications to reduce friction and wear. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) is the favourable coating method, as it allows a coating of large surface areas with high homogeneity. Due to the high temperatures occurring in this CVD-process, the selection of substrate materials is limited. With the desire to coat light materials, steels and polymers a new approach has been developed. First, by using temperature-stable templates in the HFCVD and stripping off the diamond layer afterwards, a flexible, up to 150 μm thick and free standing nanocrystalline diamond foil (NCDF) can be produced. Afterwards, these NCDF can be applied on technical components through bonding and brazing, allowing any material as substrate. This two-step process offers the possibility to join a diamond layer on any desired surface. With a modified scratch test and Rockwell indentation testing the adhesion strength of NCDF on aluminium and steel is analysed. The results show that sufficient adhesion strength is reached both on steel and aluminium. The thermal stress in the substrates is very low and if failure occurs, cracks grow undercritically. Adhesion strength is even higher for the brazed samples, but here crack growth is critical, delaminating the diamond layer to some extent. In comparison to a sample directly coated with diamond, using a high-temperature CVD interlayer, the brazed as well as the adhesively bonded samples show very good performance, proving their competitiveness. A high support of the bonding layer could be identified as crucial, though in some cases a lower stiffness of the latter might be acceptable considering the possibility to completely avoid thermal stresses which occur during joining at higher temperatures.

  17. Radiation curable pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) formulations from palm oil based resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hilmi Mahmood; Rosley Che Ismail; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan

    2000-01-01

    Various low glass transition temperature (T g ) acrylate and methacrylate monomers were mixed with epoxidised palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) with the ratio of 50/50 prior to curing with electron beam (EB) irradiation. Methacrylate monomers such as dicyclopentenyloxyethyl methacrylate (DCPOEMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (ISBMA), although displaying relatively higher adhesive properties compared to others were finally excluded from being further utilised as monomers for PSA because of a very slow curing speed. Literally, it is suggested that poorer adhesive performances of the cured films made from 50/50:EPOLA/monomer mixture as compared to that of 100% monomer was attributed to the lack of compatibility between EPOLA and the particular monomers. Further compatibility investigations were continued using formulations prepared via prepolymer route cured by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and the results showed that several monoacrylate monomers with polar and non-polar groups exhibited high curing speed as well as good compatibility with EPOLA as shown by their cured film properties such as surface tackiness, peel adhesion and creep resistance. It is also suggested that these monomers were acting as surfactants for EPOLA which consequently enhance their compatibility upon mixing. Earlier results of the studies on the use of several tackifiers such as poly(vinylmethylether) (PVME), liquid epoxidised natural rubber (LENR) and acrylic oligomer based active tackifier (IRR-153) in the PSA formulations showed that the addition of tackifiers, particularly 3 to 50% IRR-153 into the PSA formulations (while maintaining palm oil contents at 50% ) significantly improved the adhesive properties of cured films. The use qf tackifiers also reducing or eliminating the needs to employ prepolymer method in preparing PSA formulations since most of their viscosities are already above the optimum level (>500 Cps at 25 degree C)

  18. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in "ventral F-actin waves" that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the ex...

  19. Proteomic dataset of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus adhesive organs and secreted adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebesgue, Nicolas; da Costa, Gonçalo; Ribeiro, Raquel Mesquita; Ribeiro-Silva, Cristina; Martins, Gabriel G; Matranga, Valeria; Scholten, Arjen; Cordeiro, Carlos; Heck, Albert J R; Santos, Romana

    Sea urchins have specialized adhesive organs called tube feet, which mediate strong but reversible adhesion. Tube feet are composed by a disc, producing adhesive and de-adhesive secretions for substratum attachment, and a stem for movement. After detachment the secreted adhesive remains bound to the

  20. Durability properties for adhesively bonded structural aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, D.K.; Davis, G.D.; McNamara, D.K.; Shah, T.K.; Desai, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of good bond durability of adhesively joined aerospace components which has been recognized for many years. Military and civilian aircraft are exposed to harsh environments in addition to severe thermal and stress cycles during their service lives. Moisture is responsible for the majority of bond failures in the field. The presence of surface contaminants (e.g., fluoride, silicones) and the non-neutral pH of poor rinse water are common causes of adhesion problems in production environments. Honeycomb panels, stringer skins, doubler plates and core cowl assemblies are bonded joint structures that are subject to environmental- or contaminant-induced debonding. The identification and characterization of the causes of such bond failures leads to improved production quality, yield and cost reduction

  1. Double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes: Synthesis, characterization and platelet adhesion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Dongsheng; Zhang Xiaoqing; Li Jiehua; Tan Hong; Fu Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel phospholipid containing double chains and phosphotidylcholine polar head groups, 2-(10-(2-aminoethylamino)-10-oxodecanamido)-3-(decyloxy)-3-oxopropyl phosphorylcholine (ADDPC), was synthesized and characterized. Two kinds of double-chain phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes with different soft segments were prepared. The structure of prepared polyurethanes was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometry and atomic force microscope (AFM), which indicated that the double-chain phospholipids enriched onto the top surface of the prepared polyurethane films. The preliminary evaluation of blood compatibility showed that these novel phospholipid end-capped polyurethanes could suppress platelet adhesion and activation effectively. This property did not depend on the chemical structure of polyurethanes. In addition, according to tensile test results, the phospholipid polyurethanes kept good mechanical properties in comparison with original polyurethanes. It is suggested that double-chain phospholipid end-caption has good potential for achieving both hemocompatibility and good mechanical properties simultaneously for polyurethanes.

  2. A mucus adhesion promoting protein, MapA, mediates the adhesion of Lactobacillus reuteri to Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yukihiro; Okada, Sanae; Uchimura, Tai; Satoh, Eiichi

    2006-07-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri is one of the dominant lactobacilli found in the gastrointestinal tract of various animals. A surface protein of L. reuteri 104R, mucus adhesion promoting protein (MapA), is considered to be an adhesion factor of this strain. We investigated the relation between MapA and adhesion of L. reuteri to human intestinal (Caco-2) cells. Quantitative analysis of the adhesion of L. reuteri strains to Caco-2 cells showed that various L. reuteri strains bind not only to mucus but also to intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, purified MapA bound to Caco-2 cells, and this binding inhibited the adhesion of L. reuteri in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on these observations, the adhesion of L. reuteri appears due to the binding of MapA to receptor-like molecules on Caco-2 cells. Further, far-western analysis indicated the existence of multiple receptor-like molecules in Caco-2 cells.

  3. Humidity dependence of adhesion for silane coated microcantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, Maarten P.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Carpick, Robert W.; Michalske, Terry A.; Srinivasan, U.; Maboudian, R.

    1999-01-01

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C(sub 18)H(sub 37)SiCl(sub 3)) or FDTS (C(sub 8)F(sub 17)C(sub 2)H(sub 4)SiCl(sub 3)) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115(degree)) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112(degree)), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase

  4. Adhesion of resin composite core materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, K L; Powers, J M

    2001-01-01

    This study determined (1) the effect of polymerization mode of resin composite core materials and dental adhesives on the bond strength to dentin, and (2) if dental adhesives perform as well to dentin etched with phosphoric acid as to dentin etched with self-etching primer. Human third molars were sectioned 2 mm from the highest pulp horn and polished. Three core materials (Fluorocore [dual cured], Core Paste [self-cured], and Clearfil Photo Core [light cured]) and two adhesives (Prime & Bond NT Dual Cure and Clearfil SE Bond [light cured]) were bonded to dentin using two dentin etching conditions. After storage, specimens were debonded in microtension and bond strengths were calculated. Scanning electron micrographs of representative bonding interfaces were analyzed. Analysis showed differences among core materials, adhesives, and etching conditions. Among core materials, dual-cured Fluorocore had the highest bond strengths. There were incompatibilities between self-cured Core Paste and Prime & Bond NT in both etched (0 MPa) and nonetched (3.0 MPa) dentin. Among adhesives, in most cases Clearfil SE Bond had higher bond strengths than Prime & Bond NT and bond strengths were higher to self-etched than to phosphoric acid-etched dentin. Scanning electron micrographs did not show a relationship between resin tags and bond strengths. There were incompatibilities between a self-cured core material and a dual-cured adhesive. All other combinations of core materials and adhesives produced strong in vitro bond strengths both in the self-etched and phosphoric acid-etched conditions.

  5. Bio-inspired enhancement of friction and adhesion at the polydimethylsiloxane-intestine interface and biocompatibility characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongyu, E-mail: zhanghyu@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Vasilescu, Steven [School of Mathematics and Physical Science, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, New South Wales 2007 (Australia); Gu, Zhibin [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-01

    An active navigation of self-propelled miniaturized robot along the intestinal tract without injuring the soft tissue remains a challenge as yet. Particularly in this case an effective control of the interfacial friction and adhesion between the material used and the soft tissue is crucial. In the present study, we investigated the frictional and adhesive properties between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, microscopically patterned with micro-pillar arrays and non-patterned with a flat surface) and rabbit small intestinal tract using a universal material tester. The friction coefficient-time plot and adhesive force-time plot were recorded during the friction test (sliding speed: 0.25 mm/s; normal loading: 0.4 N) and adhesion test (preloading: 0.5 N; hoisting speed: 2.5 × 10{sup −3} mm/s). In addition, biocompatibility of the PDMS samples was characterized in terms of cell morphology (scanning electron microscope) and cell cytotoxicity (alamarBlue assay) using human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that the interfacial friction (0.27 vs 0.19) and adhesion (34.9 mN vs 26.7 mN) were greatly increased using microscopically patterned PDMS, in comparison with non-patterned PDMS. HUVECs adhered to and proliferated on non-patterned/microscopically patterned PDMS very well, with a relative cell viability of about 90% following seeding at 1 d, 3 d, and 5 d. The favorable enhancement of the frictional and adhesive properties, along with the excellent biocompatibility of the microscopically patterned PDMS, makes it a propitious choice for clinical application of self-propelled miniaturized robots. - Highlights: • Micro-pillars enhanced friction and adhesion between PDMS and intestinal tract. • Micro-patterned PDMS showed good cell morphology and cytotoxicity using HUVECs. • Micro-pattern technology may be applied in self-propelled miniaturized robot.

  6. Bio-inspired enhancement of friction and adhesion at the polydimethylsiloxane-intestine interface and biocompatibility characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wang, Yi; Vasilescu, Steven; Gu, Zhibin; Sun, Tao

    2017-01-01

    An active navigation of self-propelled miniaturized robot along the intestinal tract without injuring the soft tissue remains a challenge as yet. Particularly in this case an effective control of the interfacial friction and adhesion between the material used and the soft tissue is crucial. In the present study, we investigated the frictional and adhesive properties between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, microscopically patterned with micro-pillar arrays and non-patterned with a flat surface) and rabbit small intestinal tract using a universal material tester. The friction coefficient-time plot and adhesive force-time plot were recorded during the friction test (sliding speed: 0.25 mm/s; normal loading: 0.4 N) and adhesion test (preloading: 0.5 N; hoisting speed: 2.5 × 10 −3 mm/s). In addition, biocompatibility of the PDMS samples was characterized in terms of cell morphology (scanning electron microscope) and cell cytotoxicity (alamarBlue assay) using human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results demonstrated that the interfacial friction (0.27 vs 0.19) and adhesion (34.9 mN vs 26.7 mN) were greatly increased using microscopically patterned PDMS, in comparison with non-patterned PDMS. HUVECs adhered to and proliferated on non-patterned/microscopically patterned PDMS very well, with a relative cell viability of about 90% following seeding at 1 d, 3 d, and 5 d. The favorable enhancement of the frictional and adhesive properties, along with the excellent biocompatibility of the microscopically patterned PDMS, makes it a propitious choice for clinical application of self-propelled miniaturized robots. - Highlights: • Micro-pillars enhanced friction and adhesion between PDMS and intestinal tract. • Micro-patterned PDMS showed good cell morphology and cytotoxicity using HUVECs. • Micro-pattern technology may be applied in self-propelled miniaturized robot.

  7. Adhesive performance of a multi-mode adhesive system: 1-year in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Giulio; Frassetto, Andrea; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Apolonio, Fabianni; Diolosà, Marina; Cadenaro, Milena; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adhesive stability over time of a multi-mode one-step adhesive applied using different bonding techniques on human coronal dentine. The hypotheses tested were that microtensile bond strength (μTBS), interfacial nanoleakage expression and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activation are not affected by the adhesive application mode (following the use of self-etch technique or with the etch-and-rinse technique on dry or wet dentine) or by ageing for 24h, 6 months and 1year in artificial saliva. Human molars were cut to expose middle/deep dentine and assigned to one of the following bonding systems (N=15): (1) Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE) self-etch mode, (2) Scotchbond Universal etch-and-rinse technique on wet dentine, (3) Scotchbond Universal etch-and-rinse technique on dry dentine, and (4) Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply De Trey) etch-and-rinse technique on wet dentine (control). Specimens were processed for μTBS test in accordance with the non-trimming technique and stressed to failure after 24h, 6 months or 1 year. Additional specimens were processed and examined to assay interfacial nanoleakage and MMP expression. At baseline, no differences between groups were found. After 1 year of storage, Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode and Prime&Bond NT showed higher μTBS compared to the other groups. The lowest nanoleakage expression was found for Scotchbond Universal applied in the self-etch mode, both at baseline and after storage. MMPs activation was found after application of each tested adhesive. The results of this study support the use of the self-etch approach for bonding the tested multi-mode adhesive system to dentine due to improved stability over time. Improved bonding effectiveness of the tested universal adhesive system on dentine may be obtained if the adhesive is applied with the self-etch approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [The durability of three self-etch adhesives bonded to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fu-Cong; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Xue-Jun

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the durability of self-etch adhesives bonded to dentin in vitro. Forty-two extracted human molars were selected and occlusal dentin surfaces were exposed. The teeth were randomly distributed into three groups based on adhesives applied. The one-step self-etch adhesive B(Adper Prompt) and C(G-Bond) and two-step self-etch adhesive A (Clearfil SE bond) were used. After application of the adhesives to the dentin surfaces, composite crowns were built up, after 24 h water storage, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into sticks (1.0 mm×1.0 mm bonding area) for microtensile testing or slabs (1 mm thick) for scanning electron microscopec (SEM) observation. Bonding strength (mTBS) and nano-leakage were evaluated immediately after cutting or after 6 months in water. The mTBS was analyzed using one-way ANOVA (SPSS 13.0). The nanoleakage was observed by SEM with a backscattered electron detector. Both adhesives and water storage time affected the mTBS. All adhesives showed decreased bond strength after six-month water aging [A dropped from (40.60 ± 5.76) MPa to (36.04 ± 3.15) MPa; B dropped from (19.06 ± 1.50) MPa to (11.19 ± 1.97) MPa; C dropped from (17.75 ± 1.10) MPa to (9.14 ± 1.15) MPa] (P adhesives tested were probably influenced by water aging, however, the two-step adhesive showed better durability than the one-step adhesives.

  9. Production on pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) from palm oil based resin - a prepolymer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hilmi Mahmood; Zahid Abdullah; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan; Yasuo Sakurai

    1999-01-01

    Various low T sub g acrylate and methacrylate monomers were mixed with epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) with the ratio of 50/50 prior to curing with an electron beam (EB) irradiation. Methacrylate monomers such as dicyclopentenyloxyethyl methacrylate (DCPOEMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (ISBMA), although displayed relatively high adhesive properties but were finally excluded from being further utilised as monomers for PSA because of a very slow curing speed. Literally, it is suggested that poorer adhesive performances of the cured films made from 50/50:EPOLA/monomer mixture as compared to that of 100% monomer was attributed to the lack of compatibility between EPOLA and that particular monomers. Further compatibility investigations were continued using formulations prepared via prepolymer route cured by an ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and the results showed that several monoacrylate monomers with polar and non-polar groups exhibited high curing speed as well as good compatibility with EPOLA as shown by their cured film properties such as; surface tackiness, peel adhesion and creep resistance. It is also suggested that these monomers were acting as surfactants for EPOLA which consequently enhance their compatibility upon mixing

  10. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Elliot W; Eason, Eric V; Christensen, David L; Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-01-06

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for synthetic materials, so can gecko adhesion systems provide a baseline for scaling efficiency. In the tokay gecko (Gekko gecko), a scaling power law has been reported relating the maximum shear stress σmax to the area A: σmax ∝ A(-1/4). We present a mechanical concept which improves upon the gecko's non-uniform load-sharing and results in a nearly even load distribution over multiple patches of gecko-inspired adhesive. We created a synthetic adhesion system incorporating this concept which shows efficient scaling across four orders of magnitude of area, yielding an improved scaling power law: σmax ∝ A(-1/50). Furthermore, we found that the synthetic adhesion system does not fail catastrophically when a simulated failure is induced on a portion of the adhesive. In a practical demonstration, the synthetic adhesion system enabled a 70 kg human to climb vertical glass with 140 cm(2) of adhesive per hand. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubroeck, David, E-mail: David.Schaubroeck@elis.ugent.be [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Mader, Lothar [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Dubruel, Peter [Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4 bis, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanfleteren, Jan [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Surface modifications of epoxy resins with polydopamine and grafted polyamines can significantly increase the adhesion toward electroless deposited copper. • A clear characterization of the copper/epoxy interphase is provided by SEM analyses of cross sections. • Tailored conditions such as etching time (roughness) and electroless deposition temperature are needed to increase the adhesion of the modified surfaces. - Abstract: In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  12. Strong composition dependence of adhesive properties of ultraviolet curing adhesives with modified acrylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yefeng; Li, Yandong; Wang, Fupeng; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Zhichao; Hu, Jianbing

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) curable adhesives have been widely researched in fields of health care and electronic components. UV curing systems with modified acrylic ester prepolymers have been frequently employed. In order to clarify composition dependence of adhesive properties of adhesives containing modified acrylates, in this work, several UV curing adhesives bearing urethane and epoxy acrylates were designed and fabricated. The effects of prepolymer, diluent, feed ratio, initiator and assistant on adhesive performances were investigated. This work might offer a facile route to gain promising high-performance UV curable adhesives with desired adhesive traits through regulating their compositions.

  13. From Nano to Micro: Importance of Structure and Architecture in Spider Silk Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Vasav; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Spiders have developed outstanding adhesives over millions of years of evolution for prey capture and locomotion. We show that the structure and architecture of these adhesives play an important role in the adhesion. The adhesive produced by orb-weaving spiders to capture prey (viscid glue) is laid on a pair of silk fibers as micron-size glue drops composed of salts and glycoproteins. By stretching single drops, we show that viscid glue behaves like a viscoelastic solid and that elasticity is critical in enhancing adhesion caused by specific adhesive ligands by over 100 times. Comparing viscid glue with gumfoot glue, the glue produced by cob-weavers, the evolutionary descendants of orb-weavers, showed that, in spite of being produced in homologous aggregate glands, gumfoot glue behaves like a viscoelastic liquid. Moreover, gumfoot glue is humidity-resistant and viscid glue is humidity-sensitive. We use a synthetic strategy to spin beads-on-a-string (BOAS) architecture to mimic the adhesive properties of spider silk. Using these mimic threads, we show that the BOAS structure adheres more than a cylindrical structure during contact (collision of prey) and during separation (escape attempt of prey). These results inspire design of novel tunable adhesives.

  14. Co-micellized Pluronic mixture with thermo-sensitivity and residence stability as an injectable tissue adhesion barrier hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kang, Jun Goo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2018-01-01

    Although the tissue adhesion which leads to various complications frequently occurs after surgery, the development of an ideal tissue adhesion barrier is still a challenge. In this study, a thermo-sensitive hydrogel, which can fulfill the essential requirements of tissue adhesion barrier (that is, ease of handling for surgeon, flowing down prevention after application, stable residence on the injury during wound healing, and no use of toxic additives), was developed using biocompatible polyethylene glycol-polypropylene glycol copolymers (Pluronic F127/F68/P123 mixture). From the in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal study, it was observed that the Pluronic mixtures showed sol-gel transition at approximately body temperature (for easy injection or coating on the injury site and flowing down prevention after application) and prolonged residence stability in aqueous environment (> ∼7 days for stable protection of injury tissues/organs during wound healing), and thus was highly effective for the prevention of tissue adhesion without adverse tissue responses. Based on these results, the Pluronic F127/F68/P123 mixture itself (without any additives) can be a good candidate as an injectable or coatable tissue adhesion barrier hydrogel applicable to various injury tissues in terms of ease of use, effectiveness, and safety. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 172-182, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Temporary ectropion therapy by adhesive taping: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermann Anke

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Various surgical procedures are available to correct paralytic ectropion, which are applied in irreversible facial paresis. Problems occur when facial paresis has an unclear prognosis, since surgery of the lower eyelid is usually irreversible. We propose a simple method to correct temporary ectropion in facial palsy by applying an adhesive strip. Patients and methods Ten patients with peripheral facial paresis and paralytic ectropion were treated with an adhesive strip to correct paralytic ectropion. We used "Steri-Strips" (45 × 6.0 mm, which were taped on the carefully cleaned skin of the lower eyelid and of the adjacent zygomatic region until the prognosis of the paresis was clarified. In addition to the examiner's evaluation of the lower lacrimal point in the lacrimal lake, subjective improvement of the symptoms was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS, 1–10. Results 9 patients reported a clear improvement of the symptoms after adhesive taping. There was a clear regression of tearing (VAS (median = 8; 1 = no improvement, 10 = very good improvement, the cosmetic impairment of the adhesive tape was low (VAS (median = 2.5; 1 = no impairment, 10 = severe impairment and most of the patients found the use of the adhesive strip helpful. There was slight reddening of the skin in one case and well tolerated by the facial skin in the other cases. Conclusion The cause and location of facial nerve damage are decisive for the type of surgical therapy. In potentially reversible facial paresis, procedures should be used that are easily performed and above all reversible without complications. Until a reliable prognosis of the paresis can be made, adhesive taping is suited for the temporary treatment of paralytic ectropion. Adhesive taping is simple and can be performed by the patient.

  16. The glycocalyx promotes cooperative binding and clustering of adhesion receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Qian, Jin; Hu, Jinglei

    2016-05-18

    Cell adhesion plays a pivotal role in various biological processes, e.g., immune responses, cancer metastasis, and stem cell differentiation. The adhesion behaviors depend subtly on the binding kinetics of receptors and ligands restricted at the cell-substrate interfaces. Although much effort has been directed toward investigating the kinetics of adhesion molecules, the role of the glycocalyx, anchored on cell surfaces as an exterior layer, is still unclear. In this paper, we propose a theoretical approach to study the collective binding kinetics of a few and a large number of binders in the presence of the glycocalyx, representing the cases of initial and mature adhesions of cells, respectively. The analytical results are validated by finding good agreement with our Monte Carlo simulations. In the force loading case, the on-rate and affinity increase as more bonds form, whereas this cooperative effect is not observed in the displacement loading case. The increased thickness and stiffness of the glycocalyx tend to decrease the affinity for a few bonds, while they have less influence on the affinity for a large number of bonds. Moreover, for a flexible membrane with thermally-excited shape fluctuations, the glycocalyx is exhibited to promote the formation of bond clusters, mainly due to the cooperative binding of binders. This study helps to understand the cooperative kinetics of adhesion receptors under physiologically relevant loading conditions and sheds light on the novel role of the glycocalyx in cell adhesion.

  17. Growth and adhesion to HT-29 cells inhibition of Gram-negatives by Bifidobacterium longum BB536 e Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 alone and in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inturri, R; Stivala, A; Furneri, P M; Blandino, G

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inhibitory effect of supernatants of broth cultures of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, both individually and in combination, against Gram-negative strains (uropathogens, enteropathogens and a reference strain). Moreover, in vitro protection of B. longum BB536 and L. rhamnosus HN001, both individually and in combination, against pathogen adhesion to HT-29 cell line, was investigated. The inhibitory activity was performed by the agar diffusion test and in vitro antagonistic activity against pathogen adhesion to human epithelial intestinal HT-29 cells was performed using standardized culture techniques. The study showed that B. longum BB536 and L. rhamnosus HN001, individually and in combination have inhibitory activity against the majority of the Gram negative strains tested. Furthermore, the results showed that both probiotic strains have a good capacity to inhibit pathogenic adhesion to HT-29 cells. Moreover, the ability of B. longum BB536 and L. rhamnosus HN001 to inhibit pathogenic adhesion increased when they were used in combination. The combination of B. longum BB536 and L. rhamnosus HN001 showed inhibitory activity against Gram-negatives and an improved ability to reduce their adhesion properties and to compete with them. The simultaneous presence of the two-probiotic strains could promote competitive mechanisms able to reduce the adhesion properties of pathogen strains and have an important ecological role within the highly competitive environment of the human gut.

  18. Preparation and characterization of UV-curable cationic composite adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yan; Yang Wenbin; Li Yintao; Xie Changqiong; Li Yingjun; Cheng Yafei; Zhou Yuanlin; Lu Zhongyuan

    2011-01-01

    UV-curable cationic composite adhesives containing TiO 2 nanostructures were prepared by using 3, 4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3, 4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate(CE) as monomer, triphenylsulfonium hexafluorophosphate salt (PI-432) as photoinitiator and titanium isopropoxide (TIP) as inorganic precursor. The morphology of the composite adhesives was characterized by atom force microscopy (AFM). The effect of TIP content on refractive index and transmittance of adhesives were studied. The results show that TiO 2 nanostructures, the average diameter of which is 20 nm or so, can be uniformly dispersed in polymers of composite adhesives. The refractive index of adhesives can be adjusted from 1.501 9 to 1.544 9 with the change of TIP content. The transmittance of adhesives has a slight reduce with the increase of TIP content. When TIP content is up to 40%, the transmittance of composite adhesives remains around 90% or so. (authors)

  19. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Silva-Dias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the CLSI protocol for yeast M27-A3 S4.Yeast cells of non-albicans species exhibit increased ability to adhere and form biofilm. However the correlation between adhesion and biofilm formation varied according to species and also with the methodology used for biofilm assessment. No association was found between strain´s site of isolation or planktonic antifungal susceptibility and adhesion or biofilm formation. Finally CSH seemed to be a good predictor for biofilm formation but not for adhesion.Despite the marked variability registered intra and inter species, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis were the species exhibiting high adhesion profile. C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii and C. krusei revealed higher biofilm formation values in terms of biomass. C. parapsilosis was the species with lower biofilm metabolic activity.

  20. Adhesion, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and antifungal planktonic susceptibility: relationship among Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Dias, Ana; Miranda, Isabel M; Branco, Joana; Monteiro-Soares, Matilde; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio G

    2015-01-01

    We have performed the characterization of the adhesion profile, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and antifungal susceptibility of 184 Candida clinical isolates obtained from different human reservoirs. Adhesion was quantified using a flow cytometric assay and biofilm formation was evaluated using two methodologies: XTT and crystal violet assay. CSH was quantified with the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons test while planktonic susceptibility was assessed accordingly the CLSI protocol for yeast M27-A3 S4. Yeast cells of non-albicans species exhibit increased ability to adhere and form biofilm. However, the correlation between adhesion and biofilm formation varied according to species and also with the methodology used for biofilm assessment. No association was found between strain's site of isolation or planktonic antifungal susceptibility and adhesion or biofilm formation. Finally CSH seemed to be a good predictor for biofilm formation but not for adhesion. Despite the marked variability registered intra and inter species, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis were the species exhibiting high adhesion profile. C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei revealed higher biofilm formation values in terms of biomass. C. parapsilosis was the species with lower biofilm metabolic activity.

  1. Direct Covalent Grafting of Phytate to Titanium Surfaces through Ti-O-P Bonding Shows Bone Stimulating Surface Properties and Decreased Bacterial Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Alba; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Perelló, Joan; Isern, Bernat; González-Martín, María Luisa; Monjo, Marta; Ramis, Joana M

    2016-05-11

    Myo-inositol hexaphosphate, also called phytic acid or phytate (IP6), is a natural molecule abundant in vegetable seeds and legumes. Among other functions, IP6 inhibits bone resorption. It is adsorbed on the surface of hydroxyapatite, inhibiting its dissolution and decreasing the progressive loss of bone mass. We present here a method to directly functionalize Ti surfaces covalently with IP6, without using a cross-linker molecule, through the reaction of the phosphate groups of IP6 with the TiO2 layer of Ti substrates. The grafting reaction consisted of an immersion in an IP6 solution to allow the physisorption of the molecules onto the substrate, followed by a heating step to obtain its chemisorption, in an adaptation of the T-Bag method. The reaction was highly dependent on the IP6 solution pH, only achieving a covalent Ti-O-P bond at pH 0. We evaluated two acidic pretreatments of the Ti surface, to increase its hydroxylic content, HNO3 30% and HF 0.2%. The structure of the coated surfaces was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and ellipsometry. The stability of the IP6 coating after three months of storage and after sterilization with γ-irradiation was also determined. Then, we evaluated the biological effect of Ti-IP6 surfaces in vitro on MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, showing an osteogenic effect. Finally, the effect of the surfaces on the adhesion and biofilm viability of oral microorganisms S. mutans and S. sanguinis was also studied, and we found that Ti-IP6 surfaces decreased the adhesion of S. sanguinis. A surface that actively improves osseointegration while decreasing the bacterial adhesion could be suitable for use in bone implants.

  2. Rationally engineered nanoparticles target multiple myeloma cells, overcome cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance, and show enhanced efficacy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiziltepe, T; Ashley, J D; Stefanick, J F; Qi, Y M; Alves, N J; Handlogten, M W; Suckow, M A; Navari, R M; Bilgicer, B

    2012-01-01

    In the continuing search for effective cancer treatments, we report the rational engineering of a multifunctional nanoparticle that combines traditional chemotherapy with cell targeting and anti-adhesion functionalities. Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated adhesion of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stroma confers MM cells with cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). In our design, we used micellar nanoparticles as dynamic self-assembling scaffolds to present VLA-4-antagonist peptides and doxorubicin (Dox) conjugates, simultaneously, to selectively target MM cells and to overcome CAM-DR. Dox was conjugated to the nanoparticles through an acid-sensitive hydrazone bond. VLA-4-antagonist peptides were conjugated via a multifaceted synthetic procedure for generating precisely controlled number of targeting functionalities. The nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by MM cells and induced cytotoxicity. Mechanistic studies revealed that nanoparticles induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis in MM cells. Importantly, multifunctional nanoparticles overcame CAM-DR, and were more efficacious than Dox when MM cells were cultured on fibronectin-coated plates. Finally, in a MM xenograft model, nanoparticles preferentially homed to MM tumors with ∼10 fold more drug accumulation and demonstrated dramatic tumor growth inhibition with a reduced overall systemic toxicity. Altogether, we demonstrate the disease driven engineering of a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system, enabling the model of an integrative approach in the treatment of MM

  3. A single-cell analysis platform for electrochemiluminescent detection of platelets adhesion to endothelial cells based on Au@DL-ZnCQDs nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dongping; Shang, Yunfei; Qiu, Youyi; Zhou, Bin; Yang, Peihui

    2018-04-15

    A novel single-cell analysis platform (SCA) was developed for the investigation of platelets adhesion to single human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) via using the adhesion molecule (E-selectin) on the damaged HUVEC as the marker site, and integrating electrochemiluminescence (ECL) with the ultrasensitive Au@DL-ZnCQDs nanoprobes. The Au@DL-ZnCQDs nanocomposite, a kind of double layer zinc-coadsorbed carbon quantum dot (ZnCQDs) core-shell nanoprobe, was firstly constructed by using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the core to load with ZnCQDs and then the citrate-modified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as the bridge to link AuNPs-ZnCQDs with ZnCQDs to form the core-shell with double layer ZnCQDs (DL-ZnCQDs) nanoprobe, revealed a 10-fold signal amplification. The H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damage HUVECs were utilized as the cellular model on which anti-E-selectin functionalized nanoprobes specially recognized E-selectin, the SCA showed that the ECL signals decreased with platelets adhesion to single HUVEC. The proposed SCA could effectively and dynamically monitor the adhesion between single HUVEC and platelets in the absence and presence of collagen activation, moreover, be able to quantitatively detect the number of platelets adhesion to single HUVEC, and show a good analytical performance with linear range from 1 to 15 platelets. In contrast, the HUVEC was down-regulated the expression of adhesion molecules by treating with quercetin inhibitor, and the SCA also exhibited the feasibility for analysis of platelets adhesion to single HUVEC. Therefore, the single-cell analysis platform provided a novel and promising protocol for analysis of the single intercellular adhesion, and it will be beneficial to elucidate the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacterial endotoxin adhesion to different types of orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Coutinho ROMUALDO

    Full Text Available Abstract Bacterial endotoxin (LPS adhesion to orthodontic brackets is a known contributing factor to inflammation of the adjacent gingival tissues. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems, comparing two commercial brands. Material and Methods Forty specimens were fabricated from Transbond XT and Light Bond composite and bonding agent components (n=10/component, then contaminated by immersion in a bacterial endotoxin solution. Contaminated and non-contaminated acrylic resin samples were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. LPS quantification was performed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate QCL-1000™ test. Data obtained were scored and subjected to the Chi-square test using a significance level of 5%. Results There was endotoxin adhesion to all materials (p0.05. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 among commercial brands. Affinity of endotoxin was significantly greater for the bonding agents (p=0.0025. Conclusions LPS adhered to both orthodontic adhesive systems. Regardless of the brand, the endotoxin had higher affinity for the bonding agents than for the composites. There is no previous study assessing the affinity of LPS for orthodontic adhesive systems. This study revealed that LPS adheres to orthodontic adhesive systems. Therefore, additional care is recommended to orthodontic applications of these materials.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of novel siloxane-methacrylate monomers used as dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xueping; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to synthesize two new siloxane-methacrylate (SM) monomers for application in dentin adhesives and to investigate the influence of different functionality of the siloxane-containing monomers on the adhesive photopolymerization, water sorption, and mechanical properties. Two siloxane-methacrylate monomers (SM1 and SM2) with four and eight methacrylate groups were synthesized. Dentin adhesives containing BisGMA, HEMA and the siloxane-methacrylate monomers were photo-polymerized. The experimental adhesives were compared with the control adhesive (HEMA/BisGMA, 45/55, w/w) and characterized with regard to degree of conversion (DC), water miscibility of the liquid resin, water sorption and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The experimental adhesives exhibited improved water miscibility as compared to the control. When cured in the presence of 12 wt% water to simulate the wet environment of the mouth, the SM-containing adhesives showed DC comparable to the control. The experimental adhesives showed higher rubbery modulus than the control under dry conditions. Under wet conditions, the mechanical properties of the formulations containing SM monomer with increased functionality were comparable with the control, even with more water sorption. The concentration and functionality of the newly synthesized siloxane-methacrylate monomers affected the water miscibility, water sorption and mechanical properties of the adhesives. The experimental adhesives show improved water compatibility compared with the control. The mechanical properties were enhanced with an increase of the functionality of the siloxane-containing monomers. The results provide critical structure/property relationships and important information for future development of durable, versatile siloxane-containing dentin adhesives. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Role of cellular adhesions in tissue dynamics spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Daniel A.; An, Ran; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2014-02-01

    Cellular adhesions play a critical role in cell behavior, and modified expression of cellular adhesion compounds has been linked to various cancers. We tested the role of cellular adhesions in drug response by studying three cellular culture models: three-dimensional tumor spheroids with well-developed cellular adhesions and extracellular matrix (ECM), dense three-dimensional cell pellets with moderate numbers of adhesions, and dilute three-dimensional cell suspensions in agarose having few adhesions. Our technique for measuring the drug response for the spheroids and cell pellets was biodynamic imaging (BDI), and for the suspensions was quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS). We tested several cytoskeletal chemotherapeutic drugs (nocodazole, cytochalasin-D, paclitaxel, and colchicine) on three cancer cell lines chosen from human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29), human pancreatic carcinoma (MIA PaCa-2), and rat osteosarcoma (UMR-106) to exhibit differences in adhesion strength. Comparing tumor spheroid behavior to that of cell suspensions showed shifts in the spectral motion of the cancer tissues that match predictions based on different degrees of cell-cell contacts. The HT-29 cell line, which has the strongest adhesions in the spheroid model, exhibits anomalous behavior in some cases. These results highlight the importance of using three-dimensional tissue models in drug screening with cellular adhesions being a contributory factor in phenotypic differences between the drug responses of tissue and cells.

  7. Saikosaponin D Isolated from Bupleurum falcatum Inhibits Selectin-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung-Jun Jang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three saikosaponins were isolated from the MeOH extract of the roots of Bupleurum falcatum L.: saikosaponins B3 (1; B4 (2; and D (3. Of the three, compound 3 inhibited the interaction of selectins (E, L, and P and THP-1 cells with IC50 values of 1.8, 3.0 and 4.3 µM, respectively. Also, the aglycone structure 4 of compound 3 showed moderate inhibitory activity on L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion. From these results, we suspect that compound 3 isolated from Bupleurum falcatum roots would be a good candidate for therapeutic strategies to treat inflammation.

  8. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perton, M; Blouin, A; Monchalin, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  9. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively

  10. Adhesive Strength of dry Adhesive Structures Depending on the Thickness of Metal Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Hye; Kwon, Da Som; Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Su Hee; Yoon, Ji Won; An, Tea Chang; Hwang, Hui Yun [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recently, engineering applications have started to adopt solutions inspired by nature. The peculiar adhesive properties of gecko skin are an example, as they allow the animal to move freely on vertical walls and even on ceilings. The high adhesive forces between gecko feet and walls are due to the hierarchical microscopical structure of the skin. In this study, the effect of metal coatings on the adhesive strength of synthetic, hierarchically structured, dry adhesives was investigated. Synthetic dry adhesives were fabricated using PDMS micro-molds prepared by photolithography. Metal coatings on synthetic dry adhesives were formed by plasma sputtering. Adhesive strength was measured by pure shear tests. The highest adhesion strengths were found with coatings composed of 4 nm thick layers of Indium, 8 nm thick layers of Zinc and 6 nm thick layers of Gold, respectively.

  11. Physics of adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerberich, W W; Cordill, M J

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion physics was relegated to the lowest echelons of academic pursuit until the advent of three seemingly disconnected events. The first, atomic force microscopy (AFM), eventually allowed fine-scale measurement of adhesive point contacts. The second, large-scale computational materials science, now permits both hierarchical studies of a few thousand atoms from first principles or of billions of atoms with less precise interatomic potentials. The third is a microelectronics industry push towards the nanoscale which has provided the driving force for requiring a better understanding of adhesion physics. In the present contribution, an attempt is made at conjoining these separate events into an updating of how theoretical and experimental approaches are providing new understanding of adhesion physics. While all material couples are briefly considered, the emphasis is on metal/semiconductor and metal/ceramic interfaces. Here, adhesion energies typically range from 1 to 100 J m -2 where the larger value is considered a practical work of adhesion. Experimental emphasis is on thin-film de-adhesion for 10 to 1000 nm thick films. For comparison, theoretical approaches from first principles quantum mechanics to embedded atom methods used in multi-scale modelling are utilized

  12. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules.

  13. On the Adhesion performance of a single electrospun fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baji, Avinash; Zhou, Limin; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yang, Zhifang; Yao, Haimin

    2015-01-01

    The micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures found on the feet of spiders and geckos function as adhesion devices which allow them to adhere to both molecularly smooth and rough surfaces. This adhesion has been argued to arise from intermolecular forces, such as van der Waals (vdW) force, acting at the interface between any two materials in contact. Thus, it is possible to mimic their adhesion using synthetic nanostructured analogs. Herein, we report the first successful pull-off force measurements on a single electrospun fiber and show the potential of using electrospinning to fabricate adhesive analogs. A single fiber is glued to the atomic force microscope cantilever, and its adhesion to a metal substrate is studied by recording the pull-off force/displacement curves. The measured adhesive force of ~18 nN matches closely that of their biological counterparts. Similar to natural structures, the adhesive mechanism of these electrospun structures is controlled by vdW interactions.

  14. Effect of Paste Flux Concentration on Adhesion Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DU Quan-bin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In view of the problem that paste flux is difficult to spread uniformly on the surface of filler metal, the adhesion behavior of the different concentrations of paste flux on the surface of filler metal was studied by the equipment of OM, wetting angle tester and surface tensiometer. The results show that adhesive layer is gradually thickened with the increase of the concentration of paste flux. A small amount of shrinkage appears in the thin adhesive layer. however, mass paste flux slides off filler metal when adhesive layer is thicker, accompanying by severe aggregation and shrinkage. For the ideal surface, the adhesive tension of paste flux with different concentrations of paste flux is the same. For the actual surface, the stripe groove additional pressure is formed when paste flux wets stripe groove, and the additional pressure is the main reason for the lagging phenomenon of the shrinkage of the adhesive layer. With the increase of paste flux concentration, the additional pressure decreases, the hysteresis resistance decreases, and the shrinkage increases. A relationship is satisfied when the shrinkage takes place in thin adhesive layer, this is ΔWC ≥ A+ΔP. Whether the shrinkage occurs mainly depends on the adhesion tension and the additional pressure.

  15. Endothelial cell adhesion to ion implanted polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y; Kusakabe, M [SONY Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Lee, J S; Kaibara, M; Iwaki, M; Sasabe, H [RIKEN (Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research), Saitama (Japan)

    1992-03-01

    The biocompatibility of ion implanted polymers has been studied by means of adhesion measurements of bovine aorta endothelial cells in vitro. The specimens used were polystyrene (PS) and segmented polyurethane (SPU). Na{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +} and Kr{sup +} ion implantations were performed at an energy of 150 keV with fluences ranging from 1x10{sup 15} to 3x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The chemical and physical structures of ion-implanted polymers have been investigated in order to analyze their tissue compatibility such as improvement of endothelial cell adhesion. The ion implanted SPU have been found to exhibit remarkably higher adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells than unimplanted specimens. By contrast, ion implanted PS demonstrated a little improvement of adhesion of cells in this assay. Results of FT-IR-ATR showed that ion implantation broke the original chemical bond to form new radicals such as OH, ....C=O, SiH and condensed rings. The results of Raman spectroscopy showed that ion implantation always produced a peak near 1500 cm{sup -1}, which indicated that these ion implanted PS and SPU had the same carbon structure. This structure is considered to bring the dramatic increase in the extent of cell adhesion and spreading to these ion implanted PS and SPU. (orig.).

  16. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell adhesion in Drosophila: versatility of cadherin and integrin complexes during development

    OpenAIRE

    Bulgakova, Natalia A.; Klapholz, Benjamin; Brown, Nicholas H.

    2012-01-01

    We highlight recent progress in understanding cadherin and integrin function in the model organism Drosophila. New functions for these adhesion receptors continue to be discovered in this system, emphasising the importance of cell adhesion within the developing organism and showing that the requirement for cell adhesion changes between cell types. New ways to control adhesion have been discovered, including controlling the expression and recruitment of adhesion components, their posttranslati...

  18. Adhesion properties of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based adhesives in the presence of phenol formaldehyde resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The adhesion properties, i. e. viscosity, tack and peel strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR/Standard Malaysian Rubber (SMR L-based pressure-sensitive adhesive was studied using phenol formaldehyde resin as the tackifying resin. Toluene was used as the solvent throughout the experiment. SBR composition in SBR/SMR L blend used was 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100%. Three different resin loadings, i. e. 40, 80 and 120 parts per hundred parts of rubber (phr were used in the adhesive formulation. The viscosity of adhesive was determined by a HAAKE Rotary Viscometer whereas loop tack and peel strength of paper/polyethylene terephthalate (PET film were measured using a Lloyd Adhesion Tester operating at 30 cm/min. Results indicate that the viscosity of adhesive decreases with increasing % SBR whereas loop tack passes through a maximum value at 20% SBR for all resin loadings. Except for the control sample (without resin, the peel strength shows a maximum value at 60% SBR for the three modes of peel tests. For a fixed % SBR, adhesive sample containing 40 phr phenol formaldehyde resin always exhibits the highest loop tack and peel strength, an observation which is associated to the optimum wettability of adhesive on the substrate.

  19. Natural and bio-inspired underwater adhesives: Current progress and new perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengkui; Ren, Susu; Wei, Shicao; Sun, Chengjun; Zhong, Chao

    2017-11-01

    Many marine organisms harness diverse protein molecules as underwater adhesives to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Natural underwater adhesion phenomena thus provide inspiration for engineering adhesive materials that can perform in water or high-moisture settings for biomedical and industrial applications. Here we review examples of biological adhesives to show the molecular features of natural adhesives and discuss how such knowledge serves as a heuristic guideline for the rational design of biologically inspired underwater adhesives. In view of future bio-inspired research, we propose several potential opportunities, either in improving upon current L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-based and coacervates-enabled adhesives with new features or engineering conceptually new types of adhesives that recapitulate important characteristics of biological adhesives. We underline the importance of viewing natural adhesives as dynamic materials, which owe their outstanding performance to the cellular coordination of protein expression, delivery, deposition, assembly, and curing of corresponding components with spatiotemporal control. We envision that the emerging synthetic biology techniques will provide great opportunities for advancing both fundamental and application aspects of underwater adhesives.

  20. Natural and bio-inspired underwater adhesives: Current progress and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengkui Cui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Many marine organisms harness diverse protein molecules as underwater adhesives to achieve strong and robust interfacial adhesion under dynamic and turbulent environments. Natural underwater adhesion phenomena thus provide inspiration for engineering adhesive materials that can perform in water or high-moisture settings for biomedical and industrial applications. Here we review examples of biological adhesives to show the molecular features of natural adhesives and discuss how such knowledge serves as a heuristic guideline for the rational design of biologically inspired underwater adhesives. In view of future bio-inspired research, we propose several potential opportunities, either in improving upon current L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-based and coacervates-enabled adhesives with new features or engineering conceptually new types of adhesives that recapitulate important characteristics of biological adhesives. We underline the importance of viewing natural adhesives as dynamic materials, which owe their outstanding performance to the cellular coordination of protein expression, delivery, deposition, assembly, and curing of corresponding components with spatiotemporal control. We envision that the emerging synthetic biology techniques will provide great opportunities for advancing both fundamental and application aspects of underwater adhesives.

  1. Bacterial adhesion capacity on food service contact surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Rok; Okanovič, Denis; Dražič, Goran; Abram, Anže; Oder, Martina; Jevšnik, Mojca; Bohinc, Klemen

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the adhesion of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus on food contact materials, such as polyethylene terephthalate, silicone, aluminium, Teflon and glass. Surface roughness, streaming potential and contact angle were measured. Bacterial properties by contact angle and specific charge density were characterised. The bacterial adhesion analysis using staining method and scanning electron microscopy showed the lowest adhesion on smooth aluminium and hydrophobic Teflon for most of the bacteria. However, our study indicates that hydrophobic bacteria with high specific charge density attach to those surfaces more intensively. In food services, safety could be increased by selecting material with low adhesion to prevent cross contamination.

  2. Molecular architecture of a complex between an adhesion protein from the malaria parasite and intracellular adhesion molecule 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Alan; Turner, Louise; Christoffersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human tissues or endothelium is central to the pathology caused by the parasite during malaria. It contributes to the avoidance of parasite clearance by the spleen and to the specific pathologies of cerebral and placental malaria....... The PfEMP1 family of adhesive proteins is responsible for this sequestration by mediating interactions with diverse human ligands. In addition, as the primary targets of acquired, protective immunity, the PfEMP1s are potential vaccine candidates. PfEMP1s contain large extracellular ectodomains made from......, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). We show through small angle x-ray scattering that IT4VAR13 is rigid, elongated, and monomeric. We also show that it interacts with ICAM-1 through the DBLß domain alone, forming a 1:1 complex. These studies provide a first low resolution structural view of a PfEMP1...

  3. Reflections about Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas Borges, Marciano; Diesel, Pâmela Gutheil; Corrêa, Fernanda Gomez; Bernardi, Eledana; Fernandes Montagner, Anelise; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Susin, Alexandre Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The adhesive systems are responsible for an efficient union between teeth and resin, resulting in a longevity restoration. They are organic molecules di or multifunctional that contain reactive groups that interact with dentin and with the resin monomer of composite resin. The adhesive systems are characterized by wet adhesion, which is a result of presence of hidrophylics radicals in their compositions, to promote a better bond and the best properties of the adhesion. Adhesive systems may us...

  4. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Menon, C

    2013-01-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm 2 . (paper)

  5. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  6. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  7. Coupling biochemistry and mechanics in cell adhesion: a model for inhomogeneous stress fiber contraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besser, Achim; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2007-01-01

    Biochemistry and mechanics are closely coupled in cell adhesion. At sites of cell-matrix adhesion, mechanical force triggers signaling through the Rho-pathway, which leads to structural reinforcement and increased contractility in the actin cytoskeleton. The resulting force acts back to the sites of adhesion, resulting in a positive feedback loop for mature adhesion. Here, we model this biochemical-mechanical feedback loop for the special case when the actin cytoskeleton is organized in stress fibers, which are contractile bundles of actin filaments. Activation of myosin II molecular motors through the Rho-pathway is described by a system of reaction-diffusion equations, which are coupled into a viscoelastic model for a contractile actin bundle. We find strong spatial gradients in the activation of contractility and in the corresponding deformation pattern of the stress fiber, in good agreement with experimental findings

  8. Adhesive Stretchable Printed Conductive Thin Film Patterns on PDMS Surface with an Atmospheric Plasma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Yi; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2016-05-11

    In this study, a plasma surface modification with printing process was developed to fabricate printed flexible conductor patterns or devices directly on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface. An atmospheric plasma treatment was first used to oxidize the PDMS surface and create a hydrophilic silica surface layer, which was confirmed with photoelectron spectra. The plasma operating parameters, such as gas types and plasma powers, were optimized to obtain surface silica layers with the longest lifetime. Conductive paste with epoxy resin was screen-printed on the plasma-treated PDMS surface to fabricate flexible conductive tracks. As a result of the strong binding forces between epoxy resin and the silica surface layer, the printed patterns showed great adhesion on PDMS and were undamaged after several stringent adhesion tests. The printed conductive tracks showed strong mechanical stability and exhibited great electric conductivity under bending, twisting, and stretching conditions. Finally, a printed pressure sensor with good sensitivity and a fast response time was fabricated to demonstrate the capability of this method for the realization of printed electronic devices.

  9. Asperity interaction in adhesive contact of metallic rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasanta; Banerjee, Atanu

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of adhesive contact of metallic rough surfaces considering the effect of asperity interaction is the subject of this investigation. The micro-contact model of asperity interactions developed by Zhao and Chang (2001 Trans. ASME: J. Tribol. 123 857-64) is combined with the elastic plastic adhesive contact model developed by Chang et al (1988 Trans. ASME: J. Tribol. 110 50-6) to consider the asperity interaction and elastic-plastic deformation in the presence of surface forces simultaneously. The well-established elastic adhesion index and plasticity index are used to consider the different contact conditions. Results show that asperity interaction influences the load-separation behaviour in elastic-plastic adhesive contact of metallic rough surfaces significantly and, in general, adhesion is reduced due to asperity interactions

  10. Influence of Etching Mode on Enamel Bond Durability of Universal Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Takamizawa, T; Barkmeier, W W; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Erickson, R L; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the enamel bond durability of three universal adhesives in different etching modes through fatigue testing. The three universal adhesives used were Scotchbond Universal, Prime&Bond Elect universal dental adhesive, and All-Bond Universal light-cured dental adhesive. A single-step self-etch adhesive, Clearfil S 3 Bond Plus was used as a control. The shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) to human enamel were evaluated in total-etch mode and self-etch mode. A stainless steel metal ring with an internal diameter of 2.4 mm was used to bond the resin composite to the flat-ground (4000-grit) tooth surfaces for determination of both SBS and SFS. For each enamel surface treatment, 15 specimens were prepared for SBS and 30 specimens for SFS. The staircase method for fatigue testing was then used to determine the SFS of the resin composite bonded to the enamel using 10-Hz frequencies for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe representative debonded specimen surfaces and the resin-enamel interfaces. A two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test were used for analysis of the SBS data, whereas a modified t-test with Bonferroni correction was used for the SFS data. All adhesives in total-etch mode showed significantly higher SBS and SFS values than those in self-etch mode. Although All-Bond Universal in self-etch mode showed a significantly lower SBS value than the other adhesives, there was no significant difference in SFS values among the adhesives in this mode. All adhesives showed higher SFS:SBS ratios in total-etch mode than in self-etch mode. With regard to the adhesive systems used in this study, universal adhesives showed higher enamel bond strengths in total-etch mode. Although the influence of different etching modes on the enamel-bonding performance of universal adhesives was found to be dependent on the adhesive material, total-etch mode

  11. Probing cellular mechanoadaptation using cell-substrate de-adhesion dynamics: experiments and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S S, Soumya; Sthanam, Lakshmi Kavitha; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M; Sen, Shamik

    2014-01-01

    Physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are known to regulate cellular processes ranging from spreading to differentiation, with alterations in cell phenotype closely associated with changes in physical properties of cells themselves. When plated on substrates of varying stiffness, fibroblasts have been shown to exhibit stiffness matching property, wherein cell cortical stiffness increases in proportion to substrate stiffness up to 5 kPa, and subsequently saturates. Similar mechanoadaptation responses have also been observed in other cell types. Trypsin de-adhesion represents a simple experimental framework for probing the contractile mechanics of adherent cells, with de-adhesion timescales shown to scale inversely with cortical stiffness values. In this study, we combine experiments and computation in deciphering the influence of substrate properties in regulating de-adhesion dynamics of adherent cells. We first show that NIH 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on collagen-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels de-adhere faster on stiffer substrates. Using a simple computational model, we qualitatively show how substrate stiffness and cell-substrate bond breakage rate collectively influence de-adhesion timescales, and also obtain analytical expressions of de-adhesion timescales in certain regimes of the parameter space. Finally, by comparing stiffness-dependent experimental and computational de-adhesion responses, we show that faster de-adhesion on stiffer substrates arises due to force-dependent breakage of cell-matrix adhesions. In addition to illustrating the utility of employing trypsin de-adhesion as a biophysical tool for probing mechanoadaptation, our computational results highlight the collective interplay of substrate properties and bond breakage rate in setting de-adhesion timescales.

  12. Carbon nanotube based gecko inspired self-cleaning adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sunny; Ge, Liehui; Ajayan, Pulickel; Ali, Dhinojwala

    2008-03-01

    Wall climbing organisms like geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without use of any viscoelastic material. The hairy structure found in gecko feet allows them to obtain intimate contact over a large area thus allowing then to adhere using van der Waals interactions. Not only high adhesion, the geometry of the hairs makes gecko feet self cleaning, thus allowing them to walk continuously without worrying about loosing adhesive strength. Such properties if mimicked synthetically could form basis of a new class of materials, which, unlike conventional adhesives would show two contradictory properties, self cleaning and high adhesion. Such materials would form essential component of applications like wall climbing robot. We tried to synthesize such material using micropatterened vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. When dealing with large areas, probability of defects in the structure increase, forming patterns instead of using uniform film of carbon nanotubes helps to inhibit crack propagation, thus gives much higher adhesive strength than a uniform film. When carbon nanotube patterns with optimized aspect ratio are used, both high adhesion and self cleaning properties are observed.

  13. Shear Bond Strengths of Different Adhesive Systems to Biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaş, Mesut Enes; Bani, Mehmet; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the shear bond strength of different adhesive systems to Biodentine with different time intervals. Eighty specimens of Biodentine were prepared and divided into 8 groups. After 12 minutes, 40 samples were randomly selected and divided into 4 groups of 10 each: group 1: (etch-and-rinse adhesive system) Prime & Bond NT; group 2: (2-step self-etch adhesive system) Clearfil SE Bond; group 3: (1-step self-etch adhesive systems) Clearfil S3 Bond; group 4: control (no adhesive). After the application of adhesive systems, composite resin was applied over Biodentine. This procedure was repeated 24 hours after mixing additional 40 samples, respectively. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, and the data were subjected to 1-way analysis of variance and Scheffé post hoc test. No significant differences were found between all of the adhesive groups at the same time intervals (12 minutes and 24 hours) (P > .05). Among the two time intervals, the lowest value was obtained for group 1 (etch-and-rinse adhesive) at a 12-minute period, and the highest was obtained for group 2 (two-step self-etch adhesive) at a 24-hour period. The placement of composite resin used with self-etch adhesive systems over Biodentine showed better shear bond strength. PMID:24222742

  14. Adhesion of some probiotic and dairy Lactobacillus strains to Caco-2 cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomola, E M; Salminen, S J

    1998-05-05

    The adhesion of 12 different Lactobacillus strains was studied using Caco-2 cell line as an in vitro model for intestinal epithelium. Some of the strains tested have been used as probiotics, and most of them are used in the dairy and food industry. Human and bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 cell cultures was quantitated using radiolabelled bacteria. The adherence of bacteria was also observed microscopically after Gram staining. Viability of bacteria prior to adhesion was verified using flow cytometry. Among the tested strains, L. casei (Fyos) was the most adhesive strain and L. casei var. rhamnosus (Lactophilus) was the least adhesive strain, approximately 14 and 3% of the added bacteria adhered to Caco-2 cell cultures, respectively. The corresponding values for positive and negative control E. coli strains were 14 and 4%, respectively. The Lactobacillus strains tested could not be divided into distinctly adhesive or non-adhesive strains, since there was a continuation of adhesion rates. The four most adhesive strains were L. casei (Fyos), L. acidophilus 1 (LC1), L. rhamnosus LC-705 and Lactobacillus GG (ATCC 53103). No significant differences in the percentage adhesion were observed between these strains. Adhesion of all the strains was dependent on the number of bacteria used, since an approximately constant number of Caco-2 cells was used, indicating that the Caco-2 cell binding sites were not saturated. Viability of bacteria was high since approximately 90% of the bacteria were viable with the exception of L. acidophilus 1 which was 74% viable. Microscopic evaluations agreed with the radiolabelled binding as evidenced by observing more bacteria in Gram-stained preparations of good adhering strains compared to poorly adhering strains.

  15. Competitive endothelial adhesion between Plasmodium falciparum isolates under physiological flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molyneux Malcolm

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequestration of parasitized red blood cells in the microvasculature of major organs involves a sequence of events that is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of severe falciparum malaria. Plasmodium falciparum infections are commonly composed of multiple subpopulations of parasites with varied adhesive properties. A key question is: do these subpopulations compete for adhesion to endothelium? This study investigated whether, in a laboratory model of cytoadherence, there is competition in binding to endothelium between pRBC infected with P. falciparum of variant adhesive phenotypes, particularly under flow conditions. Methods Four different P. falciparum isolates, of known adherence phenotypes, were matched in pairs, mixed in different proportions and allowed to bind to cultured human endothelium. Using in vitro competitive static and flow-based adhesion assays, that allow simultaneous testing of the adhesive properties of two different parasite lines, adherence levels of paired P. falciparum isolates were quantified and analysed using either non-parametric Wilcoxon's paired signed rank test or Student paired test. Results Study findings show that P. falciparum parasite lines show marked differences in the efficiency of adhesion to endothelium. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum variants will compete for adhesion to endothelia and variants can be ranked by their efficiency of binding. These findings suggest that variants from a mixed infection will not show uniform cytoadherence and so may vary in their ability to cause disease.

  16. Longevity of Self-etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives Compared to Etch-and-rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarwa, Nader; Mohamed, Ahmed; Abou-Rabii, Iyad; Abu Zaghlan, Rawan; Steier, Liviu

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to compare longevity of Self-Etch Dentin Bonding Adhesives to Etch-and-Rinse Dentin Bonding Adhesives. The following databases were searched for PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library complemented by a manual search of the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry. The MESH keywords used were: "etch and rinse," "total etch," "self-etch," "dentin bonding agent," "bond durability," and "bond degradation." Included were in-vitro experimental studies performed on human dental tissues of sound tooth structure origin. The examined Self-Etch Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and One Step Self-Etch Bonds, while Etch-and-Rinse Bonds were of two subtypes; Two Steps and Three Steps. The included studies measured micro tensile bond strength (μTBs) to evaluate bond strength and possible longevity of both types of dental adhesives at different times. The selected studies depended on water storage as the aging technique. Statistical analysis was performed for outcome measurements compared at 24 h, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months of water storage. After 24 hours (p-value = 0.051), 3 months (p-value = 0.756), 6 months (p-value=0.267), 12 months (p-value=0.785) of water storage self-etch adhesives showed lower μTBs when compared to the etch-and-rinse adhesives, but the comparisons were statistically insignificant. In this study, longevity of Dentin Bonds was related to the measured μTBs. Although Etch-and-Rinse bonds showed higher values at all times, the meta-analysis found no difference in longevity of the two types of bonds at the examined aging times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.D.; Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame's arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame

  18. Improving adhesion of seasonings to crackers with hydrocolloid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matthew E; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2013-11-01

    Food powders were applied on crackers that had been coated using water, oil, emulsion, sucrose, or hydrocolloid solutions. The hydrocolloids that were used include gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan, methylcellulose, gum karaya, gum tragacanth, gum arabic, guar gum, modified starch, and maltodextrin. Solutions of similar hydrophobicity to the powder gave the greatest adhesion. NaCl, barbecue (BBQ), ranch, and sour cream & onion (SC&O) seasoning showed greatest adhesion with water, cheese powder with an emulsion of 12.5% to 25% oil, and cocoa powder with oil. For NaCl, BBQ, ranch, and SC&O seasoning, hydrocolloids improved the adhesion over using water alone, with gellan gum providing the greatest adhesion. Hydrocolloid structural differences, including the presence or absence of branching, substitution of sugar units, and molecular weight affect water binding and thickening of the hydrocolloid spray that seemed to be significant factors affecting adhesion of powders to the target surface. For cheese powder, hydrocolloids were capable of replacing the oil within an emulsion while improving or maintaining the same level of adhesion, with gum arabic providing the greatest adhesion. For cocoa powder, hydrocolloid solutions were ineffective adhesives due to differences in hydrophilicity that result in insolubility. The effect of hydrocolloid concentration on adhesion was dependent both on the hydrocolloid type and the concentration that is sprayable, with 0.5% being the optimum concentration for most gums. Adhesion using sucrose solutions was determined by particle size and relative hydrophobicity. Increasing sucrose concentration decreased adhesion of smaller particles, but increased adhesion of larger particles. Adhesion of NaCl significantly increased with decreasing NaCl size using oil, water, and sucrose solutions. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Photolithography of polytetrafluoroethylene for tailored adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, R.R.; Martinez, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Irradiation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Mg (Kα) x-rays is shown to protect the surface against the chemical etching steps used to prepare PTFE for adhesion. Pre-irradiated etched samples of PTFE have adhesions strengths of less than 3% of that for non-irradiated etched samples. The major portion of this decrease in adhesion strength occurs for x-ray exposures of less than 10 min ∼4.8 x10 3 mrads) and failure in every case occurs in PTFE and not in the bonded transition region. XPS measurements (20 angstrom sampling depth) show little difference in F content between irradiated and non-irradiated samples, but thermal desorption shows increasing fluorocarbon desorption with irradiation time. These results are consistent with the known radiation chemistry of PTFE. Irradiation produced free radicals lead to branching and/ or cross-linking, and a surface rich in low molecular weight fluorocarbons. The more rigid cross-linked surface is resistant to deep (10,000 angstrom chemical attack and the bond formed is with a surface rich in short chain flurocarbons. Both a thin boundary region and bonding to short chain species is expected to lead to weak adhesive bonding. Electron irradiation is shown to lead to protection against chemical etching comparable to that obtained with X-rays. With electrons one has the patterns with resolution limited by the beam diameter

  20. Effect of molecular weight and testing rate on adhesion property of pressure-sensitive adhesives prepared from epoxidized natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Imran; Poh, B.T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Elucidation of adhesion property of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25). → Correlation of peel and shear strength with molecular weight and rate of testing. → Confirmation of miscibility of tackifier and ENR 25 by DSC and FTIR study. → Applicability of Fox equation in ENR 25/coumarone-indene resin system. -- Abstract: The dependence of peel strength and shear strength of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR 25)-based pressure-sensitive adhesive on molecular weight and rate of testing was investigated using coumarone-indene as the tackifying resin. Toluene and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were used as the solvent and substrate respectively throughout the study. A SHEEN hand coater was used to coat the adhesive on the substrate at a coating thickness of 120 μm. All the adhesion properties were determined by a Llyod Adhesion Tester operating at different rates of testing. Result shows that peel strength and shear strength increases up to an optimum molecular weight of 6.5 x 10 4 of ENR 25. For peel strength, the observation is attributed to the combined effects of wettability and mechanical strength of rubber at the optimum molecular weight, whereas for the shear strength, it is ascribed to the increasing amount of adhesive present in the coating layer which enhances the shear resistance of the adhesive. Peel strength and shear strength also increases with increase in rate of testing, an observation which is associated to the viscoeslastic response of the adhesive. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study confirms the miscibility of tackifier and the ENR 25.

  1. Collapsed adhesion of carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates: continuum mechanics and atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xuebo; Wang, Youshan

    2018-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can undergo collapse from the ordinary cylindrical configurations to bilayer ribbons when adhered on substrates. In this study, the collapsed adhesion of CNTs on the silicon substrates is investigated using both classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and continuum analysis. The governing equations and transversality conditions are derived based on the minimum potential energy principle and the energy-variational method, considering both the van der Waals interactions between CNTs and substrates and those inside CNTs. Closed-form solutions for the collapsed configuration are obtained which show good agreement with the results of MD simulations. The stability of adhesive configurations is investigated by analyzing the energy states. It is found that the adhesive states of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) (n, n) on the silicon substrates can be categorized by two critical radii, 0.716 and 0.892 nm. For SWCNTs with radius larger than 0.892 nm, they would fully collapse on the silicon substrates. For SWCNTs with radius less than 0.716 nm, the initial cylindrical configuration is energetically favorable. For SWCNTs with radius between two critical radii, the radially deformed state is metastable. The non-contact ends of all collapsed SWCNTs are identical with the same arc length of 2.38 nm. Finally, the role of number of walls on the adhesive configuration is investigated quantitatively. For multi-walled CNTs with the number of walls exceeding a certain value, the cylindrical configuration is stable due to the increasing bending stiffness. The present study can be useful for the design of CNT-based nanodevices.

  2. Use of a novel cell adhesion method and digital measurement to show stimulus-dependent variation in somatic and oral ciliary beat frequency in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Wade E; Hallworth, Richard; Wyatt, Todd A; Sisson, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    When Paramecium encounters positive stimuli, the membrane hyperpolarizes and ciliary beat frequency increases. We adapted an established immobilization protocol using a biological adhesive and a novel digital analysis system to quantify beat frequency in immobilized Paramecium. Cells showed low mortality and demonstrated beat frequencies consistent with previous studies. Chemoattractant molecules, reduction in external potassium, and posterior stimulation all increased somatic beat frequency. In all cases, the oral groove cilia maintained a higher beat frequency than mid-body cilia, but only oral cilia from cells stimulated with chemoattactants showed an increase from basal levels. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  3. TANNIN ADHESIVES AS AN ALTENATIVE TO THE SYNTHETIC PHENOLIC ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Çolak

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been paid industrially to the use of tannin formaldehyde adhesives in production of wood based panel products such as particleboard, fiber board and plywood. The researches on the use of tannin extracts as a wood adhesive started in 1950, however, they proceeded very slowly since the problems associated with the application of them. The idea which tannin extract can be used replace the oil-based phenolic adhesive was the base of several studies after the oil crisis of the 1970s. In the past, the economical aspects were important in the researches on the tannin-based adhesives. Nowadays, however, both economical and ecological factors should have taken into consideration in wood bonding.

  4. Microtensile bond strength of contemporary adhesives to primary enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquezan, Marcela; da Silveira, Bruno Lopes; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Rodrigues, Célia Regina Martins Delgado; Kramer, Paulo Floriani

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bond strength of three self-etching and two total-etch adhesive systems bonded to primary tooth enamel and dentin. Forty extracted primary human molars were selected and abraded in order to create flat buccal enamel and occlusal dentin surfaces. Teeth were assigned to one of the adhesive systems: Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, Adper Single Bond 2, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and AdheSE. Immediately to adhesive application, a composite resin (Filtek Z250) block was built up. After 3 months of water storage, each sample was sequentially sectioned in order to obtain sticks with a square cross-sectional area of about 0.72 mm2. The specimens were fixed lengthways to a microtensile device and tested using a universal testing machine with a 50-N load cell at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Microtensile bond strength values were recorded in MPa and compared by Analysis of Variance and the post hoc Tukey test (a = 0.05). In enamel, Clearfil SE Bond presented the highest values, followed by Adper Single Bond 2, AdheSE and Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose, without significant difference. The highest values in dentin were obtained with Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and all other adhesives did not present significant different values from that, except Adper Prompt L-Pop that achieved the lowest bond strength in both substrates. Adper Scotch Bond Multi Purpose and Adper Single Bond 2 presented significantly lower values in enamel than in dentin although all other adhesives presented similar results in both substrates. contemporary adhesive systems present similar behaviors when bonded to primary teeth, with the exception of the one-step self-etching system; and self-etching systems can achieve bond strength values as good in enamel as in dentin of primary teeth.

  5. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  6. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tramacere

    Full Text Available The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa. In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  7. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  8. Wet self-cleaning of superhydrophobic microfiber adhesives formed from high density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongho; Fearing, Ronald S

    2012-10-30

    Biologically inspired adhesives developed for switchable and controllable adhesion often require repetitive uses in general, dirty, environments. Superhydrophobic microstructures on the lotus leaf lead to exceptional self-cleaning of dirt particles on nonadhesive surfaces with water droplets. This paper describes the self-cleaning properties of a hard-polymer-based adhesive formed with high-aspect-ratio microfibers from high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The microfiber adhesive shows almost complete wet self-cleaning of dirt particles with water droplets, recovering 98% of the adhesion of the pristine microfiber adhesives. The low contact angle hysteresis indicates that the surface of microfiber adhesives is superhydrophobic. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal a design parameter, length, which can control the adhesion without affecting the superhydrophobicity. The results suggest some properties of biologically inspired adhesives can be controlled independently by adjusting design parameters.

  9. Energetics of bacterial adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loosdrecht, M.C.M. van; Zehnder, A.J.B.

    1990-01-01

    For the description of bacterial adhesion phenomena two different physico-chemical approaches are available. The first one, based on a surface Gibbs energy balance, assumes intimate contact between the interacting surfaces. The second approach, based on colloid chemical theories (DLVO theory), allows for two types of adhesion: 1) secondary minimum adhesion, which is often weak and reversible, and 2) irreversible primary minimum adhesion. In the secondary minimum adhesion a thin water film remains present between the interacting surface. The merits of both approaches are discussed in this paper. In addition, the methods available to measure the physico-chemical surface characteristics of bacteria and the influence of adsorbing (in)organic compounds, extracellular polymers and cell surface appendages on adhesion are summarized. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 50 refs

  10. Morphological Evaluation of the Adhesive/Enamel interfaces of Two-step Self-etching Adhesives and Multimode One-bottle Self-etching Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Matsui, Naoko; Hamba, Hidenori; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    To evaluate the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) at the adhesive/enamel interface of self-etching adhesives with or without prior phosphoric acid etching. Four adhesives were used in 8 groups: Clearfil SE Bond (SEB), Optibond XTR (XTR), Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU), and Clearfil BOND SE ONE (ONE) without prior phosphoric-acid etching, and each adhesive with phosphoric acid etching for 10 s (P-SEB, P-XTR, P-SBU and P-ONE, respectively). After application of self-etching adhesives on ground enamel surfaces of human teeth, a flowable composite was placed. For observation of the acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ), the bonded interface was exposed to demineralizing solution (pH 4.5) for 4.5 h, followed by 5% NaOCl with ultrasonication for 20 min. After the acid-base challenge, morphological attributes of the interface were observed using SEM. ABRZ formation was confirmed in all groups. The funnel-shaped erosion beneath the interface was present in SBU and ONE, where nearly 10 to 15 μm of enamel was dissolved. With phosphoric acid etching, the ABRZs were obviously thicker compared with no phosphoric acid etching. Enamel beneath the bonding interface was more susceptible to acid dissolution in SBU and ONE. In the case of the one-bottle self-etching adhesives and universal adhesives that intrinsically have higher pH values, enamel etching should be recommended to improve the interfacial quality.

  11. Functionalization of CoCr surfaces with cell adhesive peptides to promote HUVECs adhesion and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, Maria Isabel, E-mail: maria.isabel.castellanos@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in Nanoengineering (CRNE), UPC, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mas-Moruno, Carlos, E-mail: carles.mas.moruno@upc.edu [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in Nanoengineering (CRNE), UPC, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Grau, Anna, E-mail: agraugar@gmail.com [Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centre for Research in Nanoengineering (CRNE), UPC, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Serra-Picamal, Xavier, E-mail: xserrapicamal@gmail.com [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), 08028 Barcelona (Spain); University of Barcelona and CIBER-BBN, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Trepat, Xavier, E-mail: xtrepat@ub.edu [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), 08028 Barcelona (Spain); University of Barcelona and CIBER-BBN, 08036 Barcelona (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Albericio, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.albericio@irbbarcelona.org [Department of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, CIBER-BBN, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Joner, Michael, E-mail: michaeljoner@me.com [Department of Cardiology, Deutsches Herzzentrum München, 80636 Munich (Germany); CVPath Institute, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (United States); and others

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • We immobilized peptides on CoCr alloy through physisorption and covalent bonding. • Surface activation is an essential step prior to silanization to enhance peptide attachment. • Biofunctionalized surface characteristics were discussed. • RGDS, YIGSR and combination peptides display an improved HUVECs adhesion and proliferation. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification with peptides that have specific cell-binding moieties is a promising approach to improve endothelialization of metal-based stents. In this study, we functionalized CoCr surfaces with RGDS, REDV, YIGSR peptides and their combinations to promote endothelial cells (ECs) adhesion and proliferation. An extensive characterization of the functionalized surfaces was performed by XPS analysis, surface charge and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), which demonstrated the successful immobilization of the peptides to the surface. Cell studies demonstrated that the covalent functionalization of CoCr surfaces with an equimolar combination of RGDS and YIGSR represents the most powerful strategy to enhance the early stages of ECs adhesion and proliferation, indicating a positive synergistic effect between the two peptide motifs. Although these peptide sequences slightly increased smooth muscle cells (SMCs) adhesion, these values were ten times lower than those observed for ECs. The combination of RGDS with the REDV sequence did not show synergistic effects in promoting the adhesion or proliferation of ECs. The strategy presented in this study holds great potential to overcome clinical limitations of current metal stents by enhancing their capacity to support surface endothelialization.

  12. Cytotoxicity of four denture adhesives on human gingival fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Chung, Shin-Hye; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Ju, Sung-Won; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of four denture adhesives on human gingival fibroblast cells. Immortalized human gingival fibroblasts were cultured with one of four different denture adhesives, Polident, Protefix, Staydent or Denfix-A, which was placed in insert dishes (10% w/v concentration) for 48 h. The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometric apoptosis assay were used to evaluate cell viability and apoptosis rates. The fibroblasts were also examined under a scanning electron microscope. The MTT assay showed that all denture adhesives resulted in a significantly lower cell viability compared to the control cells propagated in normal culture medium (p 0.05). Staydent showed the highest apoptosis rate. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the cells of the Staydent group underwent cytoplasmic membrane shrinkage, with cell free areas containing residual fragments of the membrane of dead cells. The four denture adhesives evaluated in this study imparted cytotoxic effects on human gingival fibroblast cells. Staydent showed the highest toxicity.

  13. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  14. Poly(ethylene glycol) dicarboxylate/poly(ethylene oxide) hydrogel film co-crosslinked by electron beam irradiation as an anti-adhesion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haryanto,; Singh, Deepti; Han, Sung Soo; Son, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Seong Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) dicarboxylate (PEGDC)/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA)/(PEO) hydrogels were developed for possible biomedical applications such as an anti-adhesion barrier. Various contents of PEGDC/PEO film were irradiated using an electron beam with various beam intensities in order to obtain various degrees of crosslinked hydrogels. The optimum dose (300 kGy) and total crosslinker content of 10% were used to prepare crosslinked hydrogel films with three different compositions (10% PEGDC, 10% PEGDMA, 5% PEGDC–5% PEGDMA). Among them, 10% PEGDC hydrogel film exhibited the highest elongation at break (69.33 ± 6.87%) with high mechanical strength. 10% PEGDC hydrogel film showed the lowest hemolysis activity (6.03 ± 0.01%) and the highest tissue adherence (75.67 ± 1.15 cN). The result also indicated that the carboxyl groups in PEGDC affect the tissue adherence of hydrogel films via H-bonding interactions. In animal studies, 10% PEGDC anti-adhesion hydrogel film degraded within 3 weeks and demonstrated better anti-adhesive effect compared to Guardix-SG®. - Highlights: • The crosslinked PEGDC/PEO hydrogel was developed by e-beam irradiation. • 10% PEGDC hydrogel film showed the highest elongation at break and tissue adhesion. • The COOH group enhanced the tissue adherence of hydrogel films on the intestine. • 10% PEGDC hydrogel film demonstrated a good anti-adhesive effect in animal study. • All of the hydrogel films with 10% PEGDC degraded in vivo within three weeks

  15. A mechanical model of biomimetic adhesive pads with tilted and hierarchical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schargott, M

    2009-06-01

    A 3D model for hierarchical biomimetic adhesive pads is constructed. It is based on the main principles of the adhesive pads of the Tokay gecko and consists of hierarchical layers of vertical or tilted beams, where each layer is constructed in such a way that no cohesion between adjacent beams can occur. The elastic and adhesive properties are calculated analytically and numerically. For the adhesive contact on stochastically rough surfaces, the maximum adhesion force increases with increasing number of hierarchical layers. Additional calculations show that the adhesion force also depends on the height spectrum of the rough surface.

  16. A mechanical model of biomimetic adhesive pads with tilted and hierarchical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schargott, M [Institute of Mechanics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strd 17 Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: martin.schargott@tu-berlin.de

    2009-06-01

    A 3D model for hierarchical biomimetic adhesive pads is constructed. It is based on the main principles of the adhesive pads of the Tokay gecko and consists of hierarchical layers of vertical or tilted beams, where each layer is constructed in such a way that no cohesion between adjacent beams can occur. The elastic and adhesive properties are calculated analytically and numerically. For the adhesive contact on stochastically rough surfaces, the maximum adhesion force increases with increasing number of hierarchical layers. Additional calculations show that the adhesion force also depends on the height spectrum of the rough surface.

  17. A mechanical model of biomimetic adhesive pads with tilted and hierarchical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schargott, M

    2009-01-01

    A 3D model for hierarchical biomimetic adhesive pads is constructed. It is based on the main principles of the adhesive pads of the Tokay gecko and consists of hierarchical layers of vertical or tilted beams, where each layer is constructed in such a way that no cohesion between adjacent beams can occur. The elastic and adhesive properties are calculated analytically and numerically. For the adhesive contact on stochastically rough surfaces, the maximum adhesion force increases with increasing number of hierarchical layers. Additional calculations show that the adhesion force also depends on the height spectrum of the rough surface

  18. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  19. Use of Soy Flour-Tannin Adhesive for Particleboard (Dry Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Ghahri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research soy flour- tannin adhesives were used in particleboard preparation, successfully. Tow type of different tannins Mimosa (as condensed tannin and Chestnut (as hydrolysable tannins were used for soy resin modification. For this purpose, mimosa and chestnut tannin were added to soy adhesive with 5, 10 and 15 percent based on dry weight of soy flour. 9 percent Glyoxal was used based on dry weight of tannin for accelerate tannin reaction’s with soyflour components. Prepared soy-tannin adhesives were used in particle board manufacturing with 350×300×14 mm3 dimansion and 0.7 g/cm3 nominal density. Results of viscosity measurment showed that addition of each of tannins decreased visocosity of soy adhesive. In this study, result of thermo-mechanical analyze indicated that chestnut cloud improve adhesion behavior of soy adhesive better than mimosa. Also, Using of tannins in soy adhesive composition increase internal bonding and bending properties in manufactured particleboards.

  20. Focal adhesion kinase maintains, but not increases the adhesion of dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuyan; Shao, Meiying; Zou, Wenlin; Wang, Linyan; Cheng, Ran; Hu, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions as a key enzyme in the integrin-mediated adhesion-signalling pathway. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of FAK on adhesion of human dental pulp (HDP) cells. We transfected lentiviral vectors to silence or overexpress FAK in HDP cells ex vivo. Early cell adhesion, cell survival and focal contacts (FCs)-related proteins (FAK and paxillin) were examined. By using immunofluorescence, the formation of FCs and cytoskeleton was detected, respectively. We found that both adhesion and survival of HDP cells were suppressed by FAK inhibition. However, FAK overexpression slightly inhibited cell adhesion and exhibited no change in cell survival compared with the control. A thick rim of cytoskeleton accumulated and smaller dot-shaped FCs appeared in FAK knockdown cells. Phosphorylation of paxillin (p-paxillin) was inhibited in FAK knockdown cells, verifying that the adhesion was inhibited. Less cytoskeleton and elongated FCs were observed in FAK-overexpressed cells. However, p-paxillin had no significant difference compared with the control. In conclusion, the data suggest that FAK maintains cell adhesion, survival and cytoskeleton formation, but excessive FAK has no positive effects on these aspects.

  1. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading and inva......Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......-mediated invadopodia formation. Taken together, our results indicate that RNA-binding proteins exert profound effects on cellular adhesion and invasion during development and cancer formation....

  2. Nanohairs and nanotubes: Efficient structural elements for gecko-inspired artificial dry adhesives

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2009-08-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the development of gecko-inspired synthetic dry adhesives is presented, with particular emphasis on two major structural elements of nanohairs and nanotubes. With the advance of nanofabrication techniques, recently developed dry adhesives made of nanohairs and nanotubes show excellent adhesion strength, smart directional adhesion as well as rough surface adaptability by better mimicking gecko foot hairs. After a brief description of the requirements for high-performance artificial dry adhesives, a variety of synthetic adhesives are described based on materials and structural features of the gecko-inspired nanostructures. In addition, current challenges and future directions towards an optimized synthetic dry adhesive are presented. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanohairs and nanotubes: Efficient structural elements for gecko-inspired artificial dry adhesives

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the development of gecko-inspired synthetic dry adhesives is presented, with particular emphasis on two major structural elements of nanohairs and nanotubes. With the advance of nanofabrication techniques, recently developed dry adhesives made of nanohairs and nanotubes show excellent adhesion strength, smart directional adhesion as well as rough surface adaptability by better mimicking gecko foot hairs. After a brief description of the requirements for high-performance artificial dry adhesives, a variety of synthetic adhesives are described based on materials and structural features of the gecko-inspired nanostructures. In addition, current challenges and future directions towards an optimized synthetic dry adhesive are presented. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Y Stark

    Full Text Available Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.. This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  5. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  6. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  7. Effect of repeated contact on adhesion measurements involving polydimethylsiloxane structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroner, E; Arzt, E; Maboudian, R

    2009-01-01

    During the last few years several research groups have focused on the fabrication of artificial gecko inspired adhesives. For mimicking these structures, different polymers are used as structure material, such as polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), polyurethanes (PU), and polypropylene (PP). While these polymers can be structured easily and used for artificial adhesion systems, the effects of repeated adhesion testing have never been investigated closely. In this paper we report on the effect of repeated adhesion measurements on the commercially available poly(dimethylsiloxane) polymer kit Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning). We show that the adhesion force decreases as a function of contact cycles. The rate of change and the final value of adhesion are found to depend on the details of the PDMS synthesis and structuring.

  8. Glulam Properties of Fast-growing Species Using Mahogany Tannin Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sri Rahayu Diza Lestari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing glued laminated timber (glulam can help overcome the limited availability of large-sized timber, and the use of bio-adhesives may resolve environmental problems associated with synthetic adhesives containing high formaldehyde contents. Tannin adhesive is a bio-adhesive that can be used as alternative glue in the manufacture of glulam. The purpose of this study was to determine the physical and mechanical properties of glulam made with mahogany (Swietenia sp. tannin adhesive and wood from three fast-growing species, namely pine (Pinus merkusii, jabon (Anthocephalus cadamba, and sengon (Falcataria moluccana. Glulam (3 cm × 6 cm × 120 cm in thickness, width, and length, respectively was manufactured with three layers of lamina. The physical and mechanical properties of the glulams were tested based on relevant standards. The results showed that pine glulam fulfilled the standard for the modulus of rupture and modulus of elasticity, while sengon glulam met the standard for shear strength. In the delamination test, sengon glulam was resistant to immersion in cold water and hot water. All glulams had low formaldehyde emission levels and therefore fulfilled the standard requirements. The results showed that the tannin adhesive from mahogany bark was equal in quality to methylene diphenyl di-isocyanate for glulam manufacturing.

  9. Application of atmospheric pressure plasma on polyethylene for increased prosthesis adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Vrekhem, S., E-mail: stijn.vanvrekhem@ugent.be [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cools, P. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Declercq, H. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 6B3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Tongel, A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185 13K12, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vercruysse, C.; Cornelissen, M. [Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185 6B3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Geyter, N.; Morent, R. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41 B4, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    Biopolymers are often subjected to surface modification in order to improve their surface characteristics. The goal of this study is to show the use of plasma technology to enhance the adhesion of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) shoulder prostheses. Two different plasma techniques (low pressure plasma activation and atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization) are performed on UHMWPE to increase the adhesion between (1) the polymer and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and (2) the polymer and osteoblast cells. Both techniques are performed using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). A previous paper showed that low pressure plasma activation of UHMWPE results in the incorporation of oxygen-containing functional groups, which leads to an increased surface wettability. Atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of methylmethacrylate (MMA) on UHMWPE results in a PMMA-like coating, which could be deposited with a high degree of control of chemical composition and layer thickness. The thin film also proved to be relatively stable upon incubation in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). This paper discusses the next stage of the study, which includes testing the adhesion of the plasma-activated and plasma-polymerized samples to bone cement through pull-out tests and testing the cell adhesion and proliferation on the samples. In order to perform the pull-out tests, all samples were cut to standard dimensions and fixed in bone cement in a reproducible way with a sample holder specially designed for this purpose. The cell adhesion and proliferation were tested by means of an MTS assay and live/dead staining after culturing MC3T3 osteoblast cells on UHMWPE samples. The results show that both plasma activation and plasma polymerization significantly improve the adhesion to bone cement and enhance cell adhesion and proliferation. In conclusion, it can be stated that the use of plasma technology can lead to an implant with improved quality and a subsequent

  10. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    . As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  11. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  12. THz Properties of Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübling, E.; Gomell, L.; Sommer, S.; Winkel, A.; Kahlmeyer, M.; Böhm, S.; Koch, M.

    2018-06-01

    We determined the THz properties of 12 different adhesives which are mainly used for industrial purposes. The adhesives applied can be classified according to their chemical structure: epoxy resins, acrylic resins, and polyurethane based materials. This work represents a basis for future studies, which will concentrate on aging effects, including the absorption of water of adhesive joints. Thus, the dielectric properties of the unaged adhesives are investigated and the results of these measurements are described herein.

  13. Postoperative adhesion prevention in gynecologic surgery with hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, G; Cerrone, L; Iovenitti, P

    2004-01-01

    Despite improvements in surgical instrumentation and techniques, adhesions continue to form after most procedures. Peritoneal adhesions develop in 60-90% of women who undergo major gynecological operations. This adhesion formation causes significant postoperative morbidity such as bowel obstruction (65%), infertility (15-20%), and chronic pelvic pain (40%). To demonstrate the efficacy of a hyaluronic acid product (Hyalobarrier Gel) for the prevention of adhesions in gynecological surgery. From October 2000 to July 2002, 18 women from 26 to 41 years old (mean age 33.66) underwent myomectomy via laparotomy as their first abdominal operation. Between August 2001 and May 2003, the patients underwent a second-look laparoscopy (7 women, 38.9%, 15 sites, 42.8%) or a second-look laparotomy (11 women, 61.1%, 20 sites, 57.1%) during which all the 35 sites corresponding to the previous myomectomies were analyzed. During the second-look procedure the presence, localization and severity of adhesions were evaluated using the Operative Laparoscopy Study Group Classification (OLSG) and American Fertility Society Classification (AFSC). All patients underwent a second-look laparoscopy/laparotomy and only five of 18 (27.7%) showed pelvic adhesions in seven sites (20%) of previous myomectomies. No adhesion was found on the previous sites of myomectomies of pedunculated leiomyomas so, excluding those, adhesions were found in seven of 29 sites of myomectomies (24.1%). The present study emphasizes the need for improved treatments to prevent adhesions, as there is no doubt that adhesions represent one of the major causes of female morbidity.

  14. Importance of loading and unloading procedures for gecko-inspired controllable adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamelier, John; Chary, Sathya; Turner, Kimberly L

    2013-08-27

    The importance of loading and unloading procedures has been shown in a variety of different methods for biological dry adhesives, such as the fibers on the feet of the Tokay gecko, but biomimetic dry adhesives have yet to be explored in a similar manner. To date, little work has systematically varied multiple parameters to discern the influence of the testing procedure, and the effect of the approach angle remains uncertain. In this study, a synthetic adhesive is moved in 13 individual approach and retraction angles relative to a flat substrate as well as 9 different shear lengths to discern how loading and unloading procedures influence the preload, adhesion, and shear/friction forces supported. The synthetic adhesive, composed of vertical 10 μm diameter semicircular poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, is tested against a 4 mm diameter flat glass puck on a home-built microtribometer using both vertical approach and retraction tests and angled approach and retraction tests. The results show that near maximum adhesion and friction can be obtained for most approach and retraction angles, provided that a sufficient shear length is performed. The results also show that the reaction forces during adhesive placement can be significantly reduced by using specific approach angles, resulting for the vertical fibers in a 38-fold increase in the ratio of adhesion force to preload force, μ', when compared to that when using a vertical approach. These results can be of use to those currently researching gecko-inspired adhesives when designing their testing procedures and control algorithms for climbing and perching robots.

  15. Bioinspired pressure actuated adhesive system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paretkar, D.R.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schneider, A.S.; Martina, D.; Creton, C.; Arzt, E.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a dry synthetic adhesive system inspired by gecko feet adhesion that can switch reversibly from adhesion to non-adhesion with applied pressure as external stimulus. Micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces with pillars of 30 µm length and 10 µm diameter were fabricated using

  16. Staying sticky: contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengüç, Yigit; Röhrig, Michael; Abusomwan, Uyiosa; Hölscher, Hendrik; Sitti, Metin

    2014-05-06

    The exceptionally adhesive foot of the gecko remains clean in dirty environments by shedding contaminants with each step. Synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives have achieved similar attachment strengths to the gecko on smooth surfaces, but the process of contact self-cleaning has yet to be effectively demonstrated. Here, we present the first gecko-inspired adhesive that has matched both the attachment strength and the contact self-cleaning performance of the gecko's foot on a smooth surface. Contact self-cleaning experiments were performed with three different sizes of mushroom-shaped elastomer microfibres and five different sizes of spherical silica contaminants. Using a load-drag-unload dry contact cleaning process similar to the loads acting on the gecko foot during locomotion, our fully contaminated synthetic gecko adhesives could recover lost adhesion at a rate comparable to that of the gecko. We observed that the relative size of contaminants to the characteristic size of the microfibres in the synthetic adhesive strongly determined how and to what degree the adhesive recovered from contamination. Our approximate model and experimental results show that the dominant mechanism of contact self-cleaning is particle rolling during the drag process. Embedding of particles between adjacent fibres was observed for particles with diameter smaller than the fibre tips, and further studied as a temporary cleaning mechanism. By incorporating contact self-cleaning capabilities, real-world applications of synthetic gecko adhesives, such as reusable tapes, clothing closures and medical adhesives, would become feasible.

  17. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ′) of 8–16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ′, along with a large shear force of ∼78 kPa, approaching the 88–226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry. (paper)

  18. Microtensile bond strength of eleven contemporary adhesives to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Satoshi; Vargas, Marcos A; Abe, Yasuhiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido; Sano, Hidehiko; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2003-10-01

    To compare the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to enamel of 10 contemporary adhesives, including three one-step self-etch systems, four two-step self-etch systems and three two-step total-etch systems, with that of a conventional three-step total-etch adhesive. Resin composite (Z100, 3M) was bonded to flat, #600-grit wet-sanded enamel surfaces of 18 extracted human third molars using the adhesives strictly according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into 2-4 thin slabs of approximately 1 mm thickness and 2.5 mm width. They were then trimmed into an hourglass shape with an interface area of approximately 1 mm2, and subsequently subjected to microTBS-testing with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. The microTBS to enamel varied from 3.2 MPa for the experimental one-step self-etch adhesive PQ/Universal (self-etch) to 43.9 MPa for the two-step total-etch adhesive Scotchbond 1. When compared with the conventional three-step total-etch adhesive OptiBond FL, the bond strengths of most adhesives with simplified application procedures were not significantly different, except for two one-step self-etch adhesives, experimental PQ/Universal (self-etch) and One-up Bond F, that showed lower bond strengths. Specimen failures during sample preparation were recorded for the latter adhesives as well.

  19. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ‧) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ‧, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  20. Elimination of the reactivation process in the adhesion of chlorinated SBS rubber with polychloroprene adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination treatment of a thermoplastic styrene-butadiene-styrene rubber (SBS with a 3 wt% solution of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCI in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK introduces chlorinated and oxidized moieties on the rubber surface which increase its surface energy and produces surface microroughness. Consequently adhesion properties, evaluated by T-peel strength measurements in chlorinated SBS/solvent based-polyurethane adhesive/leather joints, are enhanced. In this study, two solvent-based polychloroprene adhesives (PCP0 and PCP30R have been considered as an alternative to the commonly used solvent-based polyurethane adhesive (PU. A thermoreactive phenolic resin was added to one of the polychloroprene adhesive formulations (PCP30R. This tackifier resin favors chlorination of the adhesive and reinforces the interface between the chlorinated adhesive and the chlorinated rubber surface. Besides, PCP30R adhesive does not need adhesive reactivation and considerable high T-peel strength value (5.7±0.3 kN/m was obtained. Elimination of the reactivation process implies a considerable improvement of the manufacturing process in the footwear industry.

  1. Shape and Dynamics of Adhesive Cells: Mechanical Response of Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-05-01

    Cell adhesion is an essential biological process. However, previous theoretical and experimental studies ignore a key variable, the changes of cellular volume and pressure, during the dynamic adhesion process. Here, we treat cells as open systems and propose a theoretical framework to investigate how the exchange of water and ions with the environment affects the shape and dynamics of cells adhered between two adhesive surfaces. We show that adherent cells can be either stable (convex or concave) or unstable (spontaneous rupture or collapse) depending on the adhesion energy density, the cell size, the separation of two adhesive surfaces, and the stiffness of the flexible surface. Strikingly, we find that the unstable states vanish when cellular volume and pressure are constant. We further show that the detachments of convex and concave cells are very different. The mechanical response of adherent cells is mainly determined by the competition between the loading rate and the regulation of the cellular volume and pressure. Finally, we show that as an open system the detachment of adherent cells is also significantly influenced by the loading history. Thus, our findings reveal a major difference between living cells and nonliving materials.

  2. Adhesive contact: from atomistic model to continuum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Kang-Qi; Jia Jian-Yuan; Zhu Ying-Min; Zhang Xiu-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Two types of Lennard-Jones potential are widely used in modeling adhesive contacts. However, the relationships between the parameters of the two types of Lennard-Jones potential are not well defined. This paper employs a self-consistent method to derive the Lennard-Jones surface force law from the interatomic Lennard-Jones potential with emphasis on the relationships between the parameters. The effect of using correct parameters in the adhesion models is demonstrated in single sphere-flat contact via continuum models and an atomistic model. Furthermore, the adhesion hysteresis behaviour is investigated, and the S-shaped force-distance relation is revealed by the atomistic model. It shows that the adhesion hysteresis loop is generated by the jump-to-contact and jump-off-contact, which are illustrated by the S-shaped force-distance curve. (atomic and molecular physics)

  3. Early cell adhesion events differ between osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinpanayagam, H; Zaharias, R; Stanford, C; Brand, R; Keller, J; Schneider, G

    2001-11-01

    In osteoporosis, the regenerative capacity of bone is compromised, which may involve altered osteoblast (OB) activity. This could be attributed to an inappropriate synthesis and assembly of an extracellular matrix (ECM), altered cell adhesion to the ECM, or be due to inappropriate downstream activation of adhesion-mediated signaling cascades through proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The purpose of our study was to compare early adhesion-mediated events using previously described and characterized clinically derived OBs obtained from human patients undergoing major joint arthroplasty for osteoporosis or osteoarthritis. The presence or absence of osteoporosis was established with a radiographic index. Using light microscopy and crystal violet staining, we show that OB cells derived from sites of osteoporosis do not attach and spread as well as non-osteoporotic (OP) OB cells. OP cells initially have a more rounded morphology, and show significantly less (P attachment to serum-coated tissue culture plastic over a 24 h time period. Immunofluorescent labeling after 24 h of attachment showed that OP OB focal adhesions (FAs) and stress fibers were less defined, and that the OP cells were smaller and had a more motile phenotype. When normalized protein lysates were Western blotted for phosphotyrosine (PY) a band corresponding to pp125FAK was identified. FAK tyrosine phosphorylation was evident at 6 h in both the OP and non-OP OBs, but decreased or was absent through 24 h in OP OBs. These results suggest early adhesion-mediated events, such as cell adhesion, attachment, and FAK signaling via PY may be altered in OP OBs.

  4. Two-year clinical performance of four adhesive strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Hasab Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the clinical performance of four adhesive strategies; 3-step etch-and-rinse Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM, 2-step etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond-2 [S2], 2-step self-etch Adper Scotchbond SE (SE and 1-step self-etch (Adper Single Bond Universal [SU]. Materials and Methods: Eighty cervical cavities exhibiting dentin carious lesions were used. Four adhesives from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA representing different bonding strategies were used; SM (3-step etch-and-rinse, Adper S2 (2-step etch-and-rinse, SE (2-step self-etch and SU (1-step self-etch. Cavities were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin (Z-350XT - 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, and clinically followed up for 24 months using the modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Results: The outcome of Wilcoxon signed rank test showed no significant difference among the groups for each adhesive material at different evaluation periods (P > 0.05. Furthermore, the Friedman test revealed that there was no significant difference between all materials in all evaluation criteria, except for marginal discoloration at 24-month evaluation period. At 24-month evaluation period, teeth restored with self-etch adhesives showed more marginal staining. Conclusions: The four bonding strategies used in the current study showed an acceptable 2-year clinical performance.

  5. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    in their intracellular compartment. Among these are tyrosine kinases, which have received a great deal of attention, whereas the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C has received much less. Here the status of protein kinase C in focal adhesions and cell migration is reviewed, together with discussion of its roles...... and adhesion turnover. Focal adhesions, or focal contacts, are widespread organelles at the cell-matrix interface. They arise as a result of receptor interactions with matrix ligands, together with clustering. Recent analysis shows that focal adhesions contain a very large number of protein components...

  6. Reversible low adhesive to high adhesive superhydrophobicity transition on ZnO nanoparticle surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jian; Jing, Zhijiao; Yang, Yaoxia; Zha, Fei; Yan, Long; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces with water contact angle of 162° and sliding angle of 2° were fabricated successfully by spraying hydrophobic ZnO nanoparticle suspensions without limitations the shape and size of substrates. The as-prepared superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces are low adhesive and a water droplet easily rolls off with the surface slightly tilted. However, after being irradiated by UV light through a photomask, it becomes highly adhesive, on which a water droplet is firmly pinned without any movement. Further annealing the irradiated film, water droplets can roll off the surface again. Reversible transition between the low adhesive rolling state and high adhesive pinning state can be realized simply by UV illumination and heat treatment alternately. At the same time, the maximum adhesive force between the superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces and the water droplet changes from extreme low (∼5.1 μN) to very high (∼136.1 μN). When irradiated without a photomask, the surface became hydrophilic. Additionally, a water droplet can be transfered from the low adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces to the hydrophilic ZnO surfaces using the high adhesive superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces as a mechanical hand.

  7. Adhesion of Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 coatings to typical aerospace substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marraco-Borderas, C.; Nistal, A.; Garcia, E.; Sainz, M.A.; Martin de la Escalera, F.; Essa, Y.; Miranzo, P.

    2016-01-01

    High performance lightweight materials are required in the aerospace industry. Silicon carbide, carbon fiber reinforced carbon and slicon carbide composites comply with those requirements but they suffer from oxidation at the high temperature of the service conditions. One of the more effective approaches to prevent this problem is the use of protecting ceramic coatings, where the good adhesion between substrates and coatings are paramount to guarantee the optimal protection performance. In the present work, the adhesion between those substrates and glass coatings of the Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system processed by oxyacetylene flame spraying is analyzed. Increasing load scratch tests are employed for determining the failure type, maximum load and their relation with the elastic and mechanical properties of the coatings. The results points to the good adhesion of the coatings to silicon carbide and carbon fibre reinforced silicon carbide while the carbon fiber reinforced carbon is not a suitable material to be coated. (Author)

  8. INFLUENCE OF PLASMA NITRIDING ON THE CORROSION BEHAVIOUR AND ADHESION OF DLC COATINGS DEPOSITED ON AISI 420 STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge N. Pecina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the corrosion behavior and adhesion of two DLC (“Diamond Like Carbon” films (“Soft” and “Hard” were studied. Both coatings were deposited by PACVD (“Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition” on plasma-nitrided and non-nitrided AISI 420 stainless steel. Raman spectroscopy was conducted and surface hardness was measured. The microstructure by OM and SEM, was observed. Adhesion tests were performed with C. Rockwell indentation test. Salt Spray and immersion were performed in HCl. The “Soft” coating was 20 μm thick, the “Hard” film was about 2.5 μm. The hardness was of 500 HV in the “Soft” DLC and 1400 HV in the “Hard” DLC. Both coatings presented low friction coefficient and good adhesion when they were deposited on nitrided steel. Also presented good resistance to atmospheric corrosion. HCl DLC degradation slowed rapidly introduced uncoated samples.

  9. Increased adhesion of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use by surface treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel; Pulpytel, Jérôme; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    The surface properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were modified by treatment with an atmospheric pressure rotating plasma jet (APPJ) and the surface modifications were studied to assess its hydrophilicity and adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape intended for medical applications. Furthermore, the extent of hydrophobic recovery under different storage conditions was studied. The surface treatment of PDMS with the APPJ under optimal conditions noticeably increased the oxygen content and most of the surface silicon species were fully oxidized. A brittle silica-like layer on the outermost surface was created showing changes in topography due to the formation of grooves and cracks. A huge improvement in T-peel and the shear adhesive strength of the APPJ-treated PDMS surface/acrylic tape joints was obtained. On the other hand, the hydrophilicity of the PDMS surface increased noticeably after the APPJ treatment, but 24 h after treatment almost 80% hydrophobicity was recovered and the adhesive strength was markedly reduced with time after the APPJ treatment. However, the application of an acrylic adhesive layer on the just-APPJ-treated PDMS surface retained the adhesive strength, limiting the extent of hydrophobic recovery. (paper)

  10. Characterization of Incorporation the Glass Waste in Adhesive Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D. P.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Hespanhol, R. L.; Alexandre, J.

    Ehe search for reuse generated waste in urban centers, intending to preserve natural resources, has remained fairly constant, both in context of preventing exploitation of resources as the emplacement of waste on the environment. Glass waste glass created a serious environmental problem, mainly because of inconsistency of its flows. Ehe use of this product as a mineral additive, finely ground, cement replacement and aggregate is a promising direction for recycling. This work aims to study the influence of glass waste from cutting process in adhesive mortar, replacing part of cement. Ehe glass powder is used replacing Portland cement at 10, 15 and 20% by mass. Ehe produced mortars will be evaluated its performance in fresh and hardened states through tests performed in laboratory. Ehe selected feature is indicated by producers of additive and researchers to present good results when used as adhesive mortar.

  11. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Bates

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain, histatin 5 (only one strain, lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis.

  12. Arachnids secrete a fluid over their adhesive pads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Peattie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many arachnids possess adhesive pads on their feet that help them climb smooth surfaces and capture prey. Spider and gecko adhesives have converged on a branched, hairy structure, which theoretically allows them to adhere solely by dry (solid-solid intermolecular interactions. Indeed, the consensus in the literature is that spiders and their smooth-padded relatives, the solifugids, adhere without the aid of a secretion. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the adhesive contact zone of living spiders, solifugids and mites using interference reflection microscopy, which allows the detection of thin liquid films. Like insects, all the arachnids we studied left behind hydrophobic fluid footprints on glass (mean refractive index: 1.48-1.50; contact angle: 3.7-11.2°. Fluid was not always secreted continuously, suggesting that pads can function in both wet and dry modes. We measured the attachment forces of single adhesive setae from tarantulas (Grammostola rosea by attaching them to a bending beam with a known spring constant and filming the resulting deflection. Individual spider setae showed a lower static friction at rest (26%±2.8 SE of the peak friction than single gecko setae (Thecadactylus rapicauda; 96%±1.7 SE. This may be explained by the fact that spider setae continued to release fluid after isolation from the animal, lubricating the contact zone. SIGNIFICANCE: This finding implies that tarsal secretions occur within all major groups of terrestrial arthropods with adhesive pads. The presence of liquid in an adhesive contact zone has important consequences for attachment performance, improving adhesion to rough surfaces and introducing rate-dependent effects. Our results leave geckos and anoles as the only known representatives of truly dry adhesive pads in nature. Engineers seeking biological inspiration for synthetic adhesives should consider whether model species with fluid secretions are appropriate to their

  13. Bond Strength of a Bisphenol-A-Free Fissure Sealant With and Without Adhesive Layer under Conditions of Saliva Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis de; Sabbatini, Iliana Ferraz; Almeida, Cintia Guimarães de; Galo, Rodrigo; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Dental sealants are important for prevention of carious lesions, if they have good shear strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two sealants to saliva-contaminated and non-contaminated enamel with and without an intermediate adhesive layer underneath the sealant. Ninety flat enamel surfaces from human third molars were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=15): F (control): Fluroshield(tm) sealant; EWB (control): Embrace(tm) WetBond(tm); SB/F: Single Bond adhesive system + F; SB/EWB, s-SB/F and s-SB/EWB. In the s-SB/F and s-SB/EWB groups, the acid-etched enamel was contaminated with 0.01 mL of fresh human saliva for 20 s. Sealant cylinders were bonded to enamel surface with and without an intermediate adhesive system layer. The shear tests were performed using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). F presented higher mean SBS than EWB in all experimental conditions. The lowest SBS mean was obtained for EWB on contaminated enamel (p<0.05). In conclusion, an adhesive system layer should be used prior to sealant placement, in both dry and saliva-contaminated enamel. F had the best performance in all experimental conditions. EWB sealant showed very low results, but an adhesive layer underneath the sealant increased its SBS even after salivary contamination.

  14. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  15. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  16. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  17. Peel testing behavior of mushroom-top terminated structured adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossfeld, Craig Kenneth

    Synthetic structured surfaces have been created based on the extraordinary adhesive ability exhibited by insects, spiders, and geckos. The adhesion of synthetic and natural structured adhesives is attributed to the cumulative addition of van der Waals forces acting on the structures of the surface. It has been shown that for synthetic surfaces a "mushroom top" or "flanged" terminating structure exhibits the highest adhesion. Unfortunately, due to the variety of testing and fabrication techniques and the small scale of previous studies, the detachment behavior of these structures is not well understood. This research systematically investigated the effect of peel angle, pillar diameter, flange diameter, and pillar aspect ratio on the force required for peeling. Explicit emphasis was placed on relatively large pillar structures to allow for in situ optical visualization in order to gain insights into fundamental mechanisms which dictate peeling. Traditional molding techniques were used to fabricate optical-scale mushroom terminated structures with pillar diameters of 1mm and 400microm and aspect ratios of 1, 3, and 5. Results were quantitatively compared to peel testing theory for conventional adhesives. It was convincingly demonstrated that the adhesive energy of a patterned surface changes as function of angle, and cannot be treated as a constant. The variability in the energy was linked to mechanistic differences in detachment through in situ observations and finite element analysis. Experimental results show that smaller pillars do not necessarily lead to higher adhesion during peeling, aspect ratio plays little role in peeling adhesive behavior, and pillar flange size is critical to adhesion. The conclusions from this study outline design parameters for mushroom topped dry adhesives in peeling applications.

  18. Thermo-responsive in-situ forming hydrogels as barriers to prevent post-operative peritendinous adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pang-Yun; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Shih-Hsien; Fong, Yi Teng; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we aimed to assess whether thermo-responsive in-situ forming hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) could prevent post-operative peritendinous adhesion. The clinical advantages of the thermo-responsive hydrogels are acting as barrier material to block penetration of fibroblasts, providing mobility and flexibility during application and enabling injection through a small opening to fill spaces of any shape after surgery. The thermo-responsiveness of hydrogels was determined to ensure their clinic uses. By grafting hydrophilic biopolymers chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) to PNIPAM, the copolymer hydrogels show enhanced water retention and lubrication, while reduced volume shrinkage during phase transition. In cell culture experiments, the thermo-responsive hydrogel has good biocompatibility and reduces fibroblast penetration. In animal experiments, the effectiveness of preventing post-operative peritendinous adhesion was studied in a rabbit deep flexor tendon model. From gross examination, histology, bending angles of joints, tendon gliding excursion and pull-out force, HA-CS-PNIPAM (HACPN) was confirmed to be the best barrier material to prevent post-operative peritendinous adhesion compared to PNIPAM and CS-PNIPAM (CPN) hydrogels and a commercial barrier film Seprafilm®. There was no significant difference in the breaking strength of HACPN-treated tendons and spontaneously healed ones, indicating HACPN hydrogel application did not interfere with normal tendon healing. We conclude that HACPN hydrogel can provide the best functional outcomes to significantly prevent post-operative tendon adhesion in vivo. We prepared thermo-responsive in-situ forming hydrogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) to prevent post-operative peritendinous adhesion. The injectable barrier hydrogel could have better anti-adhesive properties than current commercial products by acting as barrier material to block penetration of fibroblasts

  19. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  20. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  1. Cohesion and Adhesion with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in bio-based adhesives, research on proteins has expanded because historically they have been used by both nature and humans as adhesives. A wide variety of proteins have been used as wood adhesives. Ancient Egyptians most likely used collagens tobond veneer to wood furniture, then came casein (milk), blood, fish scales, and soy adhesives, with...

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of glassy carbon for adhesion improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Mortensen, Henrik Junge; Stenum, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    density increased with the plasma treatments. Adhesion test of the treated glassy carbon covered with cured epoxy showed cohesive failure, indicating strong bonding after the treatments. This is in contrast to the adhesion tests of untreated samples where the epoxy readily peeled off the glassy carbon....

  3. Geckos as Springs: Mechanics Explain Across-Species Scaling of Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey A Gilman

    Full Text Available One of the central controversies regarding the evolution of adhesion concerns how adhesive force scales as animals change in size, either among or within species. A widely held view is that as animals become larger, the primary mechanism that enables them to climb is increasing pad area. However, prior studies show that much of the variation in maximum adhesive force remains unexplained, even when area is accounted for. We tested the hypothesis that maximum adhesive force among pad-bearing gecko species is not solely dictated by toepad area, but also depends on the ratio of toepad area to gecko adhesive system compliance in the loading direction, where compliance (C is the change in extension (Δ relative to a change in force (F while loading a gecko's adhesive system (C = dΔ/dF. Geckos are well-known for their ability to climb on a range of vertical and overhanging surfaces, and range in mass from several grams to over 300 grams, yet little is understood of the factors that enable adhesion to scale with body size. We examined the maximum adhesive force of six gecko species that vary in body size (~2-100 g. We also examined changes between juveniles and adults within a single species (Phelsuma grandis. We found that maximum adhesive force and toepad area increased with increasing gecko size, and that as gecko species become larger, their adhesive systems become significantly less compliant. Additionally, our hypothesis was supported, as the best predictor of maximum adhesive force was not toepad area or compliance alone, but the ratio of toepad area to compliance. We verified this result using a synthetic "model gecko" system comprised of synthetic adhesive pads attached to a glass substrate and a synthetic tendon (mechanical spring of finite stiffness. Our data indicate that increases in toepad area as geckos become larger cannot fully account for increased adhesive abilities, and decreased compliance must be included to explain the scaling of

  4. Geckos as Springs: Mechanics Explain Across-Species Scaling of Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Casey A; Imburgia, Michael J; Bartlett, Michael D; King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J; Irschick, Duncan J

    2015-01-01

    One of the central controversies regarding the evolution of adhesion concerns how adhesive force scales as animals change in size, either among or within species. A widely held view is that as animals become larger, the primary mechanism that enables them to climb is increasing pad area. However, prior studies show that much of the variation in maximum adhesive force remains unexplained, even when area is accounted for. We tested the hypothesis that maximum adhesive force among pad-bearing gecko species is not solely dictated by toepad area, but also depends on the ratio of toepad area to gecko adhesive system compliance in the loading direction, where compliance (C) is the change in extension (Δ) relative to a change in force (F) while loading a gecko's adhesive system (C = dΔ/dF). Geckos are well-known for their ability to climb on a range of vertical and overhanging surfaces, and range in mass from several grams to over 300 grams, yet little is understood of the factors that enable adhesion to scale with body size. We examined the maximum adhesive force of six gecko species that vary in body size (~2-100 g). We also examined changes between juveniles and adults within a single species (Phelsuma grandis). We found that maximum adhesive force and toepad area increased with increasing gecko size, and that as gecko species become larger, their adhesive systems become significantly less compliant. Additionally, our hypothesis was supported, as the best predictor of maximum adhesive force was not toepad area or compliance alone, but the ratio of toepad area to compliance. We verified this result using a synthetic "model gecko" system comprised of synthetic adhesive pads attached to a glass substrate and a synthetic tendon (mechanical spring) of finite stiffness. Our data indicate that increases in toepad area as geckos become larger cannot fully account for increased adhesive abilities, and decreased compliance must be included to explain the scaling of adhesion in

  5. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown...... to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myeloid cell/endothelial adhesion in a signal transduction-dependent manner involving monocytic cytoskeletal...... rearrangement and filopodia formation. Treatment with soluble recombinant (r)CD13 blocks this CD13-dependent adhesion, and CD13 molecules from monocytic and endothelial cells are present in the same immunocomplex, suggesting a direct participation of CD13 in the adhesive interaction. This concept...

  6. A short-time scale colloidal system reveals early bacterial adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of bacteria on abiotic surfaces has important public health and sanitary consequences. However, despite several decades of study of bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces, the biophysical mechanisms governing this process remain poorly understood, due, in particular, to the lack of methodologies covering the appropriate time scale. Using micrometric colloidal surface particles and flow cytometry analysis, we developed a rapid multiparametric approach to studying early events in adhesion of the bacterium Escherichia coli. This approach simultaneously describes the kinetics and amplitude of early steps in adhesion, changes in physicochemical surface properties within the first few seconds of adhesion, and the self-association state of attached and free-floating cells. Examination of the role of three well-characterized E. coli surface adhesion factors upon attachment to colloidal surfaces--curli fimbriae, F-conjugative pilus, and Ag43 adhesin--showed clear-cut differences in the very initial phases of surface colonization for cell-bearing surface structures, all known to promote biofilm development. Our multiparametric analysis revealed a correlation in the adhesion phase with cell-to-cell aggregation properties and demonstrated that this phenomenon amplified surface colonization once initial cell-surface attachment was achieved. Monitoring of real-time physico-chemical particle surface properties showed that surface-active molecules of bacterial origin quickly modified surface properties, providing new insight into the intricate relations connecting abiotic surface physicochemical properties and bacterial adhesion. Hence, the biophysical analytical method described here provides a new and relevant approach to quantitatively and kinetically investigating bacterial adhesion and biofilm development.

  7. Strong Adhesion of Silver/Polypyrrole Composite onto Plastic Substrates toward Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakita, Jin; Hashimoto, Yasuo; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2013-06-01

    Flexible electronics require sufficient adhesion to substrates, such as a plastic or a polymer, of the electric wiring for devices. A composite of a conducting metal and a polymer is a candidate alternative to pure metals in terms of wire flexibility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adhesiveness of a silver/polypyrrole composite to plastic substrates and to clarify the mechanism of adhesion. The composite was prepared on various plastic substrates by dropping its fluid dispersion. Its adhesiveness was evaluated by the peel-off test and its interfacial structure was characterized by microscopy measurements. Some polymers including Teflon with generally weak adhesion to different materials showed a high adhesiveness of more than 90%. The strong adhesion was related to the anchoring effect of the composite penetrating into the pores near the surface of the substrate.

  8. Many Roles of Wood Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2014-01-01

    Although wood bonding is one of the oldest applications of adhesives, going back to early recorded history (1), some aspects of wood bonds are still not fully understood. Most books in the general area of adhesives and adhesion do not cover wood bonding. However, a clearer understanding of wood bonding and wood adhesives can lead to improved products. This is important...

  9. Bond durability of universal adhesive to bovine enamel using self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Soshi; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Imai, Arisa; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Sai, Keiichi; Takimoto, Masayuki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode under 2-year water storage and thermal cycling conditions. Three commercially available universal adhesives and a gold standard two-step self-etch adhesive were used. Ten specimens of bovine enamel were prepared per test group, and shear bond strength (SBS) was measured to determine the bonding durability after thermal cycling (TC) or long-term water storage (WS). The bonded specimens were divided into three groups: (1) specimens subjected to TC, where the bonded specimens were stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h before being subjected to 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 TC; (2) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 3 months, 6 months, 1 year or 2 year; and (3) specimens stored in 37 °C distilled water for 24 h, serving as a baseline. The two-step self-etch adhesive showed significantly higher SBS than the universal adhesives tested, regardless of the type of degradation method. All universal adhesives showed no significant enamel SBS reductions in TC and WS, when compared to baseline and the other degradation conditions. Compared to the bond strengths obtained with the two-step self-etch adhesive, significantly lower bond strengths were obtained with universal adhesives. However, the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives was relatively stable under both degradation conditions tested. The present data indicate that the enamel bond durability of universal adhesives in the self-etch mode might be sufficient for clinical use.

  10. Influence of the nano-micro structure of the surface on bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Díaz

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials failures are frequently associated to the formation of bacterial biofilms on the surface. The aim of this work is to study the adhesion of non motile bacteria streptococci consortium and motile Pseudomonas fluorescens. Substrates with micro and nanopatterned topography were used. The influence of surface characteristics on bacterial adhesion was investigated using optical and epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Results showed an important influence of the substratum nature. On microrough surfaces, initial bacterial adhesion was less significant than on smooth surfaces. In contrast, nanopatterned samples showed more bacterial attachment than the smooth control. It was also noted a remarkable difference in morphology, orientation and distribution of bacteria between the smooth and the nanostructured substrate. The results show the important effect of substratum nature and topography on bacterial adhesion which depended on the relation between roughness characteristics dimensions and bacterial size.

  11. Effect of Dentin Wetness on the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Na Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of dentin wetness on the bond strength and adhesive interface morphology of universal adhesives have been investigated using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS testing and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Seventy-two human third molars were wet ground to expose flat dentin surfaces. They were divided into three groups according to the air-drying time of the dentin surfaces: 0 (without air drying, 5, and 10 s. The dentin surfaces were then treated with three universal adhesives: G-Premio Bond, Single Bond Universal, and All-Bond Universal in self-etch or etch-and-rinse mode. After composite build up, a μTBS test was performed. One additional tooth was prepared for each group by staining the adhesives with 0.01 wt % of Rhodamine B fluorescent dye for CLSM analysis. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Two-way ANOVA showed significant differences among the adhesive systems and dentin moisture conditions. An interaction effect was also observed (p < 0.05. One-way ANOVA showed that All-Bond Universal was the only material influenced by the wetness of the dentin surfaces. Wetness of the dentin surface is a factor influencing the micro-tensile bond strength of universal adhesives.

  12. Are pelvic adhesions associated with pain, physical, emotional and functional characteristics of women presenting with chronic pelvic pain? A cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ying; Saran, Mili; Hounslow, James William; Reading, Isabel Claire

    2018-01-08

    Chronic pelvic pain is a debilitating condition. It is unknown if there is a clinical phenotype for adhesive disorders. This study aimed to determine if the presence or absence, nature, severity and extent of adhesions correlated with demographic and patient reported clinical characteristics of women presenting with CPP. Women undergoing a laparoscopy for the investigation of chronic pelvic pain were recruited prospectively; their pain and phenotypic characteristics were entered into a hierarchical cluster analysis. The groups with differing baseline clinical and operative characteristics in terms of adhesions involvement were analyzed. Sixty two women were recruited where 37 had adhesions. A low correlation was found between women's reported current pain scores and that of most severe (r = 0.34) or average pain experienced (r = 0.44) in the last 6 months. Three main groups of women with CPP were identified: Cluster 1 (n = 35) had moderate severity of pain, with poor average and present pain intensity; Cluster 2 (n = 14) had a long duration of symptoms/diagnosis, the worst current pain and worst physical, emotional and social functions; Cluster 3 (n = 11) had the shortest duration of pain and showed the best evidence of coping with low (good) physical, social and emotional scores. This cluster also had the highest proportion of women with adhesions (82%) compared to 51% in Cluster 1 and 71% in Cluster 2. In this study, we found that there is little or no correlation between patient-reported pain, physical, emotional and functional characteristics scores with the presence or absence of intra-abdominal/pelvic adhesions found during investigative laparoscopy. Most women who had adhesions had the lowest reported current pain scores.

  13. The preventive effect of Rofecoxib in postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, M; Oztürk, H; Erten, C; Büyükbayram, H

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies showed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs suppressed prostaglandin synthesis and were able to prevent adhesion formation following surgical trauma to the peritoneum. The selective suppression inflammatory cascade may prevent adhesion formation. Therefore, we planned this study to experimentally evaluate the effects of Rofecoxib, the selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor, in postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups of 10. All rats underwent midline laparotomy under ketamine anaesthesia (25 mg/kg im). In group 1 (n = 10), the sham operation group (SG); abdominal walls were closed without any process after 2 minutes. In Group 2 (n = 10), the control group (CG); standard serosal damage was constituted and the abdominal wall was closed. In group 3 (n = 10), the COX-2 group (COXG), after serosal damage, the abdominal wall was closed. A 12 mg/kg/day dose of was given orally to the rats during one week. On the 7th postoperative day, all rats were sacrificed and intra-abdominal adhesions were evaluated both macroscopically and microscopically. Macroscopically, no serious adhesion formations were seen in the SG. Multiple adhesion formations of the CG were significantly more than those of the SG (p < 0.0001). It was determined that adhesions of the COXG diminished (p < 0.0001) when macromorphological adhesion scale results of the COXG were compared with those of the CG. The adhesion scores of the CG were compared microscopically with those of the COXG and granulation tissue formation and fibrosis in the COXG were found to be significantly less than those of the CG (respectively p = 0.002, p < 0.0001). We were of the opinion that Rofecoxib, the selective cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, was effective in the prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

  14. Influence of degradation conditions on dentin bonding durability of three universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Keiichi; Shimamura, Yutaka; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Imai, Arisa; Endo, Hajime; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine dentin bonding durability of universal adhesives using shear bond strength (SBS) tests under various degradation conditions. G-Premio Bond (GP, GC), Scotchbond Universal (SU, 3M ESPE) and All Bond Universal (AB, Bisco) were compared with conventional two-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (SE, Kuraray Noritake Dental). Bonded specimens were divided into three groups of ten, and SBSs with bovine dentin were determined after the following treatments: 1) Storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h followed by 3000, 10,000, 20,000 or 30,000 thermal cycles (TC group), 2) Storage in distilled water at 37°C for 3 months, 6 months or 1year (water storage, WS group) and 3) Storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h (control). SE bonded specimens showed significantly higher SBSs than universal adhesives, regardless of TC or storage periods, although AB specimens showed significantly increased SBSs after 30,000 thermal cycles. In comparisons of universal adhesives under control and degradation conditions, SBS was only reduced in SU after 1year of WS. Following exposure of various adhesive systems to degradation conditions of thermal cycling and long term storage, SBS values of adhesive systems varied primarily with degradation period. Although universal adhesives have lower SBSs than the two-step self-etch adhesive SE, the present data indicate that the dentin bonding durability of universal adhesives in self-etch mode is sufficient for clinical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of inorganic fillers in paper on the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weixu Chen; Xiaoyan Tang; John Considine; Kevin T. Turner

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic fillers are inexpensive materials used to increase the density, smoothness and other properties of paper that are important for printing. In the current study, the adhesion of pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSAs), a common type of adhesive used in labels and tapes, to papers containing varying amounts and types of fillers is investigated. Papers with three...

  16. Slip Interface Imaging Predicts Tumor-Brain Adhesion in Vestibular Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Glaser, Kevin J; Manduca, Armando; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Link, Michael J; Hughes, Joshua D; Romano, Anthony; Ehman, Richard L; Huston, John

    2015-11-01

    To test the clinical feasibility and usefulness of slip interface imaging (SII) to identify and quantify the degree of tumor-brain adhesion in patients with vestibular schwannomas. S With institutional review board approval and after obtaining written informed consent, SII examinations were performed in nine patients with vestibular schwannomas. During the SII acquisition, a low-amplitude mechanical vibration is applied to the head with a pillow-like device placed in the head coil and the resulting shear waves are imaged by using a phase-contrast pulse sequence with motion-encoding gradients synchronized with the applied vibration. Imaging was performed with a 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system in less than 7 minutes. The acquired shear motion data were processed with two different algorithms (shear line analysis and calculation of octahedral shear strain [OSS]) to identify the degree of tumor-brain adhesion. Blinded to the SII results, neurosurgeons qualitatively assessed tumor adhesion at the time of tumor resection. Standard T2-weighted, fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA), and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging were reviewed to identify the presence of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) clefts around the tumors. The performance of the use of the CSF cleft and SII to predict the degree of tumor adhesion was evaluated by using the κ coefficient and McNemar test. Among the nine patients, SII agreed with the intraoperative assessment of the degree of tumor adhesion in eight patients (88.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 57%, 98%), with four of four, three of three, and one of two cases correctly predicted as no adhesion, partial adhesion, and complete adhesion, respectively. However, the T2-weighted, FIESTA, and T2-weighted FLAIR images that used the CSF cleft sign to predict adhesion agreed with surgical findings in only four cases (44.4% [four of nine]; 95% CI: 19%, 73%). The κ coefficients indicate good agreement (0

  17. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel).

  18. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lewis basicity, adhesion thermodynamic work and coordinating ability on aminated silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Paniagua, Sergio A.; Borge, Ignacio; Viales, Christian; Montero, Mavis L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Silicon(1 0 0) surfaces with diamines followed by anchoring of copper complexes over the diamine layer, an approach that could be used for advanced functionalization of semiconducting surfaces. • Lewis basicity (using Fowkes–van Oss–Chaudhury–Good surface tension model) and adhesion thermodynamic work (using chemical force microscopy) were determined. • Higher basicity and thermodynamic work correlate with selective copper acetate monolayer grow. The cyclic voltammetry studies confirm the confined copper redox activity. - Abstract: Silicon(1 0 0) surfaces have been modified with three different amines (aniline, benzylamine and dodecylamine) and diamines (4-aminopyridine, 4-aminomethylpyridine, 1,12-dodecyldiamine). The surface energy was measured by contact angle technique. For Si-diamine surfaces, Lewis basicity (using Fowkes–van Oss–Chaudhury–Good surface tension model) and adhesion thermodynamic work (using chemical force microscopy) were determined. We related these data, the amine/diamine nature and their geometry on the surface (via DFT calculations) with the consequent ability to coordinate copper(II) acetate. Finally, copper(II) acetate monolayers behavior was studied by cyclic voltammetry

  20. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B N J

    2007-01-01

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications

  1. Wet adhesion with application to tree frog adhesive toe pads and tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2007-09-19

    Strong adhesion between solids with rough surfaces is only possible if at least one of the solids is elastically very soft. Some lizards and spiders are able to adhere (dry adhesion) and move on very rough vertical surfaces due to very compliant surface layers on their attachment pads. Flies, bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs have less compliant pad surface layers, and in these cases adhesion to rough surfaces is only possible because the animals inject a wetting liquid into the pad-substrate contact area, which generates a relative long-range attractive interaction due to the formation of capillary bridges. In this presentation I will discuss some aspects of wet adhesion for tree frogs and give some comments related to tire applications.

  2. Adhesion of silver/polypyrrole nanocomposite coating to a fluoropolymer substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the adhesive interface between a conducting polymer/metal composite and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate. Strong adhesion was observed from using a Ag/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite on a fluoropolymer substrate, which in most cases has a very low adhesion to different materials. To clarify the adhesion mechanism between the Ag/PPy composite and the PTFE substrate, the interfacial structure was studied by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results show that Ag/PPy composite is absorbed inside the nano-sized pores of PTFE and the composite mechanically interlocks after solidifying, which causes the nanocomposite to stick strongly to the substrate. The use of Ag/PPy coating could be a novel technique for developing electrodes, antennae or other high performance applications as this metal/conductive polymer composite has excellent adhesion properties on various plastics.

  3. Acrylic Triblock Copolymers Incorporating Isosorbide for Pressure Sensitive Adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, James J.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; Reineke, Theresa M. (UMM)

    2016-05-10

    A new monomer acetylated acrylic isosorbide (AAI) was prepared in two steps using common reagents without the need for column chromatography. Free radical polymerization of AAI afforded poly(acetylated acrylic isosorbide) (PAAI), which exhibited a glass transition temperature (Tg) = 95 °C and good thermal stability (Td, 5% weight loss; N2 = 331 °C, air = 291 °C). A series of ABA triblock copolymers with either poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) or poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) (PEHA) as the low Tg midblocks and PAAI as the high Tg end blocks were prepared using Reversible Addition–Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The triblock copolymers ranging from 8–24 wt % PAAI were evaluated as pressure sensitive adhesives by 180° peel, loop tack, and static shear testing. While the PAAI-PEHA-PAAI series exhibited poor adhesive qualities, the PAAI-PnBA-PAAI series of triblock copolymers demonstrated peel forces up to 2.9 N cm–1, tack forces up to 3.2 N cm–1, and no shear failure up to 10000 min. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that PAAI-PEHA-PAAI lacked the dissipative qualities needed to form an adhesive bond with the substrate, while the PAAI-PnBA-PAAI series exhibited a dynamic mechanical response consistent with related high performing PSAs.

  4. Zebra mussel adhesion: structure of the byssal adhesive apparatus in the freshwater mussel, Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, Nikrooz; Sone, Eli D

    2012-03-01

    The freshwater zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) owes a large part of its success as an invasive species to its ability to attach to a wide variety of substrates. As in marine mussels, this attachment is achieved by a proteinaceous byssus, a series of threads joined at a stem that connect the mussel to adhesive plaques secreted onto the substrate. Although the zebra mussel byssus is superficially similar to marine mussels, significant structural and compositional differences suggest that further investigation of the adhesion mechanisms in this freshwater species is warranted. Here we present an ultrastructural examination of the zebra mussel byssus, with emphasis on interfaces that are critical to its adhesive function. By examining the attached plaques, we show that adhesion is mediated by a uniform electron dense layer on the underside of the plaque. This layer is only 10-20 nm thick and makes direct and continuous contact with the substrate. The plaque itself is fibrous, and curiously can exhibit either a dense or porous morphology. In zebra mussels, a graded interface between the animal and the substrate mussels is achieved by interdigitation of uniform threads with the stem, in contrast to marine mussels, where the threads themselves are non-uniform. Our observations of several novel aspects of zebra mussel byssal ultrastructure may have important implications not only for preventing biofouling by the zebra mussel, but for the development of new bioadhesives as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved adhesive properties of recombinant bifidobacteria expressing the Bifidobacterium bifidum-specific lipoprotein BopA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleinser Marita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bifidobacteria belong to one of the predominant bacterial groups in the intestinal microbiota of infants and adults. Several beneficial effects on the health status of their human hosts have been demonstrated making bifidobacteria interesting candidates for probiotic applications. Adhesion of probiotics to the intestinal epithelium is discussed as a prerequisite for colonisation of and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract. Results In the present study, 15 different strains of bifidobacteria were tested for adhesion. B. bifidum was identified as the species showing highest adhesion to all tested intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines. Adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs was strongly reduced after treatment of bacteria with pronase. These results strongly indicate that a proteinaceous cell surface component mediates adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. In silico analysis of the currently accessible Bifidobacterium genomes identified bopA encoding a lipoprotein as a B. bifidum-specific gene previously shown to function as an adhesin of B. bifidum MIMBb75. The in silico results were confirmed by Southern Blot analysis. Furthermore, Northern Blot analysis demonstrated that bopA is expressed in all B. bifidum strains tested under conditions used to cultivate bacteria for adhesion assays. The BopA gene was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography as a C-terminal His6-fusion. Purified BopA had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. Moreover, bopA was successfully expressed in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum/infantis E18. Strains overexpressing bopA showed enhanced adhesion to IECs, clearly demonstrating a role of BopA in adhesion of B. bifidum strains. Conclusions BopA was identified as a B. bifidum-specific protein involved in adhesion to IECs. Bifidobacterium strains expressing bopA show enhanced adhesion. Our results represent the first report on recombinant

  6. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through homophilic trans-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, Francis X; Martin, Ryan A; Springer, Evan M; Leffler, Maxwell S; Woelmer, Bryce R; Recker, Isaac J; Leaman, Douglas W

    2017-07-11

    The overall objective of the study was to identify mechanisms through which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) augments the adhesive and fusogenic properties of myogenic cells. Hypotheses were tested using cultured myoblasts and fibroblasts, which do not constitutively express ICAM-1, and myoblasts and fibroblasts forced to express full length ICAM-1 or a truncated form lacking the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. ICAM-1 mediated myoblast adhesion and fusion were quantified using novel assays and cell mixing experiments. We report that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion to myoblasts and myotubes through homophilic trans-interactions. Such adhesive interactions enhanced levels of active Rac in adherent and fusing myoblasts, as well as triggered lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts through the signaling function of the cytoplasmic domain of ICAM-1. Rac inhibition negated ICAM-1 mediated lamellipodia, spreading, and fusion of myoblasts. The fusogenic property of ICAM-1-ICAM-1 interactions was restricted to myogenic cells, as forced expression of ICAM-1 by fibroblasts did not augment their fusion to ICAM-1+ myoblasts/myotubes. We conclude that ICAM-1 augments myoblast adhesion and fusion through its ability to self-associate and initiate Rac-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton.

  7. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  8. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob; Zhao, Boxin; Tian Yu; Autumn, Kellar

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  9. Tissue adhesives for simple traumatic lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Joel W

    2008-01-01

    independently randomized and evaluated, and the other group randomized the patient and assigned all lacerations to a treatment group (tissue adhesive with SWC or tissue adhesive with tissue adhesive). The sample sizes ranged between 60 and 163 lacerations, and all 11 studies were performed in emergency departments. The primary measure in all included studies was cosmetic outcome. The majority of groups used the Cosmetic Visual Analogue Scale, the Wound Evaluation Score, or a combination of these measures. Three groups measured cosmetic outcome with nonvalidated scoring systems. Assessment time periods were grouped and reported at (1) 5 to 14 days, (2) 1 to 3 months, and (3) 9 to 12 months after wound closure. Secondary outcomes were pain (as noted on visual analogue scale) and time to complete the procedure (as mean number of minutes). The 11 studies scored from 1 to 3 on the Jadad Scale. Adequate allocation concealment was reported in only 1 group. Examining cosmetic outcome, 8 groups (565 lacerations) used the Cosmetic Visual Analogue Scale to compare tissue adhesives and SWC. The authors reported no significant differences in scores at the time periods of 5 to 14 days, 1 to 3 months, and 9 to 12 months. A subgroup analysis showed a significant ( P = .005) superiority of butylcyanoacrylate over SWC at 1 to 3 months. Using the Wound Evaluation Score, 4 studies (364 lacerations) compared tissue adhesives with SWC. No significant differences in cosmetic scores were found at 5 to 14 days, 1 to 3 months, or 9 to 12 months. One group (83 lacerations) compared butylcyanoacrylate with octylcyanoacrylate and reported no significant differences in cosmetic scores using the Cosmetic Visual Analogue Scale at 1 to 3 months and the Wound Evaluation Score at 5 to 14 days and 1 to 3 months. Examining secondary outcomes, 6 groups (570 lacerations) compared tissue adhesives with SWC using the visual analogue scale for pain. Scores reported by parents, patients, physicians, and nurses

  10. Facile synthesis of main-chain degradable block copolymers for performance enhanced dismantlable adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eriko; Hagihara, Takashi; Matsumoto, Akikazu

    2012-04-01

    Block copolymers consisting of readily degradable polyperoxides and non-degradable vinyl polymers as the block segments were successfully synthesized by reversible chain transfer catalyzed polymerization, which is one of living radical polymerization techniques. The block copolymers showed characteristic morphology and wettability being different from the polymer blends. When block copolymers containing polyperoxide and polymethacrylate blocks were heated below 150 °C, the polyperoxide blocks were completely degraded and the polymethacrylate blocks were recovered without degradation. Block copolymers containing a poly(2-ethylhexyl methacrylate) block were then investigated as a dismantlable adhesion material, which requires adequate bonding strength during use and easy debonding on demand. Among the several block copolymers, the one consisting of poly(2-ethylhexyl methacrylate) and polyperoxide from methyl sorbate (PPMS) (M(n) = 4900) exhibited good performance as a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA). After heating the test specimens in a temperature range from 60 to 100 °C, PSA performance, which was evaluated by 180° peel strength and shear holding power measurements, was significantly diminished. Especially, after heating at 100 °C for 1 h, spontaneous debonding of some test specimens was observed because of the evolution of volatile acetaldehyde from PPMS.

  11. Dry adhesives from carbon nanofibers grown in an open ethanol flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lutz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on magnetic-field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers in an open ethanol flame we fabricated arrays of carbon nanofibers with different degrees of orientation. Inspired by the dry adhesive system of geckos we investigated the adhesive properties of such carbon nanofiber arrays with ordered and random orientation. AFM-based force spectroscopy revealed that adhesion force and energy rise linear with preload force. Carbon nanofibers oriented by a magnetic field show a 68% higher adhesion (0.66 N/cm2 than the randomly oriented fibers. Endurance tests revealed that the carbon nanofiber arrays withstand 50.000 attachment/detachment cycles without observable wear.

  12. Reconstruction of fiber Bragg grating strain profile used to monitor the stiffness degradation of the adhesive layer in carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chunsheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adhesive-bonded joint of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic is one of the core components in aircraft structure design. It is an effective guarantee for the safety and reliability of the aerospace aircraft structure to use effective methods for monitoring and early warning of internal failure. In this article, the mapping relation model between the strain profiles of the adherend of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap adhesive joint and the stiffness degradation evolution of adhesive layer was achieved by finite element software ABAQUS. The fiber Bragg grating was embedded in the adherend between the first and second layers at the end of the adhesive layer to calculate the reflection spectrum of fiber Bragg grating sensor region with improved T-matrix method for reconstruction of the adherend strain profile of fiber Bragg grating sensing area with the help of genetic algorithm. According to the reconstruction results, the maximum error between the ideal and reconstructed strain profile under different tension loads did not exceed 7.43%, showing a good coincidence degree. The monitoring method of the stiffness degradation evolution of adhesive layer of the carbon fiber–reinforced plastic single-lap joint based on the reconstruction of the adherend strain profile of fiber Bragg grating sensing area thus was figured out.

  13. Substrate adhesion regulates sealing zone architecture and dynamics in cultured osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Anderegg

    Full Text Available The bone-degrading activity of osteoclasts depends on the formation of a cytoskeletal-adhesive super-structure known as the sealing zone (SZ. The SZ is a dynamic structure, consisting of a condensed array of podosomes, the elementary adhesion-mediating structures of osteoclasts, interconnected by F-actin filaments. The molecular composition and structure of the SZ were extensively investigated, yet despite its major importance for bone formation and remodelling, the mechanisms underlying its assembly and dynamics are still poorly understood. Here we determine the relations between matrix adhesiveness and the formation, stability and expansion of the SZ. By growing differentiated osteoclasts on micro-patterned glass substrates, where adhesive areas are separated by non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG barriers, we show that SZ growth and fusion strictly depend on the continuity of substrate adhesiveness, at the micrometer scale. We present a possible model for the role of mechanical forces in SZ formation and reorganization, inspired by the current data.

  14. ADAMTS9-Regulated Pericellular Matrix Dynamics Governs Focal Adhesion-Dependent Smooth Muscle Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Mead

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Focal adhesions anchor cells to extracellular matrix (ECM and direct assembly of a pre-stressed actin cytoskeleton. They act as a cellular sensor and regulator, linking ECM to the nucleus. Here, we identify proteolytic turnover of the anti-adhesive proteoglycan versican as a requirement for maintenance of smooth muscle cell (SMC focal adhesions. Using conditional deletion in mice, we show that ADAMTS9, a secreted metalloprotease, is required for myometrial activation during late gestation and for parturition. Through knockdown of ADAMTS9 in uterine SMC, and manipulation of pericellular versican via knockdown or proteolysis, we demonstrate that regulated pericellular matrix dynamics is essential for focal adhesion maintenance. By influencing focal adhesion formation, pericellular versican acts upstream of cytoskeletal assembly and SMC differentiation. Thus, pericellular versican proteolysis by ADAMTS9 balances pro- and anti-adhesive forces to maintain an SMC phenotype, providing a concrete example of the dynamic reciprocity of cells and their ECM. : Mead et al. identify a proteolytic mechanism that actively maintains a pericellular microenvironment conducive to uterine smooth muscle activation prior to parturition. They show that pericellular matrix proteolysis by the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS9 is crucial for maintenance of focal adhesions in uterine smooth muscle cells, and its absence impairs parturition. Keywords: metalloprotease, extracellular matrix, smooth muscle, proteoglycan, myometrium, parturition, uterus, focal adhesion, proteolysis, interference reflection microscopy

  15. Contribution of Auger electron spectroscopy to study of mechanism of adhesive wear of valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrkovsky, E.; Koutnik, M.; Potmesilova, A.

    1987-01-01

    Briefly characterized are hypotheses describing the process of intensive adhesive wear (jamming) of materials on functional friction surfaces of valves. Two types of alloys were studied, 1Cr18Ni8Mo5Mn5Si5Nb and NiCrSiB. Auger electron spectroscopy was used in the study of the chemical composition of surface layers. The following conclusions can be made from the results of the adhesive wear measurement and the Auger spectroscopy measurement: There are oxide layers on the surfaces of the specimens which, however, can only to a certain extent affect the process of adhesive wear. Adhesive wear resistance tests using low hardness specimens show that in spite of the existence of oxide layers, friction pairs showing low surface hardness also feature low adhesive wear resistance. Following heat treatment, the surface oxide layers have practically the same chemical composition as the specimens without heat treatment. However, there adhesive wear resistance is significantly higher. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 7 refs

  16. Optical adhesive property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  17. Adhesion mechanism of a gecko-inspired oblique structure with an adhesive tip for asymmetric detachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yu; Sato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    An adhesion model of an oblique structure with an adhesive tip is proposed by considering a limiting stress for adhesion to describe the detachment mechanism of gecko foot hairs. When a force is applied to the root of the oblique structure, normal and shear stresses are generated at contact and the adhesive tip is detached from the surface when reaching the limiting stress. An adhesion criterion that considers both the normal and shear stresses is introduced, and the asymmetric detachment of the oblique structure is theoretically investigated. In addition, oblique beam array structures are manufactured, and an inclination effect of the structure on the asymmetric detachment is experimentally verified. (paper)

  18. Effect of blood contamination with 1-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, H M; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of blood contamination and decontamination methods on the microtensile bond strength of 1-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin contaminated after adhesive application and light curing. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop) and 1 resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) were used. Third molars that had been stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the 3 adhesive systems. The adhesive systems were used under 3 conditions: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood and reapplication of adhesive (Contamination 1) and contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood, then washing, drying and reapplication of the adhesive (Contamination 2). Following light curing of the adhesive, the resin composite was placed in 3 increments up to a 5-mm-thick layer on the bonded surface. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The microtensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p=0.05). After debonding, 5 specimens were selected from each group and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. For all adhesives, contamination groups showed lower bond strength than the control (p0.05). For Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop, contamination group #2 showed the lowest bond strength among the groups (pcontamination group #2 showed higher bond strength than contamination group #1 but showed no statistical significance between them (p>0.05).

  19. Effect of Superhydrophobic Surface of Titanium on Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifu Tang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the systemic antibiotics prophylaxis, orthopedic implants still remain highly susceptible to bacterial adhesion and resulting in device-associated infection. Surface modification is an effective way to decrease bacterial adhesion. In this study, we prepared surfaces with different wettability on titanium surface based on TiO2 nanotube to examine the effect of bacterial adhesion. Firstly, titanium plates were calcined to form hydrophilic TiO2 nanotube films of anatase phase. Subsequently, the nanotube films and inoxidized titaniums were treated with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyl-triethoxysilane (PTES, forming superhydrophobic and hydrophobic surfaces. Observed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the different surfaces have different characteristics. Staphylococcus aureus (SA adhesion on different surfaces was evaluated. Our experiment results show that the superhydrophobic surface has contact angles of water greater than 150∘ and also shows high resistance to bacterial contamination. It is indicated that superhydrophobic surface may be a factor to reduce device-associated infection and could be used in clinical practice.

  20. Design methodology for nano-engineered surfaces to control adhesion: Application to the anti-adhesion of particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taekyung [National Center for Optically-Assisted Ultra-High Precision Mechanical Systems, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Cheongwan [National Center for Optically-Assisted Ultra-High Precision Mechanical Systems, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Myungki; Lee, Jinhyung; Park, Changsu [National Center for Optically-Assisted Ultra-High Precision Mechanical Systems, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shinill, E-mail: snlkang@yonsei.ac.kr [National Center for Optically-Assisted Ultra-High Precision Mechanical Systems, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A design method using the Derjaguin approximation with FEA for low-adhesion surface. • Fabrication of nanostructures with small adhesion forces by presented design method. • Characterization of adhesion force via AFM FD-curve with modified atypical tips. • Verification of low-adhesion of designed surfaces using centrifugal detachment tests. • Investigation of interdependence of hydrophobicity and anti-adhesion force. - Abstract: With increasing demand for means of controlling surface adhesion in various applications, including the semiconductor industry, optics, micro/nanoelectromechanical systems, and the medical industry, nano-engineered surfaces have attracted much attention. This study suggests a design methodology for nanostructures using the Derjaguin approximation in conjunction with finite element analysis for the control of adhesion forces. The suggested design methodology was applied for designing a nano-engineered surface with low-adhesion properties. To verify this, rectangular and sinusoidal nanostructures were fabricated and analyzed using force-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy and centrifugal detachment testing. For force-distance curve measurements, modified cantilevers with tips formed with atypical particles were used. Subsequently, centrifugal detachment tests were also conducted. The surface wettability of rectangular and sinusoidal nanostructures was measured and compared with the measured adhesion force and the number of particles remaining after centrifugal detachment tests.

  1. The minimal essential unit for cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion comprises extracellular domains 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shan, Weisong; Yagita, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhaohui

    2004-01-01

    of the extracellular domains of N-cadherin and produced various cell lines to examine adhesion properties. We show that the first domain of N-cadherin alone on the cell surface fails to generate adhesive activity and that the first two domains of N-cadherin form the "minimal essential unit" to mediate cell adhesion...... domains of N-cadherin have distinct roles in cell adhesion, i.e. the first two domains are responsible for homophilic adhesion activity, and the other domains promote adhesion efficiency most likely by positioning essential domains relatively far out from the cell surface....

  2. Adhesion and friction of the smooth attachment system of the cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa and the influence of the application of fluid adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Betz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two different measurement techniques were applied to study the attachment of the smooth foot pads of the Madagascar hissing cockroach Gromphadorhina portentosa. The attachment of the non-manipulated adhesive organs was compared with that of manipulated ones (depletion or substitution by artificial secretions. From measurements of the friction on a centrifuge, it can be concluded that on nanorough surfaces, the insect appears to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction. Measurements performed with a nanotribometer on single attachment organs showed that, in the non-manipulated euplantulae, friction was clearly increased in the push direction, whereas the arolium of the fore tarsus showed higher friction in the pull direction. The surface of the euplantulae shows an imbricate appearance, whereupon the ledges face distally, which might contribute to the observed frictional anisotropy in the push direction. Upon depletion of the tarsal adhesion-mediating secretion or its replacement by oily fluids, in several cases, the anisotropic effect of the euplantula disappeared due to the decrease of friction forces in push-direction. In the euplantulae, adhesion was one to two orders of magnitude lower than friction. Whereas the tenacity was slightly decreased with depleted secretion, it was considerably increased after artificial application of oily liquids. In terms of adhesion, it is concluded that the semi-solid consistence of the natural adhesion-mediating secretion facilitates the detachment of the tarsus during locomotion. In terms of friction, on smooth to nanorough surfaces, the insects appear to benefit from employing emulsions instead of pure oils to avoid excessive friction forces, whereas on rougher surfaces the tarsal fluid rather functions in improving surface contact by keeping the cuticle compliable and compensating surface asperities of the substratum.

  3. Involvement of Sib Proteins in the Regulation of Cellular Adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cornillon, Sophie; Froquet, Romain; Cosson, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms ensuring cellular adhesion have been studied in detail in Dictyostelium amoebae, but little is known about the regulation of cellular adhesion in these cells. Here, we show that cellular adhesion is regulated in Dictyostelium, notably by the concentration of a cellular secreted factor accumulating in the medium. This constitutes a quorum-sensing mechanism allowing coordinated regulation of cellular adhesion in a Dictyostelium population. In order to understand the mechani...

  4. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Influence of application methods of one-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Choi,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various application methods of one-step self-etch adhesives to microtensile resin-dentin bond strength. Materials and Methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were used. The teeth were assigned randomly to twelve groups (n = 15, according to the three different adhesive systems (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, Adper Prompt L-Pop, G-Bond and application methods. The adhesive systems were applied on the dentin as follows: 1 The single coating, 2 The double coating, 3 Manual agitation, 4 Ultrasonic agitation. Following the adhesive application, light-cure composite resin was constructed. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours, and prepared 15 specimens per groups. Then microtensile bond strength was measured and the failure mode was examined. Results Manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating and double coating did. Double coating of adhesive significantly increased the microtensile bond strength than single coating did and there was no significant difference between the manual agitation and ultrasonic agitation group. There was significant difference in microtensile bonding strength among all adhesives and Clearfil Tri-S Bond showed the highest bond strength. Conclusions In one-step self-etching adhesives, there was significant difference according to application methods and type of adhesives. No matter of the material, the manual or ultrasonic agitation of the adhesive showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength.

  6. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  7. Experimental study on the viscosity and adhesive performance of exogenous liquid fibrin glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takuro; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Inamasu, Joji; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hirose, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous fibrin glue (FG) is highly suitable for neurosurgical procedures, because of its viscosity and adhesive properties. Several FGs are commercially available, but only few reports detail their differences. In the present study, we investigated the viscosity and adhesive performance of two types of FG: one is derived from blood donated in Europe and the United States (CSL Behring's Beriplast(®), BP) and the other is derived from blood donated in Japan (the Chemo-Sero-Therapeutic Research Institute's Bolheal(®), BH). The viscosity test that measured fibrinogen viscosity revealed that BP had significantly higher viscosity than BH. Similarly, the dripping test showed that BP traveled a significantly shorter drip distance in the vertical direction than BH, although the transverse diameter of the coagulated FG did not differ statistically significantly. In the tensile strength test, BP showed superior adhesion performance over BH. The histological study of the hematoxylin-eosin-stained specimens in both groups showed favorable adhesion. Although further studies are required on its manufacturing and usage methods, FG shows differences in viscosity and adhesive performance according to the blood from which it is derived. We conclude that it is desirable to select the type and usage method of FG according to the characteristics of the surgical operation in question. Our findings suggest that FG produced from the blood donated in Europe and the United States might be more suitable for use in surgical procedures that demand an especially high degree of viscosity and rapid adhesive performance.

  8. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  9. Strenght of the glue line of edge glued panels of Pinus taeda made with different adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merielen de Carvalho Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study compares the strength of the glue line of edge glued panels of Pinus taeda made with different industrial adhesives. Three types of adhesives (poly(vinyl acetate (PVAc, emulsion polymer isocyanate (EPI and polyurethane (PU glued in two side gluing orientation (radial and tangential and analyzed after the conditioning tests (dry and wet were analyzed. The 360 specimens were prepared for determining the shear strength of edge glued panels of Pinus taeda, and these were tested in a universal testing machine called EMIC. The shear strength of the glue line at dry condition was lower in the tangential side for the three types of adhesives analyzed. The PU adhesive showed the highest values of shear strength in the applied conditions, differing from PVAc and EPI adhesive when tested on dry condition and did not differ from the others adhesives when tested on wet condition. The highest percentage of wood failure was observed after the shear strength test at dry condition to EPI adhesive glued in the radial side. And in the wet condition, the EPI adhesive and PU adhesive glued in tangential side showed higher mean values of wood failure. Thus, it was possible to conclude that the strength of the glue line of Pinus taeda wood was influenced by the type of adhesive and side gluing orientation, and showed differently behavior according to the condition of use (wet or dry.

  10. Adaptive governance good practice: Show me the evidence!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Wallace, Lisa; Velarde, Sandra J; Wreford, Anita

    2018-09-15

    -based adaptive governance good practice within and across diverse sectors, issues, and contexts. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  12. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey M Bove

    Full Text Available Postoperative adhesions are pathological attachments that develop between abdominopelvic structures following surgery. Considered unavoidable and ubiquitous, postoperative adhesions lead to bowel obstructions, infertility, pain, and reoperations. As such, they represent a substantial health care challenge. Despite over a century of research, no preventive treatment exists. We hypothesized that postoperative adhesions develop from a lack of movement of the abdominopelvic organs in the immediate postoperative period while rendered immobile by surgery and opiates, and tested whether manual therapy would prevent their development. In a modified rat cecal abrasion model, rats were allocated to receive treatment with manual therapy or not, and their resulting adhesions were quantified. We also characterized macrophage phenotype. In separate experiments we tested the safety of the treatment on a strictureplasty model, and also the efficacy of the treatment following adhesiolysis. We show that the treatment led to reduced frequency and size of cohesive adhesions, but not other types of adhesions, such as those involving intraperitoneal fatty structures. This effect was associated with a delay in the appearance of trophic macrophages. The treatment did not inhibit healing or induce undesirable complications following strictureplasty. Our results support that that maintained movements of damaged structures in the immediate postoperative period has potential to act as an effective preventive for attenuating cohesive postoperative adhesion development. Our findings lay the groundwork for further research, including mechanical and pharmacologic approaches to maintain movements during healing.

  13. Attenuation of postoperative adhesions using a modeled manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Geoffrey M; Chapelle, Susan L; Hanlon, Katherine E; Diamond, Michael P; Mokler, David J

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative adhesions are pathological attachments that develop between abdominopelvic structures following surgery. Considered unavoidable and ubiquitous, postoperative adhesions lead to bowel obstructions, infertility, pain, and reoperations. As such, they represent a substantial health care challenge. Despite over a century of research, no preventive treatment exists. We hypothesized that postoperative adhesions develop from a lack of movement of the abdominopelvic organs in the immediate postoperative period while rendered immobile by surgery and opiates, and tested whether manual therapy would prevent their development. In a modified rat cecal abrasion model, rats were allocated to receive treatment with manual therapy or not, and their resulting adhesions were quantified. We also characterized macrophage phenotype. In separate experiments we tested the safety of the treatment on a strictureplasty model, and also the efficacy of the treatment following adhesiolysis. We show that the treatment led to reduced frequency and size of cohesive adhesions, but not other types of adhesions, such as those involving intraperitoneal fatty structures. This effect was associated with a delay in the appearance of trophic macrophages. The treatment did not inhibit healing or induce undesirable complications following strictureplasty. Our results support that that maintained movements of damaged structures in the immediate postoperative period has potential to act as an effective preventive for attenuating cohesive postoperative adhesion development. Our findings lay the groundwork for further research, including mechanical and pharmacologic approaches to maintain movements during healing.

  14. Comparing Soy Flour Wood Adhesives to Purified Soy Protein Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    While economics dictate that soy-based wood adhesives be made with soy flour, much of the recent literature on soy-based wood adhesives has involved using soy protein isolate. The obvious assumption is that the additional carbohydrates in the flour but not in the isolate only serve as inert diluents. Our studies have shown that the isolate can provide 10 times the wet...

  15. The synaptic cell adhesion molecule, SynCAM1, mediates astrocyte-to-astrocyte and astrocyte-to-GnRH neuron adhesiveness in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandau, Ursula S; Mungenast, Alison E; McCarthy, Jack; Biederer, Thomas; Corfas, Gabriel; Ojeda, Sergio R

    2011-06-01

    We previously identified synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1 (SynCAM1) as a component of a genetic network involved in the hypothalamic control of female puberty. Although it is well established that SynCAM1 is a synaptic adhesion molecule, its contribution to hypothalamic function is unknown. Here we show that, in addition to the expected neuronal localization illustrated by its presence in GnRH neurons, SynCAM1 is expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes. Cell adhesion assays indicated that SynCAM is recognized by both GnRH neurons and astrocytes as an adhesive partner and promotes cell-cell adhesiveness via homophilic, extracellular domain-mediated interactions. Alternative splicing of the SynCAM1 primary mRNA transcript yields four mRNAs encoding membrane-spanning SynCAM1 isoforms. Variants 1 and 4 are predicted to be both N and O glycosylated. Hypothalamic astrocytes and GnRH-producing GT1-7 cells express mainly isoform 4 mRNA, and sequential N- and O-deglycosylation of proteins extracted from these cells yields progressively smaller SynCAM1 species, indicating that isoform 4 is the predominant SynCAM1 variant expressed in astrocytes and GT1-7 cells. Neither cell type expresses the products of two other SynCAM genes (SynCAM2 and SynCAM3), suggesting that SynCAM-mediated astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-GnRH neuron adhesiveness is mostly mediated by SynCAM1 homophilic interactions. When erbB4 receptor function is disrupted in astrocytes, via transgenic expression of a dominant-negative erbB4 receptor form, SynCAM1-mediated adhesiveness is severely compromised. Conversely, SynCAM1 adhesive behavior is rapidly, but transiently, enhanced in astrocytes by ligand-dependent activation of erbB4 receptors, suggesting that erbB4-mediated events affecting SynCAM1 function contribute to regulate astrocyte adhesive communication.

  16. Tenomodulin expression in the periodontal ligament enhances cellular adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuske Komiyama

    Full Text Available Tenomodulin (Tnmd is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain.

  17. A Histopathological Study of Direct Pulp Capping with Adhesive Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Salhenejad

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recently, it has been proposed that different adhesive materials can be used for direct pulp capping. Previous studies have demonstrated that multi steps dentin adhesives could form reparative dentin similar to calcium hydroxide (CH.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the histological pulp response of ninety mechanically exposed cat pulps to two adhesive resins (Scotch Bond MP and Single Bond 3M were compared with a calcium hydroxide cement (Dycal, Dentsply.Materials and Methods : Class V facial cavities with similar pulpal exposures were prepared in canines. In the experimental groups phosphoric acid was used to etch the enamel and dentin and pulp exposure, and after it dentin adhesives was applied. The exposure point of the control group was capped with Dycal then the remainder of the cavities was etched and a dentin adhesive (single bond was applied. All of the cavities were restored with a composite resin (Z 100 in usual manner. The animals were scarified after 7, 30 and 60 days (n=30, and the pulp evaluated histologically, statistical analysis was carried out with Kruskal- Wallis test (a=0.05.Results: The data showed that most of the cases had mild inflammation of pulp tissue.There was no significant difference in inflammatory reaction of pulp by Dycal and two adhesive systems, severe inflammatory reaction of pulp was observed only in most of the 30- day Single Bond group. Soft tissue organization of dentin bridge was less than ScotchBond and Dycal groups, the differentiation of dentin bridge was less than Scotch Bond group after 7 days.Conclusion: Slight inflammatory cell infiltration was the main reaction of exposed pulp when two commercially available adhesive resins were placed directly on the exposed pulp.There was no significant difference in inflammatory reaction of pulp between Dycal and two adhesive systems after 7 days and 60 days. After 7 days most of the specimens showed an amount of predentin

  18. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-06

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air.

  19. Adjuvant Therapy for the Reduction of Postoperative Intra-abdominal Adhesion Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason PY Cheung

    2009-07-01

    Conclusions: Only a limited number of adjuvant treatment methods are currently available for the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Seprafilm has been proven to be the efficacious method to reduce adhesions. Investigations into the novel therapies are showing promising results in experimental studies and clinical studies before their wider application.

  20. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-10-23

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  1. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infected dentin was excavated with the help of caries detector dye. On the remaining hard dentin, a standardized smear layer was created by polishing with 600-grit SiC paper. Teeth were divided into three groups and treated with one of the three tested adhesives: Adper Scotchbond 1 XT (3M ESPE), a 2-step etch-andrinse adhesive, Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), a 1-step self-etching or all-in-one adhesive, and Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), a 2-step self-etching adhesive. Five-mm-thick composite buildups (Z-250, 3M ESPE) were built and light cured. After water storage for 24 h at 37ºC, the bonded specimens were sectioned into bars (1.0 x 1.0 mm; n = 20 to 30). Microtensile bond strength of normal dentin specimens and caries-affected dentin specimens was measured in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed = 1 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p adhesives were found. Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and Clearfil S3 Bond showed significantly lower bond strength values to caries-affected dentin. For Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values to normal and caries-affected dentin were not significantly different. All the tested simplified adhesives showed similar bond strength values to normal dentin. For the tested 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesive and the all-in-one adhesive, the bond strength values to caries-affected dentin were lower than to normal dentin.

  2. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Gregory L; de Baat, Cees

    2012-06-01

    To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. The survey took place in Greece and the Netherlands with a sample of 284 and 165 consecutive complete denture wearers, respectively, by using a 9-item prepared questionnaire. Statistical analysis relied on chi-square test at α = 0.05. In this survey, 26 and 20% of Greek and Dutch patients, respectively, had tried denture adhesive, but only 27% of them in Greece as well as in the Netherlands currently used it; 49% of the Greek and 45% of the Dutch participants rated the overall performance of adhesives as good. Between the two populations, no differences were identified in a majority of the research variables, except where 27% of Greeks answered that they did not know the existence of denture adhesives compared to none of the Dutch patients and when 90% of the Dutch contrary to 70% of Greeks reported that they did not need denture adhesives as they could manage their dentures well. The usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives between the Greek and Dutch sample were similar with only two exceptions concerning the knowledge of existence and the need of using denture adhesives. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Influence of substrate modulus on gecko adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klittich, Mena R.; Wilson, Michael C.; Bernard, Craig; Rodrigo, Rochelle M.; Keith, Austin J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The gecko adhesion system fascinates biologists and materials scientists alike for its strong, reversible, glue-free, dry adhesion. Understanding the adhesion system’s performance on various surfaces can give clues as to gecko behaviour, as well as towards designing synthetic adhesive mimics. Geckos encounter a variety of surfaces in their natural habitats; tropical geckos, such as Gekko gecko, encounter hard, rough tree trunks as well as soft, flexible leaves. While gecko adhesion on hard surfaces has been extensively studied, little work has been done on soft surfaces. Here, we investigate for the first time the influence of macroscale and nanoscale substrate modulus on whole animal adhesion on two different substrates (cellulose acetate and polydimethylsiloxane) in air and find that across 5 orders of magnitude in macroscale modulus, there is no change in adhesion. On the nanoscale, however, gecko adhesion is shown to depend on substrate modulus. This suggests that low surface-layer modulus may inhibit the gecko adhesion system, independent of other influencing factors such as macroscale composite modulus and surface energy. Understanding the limits of gecko adhesion is vital for clarifying adhesive mechanisms and in the design of synthetic adhesives for soft substrates (including for biomedical applications and wearable electronics).

  4. Adhesion to brown trout skin mucus, antagonism against cyst adhesion and pathogenicity to rainbow trout of some inhibitory bacteria against Saprolegnia parasitica .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal-González, M T; Fregeneda-Grandes, J M; González-Palacios, C; Aller-Gancedo, J M

    2013-04-29

    Biological control of saprolegniosis with bacteria might be an alternative to the use of chemical compounds. Among criteria for the selection of such bacteria are their absence of pathogenicity to fish and their ability to prevent adhesion of the pathogen to the skin mucus. The pathogenicity to rainbow trout of 21 bacterial isolates with in vitro inhibitory activity against Saprolegnia parasitica was studied. Fifteen of the isolates, identified as Aeromonas sobria, Pantoea agglomerans, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia fonticola, Xanthomonas retroflexus and Yersinia kristensenii, were non-pathogenic when injected into rainbow trout. Their capacity to adhere to the skin mucus of male and female brown trout and to reduce the adhesion of S. parasitica cysts under exclusion, competition and displacement conditions was tested. The 15 bacterial isolates showed a low adhesion rate, ranging between 1.7% (for an A. sobria isolate) and 15.3% (a P. fluorescens isolate). This adhesion was greater in the case of mucus from male brown trout than from females. Similarities in the adhesion to male mucus and other substrates and correlation to that observed to polystyrene suggest that adhesion to skin mucus does not depend on the substrate. A high percentage (88.9%) of the S. parasitica cysts adhered to the skin mucus of male brown trout. Almost all of the bacteria reduced this adhesion ratio significantly under exclusion and competition conditions. However, only half of the isolates displaced cysts from skin mucus, and more bacterial cells were necessary for this effect. A novel method to study the adhesion of S. parasitica cysts to skin mucus of trout and their interactions with inhibitory bacteria is described.

  5. Improvement of the T-peel Strength of Polypropylene Adhesion Joints by Surface Photografting Pre-Treatment with Methyl Methacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balart, R.; Sánchez-Nácher, L.; Balart, J.; Fombuena, V.; España, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    Although polypropylene is one of the most used polymers at industrial level due to good balanced properties, it presents some restrictions in applications that require good adhesion properties as well as coating and painting. These restrictions are related to its non polar nature which leads to low wetting properties. So that, in most cases, it is necessary a previous surface pre-treatment in order to improve adhesion properties. These surface treatments could be physical or chemical. Among the wide variety of physical processes, plasma technologies are useful from both technical and environmental points of view. If we take into account economic considerations, chemical processes are interesting due to low cost equipment and procedures. In particular, we have used photografting of methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer on polypropylene substrates with UV radiation and initiators. This process is useful to promote chemical modification of polypropylene surface by grafting MMA monomers into polypropylene polymer chains. Due to polarity of some groups in MMA monomers, it is possible to increase surface wettability thus promoting a remarkable increase in adhesion properties of polypropylene. In this work, changes in wettability of polypropylene surfaces in terms of the exposure time to UV radiation in presence of MMA monomers and initiators has been investigated. Furthermore, chemical changes have been characterized by FTIR analysis and mechanical performance of adhesion joints has been evaluated by T-peel tests.

  6. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  7. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  8. Adhesive Bonding and Corrosion Performance Investigated as a Function of Aluminum Oxide Chemistry and Adhesives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahami, S.T.; Hauffman, T.; de Kok, John M.M.; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    The long-term strength and durability of an adhesive bond is dependent on the stability of the oxide-adhesive interface. As such, changes in the chemistry of the oxide and/or the adhesive are expected to modify the interfacial properties and affect the joint performance in practice. The upcoming

  9. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  10. Correlation between degree of conversion, resin-dentin bond strength and nanoleakage of simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Viviane; Dobrovolski, Max; Zander-Grande, Christiana; Martins, Gislaine Cristine; Gordillo, Luís Alfonso Arana; Rodrigues Accorinte, Maria de Lourdes; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of conversion measured inside the hybrid layer (DC) with the microtensile resin-dentin bond strength (μTBS) and silver nitrate uptake or nanoleakage (SNU) for five simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Fifty-five caries free extracted molars were used in this study. Thirty teeth were used for μTBS/SNU [n=6] and 25 teeth for DC [n=5]. The dentin surfaces were bonded with the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond 2 (SB), Ambar (AB), XP Bond (XP), Tetric N-Bond (TE) and Stae (ST) followed by composite resin build-ups. For μTBS and SNU test, bonded teeth were sectioned in order to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8mm(2)), which were tested under tensile stress (0.5mm/min). Three bonded sticks, from each tooth, were not tested in tensile stress and they were immersed in 50% silver nitrate, photo-developed and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Longitudinal 1-mm thick sections were prepared for the teeth assigned for DC measurement and evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. ST showed lowest DC, μTBS, and higher SNU (p0.05), except for TE which showed an intermediate SNU level. The DC was positively correlated with μTBS and negatively correlated with SNU (p<0.05). SNU was also negatively correlated with μTBS (p<0.05). The measurement of DC inside the hybrid layer can provide some information about bonding performance of adhesive systems since this property showed a good correlation with resin-dentin bond strength and SNU values. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of adhesion properties of novel probiotic strains to human intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, A C; Tuomola, E M; Tölkkö, S; Salminen, S

    2001-02-28

    Potential new probiotic strains Lactobacillus brevis PELI, L. reuteri ING1, L. rhamnosus VTT E-800 and L. rhamnosus LC-705 were assessed for their adhesion properties using the human intestinal mucus model. The effect on the adhesion of exposure to acid and pepsin and to milk were tested to simulate gastric and food processing conditions, and the effect of different growth media on adhesion was tested. The properties of the four strains were compared to the well-investigated probiotic L. rhamnosus strain GG. Three of the tested strains showed significant adhesion properties in the mucus model, while L. brevis PELI had intermediate adhesion and L. rhamnosus LC-705 adhered poorly. Pretreatment with different milks decreased the adhesion and low pH and pepsin treatment reduced the adhesion of all tested strains except L. rhamnosus LC-705. No competitive exclusion of pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli SfaII was observed. The results indicate that major differences exist between tested proposed probiotic strains. The growth media and the food matrix significantly affect the adhesive ability of the tested strains. This has previously not been taken into account when selecting novel probiotic strains.

  12. Soy protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2010-01-01

    In the quest to manufacture and use building materials that are more environmentally friendly, soy adhesives can be an important component. Trees fix and store carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. After the trees are harvested, machinery converts the wood into strands, which are then bonded together with adhesives to form strandboard, used in constructing long-lasting...

  13. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  14. Specie – treatment – adhesive combinations for glulam purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlito Calil Neto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glued laminated timber is an engineered product that requires precision manufacturing in all its stages. The finished product can only be tested in laboratory conditions. However, it is necessary to have quality control in the production to ensure that the properties of the glulam are appropriate to the product specified requirements in accordance with the standards. In Brazil is still no specific standard of qualification for the manufactures of Glulam. In this context, different kinds of wood, adhesives and preservative treatments in the composition of Glulam can be used. This paper aims to evaluate the proposed trials conducted with combinations of four Brazilian reforestation species, three adhesives and three types of preservative treatment. As a result was observed that combinations, which showed the best performance, were pine and parica wood, with any type of adhesive or treatment investigated, which can be used in exterior applications. Lyptus® wood for any combination of treatments falls into the internal use class. Teak wood can be used indoors (adhesive polyurethane and all kinds of treatment or external (phenol resorcinol formaldehyde adhesive and all kinds of treatment.

  15. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  16. Effect of Dentin Wetness on the Bond Strength of Universal Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Son, Sung-Ae; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The effects of dentin wetness on the bond strength and adhesive interface morphology of universal adhesives have been investigated using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Seventy-two human third molars were wet ground to expose flat dentin surfaces. They were divided into three groups according to the air-drying time of the dentin surfaces: 0 (without air drying), 5, and 10 s. The dentin surfaces were then treated with three universal adhesives: G-Premio Bond, Single Bond Universal, and All-Bond Universal in self-etch or etch-and-rinse mode. After composite build up, a μTBS test was performed. One additional tooth was prepared for each group by staining the adhesives with 0.01 wt % of Rhodamine B fluorescent dye for CLSM analysis. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Two-way ANOVA showed significant differences among the adhesive systems and dentin moisture conditions. An interaction effect was also observed (p adhesives. PMID:29068404

  17. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  18. Genome shuffling of Lactobacillus plantarum C88 improves adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yujuan; Duan, Cuicui; Gao, Lei; Yu, Xue; Niu, Chunhua; Li, Shengyu

    2017-01-01

    Genome shuffling is an important method for rapid improvement in microbial strains for desired phenotypes. In this study, ultraviolet irradiation and nitrosoguanidine were used as mutagens to enhance the adhesion of the wild-type Lactobacillus plantarum C88. Four strains with better property were screened after mutagenesis to develop a library of parent strains for three rounds of genome shuffling. Fusants F3-1, F3-2, F3-3, and F3-4 were screened as the improved strains. The in vivo and in vitro tests results indicated that the population after three rounds of genome shuffling exhibited improved adhesive property. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA results showed significant differences between the parent strain and recombinant strains at DNA level. These results suggest that the adhesive property of L. plantarum C88 can be significantly improved by genome shuffling. Improvement in the adhesive property of bacterial cells by genome shuffling enhances the colonization of probiotic strains which further benefits to exist probiotic function.

  19. Adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz; Taktak, Suekrue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, the wear and adhesion properties of BDI were investigated. → Boro-tempering process under several heat treatment conditions was examined. → Optical microscope, SEM and XRD analysis were carried out to investigate the microstructure. → It was observed that boro-tempering process improves micro-hardness and wear properties of ductile irons. -- Abstract: In this study, adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron (BDI) were investigated. Boro-tempering was carried out on two stage processes i.e. boronizing and tempering. At the first stage, ductile iron samples were boronized by using pack process at 900 o C for 1, 3, and 5 h and then, secondly tempered at 250, 300, 350, and 400 o C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of boro-tempered samples showed that FeB and Fe 2 B phases were found on the surface of the samples. The Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test was used to assess the adhesion of boride layer. Test result showed that adhesion decreased with increasing boriding time and increased with increasing tempering temperature. Dry sliding wear tests of these samples were performed against Al 2 O 3 ball at a constant sliding speed and loads of 5 and 10 N. Wear tests indicated that boro-tempering heat treatment increased wear resistance of ductile iron. In addition, it was found that while wear rate of boro-tempered samples decreased with increasing boriding time, there is no significant affect of tempering temperature on wear rate.

  20. Current dental adhesives systems. A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Egle; Cumbo, Enzo; Cardoso, Rielson Jose A; Gallina, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry is based on the development of materials which establish an effective bond with the tooth tissues. In this context, adhesive systems have attracted considerable research interest in recent years. Successful adhesive bonding depends on the chemistry of the adhesive, on appropriate clinical handling of the material as well as on the knowledge of the morphological changes caused on dental tissue by different bonding procedures. This paper outlines the status of contemporary adhesive systems, with particular emphasis on chemical characteristics and mode of interaction of the adhesives with enamel and dentinal tissues. Dental adhesives are used for several clinical applications and they can be classified based on the clinical regimen in "etch-and-rinse adhesives" and "self-etch adhesives". Other important considerations concern the different anatomical characteristics of enamel and dentine which are involved in the bonding procedures that have also implications for the technique used as well as for the quality of the bond. Etch-and-rinse adhesive systems generally perform better on enamel than self-etching systems which may be more suitable for bonding to dentine. In order to avoid a possible loss of the restoration, secondary caries or pulp damage due to bacteria penetration or due to cytotoxicity effects of eluted adhesive components, careful consideration of several factors is essential in selecting the suitable bonding procedure and adhesive system for the individual patient situation.

  1. A nontransferring dry adhesive with hierarchical polymer nanohairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Lee, Jin-Kwan; Kim, Hong Nam; Moon, Sang Heup; Suh, Kahp Y

    2009-04-07

    We present a simple yet robust method for fabricating angled, hierarchically patterned high-aspect-ratio polymer nanohairs to generate directionally sensitive dry adhesives. The slanted polymeric nanostructures were molded from an etched polySi substrate containing slanted nanoholes. An angled etching technique was developed to fabricate slanted nanoholes with flat tips by inserting an etch-stop layer of silicon dioxide. This unique etching method was equipped with a Faraday cage system to control the ion-incident angles in the conventional plasma etching system. The polymeric nanohairs were fabricated with tailored leaning angles, sizes, tip shapes, and hierarchical structures. As a result of controlled leaning angle and bulged flat top of the nanohairs, the replicated, slanted nanohairs showed excellent directional adhesion, exhibiting strong shear attachment (approximately 26 N/cm(2) in maximum) in the angled direction and easy detachment (approximately 2.2 N/cm(2)) in the opposite direction, with a hysteresis value of approximately 10. In addition to single scale nanohairs, monolithic, micro-nanoscale combined hierarchical hairs were also fabricated by using a 2-step UV-assisted molding technique. These hierarchical nanoscale patterns maintained their adhesive force even on a rough surface (roughness <20 microm) because of an increase in the contact area by the enhanced height of hierarchy, whereas simple nanohairs lost their adhesion strength. To demonstrate the potential applications of the adhesive patch, the dry adhesive was used to transport a large-area glass (47.5 x 37.5 cm(2), second-generation TFT-LCD glass), which could replace the current electrostatic transport/holding system with further optimization.

  2. Polyurethane structural adhesives applied in automotive composite joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Garcia Quini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years structural adhesives technology has demonstrated great potential for application due to its capacity to transform complex structures into solid unitary and monolithic assemblies using different materials. Thus, seams or joints integrate these structures providing, besides a reduction in weight, a considerable increase in the mechanical resistance and stiffness. The increase in the industrial use of structural adhesives is mainly due to their ability to efficiently bond different materials in an irreversible manner, even replacing systems involving mechanical joints. In the automobile industry structural adhesives have been widely used for the bonding of metal substrates, thermoplastics and composites, frequently employing these in combination, particularly glass fiber and polyester resin composites molded using RTM and SMC processes. However, the use of urethane structural adhesives in applications involving composites and thermoplastics has been the subject of few investigations. In this study the effects of temperature and time on the shear strength of RTM, SMC and ABS joints, applying temperatures of -40, 25, 80, 120 and 177 °C and times of 20 minutes and 500 hours, were determined. The objective was to evaluate the performance under extreme conditions of use in order to assess whether these joints could be used in passenger or off-road vehicles. The results showed that the urethane structural adhesive promoted the efficient bonding of these materials, considering that due to the high adhesive strength the failures occurred in the substrates without adversely affecting the bonded area. For each test condition the joint failure modes were also determined.

  3. A nontransferring dry adhesive with hierarchical polymer nanohairs

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, H. E.

    2009-03-20

    We present a simple yet robust method for fabricating angled, hierarchically patterned high-aspect-ratio polymer nanohairs to generate directionally sensitive dry adhesives. The slanted polymeric nanostructures were molded from an etched polySi substrate containing slanted nanoholes. An angled etching technique was developed to fabricate slanted nanoholes with flat tips by inserting an etch-stop layer of silicon dioxide. This unique etching method was equipped with a Faraday cage system to control the ion-incident angles in the conventional plasma etching system. The polymeric nanohairs were fabricated with tailored leaning angles, sizes, tip shapes, and hierarchical structures. As a result of controlled leaning angle and bulged flat top of the nanohairs, the replicated, slanted nanohairs showed excellent directional adhesion, exhibiting strong shear attachment (approximately 26 N/cm(2) in maximum) in the angled direction and easy detachment (approximately 2.2 N/cm(2)) in the opposite direction, with a hysteresis value of approximately 10. In addition to single scale nanohairs, monolithic, micro-nanoscale combined hierarchical hairs were also fabricated by using a 2-step UV-assisted molding technique. These hierarchical nanoscale patterns maintained their adhesive force even on a rough surface (roughness <20 microm) because of an increase in the contact area by the enhanced height of hierarchy, whereas simple nanohairs lost their adhesion strength. To demonstrate the potential applications of the adhesive patch, the dry adhesive was used to transport a large-area glass (47.5 x 37.5 cm(2), second-generation TFT-LCD glass), which could replace the current electrostatic transport/holding system with further optimization.

  4. The effect of denture adhesives on Candida albicans growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Sousa-Rodrigues, Patricia; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Scully, Crispian

    2012-06-01

    Denture-wearing favours the growth of Candida. In view of the fact that many denture wearers regularly use adhesives to enhance denture retention, stability and function, the aim of this work was to study the effect of denture adhesives on Candida albicans growth in vitro. The denture adhesives tested were Corega(®) cream, Kukident(®) cream, Novafix(®) cream, Polident(®) cream, Protefix(®) cream, Steradent(®) cream, Aderyn(®) powder, Corega(®) ultra powder, Protefix(®) powder and Corega(®) strip. C. albicans growth curves were obtained in the presence or absence of a 1% solution of the denture adhesive diluted in Sabouraud broth. Macro- and microscopic morphological changes in C. albicans were analysed, as was microbial contamination of the denture adhesive. Most of the denture adhesives studied induced morphological changes in C. albicans cells and colonies, but only two had any significant inhibitory effect on yeast growth. Kukident(®) cream markedly inhibited C. albicans growth in a concentration-dependent way, reducing the growth rate by 95%, whereas Corega(®) cream also inhibited C. albicans growth but in a non-concentration-dependent way, reducing the growth rate by 37%. In addition, denture adhesives available as powders had detectable microbial contamination. Some commercially available denture adhesives showed microbial contamination and some had significant inhibitory effect on C. albicans growth. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Mechanical and Anti-bacterial Properties of Dental Adhesive Containing Diamond Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zeinab Ebadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nanoparticle diamond incorporated in an experimental dental adhesive formulation is valuated by examining the mechanical properties and shear bond strength of the system. Diamond nanoparticles were incorporated into the dentin adhesive system in different concentrations of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 weight percentages. The suspensions were ultrasonicated to facilitate the nano-particle dispersion in an adhesive solution containing ethanol, bis-GMA, UDMA, TMPTMA, HEMA  and photo-initiator  system. Diametral  tensile  strength, fexural strength, fexural modulus, depth of cure and microshear bond strength of the adhesive system were measured. The adhesive-dentin interface was then observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA at a signifcant level of P>0.05. No signifcant difference was observed between the diametral tensile strength of the adhesive. At nanoparticle content level of 0.1% (by wt, however, 85% increase in fexural strength and 13% enhancement in fexural modulus were observed. Microshear bond strength test revealed 70% and 79% improvements of adhesion force in systems containing 0.1% and 0.2% nanoparticles, respectively. Although the neat diamond nanoparticles revealed antibacterial activity, the adhesive containing different percentages of the nano particles did not show any antibacterial activities when tested against, Staphilococcus Aureus, Staphilococcus Streptococcus, Staphilococcus ephidermidis, Saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis bacteries.

  6. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self-associate form......Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P....... The specificity of adhesive interaction was localized to the amino-terminal (EC1) domain of both cadherins. Thus, EC1 domain of classic cadherins exposes two determinants responsible for nonspecific lateral and cadherin type-specific adhesive dimerization....

  7. Effects of solvent evaporation time on immediate adhesive properties of universal adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Martinez, Issis V; Perdigão, Jorge; Muñoz, Miguel A; Sezinando, Ana; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) of three universal or multi-mode adhesives, applied with increasing solvent evaporation times. One-hundred and forty caries-free extracted third molars were divided into 20 groups for bond strength testing, according to three factors: (1) Adhesive - All-Bond Universal (ABU, Bisco, Inc.), Prime&Bond Elect (PBE, Dentsply), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU, 3M ESPE); (2) Bonding strategy - self-etch (SE) or etch-and-rinse (ER); and (3) Adhesive solvent evaporation time - 5s, 15s, and 25s. Two extra groups were prepared with ABU because the respective manufacturer recommends a solvent evaporation time of 10s. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h). Resin-dentin beams (0.8mm(2)) were tested at 0.5mm/min (μTBS). For NL, forty extracted molars were randomly assigned to each of the 20 groups. Dentin disks were restored, immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate, sectioned and processed for evaluation under a FESEM in backscattered mode. Data from μTBS were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (adhesive vs. drying time) for each strategy, and Tukey's test (α=0.05). NL data were computed with non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, α=0.05). Increasing solvent evaporation time from 5s to 25s resulted in statistically higher mean μTBS for all adhesives when used in ER mode. Regarding NL, ER resulted in greater NL than SE for each of the evaporation times regardless of the adhesive used. A solvent evaporation time of 25s resulted in the lowest NL for SBU-ER. Residual water and/or solvent may compromise the performance of universal adhesives, which may be improved with extended evaporation times. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling cell adhesion and proliferation: a cellular-automata based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, J; Garzón-Alvarado, D; Cerrolaza, M

    Cell adhesion is a process that involves the interaction between the cell membrane and another surface, either a cell or a substrate. Unlike experimental tests, computer models can simulate processes and study the result of experiments in a shorter time and lower costs. One of the tools used to simulate biological processes is the cellular automata, which is a dynamic system that is discrete both in space and time. This work describes a computer model based on cellular automata for the adhesion process and cell proliferation to predict the behavior of a cell population in suspension and adhered to a substrate. The values of the simulated system were obtained through experimental tests on fibroblast monolayer cultures. The results allow us to estimate the cells settling time in culture as well as the adhesion and proliferation time. The change in the cells morphology as the adhesion over the contact surface progress was also observed. The formation of the initial link between cell and the substrate of the adhesion was observed after 100 min where the cell on the substrate retains its spherical morphology during the simulation. The cellular automata model developed is, however, a simplified representation of the steps in the adhesion process and the subsequent proliferation. A combined framework of experimental and computational simulation based on cellular automata was proposed to represent the fibroblast adhesion on substrates and changes in a macro-scale observed in the cell during the adhesion process. The approach showed to be simple and efficient.

  9. Peritoneal adhesions after laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, Valerio

    2014-05-07

    Although laparoscopy has the potential to reduce peritoneal trauma and post-operative peritoneal adhesion formation, only one randomized controlled trial and a few comparative retrospective clinical studies have addressed this issue. Laparoscopy reduces de novo adhesion formation but has no efficacy in reducing adhesion reformation after adhesiolysis. Moreover, several studies have suggested that the reduction of de novo post-operative adhesions does not seem to have a significant clinical impact. Experimental data in animal models have suggested that CO₂ pneumoperitoneum can cause acute peritoneal inflammation during laparoscopy depending on the insufflation pressure and the surgery duration. Broad peritoneal cavity protection by the insufflation of a low-temperature humidified gas mixture of CO₂, N₂O and O₂ seems to represent the best approach for reducing peritoneal inflammation due to pneumoperitoneum. However, these experimental data have not had a significant impact on the modification of laparoscopic instrumentation. In contrast, surgeons should train themselves to perform laparoscopy quickly, and they should complete their learning curves before testing chemical anti-adhesive agents and anti-adhesion barriers. Chemical anti-adhesive agents have the potential to exert broad peritoneal cavity protection against adhesion formation, but when these agents are used alone, the concentrations needed to prevent adhesions are too high and could cause major post-operative side effects. Anti-adhesion barriers have been used mainly in open surgery, but some clinical data from laparoscopic surgeries are already available. Sprays, gels, and fluid barriers are easier to apply in laparoscopic surgery than solid barriers. Results have been encouraging with solid barriers, spray barriers, and gel barriers, but they have been ambiguous with fluid barriers. Moreover, when barriers have been used alone, the maximum protection against adhesion formation has been no

  10. Halloysite nanotube incorporation into adhesive systems—effect on bond strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatheeri, Mohammed S; Palasuk, Jadesada; Eckert, George J; Platt, Jeffrey A; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Halloysite® aluminosilicate clay nanotube (HNT) incorporation into a two-step etch-and-rinse (ER) and a one-step self-etch (SE) adhesive on human dentin shear bond strength (SBS). Ten groups (n = 12) were prepared according to the adhesive system (i.e., ER or SE) and amount of HNT incorporated (5-20%, w/v), as follows: commercial control (i.e., the adhesive was used as purchased, 0% HNT); experimental control (i.e., the adhesive was processed through mixing/stirring and sonication similarly to the HNT-incorporated experimental groups, but without HNT); and 5, 10, and 20% HNT. SBS testing was performed after 24 h of storage in deionized water at 37 °C. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope (×40). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the resin-dentin interface of selected specimens was carried out. Two-way ANOVA revealed that incorporation of HNT up to 20% (w/v) in ER and up to 10% (w/v) in SE demonstrated an increased SBS compared to their experimental controls. Compared to the commercial control, SBS of HNT-modified dentin adhesives was not significantly different for ER adhesives (p > 0.05) but was significantly higher with 5% HNT in the SE adhesive (p < 0.05). Failure modes were predominantly adhesive and mixed failures. SEM micrographs of resin-dentin interfaces for ER-commercial control and ER-10% showed a similar morphology. A thicker adhesive layer and the presence of agglomerated HNT on the resin tags were seen in ER-10%. An increased number of short resin tags in SE-5% compared with SE-commercial control were observed. HNT addition up to 20% in ER and up to 10 % in SE showed increased SBS to dentin compared with the experimental control. HNT can be used not only to reinforce adhesive resins but also hold potential for the development of bioactive adhesives by the encapsulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors or anticariogenic agents.

  11. Multifunctional nanoparticles as a tissue adhesive and an injectable marker for image-guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwangsoo; Choi, Jin Woo; Ko, Giho; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Park, Ok Kyu; Lee, Kyoungbun; Cho, Hye Rim; Han, Sang Ihn; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Lee, Nohyun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2017-07-01

    Tissue adhesives have emerged as an alternative to sutures and staples for wound closure and reconnection of injured tissues after surgery or trauma. Owing to their convenience and effectiveness, these adhesives have received growing attention particularly in minimally invasive procedures. For safe and accurate applications, tissue adhesives should be detectable via clinical imaging modalities and be highly biocompatible for intracorporeal procedures. However, few adhesives meet all these requirements. Herein, we show that biocompatible tantalum oxide/silica core/shell nanoparticles (TSNs) exhibit not only high contrast effects for real-time imaging but also strong adhesive properties. Furthermore, the biocompatible TSNs cause much less cellular toxicity and less inflammation than a clinically used, imageable tissue adhesive (that is, a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol). Because of their multifunctional imaging and adhesive property, the TSNs are successfully applied as a hemostatic adhesive for minimally invasive procedures and as an immobilized marker for image-guided procedures.

  12. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift (Δf) and dissipation energy shift (ΔD), and the viscoelastic change as ΔD-Δf plot. The Col adsorption showed larger Δf and ΔD values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The ΔD-Δf plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  13. Protein Adsorption and Subsequent Fibroblasts Adhesion on Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Junzo [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: tagaya.m.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique was employed for protein adsorption and subsequent fibroblast adhesion on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals. The pre-adsorption of three proteins (albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) or collagen (Col)) and subsequent adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and the adhesion of fibroblasts on the surface were in situ monitored, and evaluated with the frequency shift ({Delta}f) and dissipation energy shift ({Delta}D), and the viscoelastic change as {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot. The Col adsorption showed larger {Delta}f and {Delta}D values compared with BSA or Fn adsorption, and the subsequent FBS adsorption depended on the pre-adsorbed proteins. The {Delta}D-{Delta}f plot of the cell adhesion also showed the different behaviour on the surfaces, indicating the process affected by cell-protein interactions. The confocal laser scanning microscope images of adherent cells showed the different morphology and pseudopod on the surfaces. The cells adhered on the surfaces modified with Fn and Col had the uniaxially expanded shape with fibrous pseudopods, while those modified with BSA had round shape. The different cell-protein interaction would cause the arrangement of extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton changes at the interfaces.

  14. Protein kinase C involvement in focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix molecules such as fibronectin can promote cell attachment, spreading and focal adhesion formation. Although some interactions of fibronectin with cell surface receptors have now been identified, the consequent activation of intracellular messenger systems by cell/matrix interactions have...... still to be elucidated. We show here that the kinase inhibitors H7 and HA1004 reduce focal adhesion and stress fiber formation in response to fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner, and that activators of protein kinase C can promote their formation under conditions where they do not normally form....... Fibroblasts spread within 1h on substrata composed of fibronectin and formed focal adhesions by 3h, as monitored by interference reflection microscopy (IRM) and by labeling for talin, vinculin and integrin beta 1 subunits. In addition, stress fibers were visible. When cells were allowed to spread for 1h...

  15. High-throughput sequencing identification and characterization of potentially adhesion-related small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhui; Liu, Shanshan; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Huancai

    2018-05-01

    Adherence capacity is one of the principal virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, and adhesion virulence factors are controlled by small RNAs (sRNAs) at the post-transcriptional level in various bacteria. Here, we aimed to identify and decipher putative adhesion-related sRNAs in clinical strains of S. mutans. RNA deep-sequencing was performed to identify potential sRNAs under different adhesion conditions. The expression of sRNAs was analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and bioinformatic methods were used to predict the functional characteristics of sRNAs. A total of 736 differentially expressed candidate sRNAs were predicted, and these included 352 sRNAs located on the antisense to mRNA (AM) and 384 sRNAs in intergenic regions (IGRs). The top 7 differentially expressed sRNAs were successfully validated by qRT-PCR in UA159, and 2 of these were further confirmed in 100 clinical isolates. Moreover, the sequences of two sRNAs were conserved in other Streptococcus species, indicating a conserved role in such closely related species. A good correlation between the expression of sRNAs and the adhesion of 100 clinical strains was observed, which, combined with GO and KEGG, provides a perspective for the comprehension of sRNA function annotation. This study revealed a multitude of novel putative adhesion-related sRNAs in S. mutans and contributed to a better understanding of information concerning the transcriptional regulation of adhesion in S. mutans.

  16. Genotoxic evaluation of orthodontic bonding adhesives exposed to electron beam irradiation: an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijay, R.; Ravi, M.S.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Panchasara, Chirag; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of two orthodontic adhesives and to determine the type of cell death they induce on human lymphocytes after exposing to Electron Beam Irradiation. The materials tested were 1. Light cure orthodontic adhesive with conventional primer (Transbond XT3M) and 2. Self cure orthodontic adhesive (Unite, 3M). Cured sterile individual masses were immersed in Phosphate Buffer saline and left at 370℃ for 24 h. Then a volume of 200 μL of the extract medium was mixed with human peripheral blood lymphocyte tested for comet assay by single cell DNA damage assay and apoptosis by DNA diffusion agar assay. The results showed all parameters studied by comet assay were significant (P>0.05). In case of apoptosis, light cure orthodontic adhesive (188.92±55.05) and self cure orthodontic adhesives (255.23±76.43) showed increased diffusion of DNA compared to normal lymphocyte (111.22±8.78). However the level of DNA diffusion was not significantly different between the two adhesives. Light cure orthodontic and self cure orthodontic adhesives were induced apoptosis. Both the adhesives had no significant effect on the percentage of DNA tail and olive tail moment. (author)

  17. Adhesive bonding of wood materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Vick

    1999-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of wood components has played an essential role in the development and growth of the forest products industry and has been a key factor in the efficient utilization of our timber resource. The largest use of adhesives is in the construction industry. By far, the largest amounts of adhesives are used to manufacture building materials, such as plywood,...

  18. Clinical evaluation of three denture cushion adhesives by complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronis, Spyros; Pizatos, Evangelos; Polyzois, Gregory; Lagouvardos, Panagiotis

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was the clinical evaluation of three denture cushion adhesives and whether the results were correlated to Kapur Index for denture-supporting tissues. Various types of denture adhesives are used among denture patients. However, information on the clinical behaviour of denture cushions is limited. Thirty edentulous patients had their denture-supporting tissues scored by Kapur Index and their old dentures replaced. They received three brands of denture cushion adhesives (Fittydent(®) , Protefix(®) and Seabond(®)) and were instructed to use them in a sequence according to the group they were randomly assigned to. Each brand of adhesive was used for 48 h on the lower denture according to the manufacturer's suggestions. After each brand was used, participants spent 24 h without applying any sort of adhesive. Finally, a questionnaire evaluating and comparing the performance of each brand was filled out. Denture adhesives generally improved patient satisfaction and masticatory ability, especially in participants with poor Kapur Index and those who reported a poor retention of their old dentures. Fittydent(®) was the most preferred adhesive, showing the best retention and the longest duration of its effect, but also reported as difficult to remove from the denture-bearing area. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Starch-based Aqueous Polymer Isocyanate Wood Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-min Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Modified starch was prepared in this work by acid-thinning and oxidizing corn starch with ammonium persulfate. Also, starch-based aqueous polymer isocyanate (API wood adhesive was prepared. The effect of the added amount of modified starch, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate (P-MDI, and the mass concentration of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH on the bonding strength of starch-based API adhesives were determined by orthogonal testing. The starch-based API adhesive performance was found to be the best when the addition of modified starch (mass concentration 35% was 45 g, the amount of SBR was 3%, the PVOH mass concentration was 10%, and the amount of P-MDI was 18%. The compression shearing of glulam produced by starch-based API adhesive reached bonding performance indicators of I type adhesive. A scanning electron microscope (SEM was used to analyze the changes in micro-morphology of the starch surface during each stage. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR was used to study the changes in absorption peaks and functional groups from starch to starch-based API adhesives. The results showed that during starch-based API adhesive synthesis, corn starch surface was differently changed and it gradually reacted with other materials.

  20. Wood Composite Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueso, Jose; Haupt, Robert

    The global environment, in which phenolic resins are being used for wood composite manufacture, has changed significantly during the last decade. This chapter reviews trends that are driving the use and consumption of phenolic resins around the world. The review begins with recent data on volume usage and regional trends, followed by an analysis of factors affecting global markets. In a section on environmental factors, the impact of recent formaldehyde emission regulations is discussed. The section on economics introduces wood composite production as it relates to the available adhesive systems, with special emphasis on the technical requirement to improve phenolic reactivity. Advances in composite process technology are introduced, especially in regard to the increased demands the improvements place upon adhesive system performance. The specific requirements for the various wood composite families are considered in the context of adhesive performance needs. The results of research into current chemistries are discussed, with a review of recent findings regarding the mechanisms of phenolic condensation and acceleration. Also, the work regarding alternate natural materials, such as carbohydrates, lignins, tannins, and proteinaceous materials, is presented. Finally, new developments in alternative adhesive technologies are reported.

  1. Long ligands reinforce biological adhesion under shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Aleksey V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, computer modeling has been used to show that longer ligands allow biological cells (e.g., blood platelets) to withstand stronger flows after their adhesion to solid walls. A mechanistic model of polymer-mediated ligand-receptor adhesion between a microparticle (cell) and a flat wall has been developed. The theoretical threshold between adherent and non-adherent regimes has been derived analytically and confirmed by simulations. These results lead to a deeper understanding of numerous biophysical processes, e.g., arterial thrombosis, and to the design of new biomimetic colloid-polymer systems.

  2. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.-C.; Su, H.-W.; Lee, C.-C.; Tang, M.-J.; Su, F.-C.

    2005-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level (∼600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration

  3. Adhesion of silver/polypyrrole nanocomposite coating to a fluoropolymer substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin, E-mail: KAWAKITA.Jin@nims.go.jp; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Interfacial structure between Ag/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite and PTFE was revealed. • PPy enters into PTFE substrate as a dispersion with up to 12 nm size Ag nanoparticles. • The nanocomposite is absorbed by PTFE substrate up to 1–2 μm deep. • Ag/PPy interlocks mechanically with PTFE causing strong adhesion. - Abstract: This paper describes the adhesive interface between a conducting polymer/metal composite and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate. Strong adhesion was observed from using a Ag/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite on a fluoropolymer substrate, which in most cases has a very low adhesion to different materials. To clarify the adhesion mechanism between the Ag/PPy composite and the PTFE substrate, the interfacial structure was studied by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results show that Ag/PPy composite is absorbed inside the nano-sized pores of PTFE and the composite mechanically interlocks after solidifying, which causes the nanocomposite to stick strongly to the substrate. The use of Ag/PPy coating could be a novel technique for developing electrodes, antennae or other high performance applications as this metal/conductive polymer composite has excellent adhesion properties on various plastics.

  4. Smart biomaterials: Surfaces functionalized with proteolytically stable osteoblast-adhesive peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annj Zamuner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration are designed to promote cell adhesion, growth, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, covalent and selective functionalization of glass and titanium surfaces with an adhesive peptide (HVP mapped on [351–359] sequence of human Vitronectin allowed to selectively increase osteoblast attachment and adhesion strength in in vitro assays, and to promote osseointegration in in vivo studies. For the first time to our knowledge, in this study we investigated the resistance of adhesion sequences to proteolytic digestion: HVP was completely cleaved after 5 h. In order to overcome the enzymatic degradation of the native peptide under physiological conditions we synthetized three analogues of HVP sequence. A retro-inverted peptide D-2HVP, composed of D amino acids, was completely stable in serum-containing medium. In addition, glass surfaces functionalized with D-2HVP increased human osteoblast adhesion as compared to the native peptide and maintained deposition of calcium. Interestingly, D-2HVP increased expression of IBSP, VTN and SPP1 genes as compared to HVP functionalized surfaces. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscope analysis showed cells with numerous filopodia spread on D-2HVP-functionalized surfaces. Therefore, the D-2HVP sequence is proposed as new osteoblast adhesive peptide with increased bioactivity and high proteolytic resistance.

  5. Smart biomaterials: Surfaces functionalized with proteolytically stable osteoblast-adhesive peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuner, Annj; Brun, Paola; Scorzeto, Michele; Sica, Giuseppe; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Dettin, Monica

    2017-09-01

    Engineered scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration are designed to promote cell adhesion, growth, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, covalent and selective functionalization of glass and titanium surfaces with an adhesive peptide (HVP) mapped on [351-359] sequence of human Vitronectin allowed to selectively increase osteoblast attachment and adhesion strength in in vitro assays, and to promote osseointegration in in vivo studies. For the first time to our knowledge, in this study we investigated the resistance of adhesion sequences to proteolytic digestion: HVP was completely cleaved after 5 h. In order to overcome the enzymatic degradation of the native peptide under physiological conditions we synthetized three analogues of HVP sequence. A retro-inverted peptide D-2HVP, composed of D amino acids, was completely stable in serum-containing medium. In addition, glass surfaces functionalized with D-2HVP increased human osteoblast adhesion as compared to the native peptide and maintained deposition of calcium. Interestingly, D-2HVP increased expression of IBSP, VTN and SPP1 genes as compared to HVP functionalized surfaces. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscope analysis showed cells with numerous filopodia spread on D-2HVP-functionalized surfaces. Therefore, the D-2HVP sequence is proposed as new osteoblast adhesive peptide with increased bioactivity and high proteolytic resistance.

  6. Adhesion of silver/polypyrrole nanocomposite coating to a fluoropolymer substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horváth, Barbara; Kawakita, Jin; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Interfacial structure between Ag/polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite and PTFE was revealed. • PPy enters into PTFE substrate as a dispersion with up to 12 nm size Ag nanoparticles. • The nanocomposite is absorbed by PTFE substrate up to 1–2 μm deep. • Ag/PPy interlocks mechanically with PTFE causing strong adhesion. - Abstract: This paper describes the adhesive interface between a conducting polymer/metal composite and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) substrate. Strong adhesion was observed from using a Ag/polypyrrole (Ag/PPy) composite on a fluoropolymer substrate, which in most cases has a very low adhesion to different materials. To clarify the adhesion mechanism between the Ag/PPy composite and the PTFE substrate, the interfacial structure was studied by the use of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results show that Ag/PPy composite is absorbed inside the nano-sized pores of PTFE and the composite mechanically interlocks after solidifying, which causes the nanocomposite to stick strongly to the substrate. The use of Ag/PPy coating could be a novel technique for developing electrodes, antennae or other high performance applications as this metal/conductive polymer composite has excellent adhesion properties on various plastics.

  7. Adhesion of Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis on a Planar Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Joy, David Charles [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Adhesion of spores of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and spherical silica particles on surfaces was experimentally and theoretically investigated in this study. Topography analysis via atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy indicates that Bt spores are rod shaped, {approx}1.3 {mu}m in length and {approx}0.8 {mu}m in diameter. The adhesion force of Bt spores and silica particles on gold-coated glass was measured at various relative humidity (RH) levels by AFM. It was expected that the adhesion force would vary with RH because the individual force components contributing to the adhesion force depend on RH. The adhesion force between a particle and a planar surface in atmospheric environments was modeled as the contribution of three major force components: capillary, van der Waals, and electrostatic interaction forces. Adhesion force measurements for Bt spore (silica particle) and the gold surface system were comparable with calculations. Modeling results show that there is a critical RH value, which depends on the hydrophobicity of the materials involved, below which the water meniscus does not form and the contribution of the capillary force is zero. As RH increases, the van der Waals force decreases while the capillary force increases to a maximum value.

  8. Th17 Cell Induction by Adhesion of Microbes to Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Ando, Minoru; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nagano, Yuji; Narushima, Seiko; Suda, Wataru; Imaoka, Akemi; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nagamori, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eiji; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Hara, Taeko; Kado, Shoichi; Jinnohara, Toshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Shin-Ichiro; Tokoro, Shunji; Mori, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yurika; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Camp, J Gray; Hattori, Masahira; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya

    2015-10-08

    Intestinal Th17 cells are induced and accumulate in response to colonization with a subgroup of intestinal microbes such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) and certain extracellular pathogens. Here, we show that adhesion of microbes to intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) is a critical cue for Th17 induction. Upon monocolonization of germ-free mice or rats with SFB indigenous to mice (M-SFB) or rats (R-SFB), M-SFB and R-SFB showed host-specific adhesion to small intestinal ECs, accompanied by host-specific induction of Th17 cells. Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia coli O157 triggered similar Th17 responses, whereas adhesion-defective mutants of these microbes failed to do so. Moreover, a mixture of 20 bacterial strains, which were selected and isolated from fecal samples of a patient with ulcerative colitis on the basis of their ability to cause a robust induction of Th17 cells in the mouse colon, also exhibited EC-adhesive characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Membrane tension controls adhesion positioning at the leading edge of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Monzo, Pascale; Gole, Laurent; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Tam, Zhi Yang; Luo, Weiwei; Kan, Sophie; Viasnoff, Virgile; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Tucker-Kellogg, Lisa; Gauthier, Nils C

    2017-09-04

    Cell migration is dependent on adhesion dynamics and actin cytoskeleton remodeling at the leading edge. These events may be physically constrained by the plasma membrane. Here, we show that the mechanical signal produced by an increase in plasma membrane tension triggers the positioning of new rows of adhesions at the leading edge. During protrusion, as membrane tension increases, velocity slows, and the lamellipodium buckles upward in a myosin II-independent manner. The buckling occurs between the front of the lamellipodium, where nascent adhesions are positioned in rows, and the base of the lamellipodium, where a vinculin-dependent clutch couples actin to previously positioned adhesions. As membrane tension decreases, protrusion resumes and buckling disappears, until the next cycle. We propose that the mechanical signal of membrane tension exerts upstream control in mechanotransduction by periodically compressing and relaxing the lamellipodium, leading to the positioning of adhesions at the leading edge of cells. © 2017 Pontes et al.

  10. Physically based principles of cell adhesion mechanosensitivity in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladoux, Benoit; Nicolas, Alice

    2012-01-01

    . In this review, we present physical concepts of tissue cell adhesion and the unexpected cellular responses to mechanical cues such as external forces and stiffness sensing. We show how biophysical approaches, both experimentally and theoretically, have contributed to our understanding of the regulation of cellular functions through physical force sensing mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the different physical models that could explain how tissue cell adhesion and force sensing can be coupled to internal mechanosensitive processes within the cell body. (review article)

  11. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Bai, X.; Liu, Y.W.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. PMID:26635279

  12. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  13. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  14. Adhesion of Zinc Hot-dip Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on verification of quality adhesion of zinc coating. It describes elements which affect quality and adhesive solidity within the coating. For assessment itself it will be neccessary to get know the basic elements which can affect adhesion of hot-dip coating which will be essential for choosing suitable samples for verification itself. These elements characterise acoustic responses during delamination coating. They affect elements influencing progress of signal. In research there is also a summary of existing methods for testing adhesion of coatings. As a result a new proposal of a new method comes out for purpose of quality testing of adhesion zinc hot-dip coating. The results of verification of this method are put to scientific analysis and findings lead to assessment of proposed method and its application in technical practise.The goal of this contribution is also include to proposed methodology testing adhesion zinc coating by nondestructive diagnostic method of acoustic emission (AE, which would monitor characterise progress of coating delamination of hot-dip zinc from basic material in way to adhesion tests would be practicable in situ. It can be enabled by analysis and assessment of results acquired by method AE and its application within verification of new method of adhesion anti-corrosive zinc coating.

  15. Creep analysis of adhesively bonded single lap joint using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehsaz, Mohammad; Vakilitahami, Tahami Farid; Saeimisadigh, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive joints are being used widely in engineering industries due to the increasing demand for designing lightweight structures. Because of the physical properties of the most adhesives, they creep even at room temperature. Therefore, the creep behavior of a single lap adhesive joint is studied in this paper. For this purpose, using the experimental data, creep constitutive equations for the adhesive has been obtained. Then, these equations have been employed to investigate the creep behavior of the joint. The results show that due to the creep straining, the stresses in the joint corners, decrease. However, creep strain accumulates in these areas which this in turn may lead to separation of adhesive from adherent. In order to eliminate the effect of strain accumulation, two modifying methods have been proposed in this paper: increasing the layer thickness and using filleted joints.

  16. Rubber contact mechanics: adhesion, friction and leakage of seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Dorogin, L; Tahir, M; Stöckelhuber, K W; Heinrich, G; Espallargas, N; Persson, B N J

    2017-12-13

    We study the adhesion, friction and leak rate of seals for four different elastomers: Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR), Ethylene Propylene Diene (EPDM), Polyepichlorohydrin (GECO) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Adhesion between smooth clean glass balls and all the elastomers is studied both in the dry state and in water. In water, adhesion is observed for the NBR and PDMS elastomers, but not for the EPDM and GECO elastomers, which we attribute to the differences in surface energy and dewetting. The leakage of water is studied with rubber square-ring seals squeezed against sandblasted glass surfaces. Here we observe a strongly non-linear dependence of the leak rate on the water pressure ΔP for the elastomers exhibiting adhesion in water, while the leak rate depends nearly linearly on ΔP for the other elastomers. We attribute the non-linearity to some adhesion-related phenomena, such as dewetting or the (time-dependent) formation of gas bubbles, which blocks fluid flow channels. Finally, rubber friction is studied at low sliding speeds using smooth glass and sandblasted glass as substrates, both in the dry state and in water. The measured friction coefficients are compared to theory, and the origin of the frictional shear stress acting in the area of real contact is discussed. The NBR rubber, which exhibits the strongest adhesion both in the dry state and in water, also shows the highest friction both in the dry state and in water.

  17. Salinity-Dependent Adhesion Response Properties of Aluminosilicate (K-Feldspar) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Bärbel; Ceccato, Marcel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2017-01-01

    is composed predominantly of quartz with some clay, but feldspar grains are often also present. While the wettability of quartz and clay surfaces has been thoroughly investigated, little is known about the adhesion properties of feldspar. We explored the interaction of model oil compounds, molecules...... in well sorted sandstone. Adhesion forces, measured with the chemical force mapping (CFM) mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed a low salinity effect on the fresh feldspar surfaces. Adhesion force, measured with -COO(H)-functionalized tips, was 60% lower in artificial low salinity seawater (LS......, ∼1500 ppm total dissolved solids) than in the high salinity solution, artificial seawater (HS, ASW, ∼35 600 ppm). Adhesion with the -CH3 tips was as much as 30% lower in LS than in HS. Density functional theory calculations indicated that the low salinity response resulted from expansion of the electric...

  18. Thermal gelation and tissue adhesion of biomimetic hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Sean A; Ritter-Jones, Marsha; Lee, Bruce P; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2007-01-01

    Marine and freshwater mussels are notorious foulers of natural and manmade surfaces, secreting specialized protein adhesives for rapid and durable attachment to wet substrates. Given the strong and water-resistant nature of mussel adhesive proteins, significant potential exists for mimicking their adhesive characteristics in bioinspired synthetic polymer materials. An important component of these proteins is L-3,4-dihydroxylphenylalanine (DOPA), an amino acid believed to contribute to mussel glue solidification through oxidation and crosslinking reactions. Synthetic polymers containing DOPA residues have previously been shown to crosslink into hydrogels upon the introduction of oxidizing reagents. Here we introduce a strategy for stimuli responsive gel formation of mussel adhesive protein mimetic polymers. Lipid vesicles with a bilayer melting transition of 37 0 C were designed from a mixture of dipalmitoyl and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholines and exploited for the release of a sequestered oxidizing reagent upon heating from ambient to physiologic temperature. Colorimetric studies indicated that sodium-periodate-loaded liposomes released their cargo at the phase transition temperature, and when used in conjunction with a DOPA-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) polymer gave rise to rapid solidification of a crosslinked polymer hydrogel. The tissue adhesive properties of this biomimetic system were determined by in situ thermal gelation of liposome/polymer hydrogel between two porcine dermal tissue surfaces. Bond strength measurements showed that the bond formed by the adhesive hydrogel (mean = 35.1 kPa, SD = 12.5 kPa, n = 11) was several times stronger than a fibrin glue control tested under the same conditions. The results suggest a possible use of this biomimetic strategy for repair of soft tissues

  19. Effect of hot-humid exposure on static strength of adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hot-humid exposure (i.e., 40 °C and 98% R.H. on the quasi-static strength of the adhesive-bonded aluminum alloys was studied. Test results show that the hot-humid exposure leads to the significant decrease in the joint strength and the change of the failure mode from a mixed cohesive and adhesive failure with cohesive failure being dominant to adhesive failure being dominant. Careful analyses of the results reveal that the physical bond is likely responsible for the bond adhesion between L adhesive and aluminum substrates. The reduction in joint strength and the change of the failure mode resulted from the degradation in bond adhesion, which was primarily attributed to the corrosion of aluminum substrate. In addition, the elevated temperature exposure significantly accelerated the corrosion reaction of aluminum, which accelerated the degradation in joint strength.

  20. Study on surface adhesion of Plasma modified Polytetrafluoroethylene hollow fiber membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangrong; Zhang, Huifeng; Liu, Guochang; Guo, Chungang; Lv, Jinglie; Zhangb, Yushan

    2018-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is popular membrane material because of its excellent thermal stability, chemical stability and mechanical stability. However, the low surface energy and non-sticky property of PTFE present challenges for modification. In the present study, plasma treatment was performed to improve the surface adhesion of PTFE hollow fiber membrane. The effect of discharge voltage, treatment time on the adhesion of PTFE hollow fiber membrane was symmetrically evaluated. Results showed that the plasma treatment method contributed to improve the surface activity and roughness of PTFE hollow fiber membrane, and the adhesion strength depend significantly on discharge voltage, which was beneficial to seepage pressure of PTFE hollow fiber membrane module. The adhesion strength of PTFE membrane by plasma treated at 220V for 3min reached as high as 86.2 N, far surpassing the adhesion strength 12.7 N of pristine membrane. Furthermore, improvement of content of free radical and composition analysis changes of the plasma modified PTFE membrane were investigated. The seepage pressure of PTFE membrane by plasma treated at 220V for 3min was 0.375 MPa, which means that the plasma treatment is an effective technique to improve the adhesion strength of membrane.

  1. EB curable laminating adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Asao; Kobayashi, Masahide; Gotoh, Sakiko

    1992-01-01

    New developed solvent free EB curable laminating adhesives have two liquid components, A with hydroxy and acryloyl group, B with isocyanate and acryloyl group in a molecule. These EB laminating adhesives do not need any aging process, which is a big advantage, and are very suitable for environment, safety, and health because of no heating process and solvent free formulas. And we have made basic research about the relation of peel strength or heat seal strength versus Tg of cured film, elongation at break, elastic modulus, and so on. Basic specifications of the new developed adhesives are shown. (author)

  2. Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been measured in citrated whole blood and in platelet-rich plasma obtained from normal subjects, splenectomized patients, and from patients in whom the diagnosis of recurrent venous thrombosis had been made. The duration of centrifugation used in the preparation of platelet-rich plasma was found to have a profound effect on the measurement of platelet adhesiveness because the figure for platelet adhesiveness measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation was considerably lower than that found in citrated whole blood. This effect was particularly marked when platelet-rich plasma was obtained from subjects in whom platelet adhesiveness measured in whole blood was increased. PMID:5699080

  3. Adhesion enhancement of Al coatings on carbon/epoxy composite surfaces by atmospheric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, J.F.; Tournerie, N.; Maillard, H.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion strengths between aluminium thin film coatings and manufactured carbon/epoxy composite surfaces were measured by assessing fracture tensile strengths using pull-off tests. The effect of the substrate roughness (nm to μm) of these composite surfaces on adhesion was studied by examining the surface free energies and adhesion strengths. The adhesion strengths of the coatings varied significantly. To improve the coating adhesion, each composite surface was treated with atmospheric plasma prior to deposition, which resulted in an increase in the surface free energy from approximately 40 mJ/m 2 to 70 mJ/m 2 because the plasma pretreatment led to the formation of hydrophilic C-O and C=O bonds on the composite surfaces, as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The adhesion strengths of the coatings were enhanced for all surface roughnesses studied. In our study, the effect of mechanical adhesion due to roughness was separated from the effect of modifying the chemical bonds with plasma activation. The adhesion ability of the pure resin was relatively weak. Increasing the surface roughness largely improved the adhesion of the resin surface. Plasma treatment of the pure resin also increased the surface adhesion. Our study shows that plasma activation effectively enhances the adhesion of manufactured composites, even when the surface roughness is on the order of microns. The ageing of the surface activation was also investigated, and the results demonstrate that atmospheric plasma has potential for use in the pretreatment of composite materials.

  4. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

  5. Nanomolar concentrations of adrenaline induce platelet adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Whiss, Per A

    2013-01-01

    Adrenaline is a platelet activator having a resting plasma concentration of adrenaline in micromolar concentrations. This makes it difficult to estimate the relevance of in vitro data for the in vivo situation. The aim of this study was to investigate experimental conditions in vitro that could detect platelet effects of adrenaline in nanomolar concentrations. Platelet adhesion to albumin and collagen was evaluated with a static platelet adhesion assay. Our results show that 10 nmol/l adrenaline induced platelet adhesion to albumin in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) prepared at 140 × g, while 100 nmol/l was necessary in order to increase adhesion of platelets prepared at 220 × g. The mean platelet volume was increased after preparation at 140 × g, suggesting that large reactive platelets contributed to the increased adrenaline sensitivity. At optimal Mg(2+)-concentration, adhesion to collagen was increased by 10 nmol/l adrenaline irrespective of centrifugal force applied during PRP preparation. More specifically, we defined two populations where adhesion to collagen was increased by 10 nmol/l adrenaline either upon centrifugation at 140 × g but not 220 × g or vice versa. In some experiments, platelet adhesion to collagen was induced by 3 nmol/l adrenaline, which corresponds to concentrations achieved during stress in vivo. In summary, the static adhesion assay is able to detect platelet activating effects of adrenaline very close to physiological concentrations. This is rare for in vitro assays and motivates further research about adrenergic signalling in platelets.

  6. Adhesive Joints in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn

    to be determined in several different ways. The accuracy of different ways of measuring residual stresses in the adhesive was tested by applying five different methods on a single sandwich test specimen (laminate/adhesive/laminate) that was instrumented with strain gauges and fiber Bragg gratings. Quasi...... of the project is to develop new- and to improve the existing design rules for adhesive joints in wind turbine blades. The first scientific studies of adhesive joints were based on stress analysis, which requires that the bond-line is free of defects, but this is rarely the case for a wind turbine blade. Instead...... curing and test temperatures) on the formation of transverse cracks in the adhesive were tested experimentally. It was assumed that the transverse cracks evolved due to a combination of mechanical- and residual stresses in the adhesive. A new approach was developed that allows the residual stress...

  7. Influence of Conditioning Time of Universal Adhesives on Adhesive Properties and Enamel-Etching Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, A M; Siqueira, F; Rocha, J; Szesz, A L; Anwar, M; El-Askary, F; Reis, A; Loguercio, A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of application protocol in resin-enamel microshear bond strength (μSBS), in situ degree of conversion, and etching pattern of three universal adhesive systems. Sixty-three extracted third molars were sectioned in four parts (buccal, lingual, and proximals) and divided into nine groups, according to the combination of the main factors-Adhesive (Clearfil Universal, Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc, Tokyo, Japan; Futurabond U, VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany; and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA)-and enamel treatment/application time (etch-and-rinse mode [ER], self-etch [SE] application for 20 seconds [SE20], and SE application for 40 seconds [SE40]). Specimens were stored in water (37°C/24 h) and tested at 1.0 mm/min (μSBS). The degree of conversion of the adhesives at the resin-enamel interfaces was evaluated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. The enamel-etching pattern was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). In general, the application of the universal adhesives in the SE40 produced μSBS and degree of conversion that were higher than in the SE20 (puniversal adhesives in the SE mode may be a viable alternative to increase the degree of conversion, etching pattern, and resin-enamel bond strength.

  8. 21 CFR 175.125 - Pressure-sensitive adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pressure-sensitive adhesives. 175.125 Section 175...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives § 175.125 Pressure-sensitive adhesives. Pressure-sensitive...

  9. AN ANALYTICAL STUDY IN ADHESIVE BOWEL OBSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Anand Raja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Peritoneal adhesions can be defined as abnormal fibrous bands between organs or tissues or both in the abdominal cavity that are normally separated. Adhesions may be acquired or congenital; however, most are acquired as a result of peritoneal injury, the most common cause of which is abdominopelvic surgery. Less commonly, adhesions may form as the result of inflammatory conditions, intraperitoneal infection or abdominal trauma. The extent of adhesion formation varies from one patient to another and is most dependent on the type and magnitude of surgery performed as well as whether any postoperative complications develop. Fortunately, most patients with adhesions do not experience any overt clinical symptoms. For others, adhesions may lead to any one of a host of problems and can be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective study of 50 patients admitted in Government Royapettah Hospital with adhesive bowel obstruction between September 2008 to September 2010. All patients were admitted and managed either conservatively or surgically. RESULTS 1. Adhesive bowel disease is the most common cause for bowel obstruction followed by hernias. 2. Increased incidence is noted in females. 3. Increased incidence of adhesions was documented in gynaecological and colorectal surgeries. 4. Below umbilical incisions have higher propensity for adhesion formation. 5. Laparotomies done for infective aetiology have higher adhesion risks. 6. Most of adhesive obstructions can be managed conservatively. 7. Adhesiolysis preferably laparoscopic can be done. For gangrenous bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy done. 8. Given the above risk factors, adhesive bowel disease can be prevented to a certain extent. CONCLUSION The formation of peritoneal adhesions continues to plague patients, surgeons and society. Although, research in this area is ongoing, there is currently no method that is 100% effective in

  10. Characterization of tannin-based adhesives from Acacia mangium barks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Fatahiyah Mohamada; Pizzi, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate the performances of Acacia Mangium tannin-based tannin designed as adhesive in the particleboard production. The tannin was extracted from acacia mangium barks in differences medium extraction. Three difference medium, (1)Water (Control), (2)Na 2 SO 3 (4 %) / Na 2 CO 3 (0.4 %) and (3) Na 2 SO 3 (8 %) / Na 2 CO 3 (0.8 %) used, the (3) medium extraction produce then highest yield (25.8 %) follow the (2) medium extraction (21.6%) and the less yield (17.7%). To evaluate the mechanical performances of optimal Acacia mangium tannin-based adhesives, particleboard were produced using 3 differences hardener and mechanical properties (Internal bonding) were investigated. The performance of these panels is comparable to those of particle panels commercial. The results showed that particleboard panels bonded with parafomaldehid (0.392 Mpa) exhibited better mechanical properties, continue particleboard panel hardened with hexamine (0.367 MPa) and particleboard panel bonded with glyoxol-tannin based adhesives (0.244 MPa). This show the suitable harder for acacia mangium tannin are formaldehyde > hexamine > glyoxol. (author)

  11. Effect of double-layer application on dentin bond durability of one-step self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschner, M; Kümmerling, M; Lohbauer, U; Breschi, L; Petschelt, A; Frankenberger, R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was 1) to analyze the influence of a double-layer application technique of four one-step self-etch adhesive systems on dentin and 2) to determine its effect on the stability of the adhesive interfaces stored under different conditions. Four different one-step self-etch adhesives were selected for the study (iBondSE, Clearfil S(3) Bond, XenoV(+), and Scotchbond Universal). Adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' instructions or with a double-layer application technique (without light curing of the first layer). After bonding, resin-dentin specimens were sectioned for microtensile bond strength testing in accordance with the nontrimming technique and divided into 3 subgroups of storage: a) 24 hours (immediate bond strength, T0), b) six months (T6) in artificial saliva at 37°C, or c) five hours in 10 % NaOCl at room temperature. After storage, specimens were stressed to failure. Fracture mode was assessed under a light microscope. At T0, iBond SE showed a significant increase in microtensile bond strength when the double-application technique was applied. All adhesive systems showed reduced bond strengths after six months of storage in artificial saliva and after storage in 10% NaOCl for five hours; however at T6, iBond SE, Clearfil S(3) Bond, and XenoV(+) showed significantly higher microtensile bond strength results for the double-application technique compared with the single-application technique. Scotchbond Universal showed no difference between single- or double-application, irrespective of the storage conditions. The results of this study show that improvements in bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives by using the double-application technique are adhesive dependent.

  12. Effect of Nd:YAG laser on the solvent evaporation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Damião, Álvaro José; de Oliveira, Hueder Paulo Moisés; de Paiva Gonçalves, Sérgio Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of Nd:YAG laser on the evaporation degree (ED) of the solvent components in total-etch and self-etch adhesives. The ED of Gluma Comfort Bond (Heraeus-Kulzer) one-step self-etch adhesive, and Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE), and XP Bond (Dentsply) total-etch adhesives was determined by weight alterations using two techniques: Control--spontaneous evaporation of the solvent for 5 min; Experimental--Nd:YAG laser irradiation for 1 min, followed by spontaneous evaporation for 4 min. The weight loss due to evaporation of the volatile components was measured at baseline and after 10 s, 20 s, 30 s, 40 s, 50 s, 60 s, 70 s, 80 s, 90 s, 100 s, 110 s, 2 min, 3 min, 4 min, and 5 min. Evaporation of solvent components significantly increased with Nd:YAG laser irradiation for all adhesives investigated. Gluma Comfort Bond showed significantly higher evaporation of solvent components than Adper Single Bond 2 and XP Bond. All the adhesives lost weight quickly during the first min of Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The application of Nd:YAG laser on adhesives before light curing had a significant effect on the evaporation of the solvent components, and the ED of Gluma Comfort Bond one-step self-etch adhesive was significantly higher than with Adper Single Bond 2 and XP Bond total-etch adhesives. The use of the Nd:YAG laser on the uncured adhesive technique can promote a greater ED of solvents, optimizing the longevity of the adhesive restorations.

  13. Disorders of adhesions or adhesion-related disorder: monolithic entities or part of something bigger--CAPPS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, David M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review progress in the field of abdominopelvic adhesions and the validity of its two underlying assumptions: (1) The formation of adhesions results in infertility, bowel obstruction, or other complications. Reducing or avoiding adhesions will curb these sequelae. (2) "Adhesions" is a monolithic entity to be tackled without regard to any other condition. Evidence is discussed to validate the first assumption. We reviewed progress in the field by examining hospital data. We found a growing trend in the number and cost of discharges for just two adhesion-related diagnoses, and the low usage of adhesion barriers appears in at most 5% of appropriate procedures. Data from an Internet-based survey suggested that the problem may be partly due to ignorance among patients and physicians about adhesions and their prevention. Two other surveys of patients visiting the adhesions.org Web site defined more fully adhesion-related disorder (ARD). The first survey ( N = 466) described a patient with chronic pain, gastrointestinal disturbances, an average of nine bowel obstructions, and an inability to work or maintain family or social relationships. The second survey (687 U.S. women) found a high (co-) prevalence of abdominal or pelvic adhesions (85%), chronic abdominal or pelvic pain (69%), irritable bowel syndrome (55%), recurrent bowel obstruction (44%), endometriosis (40%), and interstitial cystitis (29%). This pattern suggests that although "adhesions" may start out as a monolithic entity, an adhesions patient may develop related conditions (ARD) until they merge into an independent entity where they are practically indistinguishable from patients with multiple symptoms originating from other abdominopelvic conditions such as pelvic or bladder pain. Rather than use terms that constrain the required multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial approach to these patients by the paradigms of the specialty related to the patient's initial symptom set, the

  14. Effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel etched with hydrochloric or phosphoric acid combined with conventional adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkiner, Enver; Ozcan, Mutlu; Wegehaupt, Florian Just; Wiegand, Annette; Eden, Ece; Attin, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of a low-viscosity adhesive resin (Icon) applied after either hydrochloric (HCl) or phosphoric acid (H3PO4) on the adhesion of metal brackets to enamel. Failure types were analyzed. The crowns of bovine incisors (N = 20) were sectioned mesio-distally and inciso-gingivally, then randomly assigned to 4 groups according to the following protocols to receive mandibular incisor brackets: 1) H3PO4 (37%)+TransbondXT (3M UNITEK); 2) H3PO4 (37%)+Icon+TransbondXT; 3) HCl (15%)+Icon (DMG)+TransbondXT 4) HCl (15%)+Icon+Heliobond (Ivoclar Vivadent)+TransbondXT. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h and thermocycled (5000x, 5°C to 55°C). The shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types were classified according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Contact angles of adhesive resins were measured (n = 5 per adhesive) on ceramic surfaces. No significant difference in SBS was observed, implying no difference between combinations of adhesive resins and etching agents (p = 0.712; ANOVA). The Weibull distribution presented significantly lower Weibull modulus (m) of group 3 (m = 2.97) compared to other groups (m = 5.2 to 6.6) (p group 1 (45.4 ± 7.9) > group 2 (44.2 ± 10.6) > group 3 (42.6 ± 15.5). While in groups 1, 3, and 4 exclusively an ARI score of 0 (no adhesive left on tooth) was observed, in group 2, only one specimen demonstrated score 1 (less than half of adhesive left on tooth). Contact angle measurements were as follows: Icon (25.86 ± 3.81 degrees), Heliobond (31.98 ± 3.17 degrees), TransbondXT (35 ± 2.21 degrees). Icon can be safely used with the conventional adhesives tested on surfaces etched with either HCl or H3PO4.

  15. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  16. Physical and biological properties of a novel anti-adhesion material made of thermally cross-linked gelatin film: Investigation of the usefulness as anti-adhesion material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Tsunehito; Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Hiroe; Yamanaka, Koki; Tanaka, Shota; Torii, Hiroko; Ozamoto, Yuki; Takamori, Hideki; Nakamachi, Eiji; Ikada, Yoshito; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2018-02-01

    To create more useful, effective and safer anti-adhesion materials, we developed a thermally cross-linked gelatin film. In this study, we examined the physical properties of the film such as the physical strength and the adhesiveness to reveal the handling properties and biological properties, such as the anti-adhesion effect, the influence on cell proliferation, and the cytotoxicity to reveal the anti-adhesion mechanism, especially in comparison with the conventional hyaluronic acid and carboxymethylcellulose film (the conventional film). A tensile test under dry and wet conditions and shearing stress test showed that the gelatin film has significant higher maximum tensile stress and fracture strain than the conventional film. In the study using a rat model of cecum adhesion, the anti-adhesion effect of the gelatin film was significantly superior to that of the conventional film. In the cell proliferation test, the number of fibroblast cells on the gelatin film increased at each time point, while no cell proliferation was observed on the conventional film. Furthermore, in the cytotoxicity test using a colony assay and Live/Dead assay, the extract of the gelatin film had no cytotoxicity, while the extract of the conventional film had cytotoxicity considerably. These results suggest that the gelatin film provides better handling than the conventional film, due to better physical strength and ductility of the film. In addition, the gelatin film has a significantly greater anti-adhesion effect than the conventional film without any cytotoxicity. Therefore, the gelatin film is quite favorable as an anti-adhesion material. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 689-696, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Adhesion and adhesion changes at the copper metal-(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) polymer interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisin, S.; Varst, van der P.G.T.; With, de G.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the adhesive strength of metallic films on polymer substrates often changes in the course of time. To study this effect in more detail, the adhesion energy of sputtered and galvanically strengthened copper coatings on acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene polymer substrate was determined

  18. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  19. Adhesion of Pharmaceutical Binding Agents I-Adhesion to polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Orafai

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of three commonly used pharmaceutical binding agents, HPMC , PVP and Gelatin to five different polymeric sheet materials was studied. After conditioning, the bond strength of the specimens were measured by shear testing method using a suitablely designed apparatus. The results were correlated to the surface energies and the solubiiity parameters of the adherends. It is concluded that the thermodynamic properties and the solubility parameters are dominant when the mechanisms of adhesion are by adsorption and diffusion respectively.

  20. "The Effect of Hydroxyl Containing Tablet Excipients on the Adhesive Duration of Some Mucoadhesive Polymers "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Mortazavi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of hydroxyl group containing tablet excipients on the duration of adhesion of mucoadhesive polymers, discs containing Carbopol 934 (C934, polycarbophil (PC, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC, tragacanth (trag. and sodium alginate (Na alg., either alone or in the presence of various amounts of excipients were prepared. The duration of adhesion of the prepared discs were determined in pH 7.0 phosphate buffer at 37°C. All the excipients examined reduced the duration of adhesion and the relative durability of the polymer containing discs. HPMC discs despite showing the longest duration of mucoadhesion, suffered the greatest reduction in adhesive properties in the presence of excipients which were examined. Following HPMC, Na alg. and then trag. discs showed the greatest sensitivity to the presence of excipients. The least reduction in the duration of adhesion was observed with PC and C934. Among the excipients tested, spray-dried lactose produced the greatest reduction in the duration of adhesion, followed by polyethylene glycol 6000 and pregelatinized starch. The smallest reduction in the adhesive properties of the test polymers was due to talc powder. Hence, it seems that addition of the tablet excipients adversely reduce the adhesive properties of mucoadhesive dosage forms, which should be carefully considered during their formulation.

  1. Normally Oriented Adhesion versus Friction Forces in Bacterial Adhesion to Polymer-Brush Functionalized Surfaces Under Fluid Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Veeregowda, Deepak H.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is problematic in many diverse applications. Coatings of hydrophilic polymer chains in a brush configuration reduce bacterial adhesion by orders of magnitude, but not to zero. Here, the mechanism by which polymer-brush functionalized surfaces reduce bacterial adhesion from a

  2. Performance Evaluation and Durability Studies of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Shantanu Rajendra

    In this thesis, four test approaches were developed to characterize the adhesion performance and durability of adhesive bonds for specific applications in areas spanning from structural adhesive joints to popular confectionaries such as chewing gum. In the first chapter, a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen geometry is proposed for combinatorial fracture studies of structural adhesive bonds. This specimen geometry enabled the characterization of fracture energy vs. bondline thickness trends through fewer tests than those required during a conventional "one at a time" characterization approach, potentially offering a significant reduction in characterization times. The second chapter investigates the adhesive fracture resistance and crack path selection in adhesive joints containing patterns of discreet localized weak interfaces created using physical vapor deposition of copper. In a DCB specimen tested under mode-I conditions, fracture energy within the patterned regions scaled according to a simple rule of mixture, while reverse R-curve and R-curve type trends were observed in the regions surrounding weak interface patterns. Under mixed mode conditions such that bonding surface with patterns is subjected to axial tension, fracture energy did not show R-curve type trends while it was observed that a crack could be made to avoid exceptionally weak interfaces when loaded such that bonding surface with defects is subjected to axial compression. In the third chapter, an adaptation of the probe tack test is proposed to characterize the adhesion behavior of gum cuds. This test method allowed the introduction of substrates with well-defined surface energies and topologies to study their effects on gum cud adhesion. This approach and reported insights could potentially be useful in developing chewing gum formulations that facilitate easy removal of improperly discarded gum cuds from adhering surfaces. In the fourth chapter we highlight a procedure to obtain insights

  3. Effect of rate on adhesion and static friction of a film-terminated fibrillar interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajpayee, Shilpi; Long, Rong; Shen, Lulin; Jagota, Anand; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2009-03-03

    A film-terminated fibrillar interface has been shown to result in significant enhancement of adhesion and static friction compared to a flat control. This enhancement increases with interfibril spacing. In this, the first of a two-part study, by studying the effect of rate on adhesion and static friction, we show that both adhesion and static friction enhancement are due to a crack-trapping mechanism. For adhesion, as measured by an indentation experiment, an analytical model is used to relate the applied indenter displacement rate and measured forces to contact line velocity and energy release rate, respectively. The two mechanisms for adhesion enhancement--varying rate and crack-trapping--are found to be coupled multiplicatively.

  4. Surface science. Adhesion and friction in mesoscopic graphite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Elad; Lörtscher, Emanuel; Rawlings, Colin; Knoll, Armin W; Duerig, Urs

    2015-05-08

    The weak interlayer binding in two-dimensional layered materials such as graphite gives rise to poorly understood low-friction characteristics. Accurate measurements of the adhesion forces governing the overall mechanical stability have also remained elusive. We report on the direct mechanical measurement of line tension and friction forces acting in sheared mesoscale graphite structures. We show that the friction is fundamentally stochastic in nature and is attributable to the interaction between the incommensurate interface lattices. We also measured an adhesion energy of 0.227 ± 0.005 joules per square meter, in excellent agreement with theoretical models. In addition, bistable all-mechanical memory cell structures and rotational bearings have been realized by exploiting position locking, which is provided solely by the adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Adhesiveness of cold rolled steels for car body parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiner Marques Marra

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the adhesiveness of uncoated and zinc-electrogalvanized steel sheets used in the automotive industry. Three types of adhesives, one acrylic and two epoxy resins, were employed to join low carbon cold rolled steels, one uncoated and another electrogalvanized, both previously degreased or chemically pickled. Mechanical strength of the joints was evaluated by the T-peel and tensile strength tests. Steel grade, surface condition and heating below the cure temperatures did not influence the joints' mechanical strength. However, their shear strength decreased drastically as the test temperature increased. The exposure of the joints to an atmosphere with 90% relative humidity at 40 °C caused reduction of their shear strength. Epoxy adhesives showed higher mechanical strength, but exhibited higher degradation by humidity.

  6. Biomimetic honeycomb-patterned surface as the tunable cell adhesion scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuangshuang; Lu, Xuemin; Hu, Ying; Lu, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the typically adhesive behaviors of fish skin and Parthenocissus tricuspidata, two different decorations of polystyrene honeycomb membrane (PSHCM) prepared by the breath figure approach were carried out with poly(N-(3-Sulfopropyl)-N-(methacryloxyethyl)-N,N-dimethylammonium betaine)(polySBMA) to explore controllable bioadhesive surfaces. Casting and dip-coating were employed to graft polySBMA onto the plasma treated PSHCM. The polySBMA casted PSHCM showed a uniform covering layer on the PSHCM similar to the mucus layer of fish skin, presenting excellent antifouling properties. On the contrary, a dip-coated one showed the polySBMA aggregating on the honeycomb pore walls forming a large number of sucking disks such as the adhesive disks of the tendrils of P. tricuspidata, which remarkably boosts cell adhesion on substrates. Thus, bioadhesion could be regulated as desired by tuning the distribution of zwitterionic polymer on the honeycomb surface. The results may provide a new approach for the design of biomaterial surfaces.

  7. Effect of a Novel Quaternary Ammonium Methacrylate Polymer (QAMP on Adhesion and Antibacterial Properties of Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine M. Pupo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the resin–dentin bond strength (μTBS, degree of conversion (DC, and antibacterial potential of an innovative adhesive system containing a quaternary ammonium methacrylate polymer (QAMP using in situ and in vitro assays. Forty-two human third molars were flattened until the dentin was exposed and were randomly distributed into three groups of self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP (experimental group, Clearfil™ Protect Bond (positive control and Clearfil™ SE Bond (negative control. After light curing, three 1 mm-increments of composite resin were bonded to each dentin surface. A total of thirty of these bonded teeth (10 teeth per group was sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens and tested under tensile stress immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Twelve bonded teeth (4 teeth per group were longitudinally sectioned in a mesio-to-distal direction to obtain resin-bonded dentin slabs. In situ DC was evaluated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. In vitro DC of thin films of each adhesive system was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro susceptibility tests of these three adhesive systems were performed by the minimum inhibitory/minimum bactericidal concentration (MIC/MBC assays against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces naeslundii. No statistically significant difference in μTBS was observed between Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP and Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05 immediately, and after 6 and 12 months of water storage. However Clearfil™ Protect Bond showed a significant reduction of μTBS after 12 months of storage (p = 0.039. In addition, QAMP provided no significant change in DC after incorporating into Clearfil™ SE Bond (p > 0.05. Clearfil™ SE Bond containing 5% QAMP demonstrated MIC/MBC values similar to the positive control against L. casei and A. naeslundii and higher than the negative

  8. Influence of Pre-etching Times on Fatigue Strength of Self-etch Adhesives to Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Endo, Hajime; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    To use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence of phosphoric acid pre-etching times prior to application of self-etch adhesives on enamel bonding. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives (Prime&Bond Elect and Scotchbond Universal), a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive (G-ӕnial Bond), and a conventional two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR) were used. The SBS and SFS were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching for 3, 10, or 15 s prior to application of the adhesives, and without pre-etching (0 s) as a control. A staircase method was used to determine the SFS with 10 Hz frequency for 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. The mean demineralization depth for each treated enamel surface was also measured using a profilometer. For all the adhesives, the groups with pre-etching showed significantly higher SBS and SFS than groups without pre-etching. However, there was no significant difference in SBS and SFS among groups with > 3 s of preetching. In addition, although the groups with pre-etching showed significantly deeper demineralization depths than groups without pre-etching, there was no significant difference in depth among groups with > 3 s of pre-etching. Three seconds of phosphoric acid pre-etching prior to application of self-etch adhesive can enhance enamel bonding effectiveness.

  9. Structural and compositional characterization of the adhesive produced by reef building oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Erik M; Taylor, Stephen D; Edwards, Stephanie L; Sherman, Debra M; Huang, Chia-Ping; Kenny, Paul; Wilker, Jonathan J

    2015-04-29

    Oysters have an impressive ability to overcome difficulties of life within the stressful intertidal zone. These shellfish produce an adhesive for attaching to each other and building protective reef communities. With their reefs often exceeding kilometers in length, oysters play a major role in balancing the health of coastal marine ecosystems. Few details are available to describe oyster adhesive composition or structure. Here several characterization methods were applied to describe the nature of this material. Microscopy studies indicated that the glue is comprised of organic fiber-like and sheet-like structures surrounded by an inorganic matrix. Phospholipids, cross-linking chemistry, and conjugated organics were found to differentiate this adhesive from the shell. Symbiosis in material synthesis could also be present, with oysters incorporating bacterial polysaccharides into their adhesive. Oyster glue shows that an organic-inorganic composite material can provide adhesion, a property especially important when constructing a marine ecosystem.

  10. Accelerated growth of oxide film on aluminium alloys under steam: Part II: Effects of alloy chemistry and steam vapour pressure on corrosion and adhesion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The steam treatment of aluminium alloys with varying vapour pressure of steamresulted in the growth of aluminium oxyhydroxide films of thickness range between 450 - 825nm. The surface composition, corrosion resistance, and adhesion of the produced films was characterised by XPS, potentiodynamic p...... of the vapour pressure of the steam. The accelerated corrosion and adhesion tests on steam generated oxide films with commercial powder coating verified that the performance of the oxide coating is highly dependent on the vapour pressure of the steam....... polarization, acetic acid salt spray, filiform corrosion test, and tape test. The oxide films formed by steam treatment showed good corrosion resistance in NaCl solution by significantly reducing anodic and cathodic activities. The pitting potential of the surface treated with steam was a function...

  11. Accelerating effects of cellulase in the removal of denture adhesives from acrylic denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada-Hada, Kae; Mimura, Sumiyo; Hong, Guang; Hashida, Tatsumi; Abekura, Hitoshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masahiro; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    Studies of effective methods for the easy removal of denture adhesives from a denture base are not well represented in the literature. We previously assessed the removability of denture adhesives by immersing within denture cleaners, showing that some cleaners have a weak effect, insufficiently effective in daily use. In this study, we prepared a cellulase, as a potential component for denture adhesive removers, and we examined whether the addition of cellulase to denture cleaners is effective in the removal of cream denture adhesives. We prepared the cellulase Meicelase as one component for the liquefaction of denture adhesives. We used two denture cleaners and two cream adhesives. After the immersion of plates in sample solutions, we evaluated the area of the sample plate still covered with adhesives. Biofilm removal assay was also performed using denture cleaners containing cellulase. The addition of cellulase accelerated the removal of cream adhesives in immersion experiments to a rate faster than that of water and denture cleaners. However, it did not influence the removability of Candida albicans biofilms from acrylic resin specimens. Cellulase hastened the liquefaction of cream adhesives. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adhesion of periodontal pathogens to self-ligating orthodontic brackets: An in-vivo prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Sun; Kim, Kyungsun; Cho, Soha; Ahn, Sug-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Our aims were to analyze adhesion of periodontopathogens to self-ligating brackets (Clarity-SL [CSL], Clippy-C [CC] and Damon Q [DQ]) and to identify the relationships between bacterial adhesion and oral hygiene indexes. Central incisor brackets from the maxilla and mandible were collected from 60 patients at debonding after the plaque and gingival indexes were measured. Adhesions of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Tannerella forsythia (Tf) were quantitatively determined using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Factorial analysis of variance was used to analyze bacterial adhesion in relation to bracket type and jaw position. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationships between bacterial adhesion and the oral hygiene indexes. Total bacteria showed greater adhesion to CSL than to DQ brackets, whereas Aa, Pg, and Pi adhered more to DQ than to CSL brackets. CC brackets showed an intermediate adhesion pattern between CSL and DQ brackets, but it did not differ significantly from either bracket type. Adhesion of Fn and Tf did not differ significantly among the 3 brackets. Most bacteria were detected in greater quantities in the mandibular than in the maxillary brackets. The plaque and gingival indexes were not strongly correlated with bacterial adhesion to the brackets. Because Aa, Pg, and Pi adhered more to the DQ brackets in the mandibular area, orthodontic patients with periodontal problems should be carefully monitored in the mandibular incisors where the distance between the bracket and the gingiva is small, especially when DQ brackets are used. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  14. The adhesion force of Notch with Delta and the rate of Notch signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ahimou, Francois; Mok, Lee-Peng; Bardot, Boris; Wesley, Cedric

    2004-01-01

    Notch signaling is repeatedly used during animal development to specify cell fates. Using atomic force microscopy on live cells, chemical inhibitors, and conventional analyses, we show that the rate of Notch signaling is linked to the adhesion force between cells expressing Notch receptors and Delta ligand. Both the Notch extracellular and intracellular domains are required for the high adhesion force with Delta. This high adhesion force is lost within minutes, primarily due to the action of ...

  15. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  16. The adhesion force of Notch with Delta and the rate of Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahimou, Francois; Mok, Lee-Peng; Bardot, Boris; Wesley, Cedric

    2004-12-20

    Notch signaling is repeatedly used during animal development to specify cell fates. Using atomic force microscopy on live cells, chemical inhibitors, and conventional analyses, we show that the rate of Notch signaling is linked to the adhesion force between cells expressing Notch receptors and Delta ligand. Both the Notch extracellular and intracellular domains are required for the high adhesion force with Delta. This high adhesion force is lost within minutes, primarily due to the action of Presenilin on Notch. Reduced turnover or Delta pulling accelerate this loss. These data suggest that strong adhesion between Notch and Delta might serve as a booster for initiating Notch signaling at a high rate.

  17. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  18. Aluminum and steel adhesion with polyurethanes from castor oil adhesives submitted to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Elaine C.; Assumpcao, Roberto L.; Nascimento, Eduardo M. do; Claro Neto, Salvador; Soboll, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes adhesive from castor oil is used to join aluminum and steel pieces. The effect of gamma radiation on the resistance to tension tests is investigated. The aluminum and steel pieces after being glued with the adhesive were submitted to gamma irradiation in doses of 1 kGy, 25 kGy and 100 kGy. The rupture strength of the joints after irradiation have a slightly increase or remains practically unchanged indicating that the adhesive properties is not affected by the gamma radiation. (author)

  19. Influence of ceramic thickness and type on micromechanical properties of light-cured adhesive bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Elif; Bolay, Sükran; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromechanical properties of different adhesive bonding agents when polymerized through ceramics. Sixty sound extracted human third molars were selected and the crowns were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis in order to obtain dentin slices to be bonded with one of the following adhesives: Syntac/Heliobond (Ivoclar-Vivadent) or Adper-Scotchbond-1XT (3M-ESPE). The adhesives were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10 s, 20 s and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS-e.max-Press, Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS-Empress®CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0 mm, 0.75 mm, 2 mm). Thirty groups were included, each containing 60 measurements. Micromechanical properties (Hardness, HV; indentation modulus, E; and creep, Cr) of the adhesives were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). Data were statistically analyzed by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test, as well as a multivariate analysis to test the influence of the study parameters (SPSS 18.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the adhesives (p ceramic type showed the highest effect on HV (Partial-eta squared (η(2)) = 0.109) of the tested adhesives, while E (η(2) = 0.275) and Cr (η(2) = 0.194) were stronger influenced by the adhesive type. Ceramic thickness showed no effect on the E and Cr of the adhesives. The adhesive bonding agents used in this study performed well by curing through different thicknesses of ceramics. The micromechanical properties of the adhesives were determined by the adhesive type and were less influenced by ceramic type and curing time.

  20. Enhanced Neural Cell Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth on Graphene-Based Biomimetic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suck Won Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs, that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay, intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay, and membrane integrity (with LDH assay. Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine.

  1. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  2. In vitro effects of ATG-Fresenius on immune cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzler, I; Seitz-Merwald, I; Schleger, S; Kaczmarek, I; Kur, F; Beiras-Fernandez, A

    2013-06-01

    ATG-Fresenius, a purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human T-lymphocyte immunoglobulin is used for induction immunosuppression as well as prevention and treatment of acute rejection episodes among patients receiving solid organ transplants. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro activity of ATG-Fresenius upon immune cell adhesion, which may explain its activity to mitigate ischemia-reperfusion injury. Human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from umbilical vein or peripheral blood were incubated 20 to 24 hours before analysis. HUVEC were incubated with 10 and 100 μg/mL ATG-Fresenius or reference polyclonal rabbit immunoglobulin G. Analysis of immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells was studied in cocultures of PBMCs and adherent HUVEC. Endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules CD62E and CD54 was determined by flow cytometry. The numbers of T-, B- and natural killer cells attached to HUVEC were also determined by flow cytometry. Groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance. We showed that ATG-Fresenius binds to endothelial cells particularly activated ones expressing increased levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1. The increased binding of ATG-Fresenius to activated endothelial cells was consistent with its known binding to Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and selectins. We also showed that ATG-Fresenius inhibited adhesion of prestimulated immune cells to activated endothelium. We demonstrated dose-dependent binding of ATG-Fresenius to activated endothelial cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of different pre-etching times on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Scheidel, Donal D; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing to determine the influence on dentin bonding of phosphoric acid pre-etching times before the application of self-etch adhesives. Two single-step self-etch universal adhesives [Prime & Bond Elect (EL) and Scotchbond Universal (SU)], a conventional single-step self-etch adhesive [G-aenial Bond (GB)], and a two-step self-etch adhesive [OptiBond XTR (OX)] were used. The SBS and SFS values were obtained with phosphoric acid pre-etching times of 3, 10, or 15 s before application of the adhesives, and for a control without pre-etching. For groups with 3 s of pre-etching, SU and EL showed higher SBS values than control groups. No significant difference was observed for GB among the 3 s, 10 s, and control groups, but the 15 s pre-etching group showed significantly lower SBS and SFS values than the control group. No significant difference was found for OX among the pre-etching groups. Reducing phosphoric acid pre-etching time can minimize the adverse effect on dentin bonding durability for the conventional self-etch adhesives. Furthermore, a short phosphoric acid pre-etching time enhances the dentin bonding performance of universal adhesives. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus reuteri Strains on the Adhesion Characteristics of Selected Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder P; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kapila, Suman; Malik, Ravinder K

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion ability of probiotics is the key factor that decides their colonization in the gastrointestinal tract and potential to inhibit pathogens. Therefore, adhesion ability can be considered as a key determinant for probiotic efficacy. Presents study documents the antagonistic activity of viable/untreated, Lithium chloride (LiCl) treated or heat-killed forms of eight probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains on the adhesion characteristics of selected pathogens. All strains investigated were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells. L. reuteri strains tested were able to inhibit and displace ( P strain L. reuteri LR6 showed the strongest adhesion and pathogen inhibition ability among the eight L. reuteri strains tested. In addition, the abilities to inhibit and to displace adhered pathogens depended on both the probiotic and the pathogen strains tested suggesting the involvement of various mechanisms. The adhesion and antagonistic potential of the probiotic strains were significantly decreased upon exposure to 5 M LiCl, showing that surface molecules, proteinaceous in nature, are involved. The heat-killed forms of the probiotic L. reuteri strains also inhibited the attachment of selected pathogens to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, in vitro assays showed that L. reuteri strains, as viable or heat-killed forms, are adherent to Caco-2 cells and are highly antagonistic to pathogens tested in which surface associated proteins play an important role.

  5. Investigations on the viscoelastic performance of pressure sensitive adhesives in drug-in-adhesive type transdermal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Hans-Michael; Irsan; Dodou, Kalliopi

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of solubility parameter and drug concentration on the rheological behaviour of drug-in-adhesive films intended for transdermal application. Films were prepared over a range of drug concentrations (5%, 10% and 20% w/w) using ibuprofen, benzoic acid, nicotinic acid and lidocaine as model drugs in acrylic (Duro-Tak 87-4287 and Duro-Tak 87900A) or silicone (Bio-PSA 7-4301 and Bio-PSA 7-4302) pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). Saturation status of films was determined using light microscopy. Viscoelastic parameters were measured in rheology tests at 32°C. Subsaturated films had lower viscoelastic moduli whereas saturated films had higher moduli than the placebo films and/or a concentration-dependent increase in their modulus. Saturation concentration of each drug in the films was reflected by decreasing/increasing viscoelastic patterns. The viscoelastic windows (VWs) of the adhesive and drug-in-adhesive films clearly depicted the effect of solubility parameter differences, molar concentration of drug in the adhesive film and differences in PSA chemistry. Drug solubility parameters and molar drug concentrations have an impact on rheological patterns and thus on the adhesive performance of tested pressure sensitive adhesives intended for use in transdermal drug delivery systems. Use of the Flory equation in its limiting form was appropriate to predict drug solubility in the tested formulations.

  6. Strong adhesion of Saos-2 cells to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Makoto; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Totsuka, Yasunori; Watari, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered potential biomedical materials because of their unique character. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of a human osteoblast-like cell line - Saos-2 - on single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). The surface of a culture dish was coated with CNTs, and Saos-2 cells were cultured for three days. Cell morphology, viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, adhesion, and vinculin expression were evaluated. The result showed high cell viability and strong adhesion to MWCNTs. Saos-2 cultured on MWCNTs exhibited vinculin expression throughout the cell body, while the cells attached to SWCNTs and glass were mostly limited to their periphery. Our results suggest that CNT coatings promote cell activity and adhesiveness. These findings indicate that MWCNTs could be used as surface coating materials to promote cell adhesion.

  7. Improved Adhesion of Gold Thin Films Evaporated on Polymer Resin: Applications for Sensing Surfaces and MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrang Moazzez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present and analyze a method to improve the morphology and mechanical properties of gold thin films for use in optical sensors or other settings where good adhesion of gold to a substrate is of importance and where controlled topography/roughness is key. To improve the adhesion of thermally evaporated gold thin films, we introduce a gold deposition step on SU-8 photoresist prior to UV exposure but after the pre-bake step of SU-8 processing. Shrinkage and distribution of residual stresses, which occur during cross-linking of the SU-8 polymer layer in the post-exposure baking step, are responsible for the higher adhesion of the top gold film to the post-deposition cured SU-8 sublayer. The SU-8 underlayer can also be used to tune the resulting gold film morphology. Our promoter-free protocol is easily integrated with existing sensor microfabrication processes.

  8. Enhancing the Adhesive Strength of a Plywood Adhesive Developed from Hydrolyzed Specified Risk Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birendra B. Adhikari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The current production of wood composites relies mostly on formaldehyde-based adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF and phenol formaldehyde (PF resins. As these resins are produced from non-renewable resources, and there are some ongoing issues with possible health hazard due to formaldehyde emission from such products, the purpose of this research was to develop a formaldehyde-free plywood adhesive utilizing waste protein as a renewable feedstock. The feedstock for this work was specified risk material (SRM, which is currently being disposed of either by incineration or by landfilling. In this report, we describe a technology for utilization of SRM for the development of an environmentally friendly plywood adhesive. SRM was thermally hydrolyzed using a Canadian government-approved protocol, and the peptides were recovered from the hydrolyzate. The recovered peptides were chemically crosslinked with polyamidoamine-epichlorohydrin (PAE resin to develop an adhesive system for bonding of plywood specimens. The effects of crosslinking time, peptides/crosslinking agent ratio, and temperature of hot pressing of plywood specimens on the strength of formulated adhesives were investigated. Formulations containing as much as 78% (wt/wt peptides met the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials specifications of minimum dry and soaked shear strength requirement for UF resin type adhesives. Under the optimum conditions tested, the peptides–PAE resin-based formulations resulted in plywood specimens having comparable dry as well as soaked shear strength to that of commercial PF resin.

  9. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  10. Flagellin based biomimetic coatings: From cell-repellent surfaces to highly adhesive coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Boglarka; Patko, Daniel; Szekacs, Inna; Orgovan, Norbert; Kurunczi, Sandor; Sulyok, Attila; Khanh, Nguyen Quoc; Toth, Balazs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc; Horvath, Robert

    2016-09-15

    Biomimetic coatings with cell-adhesion-regulating functionalities are intensively researched today. For example, cell-based biosensing for drug development, biomedical implants, and tissue engineering require that the surface adhesion of living cells is well controlled. Recently, we have shown that the bacterial flagellar protein, flagellin, adsorbs through its terminal segments to hydrophobic surfaces, forming an oriented monolayer and exposing its variable D3 domain to the solution. Here, we hypothesized that this nanostructured layer is highly cell-repellent since it mimics the surface of the flagellar filaments. Moreover, we proposed flagellin as a carrier molecule to display the cell-adhesive RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide sequence and induce cell adhesion on the coated surface. The D3 domain of flagellin was replaced with one or more RGD motifs linked by various oligopeptides modulating flexibility and accessibility of the inserted segment. The obtained flagellin variants were applied to create surface coatings inducing cell adhesion and spreading to different levels, while wild-type flagellin was shown to form a surface layer with strong anti-adhesive properties. As reference surfaces synthetic polymers were applied which have anti-adhesive (PLL-g-PEG poly(l-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol)) or adhesion inducing properties (RGD-functionalized PLL-g-PEG). Quantitative adhesion data was obtained by employing optical biochips and microscopy. Cell-adhesion-regulating coatings can be simply formed on hydrophobic surfaces by using the developed flagellin-based constructs. The developed novel RGD-displaying flagellin variants can be easily obtained by bacterial production and can serve as alternatives to create cell-adhesion-regulating biomimetic coatings. In the present work, we show for the first time that. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of Different Binders on the Roughness, Adhesion Strength, and Other Properties of Mortars with Expanded Cork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnat-Hunek, Danuta; Widomski, Marcin K; Szafraniec, Małgorzata; Łagód, Grzegorz

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the research that is presented in this paper was to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of heat-insulating mortars with expanded cork aggregates and different binders. In this work, the measurements of surface roughness and adhesion strength, supported by determination of basic mechanical and physical parameters, such as density, bulk density, open porosity, total porosity, absorbability, thermal conductivity coefficient, compressive strength, flexural strength, and frost resistance of mortars containing expanded oak cork, were performed. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations demonstrated the microstructure, contact zone, and distribution of pores in the heat-insulating mortars containing expanded cork. The results indicated that the addition of expanded cork and different binders in heat-insulating mortars triggers changes in their roughness and adhesion strength. The SEM research confirmed the very good adhesion of the paste to the cork aggregate.

  12. Theory of the mechanical response of focal adhesions to shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biton, Y Y; Safran, S A

    2010-01-01

    The response of cells to shear flow is primarily determined by the asymmetry of the external forces and moments that are sensed by each member of a focal adhesion pair connected by a contractile stress fiber. In the theory presented here, we suggest a physical model in which each member of such a pair of focal adhesions is treated as an elastic body subject to both a myosin-activated contractile force and the shear stress induced by the external flow. The elastic response of a focal adhesion complex is much faster than the active cellular processes that determine the size of the associated focal adhesions and the direction of the complex relative to the imposed flow. Therefore, the complex attains its mechanical equilibrium configuration which may change because of the cellular activity. Our theory is based on the experimental observation that focal adhesions modulate their cross-sectional area in order to attain an optimal shear. Using this assumption, our elastic model shows that such a complex can passively change its orientation to align parallel to the direction of the flow.

  13. Controlling the Adhesion of Superhydrophobic Surfaces Using Electrolyte Jet Machining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xin; Lu, Yao; Zhou, Shining; Gao, Mingqian; Song, Jinlong; Xu, Wenji

    2016-01-01

    Patterns with controllable adhesion on superhydrophobic areas have various biomedical and chemical applications. Electrolyte jet machining technique (EJM), an electrochemical machining method, was firstly exploited in constructing dimples with various profiles on the superhydrophobic Al alloy surface using different processing parameters. Sliding angles of water droplets on those dimples firstly increased and then stabilized at a certain value with the increase of the processing time or the applied voltages of the EJM, indicating that surfaces with different adhesion force could be obtained by regulating the processing parameters. The contact angle hysteresis and the adhesion force that restricts the droplet from sliding off were investigated through experiments. The results show that the adhesion force could be well described using the classical Furmidge equation. On account of this controllable adhesion force, water droplets could either be firmly pinned to the surface, forming various patterns or slide off at designed tilting angles at specified positions on a superhydrophobic surface. Such dimples on superhydrophopbic surfaces can be applied in water harvesting, biochemical analysis and lab-on-chip devices. PMID:27046771

  14. Effect of atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment on the adhesion properties of a thin adhesive layer in a selective transfer process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min-Ah; Kim, Chan; Hur, Min; Kang, Woo Seok; Kim, Jaegu; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Kim, Kwang-Seop

    2018-01-01

    The adhesion between a stamp and thin film devices is crucial for their transfer on a flexible substrate. In this paper, a thin adhesive silicone layer on the stamp was treated by atmospheric pressure plasma to locally control the adhesion strength for the selective transfer. The adhesion strength of the silicone layer was significantly reduced after the plasma treatment, while its surface energy was increased. To understand the inconsistency between the adhesion strength and surface energy changes, the surface properties of the silicone layer were characterized using nanoindentation and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These techniques revealed that a thin, hard, silica-like layer had formed on the surface from plasma-enhanced oxidation. This layer played an important role in decreasing the contact area and increasing the interfacial slippage, resulting in decreased adhesion. As a practical application, the transfer process was demonstrated on GaN LEDs that had been previously delaminated by a laser lift-off (LLO) process. Although the LEDs were not transferred onto the treated adhesive layer due to the reduced adhesion, the untreated adhesive layer could readily pick up the LEDs. It is expected that this simple method of controlling the adhesion of a stamp with a thin adhesive layer would enable a continuous, selective and large-scale roll-to-roll selective transfer process and thereby advance the development of flexible, stretchable and wearable electronics.

  15. In vitro cell culture, platelet adhesion tests and in vivo implant tests of plasma-polymerized para-xylene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Man [Department of Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan, ROC (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yeh, Chou-Ming, E-mail: cmchou4301@gmail.com [Taichung Hospital, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chung, Chi-Jen [Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China); He, Ju-Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-01

    Plasma-polymerized para-xylene (PPX) was developed in a previous study by adjusting the process parameters: pulse frequency of the power supply (ω{sub p}) and para-xylene monomer flow rate (f{sub p}). All the obtained PPX films exhibit an amorphous structure and present hydrophobicity (water contact angle ranging from 98.5° to 121.1°), higher film growth rate and good fibroblast cell proliferation. In this study, in vitro tests (fibroblast cell compatibility and platelet adhesion) and an in vivo animal study were performed by using PPX deposited industrial-grade silicone sheets (IGS) and compared with medical-grade silicone ones (MS), which were commonly manufactured into catheters or drainage tubes in clinical use. The results reveal that PPX deposited at high ω{sub p} or high f{sub p}, in comparison with MS, exhibit better cell proliferation and clearly shows less cell adhesion regardless of ω{sub p} and f{sub p}. PPX also exhibit a comparatively lower level of platelet adhesion than MS. In the animal study, PPX-coated IGS result in similar local tissue responses at 3, 7 and 28 days (short-term) and 84 days (long-term) after subcutaneous implantation the abdominal wall of rodents compared with respective responses to MS. These results suggest that PPX-coated industrial-grade silicone is one alternative to high cost medical-grade silicone.

  16. In vitro cell culture, platelet adhesion tests and in vivo implant tests of plasma-polymerized para-xylene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Yeh, Chou-Ming; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized para-xylene (PPX) was developed in a previous study by adjusting the process parameters: pulse frequency of the power supply (ω p ) and para-xylene monomer flow rate (f p ). All the obtained PPX films exhibit an amorphous structure and present hydrophobicity (water contact angle ranging from 98.5° to 121.1°), higher film growth rate and good fibroblast cell proliferation. In this study, in vitro tests (fibroblast cell compatibility and platelet adhesion) and an in vivo animal study were performed by using PPX deposited industrial-grade silicone sheets (IGS) and compared with medical-grade silicone ones (MS), which were commonly manufactured into catheters or drainage tubes in clinical use. The results reveal that PPX deposited at high ω p or high f p , in comparison with MS, exhibit better cell proliferation and clearly shows less cell adhesion regardless of ω p and f p . PPX also exhibit a comparatively lower level of platelet adhesion than MS. In the animal study, PPX-coated IGS result in similar local tissue responses at 3, 7 and 28 days (short-term) and 84 days (long-term) after subcutaneous implantation the abdominal wall of rodents compared with respective responses to MS. These results suggest that PPX-coated industrial-grade silicone is one alternative to high cost medical-grade silicone.

  17. In vitro evaluation of tissue adhesives composed of hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Matsuda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the hydrophobic group content in gelatin on the bonding strength of novel tissue–penetrating tissue adhesives was evaluated. The hydrophobic groups introduced into gelatin were the saturated hexanoyl, palmitoyl, and stearoyl groups, and the unsaturated oleoyl group. A collagen casing was employed as an adherend to model soft tissue for the in vitro determination of bonding strength of tissue adhesives composed of various hydrophobically modified gelatins and disuccinimidyl tartrate. The adhesive composed of stearoyl-modified gelatin (7.4% stearoyl; 10Ste and disuccinimidyl tartrate showed the highest bonding strength. The bonding strength of the adhesives decreased as the degree of substitution of the hydrophobic groups increased. Cell culture experiments demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled 10Ste was integrated onto the surface of smooth muscle cells and showed no cytotoxicity. These results suggest that 10Ste interacted with the hydrophobic domains of collagen casings, such as hydrophobic amino acid residues and cell membranes. Therefore, 10Ste–disuccinimidyl tartrate is a promising adhesive for use in aortic dissection.

  18. Denture Adhesives in Prosthodontics: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Ranjith; Shajahan, P A; Mathew, Jyothis; Koruthu, Anil; Aravind, Prasad; Ahammed, M Fazeel

    2015-01-01

    The use of denture adhesives is common among denture wearers, and it is also prescribed by many dentists. Prescribing denture adhesives has been viewed by many prosthodontists as a means of compensating for any defects in the fabrication procedures. Denture adhesives add to the retention and thereby improve chewing ability, reduce any instability, provide comfort and eliminate the accumulation of food debris beneath the dentures. Consequently, they increase the patient's sense of security and satisfaction. However, obtaining the advice of the dental practitioner prior to the use of adhesives is a must.

  19. Polyurethane adhesives in flat roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogárová Markéta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to stabilize individual layers of flat roofs, mainly because of wind suction. Apart from anchoring and surcharge, these layers can be secured by bonding. At present gluing is an indispensable and widely used stabilization method. On our market we can found many types of adhesives, most widely used are based on polyurethane. This paper focuses on problematic about stabilization thermal insulation from expanded polystyrene to vapor barrier from bitumen. One of the main issues is to calculate the exact amount of adhesive, which is required to guarantee the resistance against wind suction. In this problematic we can not find help neither in technical data sheets provided by the manufactures. Some of these data sheets contain at least information about amount of adhesive depending on location in roof plane and building height, but they do not specify the strength of such connection. It was therefore resorted to select several representatives polyurethane adhesives and their subsequent testing on specimens simulating the flat roof segment. The paper described the test methodology and results for two types of polyurethane adhesives.

  20. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  1. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Atash Biz Yeganeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS and microleakage during six months of water storage.Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP, Single Bond (SB, Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB, and All-Bond SE (ABSE. After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05.Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage.Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. 

  2. Study of the mechanisms of humidity-induced adhesion loss of chlorinated rubber on cleaned and rusted steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chico, B.; Feliu, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of time of exposure to the humidity on the behaviour of the system chlorinated rubber paint-steel substrate (cleaned or pre-rusted) is investigated from the interfacial chemistry and adhesion points of view. After one day of humidity exposure, the paint-rust free steel substrate system shows an increase of adhesion. A maximum adhesion value is obtained after 15 days of exposure. This behaviour is similar to that previously described for a pre-rusted steel substrate. After 30-60 days of exposure, the adhesion strength values show an important reduction and the locus of adhesion loss shifts from the paint inside to the interphase between the metallic substrate and the paint. (Author) 4 refs

  3. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  4. Environment-friendly adhesives for surface bonding of wood-based flooring using natural tannin to reduce formaldehyde and TVOC emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop environment-friendly adhesives for face fancy veneer bonding of engineered flooring using the natural tannin form bark in the wood. The natural wattle tannin adhesive were used to replace UF resin in the formaldehyde-based resin system in order to reduce formaldehyde and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the adhesives used between plywoods and fancy veneers. PVAc was added to the natural tannin adhesive to increase viscosity of tannin adhesive for surface bonding. For tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of PVAc to the natural tannin adhesives were added. tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives showed better bonding than the commercial natural tannin adhesive with a higher level of wood penetration. The initial adhesion strength was sufficient to be maintained within the optimum initial tack range. The standard formaldehyde emission test (desiccator method), field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) and VOC analyzer were used to determine the formaldehyde and VOC emissions from engineered flooring bonded with commercial the natural tannin adhesive and tannin/PVAc hybrid adhesives. By desiccator method and FLEC, the formaldehyde emission level of each adhesive showed the similar tendency. All adhesives satisfied the E(1) grade (below 1.5 mg/L) and E(0) grade (below 0.5 mg/L) with UV coating. VOC emission results by FLEC and VOC analyzer were different with the formaldehyde emission results. TVOC emission was slightly increased as adding PVAc.

  5. Strategies to improve the adhesion of rubbers to adhesives by means of plasma surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martínez, J. M.; Romero-Sánchez, M. D.

    2006-05-01

    The surface modifications produced by treatment of a synthetic sulfur vulcanized styrene-butadiene rubber with oxidizing (oxygen, air, carbon dioxide) and non oxidizing (nitrogen, argon) RF low pressure plasmas, and by treatment with atmospheric plasma torch have been assessed by ATR-IR and XPS spectroscopy, SEM, and contact angle measurements. The effectiveness of the low pressure plasma treatment depended on the gas atmosphere used to generate the plasma. A lack of relationship between surface polarity and wettability, and peel strength values was obtained, likely due to the cohesive failure in the rubber obtained in the adhesive joints. In general, acceptable adhesion values of plasma treated rubber were obtained for all plasmas, except for nitrogen plasma treatment during 15 minutes due to the creation of low molecular weight moieties on the outermost rubber layer. A toluene wiping of the N{2 } plasma treated rubber surface for 15 min removed those moieties and increased adhesion was obtained. On the other hand, the treatment of the rubber with atmospheric pressure by means of a plasma torch was proposed. The wettability of the rubber was improved by decreasing the rubber-plasma torch distance and by increasing the duration because a partial removal of paraffin wax from the rubber surface was produced. The rubber surface was oxidized by the plasma torch treatment, and the longer the duration of the plasma torch treatment, the higher the degree of surface oxidation (mainly creation of C O moieties). However, although the rubber surface was effectively modified by the plasma torch treatment, the adhesion was not greatly improved, due to the migration of paraffin wax to the treated rubber-polyurethane adhesive interface once the adhesive joint was produced. On the other hand, the extended treatment with plasma torch facilitated the migration of zinc stearate to the rubber-adhesive interface, also contributing to deteriorate the adhesion in greater extent. Finally

  6. Opto-acoustic microscopy reveals adhesion mechanics of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Liu, Liwang; Le Saux, Guillaume; Plawinski, Laurent; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2018-01-01

    Laser-generated GHz-ultrasonic-based technologies have shown the ability to image single cell adhesion and stiffness simultaneously. Using this new modality, we here demonstrate quantitative indicators to investigate contact mechanics and adhesion processes of the cell. We cultured human cells on a rigid substrate, and we used an inverted pulsed opto-acoustic microscope to generate acoustic pulses containing frequencies up to 100 GHz in the substrate. We map the reflection of the acoustic pulses at the cell-substrate interface to obtain images of the acoustic impedance of the cell, Zc, as well as of the stiffness of the interface, K, with 1 μm lateral resolution. Our results show that the standard deviation ΔZc reveals differences between different cell types arising from the multiplicity of local conformations within the nucleus. From the distribution of K-values within the nuclear region, we extract a mean interfacial stiffness, Km, that quantifies the average contact force in areas of the cell displaying weak bonding. By analogy with classical contact mechanics, we also define the ratio of the real to nominal contact areas, Sr/St. We show that Km can be interpreted as a quantitative indicator of passive contact at metal-cell interfaces, while Sr/St is sensitive to active adhesive processes in the nuclear region. The ability to separate the contributions of passive and active adhesion processes should allow gaining insight into cell-substrate interactions, with important applications in tissue engineering.

  7. Study on the Soy Protein-Based Wood Adhesive Modified by Hydroxymethyl Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To explain the reason why using phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin improves the water resistance of soy-based adhesive, the performance of soy-based adhesive cross-linked with hydroxymethyl phenol (HPF and the reaction between HPF and a common dipeptide N-(2-l-alanyl-l-glutamine (AG being used as a model compound were studied in this paper. The DSC and DMA results indicated the reaction between HPF and soy-based adhesive. The soy-based adhesive cross-linked with HPF cured at a lower temperature than the adhesive without HPF. The former showed better mechanical performance and heat resistance than the latter. The ESI-MS, FT-IR and 13C-NMR results proved the reaction between HPF and AG. Because of the existence of branched ether groups in the 13C-NMR results of HPF/AG, the reaction between HPF and AG might mainly happened between hydroxymethyl groups and amino groups under a basic condition.

  8. Rapid and serial quantification of adhesion forces of yeast and Mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Potthoff

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to surfaces represents the basis for niche colonization and survival. Here we establish serial quantification of adhesion forces of different cell types using a single probe. The pace of single-cell force-spectroscopy was accelerated to up to 200 yeast and 20 mammalian cells per probe when replacing the conventional cell trapping cantilever chemistry of atomic force microscopy by underpressure immobilization with fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM. In consequence, statistically relevant data could be recorded in a rapid manner, the spectrum of examinable cells was enlarged, and the cell physiology preserved until approached for force spectroscopy. Adhesion forces of Candida albicans increased from below 4 up to 16 nN at 37°C on hydrophobic surfaces, whereas a Δhgc1-mutant showed forces consistently below 4 nN. Monitoring adhesion of mammalian cells revealed mean adhesion forces of 600 nN of HeLa cells on fibronectin and were one order of magnitude higher than those observed for HEK cells.

  9. Denture adhesives: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Papadiochos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Denture adhesives have been the objective of scientific research for over half a century. Although they are used by denture wearers worldwide, investigations of their effectiveness and biocompatibility have led to controversial conclusions. The purpose of this study was to review the literature data with regard to the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives as well as the attitudes of both patients and dental professionals toward these materials. An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literature in the Medline database was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives. There was no limitation in publication year, so the search included all the available scientific evidence included in that particular database until March 2014. Specific inclusion criteria were used for the selection of the appropriate articles. A manual search of the citations of the obtained articles followed to extend the electronic search. A full text review was carried out for only 32 articles. Of the 32 articles, 21 examined the efficacy of denture adhesives in terms of retention and stability and masticatory performance, 6 evaluated the issue of the biocompatibility of denture adhesives, and 5 presented the attitudes of either professionals or patients toward these materials. The majority of clinical studies supported the fact that denture adhesives enhance the retention, stability, and masticatory performance of a removable prosthesis. In terms of biocompatibility, long-term in vivo studies to investigate potential harmful effects were lacking. Patients are satisfied with denture adhesives that meet their needs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  11. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  12. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  13. Scaling from single molecule to macroscopic adhesion at polymer/metal interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzig, Thomas; Raman, Sangeetha; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-03-10

    Understanding the evolution of macroscopic adhesion based on fundamental molecular interactions is crucial to designing strong and smart polymer/metal interfaces that play an important role in many industrial and biomedical applications. Here we show how macroscopic adhesion can be predicted on the basis of single molecular interactions. In particular, we carry out dynamic single molecule-force spectroscopy (SM-AFM) in the framework of Bell-Evans' theory to gain information about the energy barrier between the bound and unbound states of an amine/gold junction. Furthermore, we use Jarzynski's equality to obtain the equilibrium ground-state energy difference of the amine/gold bond from these nonequilibrium force measurements. In addition, we perform surface forces apparatus (SFA) experiments to measure macroscopic adhesion forces at contacts where approximately 10(7) amine/gold bonds are formed simultaneously. The SFA approach provides an amine/gold interaction energy (normalized by the number of interacting molecules) of (36 ± 1)k(B)T, which is in excellent agreement with the interaction free energy of (35 ± 3)k(B)T calculated using Jarzynski's equality and single-molecule AFM experiments. Our results validate Jarzynski's equality for the field of polymer/metal interactions by measuring both sides of the equation. Furthermore, the comparison of SFA and AFM shows how macroscopic interaction energies can be predicted on the basis of single molecular interactions, providing a new strategy to potentially predict adhesive properties of novel glues or coatings as well as bio- and wet adhesion.

  14. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahuan; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mucsi, Ashley D; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Detampel, Pascal; Munro, Fay; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W; Qi, Hai; Shi, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell-DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1-dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin-cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1-dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell-mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. © 2017 Chen et al.

  15. Fracture analysis of adhesive joints in wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eder, Martin Alexander; Bitsche, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Modern wind turbine rotor blades are usually made from fibre-reinforced composite subcomponents. In the final assembly stage, these subcomponents are bonded together by several adhesive joints. One important adhesive joint is situated at the trailing edge, which refers to the downstream edge where...... the air-flow rejoins and leaves the blade. Maintenance inspections of wind turbine rotor blades show that among other forms of damage, local debonding of the shells along the trailing edge is a frequent failure type. The cause of trailing edge failure in wind turbine blades is complex, and detailed...

  16. Bio-active molecules modified surfaces enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobasseri, Rezvan; Tian, Lingling; Soleimani, Masoud; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Surface modification of the substrate as a component of in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering, using bio-active molecules including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins or peptides derived ECM proteins can modulate the surface properties and thereby induce the desired signaling pathways in cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) on glass substrates modified with fibronectin (Fn), collagen (Coll), RGD peptides (RGD) and designed peptide (R-pept) as bio-active molecules. The glass coverslips were coated with fibronectin, collagen, RGD peptide and R-peptide. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on different substrates and the adhesion behavior in early incubation times was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. The MTT assay was performed to evaluate the effect of different bio-active molecules on MSCs proliferation rate during 24 and 72 h. Formation of filopodia and focal adhesion (FA) complexes, two steps of cell adhesion process, were observed in MSCs cultured on bio-active molecules modified coverslips, specifically in Fn coated and R-pept coated groups. SEM image showed well adhesion pattern for MSCs cultured on Fn and R-pept after 2 h incubation, while the shape of cells cultured on Coll and RGD substrates indicated that they might experience stress condition in early hours of culture. Investigation of adhesion behavior, as well as proliferation pattern, suggests R-peptide as a promising bio-active molecule to be used for surface modification of substrate in supporting and inducing cell adhesion and proliferation. - Highlights: • Bioactive molecules modified surface is a strategy to design biomimicry scaffold. • Bi-functional Tat-derived peptide (R-pept) enhanced MSCs adhesion and proliferation. • R-pept showed similar influences to fibronectin on FA formation and attachment.

  17. Effects of geometric nonlinearity in an adhered microbeam for measuring the work of adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenqiang; Mok, Joyce; Kesari, Haneesh

    2018-03-01

    Design against adhesion in microelectromechanical devices is predicated on the ability to quantify this phenomenon in microsystems. Previous research related the work of adhesion for an adhered microbeam to the beam's unadhered length, and as such, interferometric techniques were developed to measure that length. We propose a new vibration-based technique that can be easily implemented with existing atomic force microscopy tools or similar metrology systems. To make such a technique feasible, we analysed a model of the adhered microbeam using the nonlinear beam theory put forth by Woinowsky-Krieger. We found a new relation between the work of adhesion and the unadhered length; this relation is more accurate than the one by Mastrangelo & Hsu (Mastrangelo & Hsu 1993 J. Microelectromech. S., 2, 44-55. (doi:10.1109/84.232594)) which is commonly used. Then, we derived a closed-form approximate relationship between the microbeam's natural frequency and its unadhered length. Results obtained from this analytical formulation are in good agreement with numerical results from three-dimensional nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  18. Effects of Thermal and Humidity Aging on the Interfacial Adhesion of Polyketone Fiber Reinforced Natural Rubber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Han Ki; Kim, Dae Sik; Won, Jong Sung; Jin, Da Young; Lee, Hyun Jae; Lee, Seung Goo

    2016-01-01

    Polyketone fiber is considered as a reinforcement of the mechanical rubber goods (MRG) such as tires, automobile hoses, and belts because of its high strength and modulus. In order to apply it to those purposes, the high adhesion of fiber/rubber interface and good sustainability to aging conditions are very important. In this study, polyketone fiber reinforced natural rubber composites were prepared and they were subjected to thermal and humidity aging, to assess the changes of the interfacia...

  19. Rebonding of unused brackets with different orthodontic adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emigdio Enrique Orellana Jimenez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare in vitro shear bond strength (SBS of different orthodontic adhesives in bonding and repeatedly rebonding metal brackets, and to evaluate the bond failure site with the adhesive remnant index (ARI. METHODS: Specimens consisted of 90 extracted human first premolars, randomly divided into three groups (n=30. The adhesives Alpha Plast (AP, ConciseTM (CO and TransbondTM XT (TB were used in each group. Three SBS tests were performed, i.e., one at T0 (initial and the other two at T1 and T2 (first and second rebondings, respectively, observing a 24-hour interval. The tests were performed in a Shimadzu AG-I (10kN SBS testing machine, at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: SBS data were subjected to ANOVA, Tukey's test and Bonferroni test (p<0.05. For the ARI, the Kruskal Wallis test was performed, followed by the Dunn test. The results revealed that at T0 groups AP and CO showed SBS values that were near, but above TB values; and at T1 and T2, the highest SBS values were observed for the AP group, followed by the CO and TB groups. CONCLUSION: Statistically significant differences were found in SBS between groups AP, CO and TB during bonding and repeated rebondings of unused metal brackets, with group AP achieving the highest SBS value. Regarding ARI, adhesive AP exhibited bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface, with a higher enamel fracture frequency.

  20. Adhesive compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott D.; Sendijarevic, Vahid; O'Connor, James

    2017-12-05

    The present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesive compositions comprising aliphatic polycarbonate chains. In one aspect, the present invention encompasses polyurethane adhesives derived from aliphatic polycarbonate polyols and polyisocyanates wherein the polyol chains contain a primary repeating unit having a structure:. In another aspect, the invention provides articles comprising the inventive polyurethane compositions as well as methods of making such compositions.

  1. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  2. Human climbing with efficiently scaled gecko-inspired dry adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Elliot W.; Eason, Eric V.; Christensen, David L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the mechanism of adhesion in geckos, many synthetic dry adhesives have been developed with desirable gecko-like properties such as reusability, directionality, self-cleaning ability, rough surface adhesion and high adhesive stress. However, fully exploiting these adhesives in practical applications at different length scales requires efficient scaling (i.e. with little loss in adhesion as area grows). Just as natural gecko adhesives have been used as a benchmark for syn...

  3. Bending energy penalty enhances the adhesive strength of functional amyloid curli to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Wang, Ao; DeBenedictis, Elizabeth P.; Keten, Sinan

    2017-11-01

    The functional amyloid curli fiber, a major proteinaceous component of biofilm extracellular matrices, plays an important role in biofilm formation and enterobacteriaceae adhesion. Curli nanofibers exhibit exceptional underwater adhesion to various surfaces, have high rigidity and strong tensile mechanical properties, and thus hold great promise in biomaterials. The mechanisms of how curli fibers strongly attach to surfaces and detach under force remain elusive. To investigate curli fiber adhesion to surfaces, we developed a coarse-grained curli fiber model, in which the protein subunit CsgA (curli specific gene A) self-assembles into the fiber. The coarse-grained model yields physiologically relevant and tunable bending rigidity and persistence length. The force-induced desorption of a single curli fiber is examined using coarse-grained modeling and theoretical analysis. We find that the bending energy penalty arising from high persistence length enhances the resistance of the curli fiber against desorption and thus strengthens the adhesion of the curli fiber to surfaces. The CsgA-surface adhesion energy and the curli fiber bending rigidity both play crucial roles in the resistance of curli fiber against desorption from surfaces. To enable the desorption process, the applied peeling force must overcome both the interfacial adhesion energy and the energy barrier for bending the curli fiber at the peeling front. We show that the energy barrier to desorption increases with the interfacial adhesion energy, however, the bending induced failure of a single curli fiber limits the work of adhesion if the proportion of the CsgA-surface adhesion energy to the CsgA-CsgA cohesive energy becomes large. These results illustrate that the optimal adhesion performance of nanofibers is dictated by the interplay between bending, surface energy and cohesive energy. Our model provides timely insight into enterobacteriaceae adhesion mechanisms as well as future designs of engineered

  4. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel...... strength test and by SEM pictures. The rheology of the double-layered compared to the monolayer films changed in some cases which indicates that the adhesion process needs to be carefully introduced in order not to alter the final properties....

  5. An evaluation tool for Myofascial Adhesions in Patients after Breast Cancer (MAP-BC evaluation tool): Concurrent, face and content validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groef, An; Van Kampen, Marijke; Moortgat, Peter; Anthonissen, Mieke; Van den Kerckhove, Eric; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Neven, Patrick; Geraerts, Inge; Devoogdt, Nele

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the concurrent, face and content validity of an evaluation tool for Myofascial Adhesions in Patients after Breast Cancer (MAP-BC evaluation tool). 1) Concurrent validity of the MAP-BC evaluation tool was investigated by exploring correlations (Spearman's rank Correlation Coefficient) between the subjective scores (0 -no adhesions to 3 -very strong adhesions) of the skin level using the MAP-BC evaluation tool and objective elasticity parameters (maximal skin extension and gross elasticity) generated by the Cutometer Dual MPA 580. Nine different examination points on and around the mastectomy scar were evaluated. 2) Face and content validity were explored by questioning therapists experienced with myofascial therapy in breast cancer patients about the comprehensibility and comprehensiveness of the MAP-BC evaluation tool. 1) Only three meaningful correlations were found on the mastectomy scar. For the most lateral examination point on the mastectomy scar a moderate negative correlation (-0.44, p = 0.01) with the maximal skin extension and a moderate positive correlation with the resistance versus ability of returning or 'gross elasticity' (0.42, p = 0.02) were found. For the middle point on the mastectomy scar an almost moderate positive correlation with gross elasticity was found as well (0.38, p = 0.04) 2) Content and face validity have been found to be good. Eighty-nine percent of the respondent found the instructions understandable and 98% found the scoring system obvious. Thirty-seven percent of the therapists suggested to add the possibility to evaluate additional anatomical locations in case of reconstructive and/or bilateral surgery. The MAP-BC evaluation tool for myofascial adhesions in breast cancer patients has good face and content validity. Evidence for good concurrent validity of the skin level was found only on the mastectomy scar itself.

  6. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    were then mounted in acrylic molds. After thermocycling and mounting of the samples, shear forces were applied on the restorations by universal test machine (Dartec with cross head speed of 5mm/min. The maximum shear bond strength (MPa was calculated. Results. The mean shear bond strengths and standard deviations for group I (active-dry,II (nonactive - dry, III (active-wet and IV (nonactive-wet were 11.55±8.59, 11.02 ± 4.1, 23.38±8.09 and 26.34 ± 6.97MPa respectively. Discussion. Results indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between groups I,II and groups III,IV .In the other hand, groups III and IV have shown a good and sufficient mean shear bond strength which means the wettness of dentin surface, has a significant role on enhancement of shear bond strength of Single - Bond to etched dentin and the application of active or inactive priming dose not have a significant role on enhancement of the bond strength and can be deleted as an aditional stage. 93% of the total failure modes were adhesive, 4.5% were mixed (dentin-adhesive and 2.5% were mixed (composite-adhesive.

  7. Structural determinants of adhesion by Protocadherin-19 and implications for its role in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Sharon R.; Jontes, James D.; Sotomayor, Marcos

    2016-10-26

    Non-clustered δ-protocadherins are homophilic cell adhesion molecules essential for the development of the vertebrate nervous system, as several are closely linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. Mutations inprotocadherin-19(PCDH19) result in a female-limited, infant-onset form of epilepsy (PCDH19-FE). Over 100 mutations inPCDH19have been identified in patients with PCDH19-FE, about half of which are missense mutations in the adhesive extracellular domain. Neither the mechanism of homophilic adhesion by PCDH19, nor the biochemical effects of missense mutations are understood. Here we present a crystallographic structure of the minimal adhesive fragment of the zebrafish Pcdh19 extracellular domain. This structure reveals the adhesive interface for Pcdh19, which is broadly relevant to both non-clustered δ and clustered protocadherin subfamilies. In addition, we show that several PCDH19-FE missense mutations localize to the adhesive interface and abolish Pcdh19 adhesion inin vitroassays, thus revealing the biochemical basis of their pathogenic effects during brain development.

  8. The adhesion of pacemaker skin wounds with Histoacryl tissue adhesive: an analysis of its efficacy and cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yong; Jiang Haibin; Qin Yongwen; Chen Shaoping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and cost of Histoacryl tissue adhesive in adhering the pacemaker skin wounds. Methods: During the period from April 2010 to October 2010, permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation was performed in 112 patients in authors' hospital. The patients were divided into tissue adhesive group (n=64) and conventional suture group (n=48). Histoacryl tissue adhesive was employed in patients of tissue adhesive group. The extent of wound healing, the post-procedure hospitalization days and the hospitalization cost were recorded, and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: The clinical baselines of the two groups were compatible with each other. Primary closure of wounds was achieved in all patients of two groups. The mean post-procedure hospitalization time in tissue adhesive group and in conventional suture group was (4.4±1.4) days and (6.2±1.3) days respectively, the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). If the costs of pacemaker equipment, surgery and DSA were not included, the mean medical expenses in tissue adhesive group and in conventional suture group were (4383.39±792.40) and (4199.81±1059.93) Chinese Yuan respectively, and no significant difference in medical expenses existed between the two groups (P=0.651). Conclusion: Histoacryl tissue adhesive can effectively adhere pacemaker wounds tissue. Compared to the use of conventional suture, the use of Histoacryl tissue adhesive can reduce the post-procedure hospitalization days although the medical expenses are quite the same as that using conventional suture treatment. (authors)

  9. Modified silyl-terminated polyether polymer blends with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy for adhesive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitenieks, J; Meri, R Merijs; Zicans, J; Berzins, R; Umbraško, J; Rekners, U

    2016-01-01

    Modified silyl-terminated polyether polymer (MS Polymer) was blended with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (DGEBPA) epoxy at MS Polymer/epoxy ratio from 30/70 to 70/30. MS Polymer/epoxy systems were examined for two-component adhesive formulation with additional fillers. Applicability of the MS Polymer/epoxy system at the ratio of the components 60/40 is demonstrated for the development of adhesive formulation. Rheological analysis of the components A and B shows suitable viscosity values for development of two- component adhesives formulation. Curing dynamics as well as tensile stress-strain properties and Shore A hardness of the chosen adhesive formulation are reasonable for the development of MS Polymer/epoxy type adhesive. (paper)

  10. Self-assembled Nano-layering at the Adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y; Yoshihara, K; Nagaoka, N; Hayakawa, S; Torii, Y; Ogawa, T; Osaka, A; Meerbeek, B Van

    2012-04-01

    According to the 'Adhesion-Decalcification' concept, specific functional monomers within dental adhesives can ionically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Such ionic bonding has been demonstrated for 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) to manifest in the form of self-assembled 'nano-layering'. However, it remained to be explored if such nano-layering also occurs on tooth tissue when commercial MDP-containing adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray; Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE) were applied following common clinical application protocols. We therefore characterized adhesive-dentin interfaces chemically, using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and ultrastructurally, using (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM). Both adhesives revealed nano-layering at the adhesive interface, not only within the hybrid layer but also, particularly for Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), extending into the adhesive layer. Since such self-assembled nano-layering of two 10-MDP molecules, joined by stable MDP-Ca salt formation, must make the adhesive interface more resistant to biodegradation, it may well explain the documented favorable clinical longevity of bonds produced by 10-MDP-based adhesives.

  11. Influence of water storage on fatigue strength of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Scheidel, Donal D; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Erickson, Robert L; L