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Sample records for shoulder image gallery

  1. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glance Mission and Vision Organizational Structure Director's Message Strategic Plans & Reports Budget & Legislation ... The Image Gallery contains high-quality digital photographs available from the National Center for Complementary ...

  2. Normal shoulder: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Verbout, A.J.; Rozing, P.M.; Doornbos, J.

    1986-06-01

    Relatively poor spatial resolution has been obtained in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the shoulder because the shoulder can only be placed in the periphery of the magnetic field. The authors have devised an anatomically shaped surface coil that enables MR to demonstrate normal shoulder anatomy in different planes with high spatial resolution. In the axial plane anatomy analogous to that seen on computed tomographic (CT) scans can be demonstrated. Variations in scapular position (produced by patient positioning) may make reproducibility of sagittal and coronal plane images difficult by changing the relationship of the plane to the shoulder anatomy. Oblique planes, for which the angle is chosen from the axial image, have the advantage of easy reproducibility. Obliquely oriented structures and relationships are best seen in oblique plane images and can be evaluated in detail.

  3. Imaging shoulder impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Seeger, L.L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Yao, L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Appropriate imaging and clinical examinations may lead to early diagnosis and treatment of the shoulder impingement syndrome, thus preventing progression to a complete tear of the rotator cuff. In this article, we discuss the anatomic and pathophysiologic bases of the syndrome, and the rationale for certain imaging tests to evaluate it. Special radiographic projections to show the supraspinatus outlet and inferior surface of the anterior third of the acromion, combined with magnetic resonance images, usually provide the most useful information regarding the causes of impingement. (orig.)

  4. Imaging shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.H.; Seeger, L.L.; Yao, L.

    1993-01-01

    Appropriate imaging and clinical examinations may lead to early diagnosis and treatment of the shoulder impingement syndrome, thus preventing progression to a complete tear of the rotator cuff. In this article, we discuss the anatomic and pathophysiologic bases of the syndrome, and the rationale for certain imaging tests to evaluate it. Special radiographic projections to show the supraspinatus outlet and inferior surface of the anterior third of the acromion, combined with magnetic resonance images, usually provide the most useful information regarding the causes of impingement. (orig.)

  5. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  6. Image collection - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Togo Picture Gallery Image collection Data detail Data name Image collection DOI - Descripti...nload License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Image collection - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive ...

  7. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Neumann, C.H.; Petersen, S.; Steinbach, L.S.; Jahnke, A.H.; Morgan, F.W.; Heuck, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the MR appearance of the supraspinatus tendon and associated structures in asymptomatic individuals in order to assist in the differentiation of normal aging from rotator cuff pathology as seen in shoulder impingement syndrome. Proton-density and T2-weighted oblique coronal spin-echo images were obtained at 1.5 T. Images of 48 shoulders from asymptomatic volunteers, aged 22-25 years, were evaluated for signal intensity and distribution in the supraspinatus tendon (SST) and for the appearance of the subacromial-subdeltoid (peribursal) fat plane and acromial outlet

  8. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, T.; Weinhardt, H.; Oettl, G.; Lenz, M.; Riel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage [de

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Romanowski, L.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author)

  10. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, N.J.; Dussault, R.G.; Keats, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  11. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  12. Effects of whispering gallery mode in microsphere super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Song; Deng, Yongbo; Zhou, Wenchao; Yu, Muxin; Urbach, H. P.; Wu, Yihui

    2017-09-01

    Whispering Gallery modes have been presented in microscopic glass spheres or toruses with many applications. In this paper, the possible approaches to enhance the imaging resolution by Whispering Gallery modes are discussed, including evanescent waves coupling, transformed and illustration by Whispering Gallery modes. It shows that the high-order scattering modes play the dominant role in the reconstructed virtual image when the Whispering Gallery modes exist. Furthermore, we find that the high image resolution of electric dipoles can be achieved, when the out-of-phase components exist from the illustration of Whispering Gallery modes. Those results of our simulation could contribute to the knowledge of microsphere-assisted super-resolution imaging and its potential applications.

  13. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMenamin, Drew [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 354755, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)], E-mail: drewmcm@u.washington.edu; Koulouris, George [Gold Coast Medical Imaging, 123 Nerang Street, Southport, QLD 4215 (Australia); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, Suite 1079a, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Functional MR imaging study of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Shibuta, H.; Kokubo, T.; Itai, Y.; Iio, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a functional MR study of the shoulder performed with the positioning in which patients were about to complain of shoulder pain. A 0.064-T permanent MR system was used. The effectiveness of this study was evaluated in the diagnosis of rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Thirteen patients (11 males and two female) were examined prospectively. Three-dimensional Fourier transformation coronal images were obtained with patients' arms at the maximal abduction. They were compared with images obtained while patients' arms were at their sides, chiefly from the viewpoint of severity of impingement and intensity change of the supraspinatus muscle

  15. Imaging Evaluation of Nonacute Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, Michael J; Small, Kirstin M

    2017-09-01

    A variety of radiographic views have been described in the literature for the initial imaging of nonacute shoulder pain. Multiple articles have also discussed the best next imaging test if radiographs do not show the diagnosis, especially the use of unenhanced MRI, MR arthrography, CT arthrography, and ultrasound. The purpose of this article is to examine the evidence for the most helpful radiographic views and the best imaging test after radiographs for different clinical presentations of chronic shoulder pain. The recommended radiographic views and best next imaging test after the radiograph depends on the clinical diagnosis. Ultrasound is generally preferred over MRI for evaluating chronic rotator cuff pain, whereas MR arthrography, preferably with abducted and externally rotated images, is most accurate for imaging chronic symptoms from a suspected labral tear or instability.

  16. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  17. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  19. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Gufler, H.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [Univ. Hospital, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Biebow, N.; Hauer, M.P.; Reichelt, A. [Univ. Hospital, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1997-11-01

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.).

  20. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Gufler, H.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M.; Biebow, N.; Hauer, M.P.; Reichelt, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  1. Accurate identification of whispering gallery mode patterns of gyrotron with stabilized electro-optic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ingeun; Sawant, Ashwini; Choe, Mun Seok; Lee, Dong-Joon; Choi, EunMi

    2018-01-01

    The precise field pattern measurement and analysis of a typical whispering gallery mode excited in a gyrotron are important to understand the interaction physics of the gyrotron. We precisely analyzed the characteristic of a whispering gallery mode, rotating TE6,2 mode, by a photonic-assisted W-band (75-110 GHz) electro-optic imaging measurement system. The whispering gallery mode in the W-band region diverges fast in free space as it propagates from the radiation port. Therefore, scanning the field patterns of a device-under-test should be performed as close as possible to identify the device's characteristics. We successfully accomplished visualizing highly accurate field patterns of a rotating and mixed whispering gallery mode based on the measured electric field magnitude and phase by using dual optical fiber-scale electro-optic (EO) probes. We observed the distorted fields when the typical open-ended waveguide and a general EO probe were used in the extremely near-field zone, whereas a very precise field was measured in a minimally invasive way by the proposed EO probe. The measured mode patterns were quantitatively analyzed by using a cross correlation function and a mode purity equation. This work promises a way to provide accurate electric field information in the generation of the whispering gallery mode in the millimeter and submillimeter regime.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: Rationale and current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Helms, C.A.; Steinbach, L.; Neumann, C.; Munk, P.L.; Genant, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Because it can demonstrate a wide range of tissue contrast with excellent resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized imaging in many areas of the musculoskeletal system and has generated excitement among those interested in the painful shoulder. Shoulder impingement syndrome and glenohumeral instability constitute the two major categories of shoulder derangements. Correct diagnosis requires the use of appropriate pulse sequences and imaging planes, proper patient positioning, and a satisfactory surface coil. In addition the imager must have a thorough understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. We present a summary of the current status of MR imaging of the shoulder including technical, anatomic, and pathologic considerations and a review of the pertinent literature. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  4. mri evaluation of patients with shoulder pain at three imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shoulder 104(86.7%) compared to the left which had only 16(13.3%) lesions. Different lesions were picked on MRI. Table 1 shows the lesions seen. Table 1. Lesions seen at MR imaging (n=120). Type of lesions. Right shoulder. Left shoulder. Total. Tendinitis. 31 (25.8). 3 (2.5). 34 (28.3). Bursitis. 11 (9.7). 1 (0.8). 12 (10.0).

  5. [Modern imaging in radioanatomic study of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C; De Korvin, B; al Ghossein, I; Kadouch, R; Duvauferrier, R

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the most appropriate imaging technique or techniques for assessment of each anatomical structure in the shoulder: the head of the humerus, socket, acromion, joint space, labrum, musculotendinous structures of the supraspinatus, subscapularis and long biceps muscles. The techniques used are the most useful view of standard X-rays, as well as arthropathy, CT scan, arthroscan, ultrasonography and MRI. This is a preliminary study to assessment of shoulder lesions. In the shoulder, radiologists are frequently required to identify the anatomical disorder as exactly as possible without falling into the traps associated with all forms of imaging even the most sophisticated.

  6. 3D density imaging with muons flux measurements from underground galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Marteau, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric muons flux measurements provide information on sub-surface density distribution, giving insights on the medium structure. We measured the muons flux from the underground galleries of the Tournemire experimental platform to image the medium between the galleries and the surface. The experiment aimed at evaluating the capacity of the method to detect the presence of discontinuities produced either by secondary strike-slip faults that present small vertical displacements or by a karstic network may be present at the level of an upper aquifer. Measurements were performed from three different sites so the trajectories of detected muons paths intersect in the medium. Such a configuration provided complementary information on the density distribution, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. A specific calibration method was applied in order to interpolate the data acquired at different times with the same muons sensor. Muons flux measurements variations were then processed through a non-linear inversion, producing a 3D image of the density together with an evaluation of the different distinguished targets reliability. The density distribution showed the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, suggesting the presence of a karstic network hosting locally cavities. The trace of secondary strike-slip faults did not appear clearly on the image as the density contrast they produce might be too low compared to the signal to noise ratio present in the muons flux data. We propose different strategies to improve the density image accuracy.

  7. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ultrasound Pediatric Ultrasound Point-of-Care Ultrasound Sonography Therapeutic Ultrasound Ultrasound in Global Health Ultrasound in Medical Education CME Center CME Tracker Annual Convention Journal Tests ...

  8. Integration of microsphere resonators with bioassay fluidics for whispering gallery mode imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daniel C; Armendariz, Kevin P; Dunn, Robert C

    2013-06-07

    Whispering gallery mode resonators are small, radially symmetric dielectrics that trap light through continuous total internal reflection. The resonant condition at which light is efficiently confined within the structure is linked with refractive index, which has led to the development of sensitive label-free sensing schemes based on whispering gallery mode resonators. One resonator design uses inexpensive high index glass microspheres that offer intrinsically superior optical characteristics, but have proven difficult to multiplex and integrate with the fluidics for sample delivery and fluid exchange necessary for assay development. Recently, we introduced a fluorescence imaging approach that enables large scale multiplexing with microsphere resonators, thus removing one obstacle for assay development. Here we report an approach for microsphere immobilization that overcomes limitations arising from their integration with fluidic delivery. The approach is an adaptation of a calcium-assisted glass bonding method originally developed for microfluidic glass chip fabrication. Microspheres bonded to glass using this technique are shown to be stable with respect to fluid flow and show no detectable loss in optical performance. Measured Q-factors, for example, remain unchanged following sphere bonding to the substrate. The stability of the immobilized resonators is further demonstrated by transferring lipid films onto the immobilized spheres using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Bilayers of DOPC doped with GM1 were transferred onto immobilized resonators to detect the binding of cholera toxin to GM1. Binding curves generated from shifts in the whispering gallery mode resonance result in a measured Kd of 1.5 × 10(-11) with a limit of detection of 3.3 pM. These results are discussed in terms of future assay development using microsphere resonators.

  9. Artifacts and pitfalls in shoulder magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Marcon, Gustavo Felix; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves

    2015-01-01

    AbstractMagnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of shoulder lesions, in many cases becoming the method of choice. However, anatomical variations, artifacts and the particularity of the method may be a source of pitfalls, especially for less experienced radiologists. In order to avoid false-positive and false-negative results, the authors carried out a compilation of imaging findings that may simulate injury. It is the authors’ intention to provide a useful, consistent and ...

  10. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: a review of potential sources of diagnostic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.W.; Helms, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR arthrography are frequently utilized in the evaluation of shoulder pain and instability. The clinical scenario and imaging findings may be confusing to clinicians and radiologists and may present diagnostic challenges for those involved in evaluating and treating shoulder pathology. Often rotator cuff and labral abnormalities may be coexistent, clinical manifestations of denervation syndromes may be confusing to clinicians, and normal anatomic variations, imaging pitfalls, and various artifacts may cause dilemmas for the radiologist. This article will review the most frequently encountered mimickers and pitfalls of MR imaging of the shoulder. (orig.)

  12. Multi-modal imaging of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappia, Marcello; Di Pietto, Francesco; Aliprandi, Alberto; Pozza, Simona; De Petro, Paola; Muda, Alessandro; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-06-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a clinical condition characterized by progressive limitation of active and passive mobility of the glenohumeral joint, generally associated with high levels of pain. Although the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis is based mainly on clinical examination, different imaging modalities including arthrography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance arthrography may help to confirm the diagnosis, detecting a number of findings such as capsular and coracohumeral ligament thickening, poor capsular distension, extracapsular contrast leakage, and synovial hypertrophy and scar tissue formation at the rotator interval. Ultrasound can also be used to guide intra- and periarticular procedures for treating patients with adhesive capsulitis. • Diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis is mainly based on clinical findings. • Imaging may be used to exclude articular or rotator cuff pathology. • Thickening of coracohumeral and inferior glenohumeral ligaments are common findings. • Rotator interval fat pad obliteration has 100 % specificity for adhesive capsulitis. • Ultrasound can be used to guide intra- and periarticular treatments.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Rotator Cuff in Destroyed Rheumatoid Shoulder: Comparison with Findings during Shoulder Replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soini, I.; Belt, E.A.; Niemitukia, L.; Maeenpaeae, H.M.; Kautiainen, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with respect to rotator cuff ruptures. Material and Methods: Thirty-one patients with rheumatic disease underwent preoperative MRI before shoulder arthroplasty. The scans were reviewed independently by two experienced radiologists. Three surgeons performed all the replacements (hemiarthroplasties), and the condition of the rotator cuff was assessed. Complete and massive tears of the rotator cuff were recorded and compared at surgery and on MRI. Results: With MRI, 21 shoulders (68%) were classified as having complete or massive tears of the rotator cuff and at surgery 14 shoulders (45%). Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.44 (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.72) and accuracy 0.71 (95% CI: 0.52 to 0.86). Conclusion: In severely destroyed rheumatoid shoulder, the findings of soft tissues were incoherent both with MRI and at surgery. The integrity of tendons could not readily be elucidated with MRI because of an inflammatory process and scarred tissues; in surgery, too, changes were frequently difficult to categorize. Preoperative MRI of severely destroyed rheumatoid shoulder before arthroplasty turned out to be of only minor importance

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okur, Gokcan [Etimesgut Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Chaney, Kimberly A. [Presence St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Elgin, IL (United States); Lomasney, Laurie M. [Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. The prevalence of post-vaccination complications is likely on the rise. Complications are well known to general clinicians, but are under-reported in the imaging literature. We present four cases of post-vaccination shoulder pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed. The most likely reason for a humeral intraosseous edema-like signal was presumed injection of vaccine substance directly into osseous structures that might lead to focal osteitis. In the published literature, there is little emphasis on the imaging of local injection site complications accompanying influenza vaccination. We intended to increase familiarity of MRI findings in the setting of prolonged or severe clinical symptoms following influenza vaccination through the imaging findings of these four cases. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder; Badanie stawu ramiennego metoda MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemianski, A.; Romanowski, L. [Zaklad Radiologii Sercowo-Naczyniowej, Inst. Radiologii and Klinika Chirurgii Reki, Inst. Ortopedii i Rehabilitacji, Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author) 17 refs, 4 figs, 7 tabs

  16. Technical Developments: Zero Echo Time Imaging of the Shoulder: Enhanced Osseous Detail by Using MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breighner, Ryan E; Endo, Yoshimi; Konin, Gabrielle P; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Koff, Matthew F; Potter, Hollis G

    2018-03-01

    Purpose To determine the intermodality agreement of morphologic grading and clinically relevant quantitative measurements between computed tomography (CT) and zero echo time (ZTE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the shoulder. The primary objective was to demonstrate the clinical applicability of ZTE in osseous shoulder imaging. Materials and Methods Thirty-four patients undergoing standard-of-care (SOC) MR imaging with concomitant CT were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved study. ZTE images were acquired after SOC MR imaging. Glenoid morphology (version, vault depth, erosion), injury or disease (osteoarthritis, Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, subchondral cysts), and evidence of prior surgery were graded or measured. κ Values, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Bland-Altman limits of agreement were used to establish agreement. Qualitative comparison of osseous findings was performed between ZTE and SOC MR imaging. Results Binary classification and nominal/ordinal grades showed substantial or better agreement between raters and modalities (κ or ICC > 0.6). Continuous measurements exhibited strong correlation between raters and modalities, although not universally. Bankart ICCs were not significant, owing to low prevalence. ZTE exhibited greater conspicuity of enthesopathic cysts and marrow edema. In 21 of 34 cases, ZTE imaging of osseous features exceeded SOC MR imaging. Conclusion ZTE MR imaging provides "CT-like" contrast for bone. The results of this study demonstrate strong intermodality agreement between measurements and grades from CT and ZTE images in a cohort of patients undergoing imaging with both modalities. A majority of ZTE image sets provided superior visualization of osseous features when compared with SOC MR image sets. This superiority coupled with strong quantitative agreement with CT suggests that ZTE may be used clinically in lieu of CT in some cases. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for

  17. Measurement of angles of abduction for diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs using goniometry and digital image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Renfro, Daniel C; Tomlinson, James L; Sorensen, Jill E

    2005-01-01

    To compare abduction angles of shoulders with medial instability and unaffected shoulders in the same dogs and in age- and breed-matched dogs. Case-control study. Dogs with medial instability of the shoulder (n=33) and 26 control dogs. Dogs were sedated and positioned in lateral recumbency with both scapulas parallel to the table. With the elbow and shoulder in extension, the non-recumbent limb was maximally abducted and the angle between the scapular spine and lateral aspect of the brachium measured with a goniometer; a digital image was taken from the cranial aspect. Both techniques were performed in triplicate by 2 examiners. Mean abduction angles for each shoulder were determined from goniometric measurements and image analysis. Data were analyzed for significant differences between affected and unaffected shoulders, measurement techniques, and examiners. Strength of correlation between measurement techniques was determined. Mean abduction angles for shoulders with instability (53.7+/-4.7 degrees goniometric, 51.2+/-4.9 degrees image) were significantly (P<.001) larger than for all unaffected shoulders (32.6+/-2.0 degrees goniometric, 30.9+/-2.3 degrees image). In dogs diagnosed with instability, affected shoulders had significantly (P<.001) larger abduction angles than the contralateral (unaffected) shoulders. No significant differences were identified between right and left shoulders for control dogs, measurement techniques, or examiners. A strong (r=0.90) significant (P<.001) positive correlation between measurement techniques was noted. Shoulder abduction angles measured under sedation provide objective data for diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs. Shoulders with clinical and arthroscopic evidence of medial instability have significantly higher abduction angles than shoulders that are considered normal. Determination of shoulder abduction angles should be included in the diagnostic protocol for forelimb lameness assessment in dogs.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of shoulders with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: reliability of measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Demaille-Wlodyka, Samantha; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Poiraudeau, Serge; Revel, Michel [Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Paris (France); Drape, Jean-Luc; Diche, Thierry; Minvielle, Francois [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Department of Radiology B, Paris (France); Fermanian, Jacques [Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Biostatistics, Hopital Necker (AP-HP), Paris (France)

    2005-12-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (AC) were compared with those of contralateral healthy shoulders and the reliability of measures assessed. Twenty-six consecutive patients (26 AC and 14 healthy shoulders) were prospectively assessed. The main measurements were thickness of the joint capsule and synovial membrane in the axillary recess and rotator interval in T1-weighted spin-echo sequence enhanced with intravenous (IV) gadolinium chelate (Gd-chelate). Reliability was studied by use of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean thickness of the axillary recess on the coronal plane was 9.0{+-}2.2 mm in AC shoulders and 0.4{+-}0.7 mm in healthy shoulders. The mean thickness of the rotator interval on the sagittal plane was 8.4{+-}2.8 in AC shoulders and 0.6{+-}0.8 mm in healthy shoulders. Interobserver reliability was good for the axillary recess, with ICC values of 0.84 for the coronal plane, and good for the rotator interval, with ICC values of 0.80 for the sagittal plane. MRI with IV Gd-chelate injection can show, with acceptable reliability, signal and thickness abnormalities of the shoulder joint capsule and synovial membrane in AC. (orig.)

  19. Painful and painless shoulder magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in hemodialysis patients and correlation with clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Ayla Caglıyan; Fıdan, Nurdan; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Ozdemır, Ferda; Tomak, Leman; Ozkurt, Sultan; Sahın, Fusun

    2016-05-20

    Shoulder pain is frequently observed in haemodialysis patients. To compare haemodialysis patients with or without shoulder pain in terms of shoulder motion ranges, β2 microglobulin levels and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Forty-three patients undergoing dialysis were enrolled, of which 23 patients had explicit shoulder pain at night, which appeared during dialysis. Range of joint motion and impingement tests were evaluated. β 2 microglobulin value was recorded. MRI was used to evaluate rotator cuff tendons for thickness, homogeneity, integrity and presence of effusion. Ranges of motion were significantly lower in the painful shoulder group. Supraspinatus tendon thickness and the number of areas with effusion were higher in the painful group. There was a positive correlation between the β 2 microglobulin level and supraspinatus (r:0.352 ppain (r:0.351 ppain and shoulder motion ranges. Shoulder pain in dialysis patients can be related with tendon thickness and effusion. While the β 2 microglobulin level affects tendon thickness, it has no relation to pain and movement constraint.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears in shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  2. Comparative diagnostic imaging of the canine shoulder joint ultrasonography and radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, B

    2000-01-01

    radiographically. 6 of 17 supraspinatus insertion tendinopathies (35.3 %) and 4 of 5 bicipital tendon calcifications (80 %) were detected only with ultrasonography. Radiographic findings of bony proliferations in the intertuberal groove without signs of degenerative joint disease of the shoulder joint are indicative of severe or chronic biciptal tendon disease. In many cases, the stage and severity of cartilaginous and subchondral bone lesions with osteochondritis dissecans can be determined ultrasonographically. Osteochondritis dissecans defects not seen on radiographs are occasionally visible with ultrasound, although a negative finding is not always accurate. Ultrasonography of shoulder joint disease has been applied in humans for some time. In this study, the use of radiography and ultrasonography as diagnostic imaging modalities to determine shoulder joint lesions is presented. The ultrasonographic anatomy and pathology of the shoulder joint are described. Comparative radiographic and ultrasonographic fi...

  3. Denervation syndromes of the shoulder girdle: MR imaging with electrophysiologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredella, M.A.; Wischer, T.K.; Stork, A.; Genant, H.K.; Tirman, P.F.J.; Fritz, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the use of MR imaging in the characterization of denervated muscle of the shoulder correlated with electrophysiologic studies.Design and patients. We studied with MR imaging five patients who presented with shoulder weakness and pain and who underwent electrophysiologic studies. On MR imaging the distribution of muscle edema and fatty infiltration was recorded, as was the presence of masses impinging on a regional nerve.Results. Acute/subacute denervation was best seen on T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with fat saturation, showing increased SI related to neurogenic edema. Chronic denervation was best seen on T1-weighted spin-echo images, demonstrating loss of muscle bulk and diffuse areas of increased signal intensity within the muscle. Three patients showed MR imaging and electrophysiologic findings of Parsonage Turner syndrome. One patient demonstrated an arteriovenous malformation within the spinoglenoid notch, impinging on the suprascapular nerve with associated atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle. The fifth patient demonstrated fatty atrophy of the teres minor muscle caused by compression by a cyst of the axillary nerve and electrophysiologic findings of an incomplete axillary nerve block.Conclusion. MR imaging is useful in detecting and characterizing denervation atrophy and neurogenic edema in shoulder muscles. MR imaging can provide additional information to electrophysiologic studies by estimating the age (acute/chronic) and identifying morphologic causes for shoulder pain and atrophy. (orig.)

  4. The Maastricht Ultrasound Shoulder pain trial (MUST): Ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of patients with non-chronic shoulder pain in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Ottenheijm, Ramon PG; Joore, Manuela A; Walenkamp, Geert HIM; Weijers, René E; Winkens, Bjorn; Cals, Jochen WL; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Subacromial disorders are considered to be one of the most common pathologies affecting the shoulder. Optimal therapy for shoulder pain (SP) in primary care is yet unknown, since clinical history and physical examination do not provide decisive evidence as to the patho-anatomical origin of the symptoms. Optimal decision strategies can be furthered by applying ultrasound imaging (US), an accurate method in diagnosing SP, demonstrating a clear relationship between diagnosis ...

  5. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Nikdokht [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); Bruce, Dean [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis.

  6. Time-efficient CT colonography interpretation using an advanced image-gallery-based, computer-aided ''first-reader'' workflow for the detection of colorectal adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Thomas; Ringl, Helmut; Weber, Michael; Mueller-Mang, Christina; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Wolf, Matthias; Bogoni, Luca; Salganicoff, Marcos; Raykar, Vikas; Graser, Anno

    2012-01-01

    To assess the performance of an advanced ''first-reader'' workflow for computer-aided detection (CAD) of colorectal adenomas ≥ 6 mm at computed tomographic colonography (CTC) in a low-prevalence cohort. A total of 616 colonoscopy-validated CTC patient-datasets were retrospectively reviewed by a radiologist using a ''first-reader'' CAD workflow. CAD detections were presented as galleries of six automatically generated two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images together with interactive 3D target views and 2D multiplanar views of the complete dataset. Each patient-dataset was interpreted by initially using CAD image-galleries followed by a fast 2D review to address unprompted colonic areas. Per-patient, per-polyp, and per-adenoma sensitivities were calculated for lesions ≥ 6 mm. Statistical testing employed Fisher's exact and McNemar tests. In 91/616 patients, 131 polyps (92 adenomas, 39 non-adenomas) ≥ 6 mm and two cancers were identified by reference standard. Using the CAD gallery-based first-reader workflow, the radiologist detected all adenomas ≥ 10 mm (34/34) and cancers. Per-patient and polyp sensitivities for lesions ≥ 6 mm were 84.3 % (75/89), and 83.2 % (109/131), respectively, with 89.1 % (57/64) and 85.9 % (79/92) for adenomas. Overall specificity was 95.6 % (504/527). Mean interpretation time was 3.1 min per patient. A CAD algorithm, applied in an image-gallery-based first-reader workflow, can substantially decrease reading times while enabling accurate detection of colorectal adenomas in a low-prevalence population. (orig.)

  7. Validity of ultrasonography and measures of adult shoulder function and reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using magnetic resonance imaging as a gold standard.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2010-08-01

    To assess the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in detecting inflammatory shoulder changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to determine the agreement between US and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a gold standard.

  8. Comparative diagnostic imaging of the canine shoulder joint: ultrasonography and radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, B.

    2000-11-01

    Ultrasonography of shoulder joint disease has been applied in humans for some time. In this study, the use of radiography and ultrasonography as diagnostic imaging modalities to determine shoulder joint lesions is presented. The ultrasonographic anatomy and pathology of the shoulder joint are described. Comparative radiographic and ultrasonographic findings in 67 dogs with front limb lameness and/or radiographically visible shoulder joint lesions are presented. Shoulder joint lesions include insertion tendinopathies of the supra- and infraspinatus muscles, distension of the subtendinous bursa of the infraspinatus muscle, bicipital tendinopathies, such as tendovaginitis, calcifications, partial and complete rupture, and avulsion fractures at the supraglenoid tubercle, osteochondritis dissecans, degenerative joint disease, bony proliferations in the intertuberal groove, and neoplasia of bones and soft-tissues. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of tendon abnormalities and other soft tissue lesions is a necessary supplemental examination to radiographs, which should always be the basis for orthopedic diagnostic imaging. When using both imaging techniques, the exact location of radio-opaque mineralizations can be determined and a more accurate diagnosis made. The ultrasonographic appearance of an infraspinatus muscle insertion tendinopathy in conjunction with distension of the subtendinous bursa is reported for the first time. Low-density calcifications are not visible radiographically. 6 of 17 supraspinatus insertion tendinopathies (35.3 %) and 4 of 5 bicipital tendon calcifications (80 %) were detected only with ultrasonography. Radiographic findings of bony proliferations in the intertuberal groove without signs of degenerative joint disease of the shoulder joint are indicative of severe or chronic biciptal tendon disease. In many cases, the stage and severity of cartilaginous and subchondral bone lesions with osteochondritis dissecans can be determined ultrasonographically

  9. Moderate value of non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging after non-dislocating shoulder trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Marc; Müller-Hübenthal, Jonas; Grimme, Stefan; Balke, Maurice; Bouillon, Bertil; Lefering, Rolf; Goßmann, Axel; Shafizadeh, Sven

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the value of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained in the community setting interpreted by musculoskeletal radiologists in patients with shoulder pain initiated by a single non-dislocating shoulder trauma. In 56 of 61 consecutive patients who underwent shoulder arthroscopy due to pain after a single non-dislocating shoulder trauma, the data sets of non-contrast MRI were complete. These were retrospectively interpreted by three radiologists specialized on musculoskeletal MRI who were blinded for patients' history and who did not have access to the reports of arthroscopy. Standard evaluation forms were used to assess the MRIs for superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions, anterior or posterior labrum lesions, lesions of the long head of biceps tendon (LHB) and for partial tears of the supraspinatus tendon and the upper quarter of the subscapularis tendon. Quality of the MRI was assessed by each radiologist on a four-point scale. The pooled sensitivity for the three radiologists for the detection of SLAP lesions was 45.0 %, for anterior or posterior labrum tears 77.8 and 66.7 %, for lesions of the LHB 63.2 % and for partial tears of the supraspinatus or subscapularis tendon tears 84.8 and 33.3 %. Corresponding inter-rater reliabilities were poor (SLAP lesions) to substantial (anterior labrum tears). Quality of MRI only influenced the accuracy for the detection of posterior labrum tears. A non-contrast shoulder MRI obtained in the community setting after non-dislocating shoulder trauma has a moderate sensitivity for most intraarticular pathologies when interpreted by musculoskeletal radiologists. Accuracy is dependent on the observer and not on the assessed quality. Case series, Level IV.

  10. Correlations of magnetic resonance imaging findings with clinical symptom severity and prognosis of frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Chung, Seok Won; Lee, Byung Joo; Kim, Hyung Sup; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Jeong, Won-Ju; Moon, Sung Gyu; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Yoon, Seok Tae

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the correlation between indirect magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic imaging findings and the clinical symptoms and prognosis of patients with frozen shoulder. Indirect MR arthrography was performed for 52 patients with primary frozen shoulder (mean age 55.1 ± 9.0 years) and 52 individuals without frozen shoulder (mean age 53.1 ± 10.7 years); capsular thickening and enhancement of the axillary recess as well as soft tissue thickening of the rotator interval were evaluated. Clinical symptom severity was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS Pain), simple shoulder test (SST), Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and range of motion (ROM). At 6-month follow-up, we evaluated whether MR arthrography findings correlated with the clinical symptoms and prognosis. Capsular thickening and enhancement of the axillary recess as well as soft tissue thickening of the rotator interval were significantly greater in the patient group than in the controls (p < 0.001). Capsular thickening of the axillary recess did not correlate with clinical symptoms or ROM (n.s.); however, capsular enhancement correlated with clinical symptom severity according to VAS Pain (p = 0.005), SST (p = 0.046), and ASES scores (p = 0.009). Soft tissue thickening of the rotator interval did not correlate with clinical symptom severity, but was associated with external rotation limitation (p = 0.002). However, none of the parameters correlated with clinical symptoms at 6-month follow-up. Indirect MR arthrography provided ancillary findings, especially with capsular enhancement, for evaluating clinical symptom severity of frozen shoulder, but did not reflect the prognosis. MR findings in frozen shoulder should not replace clinical judgments regarding further prognosis and treatment decisions. IV.

  11. Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your doctor might want you to have a magnetic resonance image (MRI) scan. An MRI lets your ... doctor if you can do resistance and weight-lifting exercises to help your shoulder muscles grow stronger. ...

  12. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings; Osteocondromatose sinovial no ombro: achados por metodos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda, E-mail: reticianelli@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  13. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E.; Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I.; Tsagkalis, A.; Dailiana, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  14. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E. [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Greece, Department of Medical Radiological Technologists, Athens (Greece); Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I. [University of Thessaly, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece); Tsagkalis, A. [IASO Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Larissa (Greece); Dailiana, Z. [University of Thessaly, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  15. The reliability of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging in the measurement of infraspinatus muscle function in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders of patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane; Harris, Danny; Harris, Amanda; O'Connor, Erin; Dummar, Max; Croy, Theodore; Walker, Michael; Flynn, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Rehabilitative ultrasound Imaging (RUSI) is increasingly used in the management of musculoskeletal conditions as it provides an objective measure of muscle function while being less invasive than needle electromyography. While research has documented the ability to reliably measure trunk muscles in patients with back pain, no study to date has used RUSI to quantify infraspinatus muscle function in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). The purpose of this study was to examine the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of measuring infraspinatus muscle thickness with RUSI and to compare such measures during resting versus contracted muscle states and in the symptomatic versus asymptomatic shoulders in patients with SIS. Cross-sectional, measurement study. Fifty-two participants with unilateral SIS underwent a standard baseline examination to include RUSI of the infraspinatus muscle bilaterally. Images were acquired at rest and during a submaximal isometric contraction, by two novice examiners. The isometric contraction was elicited by having prone participants externally rotate their shoulder from a position of 90° abduction into a dynamometer and hold a static force of 20 mmHg (approximately 20-30% maximal voluntary contraction). Images were captured using a standardized placement of the transducer placed just inferior to the spine of the scapula along the medial scapular border and measured off-line using Image J software (V1.38t, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland). Estimates (ICCs) for thickness measurements ranged between 0.96 and 0.98 for intra-rater reliability and between 0.87 and 0.92 for inter-rater reliability. Reliability was substantially lower (ICC = 0.43 to 0.79) for calculations of percent thickness change. The infraspinatus muscle was significantly thicker when contracted (19.1mm) than during rest (16.2mm) in both shoulders (p shoulder (p = 0.026), indicating that the change in thickness that occurred during contraction

  16. Ultrasound imaging for tailored treatment of patients with acute shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; Cals, Jochen W L; Weijers, René; Vanderdood, Kurt; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequencies of ultrasound findings in patients with acute rotator cuff disorders in family medicine. In a prospective observational study, 129 patients aged 18 to 65 years with acute shoulder pain in whom the family physician suspected rotator cuff disease underwent ultrasound imaging. Rotator cuff disease was present in 81% of the patients, and 50% of them had multiple disorders. Calcific tendonitis was the most frequently diagnosed specific disorder. An age of 40 years or older was most strongly related to rotator cuff disease. Ultrasound imaging enables family physicians to rationalize treatment in nearly all patients who are aged 40 years and older with acute shoulder pain. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  17. Comparison of supraspinatus tendon and glenohumeral joint axes in MR imaging of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibb, M.J.; Noble, D.J.; Wong, L.L.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong (China); Peh, W.C.G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. In magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the shoulder, oblique coronal images are used for evaluating the supraspinatus tendon (SST) of patients with suspected rotator cuff tear or impingement. This study aimed to compare orientation of the SST long axis with planes perpendicular to the glenohumeral joint (GHJ).Design and patients. The axial scans of 100 consecutive patients referred for MR imaging or MR arthrography of the shoulder were reviewed. Using the electronic cursors of a computer workstation, the angle of the SST long axis was measured and compared with the angle obtained through the GHJ utilizing three different landmarks: perpendicular to the joint (GHJ-90), joint-humeral head center axis (GHJ-H) and joint-scapular body axis (GHJ-S).Results. Differences in angulation between axes of the SST and the three GHJ axes averaged only about 5 [range of means 4.5-5.3 , range of standard deviation (SD) 3.8-4.6 ]. In the majority of shoulders, angular differences measured 4 or less for all SST/GHJ comparisons. Similarly, small angular differences in the three GHJ axes were found: 4.5 (SD 3.3 ) for GHJ-90/GHJ-S, 5.0 (SD 4.0 ) for GHJ-S/GHJ-H and 2.9 (SD 3.0 ) for GHJ-90/GHJ-H. Correlation between the GHJ-90 and GHJ-H axes was particularly good, with differences of 4 or less in 84% of shoulders. The orientations of the GHJ axes and that of the SST long axis are comparable.Conclusion. The GHJ may potentially be used as a landmark for obtaining oblique coronal images of the SST. (orig.)

  18. Role and Correlation of High Resolution Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of Patients with Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Thukral, Chuni Lal; Gupta, Kamlesh; Singh, Mahesh Inder; Lata, Sneh; Arora, Ram Krishan

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate of the role of high-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with shoulder pain. This prospective study included 50 patients referred for ultrasound and MRI because of shoulder pain. All patients were examined clinically, followed by radiography of the affected shoulder. High-resolution ultrasound examination of the involved shoulder was performed together with an examination of the contralateral normal shoulder, followed by MRI of the symptomatic shoulder in all 50 patients. In the present study, the majority of patients were in age group 56-65 years, 56% were males and 44% were females (of a total of 50 patients). A total of 40 patients were diagnosed as having rotator cuff tears on ultrasound (USG) and MRI. USG showed complete-thickness tears in 25 patients and partial-thickness tears in 15 patients. MRI detected 28 complete- and 12 partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. In the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, the strength of agreement between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging was good (kappa coefficient=0.79). Ultrasonography of the shoulder shows promising results in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and in differentiating partial from complete tears. A wide availability, cost effectiveness and better tolerability of ultrasonography make it a modality of first choice for evaluating rotator cuff tears.

  19. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20

  20. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyunghee Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20.

  1. West Indian Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsaran, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews the poetry of Derek Walcott, a native of the West Indies, whose new volume 'Another Life' more resembles the poet-artists commentary on a gallery of scenes and portraits in Melvin Tolson's 'The Harlem Gallery' than anything else that has come from the English speaking Caribbean in the post-war period. (Author/JM)

  2. An assessment of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Blanchard, T.K.; Dixon, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To analyse and compare all papers published to date (August 2000) that quantify the effectiveness, defined as the impact of clinician's diagnosis or management plans, or patient outcome, of MRI of the shoulder.Design. A computerised search of Index Medicus with a broad search strategy relating to shoulder MRI was performed. Manual assessment of all papers listed was undertaken with classification of each paper depending on whether it addressed questions of (1) technical performance, (2) diagnostic performance or (3) outcome.Results. Four of 265 qualifying papers addressed aspects of effectiveness and these were reviewed. The impact on the clinician's diagnosis varied widely between papers: the primary diagnosis was altered in 23% to 68% of cases, and the management plans were subsequently changed in 15% to 61% of cases. Only one paper addressed the impact on patient health.Conclusions. The effectiveness of MRI of the shoulder depends on the clinical skills of the referring clinician and prevalence of disease in the study population. This will have implications when the effectiveness of an imaging technique between different institutions is compared, and this in turn will influence any comparisons of cost-effectiveness. (orig.)

  3. Clinically significant skeletal variations of the shoulder and the wrist: role of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M.; Sauri, A. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Carrer Doctor Mallafre Guasch, 4, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Calmet, J.; Domenech, S. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Carrer Doctor Mallafre Guasch, 4, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Several skeletal variations of the upper extremity may cause painful conditions or precipitate early degenerative changes, either spontaneously or in response to overuse and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging has proved particularly useful for accurate interpretation of many of these clinically significant skeletal variations; however, the widespread use of MR imaging may have contributed to over-emphasizing their clinical importance, which is still controversial in many cases. We review, illustrate, and discuss clinically significant skeletal variations of the upper extremity as seen on MR images, particularly those involving the shoulder and the wrist. In the shoulder region, we evaluate variations of acromial and coracoid processes as well as variations and minor dysplastic deformities of the glenoid fossa. We also review different skeletal variations of the carpal region, including ulnar variance, ulnar styloid, lunate morphology, carpal coalition, and carpal accessory ossicles. The role of MR imaging in assessing the clinical importance of such conditions, whether potential, controversial, or well established, is emphasized in this review. (orig.)

  4. Shoulder impingement syndrome: diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.P.; Chandnani, V.P.; Baird, D.E.; Deberardino, T.M.; Swenson, G.W.; Hansen, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is commonly encountered in orthopaedics. In a blinded retrospective study, magnetic resonance imaging and roentgenographic signs in 41 patients with clinical signs of impingement syndrome were compared with 40 control patients. Statistically significant differences between the groups included the absence of subacromial fat, as well as the presence of a supraspinatus tear, subacromial osteophytes, and a decreased coracohumeral distance. Other signs reported to occur in patients with impingement syndrome did not vary significantly in the population studied. 20 refs., 12 figs

  5. Rapid acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder using three-dimensional fast spin echo sequence with compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging with compressed sensing (CS) for the assessment of shoulder. Twenty-nine patients who underwent shoulder MRI including image sets of axial 3D-FSE sequence without CS and with CS, using an acceleration factor of 1.5, were included. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Two musculoskeletal radiologists compared image quality of 3D-FSE sequences without CS and with CS, and scored the qualitative agreement between sequences, using a five-point scale. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was evaluated. The acquisition time of 3D-FSE MRI was reduced using CS (3min 23s vs. 2min 22s). Quantitative evaluations showed a significant correlation between the two sequences (r=0.872-0.993, p<0.05) and SSIM was in an acceptable range (0.940-0.993; mean±standard deviation, 0.968±0.018). Qualitative image quality showed good to excellent agreement between 3D-FSE images without CS and with CS. Diagnostic agreement for pathologic shoulder lesions between the two sequences was very good (κ=0.915-1). The 3D-FSE sequence with CS is feasible in evaluating the shoulder joint with reduced scan time compared to 3D-FSE without CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff: the correlation between pain and imaging features in symptomatic and asymptomatic female shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Valerio; Consonni, Olmo; Maiorano, Emanuele; Meroni, Roberto; Goddi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    To provide new epidemiological data regarding the prevalence, distribution and macroscopic features of shoulder rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (calcific tendinopathy), and to identify the characteristics of calcific deposits associated with shoulder pain. Three hundred and two female volunteers (604 shoulders) who had been referred to a gynaecological clinic participated in the study. The subjects underwent a high-resolution ultrasonography of both shoulders, and those with a diagnosis of calcific tendinopathy compiled a standardized questionnaire relating to shoulder symptoms. We determined the prevalence of symptomatic and asymptomatic rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, and compared differences in distribution and macroscopic features of the symptomatic and asymptomatic calcifications. The prevalence of calcific tendinopathy was 17.8% (103 shoulders). Ninety-five shoulders (15.7%) were symptomatic; of these, calcific tendinopathy was found in 34 shoulders (33%) on imaging. Of the 509 asymptomatic (84.3%) shoulders, calcific tendinopathy was observed in 69 cases (67%). Among tendons, supraspinatus (53.4%) and infraspinatus (54.6%) were the most frequently involved. The majority of calcific deposits were of maximum diameter between 2 and 5 mm (77.9%), and were linear in form (69.9%). The involvement of multiple tendons and a location in the supraspinatus tendon were found to be significantly correlated with pain (p = 0.023, p = 0.043 respectively), as were age (p = 0.041) and an excessive body mass index (p = 0.024). In this sample from the general population of working age females, both intrinsic factors (location in supraspinatus, multiple tendon involvement) and extrinsic variables (age, abnormally high BMI) were correlated with pain in calcific tendinopathy. Level III, cross-sectional study, prevalence study.

  7. Diagnostic sensitivity of radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Corey R; Cook, Cristi R; Cook, James L

    2015-01-01

    Radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography are commonly used for diagnosis of shoulder osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans (OC/OCD) in dogs, however there is a lack of published information on the relative diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities for detecting shoulder OC/OCD in a group of dogs, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Inclusion criteria were history and clinical findings consistent with osteochondrosis and/or osteochondritis dissecans involving at least one shoulder. With informed client consent, both shoulders for all included dogs were examined using standardized radiography, ultrasonography, MRI, and arthroscopy protocols. One of three veterinary surgeons recorded clinical and arthroscopic findings without knowledge of diagnostic imaging findings. One of two veterinary radiologists recorded diagnostic imaging findings without knowledge of clinical and arthroscopic findings. Eighteen client-owned dogs (n = 36 shoulders) met inclusion criteria. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (correct classification rate) values for detecting presence or absence of shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans were as follows: radiography (88.5%, 90%, 88.9%), ultrasonography (92%, 60%, 82.6%), and MRI (96%, 88.9%, 94.4%). Odds of a correct diagnosis for MRI were 3.2 times more than ultrasonography and two times more than radiography. For MRI detection of lesions, the sagittal T2 or PD-FAT SAT sequences were considered to be most helpful. For radiographic detection of lesions, the additional supinated-mediolateral and pronated-mediolateral projections were considered to be most helpful. Findings from the current study support more evidence-based diagnostic imaging recommendations for dogs with clinically suspected shoulder osteochondrosis or osteochondritis dissecans. © 2014 American College of

  8. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in elite swimmers’ shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Celliers

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess clinically relevant MRI findings in the shoulders of symptomatic and asymptomatic elite swimmers. Method: Twenty (aged 16–23 years elite swimmers completed questionnaires on their swimming training, pain and shoulder function. MRI of both shoulders (n = 40 were performed and all swimmers were given a standardised clinical shoulder examination. Results: Both shoulders of 11 male and 9 female elite swimmers (n = 40 were examined. Eleven of the 40 shoulders were clinically symptomatic and 29 were asymptomatic. The most common clinical finding in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders was impingement during internal rotation, with impingement in 54.5% of the symptomatic shoulders and in 31.0% of the asymptomatic shoulders. The most common MRI findings in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders were supraspinatus tendinosis (45.5% vs. 20.7%, subacromial subdeltoid fluid (45.5% vs. 34.5%, increased signal in the AC Joint (45.5% vs. 37.9% and AC joint arthrosis (36.4% vs. 34.5%. Thirty-nine (97.5% of the shoulders showed abnormal MRI features. Conclusion: MRI findings in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders of young elite swimmers are similar and care should be taken when reporting shoulder MRIs in these athletes. Asymptomatic shoulders demonstrate manifold MRI abnormalities that may be radiologically significant but appear not to be clinically significant.

  9. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  10. Pompton Lakes Photo Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    This gallery provides representative photographs of the soil removal and dredging operations within the Pompton Lake Study Area (PLSA) performed starting in 2016 through the present. It will be periodically updated in conjunction with the progress of the

  11. Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery is an extensive collection of over 2,600 high- and moderate-resolution photographs produced by all five of the Lunar Orbiter...

  12. High volume image guided injections and structured rehabilitation in shoulder impingement syndrome: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Ghozlan, Asser; Price, Jessica; Perry, John; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the aim was to establish the effect of a high volume-image guided injection and structured rehabilitation (HVIGI&SR) on both pain and function in shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Methods 44 participants treated between January 2008 and January 2012 with a >3 month history of recalcitrant ultrasound-confirmed SIS were sent a retrospective questionnaire. All participants had received a HVIGI under ultrasound-guidance consisting of 20 mls of Marcaine with 50 mg of hydrocortisone, followed by a period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation. The validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score was used to establish the change in the score between 1 week pre-injection and 3 weeks post-injection, along with an 11-point pain scale. Results 59% of participants responded. There was a clinically and statistically significant decrease in the SPADI score of 58.7 ± 29.9 (p<0.01). 76% of participants had an improvement in their score of over 50% from their initial score. There was a clinically and statistically significant improvement in pain of 5.19 ± 2.62 (p<0.01) on the numerical rating scale of pain. Conclusion HVIGI&SR should be considered for short-term treatment of SIS as it showed a significant improvement in both pain and function. A prolonged period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation can then be undertaken for long term benefits. PMID:26605194

  13. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement; Bildgebende Diagnostik des Schultergelenkes bei Impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merl, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weinhardt, H. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Oettl, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Lenz, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Riel, K.A. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage. [Deutsch] Die Magnetresonanztomographie hat sich in den letzten Jahren zur Methode der Wahl in der Diagnostik der Gelenke entwickelt, sie erlaubt neben der Abbildung aller knoechernen auch die Abbildung aller Weichteilelemente eines Gelenkes. Auch in der Diagnostik der Schultergelenkserkrankungen besitzt die Magnetresonanztomographie einen festen Stellenwert mit hoher diagnostischer Treffsicherheit in der Beurteilung der Rotatorenmanschette, als MR-Arthrographie auch in der Beurteilung der Instabilitaet bzw von Laesionen des labrokapsulaeren Komplexes. In der Bewertung frueher Stadien des Impingement ist die klassische Magnetresonanztomographie als statische Methode auf indirekte Zeichen angewiesen, die in vielen Faellen nicht ausreichende Sicherheit bieten und dem funktionellen Charakter des Krankheitsbildes nicht ausreichend Rechnung tragen. Hier koennte die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie unter Abbildung des Arms in Abduktion und Rotation eine

  14. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound.

  15. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  16. National Gallery in Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikeš, Stanislav; Haindl, Michal; Holub, Radek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, č. 86 (2011), s. 23-24 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG11009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : virtrual reality * information system Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/RO/haindl-national gallery in prague.pdf

  17. The Maastricht Ultrasound Shoulder pain trial (MUST: Ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of patients with non-chronic shoulder pain in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cals Jochen WL

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial disorders are considered to be one of the most common pathologies affecting the shoulder. Optimal therapy for shoulder pain (SP in primary care is yet unknown, since clinical history and physical examination do not provide decisive evidence as to the patho-anatomical origin of the symptoms. Optimal decision strategies can be furthered by applying ultrasound imaging (US, an accurate method in diagnosing SP, demonstrating a clear relationship between diagnosis and available therapies. Yet, the clinical cost-effectiveness of applying US in the management of SP in primary care has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and methods of a trial assessing the cost-effectiveness of ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of primary care patients with non-chronic shoulder pain. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial (RCT will involve 226 adult patients with suspected subacromial disorders recruited by general practitioners. During a Qualification period of two weeks, patients receive care as usual as advised by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, and patients are referred for US. Patients with insufficient improvement qualify for the RCT. These patients are then randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. The therapies used in both groups are the same (corticosteroid injections, referral to a physiotherapist or orthopedic surgeon except that therapies used in the intervention group will be tailored based on the US results. Ultrasound diagnosed disorders include tendinopathy, calcific tendinitis, partial and full thickness tears, and subacromial bursitis. The primary outcome is patient-perceived recovery at 52 weeks, using the Global Perceived Effect questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are disease specific and generic quality of life, cost-effectiveness, and the adherence to the initial applied treatment. Outcome measures will be assessed

  18. Annotating Fine Art Images

    OpenAIRE

    Isemann, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The project's objective is to work with art galleries to help them find innovative ways of indexing images, especially by having automatically created and updated thesauri. National Gallery of Ireland Douglas Hyde Gallery Trinity Long Room Hub

  19. Separated Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ligaments that hold your collarbone (clavicle) to your shoulder blade. In a mild separated shoulder, the ligaments might ... the ligaments that hold your collarbone to your shoulder blade. Risk factors Participating in contact sports, such as ...

  20. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This condition is called rotator cuff tendinitis or bursitis. Shoulder pain may also be caused by: Arthritis ... shoulder joint Bone spurs in the shoulder area Bursitis , which is inflammation of a fluid-filled sac ( ...

  1. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bankart lesion; Shoulder repair; Shoulder surgery; Rotator cuff repair ... tissues include the cartilage, bones, tendons, and ligaments. ... in a muscle, tendon, or cartilage is fixed. Any damaged tissue ...

  2. Imaging of the coracoglenoid ligament: a third ligament in the rotator interval of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappia, Marcello [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Varelli Institute, Naples (Italy); Castagna, Alessandro [Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Barile, Antonio [University of L' Aquila, Applied Clinical Science and Biotechnology, L' Aquila (Italy); Chianca, Vito [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Brunese, Luca [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Pouliart, Nicole [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Basic Biomedical Sciences - Human Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-08-15

    The coracoglenoid ligament (CGL) forms part of the anterosuperior capsuloligamentous complex of the shoulder. Although it has received attention in the anatomical literature, it has not been investigated on imaging. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage value and the interobserver agreement of identification and classification of the CGL on MR and MR arthrography (MRA) imaging. Retrospectively, 280 MR and 150 MRA examinations were evaluated for detection of the CGL by two musculoskeletal radiologists. On the MRA examinations the CGL configuration in relation to the superior glenohumeral (SGHL) and coracohumeral ligament (CHL) was classified into five types. Additionally, the percentage of intra-articular appearance of the CGL and its mean thickness value were calculated. Finally, a possible correlation between pathological condition and anatomical type was evaluated on MRA. The CGL could be identified in 56%/54% of MRI and in 76%/77% of MRA examinations. On MRA, the CGL was detected as distinct structures in 37%/35% of cases and it appeared fused (partially or totally) with the SGHL and/or CHL in 39%/42%; it was absent in 12%/12% and it appears undistinguishable in the remaining cases. The interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.98 for detection on MRI; p = 0.927 for classification of anterosuperior anatomy on MRA; κ = 0.873 and 0.978 for identification on sagittal and axial external rotation MRA respectively; κ = 0.943 for classification as intra- or extra-articular on MRA). The CGL can be reliably identified on MRI and MRA. (orig.)

  3. A before and after study of the impact of academic detailing on the use of diagnostic imaging for shoulder complaints in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gialamas Angela

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the impact that Academic Detailing (AD had on General Practitioners' use of diagnostic imaging for shoulder complaints in general practice and their knowledge and confidence to manage shoulder pain. Methods One-to-one Academic Detailing (AD for management of shoulder pain was delivered to 87 General Practitioners (GPs in metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia, together with locally developed clinical guidelines and a video/DVD on how to examine the shoulder. Three months after the initial AD a further small group or an individual follow up session was offered. A 10-item questionnaire to assess knowledge about the shoulders was administered before, immediately after, and 3 months after AD, together with questions to assess confidence to manage shoulder complaints. The number of requests for plain film (X-ray and ultrasound (US imaging of the shoulder was obtained for the intervention group as well as a random comparison group of 90 GP's from the same two Divisions. The change in the rate of requests was assessed using a log Poisson GEE with adjustment for clustering at the practice level. A linear mixed effects model was used to analyse changes in knowledge. Results In an average week 54% of GPs reported seeing fewer than 6 patients with shoulder problems. Mean (SD GP knowledge score before, immediately after and 3-months after AD, was 6.2/10 (1.5; 8.6/10 (0.96 and; 7.2/10 (1.5 respectively (p Conclusion These results provide evidence that AD together with education materials and guidelines can improve GPs' knowledge and confidence to manage shoulder problems and reduce the use of imaging, at least in the short term.

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  5. The effectiveness of diagnostic imaging methods for the assessment of soft tissue and articular disorders of the shoulder and elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, M. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: Maryam@shahabpour.uzbrussel; Kichouh, M.; Laridon, E. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Gielen, J.L. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Universiteit Antwerpen, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem (Belgium); De Mey, J. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    There are no clear guidelines for diagnostic imaging of articular and soft tissue pathologies of the shoulder and elbow. Several methods are used, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and ultrasound (US). Their cost-effectiveness is still unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of the relevant literature and discussed the role of MR imaging of the shoulder and elbow compared with other diagnostic imaging modalities. For the shoulder impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, MRI and US have a comparable accuracy for detection of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. MRA and US might be more accurate for the detection of partial-thickness tears than MRI. Given the large difference in cost of MR and US, ultrasound may be the most cost-effective diagnostic method for identification of full-thickness tears in a specialist hospital setting (Evidence level 3). Both MRA and CT arthrography (CTA) are effective methods for the detection of labrum tears. More recently, multidetector CTA has offered the advantages of thinner slices than with MRA in a shorter examination time. Still, MRA has the advantage towards CTA to directly visualize the affected structures with a better evaluation of extent and location and to detect associated capsuloligamentous injuries. For the elbow pathologies, plain MRI or MRA have the advantage towards CTA to detect occult bone injuries. CTA is better for the assessment of the thin cartilage of the elbow. Both US and MRI are reliable methods to detect chronic epicondylitis; US is more available and far more cost-effective (Evidence level 2). MRA can differentiate complete from partial tears of the medial collateral ligament. US or MRI can detect partial and complete biceps tendon tears and/or bursitis. MRI can provide important diagnostic information in lesions of the ulnar, radial, or median nerve.

  6. The effectiveness of diagnostic imaging methods for the assessment of soft tissue and articular disorders of the shoulder and elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahabpour, M.; Kichouh, M.; Laridon, E.; Gielen, J.L.; De Mey, J.

    2008-01-01

    There are no clear guidelines for diagnostic imaging of articular and soft tissue pathologies of the shoulder and elbow. Several methods are used, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and ultrasound (US). Their cost-effectiveness is still unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of the relevant literature and discussed the role of MR imaging of the shoulder and elbow compared with other diagnostic imaging modalities. For the shoulder impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, MRI and US have a comparable accuracy for detection of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. MRA and US might be more accurate for the detection of partial-thickness tears than MRI. Given the large difference in cost of MR and US, ultrasound may be the most cost-effective diagnostic method for identification of full-thickness tears in a specialist hospital setting (Evidence level 3). Both MRA and CT arthrography (CTA) are effective methods for the detection of labrum tears. More recently, multidetector CTA has offered the advantages of thinner slices than with MRA in a shorter examination time. Still, MRA has the advantage towards CTA to directly visualize the affected structures with a better evaluation of extent and location and to detect associated capsuloligamentous injuries. For the elbow pathologies, plain MRI or MRA have the advantage towards CTA to detect occult bone injuries. CTA is better for the assessment of the thin cartilage of the elbow. Both US and MRI are reliable methods to detect chronic epicondylitis; US is more available and far more cost-effective (Evidence level 2). MRA can differentiate complete from partial tears of the medial collateral ligament. US or MRI can detect partial and complete biceps tendon tears and/or bursitis. MRI can provide important diagnostic information in lesions of the ulnar, radial, or median nerve

  7. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Chur (Switzerland); Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Schroeder, Michael [Center for Sports Orthopedics and Medicine, Orthosportiv, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, Andreas B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. (orig.)

  8. Design and application of combined 8-channel transmit and 10-channel receive arrays and radiofrequency shimming for 7-T shoulder magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan; Deniz, Cem Murat; Zhang, Bei; Chang, Gregory; Sodickson, Daniel K; Wiggins, Graham C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of 7-T shoulder magnetic resonance imaging by developing transmit and receive radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays and exploring RF shim methods. A mechanically flexible 8-channel transmit array and an anatomically conformable 10-channel receive array were designed and implemented. The transmit performance of various RF shim methods was assessed through local flip angle measurements in the right and left shoulders of 6 subjects. The receive performance was assessed through signal-to-noise ratio measurements using the developed 7-T coil and a baseline commercial 3-T coil. The 7-T transmit array driven with phase-coherent RF shim weights provided adequate B₁⁺ efficiency and uniformity for turbo spin echo shoulder imaging. B₁⁺ twisting that is characteristic of high-field loop coils necessitates distinct RF shim weights in the right and left shoulders. The 7-T receive array provided a 2-fold signal-to-noise ratio improvement over the 3-T array in the deep articular shoulder cartilage. Shoulder imaging at 7-T is feasible with a custom transmit/receive array either in a single-channel transmit mode with a fixed RF shim or in a parallel transmit mode with a subject-specific RF shim.

  9. Dislocated Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seek prompt medical attention. Most people regain full shoulder function within a few weeks. However, once you've ... in your neck or down your arm. The muscles in your shoulder may spasm from the disruption, often increasing the ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings after shoulder surgery: What the radiologist needs to know; Besonderheiten der Magnetresonanztomographie nach operativer Schulterintervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahlenkamp, U.L.; Hermann, K.G.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite - Campus Mitte, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Gerhardt, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite - Campus Mitte, Centrum fuer muskuloskeletale Chirurgie, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Even primary diagnostic evaluation of the shoulder is a challenge for radiologists. Many imaging findings that definitely indicate abnormal findings in the untreated shoulder should be evaluated carefully in postoperative patients. Artifacts caused by implants or metal abrasion pose considerable problems in postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Classic approaches to minimizing artifacts caused by foreign bodies include using turbo spin echo sequences, increasing bandwidth, and reducing voxel size. In recent years, several vendors have developed dedicated pulse sequences for reducing metal artifacts. Different postoperative imaging findings will be encountered, depending on the kind of surgery done. This review article describes typical postoperative MRI findings, focusing on subacromial decompression, reconstruction of the rotator cuff, labrum procedures, and biceps tenodesis. (orig.) [German] Das Schultergelenk stellt fuer jeden Radiologen bereits in der primaeren Diagnostik eine Herausforderung dar. Viele Bildbefunde, welche bei einer nicht therapierten Schulter als eindeutig pathologisch zu bewerten sind, muessen im postoperativen Setting als kritisch bewertet werden. Artefakte durch Implantate oder Metallabrieb stellen eine grosse Huerde der postoperativen Magnetresonanztomographie dar. Klassische Methoden, um Artefakte durch Fremdmaterial so gering wie moeglich zu halten, bestehen in der Anwendung von Turbo-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen sowie in der Erhoehung der Bandbreite oder der Reduktion der Voxelgroesse. Mittlerweile haben einige Anbieter jedoch spezielle Sequenzen zur Reduktion von Metallartefakten entwickelt. In Abhaengigkeit von der erfolgten Schulteroperation muessen verschiedene Bildbefunde beruecksichtigt werden. Dieser Uebersichtsartikel geht insbesondere auf die subakromiale Dekompression, die Rekonstruktion der Rotatorenmanschette, Operationen am Labrum sowie Bizepstenodesen ein und beschreibt typische postoperative Befunde. (orig.)

  11. Acute shoulder injury with a normal x-ray: a simple algorithm of patient assessment to guide the need for further imaging

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Rourke, S

    2012-09-20

    Purpose: Patients presenting to their General Practitioner or to the Emergency Department following an acute shoulder injury but a normal x-ray may have a significant underlying injury to the Rotator Cuff. Imaging (whether by ultrasound or MRI) is often indicated but available clinical evidence has yet to establish what group of patients benefit most from early imaging.\\r\

  12. Shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a frequent complaint encountered in the emergency setting. A brief review of shoulder anatomy and physical examination sets the foundation for evaluation of shoulder pain. Considerations of patient's age are helpful to predict injuries. Fractured clavicles are often seen in traumatic injuries in children and young adults, whereas fractures of the humeral head are more often seen in the elderly from traumatic injuries. Shoulder dislocations are more common in teens to fourth decade. This article reviews specific acute injuries, chronic conditions, and radiologic considerations of patients with shoulder complaints encountered in emergency settings.

  13. Gallery | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Home; ·; About; ·; Speakers; ·; Schedule; ·; Gallery · Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences; Info for Participants; ·; Downloads; ·; Contact Us. © 2017 Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru.

  14. Gallery | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Home; ·; About; ·; Speakers; ·; Schedule; ·; Gallery; Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences; Info for Participants; ·; Downloads; ·; Contact Us. © 2016 Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru.

  15. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: value of inferior glenohumeral ligament signal changes on T2-weighted fat-saturated images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro A; Balaj, Clémence; Chanson, Anne; Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain

    2012-06-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the performance of MRI for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis using signal intensity changes of the inferior glenohumeral ligament on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences. MR images of 34 shoulders with a final clinical diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis were compared with those of an age-matched control group (34 shoulders) with no clinical signs of adhesive capsulitis. MR images were acquired before and after IV injection of gadolinium and were evaluated by two readers. The T2 signal intensity at the inferior glenohumeral ligament, the thickness of the coracohumeral ligament, and whether there was obliteration of subcoracoid fat were evaluated on unenhanced images. Enhancement at the inferior glenohumeral ligament and enhancement at the rotator interval were evaluated on contrast-enhanced images. The sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver variability of these signs were calculated. T2 hyperintensity of the inferior glenohumeral ligament showed a high sensitivity (85.3-88.2%) and high specificity (88.2%) for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis with excellent interobserver variability (κ = 0.85). Signal analysis at the inferior glenohumeral ligament presented a higher sensitivity and a better interobserver agreement than the other signs of adhesive capsulitis evaluated. Gadolinium injection did not increase the performance of the inferior glenohumeral ligament signal analysis. An extracapsular hyperintense layer on T2-weighted images was identified as a new sign of adhesive capsulitis. T2 capsular signal intensity change offers a high performance for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis without the need for IV or intraarticular contrast injection.

  16. The reverse shoulder prosthesis: a review of imaging features and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, Edward G.; Sanguanjit, Prakasit; Tasaki, Atsushi; Keyurapan, Ekavit; Fishman, Elliot K.; Fayad, Laura M.

    2006-01-01

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis is a prosthesis that has been in clinical use in Europe since 1985 and was approved for use in the United States in 2004. This unique prosthesis has a baseplate attached to the glenoid, which holds a spherical component, while the humeral component includes a polyethylene insert that is flat. This design is the ''reverse'' configuration of that seen with a conventional arthroplasty, in which the spherical component is part of the humeral component. The indications for the reverse prosthesis are: (1) painful arthritis associated with irreparable rotator cuff tears (cuff tear arthropathy), (2) failed hemiarthroplasty with irreparable rotator cuff tears, (3) pseudoparalysis due to massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears, (4) some reconstructions after tumor resection, and (5) some fractures of the shoulder not repairable or reconstructable with other techniques. This prosthesis can produce a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in function for most of the indications mentioned. However, the unique configuration and the challenge of its insertion can result in a high incidence of a wide variety of unusual complications. Some of these complications, such as dislocation of the components, are similar to conventional shoulder replacement. Other complications, such as notching of the scapula and acromial stress fractures, are unique to this prosthesis. (orig.)

  17. The reverse shoulder prosthesis: a review of imaging features and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, Edward G.; Sanguanjit, Prakasit; Tasaki, Atsushi [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Lutherville, MD (United States); Keyurapan, Ekavit [Mahidol University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bangkok (Thailand); Fishman, Elliot K.; Fayad, Laura M. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2006-07-15

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis is a prosthesis that has been in clinical use in Europe since 1985 and was approved for use in the United States in 2004. This unique prosthesis has a baseplate attached to the glenoid, which holds a spherical component, while the humeral component includes a polyethylene insert that is flat. This design is the ''reverse'' configuration of that seen with a conventional arthroplasty, in which the spherical component is part of the humeral component. The indications for the reverse prosthesis are: (1) painful arthritis associated with irreparable rotator cuff tears (cuff tear arthropathy), (2) failed hemiarthroplasty with irreparable rotator cuff tears, (3) pseudoparalysis due to massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears, (4) some reconstructions after tumor resection, and (5) some fractures of the shoulder not repairable or reconstructable with other techniques. This prosthesis can produce a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in function for most of the indications mentioned. However, the unique configuration and the challenge of its insertion can result in a high incidence of a wide variety of unusual complications. Some of these complications, such as dislocation of the components, are similar to conventional shoulder replacement. Other complications, such as notching of the scapula and acromial stress fractures, are unique to this prosthesis. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of muscle thickness of the serratus anterior and lower trapezius using ultrasound imaging in competitive recreational adult swimmers, with and without current shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Leanda J; de Ronde, Mandy; Le, Minyang; Burke, William; Graves, Anna; Williams, Sian A

    2018-02-01

    To compare serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle thickness between swimmers with and without current shoulder pain, and between sides when measured by real-time ultrasound imaging. A single blinded age and gender-matched case-control study with 26 symptomatic and 26 asymptomatic recreational swimmers. Muscle thickness of serratus anterior and lower trapezius were measured using previously validated real-time ultrasound imaging protocols. Serratus anterior thickness was measured in side lying with 90° of glenohumeral flexion at rest and during a scapular protraction contraction. Lower trapezius thickness was measured in prone with 145° of glenohumeral abduction whilst at rest and when holding the weight of the arm. There was no statistically significant difference between the muscle thickness of serratus anterior and lower trapezius between the symptomatic shoulder and the dominance-matched shoulder in the asymptomatic group of swimmers. There was also no significant difference in muscle thickness between the symptomatic side and asymptomatic side within the symptomatic group. There appears to be no difference in serratus anterior and lower trapezius thickness between swimmers who have mild to moderate shoulder pain, who continue to swim and those who do not have shoulder pain. When imaging the serratus anterior and lower trapezius in swimmers with mild shoulder pain, clinicians should expect no differences between sides. If muscle thickness differences between sides are detected in recreational swimmers, this may indicate that the swimmer is participating in other asymmetrical activities or has a higher level of shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement? Evaluating the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament by ultrasound speckle tracking imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and one cause of rotator cuff disease. We aimed to identify which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement by measuring the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament using ultrasound speckle tracking imaging. Sixteen shoulders without shoulder disability were enrolled. All subjects were men, and the average age was 28.6 years. The vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament were analyzed by the motion tracing program during the following active assisted motions (active motion controlled by the examiner): (1) forward flexion in the scapular plane, (2) horizontal abduction in the axial plane, (3) external rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (ER0), (4) internal rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (IR0), (5) internal rotation with the arm at 90° abduction (IR90), and (6) internal rotation at the back (IRB). The mean vertical displacement of the coracoacromial ligament during forward flexion (2.2 mm), horizontal abduction (2.2 mm), and IR90 (2.4 mm) was significantly greater than that during the other motions (ER0, -0.7 mm; IR0, 0.5 mm; IRB, 1.0 mm; P impingement. It is recommended that patients with impingement syndrome or a repaired rotator cuff avoid these shoulder motions. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Promenade Among Words and Things: The Gallery as Catalogue, the Catalogue as Gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Lending

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the mid nineteenth century new casting techniques allowed for the production of huge architectural fragments. Well-selected collections could ideally display perfect series in galleries in which the visitor could wander among monuments and experience architecture history on full scale. The disembodied material of plaster was considered capable of embodying a number of modern historical taxonomies and aesthetical programs, most importantly chronology, comparison, style, and evolution. Veritable showcases of historicism, the casts could illustrate in spatial arrangements new conceptions on the history, contemporaneity and future of architecture. Plaster cast became a main medium in which to publish antiquities as novelties for grand audiences, taking the printed and published beyond the two-dimensional space of words and images. However, due to the increasing market of casts and their sheere size and weight, the reproductions as mounted in the galleries often behaved as unruly as architecture does outside curatorial control. In the end only the catalogues, the paper versions of these imaginary museums were capable to create the orders that their plaster referents constantly aspired to destroy. An important chapter in the history of the architecture museum these plaster monuments belong to a part of architectural print culture in which catalogues were curated and galleries edited. Metaphors drawn from the realm of writing saturated the discourse on the display of casts. Images and texts fluctuated and the image-objects were compared to books, paper, pages, documents and libraries but above all to illustrations inviting promenades in time and space.

  1. Whispering gallery mode sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Swaim, Jon D.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of sensor technology exploiting optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances. After a short introduction we begin by detailing the fundamental principles and theory of WGMs in optical microcavities and the transduction mechanisms frequently employed for sensing purposes. Key recent theoretical contributions to the modeling and analysis of WGM systems are highlighted. Subsequently we review the state of the art of WGM sensors by outlining efforts made to date to improve current detection limits. Proposals in this vein are numerous and range, for example, from plasmonic enhancements and active cavities to hybrid optomechanical sensors, which are already working in the shot noise limited regime. In parallel to furthering WGM sensitivity, efforts to improve the time resolution are beginning to emerge. We therefore summarize the techniques being pursued in this vein. Ultimately WGM sensors aim for real-world applications, such as measurements of force and temperature, or alternatively gas and biosensing. Each such application is thus reviewed in turn, and important achievements are discussed. Finally, we adopt a more forward-looking perspective and discuss the outlook of WGM sensors within both a physical and biological context and consider how they may yet push the detection envelope further. PMID:26973759

  2. Synovial response to intraarticular injections of hyaluronate in frozen shoulder. A quantitative assessment with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Kazuya; Mashitori, Hirotaka; Ohno, Wataru; Hamada, Jun'ichiro; Sakai, Hiroya; Saotome, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the response of frozen shoulder (FS) to intraarticular injections of high-molecular-weight sodium hyaluronate (HA), a mixture of 2.5 ml of HA and 1.5 ml of 1% lidocaine was injected into the glenohumeral joint of 11 patients with FS, 8 of whom received five weekly injections. The patients were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score (JOA score) before the first injection, 1 week after the first injection, and 1 week after the final injection. Following each clinical evaluation, the patients underwent dynamic magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with Gd-DTPA, and the coefficient of enhancement (CE) in the glenohumeral synovium was calculated, with the examiners blinded to the clinical information. The JOA score tended to be greater and the CE smaller after injection than before injection. The changes in the CE following both single and repeated injections were negatively correlated with changes in the JOA score. Thus, clinical improvement in patients with FS was associated with a decrease in the CE. Because the CE depends on the degree of synovitis, the therapeutic effect of intraarticular HA injection for FS results, at least in part, from suppression of synovitis in the glenohumeral joint through an antiinflammatory effect. (author)

  3. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.; Krogsgaard, M.; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  4. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  5. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as shown on an x-ray. Selection of treatment depends upon the patient’s activity level, the location of the fracture and the severity of the fracture. Recovery Shoulder fractures may leave a patient with permanent shoulder stiffness, regardless of ...

  6. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  7. Shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, William

    2013-03-01

    The frequency of shoulder dystocia in different reports has varied, ranging 0.2-3% of all vaginal deliveries. Once a shoulder dystocia occurs, even if all actions are appropriately taken, there is an increased frequency of complications, including third- or fourth-degree perineal lacerations, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Health care providers have a poor ability to predict shoulder dystocia for most patients and there remains no commonly accepted model to accurately predict this obstetric emergency. Consequently, optimal management of shoulder dystocia requires appropriate management at the time it occurs. Multiple investigators have attempted to enhance care of shoulder dystocia by utilizing protocols and simulation training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in children with brachial plexus birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudinchet, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Maeder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Oberson, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Schnyder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Five patients suffering from Erb-Duchenne brachial plexus birth palsy were prospectively studied with MRI. A group of 11 healthy children was used as a control to understand the MRI anatomy of the normal growing glenohumeral joint. A hypoplastic and flattened posterior part of the glenoid fossa and a blunt posterior labrum were found in all patients. Four patients had a blunt anterior labrum and a flattened humeral head. Three patients presented with a posterior subluxation of the humeral head. These results suggest that MRI provides a non-ionising and non-invasive method of demonstrating the early abnormalities of the shoulder associated with obstetrical brachial plexus paralysis, which may prompt orthopaedic correction. (orig.)

  9. Medical image of the week: urothelial carcinoma with pulmonary metastases presenting with shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrett B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 68 year old man with a past medical history significant only for mild hyperlipidemia and distant cigar smoking presented to this primary physician’s office with a chief complaint of left sided shoulder pain for more than 6 months duration. His only other complaint was a hacking morning cough that was attributed to GERD after resolution with omperazole therapy. He was without any other complaints such as weight loss, fevers, chills, night sweats, shortness of breath, or dyspnea on exertion. His physical exam was without any abnormality. An initial radiograph of the rileft shoudler was obtained which was without any obvious bony abnormality but demonstrated numerous potential pulmonary nodules (Figure 1. He was then referred to pulmonology for further assessment. A chest CT scan peformed with contrast again demonstrated numerous pulmonary nodules with thick walled central cavitations throughout the lung parenchyma bilaterally (Figures 2 & 3. Additional testing performed included …

  10. Udvidelse af National Gallery London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendler Nielsen, Hans Peter

    1987-01-01

    Grundig gennemgang af The Venturis projekt til udvidelse af National Gallery i London, den såkaldte Sainsbury Wing, med en indledning om den amerikanske tegnestues øvrige europæiske projekter: Frankfurts kunsthåndværkermuseum og Ponte dell' Accademia i Venezia.......Grundig gennemgang af The Venturis projekt til udvidelse af National Gallery i London, den såkaldte Sainsbury Wing, med en indledning om den amerikanske tegnestues øvrige europæiske projekter: Frankfurts kunsthåndværkermuseum og Ponte dell' Accademia i Venezia....

  11. MoMLA: From Panel to Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanza, Victor, Ed.; Kuhn, Virginia, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented here in this "Panel to Gallery" was originally produced and assembled for the 2012 Modern Language Association Conference in Seattle, Washington. Similar to "From Gallery to Webtext", the event Victor curated for the 2006 College Composition and Communication Conference, this "Panel to Gallery" event at MLA set aside the…

  12. Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Journey of Lewis and Clark Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center manages the this gallery of Landsat-derived images of one of the most remarkable and productive scientific...

  13. Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Landsat State Mosaics Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center manages the this gallery of images of the 50 U.S. states plus Puerto Rico as derived by Landsat data.

  14. A gallery approach for off-angle iris recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Yoldash, Rashiduddin; Boehnen, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    It has been proven that hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images of same eye differs in iris recognition system. The distinction of hamming distance score is caused by many factors such as image acquisition angle, occlusion, pupil dilation, and limbus effect. In this paper, we first study the effect of the angle variations between iris plane and the image acquisition systems. We present how hamming distance changes for different off-angle iris images even if they are coming from the same iris. We observe that increment in acquisition angle of compared iris images causes the increment in hamming distance. Second, we propose a new technique in off-angle iris recognition system that includes creating a gallery of different off-angle iris images (such as, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 degrees) and comparing each probe image with these gallery images. We will show the accuracy of the gallery approach for off-angle iris recognition.

  15. Dislocated Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to pull the bones out of place. Extreme rotation of your shoulder joint can pop the ball ... have discussed for your injury. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any ...

  16. Shoulder replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Many people are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder joint will last longer if less stress is placed on it. With normal use, a ...

  17. Frozen shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 35. Harris JD, Griesser MJ, Jones GL. Stiff shoulder. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  18. Augmented reality visualization with use of image overlay technology for MR imaging-guided interventions: assessment of performance in cadaveric shoulder and hip arthrography at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jan; U-Thainual, Paweena; Ungi, Tamas; Flammang, Aaron J; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian I; Carrino, John A

    2012-10-01

    To prospectively assess overlay technology in providing accurate and efficient targeting for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided shoulder and hip joint arthrography. A prototype augmented reality image overlay system was used in conjunction with a clinical 1.5-T MR imager. A total of 24 shoulder joint and 24 hip joint injections were planned in 12 human cadavers. Two operators (A and B) participated, each performing procedures on different cadavers using image overlay guidance. MR imaging was used to confirm needle positions, monitor injections, and perform MR arthrography. Accuracy was assessed according to the rate of needle adjustment, target error, and whether the injection was intraarticular. Efficiency was assessed according to arthrography procedural time. Operator differences were assessed with comparison of accuracy and procedure times between the operators. Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test were used to assess group differences. Forty-five arthrography procedures (23 shoulders, 22 hips) were performed. Three joints had prostheses and were excluded. Operator A performed 12 shoulder and 12 hip injections. Operator B performed 11 shoulder and 10 hip injections. Needle adjustment rate was 13% (six of 45; one for operator A and five for operator B). Target error was 3.1 mm±1.2 (standard deviation) (operator A, 2.9 mm±1.4; operator B, 3.5 mm±0.9). Intraarticular injection rate was 100% (45 of 45). The average arthrography time was 14 minutes (range, 6-27 minutes; 12 minutes [range, 6-25 minutes] for operator A and 16 minutes [range, 6-27 min] for operator B). Operator differences were not significant with regard to needle adjustment rate (P=.08), target error (P=.07), intraarticular injection rate (P>.99), and arthrography time (P=.22). Image overlay technology provides accurate and efficient MR guidance for successful shoulder and hip arthrography in human cadavers. © RSNA, 2012.

  19. Computed Tomography is Diagnostic in the Cervical Imaging of Helmeted Football Players With Shoulder Pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waninger, Kevin N; Rothman, Michael; Foley, Jack; Heller, Michael

    2004-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: Prospective, observational case series evaluating the value of cervical spine computed tomography (CT) scans in the initial evaluation of a helmeted football player with suspected cervical spine injury. SUBJECTS: Five asymptomatic male football players, fully equipped and immobilized on a backboard. DESIGN: Multiple 3.0-mm, helically acquired, axially displayed CT images of the cervical spine were obtained from the skull base inferiorly through T1, with images filmed at soft tissue and bone windows. Sagittal and coronal reformatted images were performed. Software was used to minimize metallic artifact. MEASUREMENTS: All series were reviewed by a Board-certified neuroradiologist for image clarity and diagnostic capability. RESULTS: Lateral scout films demonstrated mild segmental degradation, depending on the location of the metallic snaps overlying the spine. Anteroposterior scout films and bone window images were of diagnostic quality. The soft tissue windows showed minimal localized artifact occurring at the same levels as in the lateral scout views. This minimal beam-hardening streak artifact did not affect the diagnostic quality of the soft tissue windows. Reconstructed images were uniformly of clinical diagnostic quality. DISCUSSION: When CT scans were reviewed as a unit, sufficient information was available to allow reliable clinical decisions about the helmeted football player. In light of recent publications demonstrating the difficulty of obtaining adequate radiographs to evaluate cervical spine injury in equipped football players, helmeted athletes may undergo CT scanning without any significant diagnostic limitations.

  20. Do the Findings of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Arthrography, and Ultrasonography Reflect Clinical Impairment in Patients With Idiopathic Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Kwon, Dong Rak; Kwon, Dae Gil; Park, Jinyoung

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the correlation between arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography (US) findings in patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (IAC) of the shoulder and their clinical presentation as well as functional impairment. Cross-sectional observational study. Institutional practice. Patients (N=75) with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral IAC. Contrast-enhanced MRI, single-contrast arthrography, and US were performed in all patients. The thickness of the axillary recess, coracohumeral ligament (CHL), and enhanced portion in the rotator cuff interval was measured using MRI. Arthrography was used to calculate the total score of shoulder arthrographic criteria. US was used to measure the thickness of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (IGHL) and CHL, and the IGHL ratio and CHL ratio were calculated by comparing those of the unaffected side. None of the MRI parameters was correlated with clinical assessment scores. The total score of shoulder arthrographic criteria was negatively correlated with passive range of motion of the total shoulder motion (PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A prospective study of shoulder pain in primary care: Prevalence of imaged pathology and response to guided diagnostic blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNair Peter J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of imaged pathology in primary care has received little attention and the relevance of identified pathology to symptoms remains unclear. This paper reports the prevalence of imaged pathology and the association between pathology and response to diagnostic blocks into the subacromial bursa (SAB, acromioclavicular joint (ACJ and glenohumeral joint (GHJ. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain recruited from primary care underwent standardised x-ray, diagnostic ultrasound scan and diagnostic injections of local anaesthetic into the SAB and ACJ. Subjects who reported less than 80% reduction in pain following either of these injections were referred for a magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA and GHJ diagnostic block. Differences in proportions of positive and negative imaging findings in the anaesthetic response groups were assessed using Fishers test and odds ratios were calculated a for positive anaesthetic response (PAR to diagnostic blocks. Results In the 208 subjects recruited, the rotator cuff and SAB displayed the highest prevalence of pathology on both ultrasound (50% and 31% respectively and MRA (65% and 76% respectively. The prevalence of PAR following SAB injection was 34% and ACJ injection 14%. Of the 59% reporting a negative anaesthetic response (NAR for both of these injections, 16% demonstrated a PAR to GHJ injection. A full thickness tear of supraspinatus on ultrasound was associated with PAR to SAB injection (OR 5.02; p p p p ≤ 0.05. Conclusions Rotator cuff and SAB pathology were the most common findings on ultrasound and MRA. Evidence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear was associated with symptoms arising from the subacromial region, and a biceps tendon sheath effusion and an intact rotator cuff were associated with an intra-articular GHJ pain source. When combined with clinical information, these results may help guide diagnostic decision making in primary care.

  2. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Wolf, Petra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  3. Imaging characteristics of lipofibromatosis presenting as a shoulder mass in a 16-month-old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, James R.; Donaldson, Matthew M.; Mazuru, Dana G. [University of Missouri School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Columbia, MO (United States); Green, Brian A. [University of Missouri School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Columbia, MO (United States); Memphis Radiological, PC, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Lipofibromatosis is a rare, benign fibrofatty tumor of childhood. Since the tumor was first characterized in 2000, only a few additional cases have been reported. The classic presentation of lipofibromatosis is a slow-growing mass arising in a distal extremity, with boys more commonly affected than girls. We report a 16-month-old girl who presented with a lipofibromatosis in her left scapular region that increased 30% in size during a 6-week period. Although previous case reports of lipofibromatosis have emphasized immunohistological findings, this paper focuses on imaging findings and discusses the utility of imaging in the differential diagnosis of pediatric soft-tissue tumors. (orig.)

  4. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  5. Long bicipital tendon of the shoulder: normal anatomy and pathologic findings on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, S J; Fitzgerald, S W; Quinn, S F; Carrera, G F; Black, K P; Lawson, T L

    1992-05-01

    The tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle (long bicipital tendon) has a complex course from its muscle belly to its insertion onto the supraglenoid tubercle/glenoid labrum. It is stabilized by numerous tendinous and ligamentous structures and is, in turn, partly responsible for maintenance of normal glenohumeral function. In this report we describe the anatomy of this tendon, correlating high-resolution MR images with cryomicrotome sections. We illustrate typical MR findings in pathologic conditions affecting the long bicipital tendon sheath, the substance of the tendon, and finally the tendon position.

  6. Impact of outpatient clinic ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis and treatment for shoulder impingement: a randomized prospective study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, Aamir

    2013-11-05

    The use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) in guiding subdeltoid injection has been shown to improve outcome up to 6 weeks in a few small studies. A recent meta-analysis identified the need for further studies with longer-term outcome and larger sample size. This randomized prospective study assessed whether clinic-based MSUS can significantly improve diagnostic accuracy in shoulder pain and whether MSUS-guided shoulder injection results in improved long-term outcomes. One hundred consecutive patients with 125 painful shoulders were recruited. Patients were randomized to receive either sonographic assessment with consequent palpation-guided injection (Group 1, n = 66) or sonographic assessment with a MSUS-guided injection of 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate (Group 2, n = 59). A blinded rheumatologist (ADF) performed clinical assessments at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks including shoulder function tests (SFTs) (Hawkins-Kennedy test, supraspinatus tendon tenderness), physician global assessment (PGA) and patient visual analogue scores (VAS) for pain (0-10). Eighty patients with 90 symptomatic shoulders completed 12-week follow-up. Twenty patients, 11 (20 shoulders) from the palpation-guided group and 9 (15 shoulders) from the MSUS-guided group, were excluded at 6 weeks either due to requirement for repeat injection or due to surgical referral. Mean age for patients was 57.7 years, and 65 % patients were female; mean shoulder pain duration was 18 weeks (range 14-22 weeks). SFTs, patient VAS and PGA scores for pain improved significantly from baseline in both groups with significantly greater improvements in the MSUS-guided group (44 shoulders) compared to the palpation-guided group (46 shoulders) in all parameters at 6 (p < 0.01) and 12 weeks (p < 0.05). The use of MSUS in guiding subdeltoid injection has been shown to improve outcome up to 6 weeks in a few small studies. A recent meta-analysis identified the need for further studies with longer

  7. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [de

  8. [Shoulder injuries in overhead sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörtler, K

    2010-05-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence.This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes.

  9. Algorithms for Art Gallery Illumination

    OpenAIRE

    Ernestus, Maximilian; Friedrichs, Stephan; Hemmer, Michael; Kokemüller, Jan; Kröller, Alexander; Moeini, Mahdi; Schmidt, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The art gallery problem (AGP) is one of the classical problems in computational geometry. It asks for the minimum number of guards required to achieve visibility coverage of a given polygon. The AGP is well-known to be NP-hard even in restricted cases. In this paper, we consider the AGP with fading (AGPF): A polygonal region is to be illuminated with light sources such that every point is illuminated with at least a global threshold, light intensity decreases over distance, and we seek to min...

  10. Location of Rotator Cuff Tear Initiation: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of 191 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Min, Seul Ki; Park, Keun Min; Park, Yong Bok; Han, Kwang Joon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2018-03-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are generally thought to originate at the anterior margin of the supraspinatus tendon. However, a recent ultrasonography study suggested that they might originate more posteriorly than originally thought, perhaps even from the isolated infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, and propagate toward the anterior supraspinatus. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that this finding could be reproduced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose was to determine the most common location of degenerative RCTs by using 3-dimensional multiplanar MRI reconstruction. It was assumed that the location of the partial-thickness tears would identify the area of the initiation of full-thickness tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective analysis was conducted including 245 patients who had RCTs (nearly full- or partial-thickness tears) at the outpatient department between January 2011 and December 2013. RCTs were measured on 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction MRI with OsiriX software. The width and distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear were measured on T2-weighted sagittal images. In a spreadsheet, columns of consecutive numbers represented the size of each tear (anteroposterior width) and their locations with respect to the biceps brachii tendon. Data were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of all tears. Frequency histograms of the columns were made to visualize the distribution of tears. The tears were divided into 2 groups based on width (group A, location related to size. The mean width of all RCTs was 11.9 ± 4.1 mm, and the mean length was 11.1 ± 5.0 mm. Histograms showed the most common location of origin to be 9 to 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. The histograms of groups A and B showed similar tear location distributions, indicating that the region approximately 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon is the most common site of tear initiation. These

  11. MRI of impingement syndromes of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyadi, E.; Harish, S.; O'Neill, J.; Rebello, R.

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of shoulder impingement is primarily a clinical one. Imaging has a role in assisting clinicians in developing a treatment strategy by identifying and characterizing the cause of shoulder impingement. In this review, the relevant anatomy, cause/pathomechanics, clinical features, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the different types of impingement syndromes are presented

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: dependence on the level of training of the performing radiologist for diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, John S. [University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedics, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Andreisek, Gustav [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Hospital Zuerich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Harvey, Edward J. [McGill University, Division of Orthopaedics, MUHC - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolin, Preston [Center for Athletic Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Discrepancies were identified between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical findings in patients who had MR imaging examinations evaluated by community-based general radiologists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR imaging examinations of the shoulder with regard to the training level of the performing radiologist. A review of patient charts identified 238 patients (male/female, 175/63; mean age, 40.4 years) in whom 250 arthroscopies were performed and who underwent MR imaging or direct MR arthrography in either a community-based or hospital-based institution prior to surgery. All MR imaging and surgical reports were reviewed and the diagnostic performance for the detection of labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions was determined. Kappa and Student's t test analyses were performed in a subset of cases in which initial community-based MR images were re-evaluated by hospital-based musculoskeletal radiologists, to determine the interobserver agreement and any differences in image interpretation. The diagnostic performance of community-based general radiologists was lower than that of hospital-based sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists. A sub-analysis of re-evaluated cases showed that musculoskeletal radiologists performed better. {kappa} values were 0.208, 0.396, 0.376, and 0.788 for labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions (t test statistics: p =<0.001, 0.004, 0.019, and 0.235). Our results indicate that the diagnostic performance of MR imaging and MR arthrography of the shoulder depends on the training level of the performing radiologist, with sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists having a better diagnostic performance than general radiologists. (orig.)

  13. The Breast Surgery Gallery: an educational and counseling tool for people with breast cancer or having prophylactic breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Lesley A; Reid, Sheryl A; Adams, Jillian

    2010-10-01

    The Breast Surgery Gallery is a unique and innovative computer program of digital photographs depicting sequential images of oncoplastic and prophylactic breast surgery. Specialist breast nurse counselors developed the tool to provide education and assist in decision making for people facing oncoplastic and prophylactic breast surgery. This article presents a historical perspective of the development of the gallery and how it can be used during education and counseling. The authors discuss background validation, structure, and testing of the gallery, with case studies that illustrate its flexibility. Data from regular audits of the breast surgery gallery demonstrate the tool's value. The Breast Surgery Gallery is a user-friendly tool that enables patients to make informed decisions while providing realistic photographs of the postoperative recovery phase.

  14. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the collarbone (clavicle) meets the top of the shoulder blade (acromion of the scapula). It is not the same as a shoulder ... that connects the collarbone and top of the shoulder blade. These tears can also come from car accidents ...

  15. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... some women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  16. Day3 | Gallery | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home; ·; About; ·; Speakers; ·; Schedule; ·; Gallery · Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences; For Participants; ·; Downloads; ·; Contact. Sunday, 5th Nov 2017 ...

  17. Day1 | Gallery | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Toggle navigation. Indian Academy of Sciences. Home; ·; About; ·; Speakers; ·; Schedule; ·; Gallery · Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences; For Participants; ·; Downloads; ·; Contact. Friday, 3rd Nov 2017 ...

  18. Whispering-gallery-mode-based seismometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourguette, Dominique Claire; Otugen, M Volkan; Larocque, Liane Marie; Ritter, Greg Aan; Meeusen, Jason Jeffrey; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-06-03

    A whispering-gallery-mode-based seismometer provides for receiving laser light into an optical fiber, operatively coupling the laser light from the optical fiber into a whispering-gallery-mode-based optical resonator, operatively coupling a spring of a spring-mass assembly to a housing structure; and locating the whispering-gallery-mode-based optical resonator between the spring-mass assembly and the housing structure so as to provide for compressing the whispering-gallery-mode-based optical resonator between the spring-mass assembly and the housing structure responsive to a dynamic compression force from the spring-mass assembly responsive to a motion of the housing structure relative to an inertial frame of reference.

  19. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    coracoid, marked limitation of abduction, and complete absence of external rotation with a fixed internal rotation deformity.2 Lesions commonly associated with traumatic posterior subluxation/dislocation are the reverse Hill-Sachs,3 a posterior labral detachment, glenohumeral ligament lesions,4 rotator cuff tears or posterior bony fractures.1 In order to make an accurate diagnosis it is important to obtain adequate x-ray imaging, including a “Y” view.2 Anteroposterior x-rays may show widening of the glenohumeral joint resembling a “light bulb” shape of the humeral head. However, definitive diagnosis is made by the “Y” view which shows the humeral head displaced posteriorly and no longer covering the glenoid fossa6. Irreducible acute posterior dislocation of the shoulder is extremely rare5 and only one other case has been reported in the literature.7

  20. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennafirme, Simone F.; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles within the

  1. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  2. Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard D; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain is a common complaint for stroke survivors. Many pathologies are included in the diagnosis of hemiplegic shoulder pain, and many with shoulder pain have a multifactorial cause. This article provides rehabilitation specialists with an approach to evaluation and management of those with hemiplegic shoulder pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Whispering Gallery Mode Optomechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David C.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan; Yee, Karl Y.

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been made in both micromechanical resonators and micro-optical resonators over the past decade, and a new field has recently emerged combining these mechanical and optical systems. In such optomechanical systems, the two resonators are strongly coupled with one influencing the other, and their interaction can yield detectable optical signals that are highly sensitive to the mechanical motion. A particularly high-Q optical system is the whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator, which has many applications ranging from stable oscillators to inertial sensor devices. There is, however, limited coupling between the optical mode and the resonator s external environment. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel type of optomechanical sensor has been developed, offering great potential for measurements of displacement, acceleration, and mass sensitivity. The proposed hybrid device combines the advantages of all-solid optical WGM resonators with high-quality micro-machined cantilevers. For direct access to the WGM inside the resonator, the idea is to radially cut precise gaps into the perimeter, fabricating a mechanical resonator within the WGM. Also, a strategy to reduce losses has been developed with optimized design of the cantilever geometry and positions of gap surfaces.

  4. Physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of superior labrum anterior-posterior lesions of the shoulder: a sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Nirav K; Colton, Anne; Webner, David; Sennett, Brian; Huffman, G Russell

    2008-03-01

    The overall purpose of our study was to examine the sensitivity of physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance (MR) arthrogram for the identification of arthroscopically confirmed SLAP lesions of the shoulder. An analysis of 51 consecutive patients with arthroscopically confirmed SLAP lesions and no history of shoulder dislocation was performed. Before undergoing surgery, all patients underwent a standardized physical examination and had either an MRI and/or MR arthrogram performed. Sensitivity analysis was then performed on the results of both the physical examination maneuvers and the radiologic imaging compared to the arthroscopic findings at surgery. The sensitivity of O'Brien's (active compression) test was 90%, whereas the Mayo (dynamic) shear was 80% and Jobe's relocation test was 76%. The sensitivity of a physical examination with any 1 of these 3 SLAP provocative tests being positive was 100%. Neer's sign (41%) and Hawkin's impingement tests (31%) each had low sensitivity for SLAP lesions. The sensitivity of MRI for SLAP lesions was 67% when interpreted by the performing surgeon, 53% when read by a radiologist. When the MR arthrograms were analyzed alone, the sensitivity was 72% (surgeon) and 50% (radiologist), respectively. All 3 physical examination maneuvers traditionally considered provocative for SLAP pathology (O'Brien's, Mayo shear, and Jobe's relocation) were sensitive for the diagnosis of SLAP lesions. MRI and MR arthrogram imaging had lower sensitivity than these physical examination tests in diagnosing SLAP lesions. Patient history, demographics, and the surgeon's physical examination should remain central to the diagnosis of SLAP lesions. Level II, development of diagnostic criteria on basis of consecutive patients with universally applied gold standard.

  5. MRI of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatem, Stephen F.; Recht, Michael P.; Profitt, Brad

    2006-01-01

    The MRI appearance of 'Little Leaguer's shoulder' has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Purported etiologies include proximal humeral epiphyseolysis, osteochondrosis of the proximal humeral epiphysis, stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate, and rotational stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in four patients and review the literature. (orig.)

  6. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  7. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic Injections About the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Edward; Bernard, Johnathan; Dein, Eric; Johnson, Alex

    2017-12-01

    Injections about the shoulder serve diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes. Diagnosis of shoulder conditions, such as rotator cuff tears, acromioclavicular joint pathology, subacromial impingement or anterolateral pain syndrome, glenohumeral joint pathology, suprascapular nerve entrapment, and biceps tendon pathologies, is often complicated by concomitant conditions with overlapping symptoms and by inconclusive physical examination and imaging results. Injections of anesthetic agents can often help clinicians locate the source of pain. However, technique and accuracy of needle placement can vary by route. Accuracy is often improved with the use of ultrasonography guidance, although studies differ on the benefits of guided versus unguided injection.

  9. Comprehensive Shoulder US Examination: A Standardized Approach with Multimodality Correlation for Common Shoulder Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Scott E.; Orwin, John F.; Lee, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions encountered in primary care and specialty orthopedic clinic settings. Although magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is typically the modality of choice for evaluating the soft-tissue structures of the shoulder, ultrasonography (US) is becoming an important complementary imaging tool in the evaluation of superficial soft-tissue structures such as the rotator cuff, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, and biceps tendon. The advantages of US driving its recent increased use include low cost, accessibility, and capability for real-time high-resolution imaging that enables dynamic assessment and needle guidance. As more radiologists are considering incorporating shoulder US into their practices, the development of a standardized approach to performing shoulder US should be a priority to facilitate the delivery of high-quality patient care. Familiarity with and comfort in performing a standardized shoulder US examination, as well as knowledge of the types of anomalies that can be evaluated well with US, will enhance the expertise of those working in musculoskeletal radiology practices and add value in the form of increased patient and health care provider satisfaction. This review describes the utility and benefits of shoulder US as a tool that complements MR imaging in the assessment of shoulder pain. A standardized approach to the shoulder US examination is also described, with a review of the basic technique of this examination, normal anatomy of the shoulder, common indications for shoulder US, and characteristic US findings of common shoulder diseases—with select MR imaging and arthroscopic correlation. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2016 PMID:27726738

  10. The Association between the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Adhesive Capsulitis and Shoulder Muscle Fat Quantification Using a Multi-Echo Dixon Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min A; Hong, Suk-Joo; Hong, Sun; Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Baek Hyun; Kim, In Seong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the association between the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of adhesive capsulitis and shoulder muscle fat percentages using a multi-echo Dixon method. Twenty-four patients with clinical diagnoses of adhesive capsulitis and either intact rotator cuffs or Ellman grade 1 partial tears as indicated by MRI scans were included. Two radiologists independently evaluated MRI scans of adhesive capsulitis as follows: presence or absence of axillary recess capsular and extracapsular hyperintensities; thickness of the coracohumeral ligament; thickness of abnormal rotator interval soft tissue; and thickness of glenoidal/humeral axillary recess capsules. Fat quantifications of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis, teres major and posterior deltoid muscles were performed using multi-echo Dixon imaging at three locations. Inter-rater agreement was assessed. Differences in fat percentages were assessed and correlations between fat percentages and quantitative measurements were evaluated. The fat percentage of the supraspinatus was significantly higher in patients with extracapsular hyperintensity (present, 3.00 ± 1.74%; absent, 1.81 ± 0.80%; p = 0.022). There were positive correlations between the fat percentage of the teres minor and the thicknesses of the abnormal rotator interval soft tissue ( r = 0.494, p = 0.014) and the glenoidal axillary recess capsule ( r = 0.475, p = 0.019). After controlling for the effects of age, sex and clinical stage, the relationship between the teres minor fat percentage and the thickness of the abnormal rotator interval soft tissue was statistically significant ( r = 0.384, p = 0.048). Inter-rater agreement was almost perfect for fat quantification (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC] > 0.9) and qualitative analyses ( k = 0.824), but were variable for quantitative measurements (ICC, 0.170-0.606). Several MRI findings of adhesive capsulitis were significantly related to higher fat percentages

  11. Opportunities for Innovation Adoption in Art Galleries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva VITKAUSKAITĖ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the opportunities for innovation adoption in art galleries. It provides systematised information on innovation processes and innovations used in business models of art galleries. The empirical research conducted has revealed the attitude of art galleries towards innovations, as well as the benefits and opportunities to realise them. The first part of the article distinguishes the stages of innovation process and management. The following part describes the factors that influence the management of innovation process. The final part of the article analyses the application of innovations for the improvement of a business model, with Business Model Canvas by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur selected as the starting point for analysis and, finally, the outcomes of empirical research are provided.

  12. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fuerst, Josef U.; Förtsch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMR...

  13. Shoulder Ultrasonography: Performance and Common Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US of the shoulder is the most commonly requested examination in musculoskeletal US diagnosis. Sports injuries and degenerative and inflammatory processes are the main sources of shoulder pain and functional limitations. Because of its availability, low cost, dynamic examination process, absence of radiation exposure, and ease of patient compliance, US is the preferred mode for shoulder imaging over other, more sophisticated, and expensive methods. Operator dependence is the main disadvantage of US examinations. Use of high range equipment with high resolution transducers, adhering to a strict examination protocol, good knowledge of normal anatomy and pathological processes and an awareness of common pitfalls are essential for the optimal performance and interpretation of shoulder US. This article addresses examination techniques, the normal sonographic appearance of tendons, bursae and joints, and the main pathological conditions found in shoulder ultrasonography.

  14. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  15. 9. Painful shoulder complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygen, Frank; Patijn, Jacob; Rohof, Olav; Lataster, Arno; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Painful shoulder complaints have a high incidence and prevalence. The etiology is not always clear. Clinical history and the active and passive motion examination of the shoulder are the cornerstones of the diagnostic process. Three shoulder tests are important for the examination of shoulder complaints: shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, and horizontal shoulder adduction. These tests can guide the examiner to the correct diagnosis. Based on this diagnosis, in most cases, primarily a conservative treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs possibly in combination with manual and/or exercise therapy can be started. When conservative treatment fails, injection with local anesthetics and corticosteroids can be considered. In the case of frozen shoulder, a continuous cervical epidural infusion of local anesthetic and small doses of opioids or a pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the nervus suprascapularis can be considered.

  16. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the canine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C D; Nyland, T G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of the canine shoulder. Fourteen shoulders from 7 clinically normal mid-sized dogs were radiographed and imaged using high frequency ultrasound. Each shoulder was isolated postmortem, and the ultrasonographic and gross anatomy was studied during dissection. The ultrasonographic appearance of the shoulder specimens was similar to that found in the live dogs. Twenty-four shoulders isolated postmortem from 12 variably sized dogs were also used to characterize the normal ultrasound anatomy over a range of sizes. Important anatomic structures that could be consistently evaluated were the biceps tendon and bursa, the bicipital groove surface, the supraspinatous tendon, the infraspinatous tendon, the teres minor tendon, and the caudal aspect of the humeral head. Results of ultrasonographic examination of 4 dogs with shoulder lameness are described to illustrate some applications of canine shoulder ultrasonography in the evaluation of the canine shoulder. In these dogs, ultrasound was a valuable tool to evaluate effusion and synovial proliferation within the bicipital bursa, supraspinatous and biceps tendinitis, biceps tendon strain, and dystrophic calcification.

  17. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  18. Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Lädermann, Alexandre; Kevelham, Bart; Chagué, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Holzer, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

  19. Rael Artel Gallery Tartus ja Varssavis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Rael Artel Gallery : Non-Profit Project Space'i tegevusest Tartus. 27.04-27.05. 2006 Varssavis Warszawski Aktyw Artystov'i ruumides näitus "Estonian Video Art. The blood project", osalesid Flo Kasearu, Gert Hatsukov, Külli K. Kaats, Allan Tõnissoo, Marko Nautras, Tanja Muravskaja ja Airi Triisberg

  20. The painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past. (orig.) [de

  1. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  2. Work above shoulder level and degenerative alterations of the rotator cuff tendons: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Gelineck, John; Mathiassen, Svend Erik

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether work performed with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with alterations in the rotator cuff tendons as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).......To determine whether work performed with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with alterations in the rotator cuff tendons as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)....

  3. Augmented Reality Visualization with Use of Image Overlay Technology for MR Imaging–guided Interventions: Assessment of Performance in Cadaveric Shoulder and Hip Arthrography at 1.5 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jan; U-Thainual, Paweena; Ungi, Tamas; Flammang, Aaron J.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess overlay technology in providing accurate and efficient targeting for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–guided shoulder and hip joint arthrography. Materials and Methods: A prototype augmented reality image overlay system was used in conjunction with a clinical 1.5-T MR imager. A total of 24 shoulder joint and 24 hip joint injections were planned in 12 human cadavers. Two operators (A and B) participated, each performing procedures on different cadavers using image overlay guidance. MR imaging was used to confirm needle positions, monitor injections, and perform MR arthrography. Accuracy was assessed according to the rate of needle adjustment, target error, and whether the injection was intraarticular. Efficiency was assessed according to arthrography procedural time. Operator differences were assessed with comparison of accuracy and procedure times between the operators. Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test were used to assess group differences. Results: Forty-five arthrography procedures (23 shoulders, 22 hips) were performed. Three joints had prostheses and were excluded. Operator A performed 12 shoulder and 12 hip injections. Operator B performed 11 shoulder and 10 hip injections. Needle adjustment rate was 13% (six of 45; one for operator A and five for operator B). Target error was 3.1 mm ± 1.2 (standard deviation) (operator A, 2.9 mm ± 1.4; operator B, 3.5 mm ± 0.9). Intraarticular injection rate was 100% (45 of 45). The average arthrography time was 14 minutes (range, 6–27 minutes; 12 minutes [range, 6–25 minutes] for operator A and 16 minutes [range, 6–27 min] for operator B). Operator differences were not significant with regard to needle adjustment rate (P = .08), target error (P = .07), intraarticular injection rate (P > .99), and arthrography time (P = .22). Conclusion: Image overlay technology provides accurate and efficient MR guidance for successful shoulder and hip arthrography in human cadavers.

  4. Role of radiographs in shoulder pathology: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershkovich O

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oded Hershkovich,1–3,* Shachar Shapira,1–3,* Yaron Sela,1,3 Itamar B Botser1,31Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, 2Medical Corps, Israeli Defense Forces, Tel Hashomer, 3Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel*SS and OH contributed equally to this workAbstract: Shoulder pain is a very common complaint, and affects as many as 20% of all people at some point during their lives. Despite the availability of more advanced imaging modalities, X-ray remains the first imaging test to be performed in the investigation of any shoulder pain. However, with their increasing availability, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have in recent years become first-line techniques for the diagnostic imaging of the shoulder. Moreover, ultrasound of the shoulder is increasingly performed in lieu of radiography. Nevertheless, many patients who visit a shoulder specialist for their pain are referred by a family physician or community orthopedist without an X-ray having ever been performed. Shoulder pain can be caused by many conditions, including rotator cuff tears, calcification within the tendons of the rotator cuff, stiff shoulder, subacromial impingement, space-occupying lesions, degenerative changes, and rheumatoid arthritis. This paper reviews various types of shoulder injury and the radiographic symptomatology of each, with the goal of encouraging the use of radiography by demonstrating the importance of this basic tool in the diagnostic process for these injuries.Keywords: shoulder, pain, pathology, imaging, radiographs

  5. Chronic shoulder pain: part I. Evaluation and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Kelton M; Stevenson, J Herbert; Czarnecki, Gregory R; Dorfman, Justin

    2008-02-15

    Shoulder pain is defined as chronic when it has been present for longer than six months. Common conditions that can result in chronic shoulder pain include rotator cuff disorders, adhesive capsulitis, shoulder instability, and shoulder arthritis. Rotator cuff disorders include tendinopathy, partial tears, and complete tears. A clinical decision rule that is helpful in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears includes pain with overhead activity, weakness on empty can and external rotation tests, and a positive impingement sign. Adhesive capsulitis can be associated with diabetes and thyroid disorders. Clinical presentation includes diffuse shoulder pain with restricted passive range of motion on examination. Acromioclavicular osteoarthritis presents with superior shoulder pain, acromioclavicular joint tenderness, and a painful cross-body adduction test. In patients who are older than 50 years, glenohumeral osteoarthritis usually presents as gradual pain and loss of motion. In patients younger than 40 years, glenohumeral instability generally presents with a history of dislocation or subluxation events. Positive apprehension and relocation are consistent with the diagnosis. Imaging studies, indicated when diagnosis remains unclear or management would be altered, include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and computed tomography scans. Plain radiographs may help diagnose massive rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, and shoulder arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are preferred for rotator cuff disorders. For shoulder instability, magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram is preferred over magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. The Shoulder Gradient in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Method Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapula. Results In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was 76.2% (16 of 21) on the side of the relatively lower shoulder. The mean acromiohumeral interval on the side of the lower shoulder was 10.03±1.28 mm, compared with 10.46±1.50 mm for the higher shoulder. The angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapular of the side of the lower shoulder was -0.31±3.73 degrees, compared with 3.85±4.42 degrees for the higher shoulder. Conclusion The frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was significantly higher on the side of the relatively lower shoulder, and there is no significant difference in the acromiohumeral interval between the side of the lower shoulder and that of the higher shoulder. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the scapular on the side of lower shoulder was more rotated downward than on the side of the higher shoulder. PMID:22506196

  7. The shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapula. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was 76.2% (16 of 21) on the side of the relatively lower shoulder. The mean acromiohumeral interval on the side of the lower shoulder was 10.03±1.28 mm, compared with 10.46±1.50 mm for the higher shoulder. The angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapular of the side of the lower shoulder was -0.31±3.73 degrees, compared with 3.85±4.42 degrees for the higher shoulder. The frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was significantly higher on the side of the relatively lower shoulder, and there is no significant difference in the acromiohumeral interval between the side of the lower shoulder and that of the higher shoulder. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the scapular on the side of lower shoulder was more rotated downward than on the side of the higher shoulder.

  8. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Idiopathic snapping scapula in a Moroccan patient: A rare cause of shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kona Kaut Irène

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Our case illustrates a new case of a jumped shoulder blade of unknown origin after completion of all etiological imaging. Further analysis of clinical events is needed to better understand this type of jumped shoulder blade.

  10. SHOULDER DYSTOCIA : OBSTETRICIAN'S NIGHTMARE

    OpenAIRE

    KUMAR, SUSHIL; ANTHONY, ZK

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon complication of delivery. 12 cases of shoulder dystocia are presented. The study suggests that prediction of shoulder dystocia on the basis of clinical profile is difficult A high index of suspicion is to be maintained in the presence of certain risk factors such as multigravida with large baby having prolonged 1st (decelarative phase) and 2nd stage of labour necessitating instrumental delivery. High neonatal morbidity (brachial palsy 44% and low Apgar score 4...

  11. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Sports Injuries Vaccine Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Injuries & Emergencies > Sports Injuries > Shoulder Impingement ...

  12. Painful shoulder post fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Alistair Iw; Jariwala, Arpit

    2018-03-03

    CLINICAL INTRODUCTION: A 32-year-old man presented to the ED after a heavy fall on his left shoulder. He presented the following day with pain and gross limitation of movement in the left shoulder. There was no history of previous injury to the left shoulder. This was his non-dominant limb and he worked in a manual occupation. He was neurovascularly intact. His initial radiographs are shown in figures 1 and 2.emermed;emermed-2017-207003v1/F1F1F1Figure 1Anteroposterior radiograph (AP) radiograph of left shoulder.emermed;emermed-2017-207003v1/F2F2F2Figure 2Lateral radiograph of left shoulder.  QUESTION: Management options:Anterior shoulder dislocation - closed reductionAnterior shoulder dislocation - CT scanPosterior shoulder dislocation - closed reductionPosterior shoulder dislocation - CT scan. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Távora, D G F; Gama, R L; Bomfim, R C; Nakayama, M; Silva, C E P

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS. Copyright (c) 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavora, D.G.F., E-mail: danielgurgel@sarah.b [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C. [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Nakayama, M. [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados (Brazil); Silva, C.E.P. [Department of Statistics, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  15. Normal anatomy, variants and pitfalls on shoulder MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudez, Jasna [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: marco.zanetti@balgrist.ch

    2008-10-15

    MR imaging of the shoulder is widely used for assessment of impingement and instability-related clinical conditions. The following review article demonstrates the normal anatomy, variations and classical pitfalls. In addition to classical pitfalls (sublabral hole, sublabral recess, Buford complex) the authors focus on a number of normal, bony, cartilaginous, ligamentous and tendinous structures that can simulate disease at the shoulder. In addition, ways to distinguish these pitfalls from true shoulder abnormalities are shown.

  16. [Management of the worker affected by shoulder pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotini, Roberto; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder disorders due to overexertion include joint and soft tissues chronic conditions and are an important cause of disability. Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders and has been associated to manual handling of heavy loads, high repetition jobs, exposure to hand-arm vibration and to overhead activities. Diagnosis of shoulder disorders is primarily based on clinical examination; selected cases should be referred to an orthopedic specialist and to imaging. Return to normal activities should be encouraged.

  17. Shoulder Blade Squeeze (Posture Exercise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Shoulder Blade Squeeze Shoulder Blade Squeeze Make an Appointment Ask a Question Find ... do it: Stand straight and tall. Pull your shoulder blades back and slightly downward to bring your elbows ...

  18. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  19. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fürst, Josef U; Förtsch, Michael; Strekalov, Dmitry V; Vogl, Ulrich; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMRs. The radial mode numbers q and the angular mode numbers p = ℓ-m are identified and labeled via far-field imaging. The polar mode numbers ℓ are determined unambiguously by fitting the frequency differences between individual whispering gallery modes (WGMs). This allows for the accurate determination of the geometry and the refractive index at different temperatures of the WGMR. For future applications in classical and quantum optics, this mode analysis enables one to control the narrow-band phase-matching conditions in nonlinear processes such as second-harmonic generation or parametric down-conversion.

  20. Anterior Shoulder Instability in the Military Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Brian; Owens, Brett D.; Tokish, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Given its young, predominately male demographics and intense physical demands, the US military remains an ideal cohort for the study of anterior shoulder instability. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database was performed to identify all peer-reviewed publications from 1950 to 2016 from US military orthopaedic surgeons focusing on the management of anterior shoulder instability. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The incidence of anterior shoulder instability events in the military occurs at an order of magnitude greater than in civilian populations, with rates as high as 3% per year among high-risk groups. With more than 90% risk of a Bankart lesion and high risk for instability recurrence, the military has advocated for early intervention of first-time shoulder instability while documenting up to 76% relative risk reduction versus nonoperative treatment. Preoperative evaluation with advanced radiographic imaging should be used to evaluate for attritional bone loss or “off-track” engaging defects to guide comprehensive surgical management. With complex recurrent shoulder instability and/or cases of clinically significant osseous lesions, potential options such as remplissage, anterior open capsular procedures, or bone augmentation procedures may be preferentially considered. Conclusion: Careful risk stratification, clinical evaluation, and selective surgical management for at-risk military patients with anterior shoulder instability can optimize the recurrence risk and functional outcome in this population. PMID:27694151

  1. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial ...

  2. A Tate Gallery : de Millbank a Bankside

    OpenAIRE

    Baixa, Célia Maria da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Estudos de Literatura e de Cultura (Cultura e Comunicação), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Letras, 2016 Esta tese explora os contextos de evolução da Tate Gallery em Londres desde a sua origem no século XIX até ao presente. Através de uma abordagem multidisciplinar filiada nos Estudos Culturais este estudo tem como objetivo dar um contributo para a análise das transformações da cultura e da sociedade assim como fornecer um enquadramento para estudar conceitos co...

  3. Science Outreach through Art: A Journal Article Cover Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Research faculty journal covers were used to create a gallery in the Science & Technology branch library at the University of Akron. The selection, presentation, and promotion process is shared along with copyright considerations and a review of galleries used for library outreach. The event and display was a great success attracting faculty…

  4. From Analog Prototypes to Digital Drawing in the Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karen G.

    2011-01-01

    The "You Are Here" digital drawing interactive is one of the most successful interpretive elements in the renovated Oakland Museum of California Gallery of California Art. This interactive grew from considering how visitors could see themselves in the gallery and how visitor awareness of the creative process could be increased. The…

  5. Coral Reefs: A Gallery Program, Grades 7-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. Dept. of Education.

    Gallery classes at the National Aquarium in Baltimore give the opportunity to study specific aquarium exhibits which demonstrate entire natural habitats. The coral reef gallery class features the gigantic western Atlantic coral reef (325,000 gallons) with over 1,000 fish. The exhibit simulates a typical Caribbean coral reef and nearby sandy…

  6. The Shoulder Gradient in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Method Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scap...

  7. Painful/unstable shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, F.; Negueruela, J.; Martin, J.C.; Elizagaray, E.; Pena, J.M.; Merino, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography of the painful/unstable shoulder that was evaluated in more than 300 patients. We have encountered a great variety of painful shoulder pathology, including impingement syndrome, cuff tear arthropathy, lesions of the long head of the biceps tendon, calcifying tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, dead arm syndrome, and degenerative joint disease. Lesions related to instability include cases of capsular avulsions, disruption of the glenohumeral ligaments, labral pathology, glenoid fractures, Hill-Sachs lesions, and changes in glenoid angulation. CT-arthrography is an accurate exploration for both unstable and painful shoulders

  8. Simulation and Shoulder Dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaddeau, Angela K; Deering, Shad

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an unpredictable obstetric emergency that requires prompt interventions to ensure optimal outcomes. Proper technique is important but difficult to train given the urgent and critical clinical situation. Simulation training for shoulder dystocia allows providers at all levels to practice technical and teamwork skills in a no-risk environment. Programs utilizing simulation training for this emergency have consistently demonstrated improved performance both during practice drills and in actual patients with significantly decreased risks of fetal injury. Given the evidence, simulation training for shoulder dystocia should be conducted at all institutions that provide delivery services.

  9. The evidenced-based shoulder evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, John W; Toresdahl, Brett G

    2014-01-01

    The physical examination of the shoulder has been studied extensively, but the quality and statistical power of the published research often is lacking. The initial reports of new shoulder examination techniques commonly describe impressive performance. However recent meta-analyses have found that when the majority of these tests are used in isolation, they lack the ability to rule in or rule out the pathology in question, with few exceptions. The diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination improves when the shoulder tests are evaluated in combination, such as positive passive distraction and active compression identifying a superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. The accuracy also can be improved when the shoulder tests are evaluated in conjunction with specific historical findings, such as age greater than 39 years, history of popping or clicking, and a positive painful arc (pain experienced between 60° and 120° of abduction) identifying rotator cuff tendinopathy. The literature on shoulder imaging demonstrates that rotator cuff tears can be ruled in or ruled out by both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. For SLAP lesions, magnetic resonance arthrography can be used to rule out a tear but may not be as accurate as combined physical examinations to rule in a tear.

  10. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  12. The rheumatoid shoulder: current consensus on diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Thierry; Noël, Eric; Goupille, Philippe; Duquesnoy, Bernard; Combe, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    Shoulder involvement is usually inconspicuous in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and the clinical manifestations are nonspecific. Nevertheless, shoulder involvement should be sought routinely and detected early. Range of motion at the shoulder should be evaluated. Although normal radiographic findings do not rule out shoulder involvement, radiographs are crucial for detecting micro- and macro-geodes during follow-up. The development of glenohumeral joint space narrowing is a turning point that indicates a risk of rapid joint destruction. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for assessing the lesions and guiding the treatment strategy. Stepwise use of local interventions as indicated by imaging findings is recommended. Joint replacement should not be left too late, and surgical procedures on the shoulder should be built into the overall treatment plan.

  13. Frozen shoulder - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris JD, Griesser MJ, Jones GL. Stiff shoulder. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 55. Kelley MJ, Shaffer MA, ...

  14. Characteristics of UHF radio wave propagation in an underground gallery. Chika kodo wo tsutawaru goku chotanpa (UHF) no tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, T.; Isei, T. (National Research Inst. for Pollution and Resources., Tsukuba, (Japan))

    1990-03-25

    UHF radio wave propagation along underground galleries is formulated using two methods so far proposed by other authors; one is based on characteristic equations and the other one makes use of simple geometrical image sources. Experimental measurements are carried out on the propagation of UHF waves of frequency 100 - 1500 MHz sent along two underground galleries; one of reinforced concrete wall and the other one of wooden timbering, the length being 400m or 200m and the area of cross section being 5.4 or 3.8 square meter respectively. It is demonstracted that the characteristics of wave propagation calculated by means of the geometrical image source method are in better agreement with the result obtained by the measurement compared with those by the characteristic equation method. Furthermore, numerical analysis using the geometrical image source method gives the following results; as the frequency of wave is increased, the attenuation constant of the wave propagating along an underground gallery decreases, becomes almost independent on the area of cross section of the gallery and insensitive to the kind of timbering materials. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, B.; Sauer, R.; Keilholz, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term ''periarthritis humeroscapularis''. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  16. Update History of This Database - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Togo Picture Gallery Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/05/16 Togo Picture Gallery... English archive site is opened. 2011/04/01 Togo Picture Gallery ( http://togotv.dbcls.jp/ja/pi...se Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive ...

  17. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder ... actions.10 Extension, abduction and external rotation of the humerus causes ...

  18. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Lang, Philipp E-mail: phil.lang@stanford.edu

    2000-08-01

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed.

  19. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Lang, Philipp

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed

  20. Whispering gallery germanium-on-silicon photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhan; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Timurdogan, Erman; Sun, Jie; Moresco, Michele; Leake, Gerald; Adam, Thomas N; Coolbaugh, Douglas D; Watts, Michael R

    2017-08-01

    We design and demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first whispering gallery germanium-on-silicon photodetector with evanescent coupling from a silicon bus waveguide in a CMOS-compatible process. The small footprint (63.6  μm 2 ), high responsivity (∼1.04  A/W at 1530 nm), low bias voltage (-1  V), low dark current (2.03 nA), and large optoelectric bandwidth (32.9 GHz) of the detector enable simultaneous wavelength filtering and power detection, ideal for handling large network data traffic. In addition, with the resonant nature of the detector, we also optimize the design to enable long-wavelength detection, achieving a separate device with a detection range of up to 1630 nm with a >0.45  A/W responsivity, making it an important building block for optical communication networks.

  1. Aptasensors Based on Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtiero Nunzi Conti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the literature on optical evanescent field sensing in resonant cavities where aptamers are used as biochemical receptors. The combined advantages of highly sensitive whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR-based transducers, and of the unique properties of aptamers make this approach extremely interesting in the medical field, where there is a particularly high need for devices able to provide real time diagnosis for cancer, infectious diseases, or strokes. However, despite the superior performances of aptamers compared to antibodies and WGMR to other evanescent sensors, there is not much literature combining both types of receptors and transducers. Up to now, the WGMR that have been used are silica microspheres and silicon oxynitride (SiON ring resonators.

  2. Between Conceptual Acts and Photography: Dennis Oppenheim's "Gallery Transplant" (1969)

    OpenAIRE

    An, Jamin

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a study of Gallery Transplant [Gallery #1, A.D. White Museum of Art] (1969), a work by the American artist Dennis Oppenheim (1938-2011), which was executed for the 1969 exhibition "Earth Art" held at the Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art at Cornell University. The dual structure of a "conceptual act" (a term I introduce in this essay) and a photo-based panel that comprises Gallery Transplant inspires this paper's critique of a prevailing discursive framework, first emergent in ...

  3. Metallic diffraction grating enhanced coupling in whispering gallery resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Haixi; Luan, Feng

    2013-04-08

    For the first time, metallic diffraction grating is investigated to enable efficient coupling in the whispering gallery resonator (WGR). Six-fold field enhancement in the resonator is achieved with respect to their dielectric counter-parts. This higher coupling efficiency is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation which drives the whispering gallery mode along the grating. Fano resonances have been observed in optical reflection. With the metallic grating, single-port end-fire WGR configuration becomes possible - a scheme that has not been demonstrated in any other WGR coupling devices. Hence, it serves as a prototype for portable whispering gallery devices potentially useful in sensing, switching and nonlinear applications.

  4. Intra-articular elastofibroma of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang-Jin; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2002-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with an elastofibroma in his left shoulder joint. The patient had had limitation of motion in his left arm for 3 years, especially when rotating internally. Radiography of his left shoulder showed bone erosion in the neck of the humerus. On MR imaging, a soft tissue mass was noted in the shoulder joint eroding bone. The mass showed similar signal intensity to that of surrounding muscles on T1- and T2-weighted images. At surgery, a soft, encapsulated mass was found attached to the subscapularis muscle. It was pathologically confirmed as an elastofibroma. This unusual manifestation of an elastofibroma is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation and treatment of shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Deborah L

    2014-05-01

    Shoulder pain is a common symptom in the adult population. The most common cause of shoulder pain is SIS, reflecting a problem with the rotator cuff or subacromial bursa. Determining the cause of a patient’s pain is usually a clinical diagnosis based on careful history taking and physical examination. Limited use of imaging studies will be needed in the setting of trauma, possible glenohumeral arthritis, or when a complete tendon tear is suspected. Therapy is based on pain control and therapeutic exercises in almost all cases. Despite the prevalence of shoulder pain, there is no consensus on the best way to achieve pain control or on the type of exercise most likely to achieve speedy recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Detailed Shoulder MRI Findings in Manual Wheelchair Users with Shoulder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. B. Morrow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities.

  7. Detailed Shoulder MRI Findings in Manual Wheelchair Users with Shoulder Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Melissa M. B.; Van Straaten, Meegan G.; Murthy, Naveen S.; Braman, Jonathan P.; Zanella, Elia; Zhao, Kristin D.

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC) users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS) guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities. PMID:25180192

  8. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, P.; Andersen, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. METHODS: A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by quest...

  9. Photo Gallery from the Los Angeles River Watershed (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photo gallery of the Los Angeles River Watershed area of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  10. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Andersen, J H

    1999-07-01

    To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by questionnaire and by physical examinations. Impingement syndrome was diagnosed when shoulder symptoms had been present for at least 3 months during the past year and there were signs of subacromial impingement in the corresponding shoulder at physical examination. Shoulder function was assessed at the same occasion with the Constant scoring technique. Prevalence of shoulder impingement syndrome was analysed according to job title and cumulative exposure. Prevalence ratio for shoulder impingement syndrome was 5.27 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.09 to 12.26) among currently working and 7.90 (95% CI, 2.94 to 21.18) among former slaughterhouse workers. Transformed model based prevalence ratios according to years in slaughterhouse work showed an overall association between cumulative exposure and risk for shoulder impingement syndrome. This study supports the hypothesis that shoulder intensive work is a risk factor for impingement syndrome of the shoulder. Despite the historical cohort design healthy worker selection may have influenced the exposure-response relation found.

  11. Whispering Gallery Optical Resonator Spectroscopic Probe and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a spectroscopic probe comprising at least one whispering gallery mode optical resonator disposed on a support, the whispering gallery mode optical resonator comprising a continuous outer surface having a cross section comprising a first diameter and a second diameter, wherein the first diameter is greater than the second diameter. A method of measuring a Raman spectrum and an Infra-red spectrum of an analyte using the spectroscopic probe is also disclosed.

  12. [Management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ray, C; Oury, J-F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this review is to propose recommendations on the management of shoulder dystocia. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. In case of shoulder dystocia, if the obstetrician is not present at delivery, he should be systematically informed as quickly as possible (professional consensus). A third person should also be called for help in order to realize McRoberts maneuver (professional consensus). The patient has to be properly installed in gynecological position (professional consensus). It is recommended not to pull excessively on the fetal head (grade C), do not perform uterine expression (grade C) and do not realize inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). McRoberts maneuver, with or without a suprapubic pressure, is simple to perform, effective and associated with low morbidity, thus, it is recommended in the first line (grade C). Regarding the maneuvers of the second line, the available data do not suggest the superiority of one maneuver in relation to another (grade C). We proposed an algorithm; however, management should be adapted to the experience of the operator. If the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, delivery of the posterior arm should be performed preferentially (professional consensus). Routine episiotomy is not recommended in shoulder dystocia (professional consensus). Other second intention maneuvers are described. It seems necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform in case of shoulder dystocia unresolved by the maneuver McRoberts (professional consensus). All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed quickly but without precipitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...... common, and for fracture patients in particular, close postoperative monitoring of pulmonary, cardiac, and abdominal conditions seems important....

  14. Robotics in shoulder rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicuri, Chiara; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Merolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the last few decades, several researches have been conducted in the field of robotic rehabilitation to meet the intensive, repetitive and task-oriented training, with the goal to recover the motor function. Up to now, robotic rehabilitation studies of the upper extremity have generally focused on stroke survivors leaving less explored the field of orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. In this review we analyse the present status of robotic technologies, in order to understand which are the current indications and which may be the future perspective for their application in both neurological and orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. PMID:25332937

  15. Paraplegia and the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Jennifer; Goldstein, Barry

    2004-08-01

    Among consumers, families, therapists, physicians, and other rehabilitation professionals, there has been an increasing interest in shoulder pain associated with spinal cord injury. These disorders primarily affect the soft tissues, including the tendons (eg, rotator cuff tendonitis and bicipital tendinitis), muscles (eg, myalgias and myofascial pain syndromes), and bursae. Disorders of bone and joints also have been of interest (eg, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints). This article addresses the historical context, epidemiology, pathophysiology,diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of shoulder pain as it relates to patients with spinal cord injury.

  16. Advertising identities: virtual galleries as places of identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zontea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the public presentation of self through virtual art galleries, singling out the field of photography. Photography has always been disputed as being part of the highbrow arts because of its popular character. Today, anyone who owes a photo camera can experience photography as art, without a rigorous training. Everybody is able to expose the photos freely to a large number of people, on the Internet. Consequently, the Internet opens up a virtual space, in which photo artists and amateurs can promote their works and exhibit them in a personal online gallery, which represents their place in the virtual vastness. Therefore, my research approaches the matter of the virtual gallery as an identitary place, being focused on finding out why artists choose to exhibit in virtual galleries. I asked myself what are the new functions of the virtual art galleries?Are they understood as online markers that distinguish the owners in these virtual environments? In other words, are these personal galleries a way of expressing online identities?

  17. Sleep position and shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenian, John

    2010-04-01

    The overuse theory for musculoskeletal joint pain cannot explain adequately the occurrence of shoulder pain in those who do not engage in activities that involve repeated and stressful use of the shoulder since the percentage of the painful right shoulders usually does not match the percentage of dominant right arms in such individuals. An alternative hypothesis is presented to propose that shoulder pain is caused by postural immobility in the decubitus or side position during sleep. Prolonged pressure on the shoulder caused by the weight of the thorax can produce enough damage to cause subsequent shoulder pain. In order to test this hypothesis, a preliminary study was carried out to compare the laterality of shoulder pain with the laterality of sleep position. The calculated laterality ratios for sleep position and shoulder pain were found to be strikingly similar, suggesting a causal relationship between the two phenomena. However, the prevalence of shoulder pain in the general population was found to be smaller than the percentage of the time people would spend sleeping in the decubitus position. This discrepancy could be explained by the idea that in order for shoulder pain to develop subjects may have to spend longer times in the same decubitus position before changing to another position than the average person would. Additional evidence from published clinical studies also supports the postural theory of shoulder pain. More studies can be done to test this hypothesis by focusing on the sleep habits of patients with shoulder pain. According to the present hypothesis shoulder pain should for the most part occur on the side that the patient preferred to sleep on before the onset of shoulder pain. The postural theory of shoulder pain provides the possibility for a new and noninvasive method to treat shoulder pain by the modification of posture during sleep. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI findings in Painful Post-stroke Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajiv R; Haghpanah, Sepideh; Elovic, Elie P.; Flanagan, Steven R.; Behnegar, Anousheh; Nguyen, Vu; Page, Stephen J.; Fang, Zi-Ping; Chae, John

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose Describe the structural abnormalities in the painful shoulder of stroke survivors and their relationships to clinical characteristics. Method Eight-nine chronic stroke survivors with post-stroke shoulder pain underwent T1 and T2 weighed multiplanar, multisequence magnetic resonance imaging of the painful paretic shoulder. All scans were reviewed by one radiologist for the following abnormalities: rotator cuff, biceps and deltoid tears, tendonopathies and atrophy, subacromial bursa fluid, labral ligamentous complex abnormalities, and acromio-clavicular capsular hypertrophy. Clinical variables included subject demographics, stroke characteristics and the Brief Pain Inventory Questions 12 (BPI 12). The relationship between MRI findings and clinical characteristics were assessed via logistic regression. Results Thirty-five percent of subjects exhibited a tear of at least 1 rotator cuff, biceps or deltoid muscle. Fifty-three percent of subjects exhibited tendonopathy of at least 1 rotator cuff, bicep or deltoid muscle. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears increased with age. However, rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendonopathies were not related to severity of post-stroke shoulder pain. In approximately 20% of cases, rotator cuff and deltoid muscles exhibited evidence of atrophy. Atrophy was associated with reduced motor strength and reduced severity of shoulder pain. Conclusions Rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendonopathies are highly prevalent in post-stroke shoulder pain. However, their relationship to shoulder pain is uncertain. Atrophy is less common, but is associated with less severe shoulder pain. PMID:18388345

  19. Impingement Syndrome of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garving, Christina; Jakob, Sascha; Bauer, Isabel; Nadjar, Rudolph; Brunner, Ulrich H

    2017-11-10

    Shoulder pain is the third most common musculoskeletal complaint in orthopedic practice. It is usually due to a defect of the rotator cuff and/or an impingement syndrome. This review is based on pertinent literature retrieved by a selective search of the Medline database. Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome suffer from painful entrapment of soft tissue whenever they elevate the arm. The pathological mechanism is a structural narrowing in the subacromial space. A multiplicity of potential etiologies makes the diagnosis more difficult; it is established by the history and physical examination and can be confirmed with x-ray, ultra - sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The initial treatment is conservative, e.g., with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, infiltrations, and patient exercises. Conservative treatment yields satisfactory results within 2 years in 60% of cases. If symptoms persist, decompressive surgery is performed as long as the continuity of the rotator cuff is preserved and there is a pathological abnormality of the bursa. The correct etiologic diagnosis and choice of treatment are essential for a good outcome. The formal evidence level regarding the best treatment strategy is low, and it has not yet been determined whether surgical or conservative treatment is better. Randomized controlled therapeutic trials are needed so that a standardized treatment regimen can be established.

  20. Avaliação clínica e por ressonância magnética do ombro de pacientes lesados medulares Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pereira Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar o ombro destes indivíduos através de ressonância magnética para detectar lesões clínicas ou subclínicas para instituir programas específicos de reabilitação. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes lesados medulares, com seguimento no Laboratório de Biomecânica e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor HC/UNICAMP. Foram divididos em dois grupos de acordo com a presença de paraplegia ou tetraplegia e avaliados através de anamnese e exame físico para correlação com o exame de imagem. RESULTADOS: 41% dos ombros avaliados com imagens de ressonância apresentaram resultado normal. Dentre os resultados alterados, a tendinopatia do supra-espinhal e a degeneração acrômio-clavicular foram às alterações mais encontradas e 80% dos ombros com exame alterado possuiam mais de uma lesão associada. CONCLUSÃO: Pela amostra do estudo é possível identificar uma etiologia multivariada da omalgia, com particularidades para indivíduos paraplégicos e tetraplégicos. A inclusão rotineira da avaliação clínica e radiológica do ombro nos indivíduos lesados medulares pode contribuir para a evolução das técnicas de reabilitação e redução tanto das lesões músculo-articulares quanto dos sintomas álgicos. Nível de Evidência II, Desenvolvimento de critérios diagnósticos em pacientes consecutivos com padrão de referência "ouro" aplicado.OBJECTIVE: To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. METHODS: Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. RESULTS: Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of capsulolabral tears after traumatic primary anterior shoulder dislocation. A prospective comparison with arthroscopy of 25 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suder, P.A.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hougaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    . Subacute MRI evaluation identified 15 labral tears, 12 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial joint side rotator cuff lesion, and 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon. Arthroscopic examination revealed 22 labral tears, 15 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial...... joint side rotator cuff tear, 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon, and 1 osseous Bankart lesion. Anterior capsulolabral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions appeared with a high incidence after acute anterior primary shoulder dislocation. Conventional MRI was only moderately reliable in the preoperative...

  5. MRI of the shoulder. IRM de l'epaule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, C.; Duvauferrier, R.; Korvin, B. de; Lelievre, N.; Ramee, A.; Thomazeau, H. (Hopital Sud, 35 Rennes (FR))

    1991-01-01

    The affections of the shoulder are frequent and highly disabling. The MRI study of painful shoulders allows differentiating between tendon inflammation and rupture, produces information on the location and extent of the lesion, as well as on the regional trophic condition, all these being essential data for treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI are higher than those of ultrasound and arthrography in ruptures of the cuff. For the study of unstable shoulders, MRI currently is less effective than arthrographic CT to study the articular capsule and the glenoid ligament. However, the recent studies on surface coils, arthrographic MRI and radial fast imaging are very promising.

  6. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  7. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-01-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  8. Clavicular eosinophilic granuloma causing adult shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence R. Menendez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Though rarely reported, neoplasms of the clavicle occur, and their symptoms can be mistaken for more common shoulder conditions. We present the case of a benign clavicular neoplasm, rarely seen in adults, presenting with pain, and eventual pathologic fracture in a 49 year-old. A 49 year-old male firefighter underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for shoulder pain after magnetic resonance imaging revealed supraspinatus tendon tear. The patient’s pain persisted after surgery, and was described as routine until he developed severe pain after minor blunt trauma. A local Emergency Room performed the first x-rays, which revealed a pathologic fracture of the distal clavicle through a destructive lesion. The patient was referred to an orthopedic oncologist, who performed incisional biopsy, which initially diagnosed osteomyelitis. The patient was subsequently taken to surgery for debridement. Pathology then yielded the diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma. The patient was taken back to surgery for formal curettage with open reduction and internal fixation. The patient’s pain resolved, the pathologic fracture fully healed, and the patient returned to full time work as a firefighter. Though workup for common shoulder conditions often identifies incidental benign lesions of bone, the converse can be true. Persistent pain despite intervention should raise concern for further investigation. An x-ray alone can reveal a destructive bone lesion as the source of shoulder pain.

  9. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, YeNa; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook; Park, Ji Seon; Park, So Young

    2017-03-01

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis.

  10. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, YeNa; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, 892, Dongnam-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 23 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Swimmer's Shoulder: Painful Shoulder in the Competitive Swimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Suslavich, Kaytelin; Wes, David

    2016-08-01

    Swimmer's shoulder is a broad term often used to diagnose shoulder injury in swimmers. However, research has elucidated several specific shoulder injuries that often are incurred by the competitive swimmer. Hyperlaxity, scapular dyskinesis, subacromial impingement, labral damage, os acromiale, suprascapular nerve entrapment, and glenohumeral rotational imbalances all may be included within a differential diagnosis for shoulder pain in the competitive swimmer. An understanding of the mechanics of the swim stroke, in combination with the complex static and dynamic properties of the shoulder, is essential to the comprehension and identification of the painful swimmer's shoulder. It is important for the athlete, coach, and clinician to be aware of the discerning characteristics among these different injuries to ensure a proper diagnosis and treatment plan to aid the swimmer in his or her return to competition.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of capsulolabral tears after traumatic primary anterior shoulder dislocation. A prospective comparison with arthroscopy of 25 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suder, P.A.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hougaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    . Subacute MRI evaluation identified 15 labral tears, 12 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial joint side rotator cuff lesion, and 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon. Arthroscopic examination revealed 22 labral tears, 15 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial...... joint side rotator cuff tear, 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon, and 1 osseous Bankart lesion. Anterior capsulolabral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions appeared with a high incidence after acute anterior primary shoulder dislocation. Conventional MRI was only moderately reliable in the preoperative...... evaluation of labral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions, and it failed to give an accurate, differentiated preoperative diagnosis of the capsulolabral lesions....

  13. Ringing phenomenon based whispering-gallery-mode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Shen, Mei-Xia; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2016-01-22

    Highly sensitive sensing is one of the most important applications of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microresonators, which is usually accomplished through a tunable continuous-wave laser sweeping over a whispering-gallery mode with the help of a fiber taper in a relative slow speed. It is known that if a tunable continuous-wave laser sweeps over a high quality whispering-gallery mode in a fast speed, a ringing phenomenon will be observed. The ringing phenomenon in WGM microresonators is mainly used to measure the Q factors and mode-coupling strengths. Here we experimentally demonstrate that the WGM sensing can be achieved based on the ringing phenomenon. This kind of sensing is accomplished in a much shorter time and is immune to the noise caused by the laser wavelength drift.

  14. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, N.

    2013-01-01

    functional discomfort during the joint loading. Compression on the rotator cuff from the overlying acromion and the subsequent tissue reaction in the subacromial bursa causes suffering tendons of these muscles. Unrated its diagnostic leads to deepen the ‘subacromial conflict’ and reach rotator cuff initially partial and later progressed. The shoulder stiffness is a condition in which the passive motion restriction is combined with pain in their final phase as well as during sleep. This also affects the active movements which are also reduced. ‘The shoulder hardening’ is at the organic component expense and it must be distinguished from the functional disorders such as muscle contracture and ‘subacromial conflict’. Restoration of work capacity in patients with idiopathic ‘frozen shoulder’ is faster than in post-traumatic shoulder. Diagnostic estimated joint capsule fibrosis more quickly gives a way to the treatment, which shortens the patient’s suffering. MRI imaging is a method of choice for the diagnosis of these conditions. MRI shows not only broken integrity of the rotator cuff tendons, but also the fluid in the subacromial bursa, which means that, must have a lesion. MRI provides information about fatty degeneration of the tendon. MRI registers the distance of the torn tendon retraction, the rupture size, may advise the surgeon on its mobility, and hence the expected forecast. However in the impingement indicative are only local areas with increased signal on T 2 images and data about severe osteophytosis in the area of the acromioclavicular joint. Outlined are the areas of present calcification in the subacromial bursa and, what is more important for the process of treatment, - their density. In shoulder instability MRI demonstrates the presence of lesions type Bankart, partial rotator cuff lesions, lesions of the ligament apparatus in combination with SLAP lesions, lesions of the posterior labrum and refers to the type of instability and the choice of

  15. Atrophy of muscles surrounding the shoulder in hemiplegia. Analysis with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Fumio; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Matsumoto, Shinichi

    1996-01-01

    Decrease of range of motion and subluxation of shoulders are common secondary dysfunctions after the stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the atrophy of muscles surrounding shoulders in hemiplegic patients and to delineate the correlations between those atrophies and shoulder functions. MRI studies were done on bilateral shoulders in 13 hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain. The cross sectional areas of muscles surrounding shoulder, i.e., subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle were measured on those images obtained. The degree of atrophies were evaluated by dividing cross-sectional area of the muscle on affected shoulder by that of non-affected shoulder, that is muscle atrophy ratio [MAR], for each muscle in every case. Also, the range of movements [ROM], the degree of subluxation and muscle strength of shoulder flexion were evaluated. All muscle cross-sectional areas on the affected side were significantly smaller than those of muscles on the unaffected side (p<0.01). The means of MARs were 0.68, 0.69, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.69 for subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle. The pattern of muscle atrophies, however, varies from case to case. Both correlations of ROM versus supraspinatus MAR and degree of shoulder subluxation versus deltoid MAR were statistically significant (p<0.05). These results indicate the contribution of muscle atrophy to the shoulder dysfunction in hemiplegic patients. (author)

  16. Atrophy of muscles surrounding the shoulder in hemiplegia. Analysis with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Fumio; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Matsumoto, Shinichi [Fukushima Rosai Hospital, Iwaki (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    Decrease of range of motion and subluxation of shoulders are common secondary dysfunctions after the stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the atrophy of muscles surrounding shoulders in hemiplegic patients and to delineate the correlations between those atrophies and shoulder functions. MRI studies were done on bilateral shoulders in 13 hemiplegic patients with shoulder pain. The cross sectional areas of muscles surrounding shoulder, i.e., subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle were measured on those images obtained. The degree of atrophies were evaluated by dividing cross-sectional area of the muscle on affected shoulder by that of non-affected shoulder, that is muscle atrophy ratio [MAR], for each muscle in every case. Also, the range of movements [ROM], the degree of subluxation and muscle strength of shoulder flexion were evaluated. All muscle cross-sectional areas on the affected side were significantly smaller than those of muscles on the unaffected side (p<0.01). The means of MARs were 0.68, 0.69, 0.86, 0.72 and 0.69 for subscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and deltoid muscle. The pattern of muscle atrophies, however, varies from case to case. Both correlations of ROM versus supraspinatus MAR and degree of shoulder subluxation versus deltoid MAR were statistically significant (p<0.05). These results indicate the contribution of muscle atrophy to the shoulder dysfunction in hemiplegic patients. (author).

  17. The shoulder in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A B; Jobe, F W; Collins, H R

    1980-01-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common orthopaedic problem in competitive swimming. In a group of 137 of this country's best swimmers, 58 had had symptoms of "swimmer's shoulder." Population characteristics of this group indicated that symptoms increased with the caliber of the athlete, were slightly more common in men, and were related to sprint rather than distance swimming. The use of hand-paddle training exacerbated symptoms, which were more common during the early and middle season. Consideration of shoulder mechanics in swimming reveals that freestyle, butterfly, and backstroke require similar motions; a swimmer using any of these strokes is susceptible to developing shoulder pain. Swimmer's shoulder represents chronic irritation of the humeral head and rotator cuff on the coracoacromial arch during abduction of the shoulder, the so-called impingement syndrome. Treatment included stretching, rest, ice therapy, oral antiinflammatory agents, judicious use of injectable steroids, and surgery as a last resort.

  18. Wind galleries: an instrument for environmental impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, C.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decades wind galleries for non-aeronautic utilisation have proved to be a useful investigation tool in various fields, such as studies on environmental impact and risk assessment, associated with permanent or incidental release of harmful substances. In this framework the feasibility of a new installation has been evaluated in Italy, having as main target the reproduction of thermal stratification phenomena. The great deal of 'hazardous' industries, often in areas having a complex orography, as well as the high pollution levels in Italian cities, lead to the conclusion that a thermally stratified wind gallery might be an economically viable investment [it

  19. Whispering Gallery Mode Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Dusty Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, G.; Basner, R.; Ehlbeck, J.; Roepcke, J.; Maurer, H.; Kersten, H.; Davies, P. B.

    2008-01-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode spectroscopy is being assessed as a diagnostic method for the characterisation of size and chemical composition of spherical particles levitated in a plasma. With a pulsed laser whispering gallery modes (cavity resonances) are excited in individual microspheres leading to enhanced Raman scattering or fluorescence at characteristic wavelengths. This method can be used to gain specific information from the particle surface and is thus of great interest for the characterisation of layers deposited on microparticles, e.g. in molecular plasmas. We present investigations of different microparticles in air and results from fluorescent particles levitated in an Argon rf plasma.

  20. Quantum Light from a Whispering-Gallery-Mode Disk Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, J. U.; Strekalov, D. V.; Elser, D.

    2011-01-01

    the direct observation of intensity squeezing of -1.2 dB of each of the individual parametric beams in parametric down-conversion by use of a high quality whispering-gallery-mode disk resonator. In addition, we observed twin-beam quantum correlations of -2.7 dB with this cavity. Such resonators feature...... strong optical confinement and offer tunable coupling to an external optical field. This work exemplifies the potential of crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonators for the generation of quantum light. The simplicity of this device makes the application of quantum light in various fields highly...

  1. Shoulder Dystocia: Prediction and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  2. Shoulder dystocia: prediction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  3. Shoulder dystocia: management and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitely, Michael L; Gherman, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs when the fetal shoulders become impacted at the pelvic inlet. Management is based on performing maneuvers to alleviate this impaction. A number of protocols and training mnemonics have been developed to assist in managing shoulder dystocia when it occurs. This article reviews the evidence regarding the performance, timing, and sequence of these maneuvers; reviews the mechanism of fetal injury in relation to shoulder dystocia; and discusses issues concerning documentation of the care provided during this obstetric emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. IV. SMOOTH LENS MODELS FOR THE BELLS GALLERY SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Yiping [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Bolton, Adam S.; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Cornachione, Matthew A.; Zheng, Zheng; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Mao, Shude [Physics Department and Tsinghua Centre for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Marques-Chaves, Rui [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Oguri, Masamune [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ménard, Brice, E-mail: yiping.shu@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope F606W-band imaging observations of 21 galaxy-Ly α emitter lens candidates in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS) for the GALaxy-Ly α EmitteR sYstems (BELLS GALLERY) survey. Seventeen systems are confirmed to be definite lenses with unambiguous evidence of multiple imaging. The lenses are primarily massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts of approximately 0.55, while the lensed sources are Ly α emitters (LAEs) at redshifts from two to three. Although most of the lens systems are well fit by smooth lens models consisting of singular isothermal ellipsoids in an external shear field, a thorough exploration of dark substructures in the lens galaxies is required. The Einstein radii of the BELLS GALLERY lenses are, on average, 60% larger than those of the BELLS lenses because of the much higher source redshifts. This will allow for a detailed investigation of the radius evolution of the mass profile in ETGs. With the aid of the average ∼13× lensing magnification, the LAEs are frequently resolved into individual star-forming knots with a wide range of properties. They have characteristic sizes from less than 100 pc to several kiloparsecs, rest-frame far-UV apparent AB magnitudes from 29.6 to 24.2, and typical projected separations of 500 pc to 2 kpc.

  5. Structural Analysis and Design of PCC Shoulders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    A structural evaluation of PCC highway shoulders has been conducted and a comprehensive design procedure for plain jointed concrete shoulders developed. The procedure can be used to provide PCC shoulders either for rehabilitation of existing pavement...

  6. Electrical resistivity tomography survey for delineating uncharted mine galleries in West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillol, J.M.; Sen, N.

    1999-01-01

    The history of subsidence, fires, flooding and other kinds of environmental hazards related to shallow coal workings in India goes back to colonial times some 300 years ago. As coal production accelerated in modern times, so did the environmental and socio-economic drawbacks related to exploitation. In the mid-1980s, a hydropneumatic sand-stowing method was developed to fill in abandoned galleries but their exact location had to be known. Unfortunately, most of these old workings are uncharted and consequently large tracts of land cannot be stabilized. A research program making use of integrated surface, borehole and cross-hole geophysical methods was undertaken over a five-year span to try to solve this problem. Surface geophysical methods, being cheaper and faster than their cross- and downhole counterparts, were used to cover larger areas on an exploratory basis, while cross-hole methods were employed to locate more accurately one or a network of galleries to be perforated by drillhole(s) and used as a conduit for sand stowing. The authors report the results of one of the cross-hole geophysical methods: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). A pole-dipole configuration is used and both cross-hole and surface-borehole methodologies are tested. Forward modelling and inversion of synthetic data making use of downhole and surface physical and geometrical parameters are presented first. This phase is followed by the inversion of real data. It is concluded that ERT is not applicable for the detection of dry voids, but is effective in a waterlogged environment which is estimated to represent 85--90% of the cases. In waterlogged galleries, ERT is applicable in both cross-hole and surface-downhole modes, the latter allowing a larger surface coverage at low cost. ERT is thus a reliable geophysical tool to image water-filled voids and an adequate technique to address environmental and geotechnical problems

  7. [Epidemiology of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneux-Tharaux, C; Delorme, P

    2015-12-01

    To synthetize the available evidence regarding the incidence and risk factors of shoulder dystocia (SD). Consultation of the Medline database, and of national guidelines. Shoulder dystocia is defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed. With this definition, the incidence of SD in population-based studies is about 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Many risk factors have been described but most associations are not independent, or have not been constantly found. The 2 characteristics consistently found as independent risk factors for SD in the literature are previous SD (incidence of SD of about 10% in parturients with previous SD) and foetal macrosomia. Maternal diabetes and obesity also are associated with a higher risk of SD (2 to 4 folds) but these associations may be completely explained by foetal macrosomia. However, even factors independently and constantly associated with SD do not allow a valid prediction of SD because they are not discriminant; 50 to 70% of SD cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present is not associated with SD. Shoulder dystocia is defined by the need for additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, and complicates 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Its main risk factors are previous SD and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive. SD remains a non-predictable obstetrics emergency. Knowledge of SD risk factors should increase the vigilance of clinicians in at-risk contexts. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Can we predict shoulder dystocia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revicky, Vladimir; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Morris, Edward P; Nieto, Jose J

    2012-02-01

    To analyse the significance of risk factors and the possibility of prediction of shoulder dystocia. This was a retrospective cohort study. There were 9,767 vaginal deliveries at 37 and more weeks of gestation analysed during 2005-2007. Studied population included 234 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. Shoulder dystocia was defined as a delivery that required additional obstetric manoeuvres to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. First, a univariate analysis was done to identify the factors that had a significant association with shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia, birth weight, duration of second stage of labour and mode of delivery were studied factors. All factors were then combined in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (Adj. OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 2.4% (234/9,767). Only mode of delivery and birth weight were independent risk factors for shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia and duration of second stage of labour were not independent risk factors. Ventouse delivery increases the risk of shoulder dystocia almost 3 times, forceps delivery comparing to the ventouse delivery increases risk almost 3.4 times. Risk of shoulder dystocia is minimal with the birth weight of 3,000 g or less. It is difficult to foretell the exact birth weight and the mode of delivery, therefore occurrence of shoulder dystocia is highly unpredictable. Regular drills for shoulder dystocia and awareness of increased incidence with instrumental deliveries are important to reduce fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality.

  9. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Jemel; Chauhan, Suneet P; Hayes, Edward; Gherman, Robert; Lewis, David

    2010-03-01

    The goals of this review were to determine the incidence of recurrent shoulder dystocia and the incidence of brachial plexus injury in such cases. A search of PubMed was conducted between 1980 and March 2009. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The search yielded 191 publications, of which 9 provided complete data; these were used to calculate the incidence of recurrent shoulder dystocia. The rate of shoulder dystocia in the prior pregnancies was 1.64% (31,311/1,911,014). Among 10,591 known subsequent vaginal births, the rate of recurrent shoulder dystocia was 12% (OR, 8.25; 95% CI, 7.77, 8.76). Brachial plexus injury occurred significantly more often during recurrent shoulder dystocia than during the first shoulder dystocia (4% vs. 1%; OR, 3.59; 95% CI, 2.44, 5.29; or 45/1000 vs. 13/1000 births). About 12% of parturients with a history of shoulder dystocia have a recurrent dystocia in the subsequent pregnancy, a risk of about 1 in 8. Brachial plexus injury occurs in 19/1000 vaginal births during the first episode of shoulder dystocia, and in 45/1000 vaginal births after recurrent dystocia. Obstetricians & Gynecologist, Family Physicians. After completion of this educational activity, the reader will be able to compare the risk of primary versus recurrent shoulder dystocia. Formulate counseling and treatment strategies for pregnant women who have had a prior pregnancy complicated by shoulder dystocia. Assess the strength of the evidence suggesting the risk of recurrent shoulder dystocia.

  10. MRI of shoulder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus, Suite M392, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States)], E-mail: lynne.steinbach@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The most unstable joint in the body, the glenohumeral joint is subject to many insults including microinstability, subluxation and dislocation. During the last two decades, MRI has allowed for direct visualization of many of the lesions related to instability, aiding in diagnosis as well as therapeutic planning and follow-up. This article reviews the use of MRI for shoulder instability and describes the different types of lesions associated with this disorder. Topics include technical considerations, the use of MR arthrography, normal anatomy and variants, labral and glenohumeral ligament pathology, and osseous lesions related to instability.

  11. Thermal simulation of storage in TSS-Galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lain Huerta, R.; Martinez Santiago, T.; Ramirez Oyangueren, P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the experiment ''thermal simulation of storage in TSS-galleries'' what is been developed in salt mine of Asse, Germany. The report has 3 part: 1) Analysis of objectives and general description of boundary layers. 2) Geomechanics parameters of salt mine. 3) Thermal modelization, thermomechanics modelization and data acquisition

  12. Whispering gallery mode selection in optical bottle microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ming; Senthil Murugan, Ganapathy; Brambilla, Gilberto; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrated a method to excite selected whispering gallery modes in optical bottle microresonators (BMR) by inscribing microgroove scars on their surface by focused ion beam milling. Substantial spectral clean-up is obtained in appropriately scarred BMRs, providing the potential for high performance sensors and other optical devices.

  13. Engaging Families in the Galleries Using Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    The Palo Alto Art Center sought a solution to the challenge that loyal family audiences, visiting weekly for art studio classes, rarely visit the contemporary art exhibition galleries. This article relates the experience of using the human-centered design process, often called Design Thinking, as the methodology to create a solution for family…

  14. Pictures at an Exhibition–A Lagrange Multiplier Gallery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 12. Pictures at an Exhibition – A Lagrange Multiplier Gallery. Vivek S Borkar. Classroom Volume 3 ... Author Affiliations. Vivek S Borkar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  15. An Old-Growth Definition for Western Hardwood Gallery Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Kindscher; Jenny Holah

    1998-01-01

    Western hardwood gallery forests are found across an extremely large, diverse geographical area that encompasses the Great Plains in the United States and Canada. Remnant forests of this type still exist in the "Prairie Peninsula," which historically projected an eastern finger into Ohio. The forests are restricted to floodplains of major rivers and are in...

  16. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.; Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Biert, J.; Heidema, W.M.; Bekker, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia.

  17. [The total shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazas, F; Gagey, O

    1990-04-11

    Prosthetic shoulder replacement is impeded by two main obstacles: the articular cavity is very shallow, and the small glenoid surface rests on a narrow neck to which prosthetic pieces are difficult to attach. The principal, currently used prostheses are non-retentive models which reproduce the anatomy of the joint. They differ from each other mainly in the glenoid piece pattern which may be sealed only to the glenoid cavity or also fixed onto the acromion. On the whole, the clinical results reported are encouraging, particularly as regards the absence of pain, but the radiological course of the glenoidal sealing is a source of concern. Obvious unsealing is rare, but cracks between bone and cement are very frequent and some of them become wider as time goes by. In addition, there is still no satisfactory solution to the problem of big rotator cuff tears. This type of prosthesis must be envisaged with caution and should be reserved to very painful shoulders, but it would be wise not to wait until the rotator cuff is destroyed. The best indications are glenohumeral osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and necrosis of the tumoral head.

  18. Um caso de sinovite vilonodular do ombro em adolescente: diagnóstico por imagem e anatomopatológico A case of villonodular synovitis of the shoulder in an adolescent: imaging and pathologic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Lavras Costallat

    2009-02-01

    villonodular synovitis (PVNS, synovial hemangioma, synovial osteochondromatosis and arborescence lipoma. We report the case of a young patient with chronic right shoulder monoarthritis, who's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed synovitis. Arthroscopy was performed and the biopsy revealed PVNS. CASE REPORT: J C M, 15 years-old, female, Caucasian, student. She was sent to a Rheumatologist along with a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. The patient presented, for one year, a mild pain of insidious onset in her right shoulder, with relief of the symptoms in two days under nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory therapy (NSAIDs. During this year, the patient presented five or six episodes of pain with the same characteristics. No other signs and symptoms were related. The following tests showed normal or negative results:complete blood count, ESR, C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor and urinalysis. The antinuclear antibody (ANA was 1/80 speckled pattern. The MRI of the shoulder showed glenohumeral synovitis with joint effusion and soft tissue swelling in the subscapular bursa, which could correspond to pannus. As the medical history and physical examination were not compatible to JIA, a second MRI was performed, which showed an increase of the synovitis. The patient was submitted to an arthroscopy with biopsy and the histopathological examination showed PVNS. A complete synovectomy was performed and a new MRI, nine months later, showed no synovitis. PVNS of the shoulder is uncommon, and synovectomy was curative in this case.

  19. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark....... PARTICIPANTS: Sixty patients for major lung resection. INTERVENTIONS: Postoperative observation of ipsilateral shoulder pain. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Postoperative numeric rating scale score of shoulder pain and thoracic pain and postoperative examination of the sites of shoulder pain...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...

  20. The Weight-Bearing Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ronak M; Gelber, Jonathan D; Schickendantz, Mark S

    2018-01-01

    The shoulder achieves a wide spectrum of motion, and in a subset of patients, including those who use manual wheelchairs and upper extremity walking aids, the shoulder also serves as the primary weight-bearing joint. Because the weight-bearing shoulder is subject to considerable joint reaction forces and overuse, a broad spectrum of pathology can affect the joint. The combination of muscle imbalance and repetitive trauma presents most commonly as subacromial impingement syndrome but can progress to other pathology. Patients with high-level spinal cord injury, leading to quadriplegia and motor deficits, have an increased incidence of shoulder pain. Understanding the needs of patients who use manual wheelchairs or walking aids can help the physician to better comprehend the pathology of and better manage the weight-bearing shoulder.

  1. Contemporary management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittens-Williams, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic intrapartum event. Although risk factors such as maternal diabetes, obesity and macrosomia can be identified, shoulder dystocia most frequently occurs in patients who lack risk factors. Many maneuvers have been described to assist the operator in the safe release of the shoulder and subsequent delivery; however, no prospective trials have compared these maneuvers in such a way to suggest that one maneuver is superior to another. This article describes the identification of patients at risk for shoulder dystocia, clinical management of the shoulder dystocia, event documentation and the contemporary use of drills and simulation training to improve team preparedness for this unpredictable and usually unavoidable event.

  2. Image collection: 93 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Full Text Available 175 Pan_paniscus_NL.png ボノボ(ピグミーチンパンジー) Bonobos (pygmy chimpanzees) Pan paniscus 9597 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

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    Full Text Available 74 Ailuropoda_melanoleuca_NL.png ジャイアントパンダ Giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca 9646 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ネコ目

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 164 Cynocephalus_volans_NL.png フィリピンヒヨケザル Philippine flying lemur Cynocephalus volans 110931 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱

  7. Image collection: 1 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 Daubentonia_madagascariensis_NL.png アイアイ Aye-aye Daubentonia madagascariensis 31869 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

  8. Image-based acquisition of virtual gallery model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Slavík, P.

    č. 44 (2001), s. 15 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/0030 Grant - others:INCO Copernicus(XE) 960174 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1075907 Keywords : virtual reality Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

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    Full Text Available 19 Canis_lupus_familiaris_NL.png イエイヌ Domestic dogs Canis lupus familiaris 9615 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ネコ目

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    Full Text Available 109 Tyrannosaurus_rex_NL.png ティラノサウルス Tyrannosaurus Tyrannosaurus rex ... 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,爬虫綱,恐竜上目・翼竜上目

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    Full Text Available 120 Triceratops_horridus_NL.png トリケラトプス Triceratops Triceratops horridus ... 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,爬虫綱,恐竜上目・翼竜上目

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    Full Text Available 170 Brachiosaurus_altithorax_NL.png ブラキオサウルス Brachiosaurus Brachiosaurus altithorax ... 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,爬虫綱,恐竜上目・翼竜上目

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    Full Text Available 152 Tursiops_truncatus_NL.png ハンドウイルカ Bottlenose Dolphin Tursiops truncatus 9739 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,クジラ目

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    Full Text Available 83 Balaenoptera_musculus_NL.png シロナガスクジラ Blue Whale Balaenoptera musculus 9771 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,クジラ目

  16. Image collection: 172 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 172 Antilocapra_americana_NL.png プロングホーン Pronghorn Antilocapra americana 9891 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ウシ目

  17. Image collection: 44 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 44 Macaca_fascicularis_NL.png カニクイザル Cynomolgus Macaca fascicularis 9541 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

  18. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  19. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Lang, Philipp; Wagner, Ulli; Moeller, Frank; Deimling, Urs van; Genant, H.K.; Schild, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T 1 -weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  20. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H.K. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  1. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura; Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W.; Shellock, Frank G.; Crues, John V.; Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  2. The Role of Acromioplasty in the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Acromioplasty in the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüştü Nuran

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The results of open acromioplasty procedures were investigated for shoulder impingement syndrome in patients who did not respond to conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty cases of shoulder impingement syndrome who did not respond to conservative treatment were investigated prospectively. The shoulder abduction and flexion range of motion and muscle power were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Anteroposterior, neutral, axillary and impingement radiographs were taken. Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed. Clinical assessment was performed by the Constant shoulder score. Results: Results of MRI revealed that 20 cases had type 1, 2 and 3 acromion in 3, 9 and 8 patients, respectively. The mean followup time was 16 months. Compared to preoperative conditions, the results in 80% of cases were rated as perfect (p<0.000, since all cases had gained both significantly more range of motion (p<0.000 and muscle power (p<0.000, in addition to decreased pain in all cases (p<0.000. Four cases who had been rated as good had common features as advance age, traumatic etiology and inadequate rehabilitation. Conclusion: Open acromioplasty surgery reduces pain, increases range of motion and is an effective treatment option in cases of shoulder impingement syndrome not responding to conservative treatment. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2011; 49: 141-4

  3. Shoulder dystocia: definitions and incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexandra; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2014-06-01

    Though subjective in nature, both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists practice bulletin and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists green guideline are in agreement on the descriptor of shoulder dystocia: requirement of additional obstetric maneuvers when gentle downward traction has failed to affect the delivery of the shoulders. The rate of shoulder dystocia is about 1.4% of all deliveries and 0.7% for vaginal births. Compared to non-diabetics (0.6%), among diabetics, the rate of impacted shoulders is 201% higher (1.9%); newborns delivered by vacuum or forceps have 254% higher likelihood of shoulder dystocia than those born spontaneously (2.0% vs. 0.6%, respectively). When the birthweight is categorized as 4500 g, the likelihood of shoulder dystocia in the US vs. other countries varies significantly. Future studies should focus on lowering the rate of shoulder dystocia and its associated morbidities, without concomitantly increasing the rate of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Shoulder arthrodesis in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Noel; Yeadon, Russell; Smith, Thomas J; Johnson, Jacqueline; Baltzer, Wendy I; Amils, Raquel; Farrell, Michael; Frost, Alasdair O; Frost, Alastair; Holsworth, Ian G

    2012-08-01

    To report surgical technique and clinical outcome of shoulder arthrodesis in dogs. Multicenter clinical case series. Dogs (n = 14). Shoulder arthrodesis featured craniolateral plate and screw application, with application of a 2nd plate and screws craniolaterally or caudolaterally in 5 shoulders. Implants included the locking string of pearls (SOP)™ plate in 7 shoulders. Subjective preoperative, 5-8 weeks postoperative, and 11-16 weeks postoperative clinical and radiographic findings were documented. Owner questionnaire evaluation of outcome was performed 6-20 months postoperatively. Mean angle of arthrodesis was 114° (range 102°-122°). Progression of arthrodesis was noted in 13/14 cases at both the 5-8 and 11-16 weeks postoperative radiographic assessments. Nine complications occurred in 7/14 dogs, graded as catastrophic in 2/9, major in 2/9, and minor in 5/9. Where morbidity was successfully managed, 11-16-week and 6-10-month postoperative limb function was positive on both veterinary and owner evaluations in almost all cases, and in several, functional lameness was considered sufficiently mild as to be imperceptible on subjective veterinary evaluation. Where present, limb circumduction was noted as the major feature of persistent lameness. Shoulder arthrodesis in dogs results in acceptable limb function and should be considered for the management of debilitating shoulder pathology despite a high incidence of complications. Application of the SOP plate to aid shoulder arthrodesis warrants further study. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  6. Shoulder injuries in soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Martinelli, Nicolò; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Even though soccer is the most popular sport of the world, no review is available at present to resume the available data on shoulder injuries in soccer. The aim of this review is to report the available epidemiological data on shoulder specific injuries in soccer players and to describe the common mechanisms of shoulder injuries in soccer. Studies published through September 15, 2011, were identified by using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pre-CINAHL, Pub-Med, Web of Science, and the full Cochr...

  7. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terriza, M.D.; Manzanares, R.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  8. Vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; Montalvo, Enoch

    2007-01-08

    We present two cases of shoulder pain and weakness following influenza and pneumococcal vaccine injections provided high into the deltoid muscle. Based on ultrasound measurements, we hypothesize that vaccine injected into the subdeltoid bursa caused a periarticular inflammatory response, subacromial bursitis, bicipital tendonitis and adhesive capsulitis. Resolution of symptoms followed corticosteroid injections to the subacromial space, bicipital tendon sheath and glenohumeral joint, followed by physical therapy. We conclude that the upper third of the deltoid muscle should not be used for vaccine injections, and the diagnosis of vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction should be considered in patients presenting with shoulder pain following a vaccination.

  9. Shoulder proprioception - lessons we learned from idiopathic frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, Jaroslaw; Rzepka, Remigiusz; Fabis, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Jacek; Kubiak, Grzegorz; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Polguj, Michal; Maciej, Radek

    2016-03-12

    Of all the most frequent soft tissue disorders of the shoulder, idiopathic frozen shoulder (IFS) offers the greatest potential for studying proprioception. Studies concerning the presence of proprioception dysfunctions have failed to determine the potential for spontaneous healing of passive shoulder stabilizers (anterior and posterior capsule, middle and inferior gleno-humeral ligaments), its relationship with passive (PJPS) and active (AJPS) shoulder proprioception for internal and external rotation (IR, ER), as well as the isokinetic muscle performance of the internal and external rotators. This study investigates these dependencies in the case of arthroscopic release of IFS. The study group comprised 23 patients (average aged 54.2) who underwent arthroscopic release due to IFS and 20 healthy volunteers. The average follow-up time was 29.2 months. The Biodex system was used for proprioception measurement in a modified neutral arm position and isokinetic evaluation. The results were analysed using the T-test, Wilcoxon and interclass correlation coefficient. P-values lower than 0.05 were considered significant. Statistically significant differences were found between involved (I) and uninvolved (U) shoulders only in the cases of PJPS and AJPS, peak torque, time to peak torque and acceleration time for ER (p  0.05) for the U shoulders. The anatomical structure of anterior (capsule, middle and anterior band of inferior gleno-humeral ligament) and posterior (capsule and posterior band of inferior gleno-humeral ligament) passive shoulder restraints has no impact on the difference in PJPS values between ER and IR in a modified neutral shoulder position. The potential for spontaneous healing of the anterior and posterior passive shoulder restraints influences PJPS recovery after arthroscopic release of IFS. ER peak torque deficits negatively affect AJPS values. PJPS and AJPS of ER and IR can be measured with a high level of reproducibility using an isokinetic

  10. InfoGallery: Informative Arts Services for Physical Library Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Rohde, Anne; Sundararajah, Balasuthas

    2006-01-01

    Much focus in digital libraries research has been devoted to new online services rather than services for the visitors in the physical library. This paper describes InfoGallery, which is a web-based infrastructure for enriching the physical library space with informative art "exhibitions......" of digital library material and other relevant information, such as RSS news streams, event announcements etc. InfoGallery presents information in an aesthetically attractive manner on a variety of surfaces in the library, including cylindrical displays and floors. The infrastructure consists of a server...... structure, an editor application and a variety of display clients. The paper discusses the design of the infrastructure and its utilization of RSS, podcasts and manually edited news. Applications in the library domain are described and the experiences are discussed....

  11. Back-scatter based whispering gallery mode sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Joachim; Swaim, Jon D.; McAuslan, David L.; Brawley, George A.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2013-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode biosensors allow selective unlabelled detection of single proteins and, combined with quantum limited sensitivity, the possibility for noninvasive real-time observation of motor molecule motion. However, to date technical noise sources, most particularly low frequency laser noise, have constrained such applications. Here we introduce a new technique for whispering gallery mode sensing based on direct detection of back-scattered light. This experimentally straightforward technique is immune to frequency noise in principle, and further, acts to suppress thermorefractive noise. We demonstrate 27 dB of frequency noise suppression, eliminating frequency noise as a source of sensitivity degradation and allowing an absolute frequency shift sensitivity of 76 kHz. Our results open a new pathway towards single molecule biophysics experiments and ultrasensitive biosensors. PMID:24131939

  12. Growing Rhizomatically: Disability Studies, the Art Gallery and the Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Anne Lindgren

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, we propose that the Deleuzoguattarian rhizome offers a map and metaphor for the field of disability studies, especially as it develops outside the boundaries of a defined program or curriculum. As an example of rhizomatic growth, we discuss a series of events in the Philadelphia area in fall 2012 that focused on disability studies and disability arts and culture, including an art exhibition entitled What Can A Body Do? and a scholarly residency sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Women’s Studies Consortium. We suggest that the art gallery offers a generative space for the growth of disability studies, disability aesthetics, and new models of access, and we emphasize the importance of cross-institutional collaboration in the development of disability studies not only as a field but as a field of energy. Keywords: rhizome, Deleuze and Guattari, art gallery, contemporary art, curator, access, audio description, multisensory, collaboration, consortium, disability aesthetics, What Can A Body Do?

  13. Subacromial lipoma causing shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Akgun, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial lipoma represents a rare cause of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A 49-year-old male patient presented to clinic with progressive right shoulder pain and limited movement, ongoing for approximately 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lesion, compatible with lipoma, extending through subacromial space and pressing on supraspinatus muscle. After histopathological verification of lipoma, mass was excised. Postoperatively, patient completed 1 month physical therapy and rehabilitation program. Patient was free of pain at 4-month follow-up. Subacromial lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of SIS for patients unresponsive to conservative treatment; MRI is very useful to determine precise etiology and inform surgical treatment.

  14. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years. Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. Results The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Conclusion Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  15. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Kooten, Ed O; Mullender, Margriet G; van Doorn-Loogman, Mirjam H; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2009-05-18

    A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years). Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  16. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... home. Use the information below as a reminder. Self-care Wear the sling or immobilizer at all times, ... Your surgeon will refer you to a physical therapist to learn exercises for your shoulder. You will ...

  17. [Impingement syndromes of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirer, M; Imhoff, A B; Braun, S

    2017-04-01

    In addition to tears of the rotator cuff, isolated impingement syndrome of the shoulder is the most common diagnosis in shoulder disorders. This is of high relevance in orthopedic sports medicine. In fact, impingement of the shoulder is not the diagnosis but rather a symptom of a functional or even a structural pathology. Detailed knowledge about the different types of impingement and the underlying causes is essential to provide adequate treatment. Primarily, impingement of the shoulder should be treated nonoperatively. However, if there is no clinical improve despite adequate conservative treatment, there is usually a structural pathology which cannot be adequately compensated for and surgical treatment may be necessary. In the case of severe structural pathologies, such as a full-thickness tear of the rotator cuff, a subsequent surgical treatment may be indicated.

  18. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Selma M; van de Nieuwenhof, Hedwig P; Biert, Jan; Heidema, Wieteke M; Bekker, Mireille N

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia. Both babies did very well in the postpartum period. The short-term 6-week and 6-month follow-up of both mothers is described. Short-term maternal complications were minor and based on prolonged immobilization. In accordance with the international literature, the short-term and long-term follow-up after symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia was good and there were no major maternal or neonatal complications. We therefore wish to advocate symphysiotomy as a good and safe option to deliver a baby in cases of severe shoulder dystocia, when all other manoeuvres fail.

  19. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mohanakrishnan; Bhanumathy Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other heal...

  20. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R Sean

    2014-09-01

    Since the original Neer humeral replacement in the 1950s, the standard primary anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty design has slowly evolved. Most recently, the humeral stem has become progressively shorter to help combat stem-related complications. Currently, there are several companies who have developed and marketed a stemless humeral arthroplasty component. Manufacturers' data for 5 stemless shoulder arthroplasty components currently on the market were analyzed and reviewed. A literature review of short-term results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty was completed. Of the stemless shoulder arthroplasty systems available on the market, 3 are currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States. The Tornier Simpliciti (Tornier, Edina, MN, USA) clinical trial began in 2011. The study with 2-year minimum follow-up results is scheduled for completion in November 2014. The Arthrex Eclipse (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) clinical trial was started in January 2013. The tentative study completion date is 2017. The Biomet Nano (Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) clinical trial began in October 2013 and also has a tentative completion date of 2017. No other clinical trial is currently under way in the United States. Early results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty indicate clinical results similar to standard stemmed shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic analysis indicates implant stability without migration or subsidence at 2- to 3-year minimum follow-up.. Several stemless shoulder arthroplasty implants are available outside the United States. Early clinical and radiographic results are promising, but well-designed clinical studies and midterm results are lacking. Three clinical trials are currently under way in the United States with initial availability for use anticipated in 2015. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Nathalie J

    2013-02-01

    This review article presents the current knowledge on the epidemiology and the pathogenesis of calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder and discusses the clinical presentation in relation to the stage of the disease process and the appearance of the calcific deposits. The outcome and the available treatment modalities for this common shoulder disorder are also examined, emphasizing the technique of percutaneous lavage and aspiration under ultrasound guidance. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. New concepts in restoring shoulder elevation in a stiff and painful shoulder patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatelli, Robert; Ruivo, R M; Thurner, Michael; Ibrahim, Mahmoud Ibrahim

    2014-02-01

    The treatment and evaluation of a stiff and painful shoulder, characteristic of adhesive capsulitis and "frozen" shoulders, is a dilemma for orthopedic rehabilitation specialists. A stiff and painful shoulder is all-inclusive of Adhesive capsulitis and Frozen Shoulder diagnoses. Adhesive capsulitis and frozen shoulder will be referred to as a stiff and painful shoulder, throughout this paper. Shoulder motion occurs in multiple planes of movement. Loss of shoulder mobility can result in significant functional impairment. The traditional treatment approach to restore shoulder mobility emphasizes mobilization of the shoulder overhead. Forced elevation in a stiff and painful shoulder can be painful and potentially destructive to the glenohumeral joint. This manuscript will introduce a new biomechanical approach to evaluate and treat patients with stiff and painful shoulders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcifying supracoracoid bursitis as a cause of chronic shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mens, J; van der Korst, J K

    1984-01-01

    A case of chronic shoulder pain is reported with marked limitation of both active and passive elevations and a normal range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. X-ray examination demonstrated cloudy calcification in the coracoclavicular region, presumably indicating calcifying supracoracoid bursitis. Images PMID:6497468

  4. Metastatic gastric cancer presenting with shoulder-hand syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massarotti Marco

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Shoulder-hand syndrome is a relatively rare clinical entity classified as a complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and consisting essentially of a painful 'frozen shoulder' with disability, swelling, vasomotor or dystrophic changes in the homolateral hand. The pathophysiology is not completely clear but a predominant 'sympathetic' factor affecting the neural and vascular supply to the affected parts seems to be involved. Shoulder-hand syndrome has been related to many surgical, orthopedic, neurological and medical conditions; it is more often seen after myocardial infarction, hemiplegia and painful conditions of neck and shoulder, such as trauma, tumors, cervical discogenic or intraforaminal diseases and shoulder calcific tendinopathy, but has also been associated with herpetic infections, brain and lung tumors, thoracoplasty and drugs including phenobarbitone and isoniazid. The diagnosis of shoulder-hand syndrome is primarily clinical, but imaging studies, particularly bone scintigraphy, may be useful to exclude other disorders. Case presentation We report the case of a 67-year-old woman who presented with shoulder-hand syndrome as the initial manifestation of gastric cancer which had metastasized to bone. Conclusion Wider investigations are advisable in patients with atypical shoulder-hand syndrome. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first case of shoulder-hand syndrome associated with metastatic gastric cancer.

  5. Conventional MRI Finding in a Case of Adhesive Shoulder Capsulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hak Hoon [Yeosu Hanyeoexpo Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Back, Chang Hee [Yeosu Baek Hospital, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the conventional magnetic resonance image findings in patients with adhesive shoulder capsulitis. The preoperative MR images of 76 patients with adhesive shoulder capsulitis that was also treated by arthroscopic capsule release. In contrast to the MR images of 25 control patients without adhesive shoulder capsulitis, the thickness and area of hyposignal intensity around the coracohumeral ligament (CHL), subcoracoidal fat, capsular thickness of the rotator interval, capsular thickness, and height of the axillary recess were measured. The existence of fluid in the axillary recess was also verified. Patients with adhesive capsulitis showed a significant increase in the thickness (average 10.57 mm vs. 5.88 mm, T=8.289, p<0.001), area (average 3.49 point vs. 0.96 point Z=7.775, p< 0.001) of hyposignal intensity around CHL, and a thickened joint capsule in the rotator interval (average 5.93 mm vs. 2.15 mm, Z=6.472, p< 0.001). The thickness of the hyposignal intensity around the CHL is about 10 mm or more and has a specificity of 96%, a sensitivity of about 55% in the area of hyposignal intensity from around the CHL, Seventy-five percent or more of cases, showed a 100%, 95%, complete obliteration of the subcoracoidal fat that was 96%, and a 50% thickness of the capsule. A rotator interval of 6mm or more had a 96%, 50% for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. The capsular thickness and maximal height of axillary recess and the presence of fluid in the axillary recess was not significant in patients with adhesive shoulder capsulitis. Thickening of the hyposignal intensity around the CHL, subcoracoidal fat obliteration, and capsular thickening at the rotator interval, are characteristic MRI findings in adhesive shoulder capsulitis

  6. Comparison between ultrasound and plain X-ray in evaluating the cause of shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, K M; Mannan, M; Chowdhury, A Z; Haque, M A; Kaiser, M S; Nabi, S; Ferdousee, R A; Paul, B K; Ahmed, S M; Khan, M; Begum, M

    2011-01-01

    Painful shoulder is a common painful condition among patients. Apart from acute traumatic lesions such as fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains and ruptured tendons, 85 to 90% of painful shoulders are due to adhesive capsulitis, acute or chronic calcific tendinitis, bursitis, bicipital tendinitis and lesions of the musculotendinous cuff. Arthritis is the cause of less than 5% of painful shoulders. For evaluating conditions of shoulder joint, X-ray has been regarded as only method of choice for long time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an alternative procedure but the cost limits its utilization especially in Bangladesh. Ultrasonography is an effective imaging modality in the evaluation of both rotator and non-rotator cuff disorders. Because of low cost and availability, it can be an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of painful shoulder. The present study was conducted to assess ultrasonography as a useful modality in evaluating cases of shoulder pain and to compare the findings with X-ray findings. Thirty two patients with shoulder pain were evaluated by X-ray and Ultrasonography (USG). Clinical diagnosis was done for correlation. To identify the cause of shoulder pain, 100% patients were found normal in plain X-ray. On Ultrasonography (USG) 12.5% patients had displaced long head of biceps, 21.9% had biceps tendinitis, and 3.1% had bursitis. In the assessment of shoulder pathology, USG had a sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 88.2%, Positive predictive value (PPV) of 84.6%, Negative predictive value (NPV) of 78.9% and an accuracy of 81.3%. USG is a useful modality for evaluation the shoulder joint in case of painful shoulder even plain X-ray is non conclusive.

  7. Species composition, community and population dynamics of two gallery forests from the Brazilian Cerrado domain

    OpenAIRE

    Gastauer,Markus; Almado,Roosevelt; Miazaki,Angela; Souza,Écio; Moreira,Luis; Meira-Neto,João

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To understand the impacts of global changes on future community compositions, knowledge of community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our knowledge of community composition, biomass stock and maintenance of gallery forests in the Brazilian Cerrado, we provide two datasets from the 0.5 ha Corrego Fazendinha Gallery Forest Dynamics Plot and the Corrego Fundo Gallery Forest Dynamics Plot situated in the Bom Despacho region, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. New ...

  8. ECHOGRAPHIC AND KINETIC CHANGES IN THE SHOULDER JOINT AFTER MANUAL WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION UNDER TWO DIFFERENT WORKLOAD SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel eGil-Agudo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractManual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury have a high prevalence of shoulder pain, due to the use of the upper extremity for independent mobility, transfers and other activities of daily living. Indeed, shoulder pain dramatically affects quality of life of these individuals. There is limited evidence obtained through radiographic techniques of a relationship between the forces acting on the shoulder during different propulsion conditions and shoulder pathologies. Today, ultrasound is widely accepted as a precise tool in diagnosis, displaying particularly effectiveness in screening the shoulder rotator cuff. Thus, we set out to perform an ultrasound-based study of the acute changes to the shoulder soft tissues after propelling a manual wheelchair in two workload settings. Shoulder joint kinetics was recorded from 14 manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury while they performed high and low intensity wheelchair propulsion tests (constant and incremental. Shoulder joint forces and moments were obtained from inverse dynamic methods, and ultrasound screening of the shoulder was performed before and immediately after the test. Kinetic changes were more relevant after the most intensive task, showing the significance of high intensity activity, yet no differences were found in ultrasound-related parameters before and after each propulsion task. It therefore appears that further studies will be needed to collect clinical data and correlate data regarding shoulder pain with both ultrasound images and data from shoulder kinetics.

  9. Gallery productivity, emergence, and flight activity of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maner, M Lake; Hanula, James L; Braman, S Kristine

    2013-08-01

    Flight and emergence of the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff, were monitored from March 2011 through August 2012 using Lindgren funnel traps baited with manuka oil and emergence traps attached over individual beetle galleries on infested redbay (Persea borbonia (L.) Sprengel) trees. Of the 432 gallery entrances covered with emergence traps, 235 (54.4%) successfully produced at least two adults. Gallery success rates and time until adult emergence were highly variable and strongly depended on time of year galleries were initiated. Successful galleries produced 23.4 ± 2.50 (x ± SE) adult X. glabratus but one had 316 adults emerge from it. Galleries were active for an average of 231.9 ± 6.13 d but five were active for over 1 yr and one gallery produced beetles for 497 d. In total, 5,345 female and 196 males were collected during the study resulting in a sex ratio of ~27:1 (female:male) emerging from galleries. Ambrosia beetles other than X. glabratus were recovered from 18 galleries or ~4% of those studied. Beetles that attacked larger diameter trees were more likely to be successful and produce more brood. Lindgren trap captures reflected emergence trap collections but with a delay of about 1 mo between peaks in emergence and capture in traps. Peaks of activity occurred in fall 2011 and spring 2012, but at least some adult beetles were collected using both methods in every month of the year.

  10. Anterior shoulder dislocations in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronen, J G

    1986-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocations, primary and recurrent, are among the most disabling injuries to the shoulder that can plague the athlete. The diagnosis is easily made by the following: the physical appearance of the shoulder; loss of capability by the athlete to internally and externally rotate the shoulder with the elbow at his side; by evaluating the mechanism of injury; and x-rays. Anterior shoulder dislocations should be reduced as soon as possible after diagnosis, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures while the humeral head is dislocated. The reduction is not done to allow the athlete to return immediately to sport. Use of a simple traction method in the first 10 to 15 minutes following the injury will result in a successful reduction in the vast majority of dislocations. Reduction of the humeral head can be confirmed by the athlete regaining the capability to internally and externally rotate his shoulder with his elbow at his side. Following reduction, the athlete should begin a treatment regimen which includes a restrengthening programme emphasising the muscles of internal rotation and adduction plus rigid restrictions of activities until the goals of the rehabilitation programme are satisfied. The author's experience with this treatment regimen with athletes at the United States Naval Academy, has shown a decrease of the recurrence rate of primary anterior shoulder dislocations to 25% versus the 80% recurrence rate we have become familiar with from studies done which did not stress specific rehabilitation programmes. The athlete should also be instructed in a self-performed traction method for reduction should a redislocation occur, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures and allow relief from discomfort. Surgery for primary and recurrent anterior dislocations should only be considered when the athlete fails to achieve the desired goals after participating in a specific, progressive, adequate

  11. Physical Exam and Evaluation of the Unstable Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Mora, María; Ibán, Miguel Ángel Ruiz; Heredia, Jorge Diaz; Gutiérrez-Gómez, Juan Carlos; Diaz, Raquel Ruiz; Aramberri, Mikel; Cobiella, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of the patient with shoulder instability can be challenging. The pathological spectrum ranges from the straightforward "recurrent anterior dislocation" patient to the overhead athlete with a painful shoulder but not clear instability episodes. Advances in shoulder arthroscopy and imaging have helped in understanding the anatomy and physiopathology of the symptoms. The aim of this general article is to summarize the main examination manoeuvres that could be included in an overall approach to a patient with a suspicion of instability. In order to achieve the above-mentioned objective, a thorough review of the literature has been performed. Data regarding sensibility and specificity of each test have been included as well as a detailed description of the indications to perform them. Also, the most frequent and recent variations of these diagnostic tests are included. Laxity and instability should be considered separately. For anterior instability, a combination of apprehension, relocation and release tests provide great specificity. On the other hand, multidirectional or posterior instability can be difficult to diagnose especially when the main complain is pain. A detailed interview and clinical examination of the patient are mandatory in order to identify a shoulder instability problem. Range of motion of both shoulders, clicking of catching sensations as well as pain, should be considered together with dislocation and subluxation episodes. Specific instability and hyperlaxity tests should be also performed to obtain an accurate diagnosis.

  12. Multivariate analyses of rotator cuff pathologies in shoulder disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henseler, Jan F; Raz, Yotam; Nagels, Jochem; van Zwet, Erik W; Raz, Vered; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-01-01

    Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC) muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability. Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA). We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30) RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52) as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively. Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (ppathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability.

  13. Clinical evaluation of nonarthritic shoulder pain: Diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Robert E; Barfield, William R; Woolf, Shane K

    2015-07-01

    Shoulder pain and dysfunction is a complex problem frequently encountered by primary care physicians. Common nonarthritic conditions seen in the primary care setting include rotator cuff syndrome, impingement, posttraumatic stiffness, adhesive capsulitis, and instability. A thorough history and physical examination can aid in the diagnosis of many common shoulder complaints. Pain and instability are the most common shoulder complaints. Pain that is sharp or burning is commonly radicular in origin, whereas pain caused by tendinitis is often dull, diffuse, and aching. Instability is frequently found in patients with a history of dislocation, but also may occur with no prior history. Imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging can be helpful for more advanced pathology. However, many common shoulder conditions can be diagnosed without imaging, and may be initially treated with a short course of rest, ice, topical analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, directed and supervised physical therapy, and occasionally subacromial corticosteroid injections. As always, a detailed history and a thorough physical exam by a primary care physician are vital for diagnosis. When conservative measures fail, referral to an orthopaedic surgeon may be necessary for further patient management.

  14. [Osteo-articular ultrasonography of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, J; Montagnon, D; Hacquard, B; Tardieu, M

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this course is to present the normal and pathological aspects of the various periarticular structures of the shoulder, and the practical modalities of their analysis. The anatomy and pitfalls of tendon imaging is recalled, as well as the interest to detect intra and peri articular effusions. The semiological aspects of complete and partial tears of the rotator cuff and the various impingement syndromes, well demonstrated with dynamic sonography, are then studied. The examination requires time and knowledge but the diagnostic and therapeutic impact is very important regarding the low cost of this technique. The standardisation of the procedure and the production of normal reference images seems to guarantee a global increase in quality of the sonographic examinations.

  15. Classification of antibiotics by neural network analysis of optical resonance data of whispering gallery modes in dielectric microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    A novel emerging technique for the label-free analysis of nanoparticles and biomolecules in liquid fluids using optical micro cavity resonance of whispering-gallery-type modes is being developed.A scheme based on polymer microspheres fixed by adhesive on the evanescence wave coupling element has been used. We demonstrated that the only spectral shift can't be used for identification of biological agents by developed approach. So neural network classifier for biological agents and micro/nano particles classification has been developed. The developed technique is the following. While tuning the laser wavelength images were recorded as avi-file. All sequences were broken into single frames and the location of the resonance was allocated in each frame. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated over two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As input data normalized resonance shift of whispering-gallery modes and the relative efficiency of whispering-gallery modes excitation were used. Other parameters such as polarization of excited light, "center of gravity" of a resonance spectra etc. are also tested as input data for probabilistic neural network. After network designing and training we estimated the accuracy of classification. The classification of antibiotics such as penicillin and cephasolin have been performed with the accuracy of not less 97 %. Developed techniques can be used for lab-on-chip sensor based diagnostic tools as for identification of different biological molecules, e.g. proteins, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides, lipids, small molecules, viral particles, cells and for dynamics of a delivery of medicines to bodies.

  16. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  17. Directional interacting whispering-gallery modes in coupled dielectric microdisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Chil-Min; Park, Young-Jai

    2006-01-01

    We study the optical interaction in a coupled dielectric microdisks by investigating the splitting of resonance positions of interacting whispering-gallery modes (WGM's) and their pattern change, depending on the distance between the microdisks. It is shown that the interaction between the WGM's with odd parity about the y axis becomes appreciable at a distance less than a wavelength and causes directional emissions of the resulting interacting WGM's. The directionality of the interacting WGM's can be understood in terms of an effective boundary deformation in ray dynamical analysis. We also discuss the oscillation of the splitting when the distance is greater than a wavelength

  18. Method of fabricating a whispering gallery mode resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A. (Inventor); Matkso, Andrey B. (Inventor); Iltchenko, Vladimir S. (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of fabricating a whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR) is provided. The WGMR can be fabricated from a particular material, annealed, and then polished. The WGMR can be repeatedly annealed and then polished. The repeated polishing of the WGMR can be carried out using an abrasive slurry. The abrasive slurry can have a predetermined, constant grain size. Each subsequent polishing of the WGMR can use an abrasive slurry having a grain size that is smaller than the grain size of the abrasive slurry of the previous polishing iteration.

  19. Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators as Optical Reference Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartel, Lukas; Thompson, Rob; Strekalov, Dmitry; Grudinin, Ivan; Yu, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Highly stabilized lasers are an increasingly valuable tool for metrology. For many applications, however, existing Fabry Perot systems are too bulky and cumbersome. We are investigating the use of miniature monolithic whispering gallery mode resonators as reference cavities for laser stabilization. We seek to exploit the benefit of small size and vibration resistance by suppressing thermally induced frequency fluctuations. We have theoretically investigated the viability of using a thin-film coating to achieve temperature compensation. We have experimentally investigated an active temperature stabilization scheme based on birefringence in a crystalline resonator. We also report progress of laser locking to the resonators.

  20. Elite Delights: The Structure of Art Gallery Networks in India

    OpenAIRE

    Roueff, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have expressed renewed interest in the visual arts, which can be seen as one of the main providers of upper-class symbolic goods and status signals for cultural elites. India has not yet been included in that body of work. Although important insights do exist on India, a systematic empirical inquiry has yet to be made. The present article offers a step in that direction, through the statistical analysis of 101 Indian galleries and the 4,249 artists they present in...

  1. Shoulder Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elbows, Forearms, and Shoulders - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Exercises to Strengthen Your Shoulder - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  2. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and patients......The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  3. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  4. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3690 Section 888.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3680 Section 888.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis is a device that has a glenoid (socket) component...

  7. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after

  8. Shoulder Taping and Neuromuscular Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Farrell, Scott F; Tsao, Henry; Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Chipchase, Lucy S; Schabrun, Siobhan M

    2018-03-23

      Scapular taping can offer clinical benefit to some patients with shoulder pain; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Understanding these mechanisms may guide the development of treatment strategies for managing neuromusculoskeletal shoulder conditions.   To examine the mechanisms underpinning the benefits of scapular taping.   Descriptive laboratory study.   University laboratory.   A total of 15 individuals (8 men, 7 women; age = 31.0 ± 12.4 years, height = 170.9 ± 7.6 cm, mass = 73.8 ± 14.4 kg) with no history of shoulder pain.   Scapular taping.   Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to assess the (1) magnitude and onset of contraction of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior relative to the contraction of the middle deltoid during active shoulder flexion and abduction and (2) corticomotor excitability (amplitude of motor-evoked potentials from transcranial magnetic stimulation) of these muscles at rest and during isometric abduction. Active shoulder-flexion and shoulder-abduction range of motion were also evaluated. All outcomes were measured before taping, immediately after taping, 24 hours after taping with the original tape on, and 24 hours after taping with the tape removed.   Onset of contractions occurred earlier immediately after taping than before taping during abduction for the UT (34.18 ± 118.91 milliseconds and 93.95 ± 106.33 milliseconds, respectively, after middle deltoid contraction; P = .02) and during flexion for the LT (110.02 ± 109.83 milliseconds and 5.94 ± 92.35 milliseconds, respectively, before middle deltoid contraction; P = .06). These changes were not maintained 24 hours after taping. Mean motor-evoked potential onset of the middle deltoid was earlier at 24 hours after taping (tape on = 7.20 ± 4.33 milliseconds) than before taping (8.71 ± 5.24 milliseconds, P = .008). We observed no differences in peak root mean square EMG activity or corticomotor excitability of

  9. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  10. Connecting Universal Design for Learning with Gallery Tours in Art Museum Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neach, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    My research study titled, "Connecting Universal Design for Learning with Gallery Tours in Art Museum Education," establishes a relationship between gallery tours in art museum education and the principles of UDL, (CAST, 2011). Through this study I will address contemporary theories on art museum education, volunteer guide training, and…

  11. Inclusive Art Gallery Practices: Exploring Collaborative Processes and Pedagogy in Outreach Community Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    Currently, many museums and galleries are attempting to create more welcoming and meaningful experiences for individuals who tend to be reluctant to enter and participate in these institutions. Art galleries and museums are examining and experimenting with ways to connect diverse publics through socially inclusive community outreach programs. This…

  12. Download - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Togo Picture Gallery Download First of all, please read the license of this database. Data n...n Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive ...

  13. 75 FR 15740 - Gallery Leather Company, Inc., Trenton, ME; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Gallery Leather Company, Inc., Trenton, ME; Notice of Termination of... response to a petition filed on November 20, 2009, by a company official on behalf of workers of Gallery...

  14. The Portable Art Gallery: Fostering Student Ownership and Meaningful Artmaking through Exhibiting Student Artwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Jethro

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how High School Visual Arts Teacher Jethro Gillespie built a portable art gallery for his students--essentially an 8-foot cube made from plywood and lightweight boards that can be assembled with bolts and taken apart in sections. The ceiling pieces of the gallery have track lights, the interior walls have been painted gray,…

  15. Broadband light-extraction enhanced by arrays of whispering gallery resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a light-extraction approach using a whispering gallery resonators array. The wavelength-scale resonant dielectric nanospheres support whispering gallery modes, which can be coupled with the confined waveguide modes inside the bulk material, thus dramatically improving light...

  16. Teaching Students to Teach: A Case Study from the Yale University Art Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manekin, Elizabeth; Williams, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The way the Yale University Art Gallery engages students and the adult public has shifted profoundly over time, a change reflected in the evolution of the museum's signature Gallery Guide program. Founded in 1998 as an organic, experimental way to better engage Yale students to give lecture-based tours, it is now a structured, well-articulated…

  17. The Art Gallery/La Galeria de Arte: An Exhibition of Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Juliet

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of an art gallery within an urban elementary school, examining its impact on diverse students and their social interactions at school and home. The gallery had a positive impact on students (improved self-esteem, motivation, and appreciation of others); the school (transformation of the physical space and appreciation of…

  18. Current concepts in the management of shoulder instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder instability ranges from subtle instability to frank dislocation. Our understanding on the subject is getting better. Patient lifestyle, increased awareness/expectations, better availability of information, improved imaging modalities, and increased awareness about the previously less known concepts in instability all add to the challenges of managing the problem. History and clinical examination without over reliance on imaging remain essential. We used Embase, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and Google Scholar search for published literature in English. We used various combinations of the keywords, namely, human shoulder instability, sports injuries, dislocation, surgery, latarjet, glenohumeral, glenoid, and arthroscopy from 1980 to March 2017. The systematic search captured 310 publications. After applying initial exclusion criteria, 41 abstracts were assessed for eligibility. Of these, we selected 20 full-text articles with the majority of focus primarily on surgical management of traumatic shoulder instability. A tailor-made approach for the management of the individual patient is essential and should involve shared decision making. In this article, we have tried to simplify and present the current evidence in the management of traumatic shoulder instability, particularly in sportsperson.

  19. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  20. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  1. Frozen shoulder and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma B; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frozen shoulder might be a complication or a presenting symptom of cancer. We examined the risk of a cancer diagnosis after an incident diagnosis of frozen shoulder. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data from Danish registries to identify patients with frozen shoulder during 1...

  2. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro

    1997-01-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  3. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  4. The art of compromise: the founding of the National Gallery of British Art, 1890-1892

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Woodson-Boulton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the press played a key role in defining the Tate Gallery by facilitating a national debate about the siting, nature, and purpose of the proposed National Gallery of British Art. Art critics, politicians, journalists and a variety of newspaper editors weighed in on whether Britain should create a museum of modern art, a museum of national art, or both. The understanding of British art as quintessentially modern at the time of the founding of the Gallery meant that from the beginning the Tate Gallery was founded as both the National Gallery of British Art and a museum of modern art. The changing definition of modern art in the twentieth century, however, created fractures between these two identities that eventually led to the split between Tate Britain and Tate Modern.

  5. Evaluation and Management of Failed Shoulder Instability Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartucho, António; Moura, Nuno; Sarmento, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background: Failed shoulder instability surgery is mostly considered to be the recurrence of shoulder dislocation but subluxation, painful or non-reliable shoulder are also reasons for patient dissatisfaction and should be considered in the notion. Methods: The authors performed a revision of the literature and online contents on evaluation and management of failed shoulder instability surgery. Results: When we look at the reasons for failure of shoulder instability surgery we point the finger at poor patient selection, technical error and an additional traumatic event. More than 80% of surgical failures, for shoulder instability, are associated with bone loss. Quantification of glenoid bone loss and investigation of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion are determining facts. Adequate imaging studies are determinant to assess labrum and capsular lesions and to rule out associated pathology as rotator cuff tears. CT-scan is the method of choice to diagnose and quantify bone loss. Arthroscopic soft tissue procedures are indicated in patients with minimal bone loss and no contact sports. Open soft tissue procedures should be performed in patients with small bone defects, with hiperlaxity and practicing contact sports. Soft tissue techniques, as postero-inferior capsular plication and remplissage, may be used in patients with less than 25% of glenoid bone loss and Hill-Sachs lesions. Bone block procedures should be used for glenoid larger bone defects in the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion or in the presence of poor soft tissue quality. A tricortical iliac crest graft may be used as a primary procedure or as a salvage procedure after failure of a Bristow or a Latarjet procedure. Less frequently, the surgeon has to address the Hill-Sachs lesion. When a 30% loss of humeral head circumference is present a filling graft should be used. Conclusion: Reasons for failure are multifactorial. In order to address this entity, surgeons must correctly identify the causes and

  6. The effect of shoulder position on inferior glenohumeral mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Dexter W; Talbott, Nancy R

    2017-03-09

    Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Inferior mobilizations are used to treat patients with shoulder dysfunctions. Common positions recommended for promoting an inferior glide include: (1) an open-packed position (OPP) in which the shoulder is in 55° of abduction, 30° of horizontal adduction, and no rotation; (2) neutral position (NP) of the shoulder; and (3) position of 90° of shoulder abduction (ABDP). Studies comparing the impact of position on inferior mobilization are lacking. To determine the effect of shoulder position on humeral movement and mobilization force during inferior mobilizations. Twenty-three subjects were tested bilaterally. Subjects were placed in the OPP, and an ultrasound transducer placed over the superior glenohumeral joint. As inferior mobilization forces were applied through a dynamometer, ultrasound images were taken at rest and during 3 grades of inferior mobilization. This process was repeated in the NP and the ABDP. In the NP, movements during grade 1, 2, and 3 mobilizations were 1.8, 3.8, and 4.5 mm, respectively. Movements measured in the OPP (1.0, 2.4, and 3.6 mm, respectively) and in the ABDP (1.0, 2.2, and 2.3 mm, respectively) were less. Forces were higher in the NP during grade 1, 2, and 3 mobilizations (51.8, 138.7, and 202.1 N, respectively) than in the OPP (37.2, 91.2, and 139.9 N, respectively) and the ABPD (42.5, 115.3, and 165.5 N, respectively). Mobilization position altered the movement and force during inferior mobilizations. Shoulder position should be considered when utilizing inferior mobilizations. NA. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 76 FR 68101 - Safety Zone; Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... [Docket No. USCG-2011-0774] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks Display... St. Petersburg, Florida during the Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks Display on Friday... November 11, 2011, Creative Pyrotechnics is sponsoring the Art Gallery Party St. Pete 2011 Fireworks...

  8. Introducing New Library Services: Nuclear Malaysia Gallery Photos and Videos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Nasaruddin Ahmad; Habibah Adnan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the existing of library is to preserve books and journals for the organizations main business. The role of library itself is to organize the books such as borrowing and renewal services as consulting their customers on getting the best references for the customers need and demand. Nowadays, the role of library also expands and the need for storing and preserving non-monograph resources such as photo and video also increase. Follow that current situation, Nuclear Malaysia's Library also take a step forwards by introducing new services so called Photo and Video Gallery. Realizing that Nuclear Malaysia also have their valuable photo and video that contains so called memorable moment and must be preserve for future reference, the management of Nuclear Malaysia's Library have decided to buy the system so called P-Canvas. The main purpose of this paper is to explain the library new services, Photo and Video Gallery, development and advantage of this system in storing and preserving Nuclear Malaysia's photo and video. (author)

  9. Sensitivity optimization in whispering gallery mode optical cylindrical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozeymeh, F.; Razaghi, M.

    2018-01-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode resonances propagated in cylindrical resonators have two angular and radial orders of l and i. In this work, the higher radial order whispering-gallery-mode resonances, (i = 1 ‑ 4), at a fixed l are examined. The sensitivity of theses resonances is analysed as a function of the structural parameters of the cylindrical resonator like different radii and refractive index of composed material of the resonator. A practical application where cylindrical resonators are used for the measurement of glucose concentration in water is presented as a biosensor demonstrator. We calculate the wavelength shifts of the WG1-4, in several glucose/water solutions, with concentrations spanning from 0.0% to 9.0.% (weight/weight). Improved sensitivity can be achieved using multi-WGM cylindrical resonators with radius of R = 100 μm and resonator composed material of MgF 2 with refractive index of nc = 1.38. Also the effect of polarization on sensitivity is considered for all four WGMs. The best sensitivity of 83.07 nm/RIU for the fourth WGM with transverse magnetic polarization, is reported. These results propose optimized parameters aimed to fast designing of cylindrical resonators as optical biosensors, where both the sensitivity and the geometries can be optimized.

  10. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mohanakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other health professionals to approach this issue on a holistic manner. This paper deals with the importance of a physiotherapist role in prevention and dealing with the causative factors of AC and not merely its symptom. Methods: Extensive literature review was done from the electronic data bases, Systematic reviews and critical reviews from Pub med indexed journals and other peer reviewed publications across the globe. Results: It was not the type of diabetes but the duration of the disease and the glycemic index, marking the causative factor for adhesive capsulitis of shoulder. Conclusion: It may be concluded that physiotherapist play a vital role in identifying the pre-diabetic or a diabetic state of an individual reporting in a multi disciplinary set up with a AC of shoulder, and also has a role in the prevention of AC by helping the individual to maintain a good glycemic control with a holistic approach which includes aerobic exercises, General Flexibility exercises, Weight management and Yoga therapy.

  11. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  12. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  13. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training.

  14. [Screw arthrodesis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, S; Berndt, T; Lipka, W; Rühmann, O

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the procedure is arthrodesis of the shoulder by osteosynthesis of the glenohumeral and the acromiohumeral joint each with three screws, which results in preservation of scapulothoracic motion and pain relief. Traumatic brachial plexus lesions, palsy in infancy, poliomyelitis with preserved or restorable function of the elbow and the hand. Paralysis of the deltoid muscle and the rotator cuff. Nonrestorable vast defect of the rotator cuff with pseudoparalysis. Chronic infectious arthritis resistant to therapy. Unsuccessful attempts to treat glenohumeral instability. Alternative procedure to shoulder arthroplasty in young patients with omarthrosis, who perform hard physical work. Insufficient strength of the scapular muscles (Weaning from the splint after the end of the week 6 postoperatively, full range of motion allowed. In a prospective study from January 2007 to September 2008, 4 patients with a medium age of 35.7 years underwent screw arthrodesis of the shoulder with a follow-up of 1.0 (0.6-1.5) year. Primary fusion of all arthrodesis surfaces was achieved in all patients; no revision surgery was necessary. All patients improved in shoulder function with an average range of motion of 60° abduction and 40° anteversion.

  15. Interscalene block for shoulder surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Fracture dislocation of the shoulder is a common musculoskeletal injury following road traffic accident. Peripheral ... Fracture luxation de l'épaule est une commune blessures musculo-squelettiques suite route trafic accident. Périphériques nerf .... vertebral artery injection, pneumothorax, Horner's syndrome ...

  16. Complications of labor and delivery: shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane E

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews one of the less common but most dreaded complications of labor and delivery, shoulder dystocia, an infrequent but potentially devastating event that results from impaction of the fetal shoulders in the maternal pelvis. Shoulder dystocia occurs most commonly in patients without identified risk factors, and can result in both maternal and fetal morbidity. Because the vast majority of cases of shoulder dystocia are unpredictable, obstetric care providers must be prepared to recognize dystocia and respond appropriately in every delivery. Detailed documentation is essential after any delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  18. [Classification of periprosthetic shoulder fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, C; Kirchhoff, S; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The key targets in the treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are the preservation of bone, successful bony consolidation and provision of a stable anchoring of the prosthesis with the major goal of restoring the shoulder-arm function. A substantial problem of periprosthetic shoulder fractures is the fact that treatment is determined not only by the fracture itself but also by the implanted prosthesis and its function. Consequently, the exact preoperative shoulder function and, in the case of an implanted anatomical prosthesis, the status and function of the rotator cuff need to be assessed in order to clarify the possibility of a secondarily occurring malfunction. Of equal importance in this context is the type of implanted prosthesis. The existing classification systems of Wright and Cofield, Campbell et al., Groh et al. and Worland et al. have several drawbacks from a shoulder surgeon's point of view, such as a missing reference to the great variability of the available prostheses and the lack of an evaluation of rotator cuff function. The presented 6‑stage classification for the evaluation of periprosthetic fractures of the shoulder can be considered just as simple or complex to understand as the classification of the working group for osteosynthesis problems (AO, Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), depending on the viewpoint. From our point of view the classification presented here encompasses the essential points of the existing classification systems and also covers the otherwise missing points, which should be considered in the assessment of such periprosthetic fractures. The classification presented here should provide helpful assistance in the daily routine to find the most convenient form of therapy.

  19. Management of the frozen shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Laar SM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne Margaretha van de Laar, Peer van der Zwaal Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague, the Netherlands Abstract: Frozen shoulder is a very common condition with a prevalence of 2%–5% in the general population. Decrease in joint volume as a result of fibrosis and hyperplasia of the joint capsule leads to painful and restricted glenohumeral motion. Frozen shoulder is a self-limiting disease with a chronic character, and is mostly treated in a primary care setting. In this review, we set out to address the current evidence-based literature on management of this disabling disease using a PubMed search. Many non-surgical and surgical therapeutic options are described, including supervised neglect, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, physical therapy, manipulation under anesthesia, capsular distension, and arthroscopic capsular release. In the literature, the long-term outcome shows a significant decrease in pain and improvement of shoulder function for all treatment modalities without clear evidence of superiority of one over the other. This possibly indicates that a self-limiting character is the most important factor in the course of the disease. Management of frozen shoulder is primarily conservative. Supervised neglect is combined with analgesia and stretching exercises as the pain subsides. In the early painful phase, intra-articular corticosteroid injections are recommended for pain relief. When the patient has persistent pain and glenohumeral stiffness after adequate conservative treatment, invasive options can be considered, like arthroscopic capsular release, manipulation under anesthesia, or capsular distension. Keywords: frozen shoulder, adhesive capsulitis, treatment, pathophysiology

  20. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: is it predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Vered; Feldman, Roi; Walfisch, Asnat; Toledano, Ronen; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-11-01

    To examine the course and outcome of deliveries occurring in women who previously experienced shoulder dystocia. In addition, recurrent shoulder dystocia risk factors were assessed. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing all singleton deliveries with and without shoulder dystocia in their preceding delivery was conducted. Independent predictors of recurrent shoulder dystocia were investigated using a multiple logistic regression model. Of the 201,422 deliveries included in the analysis, 307 occurred in women with a previous shoulder dystocia (0.015 %). Women with a history of shoulder dystocia were more likely to be older, experienced higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus, polyhydramnios, prolonged second stage, operative delivery and macrosomia (>4000 g) in the following delivery. Previous shoulder dystocia was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia (OR = 6.1, 95 % CI 3.2-11.8, p value Shoulder dystocia is an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia. Deliveries in women with a history of shoulder dystocia are characterized by higher rates of operative delivery, prolonged second stage of labor and macrosomia.

  1. MRI of the shoulder joint with surface coils at 1. 5 Tesla. Normal anatomy and possible clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, D.; Steinbrich, W.; Krestin, G.; Koebke, J.; Kummer, B.; Bunke, J.

    1987-03-01

    High spatial resolution magnetic resonance images of the shoulder were obtained in axial, sagittal and coronal orientations using a 1.5 T imaging system and anatomically shaped, wrap-around surface coils. Variations in scapular position induced by patient positioning change the relationship of the planes to the shoulder anatomy and make reproducibility of sagittal and coronal planes difficult. We, therefore, use - after axial orientation - image-oblique planes perpendicular and parallel to the glenoid fossa. In this manner MRI can visualise the anatomic structures of the shoulder including rotator cuff, long biceps tendon, articular capsule, articular cartilage, muscles and bones due to the high soft tissue contrast of MRI.

  2. Molecular biology of frozen shoulder-induced limitation of shoulder joint movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaming; Lu, Wei; He, Yong; Jiang, Luoyong; Li, Kuokuo; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2017-01-01

    Frozen shoulder is a chronic condition characterized by pain in the shoulder and restriction of movements in all directions. Some patients are left with long-term limitation of shoulder joint activity with various severities, which results in reduced quality of life. Currently, there is a paucity of literature on the molecular biology of frozen shoulder, and the molecular biological mechanism for periarthritis-induced limitation of shoulder joint movements remains unclear. Research in this field is focused on inflammation and cytokines associated with fibrosis. Repeated investigations confirmed alterations of specified inflammatory mediators and fibrosis-associated cytokines, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of frozen shoulder by causing structural changes of the shoulder joint and eventually the limitation of shoulder movements. The aim of this article is to review studies on molecular biology of frozen shoulder and provide a reference for subsequent research, treatment, and development of new drugs.

  3. Ultrasonographic and clinical study of post-stroke painful hemiplegic shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Rania E.; Amin, Mohamed A.; Aboelsafa, Ashraf A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the work: To describe the structural abnormalities of the painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) by ultrasound (U/S) and their relationship with some clinical variables. Materials and methods: Eighty consecutive patients with post-stroke PHS were subjected to both clinical assessment and ultrasonographic examination of both shoulders. Ultrasonographic imaging data were classified into five grades. Results: The biceps tendon sheath effusion (51.25%) and the SA–SD bursitis (43.75%) were...

  4. Anterior shoulder capsular tears in professional baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulotta, Lawrence V; Lobatto, Daniel; Delos, Demetris; Coleman, Struan H; Altchek, David W

    2014-08-01

    Tearing of the anterior capsule of the shoulder is a rare but debilitating injury for throwing athletes. However, there is very little in the literature to guide its diagnosis and treatment. In this case series, we outline our experience with anterior capsular tears of the shoulder in professional baseball players. Five professional baseball players were diagnosed with midsubstance tears of their anterior capsule. A trial of rest and rehabilitation failed in all patients, and they eventually underwent surgery. These patients were retrospectively reviewed. The presenting symptoms and findings were documented, and outcomes were assessed by the player's ability to return to play. The mean age was 33.5 years (range, 31-37 years), and all patients presented with anterior shoulder pain and the inability to throw. No patient had an acute traumatic injury. Magnetic resonance imaging provided the correct diagnosis in 4 patients, and the diagnosis was made with diagnostic arthroscopy in the fifth. Three underwent arthroscopic repair, and 2 underwent open repair of the anterior capsule. Of the 5 players, 4 (80%) returned to their preinjury level by a mean of 13.3 months (range, 8-18 months). Anterior capsular tears can occur in older throwing athletes. Surgical repair, whether arthroscopic or open, can yield good results in most patients. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fungus symbionts colonizing the galleries of the ambrosia beetle Platypus quercivorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Rikiya; Suzuki, Motofumi; Okada, Gen; Takeuchi, Yuko; Futai, Kazuyoshi

    2011-07-01

    Isolations were made to determine the fungal symbionts colonizing Platypus quercivorus beetle galleries of dead or dying Quercus laurifolia, Castanopsis cuspidata, Quercus serrata, Quercus crispula, and Quercus robur. For these studies, logs from oak wilt-killed trees were collected from Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. Fungi were isolated from the: (1) entrances of beetle galleries, (2) vertical galleries, (3) lateral galleries, and (4) the larval cradle of P. quercivorus in each host tree. Among the fungus colonies which appeared on YM agar plates, 1,219 were isolated as the representative isolates for fungus species inhabiting in the galleries based on their cultural characteristics. The validity of the visual classification of the fungus colonies was checked and if necessary properly corrected using microsatellite-primed PCR fingerprints. The nucleotide sequence of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit nuclear rRNA gene detected 38 fungus species (104 strains) of which three species, i.e., Candida sp. 3, Candida kashinagacola (both yeasts), and the filamentous fungus Raffaelea quercivora were isolated from all the tree species. The two yeasts were most prevalent in the interior of galleries, regardless of host tree species, suggesting their close association with the beetle. A culture-independent method, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis was also used to characterize the fungus flora of beetle galleries. T-RFLP patterns showed that yeast species belonging to the genus Ambrosiozyma frequently occurred on the gallery walls along with the two Candida species. Ours is the first report showing the specific fungi inhabiting the galleries of a platypodid ambrosia beetle.

  6. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...... in repetitive work and 782 referents. Shoulder loads were quantified at task level and measures of exposures were assigned based on task distribution. Symptoms in combination with clinical criteria defined shoulder tendinitis. RESULTS: The prevalence of shoulder tendinitis was higher among exposed workers...

  7. Posterior labrocapsular periosteal sleeve avulsion complicating locked posterior shoulder dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, P. [Department of Radiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Hospital, Aalst (Belgium)]|[Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Joekes, E.; Bloem, J.L. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands); Nelissen, R.G.H.H. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands)

    1998-10-01

    This case presents the imaging features of a posterior shoulder dislocation complicated by a rare but surgically relevant lesion of the posterior labrum. Due to the attachment of the posterior capsule to the posterior portion of the labrum, which in itself is attached to the posterior scapular periosteum, stripping of the labrum by the posterior capsule resulted in a posterior labrocapsular periosteal sleeve avulsion. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 refs.

  8. Whispering-gallery nanocavity plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Jinxing; Tang, Shiwei; Fang, Yangfu; Wang, Jiao; Huang, Gaoshan; Liu, Ran; Zheng, Lirong; Cui, Xugao; Mei, Yongfeng

    2015-01-01

    The synergy effect in nature could enable fantastic improvement of functional properties and associated effects. The detection performance of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be highly strengthened under the cooperation with other factors. Here, greatly-enhanced SERS detection is realized based on rolled-up tubular nano-resonators decorated with silver nanoparticles. The synergy effect between whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) and surface plasmon leads to an extra enhancement at the order of 105 compared to non-resonant flat SERS substrates, which can be well tuned by altering the diameter of micron- and nanotubes and the excitation laser wavelengths. Such synchronous and coherent coupling between plasmonics and photonics could lead to new principle and design for various sub-wavelength optical devices, e.g. plasmonic waveguides and hyperbolic metamaterials. PMID:26443526

  9. Selective Coupling Enhances Harmonic Generation of Whispering-Gallery Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Luke S.; Sedlmeir, Florian; Peuntinger, Christian; Schwefel, Harald G. L.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate second-harmonic generation (SHG) in an x -cut congruent lithium niobate (LN) whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonator. First, we show theoretically that independent control of the coupling of the pump and signal modes is optimal for high conversion rates. A coupling scheme based on our earlier work [F. Sedlmeir et al., Phys. Rev. Applied 7, 024029 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevApplied.7.024029] is then implemented experimentally to verify this improvement. Thereby, we are able to improve on the efficiency of SHG by more than an order of magnitude by selectively outcoupling using a LN prism, utilizing the birefringence of it and the resonator in kind. This method is also applicable to other nonlinear processes in WGM resonators.

  10. Whispering-Gallery Mode Resonators for Detecting Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongruengkiat, Weeratouch; Pechprasarn, Suejit

    2017-09-13

    Optical resonators are sensors well known for their high sensitivity and fast response time. These sensors have a wide range of applications, including in the biomedical fields, and cancer detection is one such promising application. Sensor diagnosis currently has many limitations, such as being expensive, highly invasive, and time-consuming. New developments are welcomed to overcome these limitations. Optical resonators have high sensitivity, which enable medical testing to detect disease in the early stage. Herein, we describe the principle of whispering-gallery mode and ring optical resonators. We also add to the knowledge of cancer biomarker diagnosis, where we discuss the application of optical resonators for specific biomarkers. Lastly, we discuss advancements in optical resonators for detecting cancer in terms of their ability to detect small amounts of cancer biomarkers.

  11. Staging scientific controversies: a gallery test on science museums' interactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, Albena; Rabesandratana, Tania Mara; Greiner, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    The "transfer" model in science communication has been addressed critically from different perspectives, while the advantages of the interactive model have been continuously praised. Yet, little is done to account for the specific role of the interactive model in communicating "unfinished science." The traditional interactive methods in museums are not sufficient to keep pace with rapid scientific developments. Interactive exchanges between laypeople and experts are thought mainly through the lens of a dialogue that is facilitated and framed by the traditional "conference room" architecture. Drawing on the results of a small-scale experiment in a gallery space, we argue for the need for a new "architecture of interaction" in museum settings based on art installation and simulation techniques, which will enhance the communication potentials of science museums and will provide conditions for a fruitful even-handed exchange of expert and lay knowledge.

  12. Elementary modes of coupled oscillators as whispering-gallery microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2015-10-01

    We obtain the elementary modes of a system of parity-time reversal (PT)-symmetric coupled oscillators with balanced loss and gain. These modes are used to give a physical picture of the phase transition recently reported [C. M. Bender, M. Gianfreda, B. Peng, S. K. Özdemir and L. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 062111 (2013); L. Yang, S. K. Özdemir and B. Peng, 12th Int. Workshop and Conf. Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics, Istanbul, Turkey, July 2013; B. Peng, S. K. Özdemir, F. Lei, F. Monifi, M. Gianfreda, G. L. Long, S. Fan, F. Nori, C. M. Bender and L. Yang, Nat. Phys. 10, 394 (2014)] in experiments with whispering-gallery microresonators.

  13. Shoulder uptake in the bone scintigraphy in patients with hemiplegic reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Jin; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Hong, Joon Beom; Han, Tai Ryoon; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-01

    Increased uptake of wrist and hand joints in three phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) have been used in the detection of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS). TPBS frequently shows increased shoulder uptake in the hemiplegic RSDS patients. We investigated the significance of the shoulder uptake in the detection of these patients. Twenty three patients who had hemiplegia due to brain stroke and diagnosed as RSD were enrolled in this study (M:F=16:7, R:L=11:12). The mean age was 63{+-}10 yrs. Ten normal volunteer (mean age: 60{+-}5, M:F=1:9) data was used as control group. TPBS was performed 59{+-}32 days after stoke (acute stage). We obtained the count ratios of bilateral hands by drawing a region of interest (ROI) in three phase images and compared to the count ratios of shoulders in the delayed image. Hand ROI included an ipsilateral wrist. Sensitivity of detecting the affected limb was defined using the right/left count ratio of normal control. Sensitivities using count ratios of hand blood flow, blood pool and delayed image were 45%, 76% and 78%, respectively. Sensitivity of shoulder count ratio was 74%. Log of right/left counts of hand delayed image and that of shoulder delayed image were correlated well with statistical significance (Spearman's R=0.824, p<0.001). Shoulder uptake showed good correlation with hand uptake in the delayed image of TPBS. Shoulder uptake maybe helpful in the diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome in patients with hemiplegia.

  14. Methodics of computing the results of monitoring the exploratory gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krúpa Víazoslav

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available At building site of motorway tunnel Višòové-Dubná skala , the priority is given to driving of exploration galley that secures in detail: geologic, engineering geology, hydrogeology and geotechnics research. This research is based on gathering information for a supposed use of the full profile driving machine that would drive the motorway tunnel. From a part of the exploration gallery which is driven by the TBM method, a fulfilling information is gathered about the parameters of the driving process , those are gathered by a computer monitoring system. The system is mounted on a driving machine. This monitoring system is based on the industrial computer PC 104. It records 4 basic values of the driving process: the electromotor performance of the driving machine Voest-Alpine ATB 35HA, the speed of driving advance, the rotation speed of the disintegrating head TBM and the total head pressure. The pressure force is evaluated from the pressure in the hydraulic cylinders of the machine. Out of these values, the strength of rock mass, the angle of inner friction, etc. are mathematically calculated. These values characterize rock mass properties as their changes. To define the effectivity of the driving process, the value of specific energy and the working ability of driving head is used. The article defines the methodics of computing the gathered monitoring information, that is prepared for the driving machine Voest – Alpine ATB 35H at the Institute of Geotechnics SAS. It describes the input forms (protocols of the developed method created by an EXCEL program and shows selected samples of the graphical elaboration of the first monitoring results obtained from exploratory gallery driving process in the Višòové – Dubná skala motorway tunnel.

  15. Microwave photonics systems based on whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Henriet, Rémi; Phan Huy, Kien; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Balakireva, Irina; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K

    2013-08-05

    Microwave photonics systems rely fundamentally on the interaction between microwave and optical signals. These systems are extremely promising for various areas of technology and applied science, such as aerospace and communication engineering, sensing, metrology, nonlinear photonics, and quantum optics. In this article, we present the principal techniques used in our lab to build microwave photonics systems based on ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators. First detailed in this article is the protocol for resonator polishing, which is based on a grind-and-polish technique close to the ones used to polish optical components such as lenses or telescope mirrors. Then, a white light interferometric profilometer measures surface roughness, which is a key parameter to characterize the quality of the polishing. In order to launch light in the resonator, a tapered silica fiber with diameter in the micrometer range is used. To reach such small diameters, we adopt the "flame-brushing" technique, using simultaneously computer-controlled motors to pull the fiber apart, and a blowtorch to heat the fiber area to be tapered. The resonator and the tapered fiber are later approached to one another to visualize the resonance signal of the whispering gallery modes using a wavelength-scanning laser. By increasing the optical power in the resonator, nonlinear phenomena are triggered until the formation of a Kerr optical frequency comb is observed with a spectrum made of equidistant spectral lines. These Kerr comb spectra have exceptional characteristics that are suitable for several applications in science and technology. We consider the application related to ultra-stable microwave frequency synthesis and demonstrate the generation of a Kerr comb with GHz intermodal frequency.

  16. Calcitonin effects on shoulder adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Alireza; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Bazavar, Mohammadreza; Barzgar, Mahmood; Tabrizi, Ali; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar

    2016-08-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is a relatively prevalent disease of shoulder and affects soft tissue of glenohumeral joint. Signs include painful restricted motion and disability of the patient in daily activities. Calcitonin is a thyroid hormone, and its effectiveness has been demonstrated in painful conditions. The presents study aims to evaluate the effect of calcitonin in treating shoulder adhesive capsulitis. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted on 64 patients suffering from shoulder adhesive capsulitis. The intervention and control groups were given intranasal calcitonin and placebo for 6 weeks, respectively. For both groups, physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were administered correspondingly. The patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment for shoulder pain and shoulder range of motion (ROM). Shoulder functional outcome (secondary outcome) was evaluated using Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and Health Assessment Questionnaire disability criteria. The mean age of patients in calcitonin and control group was 52.4 ± 4.6 and 53.2 ± 4.9, respectively. Demographic characteristics and pre-treatment scores were similar in both groups (all P > 0.05). In post-treatment follow-up, shoulder pain, ROM, and the patients' functional scores were significantly improved in both groups (P adhesive capsulitis with regard to the efficiency in alleviating pain and improving functional outcome. II.

  17. Species composition, community and population dynamics of two gallery forests from the Brazilian Cerrado domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastauer, Markus; Almado, Roosevelt P; Miazaki, Angela S; Diniz, Écio S; Moreira, Luis C B; Meira-Neto, João A A

    2016-01-01

    To understand the impacts of global changes on future community compositions, knowledge of community dynamics is of crucial importance. To improve our knowledge of community composition, biomass stock and maintenance of gallery forests in the Brazilian Cerrado, we provide two datasets from the 0.5 ha Corrego Fazendinha Gallery Forest Dynamics Plot and the Corrego Fundo Gallery Forest Dynamics Plot situated in the Bom Despacho region, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. We report diameter at breast height, basal area and height measurements of 3417 trees and treelets identified during three censuses in both areas.

  18. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  19. Loess Shoulder Line Extraction Based on Openness and Threshold Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Ke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method of loess shoulder line extraction with openness and threshold segmentation. Openness is an angular measurement of the relationship between surface relief and horizontal distance which can be derived from DEM. As it has the outstanding ability of expressing the positive and negative terrain characteristics and the attribute of "analysis-scale flexibility", in this study, we developed the idea of loess shoulder line extraction based on the difference of positive and negative openness images and threshould segmentation. Firstly, we calculated the positive and negative openness of our study area based on DEM. Then, a difference image was generated by the subtraction of positive and negative openness images. Afer that, it was processed by a threshold segmentation method, and we analyzed some important spatial distribution characteristics of positive and negative terrain in study area. Finally, we extracted the shoulder lines semi-automatically by an edge-detection method which came from the concept of morphology. Our study area locates in Louchuan, Shaanxi province, a typical hilly gully region in northwstern China. Considering the effect of the local window size on analysis accuracy and the match of the fitness surface and DEM terrain surface, we chose a 5 m×5 m high-resolution DEM of Luochuan which was purchased from Shaanxi Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation. The result manifested that our method enhanced and guaranteed the accuracy ofthe basic geomorphological characters of study area.

  20. Enhanced-MRI and ultrasound evaluation of painful shoulder in patients after stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompa, Alessandra; Clemenzi, Alessandro; Troisi, Elio; Di Mario, Marco; Tonini, Angelo; Pace, Luca; Casillo, Paolo; Cuccaro, Alessandro; Grasso, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological and radiological studies have previously been performed to identify the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP). Many different etiologies have been postulated, though no clear correlations have emerged, and a multifactorial pathogenesis of HSP has been proposed. Recently, two MRI-based studies have described different shoulder findings as possible causes of pain in chronic stroke survivors. The aim of this study was to describe the structural abnormalities of the painful shoulder in the first months after stroke by ultrasound and enhanced MRI. The secondary aims were to identify possible predisposing factors for HSP and to evaluate its impact on motor recovery. One hundred and fifty-three first-time stroke patients, admitted to the Santa Lucia Foundation for rehabilitation, were investigated for HSP. Twenty-five stroke patients with HSP and 16 stroke patients without shoulder pain were included. An ultrasound evaluation and enhanced shoulder MRI were performed for all the patients. Among the shoulder abnormalities detected by both imaging studies, only capsulitis, which was detected by enhanced shoulder MRI in 88% of the HSP patients, was independently associated with pain (p pain intensity as expressed by the VAS score (p pain. Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of HSP. However, MRI, which is more expensive than other diagnostic tools, may be considered the gold standard tool for understanding the etiology of HSP. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Shoulder X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  2. Risk of shoulder dystocia in second delivery: does a history of shoulder dystocia matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overland, Eva A; Spydslaug, Anny; Nielsen, Christopher S; Eskild, Anne

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to estimate the relative and absolute risk of shoulder dystocia in the second delivery according to history of shoulder dystocia and offspring birthweight. A retrospective cohort study including all women in Norway with 2 consecutive singleton vaginal deliveries with fetus in cephalic presentation, during the period 1967-2005 (n = 537,316). In the second delivery shoulder dystocia occurred in 0.8% of all women. In women with a prior shoulder dystocia the recurrence risk was 7.3%. Most cases of shoulder dystocia in second delivery were in women without such history (96.2%). Offspring birthweight was the most important risk factor for shoulder dystocia in second delivery: crude odds ratio, 292.9 (95% confidence interval, 237.8-360.7) comparing birthweight > 5000 g with 3000-3499 g. Prior shoulder dystocia increased the risk of shoulder dystocia in the second delivery. However, offspring birthweight was by far the most important risk factor.

  3. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  4. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Papalia, R.; Tecame, A.; Torre, G.; Narbona, P.; Maffulli, N.; Denaro, V.

    2014-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and ...

  5. Studies in shoulder disorders and tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ostor, Andrew James Knowles

    2017-01-01

    The human shoulder is the most complex of any peripheral synovial joint. Despite the high incidence and prevalence of symptomatic shoulder disorders, particularly of the rotator cuff, a paucity of robust research exists into this area. Lack of consensus on the most appropriate clinical method of assessing the shoulder and lack of adequate diagnostic criteria has inhibited the development of effective management strategies. This has substantial implications for individuals, heal...

  6. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  7. Problem of painful shoulder in hemiparetics patients

    OpenAIRE

    Daumann, Pavla

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on a painful hemiparetic shoulder as a frequently observed complication in patients suffering from stroke. Basic information about stroke, anatomy and kinematics of shoulder joint is included in a theoretical part of the thesis. The largest portion describes a pathogenesis of painful hemiparetic shoulder, its prevention and commonly used physiotherapeutic approaches. The practical part of the thesis consists of two case reports of patients with stroke suffering...

  8. Shoulder arthroplasty for sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthel, Jean-David; Schoch, Bradley; Sperling, John W; Cofield, Robert; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-05-01

    Polio infection can often lead to orthopedic complications such as arthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, skeletal deformation, and chronic instability of the joints. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes and associated complications of arthroplasty in shoulders with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Seven patients (average age, 70 years) were treated between 1976 and 2013 with shoulder arthroplasty for the sequelae of polio. One patient underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty, 2 had a hemiarthroplasty, and 4 had total shoulder arthroplasty. Average follow-up was 87 months. Outcome measures included pain, range of motion, and postoperative modified Neer ratings. Overall pain scores improved from 5 to 1.6 points (on a 5-point scale) after shoulder arthroplasty. Six shoulders had no or mild pain at latest follow-up, and 6 shoulders rated the result as much better or better. Mean shoulder elevation improved from 72° to 129°, and external rotation improved from 11° to 56°. Average strength in elevation decreased from 3.9 to 3.4 postoperatively, and external rotation strength decreased from 3.9 to 3.3. This, however, did not reach significance. Evidence of muscle imbalance with radiographic instability was found in 4 shoulders that demonstrated superior subluxation, anterior subluxation, or both. This remained asymptomatic. No shoulder required revision or reoperation. Shoulder arthroplasty provides significant pain relief and improved motion in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Muscle weakness may be responsible for postoperative instability, and careful selection of the patient with good upper extremity muscles must be made. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Shoulder dystocia: impacts, prevention, prognosis, troubleshooting

    OpenAIRE

    G. Kontopoulos; S. Kouvelas

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most dramatic complications encountered in obstetrics. When this complication occurs, it can result in increased maternal morbidity rate and increased incidence of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although several risk factors are clearly associated with dystocia shoulder. The recognition of individual cases of shoulder dystocia has proven impossible in practice, before they occur during labor. Several guidelines have been published concerning the treatment...

  10. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    OpenAIRE

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after stroke (17 men) were compared with 10 healthy age-matched control subjects. Using an electromagnetic tracking device, the kinematics of both the contralateral and ipsilateral (i.e. paretic and non-paret...

  12. The influence of the whispering gallery modes resonators shape on their sensitivity to the movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Yuri V.; Govorenko, Ekaterina V.; Kukaev, Alexander S.; Shalymov, Egor V.; Venediktov, Vladimir Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The optical whispering gallery modes resonators are axially symmetrical resonators with smooth edges, supporting the existence of the whispering gallery modes by the total internal reflection on the surface of the resonator. For today various types of such resonators were developed, namely the ball-shaped, tor-shaped, bottle-shaped, disk-shaped etc. The movement of whispering gallery modes resonators in inertial space causes the changes of their shape. The result is a spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Optical methods allow to register this shift with high precision. It can be used in particular for the measurement of angular velocities in inertial orientation and navigation systems. However, different types of resonators react to the movement on a miscellaneous. In addition, their sensitivity to movement can be changed when changing the geometric parameters of these resonators. This work is devoted to a research of these aspects.

  13. The Habitable Zone Gallery 2.0: The Online Exoplanet System Visualization Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, C. O.; Kane, S. R.; Gelino, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery 2.0 provides new and improved visualization and data analysis tools to the exoplanet habitability community and beyond. Modules include interactive habitable zone plotting and downloadable 3D animations.

  14. High-Q BSW-whispering gallery modes in periodic multi-layer microring resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Haitao; Zhou, Hongwen; Xiao, Jing

    2018-03-01

    We propose a kind of ultrasensitive sensing structure based on Bloch surface wave(BSW)-whispering gallery mode localized on the surface between the sensed medium and the multi-layer microring. By exploiting low-loss and high percentage of energy extending into the sensed medium properties of BSW and high quality factor property of whispering gallery modes, this BSW-whispering gallery mode possesses a high percentage of energy in the sensed medium around 55% and a high quality factor on the order of 105. As a potential application, the BSW-whispering gallery mode could be used for sensing with a sensitivity high up to 400 nm per refractive index unit, and a significantly improved FOM about 1 . 88 × 105.

  15. Krasotshnõje snõ Sed Arte Gallery / Irina Butjajeva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Butjajeva, Irina

    2007-01-01

    Valgevene kunstnike Jelena Shlegeli, Vladimir Gontsharuki, Dmitri Zenkovitshi ja Dmitri Masli maalinäitus "Valgevene värvilised unenäod" Tallinna galeriis Aatrium. Näitust vahendas Sed Arte Gallery, galerist Olga Ljubaskina

  16. Shoulder muscle activity and function in common shoulder rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Yamashiro, Kyle; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    The rotator cuff performs multiple functions during shoulder exercises, including glenohumeral abduction, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR). The rotator cuff also stabilizes the glenohumeral joint and controls humeral head translations. The infraspinatus and subscapularis have significant roles in scapular plane abduction (scaption), generating forces that are two to three times greater than supraspinatus force. However, the supraspinatus still remains a more effective shoulder abductor because of its more effective moment arm. Both the deltoids and rotator cuff provide significant abduction torque, with an estimated contribution up to 35-65% by the middle deltoid, 30% by the subscapularis, 25% by the supraspinatus, 10% by the infraspinatus and 2% by the anterior deltoid. During abduction, middle deltoid force has been estimated to be 434 N, followed by 323 N from the anterior deltoid, 283 N from the subscapularis, 205 N from the infraspinatus, and 117 N from the supraspinatus. These forces are generated not only to abduct the shoulder but also to stabilize the joint and neutralize the antagonistic effects of undesirable actions. Relatively high force from the rotator cuff not only helps abduct the shoulder but also neutralizes the superior directed force generated by the deltoids at lower abduction angles. Even though anterior deltoid force is relatively high, its ability to abduct the shoulder is low due to a very small moment arm, especially at low abduction angles. The deltoids are more effective abductors at higher abduction angles while the rotator cuff muscles are more effective abductors at lower abduction angles. During maximum humeral elevation the scapula normally upwardly rotates 45-55 degrees, posterior tilts 20-40 degrees and externally rotates 15-35 degrees. The scapular muscles are important during humeral elevation because they cause these motions, especially the serratus anterior, which contributes to scapular upward rotation

  17. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  18. Prevalence and variance of shoulder injuries in elite collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Lee D; Flanigan, David C; Norwig, John; Jost, Patrick; Bradley, James

    2005-08-01

    Shoulder injuries are the fourth most common musculoskeletal injury encountered in American football players. There is little information in the literature on the role of playing position in the type of shoulder injuries seen. There is a high prevalence of shoulder injuries in elite collegiate American football players, with type of injury varying by playing position. Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 3. A total of 336 elite collegiate American football players were invited to the National Football League Combine for physical testing and medical evaluation. Current and historical data were evaluated for the purpose of this study, and all players underwent radiographic examinations, including plain radiographs and/or magnetic resonance imaging when necessary. All shoulder pathological conditions and shoulder surgical procedures were recorded. Players were categorized by position for the analysis of position-specific trends. Of the players, 50% had a history of shoulder injuries, with a total of 226 shoulder injuries (1.3 injuries per player injured); 56 players (34%) had a total of 73 surgeries. The most common injuries were acromioclavicular separation (41%), anterior instability (20%), rotator cuff injury (12%), clavicle fracture (4%), and posterior instability (4%). The most common surgeries performed were anterior instability reconstruction (48%), Mumford/Weaver-Dunn surgery (15%), posterior instability surgery (10%), and rotator cuff surgery (10%). Shoulder injuries were more common in quarterbacks and defensive backs. Surgery was more common in linebackers or linemen. A history of anterior instability was more common in defensive players, with surgery required 76% of the time. Linemen had more rotator cuff injuries and posterior instability than players in other positions. Shoulder injuries are common injuries in elite collegiate football players, with one-third undergoing surgical procedures. There are definitive trends in the types of injuries

  19. Rehabilitation of the shoulder in tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, K D; Litchfield, R; Hawkins, R J

    1995-01-01

    The tennis player places unique demands on the shoulder by creating a high risk for overuse and overloading of the soft tissues. Tennis requires concentric work to position and move the arm, eccentric work to stabilize the shoulder, effective depression of the humeral head to avoid impingement in the overhead position, and normal stability to prevent secondary impingement. The tennis serve produces enormous angular velocities about the shoulder joint. A comprehensive rehabilitation program has been described in which the therapist, trainer, player, and physician alike need to have an understanding of the basic biomechanics of this sport. This program can be used to treat the painful shoulder, prevent injury, and enhance performance.

  20. Shoulder dystocia: impacts, prevention, prognosis, troubleshooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kontopoulos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder dystocia is one of the most dramatic complications encountered in obstetrics. When this complication occurs, it can result in increased maternal morbidity rate and increased incidence of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although several risk factors are clearly associated with dystocia shoulder. The recognition of individual cases of shoulder dystocia has proven impossible in practice, before they occur during labor. Several guidelines have been published concerning the treatment of shoulder dystocia, aiming to instruct obstetricians to a maneuver sequence to reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.

  1. Shoulder dystocia: risk factors, predictability, and preventability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shobha H; Sokol, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency, striking fear in the hearts of obstetricians both novice and experienced. While outcomes that lead to permanent injury are rare, almost all obstetricians with enough years of practice have participated in a birth with a severe shoulder dystocia and are at least aware of cases that have resulted in significant neurologic injury or even neonatal death. This is despite many years of research trying to understand the risk factors associated with it, all in an attempt primarily to characterize when the risk is high enough to avoid vaginal delivery altogether and prevent a shoulder dystocia, whose attendant morbidities are estimated to be at a rate as high as 16-48%. The study of shoulder dystocia remains challenging due to its generally retrospective nature, as well as dependence on proper identification and documentation. As a result, the prediction of shoulder dystocia remains elusive, and the cost of trying to prevent one by performing a cesarean delivery remains high. While ultimately it is the injury that is the key concern, rather than the shoulder dystocia itself, it is in the presence of an identified shoulder dystocia that occurrence of injury is most common. The majority of shoulder dystocia cases occur without major risk factors. Moreover, even the best antenatal predictors have a low positive predictive value. Shoulder dystocia therefore cannot be reliably predicted, and the only preventative measure is cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Can shoulder dystocia be reliably predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jodie M; Catcheside, Britt; Scheil, Wendy

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate factors reported to increase the risk of shoulder dystocia, and to evaluate their predictive value at a population level. The South Australian Pregnancy Outcome Unit's population database from 2005 to 2010 was accessed to determine the occurrence of shoulder dystocia in addition to reported risk factors, including age, parity, self-reported ethnicity, presence of diabetes and infant birth weight. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence interval) of shoulder dystocia was calculated for each risk factor, which were then incorporated into a logistic regression model. Test characteristics for each variable in predicting shoulder dystocia were calculated. As a proportion of all births, the reported rate of shoulder dystocia increased significantly from 0.95% in 2005 to 1.38% in 2010 (P = 0.0002). Using a logistic regression model, induction of labour and infant birth weight greater than both 4000 and 4500 g were identified as significant independent predictors of shoulder dystocia. The value of risk factors alone and when incorporated into the logistic regression model was poorly predictive of the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. While there are a number of factors associated with an increased risk of shoulder dystocia, none are of sufficient sensitivity or positive predictive value to allow their use clinically to reliably and accurately identify the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder

  6. Critical shoulder angle combined with age predict five shoulder pathologies: a retrospective analysis of 1000 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Plachel, Fabian; Willinger, Lukas; Moroder, Philipp; Laky, Brenda; Pauzenberger, Leo; Lomoschitz, Fritz; Anderl, Werner

    2017-06-15

    Acromial morphology has previously been defined as a risk factor for some shoulder pathologies. Yet, study results are inconclusive and not all major shoulder diseases have been sufficiently investigated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze predictive value of three radiological parameters including the critical shoulder angle, acromion index, and lateral acromion angle in relationship to symptomatic patients with either cuff tear arthropathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, rotator cuff tear, impingement, and tendinitis calcarea. A total of 1000 patients' standardized true-anteroposterior radiographs were retrospectively assessed. Receiver-operating curve analyses and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine the association between shoulder pathologies and acromion morphology. The prediction model was derived from a development cohort and applied to a validation cohort. Prediction model's performance was statistically evaluated. The majority of radiological measurements were significantly different between shoulder pathologies, but the critical shoulder angle was an overall better parameter to predict and distinguish between the different pathologies than the acromion index or lateral acromion angle. Typical critical shoulder angle-age patterns for the different shoulder pathologies could be detected. Patients diagnosed with rotator cuff tears had the highest, whereas patients with osteoarthritis had the lowest critical shoulder angle. The youngest patients were in the tendinitis calcarea and the oldest in the cuff tear arthropathy group. The present study showed that critical shoulder angle and age, two easily assessable variables, adequately predict different shoulder pathologies in patients with shoulder complaints.

  7. The Phosphates of Pleistocene-Holocene Sediments of the Eastern Gallery of Denisova Cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunkov, M. V.; Kulik, N. A.; Kozlikin, M. B.; Sokol, E. V.; Miroshnichenko, L. V.; Ulianov, V. A.

    2018-01-01

    Authigenic phosphate mineralization was first studied on the territory of Russia on the basis of the Holocene and Pleistocene deposits of Denisova Cave. The formation of phosphates in the eastern gallery is related to biodegradation of the horizons of guano of insectivorous bats, which inhabited the cave in the absence man. The results confirmed the archaeological record of the Holocene and the upper part of Pleistocene sequences of the eastern gallery.

  8. Three-dimensional whispering gallery modes in InGaAs nanoneedle lasers on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T.-T. D.; Chen, R.; Ng, K. W.; Ko, W. S.; Lu, F.; Chang-Hasnain, C. J., E-mail: cch@berkeley.edu [Applied Science and Technology Group and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As-grown InGaAs nanoneedle lasers, synthesized at complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor compatible temperatures on polycrystalline and crystalline silicon substrates, were studied in photoluminescence experiments. Radiation patterns of three-dimensional whispering gallery modes were observed upon optically pumping the needles above the lasing threshold. Using the radiation patterns as well as finite-difference-time-domain simulations and polarization measurements, all modal numbers of the three-dimensional whispering gallery modes could be identified.

  9. Late Holocene history of savanna gallery forest from Carimagua area, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrio; Hooghiemstra; Behling; van der Borg K

    2000-09-01

    The pollen record of a 65cm long core Laguna Carimagua-Bosque (4 degrees 04'N, 70 degrees 13'W) shows the late Holocene environmental history from a lake located within the gallery forest of the savannas of the Llanos Orientales of Colombia. Nine AMS radiocarbon dates of the organic deposits show that the core represents the period from ca. 1300(14)CyrBP to the present. The lake evolved from an active drainage system.During the period from ca. 1300 to 875(14)CyrBP (zone CMB-Ia), Mauritia-dominated swamp and gallery forest was present, dominated by Cecropia, and later also Acalypha and Alchornea. From 875 to 700(14)CyrBP (zone CMB-Ib), the lake was completely surrounded by gallery forest. Mauritiella and Cecropia occurred around the lake. Cecropia pioneer forest reached its greatest abundance and became gradually replaced by a more species-rich gallery forest, including Acalypha, Alchornea, Euterpe/Geonoma, Moraceae/Urticaceae, Piperaceae, and Virola. From 700 to 125(14)CyrBP (zone CMB-II), Cecropia lost its dominant role, and Mauritiella palms became more frequent. The main vegetation categories were swamp forest, gallery forest, understory elements, savanna shrubs and trees, and grass savanna. From 125(14)CyrBP to recent (zone CMB-III), the plant diversity in the gallery forest became highest, Mauritiella became very abundant, and among the savanna elements, woody Didymopanax increased.Comparison of four pollen records from savanna sites shows that pollen of savanna vegetation is markedly underrepresented in lake sediments when the lake lies within the gallery forest. As most of the drainage system of a savanna is hidden by gallery forest, we also expect a significant underrepresentation of the savanna ecosystem in river-transported pollen assemblages.

  10. Management of mid-season traumatic anterior shoulder instability in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Brett D; Dickens, Jonathan F; Kilcoyne, Kelly G; Rue, John-Paul H

    2012-08-01

    Shoulder dislocation and subluxation injuries are common in young athletes and most frequently occur during the competitive season. Controversy exists regarding optimal treatment of an athlete with an in-season shoulder dislocation, and limited data are available to guide treatment. Rehabilitation may facilitate return to sport within 3 weeks, but return is complicated by a moderate risk of recurrence. Bracing may reduce the risk of recurrence, but it restricts motion and may not be tolerated in patients who must complete certain sport-specific tasks such as throwing. Surgical management of shoulder dislocation or subluxation with arthroscopic or open Bankart repair reduces the rate of recurrence; however, the athlete is unable to participate in sport for the remainder of the competitive season. When selecting a management option, the clinician must consider the natural history of shoulder instability, pathologic changes noted on examination and imaging, sport- and position-specific demands, duration of treatment, and the athlete's motivation.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures About the Shoulder: Anatomy, Indications, and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourcho, Adam M; Colio, Sean W; Hall, Mederic M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic and acute shoulder pain and dysfunction are common complaints among patients. Shoulder pain may be the result of abnormality involving the rotator cuff, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, biceps tendon, glenoid labrum, glenohumeral joint, acromioclavicular joint, sternoclavicular joint, or glenohumeral joint capsule. Ultrasound-guided (USG) procedures of the shoulder are well established for interventional management. Ultrasound provides the advantages of excellent soft tissue resolution, injection accuracy, low cost, accessibility, portability, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to perform real-time image-guided procedures. The purpose of this article is to review common indications and effective techniques for USG injections about the shoulder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Late Holocene history of savannah gallery forest from Carimagua area, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrio, Juan Carlos; Hooghiemstra, Henry; Behling, Hermann; Van Der Borg

    2002-01-01

    The pollen record of a 65-cm long core Laguna Carimagua-Bosque (4 degrade 04' N, 70 degrade 13' W) shows the late Holocene environmental history from a lake located within the gallery forest of the savannahs of the llanos Orientales of Colombia. Nine AMS radiocarbon dates of the organic deposits show the core represents the period from c. 1300 14 C yr BP to the present. The lake evolved from an active drainage system. During the period from c. 1300 to 875 14 C yr BP (zone CMB-Ia) Mauritia dominated swamp and gallery forest was present dominated by Cecropia, and later also Acalypha and Alchornea. From 875 to 700 14 C yr BP (zone CMB Ib) the lake was completely surrounded by gallery forest. Mauritiella and Cecropia occurred around the lake. Cecropia pioneer forest reached its greatest abundance and became gradually replaced by a more species rich gallery forest, including Acalypha, Alchornea, Euterpe/Geonoma, Moraceae/Urticaceae, Piperaceae, and Virola. From 700 to 125 14 C yr BP (zone CMB - II) Cecropia lost its dominant role and Mauritiella palms became more frequent. Main vegetation categories were swamp forest, gallery forest, under story elements, savannah shrubs and trees, and grass savannah. From 125 14 C yr BP to recent (zone CMB -III) plant diversity in the gallery forest became highest, Mauritiella became very abundant and among the savannah elements woody Didymopanax increased

  13. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Meskers CG, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, Janssen TW. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke. Objective: To identify a possible relationship among chronic poststroke shoulder pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose, and shoulder proprioception.

  14. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, Angelo, E-mail: angelcoraz@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Orlandi, Davide, E-mail: theabo@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Fabbro, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.fabbro@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ferrero, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.ferrero@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Messina, Carmelo, E-mail: carmelomessina.md@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sartoris, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.sartoris@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Perugin Bernardi, Silvia, E-mail: silvy-86-@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Arcidiacono, Alice, E-mail: a.arcidiacono84@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo, E-mail: silvi.enzo@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Radiologia, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16121 Genova (Italy); and others

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material.

  15. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location. (orig.)

  16. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports; Schultergelenkverletzungen bei Ueberkopfsportarten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2010-05-15

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [German] Ueberkopfsportarten stellen grosse Anforderungen an das Schultergelenk. Schulterbeschwerden bei Ueberkopf- und Wurfsportlern koennen in der Mehrzahl der Faelle auf eine chronische Ueberlastung von Sehnen und Kapsel-Band-Strukturen oder auf die Folgen einer Mikroinstabilitaet und sekundaerer Impingementsyndrome zurueckgefuehrt werden. Wegen ihres grossen Einflusses auf die Therapieentscheidung stellt die Bildgebung bei Athleten mit unklaren Schulterbeschwerden eine Herausforderung dar. Die MR-Arthrographie ist in diesem Zusammenhang als Schnittbildverfahren der ersten Wahl anzusehen, da sie den Nachweis bzw. Ausschluss pathologischer Veraenderungen aller relevanten Gelenkstrukturen mit ausreichender Sicherheit ermoeglicht. Dieser Artikel gibt eine Uebersicht ueber biomechanische und klinische Aspekte sowie MR-arthrographische Befunde der haeufigsten Schultergelenkpathologien bei Ueberkopfsportlern, wie Bizepstendinopathie, Superior-labral-anterior-posterior- (SLAP-)Laesionen, Laesionen der

  17. EFFECT OF GONG'S MOBILIZATION VERSUS MULLIGAN'S MOBILIZATION ON SHOULDER PAIN AND SHOULDER MEDIAL ROTATION MOBILITY IN FROZEN SHOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Rinku Dilip

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frozen shoulder is a painful condition with gradual restriction of all planes of movement in the shoulder joint. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of Gong’s Mobilization versus Mulligan’s Mobilization on Shoulder pain and Shoulder Medial Rotation mobility in subjects with Frozen shoulder. Methods: An Experimental study design, 40 subjects with unilateral frozen shoulder were selected and randomized 20 subjects into each of two groups- Gong’s mobilization and Mulligan’s mobilization respectively. Gong’s group received the Gong’s mobilization technique with conventional therapy while Mulligan’s group received Mulligan’s mobilization along with conventional therapy. The duration of intervention was 5 treatment sessions per week for two weeks. Outcome measures such as shoulder medial rotation was measured using a Goniometer and pain was measured using a VAS scale before and after two weeks of intervention. Results: Analysis using Independent ‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test found that there is statistically significant difference p<0.000 when pre to post interventions means were compared within the groups. When post intervention means were compared between the Gong’s and Mulligan’s groups there was no statistically significant difference in Active and Passive Range of Shoulder Medial Rotation but there was statistically significant difference in VAS when compared between the groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that both Gong’s mobilization with conventional therapy and Mulligan’s mobilization with conventional therapy are effective in improving Shoulder Medial Rotation Mobility in Frozen Shoulder. However Gong’s mobilization shown greater percentage of effect in reducing pain and Mulligan’s Mobilization shown greater percentage in improving ROM.

  18. Shooting gallery attendance among IDUs in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico: correlates, prevention opportunities, and the role of the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Morgan; Pollini, Robin A; Ramos, Rebecca; Lozada, Remedios; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Ramos, Maria Elena; Firestone-Cruz, Michelle; Case, Patricia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2008-07-01

    We identified factors associated with shooting gallery attendance among injection drug users (IDUs) in two Mexico-US border cities. IDUs in Tijuana (n=222) and Ciudad Juarez (n=205), Mexico, who were >or=18 years and injected illicit drugs in the last month were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). An interviewer-administered survey collected sociodemographic and behavioral data. Logistic regression was used to examine correlates of shooting gallery attendance in each of the two cities. Homelessness and being arrested for syringe possession--both structural level factors--were associated with shooting gallery use in both cities. In Ciudad Juarez, younger age and having overdosed were also associated with shooting gallery use. Our study highlights the need for structural interventions that mitigate homelessness among IDUs and facilitate changes in law enforcement practices associated with shooting gallery use. Harm reduction interventions based within shooting galleries should also be considered to prevent transmission of blood-borne pathogens among IDUs.

  19. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs. Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7-11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:114–120.

  20. Consensus for physiotherapy for shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintberg, Ingrid Hultenheim; Cools, Ann M J; Holmgren, Theresa M; Holzhausen, Ann-Christine Gunnarsson; Johansson, Kajsa; Maenhout, Annelies G; Moser, Jane S; Spunton, Valentina; Ginn, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Shoulder pain is a common disorder. Despite growing evidence of the importance of physiotherapy, in particular active exercise therapy, little data is available to guide treatment. The aim of this project was to contribute to the development of an internationally accepted assessment and treatment algorithm for patients with shoulder pain. Nine physiotherapists with expertise in the treatment of shoulder dysfunction met in Sweden 2012 to begin the process of developing a treatment algorithm. A questionnaire was completed prior to the meeting to guide discussions. Virtual conferences were thereafter the platform to reach consensus. Consensus was achieved on a clinical reasoning algorithm to guide the assessment and treatment for patients presenting with local shoulder pain, without significant passive range of motion deficits and no symptoms or signs of instability. The algorithm emphasises that physiotherapy treatment decisions should be based on physical assessment findings and not structural pathology, that active exercises should be the primary treatment approach, and that regular re-assessment is performed to ensure that all clinical features contributing to the presenting shoulder pain are addressed. Consensus was also achieved on a set of guiding principles for implementing exercise therapy for shoulder pain, namely, a limited number of exercises, performed with appropriate scapulo-humeral coordination and humeral head alignment, in a graduated manner without provoking the presenting shoulder pain. The assessment and treatment algorithm presented could contribute to a more formal, extensive process aimed at achieving international agreement on an algorithm to guide physiotherapy treatment for shoulder pain.

  1. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  2. MRI findings in the painful poststroke shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajiv R; Haghpanah, Sepideh; Elovic, Elie P; Flanagan, Steven R; Behnegar, Anousheh; Nguyen, Vu; Page, Stephen J; Fang, Zi-Ping; Chae, John

    2008-06-01

    We describe the structural abnormalities in the painful shoulder of stroke survivors and their relationships to clinical characteristics. Method- Eighty-nine chronic stroke survivors with poststroke shoulder pain underwent T1- and T2-weighted multiplanar, multisequence MRI of the painful paretic shoulder. All scans were reviewed by one radiologist for the following abnormalities: rotator cuff, biceps and deltoid tears, tendinopathies and atrophy, subacromial bursa fluid, labral ligamentous complex abnormalities, and acromioclavicular capsular hypertrophy. Clinical variables included subject demographics, stroke characteristics, and the Brief Pain Inventory Questions 12. The relationship between MRI findings and clinical characteristics was assessed through logistic regression. Thirty-five percent of subjects exhibited a tear of at least one rotator cuff, biceps or deltoid muscle. Fifty-three percent of subjects exhibited tendinopathy of at least one rotator cuff, bicep or deltoid muscle. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears increased with age. However, rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendinopathies were not related to severity of poststroke shoulder pain. In approximately 20% of cases, rotator cuff and deltoid muscles exhibited evidence of atrophy. Atrophy was associated with reduced motor strength and reduced severity of shoulder pain. Rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendinopathies are highly prevalent in poststroke shoulder pain. However, their relationship to shoulder pain is uncertain. Atrophy is less common but is associated with less severe shoulder pain.

  3. Eponymous terms in anterior shoulder stabilization surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, M. P.; van der Linde, J. A.; Wiegerinck, J. I.; Hoornenborg, D.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Deurzen, D. F. P.

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation and its treatment are probably as old as time. Surgical treatment has gained acceptance recently, especially in recurrent cases. Within roughly the last 100 years, numerous treatment strategies have been developed and questions elucidated regarding the entity of shoulder

  4. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of

  5. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  6. [Prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-05-20

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most tragic, fatal and unexpected obstetrical events, which is mostly unpredictable and unpreventable. This clinical picture is defined as a delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. Shoulder dystocia occurs when the fetal shoulder impacts on the maternal symphysis or sacral promontory. The incidence of shoulder dystocia is 0.2-0.6%. High perinatal mortality and morbidity is associated with the condition, even when it is managed appropriately. Obstetricians should be aware of the existing risk factors, but should always be alert to the possibility of shoulder dystocia in all labors. Maternal morbidity is also increased, particularly postpartum hemorrhage, rupture of the uterus, injury of the bladder, urethra and the bowels and fourth-degree perineal tears. Complications of the newborn include asphyxia, perinatal mortality, fracture of the clavicula and the humerus. Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most important fetal complications of shoulder dystocia, complicating 4-16% of such deliveries. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence regarding the possible prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia.

  7. The Sulphate Effect on Lijiaxia Concrete Dam (China Gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufen Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concrete degradation is one of the most serious problems for a dam construct during the normal operation, which determines the dam service life. Hence, it is very important to reduce the extent of the dam concrete degradation for the safety of the dam normal operation. Here, Lijiaxia hydroelectric station is taken as an example, and a comprehensive method to assess the sulphate effect on dam gallery is proposed. Eleven samples in total were taken from three difference locations by the drill bore. The microstructural investigations including X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were conducted to assess the sulphate attack and the degradation degree. Meanwhile, the water chemical analysis was applied to reveal the mechanism of concrete degradation. The experimental and analysis results indicate that the concrete degradation degree varies with the location of the samples. The components of the concrete change and the content of SO3 increase dramatically during degradation. Moreover, the mineral facies of the concrete change correspondingly, with the cement paste substituted by the calcite, calcium vitriol, and gypsum. The reinforcement and precaution measures are suggested based on the results of the degradation assessment.

  8. Photoluminescence and lasing in whispering gallery mode glass microspherical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristić, D.; Berneschi, S.; Camerini, M.; Farnesi, D.; Pelli, S.; Trono, C.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Ferrari, M.; Lukowiak, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Féron, P.; Righini, G.C.; Soria, S.; Conti, G. Nunzi

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results regarding the development of Er 3+ -doped glass microspherical cavities for the fabrication of compact sources at 1.55 μm. We investigate several different approaches in order to fabricate the microspheres including direct melting of Er 3+ -doped glass powders, synthesis of Er 3+ -doped monolithic microspheres by drawing Er 3+ -doped glass, and coating of silica microspheres with an Er 3+ -doped sol–gel layer. Details of the different fabrication processes are presented together with the photoluminescence characterization in free space configuration of the microspheres and of the glass precursor. We have analyzed the photoluminescence spectra of the whispering gallery modes of the microspheres excited using evanescent coupling and we demonstrate tunable laser action in a wide range of wavelengths around 1.55 μm. As much as 90 μW of laser output power was measured in Er 3+ -doped glass microspheres. - Highlights: • Different approaches in microsphere fabrication and various types of post-processing. • Trimming of photorefractive glass microsphere lasers with UV light. • Peak power record of 90 μW by pumping at 1480 nm.

  9. Phase-Array Approach to Optical Whispering Gallery Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    This technology leverages the well-defined orbital number of a whispering gallery modulator (WGM) to expand the range of applications for such resonators. This property rigidly connects the phase variation of the field in this mode with the azimuthal angle between the coupling locations. A WGM with orbital momentum L has exactly L instant nodes around the circumference of the WGM resonator supporting such a mode. Therefore, in two locations separated by the arc alpha, the phase difference of such a field will be equal to phi= alpha L. Coupling the field out of such locations, and into a balanced interferometer, once can observe a complete constructive or distractive interference (or have any situation in between) depending on the angle alpha. Similarly, a mode L + delta L will pick up the phase phi + alpha delta L. In all applications of a WGM resonator as a modulator, the orbital numbers for the carrier and sidebands are different, and their differences delta L are known (usually, but not necessarily, delta L = 1). Therefore, the choice of the angle alpha, and of the interferometer arms difference, allows one to control the relative phase between different modes and to perform the conversion, separation, and filtering tasks necessary.

  10. Whispering galleries and the control of artificial atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2016-04-28

    Quantum computation using artificial-atoms, such as novel superconducting circuits, can be sensitively controlled by external electromagnetic fields. These fields and the self-fields attributable to the coupled artificial-atoms influence the amount of quantum correlation in the system. However, control elements that can operate without complete destruction of the entanglement of the quantum-bits are difficult to engineer. Here we investigate the possibility of using closely-spaced-linear arrays of metallic-elliptical discs as whispering gallery waveguides to control artificial-atoms. The discs confine and guide radiation through the array with small notches etched into their sides that act as scatterers. We focus on π-ring artificial-atoms, which can generate their own spontaneous fluxes. We find that the micro-discs of the waveguides can be excited by terahertz frequency fields to exhibit whispering-modes and that a quantum-phase-gate composed of π-rings can be operated under their influence. Furthermore, we gauge the level of entanglement through the concurrence measure and show that under certain magnetic conditions a series of entanglement sudden-deaths and revivals occur between the two qubits. This is important for understanding the stability and life-time of qubit operations using, for example, a phase gate in a hybrid of quantum technologies composed of control elements and artificial-atoms.

  11. Photoluminescence and lasing in whispering gallery mode glass microspherical resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristić, D. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division of Materials Physics, Laboratory for Molecular Physics, Bijenička c. 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials and Sensing Devices, Research unit New Functional Materials, Bijenička c. 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Berneschi, S.; Camerini, M. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Farnesi, D.; Pelli, S. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); Trono, C. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Ferrari, M. [CSMFO Group, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Lukowiak, A. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, PAS, ul. Okolna 2, Wroclaw 50-950 (Poland); Dumeige, Y.; Féron, P. [Laboratoire d' Optronique, (CNRS-UMR 6082-Foton), ENSSAT, 6 rue de Kérampont, 22300 Lannion (France); Righini, G.C. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); Soria, S., E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Conti, G. Nunzi [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We report experimental results regarding the development of Er{sup 3+}-doped glass microspherical cavities for the fabrication of compact sources at 1.55 μm. We investigate several different approaches in order to fabricate the microspheres including direct melting of Er{sup 3+}-doped glass powders, synthesis of Er{sup 3+}-doped monolithic microspheres by drawing Er{sup 3+}-doped glass, and coating of silica microspheres with an Er{sup 3+}-doped sol–gel layer. Details of the different fabrication processes are presented together with the photoluminescence characterization in free space configuration of the microspheres and of the glass precursor. We have analyzed the photoluminescence spectra of the whispering gallery modes of the microspheres excited using evanescent coupling and we demonstrate tunable laser action in a wide range of wavelengths around 1.55 μm. As much as 90 μW of laser output power was measured in Er{sup 3+}-doped glass microspheres. - Highlights: • Different approaches in microsphere fabrication and various types of post-processing. • Trimming of photorefractive glass microsphere lasers with UV light. • Peak power record of 90 μW by pumping at 1480 nm.

  12. PHYTOSSOCIOLOGY AND DIAMETRIC ESTRUCTURE IN THE GALLERY FOREST OF PITOCO, IN THE ECOLOGICAL RESERVE OF IBGE, DF

    OpenAIRE

    Manoel Cláudio da Silva Júnior

    2005-01-01

    The gallery forest, in the cerrado region, has a very important function on the environmental and social equilibrium.Despite been protected by law, gallery forests have been systematically replaced by agriculture and other regional uses. One thousandtrees (DAP 5cm) were sampled using point centered-quarter (PCQ) method. Sampling lines were established, from the head to themouth of the stream and from the stream margins to the forest-cerrado border, of the Pitoco gallery forest, in the IBGE Ec...

  13. The unstable painful shoulder (UPS) as a cause of pain from unrecognized anteroinferior instability in the young athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Pascal; Zumstein, Matthias; Balg, Frederic; Penington, Scott; Bicknell, Ryan T

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of shoulder pain in the overhead athlete is often difficult to determine. This study hypothesized that (1) instability can present in a purely painful form, without any apparent history of instability, but with anatomic lesions indicative of instability, termed unstable painful shoulder (UPS), and that (2) arthroscopic shoulder stabilization is effective. The study evaluated 20 patients (mean age, 22 ± 8 years) at a mean of 38 months postoperatively (range, 24-69 months). Inclusion criteria were painful shoulder with lesions indicative of instability on imaging or at surgery, minimum 2-year follow-up. Exclusion criteria were recognized instability, other associated pathologies, and previous shoulder surgery. Patients were young, hyperlax athletes who complained of deep, anterior shoulder pain and denied any instability. Pain was reproduced with the arm in an anterior apprehension position and relieved by a relocation test; however, no actual apprehension was experienced. Patients often had glenohumeral laxity and hyperlaxity. Lesions indicative of instability confirmed that at least 1 unapparent shoulder subluxation occurred. The Rowe, Walch-Duplay, and University of California, Los Angeles scores improved significantly (P Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Whispering Gallery Modes in Standard Optical Fibres for Fibre Profiling Measurements and Sensing of Unlabelled Chemical Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Boleininger

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode resonances in liquid droplets and microspheres have attracted considerable attention due to their potential uses in a range of sensing and technological applications. We describe a whispering gallery mode sensor in which standard optical fibre is used as the whispering gallery mode resonator. The sensor is characterised in terms of the response of the whispering gallery mode spectrum to changes in resonator size, refractive index of the surrounding medium, and temperature, and its measurement capabilities are demonstrated through application to high-precision fibre geometry profiling and the detection of unlabelled biochemical species. The prototype sensor is capable of detecting unlabelled biomolecular species in attomole quantities.

  15. Whispering gallery modes in standard optical fibres for fibre profiling measurements and sensing of unlabelled chemical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleininger, Anna; Lake, Thomas; Hami, Sophia; Vallance, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonances in liquid droplets and microspheres have attracted considerable attention due to their potential uses in a range of sensing and technological applications. We describe a whispering gallery mode sensor in which standard optical fibre is used as the whispering gallery mode resonator. The sensor is characterised in terms of the response of the whispering gallery mode spectrum to changes in resonator size, refractive index of the surrounding medium, and temperature, and its measurement capabilities are demonstrated through application to high-precision fibre geometry profiling and the detection of unlabelled biochemical species. The prototype sensor is capable of detecting unlabelled biomolecular species in attomole quantities.

  16. The Genetic Correlation Between Scapula Shape and Shoulder Lesions in Sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbø, Ø; Gangsei, L E; Aasmundstad, T; Grindflek, E; Kongsro, J

    2018-02-19

    Shoulder lesions and body condition of sows at weaning have both environmental and genetic causes. The traits can be scored at farm-level, and following recording, the traits can be included in the breeding goal and directional selection can be applied. However, to further increase the genetic progress of these traits, it is advantageous to develop indicator traits on the selection candidates (test boars or gilts, not yet exhibiting the phenotype themselves). It has previously been suggested that the scapula morphology and the spine of scapula might be a key factor for the sow to develop shoulder lesions. In this study, we developed 11 novel traits describing the morphology of the shoulder blade based on computed tomography (CT) images from scanned test boars. These traits include the Area, Length, Width, Height and Volume of the shoulder blade as well as 6 traits obtained from principal component analysis, describing 80% of the variation observed for the scapula spine profile. The analyzed traits have moderate to high heritability (h2 from 0.29 - 0.78, SE=0.06), low to medium genetic correlations with shoulder lesions (up to 0.4, SE=0.1) and body condition scoring at weaning (up to 0.25, SE=0.1). These novel phenotypes can now be recorded automatically and accurately prior to selection of the AI boars. If such recordings are included in multivariate genomic selection models, it is expected to improve the genetic progress for shoulder lesions and body condition score by weaning.

  17. Clinical and functional profile of patients with the Painful Shoulder Syndrome (PSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daniela; Matos, Marcos; Daltro, Carla; Guimarães, Armênio

    2008-01-01

    The Painful Shoulder Syndrome (PSS) is characterized by varying degrees of pain and functional limitation. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and functional profile of these patients. 136 patients undergoing clinical treatment for PSS were evaluated by a questionnaire regarding the following variables: sex, age, occupation, affected shoulder and its dominance, image diagnosis, pain location, intensity and characteristics, physical activity involving the shoulder, preferential position of upper limbs during occupational activity, limitation of movements during activities o daily living, and job absenteeism. 74.3% of the patients were women (pshoulder was affected most frequently (58.8%) and dominant (91.9%). Rotator cuff tear was the most frequent shoulder pathology (75.4%). Treatment was sought more commonly in the chronic stage of pain (61.0%). Pain, moderate in intensity, predominated in males (54.3%) and severe pain was more frequent in females (47.5%), restricted to the shoulder in 44.1% and worsening at night (50%). The upper limbs were used more frequently below shoulder level during usual daily activities (68.4%), and limitation of movements was present mainly in women (63.4%, p=0.017). Rotator cuff tear is the most frequent cause of PSS. PSS produces pain and functional limitation, especially in women.

  18. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: how we do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Angelo; Orlandi, Davide; Fabbro, Emanuele; Ferrero, Giulio; Messina, Carmelo; Sartoris, Riccardo; Perugin Bernardi, Silvia; Arcidiacono, Alice; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91-100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In Vivo Pediatric Shoulder Muscle Volumes and Their Relationship to 3D Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyun Soo; Alter, Katharine E.; Brochard, Sylvain; Pons, Christelle; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2017-01-01

    In the pediatric shoulder, injury and pathology can disrupt the muscle force balance, resulting in severe functional losses. As little data exists pertaining to in vivo pediatric shoulder muscle function, musculoskeletal data are crucially needed to advance the treatment of pediatric shoulder pathology/injury. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a pediatric database of in vivo volumes for the major shoulder muscles and correlate these volumes to maximum isometric flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and abduction/adduction joint moments. A methodology was developed to derive 3D shoulder muscle volumes and to divide the deltoid into sub-units with unique torque producing capabilities, based on segmentation of three-dimensional magnetic resonance images. Eleven typically developing children/adolescents (4F/7M, 12.0±3.2years, 150.8±16.7cm, 49.2±16.4kg) participated. Correlation and regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between volume and maximum, voluntary, isometric joint torques. The deltoid demonstrated the largest (30.4 ±1.2%) and the supraspinatus the smallest (4.8 ± 0.5%) percent of the total summed volume of all six muscles evaluated. The anterior and posterior deltoid sections were 43.4±3.9% and 56.6±3.9% of the total deltoid volume. The percent volumes were highly consistent across subjects. Individual muscle volumes demonstrated moderate-high correlations with torque values (0.70–0.94, pshoulder muscle volume. Using these data a clear relationship between shoulder volume and the torques they produce was established in all three rotational degrees-of-freedom. This study furthers the understanding of shoulder muscle function and serves as a foundation for evaluating shoulder injury/pathology in the pediatric/adolescent population. PMID:24925254

  20. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving bilateral shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Kyung Sub; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2010-06-09

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a lesion of benign proliferative synovium that invades joint, tendon sheath, and bursa. It mainly occurs in 1 joint, the knee joint or hand, and multi-joint invasion is reported to be atrophy of the deltoid and infraspinatus and a mass-like protrusion on the anterior portion of left shoulder. Active forward elevation was limited to 30 degrees on the right and 90 degrees on the left. Overall synovial hyperplasia and nodular mass was observed on magnetic resonance imaging. Massive rotator cuff tear and invasion of the lesion toward the subacromial space and deltoid muscle was noted as well. Arthroscopic examination revealed a typical finding of PVNS: yellowish brown pigmentation over the overall joint capsule and subacromial space. Arthroscopic total synovectomy without rotator cuff repair was performed for both shoulders. Clinical outcomes showed good pain relief and no recurrence of the disease, although range of motion and muscle strength was not significantly improved, possibly due to accompanied massive rotator cuff tear. Arthroscopic total synovectomy in the treatment of PVNS of the shoulder joint is a minimally invasive and effective method, which makes it possible to access the whole joint space and subacromial space. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Posterior shoulder tightness and rotator cuff strength assessments in painful shoulders of amateur tennis players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy B. Marcondes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a relationship between shoulder posterior capsule tightness and shoulder pain in overhead athletes. However, this relationship has not been studied in tennis players. OBJECTIVES: Assessment of the shoulder range of motion (ROM, strength and posterior capsule tightness of skilled amateur tennis players who had complaints of dominant shoulder pain in comparison with tennis players without pain. METHOD: Forty-nine skilled amateur tennis players were distributed in 2 groups: Control Group (n=22 and Painful Group (n=27. The first group was composed of asymptomatic subjects, and the second was composed of subjects with shoulder pain on the dominant side. These groups were evaluated to determine the dominant and non-dominant shoulder ROM (internal and external rotation, isometric shoulder strength (internal and external rotation and posterior shoulder tightness by blind evaluators. RESULTS: The ANOVA results indicated significant differences between the groups in the dominant shoulder ROM, posterior capsule tightness, external rotation strength and strength ratio (p<0.05. The intragroup analysis (dominant versus non-dominant in the Painful Group displayed a significant difference for ROM, posterior capsule tightness and external rotation strength (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The tennis players with pain in the dominant shoulder presented greater posterior capsule tightness, internal rotation deficit (ROM, external rotation gain (ROM and deficits in external rotation strength than the tennis players without pain.

  2. Posterior shoulder tightness and rotator cuff strength assessments in painful shoulders of amateur tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Freddy B; de Jesus, Julio F; Bryk, Flavio F; de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo A; Fukuda, Thiago Y

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between shoulder posterior capsule tightness and shoulder pain in overhead athletes. However, this relationship has not been studied in tennis players. Assessment of the shoulder range of motion (ROM), strength and posterior capsule tightness of skilled amateur tennis players who had complaints of dominant shoulder pain in comparison with tennis players without pain. Forty-nine skilled amateur tennis players were distributed in 2 groups: Control Group (n=22) and Painful Group (n=27). The first group was composed of asymptomatic subjects, and the second was composed of subjects with shoulder pain on the dominant side. These groups were evaluated to determine the dominant and non-dominant shoulder ROM (internal and external rotation), isometric shoulder strength (internal and external rotation) and posterior shoulder tightness by blind evaluators. The ANOVA results indicated significant differences between the groups in the dominant shoulder ROM, posterior capsule tightness, external rotation strength and strength ratio (pPainful Group displayed a significant difference for ROM, posterior capsule tightness and external rotation strength (ppain in the dominant shoulder presented greater posterior capsule tightness, internal rotation deficit (ROM), external rotation gain (ROM) and deficits in external rotation strength than the tennis players without pain.

  3. The relationships between shoulder pain, range of motion, and disability in patients with shoulder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Al-Eisa, Einas S; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmad

    2018-02-06

    Shoulder dysfunction is a major cause of musculoskeletal pain in general population. A variety of shoulder disorders can cause a reduction in shoulder range of motion and subsequent disability. To investigate the relationship between the shoulder pain, range of motion, and disability in patients with shoulder dysfunction. Sixty-four patients (49 men and 15 women) with shoulder disorders with a varying diagnosis including, adhesive capsulitis, rotator cuff injury, impingement syndrome, acromio-clavicular pain, and instability, participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were asked to report the shoulder pain intensity and level of disability on a numerical rating scale (NRS) and the shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI), respectively. In addition, the active shoulder range of motion was evaluated. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between the shoulder pain, range of motion, and disability. A good negative correlation found between the shoulder abduction, flexion, and rotation range of motion with the NRS score (rho =-0.710 to -0.747). A moderate negative correlation found between the extension and the NRS score (rho =-0.643). A good negative correlation found between abduction and the SPADI total score (rho =-0.714). A moderate negative correlation found between the shoulder flexion and rotation range of motion with the SPADI total score (rho =-0.547 to -0.694). A fair negative correlation found between the extension and the SPADI total score (rho =-0.495). A moderated positive correlation found between the NRS and the SPADI total score (rho = 0.667). The flexion, abduction, and rotation ROMs were most significantly associated with severity of pain and the physical disability in patients with shoulder dysfunction. Further, longitudinal studies are required to confirm these results.

  4. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  5. Patterns of age-associated degeneration differ in shoulder muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam eRaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC. The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography in subjects without (N=294 and with (N=109 RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  6. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  7. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antenatal and intrapartum prediction of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish; Hockley, Christine; Quigley, Maria A; Yeh, Peter; Impey, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    To (1) develop algorithms to calculate the risk of shoulder dystocia at individual deliveries; (2) evaluate screening for shoulder dystocia. Retrospective analysis of 40284 consecutive term cephalic singleton pregnancies using a 'train and test' method. Four models were derived using logistic regression and tested (birthweight alone; birthweight and other independent antenatal variables; birthweight and all independent antenatal and intrapartum variables; and all independent variables excluding birthweight). Shoulder dystocia occurred in 240 deliveries (0.6%). Birthweight was the most important risk factor although 98 cases (41%) occurred in babies weighing shoulder dystocia of >10%. Although the antenatal model had high predictability (area under curve 0.89), it was no better than birthweight alone and had a sensitivity of 52.4%. Where birthweight was excluded, prediction of shoulder dystocia was poor. Antepartum and labour calculation of the risk of shoulder dystocia is possible. Whilst greatly hindered by the inaccuracy of estimating weight, it allows due weight to be given to factors which may already be influencing clinical practice. However, shoulder dystocia cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy to allow universal screening. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Comparative studies on the quality factors of whispering gallery modes and hybrid plasmon photon modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ping; Chen, Jiawei; Wan, Mingjie; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2017-04-17

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the multipolar hybrid plasmon-photon modes supported by a dielectric-metal core-shell resonator consisting of a dielectric core wrapped by a thin silver shell and the whispering-gallery modes in its pure dielectric counterpart (the dielectric sphere with the same size). We theoretically demonstrate that in a certain wavelength range the achievable maximum Q-factors of hybrid modes could be either larger or smaller than that of whispering-gallery modes, depending on the size of the resonator. By means of the coupling of the dye molecules to the hybrid and whispering-gallery modes, the reshaped fluorescence spectra are measured for resonators containing two different sized dye-doped dielectric spheres, which allow us to compare the Q-factors of hybrid and whispering-gallery modes, providing direct experimental support to the theoretical predictions. Our results provide guidance for appropriately choosing plasmonic core-shell (hybrid modes) or dielectric resonators (whispering-gallery modes) in applications such as ultrasensitive bio-sensors, low-threshold lasing, slow-light and nonlinear optical devices.

  10. Volcano monitoring with a multiparametric station placed inside a subhorizontal gallery in Tenerife (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-González, Pedro; Moure-García, David; Luengo-Oroz, Natividad; Jiménez-Mejías, María; Jiménez-Abizanda, Ana Isabel; García-Fraga, Jose Manuel; Soler-Javaloyes, Vicente; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2017-04-01

    Measuring gaseous emissions from a volcano is one of the main tasks in volcano monitoring. These emissions can occur inside an active crater as fumaroles or plumes or along the whole volcanic area as diffuse emissions through porous soils or using preferential paths like dikes, faults or fractures. H2O, CO2, SO2 and H2S are the main species released by volcanoes. Among them, CO2 has received special attention in the last years. It has been used as an unrest and/or eruption early warning signal due to his low magma solubility and easily measurement. In the Canary Islands (oceanic volcanic islands) during the last century hundreds of galleries, subhorizontal drillings with lengths from few meters to kilometers and a 2x2 meters mean section, have been drilled to obtain groundwater. In the island of Tenerife there are about 1200. These infrastructures can cut across some preferential rising paths like dikes or fractures, so they turn to be optimum places to measure volcanic gas emissions. In addition, atmospheric parameters influence significantly decreases inside the galleries. In this work, we present data analysis from a three years registration period of a station placed at 1600 meters from the entrance of a gallery in Tenerife. This station measures several parameters like ambient and soil temperature and CO2 and Radon air concentrations inside the gallery. We also show how outside atmospheric parameters affect the microclimate inside the gallery.

  11. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome; Diagnostik des Schulterimpingementsyndroms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [Deutsch] Grundlage des Impingementsyndroms ist eine Kompression des Supraspinatus am akromioklavikularen Bogen vor allem bei Flexion

  12. Functional shoulder radiography with use of a dynamic flat panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuda, Keita; Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a functional form of radiography and to perform a quantitative analysis for the shoulder joint using a dynamic flat panel detector (FPD) system. We obtained dynamic images at a rate of 3.75 frames per second (fps) using an FPD system. Three patients and 5 healthy controls were studied with a clinically established frontal projection, with abduction of the arms. The arm angle, glenohumeral angle (G-angle), and scapulothoracic angle (S-angle) were measured on dynamic images. The ratio of the G-angle to the S-angle (GSR) was also evaluated quantitatively. In normal subjects, the G-angle and S-angle changed gradually along with the arm angle. The G-angle was approximately twice as large as the S-angle, resulting in a GSR of 2 throughout the abduction of the shoulder. Changes in G-angle and S-angle tended to be irregular in patients with shoulder disorders. The GSR of the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis were 3-7.5, 4-9.5, and 3.5-7.5, respectively. The GSR of the anterior serratus muscle paralysis improved to approximately 2 after orthopedic treatment. Our preliminary results indicated that functional radiography by FPD and computer-aided quantitative analysis is useful for diagnosis of some shoulder disorders, such as the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis. The technique and procedures described comprise a simple, functional shoulder radiographic method for evaluation of the therapeutic effects of surgery and/or rehabilitation.

  13. CT diagnosis with shoulder joint injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.; Hoerl, M.; Schindler, G.

    1986-01-01

    With recidivistic shoulder luxation the CT examination makes possible the objective comprehension of predisposable anatomical evidence as well as the proof of posttraumatic changes. Changes in the acetabular margin (Bankart lesion) as well as in the humerus head (Hills-Sachs lesion) are depicted with recidivistic shoulder luxation as the morphological substrate of the posttraumatic damage. Individual examinations of 83 patients with recidivistic shoulder luxations showed that the mentioned changes often appear in combinations. With the CT examination the Hills-Sachs lesion can be comprehended and its location, extension and depth can be judged as well. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Seasonal feeding ecology of ring-tailed lemurs: a comparison of spiny and gallery forest habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Marni; Sauther, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Although Lemur catta persists in many habitat types in southern Madagascar, its ecology has been primarily studied within gallery forests. We compare plant food selection and properties for ring-tailed lemurs in the spiny and gallery forests over the synchronized lactation period (September to March) that includes both the dry and wet seasons. We found no significant habitat-specific differences in the type of plant part consumed per month (i.e. flower, fruit, leaf) or between the intake of soluble carbohydrates. However, the presence and use of Tamarindus indica plants appear to elevate protein and fiber intake in the gallery forest lemurs' diets. Protein is especially important for reproductive females who incur the added metabolic costs associated with lactation; however, fiber can disrupt protein digestion. Future work should continue to investigate how variations of protein and fiber affect ring-tailed lemur dietary choice and nutrient acquisition. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. MRI of the rotator interval of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Guy, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Connell, D. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom) and Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University College London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Lambert, S. [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The rotator interval of the shoulder joint is located between the distal edges of the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons and contains the insertions of the coracohumeral and superior glenohumeral ligaments. These structures form a complex pulley system that stabilizes the long head of the biceps tendon as it enters the bicipital groove of the humeral head. The rotator interval is the site of a variety of pathological processes including biceps tendon lesions, adhesive capsulitis and anterosuperior internal impingement. This article describes the anatomy, function and pathology of the rotator interval using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  16. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  17. Memorializing the Wars of Religion in Early Seventeenth-Century French Picture Galleries : Protestants and Catholics Painting the Contested Past

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, David

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how Protestant and Catholic elites in early seventeenth-century France memorialized the Wars of Religion in purpose-built picture galleries. Postwar France remained a divided nation, and portrait galleries offered a sectarian memory of the conflict, glorifying party heroes.

  18. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 4. Doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-07-07

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts is being discussed in a series of six articles. Doctor-artists in New South Wales and Victoria, and doctors as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in New South Wales, have been discussed in earlier articles. This, the fourth article, deals with doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

  19. Whispering-gallery acoustic sensing: Characterization of mesoscopic films and scanning probe microscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Andres H.; Li, Nan; Fernandez, Rodolfo; Wang, Xiaohua; Nordstrom, Richard; Padigi, S. K.

    2011-09-01

    Full understanding of the physics underlying the striking changes in viscoelasticity, relaxation time, and phase transitions that mesoscopic fluid-like films undergo at solid-liquid interfaces, or under confinement between two sliding solid boundaries, constitutes one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. Their role in the imaging process of solid substrates by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is also currently controversial. Aiming at improving the reliability and versatility of instrumentation dedicated to characterize mesoscopic films, a noninvasive whispering-gallery acoustic sensing (WGAS) technique is introduced; its application as feedback control in SPM is also demonstrated. To illustrate its working principle and potential merits, WGAS has been integrated into a SPM that uses a sharp tip attached to an electrically driven 32-kHz piezoelectric tuning fork (TF), the latter also tighten to the operating microscope's frame. Such TF-based SPMs typically monitor the TF's state of motion by electrical means, hence subjected to the effects caused by the inherent capacitance of the device (i.e., electrical resonance differing from the probe's mechanical resonance). Instead, the novelty of WGAS resides in exploiting the already existent microscope's frame as an acoustic cavity (its few centimeter-sized perimeter closely matching the operating acoustic wavelength) where standing-waves (generated by the nanometer-sized oscillations of the TF's tines) are sensitively detected by an acoustic transducer (the latter judiciously placed around the microscope's frame perimeter for attaining maximum detection). This way, WGAS is able to remote monitoring, via acoustic means, the nanometer-sized amplitude motion of the TF's tines. (This remote-detection method resembles the ability to hear faint, but still clear, levels of sound at the galleries of a cathedral, despite the extraordinary distance location of the sound source.) In applications aiming at

  20. Evaluating two infiltration gallery designs for managed aquifer recharge using secondary treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Elise; Toze, Simon; Patterson, Bradley; Fegg, Wolfgang; Shackleton, Mark; Higginson, Simon

    2013-03-15

    As managed aquifer recharge (MAR) becomes increasingly considered for augmenting water-sensitive urban areas, fundamental knowledge of the achievable scale, longevity and maintenance requirements of different options will become paramount. This paper reports on a 39 month pilot scale MAR scheme that infiltrated secondary treated wastewater through unsaturated sand into a limestone and sand aquifer. Two types of infiltration gallery were constructed to compare their hydraulic performance, one using crushed, graded gravel, the other using an engineered leach drain system (Atlantis Leach System(®)). Both galleries received 25 kL of nutrient-rich, secondary treated wastewater per day. The Atlantis gallery successfully infiltrated 17 ML of treated wastewater over three years. The slotted distribution pipe in the gravel gallery became clogged with plant roots after operating for one year. The infiltration capacity of the gravel gallery could not be restored despite high pressure cleaning, thus it was replaced with an Atlantis system. Reduction in the infiltration capacity of the Atlantis system was only observed when inflow was increased by about 3 fold for two months. The performance of the Atlantis system suggests it is superior to the gravel gallery, requiring less maintenance within at least the time frame of this study. The results from a bromide tracer test revealed a minimum transport time of 3.7 days for the recharged water to reach the water table below 9 m of sand and limestone. This set a limit on the time available for attenuation by natural treatment within the unsaturated zone before it recharged groundwater. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Theorizing How Art Gallery Interventions Impact People With Dementia and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camic, Paul M; Baker, Erin L; Tischler, Victoria

    2016-12-01

    Dementia refers to a variety of diseases that are characterized by cognitive difficulties and an overall decline in daily living skills. Psychologically informed arts and health programs may be particularly beneficial ways of improving the lives of people with dementia and their caregivers. This study sought to better understand how programs at contemporary and traditional art galleries might play a role in the lives of people with dementia. Participants included 12 people with mild-to-moderate dementia, their 12 caregivers and 4 gallery facilitators. Those with dementia and their caregivers were engaged in art viewing followed by art making over an 8-week period. Data, collected through postintervention interviews with participants, field notes and extensive written communication between the facilitators and research team, were analyzed using grounded theory methodology to theorize how gallery-based interventions affect people with dementia and those who care for them. The emerging theory has four primary components: the art gallery is seen as being a physically valued place that provides intellectual stimulation and offers opportunities for social inclusion that can change how dementia is perceived. These components coalesced to create positive emotional and relational effects for those with dementia and caregivers. The resulting theory has potential implications for the use of gallery-based programs in dementia care within public health, healthcare, and museum/art gallery policy and practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. KAJIAN CROWDING DI ANJUNGAN PENGANTAR (WAVING GALLERY BANDARA INTERNASIONAL ADISUCIPTO YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafirul Aqli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK. Crowding atau disebut juga dengan kesesakan merupakan kejadian di mana kuantitas populasi pengguna ruang yang tidak hanya manusia tapi juga benda dan non-benda melebihi dari apa yang suatu ruang bisa mewadahinya. Dipilihnya studi kasus waving gallery bandara internasional Adi Sucipto karena fenomena crowding berpotensi terjadi di ruang ini. Waving gallery tersebut memiliki luasan yang terbatas sementara fungsinya termasuk yang cukup penting bagi pengguna/ pengunjung bandara. Lebih lanjut kajian yang diangkat adalah bagaimana pola crowding yang terjadi dan perilaku keruangan apa saja yang dilakukan oleh user berkaitan dengan crowding tersebut. Sebagai kesimpulan terdapat kecenderungan bahwa crowding yang terjadi terlihat pada waktu siang hari di hari libur, yang dipicu dengan pertambahan pengunjung ke ruang tersebut dan membentuk zona-zona seperti zona orientasi, zona settled/ menetap, dan zona mobile/ berpindah-pindah, serta terjadi perilaku withdrawal untuk keluar dari kesesakan dan menempati zona kosong. Kata Kunci: Kesesakan, Anjungan Pengantar, Perilaku Pengguna ABSTRACT. Crowding is a condition in which the quantity of the users, objects and non-objects excess of what a room could accomodate it. Waving gallery at Adi Sucipto International Airport has been conducted as a case study because the phenomenon of crowding could potentially occur within the area. The waving gallery has a limited area while the function is quite vital for the users/ visitors of the airport. Study conducted is how the crowding pattern occurs and what kind of spatial behavior is being done by the user associated with the crowding. As the conclusion, there is a tendency that the crowding occurs during the daytime on the holiday, which was triggered by the increase of visitors to the gallery and forming zones of orientation, settled and mobile/ nomadic, as well as the withdrawal behavior occurs to get out of distress situation and occupy the empty zone. Key

  3. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients' ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients' reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons. PMID:25883820

  4. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  5. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  6. Questions and Answers About Shoulder Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Muscle and Bone Diseases Joint Replacement Surgery Bursitis Fibromyalgia Fibrous Dysplasia Growth Plate Injuries Marfan Syndrome ... tear. Rotator cuff disease, such as tendinitis and bursitis, happens when tendons in the shoulder inflame or ...

  7. Handball load and shoulder injury rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, R.O.; Attermann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge of injury patterns, an essential step towards injury prevention, is lacking in youth handball. Aim To investigate if an increase in handball load is associated with increased shoulder injury rates compared with a minor increase or decrease, and if an association is influenced...... by scapular control, isometric shoulder strength or glenohumeral range of motion (ROM). Methods 679 players (14-18 years) provided weekly reports on shoulder injury and handball load (training and competition hours) over 31 weeks using the SMS, phone and medical examination system. Handball load in a given...... was performed at baseline and midseason. Results An increase in handball load by >60% was associated with greater shoulder injury rate (HR 1.91; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.70, p=0.05) compared with the reference group. The effect of an increase in handball load between 20% and 60% was exacerbated among players...

  8. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  9. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...

  10. 'Drooping shoulder' - nontraumatic causes of glenohumeral subluxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev-Toaff, A.S.; Karasick, D.; Rao, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nontraumatic glenohumeral subluxation can occur in patients with hemiplegia or brachial plexus involvement by tumor. Two cases of inferior subluxation of the humeral head are presented and nontraumatic etiologies of the ''drooping shoulder'' are discussed. (orig.)

  11. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The whispering gallery as an optical component in the X-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The whispering gallery phenomenon in acoustics has been known and studied for more than a century, and the same effect has been observed to take place with waves other than sound waves. In this paper we review the theoretical basis and attractive features of the whispering gallery as a soft x-ray optical component and indicate some of its potential applications. We then describe what may be its most unique capability which, in favorable cases, is to provide a way. to manipulate the phase difference between the s and p polarization components and thus to generate circularly or elliptically polarized soft x-rays

  13. On the Problem of Filtration to an Imperfect Gallery in a Pressureless Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereslavskii, É. N.; Dudina, L. M.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of plane steady-state filtration in a pressureless bed to an imperfect gallery in the presence of evaporation from the flow free surface is considered. To study such type of flow, a mixed boundary-value problem of the theory of analytical functions is formulated and solved with application of the Polubarinova-Kochina method. Based on the model suggested, an algorithm for computing the discharge of the gallery and the ordinate of free surface emergence to the impermeable screen is developed. A detailed hydrodynamic analysis of the influence of all physical parameters of the model on the desired filtration characteristics is given.

  14. In-fiber whispering-gallery-mode resonator fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leilei; Zhu, Tao; Huang, Dongmei; Liu, Min; Deng, Ming; Huang, Wei

    2015-08-15

    An in-fiber whispering-gallery-mode resonator fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining is demonstrated. The cylinder resonator cavity is fabricated by scanning the D-fiber cladding with infrared femtosecond pulses along a cylindrical trace with a radius of 25 μm and height of 20 μm. Quality factor on the order of 10(3) is achieved by smoothing the cavity surface with an ultrasonic cleaner, which is mainly limited by the surface roughness of several hundred nanometers. Resonant characteristics and polarization dependence of the proposed resonator are also studied in detail. Our method takes a step forward in the integration of whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

  15. Tuning whispering gallery lasing modes from polymer fibers under tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linslal, C L; Kailasnath, M; Mathew, S; Nideep, T K; Radhakrishnan, P; Nampoori, V P N; Vallabhan, C P G

    2016-02-01

    Wavelength tuning of whispering gallery lasing modes has been observed from Rhodamine-B-doped polymer fibers under tensile strain. Good quality whispering gallery lasing modes are produced from both solid and hollow fibers by transverse optical pumping. The lasing modes are shifted linearly toward the shorter wavelength side when the fiber is elongated in the axial direction. Compared with solid fiber, the lasing modes of hollow fiber can be tuned over the entire gain spectrum with a tuning range of ∼5  nm. It is found that the tuning of the lasing modes of hollow fiber is reversible.

  16. Natural regeneration in several environments of the Capetinga gallery forest at Agua Limpa Farm (DF)

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanine Maria Felfili; Gabriel Henrique Pires de Mello Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    The Capetinga gallery forest is located at Agua Limpa Farm, in the Federal District, Brazil. The floristic compositionand structure of the natural regeneration at the edges and in the interior of the gallery forest at the watershed of the Capetinga stream was studied to detect floristic and structural patterns related to the forest environments. Thirty (5x5m) plots were placed in each environment to sample saplings, individuals from 1,0m high with diameter at the steam base under 5,0cm. Withi...

  17. Experiences from a Real-Time Mobile Collaborative Writing System in an Art Gallery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Polli, Anna Maria; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    We present first experiences from Local Area Artworks, a system enabling collaborative art interpretation on-site, deployed during an exhibition in a local art gallery. Through the system, we explore ways to re-connect people to local places by making use of their personal mobile devices...... as interfaces to the shared physical space. With a collocated collaborative writing system in the semi-public space of a gallery, we encourage local art discussions and provide a platform for the public to actively participate in interpretations of individual artworks. In this paper, we focus on the experiences...

  18. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato D'Angelo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others.The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases.Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical–pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions.The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique.Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles.

  19. High Fidelity In Situ Shoulder Dystocia Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pelikan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Resident physicians, emergency department (ED staff Introduction: Precipitous deliveries are high acuity, low occurrence in most emergency departments. Shoulder dystocia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of labor that can be relieved by specific maneuvers that must be implemented in a timely manner. This simulation is designed to educate resident learners on the critical management steps in a shoulder dystocia presenting to the emergency department. A special aspect of this simulation is the unique utilization of the “Noelle” model with an instructing physician at bedside maneuvering the fetus through the stations of labor and providing subtle adjustments to fetal positioning not possible though a mechanized model. A literature search of “shoulder dystocia simulation” consists primarily of obstetrics and mid-wife journals, many of which utilize various mannequin models. None of the reviewed articles utilized a bedside provider maneuvering the fetus with the Noelle model, making this method unique. While the Noelle model is equipped with a remote-controlled motor that automatically rotates and delivers the baby either to the head or to the shoulders and can produce a turtle sign and which will prevent delivery of the baby until signaled to do so by the instructor, using the bedside instructor method allows this simulation to be reproduced with less mechanistically advanced and lower cost models.1-5 Objectives: At the end of this simulation, learners will: 1 Recognize impending delivery and mobilize appropriate resources (ie, both obstetrics [OB] and NICU/pediatrics; 2 Identify risk factors for shoulder dystocia based on history and physical; 3 Recognize shoulder dystocia during delivery; 4 Demonstrate maneuvers to relieve shoulder dystocia; 5 Communicate with team members and nursing staff during resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: High-fidelity simulation. Topics: High fidelity, in situ, Noelle model

  20. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    OpenAIRE

    Menticoglou, Savas; Schneider, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 m...

  1. Using Whispering-Gallery-Mode Resonators for Refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    A method of determining the refractive and absorptive properties of optically transparent materials involves a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis of electromagnetic responses of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator disks made of those materials. The method was conceived especially for use in studying transparent photorefractive materials, for which purpose this method affords unprecedented levels of sensitivity and accuracy. The method is expected to be particularly useful for measuring temporally varying refractive and absorptive properties of photorefractive materials at infrared wavelengths. Still more particularly, the method is expected to be useful for measuring drifts in these properties that are so slow that, heretofore, the properties were assumed to be constant. The basic idea of the method is to attempt to infer values of the photorefractive properties of a material by seeking to match (1) theoretical predictions of the spectral responses (or selected features thereof) of a WGM of known dimensions made of the material with (2) the actual spectral responses (or selected features thereof). Spectral features that are useful for this purpose include resonance frequencies, free spectral ranges (differences between resonance frequencies of adjacently numbered modes), and resonance quality factors (Q values). The method has been demonstrated in several experiments, one of which was performed on a WGM resonator made from a disk of LiNbO3 doped with 5 percent of MgO. The free spectral range of the resonator was approximately equal to 3.42 GHz at wavelengths in the vicinity of 780 nm, the smallest full width at half maximum of a mode was approximately equal to 50 MHz, and the thickness of the resonator in the area of mode localization was 30 microns. In the experiment, laser power of 9 mW was coupled into the resonator with an efficiency of 75 percent, and the laser was scanned over a frequency band 9 GHz wide at a nominal wavelength of

  2. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Zoech, C.

    2004-01-01

    The shoulder joint has an important influence on arm- and handfunction. Therefore, activities of daily living, working and leisure time can be negatively influenced by diseases of the shoulder joint. Problems of the shoulder joint can be induced by muscular dysbalance and poor body posture. There is a strong relationship between shoulder function and body posture. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the shoulder joint aims at improving the local dysfunction of the shoulder joint as well as at improving function and social participation. Antiinflammatory and pain medication, exercise, occupational, electro-, ultrasound and shock wave therapy, massage, thermotherapy and pulsed electromagnetic fields are used as conservative treatments. Exercise therapy aims at improving muscular performance, joint mobility and body posture. Occupational therapy aims at improving functional movements for daily living and work. Electrotherapy is primarily used to relieve pain. Shock wave and ultrasound therapy proved to be an effective treatment for patients with calcific tendinitis. The subacromial impingement syndrome can be effectively treated by conservative therapy. (orig.) [de

  3. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, R; Tecame, A; Torre, G; Narbona, P; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic.

  4. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar shoulder dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  6. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  7. Correlation of findings in clinical and high resolution ultrasonography examinations of the painful shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheroli, Raphael; Kyburz, Diego; Ciurea, Adrian; Dubs, Beat; Toniolo, Martin; Bisig, Samuel Pascal; Tamborrini, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    High resolution ultrasonography is a non-painful and non-invasive imaging technique which is useful for the assessment of shoulder pain causes, as clinical examination often does not allow an exact diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the findings of clinical examination and high resolution ultrasonography in patients presenting with painful shoulder. Non-interventional observational study of 100 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. Exclusion criteria were shoulder fractures, prior shoulder joint surgery and shoulder injections in the past month. The physicians performing the most common clinical shoulder examinations were blinded to the results of the high resolution ultrasonography and vice versa. In order to detect pathology of the m. supraspinatus tendon, the Hawkins and Kennedy impingement test showed the highest sensitivity (0.86) whereas the Jobe supraspinatus test showed the highest specificity (0.55). To identify m. subscapularis tendon pathology the Gerber lift off test showed a sensitivity of 1, whereas the belly press test showed the higher specificity (0.72). The infraspinatus test showed a high sensitivity (0.90) and specificity (0.74). All AC tests (painful arc II(a), AC joint tenderness(b), cross body adduction stress test(c)) showed high specificities ((a)0.96, (b)0.99, (c)0.96). Evaluating the long biceps tendon, the palm up test showed the highest sensitivity (0.47) and the Yergason test the highest specificity (0.88). Knowledge of sensitivity and specificity of various clinical tests is important for the interpretation of clinical examination test results. High resolution ultrasonography is needed in most cases to establish a clear diagnosis.

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and elastography assess deltoid muscle integrity after reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Christian; Krammer, Daniel; Hug, Andreas; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Krix, Martin; Bruckner, Thomas; Kunz, Pierre; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Zeifang, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The outcome after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) depends on the condition of the deltoid muscle, which we assessed with new ultrasound modalities and electromyography (EMG). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) were applied to assess perfusion and elasticity of the deltoid muscle compared with the clinical and functional outcome. The study recruited 64 patients (mean age, 72.9 years) treated with RSA between 2004 and 2013. The deltoid muscle was examined with EMG and ultrasound imaging. Functional scores such as Constant score and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form score were assessed. Among other CEUS parameters, the wash-in perfusion index, time to peak, and rise time were compared between the operated-on and contralateral shoulders as well as between patients with above-average and below-average outcome. The stiffness of the deltoid muscle was analyzed with ARFI. After RSA, deltoid perfusion (wash-in perfusion index, Δ = -12% ± 22%, P = .0001) and shoulder function (Constant score, Δ = -14 ± 24, P Deltoid perfusion was higher in patients with above-average outcome (rise time, Δ = 33% ± 13%, P = .038). The operated-on deltoid muscles showed higher stiffness than the contralateral muscles (ARFI, Δ = 0.2 ± 0.9 m/s, P = .0545). EMG excluded functionally relevant axillary nerve injuries in the study population. CEUS revealed reduced mean perfusion of the deltoid muscle after RSA. Reduced perfusion was associated with limited range of motion and below-average outcome. Functional shoulder impairment after RSA might be predicted by noninvasive CEUS as a surrogate parameter for the integrity of the deltoid muscle. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlation of findings in clinical and high resolution ultrasonography examinations of the painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Micheroli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: High resolution ultrasonography is a non-painful and non-invasive imaging technique which is useful for the assessment of shoulder pain causes, as clinical examination often does not allow an exact diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the fi ndings of clinical examination and high resolution ultrasonography in patients presenting with painful shoulder. Methods: Non-interventional observational study of 100 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. Exclusion criteria were shoulder fractures, prior shoulder joint surgery and shoulder injections in the past month. The physicians performing the most common clinical shoulder examinations were blinded to the results of the high resolution ultrasonography and vice versa. Results: In order to detect pathology of the m. supraspinatus tendon, the Hawkins and Kennedy impingement test showed the highest sensitivity (0.86 whereas the Jobe supraspinatus test showed the highest specifi city (0.55. To identify m. subscapularis tendon pathology the Gerber lift off test showed a sensitivity of 1, whereas the belly press test showed the higher specifi city (0.72. The infraspinatus test showed a high sensitivity (0.90 and specifi city (0.74. All AC tests (painful arc IIa, AC joint tendernessb, cross body adduction stress testc showed high specifi cities (a0.96, b0.99, c 0.96. Evaluating the long biceps tendon, the palm up test showed the highest sensitivity (0.47 and the Yergason test the highest specifi city (0.88. Conclusion: Knowledge of sensitivity and specifi city of various clinical tests is important for the interpretation of clinical examination test results. High resolution ultrasonography is needed in most cases to establish a clear diagnosis.

  10. Usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Hong, Suk Ju; Suh, San Il; Yong, Hwan Suk; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Park, Cheol Min; Suh, Won Hyuck; Kim, Myung Gyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder to locate the path of access and to control the correct placement of the needle into the shoulder. Fifteen patients with suspicion of shoulder pathology were included in this study. Patients were laid in supine positions with the arm extended and slightly abducted, the palm of the hand facing upward. A sonographic unit with a high resolution transducer with 7.5 MHz linear array was used. Axial images in the anterior aspect of the shoulder were obtained to localize the coracoid process and the anteromedical portion of the humerus. Using an aseptic technique, a 21-guage needle was advanced into the shoulder joint under ultrasonographic guidance. When the needle made contract with the articular cartilage of the humeral head, the needle was tiled to position is point in the articular cavity. Solution of 0.1 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine in 25 ml of normal saline was prepared and 12-16 ml was injected into the joint cavity. The intra-articular position of the needle and the compete distension of the shoulder joint were again confirmed by sonography. The needle was accurately placed in 14 out of 15 patients without damage to neighboring structures. It took 10 to 15 minutes to complete the procedure in 14 patients. No side effects attributable to gadopentetate dimeglumine were found. Sono-guided needle puncture for the shoulder MR arthrography can be a substitutable method for fluoroscopic guidance, with easy access, advantages of lacking radiation hazard and eliminating the need for iodized contrast agents.

  11. Evaluation of shoulder integrity in space: first report of musculoskeletal US on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, E. Michael; Padalka, Gennady; Lee, Doohi; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Martin, David; Melton, Shannon L.; McFarlin, Kellie; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Investigative procedures were approved by Henry Ford Human Investigation Committee and NASA Johnson Space Center Committee for Protection of Human Subjects. Informed consent was obtained. Authors evaluated ability of nonphysician crewmember to obtain diagnostic-quality musculoskeletal ultrasonographic (US) data of the shoulder by following a just-in-time training algorithm and using real-time remote guidance aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS Expedition-9 crewmembers attended a 2.5-hour didactic and hands-on US training session 4 months before launch. Aboard the ISS, they completed a 1-hour computer-based Onboard Proficiency Enhancement program 7 days before examination. Crewmembers did not receive specific training in shoulder anatomy or shoulder US techniques. Evaluation of astronaut shoulder integrity was done by using a Human Research Facility US system. Crew used special positioning techniques for subject and operator to facilitate US in microgravity environment. Common anatomic reference points aided initial probe placement. Real-time US video of shoulder was transmitted to remote experienced sonologists in Telescience Center at Johnson Space Center. Probe manipulation and equipment adjustments were guided with verbal commands from remote sonologists to astronaut operators to complete rotator cuff evaluation. Comprehensive US of crewmember's shoulder included transverse and longitudinal images of biceps and supraspinatus tendons and articular cartilage surface. Total examination time required to guide astronaut operator to acquire necessary images was approximately 15 minutes. Multiple arm and probe positions were used to acquire dynamic video images that were of excellent quality to allow evaluation of shoulder integrity. Postsession download and analysis of high-fidelity US images collected onboard demonstrated additional anatomic detail that could be used to exclude subtle injury. Musculoskeletal US can be performed in space by minimally

  12. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...

  13. Muscular imbalance and shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, A; Krüger-Franke, M; Reininger, S; Trouillier, H H; Rosemeyer, B

    1996-09-01

    In overhead sports such as volleyball, baseball, or tennis shoulder problems are very common. The aim of this study was to identify features which may correlate with shoulder problems in volleyball attackers. 30 competitive volleyball attackers (mean age 25 years) were included in the study; 15 were suffering from shoulder pain and 15 had no history of shoulder pain. The results were compared with those of a control group of 15 recreational athletes without any overhead sports activities. Volleyball attackers have a different muscular and capsular pattern at the playing shoulder compared to the opposite shoulder. Their playing shoulder is depressed, the scapula lateralised, and the dorsal muscles and the posterior and inferior part of the shoulder capsule shortened. These differences were of more significance in volleyball attackers with shoulder pain than in volleyball players without shoulder pain. In contrast to recreational athletes without any overhead sports activity, there were no significant difference in the comparison of the two shoulders. The histories, clinical and sonographic findings did not reveal further typical features for volleyball attackers with shoulder pain. Muscular balance of the shoulder girdle is very important in this sport. It is therefore imperative to include adequate stretching and muscular training programme for the prevention, as well as for therapy, of shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

  14. Axillary nerve palsy following blunt trauma to the shoulder region: a clinical and electrophysiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, H; Bril, V

    1982-01-01

    Although the commonest type of axillary nerve palsy occurs following shoulder dislocation on humeral fracture, another form is seen after blunt trauma to the shoulder region without associated fracture or dislocation. The former usually goes on to a full recovery whereas a failure to recover is common in the latter group. In our review of 13 patients with palsy after blunt shoulder trauma, seven patients showed minimal or no recovery of deltoid muscle function and six patients went on to complete or near complete recovery. Serial electromyographic examinations usually revealed the lesion to be in continuity although eventual clinical recovery was not satisfactory in a number of these patients. The mechanism of the palsy appeared to involve a stretch injury and this was confirmed at operation in two patients. Glenohumeral fixation was a troublesome complication which limited recovery of function in four patients. Further details of the type of trauma, clinical and electromyographic examination, assessment and management are discussed. Images PMID:7175526

  15. EVALUATION OF PAINFUL SHOULDER IN BASEBALL PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Soares, André Lopes; Aihara, Leandro Jun; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2011-01-01

    To assess the relationship between shoulder mobility and strength and the presence of pain among baseball players. Between April and July 2009, 55 baseball players were assessed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the School of Medical Sciences, Santa Casa de Misericórdia, São Paulo. They were all males, aged between 15 and 33 years (mean of 21); they attended an average of three training sessions per week and had been doing this sport for a mean of 10 years. 14 of the 55 players evaluated were pitchers, and 20 reported pain during the pitching motion. The mean values for lateral and medial rotation and range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder were, respectively, 110 °, 61 ° and 171 °, with a statistically significant difference in relation to the non-dominant limb. Pitchers had greater gains in lateral rotation and deficits in medial rotation than did non-pitchers. Pain presented a statistically significant correlation with diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of "shoulder at risk". Statistically significant differences in dominant shoulder mobility were found, with increased lateral rotation, diminished medial rotation and smaller ROM, in relation to the contralateral limb. There was a statistically significant relationship between the pitcher's position and greater gain in lateral rotation and diminished medial rotation. There were statistically significant correlations between pain and diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of "shoulder at risk". There was a statistical tendency suggesting that players with diminished medial rotation of the dominant shoulder presented a relationship with pain.

  16. Aesthetic Shoulder Augmentation with Silicone Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoon Jae; Jang, Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Men with narrower shoulders may appear less muscular than other men. Deltoid muscle underdevelopment or atrophy, a condition commonly linked to narrow shoulder issues, may be associated with congenital deformity, trauma, or neoplasm. For some people, regular exercise does not effectively develop the deltoid muscle region. Some people naturally have a smaller build than others. Even with developed deltoid muscles, these people still appear to be small. The authors have performed lateral shoulder augmentation with silicone implants for 4 years. Based on their experience, this procedure stands as a reliable solution for men with narrow shoulders. Lateral shoulder augmentation with silicone implants was developed and used for 81 patients between April 2009 and April 2013. None of the patients had shoulder deformities except for two patients (one patient with Poland's syndrome and one patient with Sprengel's deformity). The implants were placed through a horizontal axillary crease incision in a plane dissected between the deltoid fascia and muscle. All augmentation or correction procedures have been met with complete patient approval. Five patients had minor complications such as hematoma and implement displacement. However, all these complications were resolved to the satisfaction of the patients. When silicone implants are used to achieve purely aesthetic improvements, successful shoulder augmentation procedures are observed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  17. Domus: An On-Gallery Digital Museum Experience in Two Parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, M.; Ray, C.A.; Gottlieb, H.; Szeląg, M.

    2014-01-01

    In September 2014, the Allard Pierson Museum, the archaeology museum of the University of Amsterdam, opened its new Roman gallery. Leading to the redevelopment, the Museum’s NewMediaLab explored how interactive technologies, particularly virtual re-contextualization, could be used to aid visitor

  18. Rupestral painting in the superior gallery of Altxerri cave (Aia, Gipuzkoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús ALTUNA

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe new details of a complex figure made with red paint in a superior gallery of Altxerri cave. The head of a bison with a corniform motif stands out among other strokes of difficult interpretation. This collection of paintings has no correlation with the numerous engravings and black paintings of the main gallery of this cave. There is no access to this superior gallery from the main gallery of the cave so the Paleolithic artist would have gained access through another entry from the mountain that is unknown in the present. Near the collection of paintings described there is a bison vertebra stuck by its spinous apophysis in a crack on the rock. The C14 dating of the vertebra has not been possible due to the lack of collagen in the sample. Underneath this figure, tarsal remains of two individuals of Rupicapra rupicapra were found dated 34195 ± 1235 y 29940 ± 745 BP. The contemporaneity of the remains and the figure cannot be established.

  19. Contemporary Adult Education Philosophies and Practices in Art Galleries and Museums in Canada and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clover, Darlene E.; Bell, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Public art galleries and museums have been mandated to become more relevant and useful to the lived experiences of the broad communities they claim to serve. Adult education has long been part of the work of these institutions, although historically the relationship has been uneasy, and they seldom feature in the adult education literature. To…

  20. A study of grandparents and grandchildren as visitors to museums and art galleries in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela Beaumont

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses one aspect of a major research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of family group visitors to museums and galleries in the UK. Grandparents visiting with their grandchildren are a little understood phenomenon in terms of visitor research and this paper aims to address that balance. The research project focuses on three art galleries and museums in the UK where 44 sets of grandparents were interviewed during the initial stages of the research. Findings have shown a number of interesting facets, some of which are presented in this paper. Grandparents are motivated to visit the museum with their grandchildren in the main because they are seeking an entertaining visit, a day out that is also educational and linked to school projects. They are likely to be the children’s primary carers as parents are out to work and the destination might not link with their own interests but those of the parents. They have social roles to play in their grandchildren’s lives. They often seek activity or workshops in the museum/art gallery that will be of benefit for their grandchildren and encourage them to explore the activities provided. These and other aspects are discussed within the paper. We conclude by suggesting how the findings can be used to inform more sophisticated approaches to ‘family friendly’ initiatives in museums and art galleries.