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Sample records for shoulder image gallery

  1. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Image Gallery Share: The Image Gallery contains high-quality digital photographs available from ... Select a category below to view additional thumbnail images. Images are available for direct download in 2 ...

  2. Virtual MR arthroscopy of the shoulder: image gallery with arthroscopic correlation of major pathologies in shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, A; Volpe, D; Volpe, N; Fornara, P; Castagna, A; Carriero, A

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare virtual MR arthroscopic reconstructions with arthroscopic images in patients affected by shoulder joint instability. MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the shoulder is now a well-assessed technique, based on the injection of a contrast medium solution, which fills the articular space and finds its way between the rotator cuff (RC) and the glenohumeral ligaments. In patients with glenolabral pathology, we used an additional sequence that provided virtual arthroscopy (VA) post-processed views, which completed the MR evaluation of shoulder pathology. We enrolled 36 patients, from whom MR arthrographic sequence data (SE T1w and GRE T1 FAT SAT) were obtained using a GE 0.5 T Signa--before any surgical or arthroscopic planned treatment; the protocol included a supplemental 3D, spoiled GE T1w positioned in the coronal plane. Dedicated software loaded on a work-station was used to elaborate VAs. Two radiologists evaluated, on a semiquantitative scale, the visibility of the principal anatomic structures, and then, in consensus, the pathology emerging from the VA images. These images were reconstructed in all patients, except one. The visualization of all anatomical structures was acceptable. VA and MR arthrographic images were fairly concordant with intraoperative findings. Although in our pilot study the VA findings did not change the surgical planning, the results showed concordance with the surgical or arthroscopic images.

  3. Postoperative imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primery impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications. (orig.) [de

  4. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Kaiser, E.; Luttke, G.; Lukas, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the occurrence, frequency, and significance of increased signal intensity (SI) in the rotator cuff (RC) of normal volunteers suggestive of pathologic findings such as partial tears and tendinitis. Shoulders of 30 volunteers without evidence of prior shoulder disease or trauma were studied. MR imaging at 1.5 T included T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences in axial, oblique coronal, and sagittal planes. Shoulders of 30 cadavers were dissected and studied for correlation with MR findings, five of them after MR examination

  5. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  6. Shoulder arthroscopy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a type of surgery to examine or repair the tissues inside or around your shoulder joint. The procedure ... small incision. If the surgeon is going to repair the joint, small surgical instruments are also used, such as a shaver to remove unwanted tissue.

  7. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, T.; Weinhardt, H.; Oettl, G.; Lenz, M.; Riel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage [de

  8. Effects of whispering gallery mode in microsphere super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Song; Deng, Yongbo; Zhou, Wenchao; Yu, Muxin; Urbach, H. P.; Wu, Yihui

    2017-09-01

    Whispering Gallery modes have been presented in microscopic glass spheres or toruses with many applications. In this paper, the possible approaches to enhance the imaging resolution by Whispering Gallery modes are discussed, including evanescent waves coupling, transformed and illustration by Whispering Gallery modes. It shows that the high-order scattering modes play the dominant role in the reconstructed virtual image when the Whispering Gallery modes exist. Furthermore, we find that the high image resolution of electric dipoles can be achieved, when the out-of-phase components exist from the illustration of Whispering Gallery modes. Those results of our simulation could contribute to the knowledge of microsphere-assisted super-resolution imaging and its potential applications.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Romanowski, L.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author)

  10. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, N.J.; Dussault, R.G.; Keats, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  11. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive imaging tool that can complement the physical examination in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic injuries of the shoulder. The superb soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capabilities of MRI make it a preferred modality to provide a global assessment of the soft tissue and osseous structures of the shoulder. Learning objectives: to review briefly the anatomy of the shoulder and the specificity of sequences and planes for MRI; to demonstrate the characteristic MR findings of some of the most common shoulder disorders; to indicate how MR arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder can add extra value to the diagnostic process; to outline a systematic approach to the interpretation of the shoulder MR examination. Choosing the most suitable sequences and planes as well as the thorough knowledge of the anatomic structures assist the correct diagnosis of the pathologic disorders of the shoulder which is of great importance for the precise treatment management, surgical versus conservative, as well as for the appropriate surgical approach, open versus arthroscopic

  13. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, Drew; Koulouris, George; Morrison, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging

  14. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMenamin, Drew [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 354755, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)], E-mail: drewmcm@u.washington.edu; Koulouris, George [Gold Coast Medical Imaging, 123 Nerang Street, Southport, QLD 4215 (Australia); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, Suite 1079a, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  16. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  17. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: Rationale and current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Helms, C.A.; Steinbach, L.; Neumann, C.; Munk, P.L.; Genant, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Because it can demonstrate a wide range of tissue contrast with excellent resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized imaging in many areas of the musculoskeletal system and has generated excitement among those interested in the painful shoulder. Shoulder impingement syndrome and glenohumeral instability constitute the two major categories of shoulder derangements. Correct diagnosis requires the use of appropriate pulse sequences and imaging planes, proper patient positioning, and a satisfactory surface coil. In addition the imager must have a thorough understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. We present a summary of the current status of MR imaging of the shoulder including technical, anatomic, and pathologic considerations and a review of the pertinent literature. (orig.)

  20. MR imaging in shoulder trauma. Value of STIR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Trattnig, S.; Haller, J.; Imhof, H.; Nguyen, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the adequacy of MR standard protocols by analyzing conventional T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences, and to evaluate the usefulness of additional fat-suppressed (STIR) images in shoulder trauma. Material and Methods: Paracoronal T1-weighted, T2-weighted SE, and STIR images were obtained on a 0.5 T superconductive system in 25 patients with shoulder trauma. In a separate evaluation of T1/T2 images and a combined evaluation of T1/T2 SE- and STIR images, we compared the number of patients with evidence of Hill-Sachs lesions, bone bruises, and/or rotator-cuff lesions. Results: Compared to the combined evaluation of T1/T2 and STIR images, the separate evaluation of T1/T2 SE images revealed identical results for rotator-cuff lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions, but different results for the bone bruises in the area of the major tubercle. Conclusion: Occult fractures of the major tubercle, indicated by areas of bone bruising, might be missed with MR using conventional SE images. We recommend the use of additional paracoronal fat-suppressed sequences in patients with clinically suspected lesions and equivocal findings on plain radiographs and on standard SE sequences. (orig.)

  1. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery Using your shoulder after surgery Images Impingement syndrome Rotator cuff muscles Heart attack ...

  2. Frozen shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your hormones, such as during menopause Shoulder injury Shoulder surgery Open heart surgery Cervical disk disease of the ... Instructions Rotator cuff exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Images Shoulder joint inflammation References Finnoff JT. ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Lehner, K.; Luttke, G.; Technische Univ. Muenchen; Muenchen Univ.

    1990-01-01

    In order to test the criteria for abnormalities of the shoulder as seen on MR, 30 normal shoulders were examined. The examination included T 1 , proton and T 2 -weighted SE sequences and T 2 * -weighted FE sequences, using transverse, oblique coronary and oblique sagittal planes. In 57% there was increased signal intensity in the tendon of the rotator cuff; this might have been interpreted as a rupture of the cuff or tendinitis. Anatomical examination suggests that the finding is due to a normal layer between the long head of the biceps and the tendon joint complex. The anterior glenoid labrum could not be clearly delineated in 57% and the posterior labrum in 5%. In two cases there was a superior, postero-lateral defect in the head of the humerus. The currently accepted criteria for the MRT diagnosis of shoulder abnormalities need to be critically re-evaluated. (orig.) [de

  4. The imaging of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayamizu, Kyoko; Ito, Katsuhide; Naito, Akira

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomographic arthrography (arthro-CT) and rotator cuff sonography (RC-US) are new methods for investigating cases with shoulder disorders. We present details of these techniques and report normal and pathological findings of the shoulder joint composed of the glenoid lablum, glenoid, joint capsule and RC. Twenty nine cases with shoulder instability and RC tears were evaluated by arthro-CT. Arthro-CT findings were correlated with surgical ones in three operated cases. Arthro-CT has provided excellent visualizations of labral tears and capsular lesions and has been successfully utilized for detection of the spilled contrast material with RC tears. We examined RC-US in 9 cases who underwent surgery or arthrography on suspicion of rotator cuff tears, and 12 normal volunteers. RC-US findings indicative of the tears included (1) defect or focal thinning of the RC in 3 cases, (2) discontinuity in the homogenous echogenicity of the RC in 2 cases, (3) presence of the abnormal central echogenic band or echogenic foci in the RC in 6 cases. The defect or thinning of the RC represented full-thickness tears. RC-US is a rapid, noninvasive and reliable method of detecting RC tears. (author)

  5. Double oblique MR images of the shoulder. Comparison with conventional images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Taisuke; Saito, Yoko; Yodono, Hiraku; Miura, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Atsushi; Abe, Shuichiro

    1998-01-01

    Because the scapula is not only slanted on transverse sections but also inclines on sagittal sections, we now perform shoulder MR imaging using double oblique images (DOI), which are planes perpendicular or parallel to the long axis of the scapula obtained with oblique sagittal scout imaging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of double oblique shoulder MR imaging. MR images of shoulders with operatively or arthroscopically proven lesions (20 cases) that had been examined on both conventional images (CI) and DOI were retrospectively reviewed. DOI were compared with CI not only in terms of diagnostic performance but also in their ability to identify the details of shoulder anatomy. All MR studies were done with a shoulder coil on a high-field (1.5 T) unit. Although the accuracy of DOI in diagnosing shoulder disorders such as rotator cuff tear and labrum injury was not as good as that of CI, DOI were better for identifying or discriminating muscles and tendons of the rotator cuff, labralbicipital junction and anterior band of the inferior gleno-humeral ligament, and for recognizing the correct position of the glenoid labrum. MR double oblique imaging of the shoulder provides more detailed information about shoulder anatomy and disorders than conventional imaging. (author)

  6. Post-operative computed tomographic imaging of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helweg, G.; Zur Nedden, D.; Wicke, K.; Knapp, R.; Oberhauser, A.; Resch, H.; Sperner, G.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1990 312 patients underwent surgery for habitual or recurrent shoulder dislocation. Out then, 65 had a post-operative CT examination. This retrospective study was launched to demonstrate the value of CT in post-operative shoulder imaging. In most cases, CT was done using standardised techniques without contrast medium. Except in 4 cases, an intra-articular double-contrast technique was used. Evaluation was focused on 41 cases after implantation of a wedged bone graft in cases of primary or secondary flat glenoid or widening of a small glenoid with cortical consoles and bone block. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of standardised CT technique in that all necessary information concerning stabilisation of the shoulder joint, sufficient implant of bone grafts and assessment of correct inclination after osteotomy were obtained. (orig.)

  7. Imaging findings in posterior instability of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, Srinivasan; Rebello, Ryan; O'Neill, John; Nagar, Arpit; Moro, Jaydeep; Pugh, David

    2008-01-01

    Posterior shoulder instability refers to the symptoms and signs resulting from excessive posterior translation of the humerus. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the radiological modality of choice in the diagnostic assessment of posterior instability. Computed tomography (CT) is useful in the evaluation of osseous abnormalities associated with posterior instability. A detailed description of the posterior osseous and labroligamentous abnormalities has evolved recently, and many variant lesions of the posteroinferior labrum and/or capsular structures have been described. As the recommended surgical management of lesions associated with posterior instability is a lesion-specific approach, awareness of the specific lesions that have been described in association with posterior instability helps in pre-surgical planning. The purpose of this article is to review the classification of, and injury mechanisms leading to, posterior shoulder instability and to describe imaging findings associated with posterior instability, with emphasis on MR imaging. (orig.)

  8. Imaging findings in posterior instability of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harish, Srinivasan; Rebello, Ryan; O' Neill, John [St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Nagar, Arpit [St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Moro, Jaydeep [St. Joseph' s Healthcare, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Pugh, David [Brantford General Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brantford, ON (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    Posterior shoulder instability refers to the symptoms and signs resulting from excessive posterior translation of the humerus. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the radiological modality of choice in the diagnostic assessment of posterior instability. Computed tomography (CT) is useful in the evaluation of osseous abnormalities associated with posterior instability. A detailed description of the posterior osseous and labroligamentous abnormalities has evolved recently, and many variant lesions of the posteroinferior labrum and/or capsular structures have been described. As the recommended surgical management of lesions associated with posterior instability is a lesion-specific approach, awareness of the specific lesions that have been described in association with posterior instability helps in pre-surgical planning. The purpose of this article is to review the classification of, and injury mechanisms leading to, posterior shoulder instability and to describe imaging findings associated with posterior instability, with emphasis on MR imaging. (orig.)

  9. [Imaging evaluation on adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Youxing; Tang, Kanglai; Yuan, Chengsong; Tao, Xu; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Bo; Guo, Yupeng

    2015-03-24

    Modern shoulder prosthesis has evolved through four generations. And the fourth generation technology has a core three-dimensional design of restoring 3D reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy. Thus a new shoulder prosthesis is developed on the basis of the technology of 3D prosthesis. Assessment of whether shoulder prosthesis can restore individualized reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy is based on the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy. To evaluate the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy through measuring the parameters of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis and compare with normal data. The parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were analyzed and evaluated for a total of 12 cases undergoing shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The relevant anatomical parameters included neck-shaft angle (NSA), retroversion angle (RA), humeral head height (HH) and humeral head diameter (HD). And the anatomical parameters were compared with the data from normal side. All underwent shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The postoperative parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were compared with those of normal side. And the difference of NSA was 0.05). Individualized shoulder prosthesis has excellent adaptability to shoulder. All core parameters are freely adjustable and specification models may be optimized. With matching tools, individualized shoulder prosthesis improves the accuracy and reliability in shoulder replacement.

  10. Shoulder imaging with MR, US, arthography, and arthoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drace, J.; Resendes, M.; Pyka, W.

    1989-01-01

    To date, the true efficacies of shoulder imaging modalities remain uncertain, as no prospective study controlling for significant selection bias has been reported. A minimum of 25 double-blind examinations now have definitive confirmation, not selected by the imaging modalities. The images and interpretations were sealed in an envelope and blinded from the arthroscopist for initial arthroscopy, but second-look arthroscopy, and in some cases open surgery, was performed after unsealing the envelope. Therefore, negative and positive cases were equivalently tested. To date, MR imaging and US remain equally sensitive (85%) for detection of rotator cuff tears, but the combination is more sensitive (90%), and both are more sensitive than arthrography. Arthrography increased specificity when MR imaging and US in combination appear useful for diagnosis of biceps tendinitis

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: a review of potential sources of diagnostic errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.W.; Helms, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR arthrography are frequently utilized in the evaluation of shoulder pain and instability. The clinical scenario and imaging findings may be confusing to clinicians and radiologists and may present diagnostic challenges for those involved in evaluating and treating shoulder pathology. Often rotator cuff and labral abnormalities may be coexistent, clinical manifestations of denervation syndromes may be confusing to clinicians, and normal anatomic variations, imaging pitfalls, and various artifacts may cause dilemmas for the radiologist. This article will review the most frequently encountered mimickers and pitfalls of MR imaging of the shoulder. (orig.)

  12. Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, wheelchair propulsion, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Michael L; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A; Towers, Jeffrey D; Koontz, Alicia M; Souza, Aaron L

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between pushrim forces and the progression of shoulder injuries in manual wheelchair users. Longitudinal case series. Biomechanics laboratory and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facility at a Veterans Health Administration medical center and university hospital, respectively. Fourteen individuals with spinal cord injury (8 men, 6 women) who used manual wheelchairs. Subjects propelled their own wheelchairs on a dynamometer at 0.9 and 1.8m/s. Bilateral biomechanical data were obtained by using force and moment sensing pushrims at time 1. Bilateral shoulder MR images were also completed on 2 occasions, at time 1 and, approximately 2 years later, at time 2. The peak pushrim forces in a pushrim coordinate system were calculated, weight normalized and averaged over 5 strokes (presented as % body weight). MRI abnormalities were graded by using a summated scale. Differences between scores between times 1 and 2 were calculated. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on change in MRI score. Seven subjects were in the group with worsening scores (MRI+; mean, 8.14 points; range, 5-16), and 7 were in the group with improving or unchanging scores (MRI-; mean, -1.00 point; range, -5 to 1). There was no significant difference between groups with respect to age, body mass index, or years from injury. There were significantly more women in the MRI+ group (6 women, 1 man) than in the MRI- group (7 men) (P=.001). The MRI+ group used significantly greater weight-normalized radial force, or force directed toward the axle at time 1, to propel their wheelchairs at each speed (Ppay particular attention to women who use wheelchairs. Reducing forces during wheelchair propulsion may minimize the likelihood of developing shoulder injuries.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Motoyuki

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic capability of MRI in depicting abnormalities in traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder (TAI) was evaluated with special attention to MR arthrogram enhanced by joint effusion or saline solution. Sixty five shoulders with TAI and 19 control shoulders were scanned using the field gradient echo method (STAGE technique) on axial plane with a 1.0 or 1.5 Tesla system. MR arthrogram was obtained in 36 shoulders with TAI (Group A) and 11 control shoulders (Group C). Conventional MRI was obtained in 29 shoulders with TAI (Group B) and 8 control shoulders (Group D). Abnormalities in Bankart lesion were assessed according to signal intensity and labral shape. Abnormal signal was obtained in 8 shoulders (27.6%) in group B. Changes in shape were seen in 35 shoulders (97.2%) in group A and 18 (62.1%) in group B. Interruption of the anterior capsule was suspected in 3 (8.3%) in group A. Hill-Sachs lesion was suspected in 60 shoulders. Shoulders in the control group showed no abnormal change. Details of Bankart lesion confirmed by subsequent arthroscopy were diagnosed correctly in all of 14 shoulders on MR arthrogram and 8 of 16 shoulders on conventional MRI. These results show that MRI, MR arthrogram in particular, is useful for depicting abnormalities in TAI. (author)

  14. Electrical resistivity imaging survey to detect uncharted mine galleries in the mining district of Linares, Jaén, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, J.; Rey, J.; Dueñas, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Benavente, J.

    2012-02-01

    The scarcity of information about the existence of old mining shafts and galleries in urban areas is an important issue for future urban development. Electrical resistivity tomography is a non-destructive geophysical technique that can detect and characterize such subsurface cavities based on differences in the behaviour of electrical current in the void and in the embedding rock. Here we present a study in which this technique was used to determine the location of old engineered structures around the city of Linares, southern Spain, and to relate these structures to the abandoned deep mines present in the area. Eight electrical resistivity imaging profiles were performed, with a total of 22 808 measurements. Correlations between geoelectrical anomalies allow detection of the depth and the direction of several galleries, as well as the voids that result from mining extraction. Given the depth at which these structures are located (in some cases less than 5 m), they pose an important risk for future construction projects in areas of urban expansion. This technique is shown to be a useful tool for locating areas that pose important urban risks and, by extension, for the decision-making process in territorial planning, especially in areas with a history of deep mining.

  15. Electrical resistivity imaging survey to detect uncharted mine galleries in the mining district of Linares, Jaén, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-López, J; Rey, J; Hidalgo, C; Dueñas, J; Benavente, J

    2012-01-01

    The scarcity of information about the existence of old mining shafts and galleries in urban areas is an important issue for future urban development. Electrical resistivity tomography is a non-destructive geophysical technique that can detect and characterize such subsurface cavities based on differences in the behaviour of electrical current in the void and in the embedding rock. Here we present a study in which this technique was used to determine the location of old engineered structures around the city of Linares, southern Spain, and to relate these structures to the abandoned deep mines present in the area. Eight electrical resistivity imaging profiles were performed, with a total of 22 808 measurements. Correlations between geoelectrical anomalies allow detection of the depth and the direction of several galleries, as well as the voids that result from mining extraction. Given the depth at which these structures are located (in some cases less than 5 m), they pose an important risk for future construction projects in areas of urban expansion. This technique is shown to be a useful tool for locating areas that pose important urban risks and, by extension, for the decision-making process in territorial planning, especially in areas with a history of deep mining

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Rotator Cuff in Destroyed Rheumatoid Shoulder: Comparison with Findings during Shoulder Replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soini, I.; Belt, E.A.; Niemitukia, L.; Maeenpaeae, H.M.; Kautiainen, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with respect to rotator cuff ruptures. Material and Methods: Thirty-one patients with rheumatic disease underwent preoperative MRI before shoulder arthroplasty. The scans were reviewed independently by two experienced radiologists. Three surgeons performed all the replacements (hemiarthroplasties), and the condition of the rotator cuff was assessed. Complete and massive tears of the rotator cuff were recorded and compared at surgery and on MRI. Results: With MRI, 21 shoulders (68%) were classified as having complete or massive tears of the rotator cuff and at surgery 14 shoulders (45%). Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.44 (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.72) and accuracy 0.71 (95% CI: 0.52 to 0.86). Conclusion: In severely destroyed rheumatoid shoulder, the findings of soft tissues were incoherent both with MRI and at surgery. The integrity of tendons could not readily be elucidated with MRI because of an inflammatory process and scarred tissues; in surgery, too, changes were frequently difficult to categorize. Preoperative MRI of severely destroyed rheumatoid shoulder before arthroplasty turned out to be of only minor importance

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okur, Gokcan [Etimesgut Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Chaney, Kimberly A. [Presence St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Elgin, IL (United States); Lomasney, Laurie M. [Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. The prevalence of post-vaccination complications is likely on the rise. Complications are well known to general clinicians, but are under-reported in the imaging literature. We present four cases of post-vaccination shoulder pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed. The most likely reason for a humeral intraosseous edema-like signal was presumed injection of vaccine substance directly into osseous structures that might lead to focal osteitis. In the published literature, there is little emphasis on the imaging of local injection site complications accompanying influenza vaccination. We intended to increase familiarity of MRI findings in the setting of prolonged or severe clinical symptoms following influenza vaccination through the imaging findings of these four cases. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okur, Gokcan; Chaney, Kimberly A.; Lomasney, Laurie M.

    2014-01-01

    The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. The prevalence of post-vaccination complications is likely on the rise. Complications are well known to general clinicians, but are under-reported in the imaging literature. We present four cases of post-vaccination shoulder pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed. The most likely reason for a humeral intraosseous edema-like signal was presumed injection of vaccine substance directly into osseous structures that might lead to focal osteitis. In the published literature, there is little emphasis on the imaging of local injection site complications accompanying influenza vaccination. We intended to increase familiarity of MRI findings in the setting of prolonged or severe clinical symptoms following influenza vaccination through the imaging findings of these four cases. (orig.)

  19. [Concordance among analysts from Latin-American laboratories for rice grain appearance determination using a gallery of digital images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Manuel; Graterol, Eduardo; Alezones, Jesús; Criollo, Beisy; Castillo, Dámaso; Kuri, Victoria; Oviedo, Norman; Moquete, Cesar; Romero, Marbella; Hanley, Zaida; Taylor, Margie

    2012-06-01

    The appearance of rice grain is a key aspect in quality determination. Mainly, this analysis is performed by expert analysts through visual observation; however, due to the subjective nature of the analysis, the results may vary among analysts. In order to evaluate the concordance between analysts from Latin-American rice quality laboratories for rice grain appearance through digital images, an inter-laboratory test was performed with ten analysts and images of 90 grains captured with a high resolution scanner. Rice grains were classified in four categories including translucent, chalky, white belly, and damaged grain. Data was categorized using statistic parameters like mode and its frequency, the relative concordance, and the reproducibility parameter kappa. Additionally, a referential image gallery of typical grain for each category was constructed based on mode frequency. Results showed a Kappa value of 0.49, corresponding to a moderate reproducibility, attributable to subjectivity in the visual analysis of grain images. These results reveal the need for standardize the evaluation criteria among analysts to improve the confidence of the determination of rice grain appearance.

  20. Optimization of T2-weighted imaging for shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography by synthetic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Hahn, Seok; Yang, Jaemoon; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-01-01

    Background Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows reformatting of various synthetic images by adjustment of scanning parameters such as repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE). Optimized MR images can be reformatted from T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values to achieve maximum tissue contrast between joint fluid and adjacent soft tissue. Purpose To demonstrate the method for optimization of TR and TE by synthetic MRI and to validate the optimized images by comparison with conventional shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) images. Material and Methods Thirty-seven shoulder MRA images acquired by synthetic MRI were retrospectively evaluated for PD, T1, and T2 values at the joint fluid and glenoid labrum. Differences in signal intensity between the fluid and labrum were observed between TR of 500-6000 ms and TE of 80-300 ms in T2-weighted (T2W) images. Conventional T2W and synthetic images were analyzed for diagnostic agreement of supraspinatus tendon abnormalities (kappa statistics) and image quality scores (one-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis). Results Optimized mean values of TR and TE were 2724.7 ± 1634.7 and 80.1 ± 0.4, respectively. Diagnostic agreement for supraspinatus tendon abnormalities between conventional and synthetic MR images was excellent (κ = 0.882). The mean image quality score of the joint space in optimized synthetic images was significantly higher compared with those in conventional and synthetic images (2.861 ± 0.351 vs. 2.556 ± 0.607 vs. 2.750 ± 0.439; P optimized TR and TE for shoulder MRA enables optimization of soft-tissue contrast.

  1. Consideration of Shoulder Joint's Image with the Changed Tube Angle of the Shoulder Oblique Projection in Supine Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Choi, Nam Gil

    2008-01-01

    There is a standard shoulder oblique method (Grashey method) available to view the shoulder joint. This method projects AP view of the shoulder joint so that the Humerus head's subuxation or joint degeneration can be easily visualized. However, in this view, the patients, with supine or sitting or erect position, have to keep their body obliquely. Whereas, the patients who are not well or operated, usually feel very uncomfortable to keep their body in this position and hence, we need other persons' help and much efforts will be needed to get the good quality shoulder joint view. Therefore, we thought of examining a method which shows the joint well by angling the tube to Medio-Lateral direction and without keeping the patients' one side upward in supine position. For this study, total 15 subjects with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness, were recruited for examinations. They consisted of 9 males and 6 females. Statistic group analysis was performed with ANOVA test. Scores of the evaluation of the experts were 1.01±0.54 at 25 degrees, 2.50±0.50 at 30 degrees, 2.85±0.36 at 35 degrees and 2.33±0.47 at 40 degrees, respectively, and they were significant(p<0.05, Table 1). Joint space of the Humerus head and Scapula were well distinguished at 35 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees with the almost same score. However, the degree of distortion at 40 degrees was more severe than that at 30 degrees. Ultimately, 30-35 degrees views were shown to yield good quality shoulder oblique images. In conclusion, this method may be very useful for the patients who are uncomfortable and for the emergency patients. In order to get similar or comparable view, the same X-tube angle is recommended to be used before and after the operation. Therefore, we hope that this new angled method seems to be efficient.

  2. mri evaluation of patients with shoulder pain at three imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: The study was conducted for a period of six months between June 2008 and December. 2008. Seventy ... shoulder due to pain, stiffness or weakness causes substantial ... society in terms of lost man-hours, direct hospital bills.

  3. Measurement of angles of abduction for diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs using goniometry and digital image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Renfro, Daniel C; Tomlinson, James L; Sorensen, Jill E

    2005-01-01

    To compare abduction angles of shoulders with medial instability and unaffected shoulders in the same dogs and in age- and breed-matched dogs. Case-control study. Dogs with medial instability of the shoulder (n=33) and 26 control dogs. Dogs were sedated and positioned in lateral recumbency with both scapulas parallel to the table. With the elbow and shoulder in extension, the non-recumbent limb was maximally abducted and the angle between the scapular spine and lateral aspect of the brachium measured with a goniometer; a digital image was taken from the cranial aspect. Both techniques were performed in triplicate by 2 examiners. Mean abduction angles for each shoulder were determined from goniometric measurements and image analysis. Data were analyzed for significant differences between affected and unaffected shoulders, measurement techniques, and examiners. Strength of correlation between measurement techniques was determined. Mean abduction angles for shoulders with instability (53.7+/-4.7 degrees goniometric, 51.2+/-4.9 degrees image) were significantly (P<.001) larger than for all unaffected shoulders (32.6+/-2.0 degrees goniometric, 30.9+/-2.3 degrees image). In dogs diagnosed with instability, affected shoulders had significantly (P<.001) larger abduction angles than the contralateral (unaffected) shoulders. No significant differences were identified between right and left shoulders for control dogs, measurement techniques, or examiners. A strong (r=0.90) significant (P<.001) positive correlation between measurement techniques was noted. Shoulder abduction angles measured under sedation provide objective data for diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs. Shoulders with clinical and arthroscopic evidence of medial instability have significantly higher abduction angles than shoulders that are considered normal. Determination of shoulder abduction angles should be included in the diagnostic protocol for forelimb lameness assessment in dogs.

  4. Time-efficient CT colonography interpretation using an advanced image-gallery-based, computer-aided ''first-reader'' workflow for the detection of colorectal adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Thomas; Ringl, Helmut; Weber, Michael; Mueller-Mang, Christina; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Wolf, Matthias; Bogoni, Luca; Salganicoff, Marcos; Raykar, Vikas; Graser, Anno

    2012-01-01

    To assess the performance of an advanced ''first-reader'' workflow for computer-aided detection (CAD) of colorectal adenomas ≥ 6 mm at computed tomographic colonography (CTC) in a low-prevalence cohort. A total of 616 colonoscopy-validated CTC patient-datasets were retrospectively reviewed by a radiologist using a ''first-reader'' CAD workflow. CAD detections were presented as galleries of six automatically generated two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images together with interactive 3D target views and 2D multiplanar views of the complete dataset. Each patient-dataset was interpreted by initially using CAD image-galleries followed by a fast 2D review to address unprompted colonic areas. Per-patient, per-polyp, and per-adenoma sensitivities were calculated for lesions ≥ 6 mm. Statistical testing employed Fisher's exact and McNemar tests. In 91/616 patients, 131 polyps (92 adenomas, 39 non-adenomas) ≥ 6 mm and two cancers were identified by reference standard. Using the CAD gallery-based first-reader workflow, the radiologist detected all adenomas ≥ 10 mm (34/34) and cancers. Per-patient and polyp sensitivities for lesions ≥ 6 mm were 84.3 % (75/89), and 83.2 % (109/131), respectively, with 89.1 % (57/64) and 85.9 % (79/92) for adenomas. Overall specificity was 95.6 % (504/527). Mean interpretation time was 3.1 min per patient. A CAD algorithm, applied in an image-gallery-based first-reader workflow, can substantially decrease reading times while enabling accurate detection of colorectal adenomas in a low-prevalence population. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of shoulders with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: reliability of measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Demaille-Wlodyka, Samantha; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Poiraudeau, Serge; Revel, Michel [Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Paris (France); Drape, Jean-Luc; Diche, Thierry; Minvielle, Francois [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Department of Radiology B, Paris (France); Fermanian, Jacques [Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Biostatistics, Hopital Necker (AP-HP), Paris (France)

    2005-12-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (AC) were compared with those of contralateral healthy shoulders and the reliability of measures assessed. Twenty-six consecutive patients (26 AC and 14 healthy shoulders) were prospectively assessed. The main measurements were thickness of the joint capsule and synovial membrane in the axillary recess and rotator interval in T1-weighted spin-echo sequence enhanced with intravenous (IV) gadolinium chelate (Gd-chelate). Reliability was studied by use of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean thickness of the axillary recess on the coronal plane was 9.0{+-}2.2 mm in AC shoulders and 0.4{+-}0.7 mm in healthy shoulders. The mean thickness of the rotator interval on the sagittal plane was 8.4{+-}2.8 in AC shoulders and 0.6{+-}0.8 mm in healthy shoulders. Interobserver reliability was good for the axillary recess, with ICC values of 0.84 for the coronal plane, and good for the rotator interval, with ICC values of 0.80 for the sagittal plane. MRI with IV Gd-chelate injection can show, with acceptable reliability, signal and thickness abnormalities of the shoulder joint capsule and synovial membrane in AC. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of shoulders with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis: reliability of measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Demaille-Wlodyka, Samantha; Mayoux-Benhamou, Marie-Anne; Poiraudeau, Serge; Revel, Michel; Drape, Jean-Luc; Diche, Thierry; Minvielle, Francois; Fermanian, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in idiopathic adhesive capsulitis (AC) were compared with those of contralateral healthy shoulders and the reliability of measures assessed. Twenty-six consecutive patients (26 AC and 14 healthy shoulders) were prospectively assessed. The main measurements were thickness of the joint capsule and synovial membrane in the axillary recess and rotator interval in T1-weighted spin-echo sequence enhanced with intravenous (IV) gadolinium chelate (Gd-chelate). Reliability was studied by use of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean thickness of the axillary recess on the coronal plane was 9.0±2.2 mm in AC shoulders and 0.4±0.7 mm in healthy shoulders. The mean thickness of the rotator interval on the sagittal plane was 8.4±2.8 in AC shoulders and 0.6±0.8 mm in healthy shoulders. Interobserver reliability was good for the axillary recess, with ICC values of 0.84 for the coronal plane, and good for the rotator interval, with ICC values of 0.80 for the sagittal plane. MRI with IV Gd-chelate injection can show, with acceptable reliability, signal and thickness abnormalities of the shoulder joint capsule and synovial membrane in AC. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  8. Denervation syndromes of the shoulder girdle: MR imaging with electrophysiologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredella, M.A.; Wischer, T.K.; Stork, A.; Genant, H.K.; Tirman, P.F.J.; Fritz, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the use of MR imaging in the characterization of denervated muscle of the shoulder correlated with electrophysiologic studies.Design and patients. We studied with MR imaging five patients who presented with shoulder weakness and pain and who underwent electrophysiologic studies. On MR imaging the distribution of muscle edema and fatty infiltration was recorded, as was the presence of masses impinging on a regional nerve.Results. Acute/subacute denervation was best seen on T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with fat saturation, showing increased SI related to neurogenic edema. Chronic denervation was best seen on T1-weighted spin-echo images, demonstrating loss of muscle bulk and diffuse areas of increased signal intensity within the muscle. Three patients showed MR imaging and electrophysiologic findings of Parsonage Turner syndrome. One patient demonstrated an arteriovenous malformation within the spinoglenoid notch, impinging on the suprascapular nerve with associated atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle. The fifth patient demonstrated fatty atrophy of the teres minor muscle caused by compression by a cyst of the axillary nerve and electrophysiologic findings of an incomplete axillary nerve block.Conclusion. MR imaging is useful in detecting and characterizing denervation atrophy and neurogenic edema in shoulder muscles. MR imaging can provide additional information to electrophysiologic studies by estimating the age (acute/chronic) and identifying morphologic causes for shoulder pain and atrophy. (orig.)

  9. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Nikdokht; Bruce, Dean; Chung, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis

  10. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Nikdokht [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); Bruce, Dean [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis.

  11. Improved CHESS imaging with the use of rice pads: Investigation in the neck, shoulder, and elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Susumu; Miki, Yukio; Yokobayashi, Tsuneo; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Komori, Yoshiaki; Fujimoto, Koji; Ishikawa, Mitsunori

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the feasibility of rice pads for improving nonuniform fat suppression in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the neck, shoulder, and elbow using the chemical shift selective (CHESS) technique. CHESS imaging of the neck, shoulder, and elbow was performed on 10 healthy volunteers with and without the use of rice pads. Images were visually assessed by one radiologist and one radiologic technologist using a four-point scale. Results were compared using Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test. Images with and without rice pads were rated 3.9 and 1.5 for the neck (P = 0.002), 3.85 and 2.5 for the shoulder (P = 0.002), and 3.4 and 2.45 for the elbow (P = 0.004). Fat-suppressed images obtained using the CHESS technique were significantly improved by rice pads for the neck, shoulder, and elbow, indicating that image deterioration with CHESS caused by magnetic field nonuniformity can be improved by rice pads in all body areas.

  12. Validity of ultrasonography and measures of adult shoulder function and reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using magnetic resonance imaging as a gold standard.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2010-08-01

    To assess the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in detecting inflammatory shoulder changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to determine the agreement between US and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a gold standard.

  13. MR imaging of the shoulder: Spectrum of abnormalities in 65 patients and correlation with arthrography and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatkin, M.B.; Reicher, M.A.; Kellerhouse, L.E.; Resnick, D.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has previously been used to demonstrate the appearance of the normal shoulder. In this investigation the authors employed MR imaging in 65 consecutive patients with shoulder pain. Subsequent arthrography was performed in 31 patients and surgery in 15. Clinical follow-up was obtained in 35 patients treated conservatively. MR imaging was highly accurate in depicting the spectrum of rotator cuff abnormalities associated with mechanical impingment, including both large and small rotator cuff tears as well as tendinitis. Abnormalities of the capsular mechanisms, osseous tumors, ostenonecrosis, and injuries to the supporting musculature were also well depicted. Considerable potential exists for MR imaging in evaluating shoulder joint disease

  14. Postoperative imaging of knee, hip and shoulder arthroplasty; Postoperative Bildgebung nach Gelenkersatz. Knie, Huefte, Schulter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saupe, Nadja; Zanetti, Marco [Klinik Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland). Zentrum fuer Muskuloskelettale Radiologie; Romero, Jose [Endoclinic Zuerich (Switzerland). Knie-Chirurgische Kompetenz-Praxis; Hersche, Otmar [Klinik Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland). Endoclinic

    2017-12-15

    Numerous joint prostheses are used in orthopedic practice. This article reviews the current status of knee, hip and shoulder replacement and the expected radiographic appearances. Different types and techniques of replacement, various designs of hardware, the imaging appearance of complications of replacement and of revisions will be discussed. This article will also acknowledge some of the basic principles to reduce metal-induced susceptibility artifacts originate in MR images. Common ways to reduce or modify artifacts will be presented too.

  15. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings; Osteocondromatose sinovial no ombro: achados por metodos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda, E-mail: reticianelli@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  16. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E.; Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I.; Tsagkalis, A.; Dailiana, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  17. NAIP Status Maps Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — NAIP Status Maps Gallery. These maps illustrate what aerial imagery collection is planned, whats been collected, when it is available and how it is available. These...

  18. Prospective, double-blind comparison of shoulder MR imaging, US, arthrography, and arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resendes, M.; Drace, J.E.; Pyka, W.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of shoulder pain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, ultrasonography (US) and arthrography were prospectively compared in a double-blind experimental protocol. Thirty consecutive patients were studied by these modalities, which received separate, blinded interpretations. The images and interpretations were sealed in an envelope and blinded from the arthroscopist for initial arthroscopy, but second-look arthroscopy, and in some cases open surgery, was performed after the envelopes were unsealed. To avoid selection bias, negative MR and/or US examinations never affected confirmation by arthrography and/or arthroscopy, so negatives and positives were equivalently tested. To date, MR imaging and US are equally sensitive in the detection of rotator cuff tears, but the combination is more sensitive. Both MR imaging and US demonstrated tears not diagnosed by means of arthrography, and MR imaging distinguished hemorrhagic muscle tears from rotator cuff tears, which arthrography and arthroscopy did not. Both MR imaging and US showed characteristic appearances of biceps tendonitis, but neither demonstrated adhesive capsulitis. The authors conclude that all three imaging modalities have a role in shoulder diagnosis

  19. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20

  20. The utility of MR imaging of the shoulder joint: comparison of the MR imaging between conventional MR imaging and arthrographic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dong Sik; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Kim, Ihn Sub; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyunghee Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI of the shoulder. Between January and June 1997, shoulder MRI and arthroscopy were performed in a total of 48 patients with shoulder pain (n=3D30) or shoulder instability (n=3D18). Forty-five were males and three were females; their ages ranged from 16 to 67 (mean 32.5) years. The period between shoulder MRI and arthroscopy was between one and 390 (mean, 42.2) days. Twenty-six patents underwent MR arthrography (AMR), and 22 conventional MRI(CMR). Each image was analyzed for rotator cuff injury, glenoid labral injury, SLAP lesion, and biceps tendon injury. On arthroscopy, one disease was found in 34 patients, two were found in six, three diseases were found in seven, and one patient had four diseases. Arthroscopic diagnosis was as follows:rotator cuff injury, 29;SLAP lesion, 12;glenoid labral injury, 10;biceps tendon injury, 4;subacromial bursitis, 2;chronic synovitis, 1;adhesive capsulitis, 1;superior glenohumeral ligament injury, 1;normal, 1. For rotator cuff injury, the sensitivity of MRI was 65.5% and specificity was 93.0% (AMR:66.7%, 95.8%, CMR:65.2%, 86.4%). For SLAP lesion, sensitivity was 58.3% and specificity was 97.2% (AMR:66.7%, 100%, CMR:50%, 93.8%);for glenoid labral injury, sensitivity was 80.0% and specificity was 89.5% (AMR:85.7%, 84.2%, CMR:66.7%, 94.7%), and for biceps tendon injury, the false negative rate was 100%. In cases involving glenoid labral injury, the diagnostic accuracy of shoulder MRI was relatively high;in rotator cuff injury and SLAP lesion, however, diagnosis was limited, and in biceps tendon injury was difficult. We suggest, however, that MR arthrography has certain diagnostic advantages over conventional MRI.=20.

  1. Consideration of Shoulder Joint's Image with the Changed Tube Angle of the Shoulder Oblique Projection in Supine Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Hyun; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    There is a standard shoulder oblique method (Grashey method) available to view the shoulder joint. This method projects AP view of the shoulder joint so that the Humerus head's subuxation or joint degeneration can be easily visualized. However, in this view, the patients, with supine or sitting or erect position, have to keep their body obliquely. Whereas, the patients who are not well or operated, usually feel very uncomfortable to keep their body in this position and hence, we need other persons' help and much efforts will be needed to get the good quality shoulder joint view. Therefore, we thought of examining a method which shows the joint well by angling the tube to Medio-Lateral direction and without keeping the patients' one side upward in supine position. For this study, total 15 subjects with no history of neurological or psychiatric illness, were recruited for examinations. They consisted of 9 males and 6 females. Statistic group analysis was performed with ANOVA test. Scores of the evaluation of the experts were 1.01{+-}0.54 at 25 degrees, 2.50{+-}0.50 at 30 degrees, 2.85{+-}0.36 at 35 degrees and 2.33{+-}0.47 at 40 degrees, respectively, and they were significant(p<0.05, Table 1). Joint space of the Humerus head and Scapula were well distinguished at 35 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees with the almost same score. However, the degree of distortion at 40 degrees was more severe than that at 30 degrees. Ultimately, 30-35 degrees views were shown to yield good quality shoulder oblique images. In conclusion, this method may be very useful for the patients who are uncomfortable and for the emergency patients. In order to get similar or comparable view, the same X-tube angle is recommended to be used before and after the operation. Therefore, we hope that this new angled method seems to be efficient.

  2. An assessment of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Blanchard, T.K.; Dixon, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To analyse and compare all papers published to date (August 2000) that quantify the effectiveness, defined as the impact of clinician's diagnosis or management plans, or patient outcome, of MRI of the shoulder.Design. A computerised search of Index Medicus with a broad search strategy relating to shoulder MRI was performed. Manual assessment of all papers listed was undertaken with classification of each paper depending on whether it addressed questions of (1) technical performance, (2) diagnostic performance or (3) outcome.Results. Four of 265 qualifying papers addressed aspects of effectiveness and these were reviewed. The impact on the clinician's diagnosis varied widely between papers: the primary diagnosis was altered in 23% to 68% of cases, and the management plans were subsequently changed in 15% to 61% of cases. Only one paper addressed the impact on patient health.Conclusions. The effectiveness of MRI of the shoulder depends on the clinical skills of the referring clinician and prevalence of disease in the study population. This will have implications when the effectiveness of an imaging technique between different institutions is compared, and this in turn will influence any comparisons of cost-effectiveness. (orig.)

  3. National Gallery in Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikeš, Stanislav; Haindl, Michal; Holub, Radek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, č. 86 (2011), s. 23-24 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG11009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : virtrual reality * information system Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/RO/haindl-national gallery in prague.pdf

  4. Shoulder impingement syndrome: diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and radiographic signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.P.; Chandnani, V.P.; Baird, D.E.; Deberardino, T.M.; Swenson, G.W.; Hansen, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is commonly encountered in orthopaedics. In a blinded retrospective study, magnetic resonance imaging and roentgenographic signs in 41 patients with clinical signs of impingement syndrome were compared with 40 control patients. Statistically significant differences between the groups included the absence of subacromial fat, as well as the presence of a supraspinatus tear, subacromial osteophytes, and a decreased coracohumeral distance. Other signs reported to occur in patients with impingement syndrome did not vary significantly in the population studied. 20 refs., 12 figs

  5. Clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in elite swimmers’ shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Celliers

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess clinically relevant MRI findings in the shoulders of symptomatic and asymptomatic elite swimmers. Method: Twenty (aged 16–23 years elite swimmers completed questionnaires on their swimming training, pain and shoulder function. MRI of both shoulders (n = 40 were performed and all swimmers were given a standardised clinical shoulder examination. Results: Both shoulders of 11 male and 9 female elite swimmers (n = 40 were examined. Eleven of the 40 shoulders were clinically symptomatic and 29 were asymptomatic. The most common clinical finding in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders was impingement during internal rotation, with impingement in 54.5% of the symptomatic shoulders and in 31.0% of the asymptomatic shoulders. The most common MRI findings in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders were supraspinatus tendinosis (45.5% vs. 20.7%, subacromial subdeltoid fluid (45.5% vs. 34.5%, increased signal in the AC Joint (45.5% vs. 37.9% and AC joint arthrosis (36.4% vs. 34.5%. Thirty-nine (97.5% of the shoulders showed abnormal MRI features. Conclusion: MRI findings in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders of young elite swimmers are similar and care should be taken when reporting shoulder MRIs in these athletes. Asymptomatic shoulders demonstrate manifold MRI abnormalities that may be radiologically significant but appear not to be clinically significant.

  6. Diagnostic sensitivity of radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Corey R; Cook, Cristi R; Cook, James L

    2015-01-01

    Radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography are commonly used for diagnosis of shoulder osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans (OC/OCD) in dogs, however there is a lack of published information on the relative diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities for detecting shoulder OC/OCD in a group of dogs, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Inclusion criteria were history and clinical findings consistent with osteochondrosis and/or osteochondritis dissecans involving at least one shoulder. With informed client consent, both shoulders for all included dogs were examined using standardized radiography, ultrasonography, MRI, and arthroscopy protocols. One of three veterinary surgeons recorded clinical and arthroscopic findings without knowledge of diagnostic imaging findings. One of two veterinary radiologists recorded diagnostic imaging findings without knowledge of clinical and arthroscopic findings. Eighteen client-owned dogs (n = 36 shoulders) met inclusion criteria. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (correct classification rate) values for detecting presence or absence of shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans were as follows: radiography (88.5%, 90%, 88.9%), ultrasonography (92%, 60%, 82.6%), and MRI (96%, 88.9%, 94.4%). Odds of a correct diagnosis for MRI were 3.2 times more than ultrasonography and two times more than radiography. For MRI detection of lesions, the sagittal T2 or PD-FAT SAT sequences were considered to be most helpful. For radiographic detection of lesions, the additional supinated-mediolateral and pronated-mediolateral projections were considered to be most helpful. Findings from the current study support more evidence-based diagnostic imaging recommendations for dogs with clinically suspected shoulder osteochondrosis or osteochondritis dissecans. © 2014 American College of

  7. Classification, clinical findings and operative treatment of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder disease What do we really need to know from an imaging report to establish a treatment strategy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boenisch, U.; Lembcke, O.; Naumann, Th.

    2000-01-01

    Successful patient care involves interdisciplinary Cupertino. Images allow an interpretation of a static dimension, but may not be sufficient to develop a surgical treatment strategy, since many shoulder problems have its origin in a dynamic pathology. This article outlines dynamic clinical tests of shoulder pathology, classifies various degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder problems and stresses key facts an imaging report should include in order to plan surgery. This article conveys basic knowledge of those tests and the dynamic background of shoulder pathology. Basic surgical treatment principles are summarised briefly

  8. Imaging of degenerative and posttraumatic disease in the shoulder joint with ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, Marco; Hodler, Juerg

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the examination technique of shoulder ultrasound, normal and abnormal ultrasound findings in acute (posttraumatic) and chronic (degenerative) lesions. Moreover, it reviews the effectiveness of ultrasound in relation to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Most authors report that full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus can reliably be diagnosed by ultrasound. However, the simple diagnosis of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear is no longer sufficient for surgical management. The precise localization and size of rotator cuff tears as well as the extent of muscle degeneration is important for surgical planning. For this aspect and for partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, for subscapularis lesions as well as for lesions of the long biceps tendons there is no consensus regarding the diagnostic value of ultrasound. To the present, ultrasound (contrary to MR imaging) has failed to demonstrate that it consistently influences the clinician's degree of confidence in the clinical diagnosis or the treatment plan. Therefore, some orthopedic surgeons prefer MR imaging to ultrasound in the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and other abnormalities of the glenohumeral joint. Moreover, MR imaging, especially when combined with arthrography, represents a one-step investigation, which not only allows for assessment of rotator cuff lesion but also of lesions of the labrum (Bankart lesions, SLAP lesions), the joint capsule and the biceps tendon. It also demonstrates muscle atrophy, which represents an important predictor of surgical outcome in rotator cuff repair

  9. Imaging of degenerative and posttraumatic disease in the shoulder joint with ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco E-mail: mzanetti@balgrist.unizh.ch; Hodler, Juerg

    2000-08-01

    This article reviews the examination technique of shoulder ultrasound, normal and abnormal ultrasound findings in acute (posttraumatic) and chronic (degenerative) lesions. Moreover, it reviews the effectiveness of ultrasound in relation to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Most authors report that full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus can reliably be diagnosed by ultrasound. However, the simple diagnosis of a full-thickness rotator cuff tear is no longer sufficient for surgical management. The precise localization and size of rotator cuff tears as well as the extent of muscle degeneration is important for surgical planning. For this aspect and for partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus, for subscapularis lesions as well as for lesions of the long biceps tendons there is no consensus regarding the diagnostic value of ultrasound. To the present, ultrasound (contrary to MR imaging) has failed to demonstrate that it consistently influences the clinician's degree of confidence in the clinical diagnosis or the treatment plan. Therefore, some orthopedic surgeons prefer MR imaging to ultrasound in the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and other abnormalities of the glenohumeral joint. Moreover, MR imaging, especially when combined with arthrography, represents a one-step investigation, which not only allows for assessment of rotator cuff lesion but also of lesions of the labrum (Bankart lesions, SLAP lesions), the joint capsule and the biceps tendon. It also demonstrates muscle atrophy, which represents an important predictor of surgical outcome in rotator cuff repair.

  10. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  11. Open MR imaging of the unstable shoulder in the apprehension test position: description and evaluation of an alternative MR examination position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintzell, G.; Larsson, S.; Larsson, H.; Zyto, K.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an alternative MR assessment procedure for analysis of unstable shoulders. Twelve patients with unilateral recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation had both shoulders examined. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with an open-MR system in the apprehension position with the shoulder in 90 of abduction and maximum tolerable external rotation. Contrast enhancement was achieved with intravenous gadolinium. Correlations were made to the findings at operation. In 10 of 12 unstable shoulders the inferior glenohumeral ligament labral complex (IGHLLC) was detached from the glenoid as seen on MR and later verified during surgery. In one shoulder MR was unable to show a capsulolabral detachment that was verified at surgery, whereas in one shoulder both MR and surgical assessment revealed no soft tissue detachment (accuracy 92 %). A Hill-Sachs lesion was visualized and verified in all unstable shoulders, whereas the stable controls revealed normal IGHLLC and no Hill-Sachs lesion. Open-MRI evaluation of the shoulder in the apprehension test position may become a useful tool for the evaluation of anterior shoulder instability. (orig.)

  12. A comparative study of the value of four imaging methods for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkova, S.; Semova, R.; Matalova, A.

    2008-01-01

    The shoulder joint becomes involved later than the peripheral joints of the lower and upper limb in rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the current study is to determine the value of plain radiography (PR), ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting bone erosions and soft tissue changes of the shoulder joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. 27 patients - 21 women and 6 men, mean age 59 years (range 39 - 78) with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis and a painful shoulder are included in the study. The mean duration of the disease is 10 years and the mean duration of the shoulder symptoms is 4 years. In every patient all the imaging modalities were performed within 30 days. PR shows depicted changes in 20 patients (74%), US - in 25 patients (93%), CT - in 23 patients (85%) and MRI - in 26 patients (96%). US and MRI are more sensitive than CT in depicting small erosions of the humeral head and soft tissue changes. MRI and CT are the best methods for the diagnosis of subchondral and intraosseous bone lesions. The traditionally used PR is less sensitive than the other methods, especially in the evaluation of the soft tissues and the small erosions. (authors)

  13. A gallery support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erokhin, A I; Orekhov, D M; Romanov, P D; Semenov, U N; Sokov, G D; Trubnikov, V P

    1981-10-15

    The gallery support includes a middle section consisting of forward and aft hydraulic walls, a roof timber and a foundation on which the cross beam is connected to a longitudinal element, and outer sections mounted on both sides of the longitudinal element behind the cross beam; these outer sections contain the roof timbers, the hydraulic walls and the foundations which are connected to the cross beam by a hydraulic jack. In order to increase the areas where it may be used, particularly for variable-level mining works, the connector between the longitudinal element and the cross beam is hinge mounted, while the roof timbers of the outer sections are connected together by an adjustible jack and are constructed to allow detachable beams to be mounted on them under the arched support; the forward hydraulic props of the mid section are mounted on the ends of the cross beam.

  14. The Maastricht Ultrasound Shoulder pain trial (MUST: Ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of patients with non-chronic shoulder pain in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cals Jochen WL

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial disorders are considered to be one of the most common pathologies affecting the shoulder. Optimal therapy for shoulder pain (SP in primary care is yet unknown, since clinical history and physical examination do not provide decisive evidence as to the patho-anatomical origin of the symptoms. Optimal decision strategies can be furthered by applying ultrasound imaging (US, an accurate method in diagnosing SP, demonstrating a clear relationship between diagnosis and available therapies. Yet, the clinical cost-effectiveness of applying US in the management of SP in primary care has not been studied. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and methods of a trial assessing the cost-effectiveness of ultrasound imaging as a diagnostic triage tool to improve management of primary care patients with non-chronic shoulder pain. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial (RCT will involve 226 adult patients with suspected subacromial disorders recruited by general practitioners. During a Qualification period of two weeks, patients receive care as usual as advised by the Dutch College of General Practitioners, and patients are referred for US. Patients with insufficient improvement qualify for the RCT. These patients are then randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. The therapies used in both groups are the same (corticosteroid injections, referral to a physiotherapist or orthopedic surgeon except that therapies used in the intervention group will be tailored based on the US results. Ultrasound diagnosed disorders include tendinopathy, calcific tendinitis, partial and full thickness tears, and subacromial bursitis. The primary outcome is patient-perceived recovery at 52 weeks, using the Global Perceived Effect questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are disease specific and generic quality of life, cost-effectiveness, and the adherence to the initial applied treatment. Outcome measures will be assessed

  15. MRI of symptomatic shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Segata, Tateki; Kunitake, Katsuhiko; Morisawa, Keizo; Harada, Masataka; Hirano, Mako

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cuff tear and acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) osteoarthrosis by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation in symptomatic shoulders. MRI was performed on 124 shoulders in 115 patients whose age ranged from 16 to 83 years (average: 58.0 years). There were 74 men (79 shoulders) and 41 women (45 shoulders). The patients were divided into three groups according to age; A group (10 shoulders: 16-29 years), B group (43 shoulders: 30-59 years), and C group (71 shoulders: 60-83 years). Rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis were graded on scales 0 to 3 (normal, increased signal intensity, incomplete, complete), and 1 to 4 (none, mild, moderate, severe), respectively. There was a significant difference in the severity of the cuff tears and the ACJ osteoarthrosis with respect to age. Twenty percent of the shoulders were graded incomplete or complete cuff tears in group A, 88% in group B, and 93% in group C. No shoulders were graded moderate or severe ACJ changes in group A, 63% in group B, and 93% in group C. There was a definite correlation between the cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. MRI of the symptomatic shoulders indicated well correlation between the rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. (author)

  16. Annotating Fine Art Images

    OpenAIRE

    Isemann, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The project's objective is to work with art galleries to help them find innovative ways of indexing images, especially by having automatically created and updated thesauri. National Gallery of Ireland Douglas Hyde Gallery Trinity Long Room Hub

  17. Efficacy of periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) for shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomo, Kazuya, E-mail: nkgzmyn.1103@gmail.com [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake, E-mail: h-yabu@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yamasaki, Yuzo, E-mail: yyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Narita, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi.narita.ty@hitachi.com [Hitachi Medical Corporation, 3-26-29 Hakataekimae, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka 812-0011 (Japan); Kumazawa, Seiji, E-mail: s_kmzw@hs.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kojima, Tsukasa, E-mail: k.tsukasa.0910@gmail.com [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sakai, Noriyuki, E-mail: noriyuki.sakai0602@gmail.com [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Masaki, Masahumi, E-mail: m-masaki@kimura-hosp.or.jp [Department of Radiology, Kimura Hospital, 2-13-19 Chiyo, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka 812-0044 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroshi, E-mail: h-kimura@kimura-hosp.or.jp [Department of Surgery, Kimura Hospital, 2-13-19 Chiyo, Hakata-ku, Fukuoka 812-0044 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Objectives: To elucidate the utility of PROPELLER for motion artefact reduction on shoulder MRI and to examine the influence of streak artefacts on diagnosis of clinical images. Methods: 15 healthy volunteers and 48 patients underwent shoulder MRI with/without PROPELLER (coronal oblique proton density-fast spin echo [PD-FSE], sagittal oblique T2-FSE). In a volunteer study, all sequences were performed in both static and exercise-loaded conditions. Two radiologists graded artefacts and delineation of various anatomical structures in the volunteer study and motion and streak artefacts in the clinical study. Mean scores were compared between sequences with/without PROPELLER. In the clinical study, mean scores of motion artefacts were compared with mean scores of streak artefacts. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for all comparisons. Results: In both studies, PROPELLER significantly reduced motion artefacts (P < 0.05). In the volunteer study, it significantly improved delineations in sagittal oblique images in the exercise-loaded condition (P < 0.05). In the clinical study, streak artefacts appeared dominantly on images with PROPELLER (P < 0.05), but influenced diagnosis to a lesser extent than motion artefacts. Conclusion: PROPELLER can reduce motion artefacts in shoulder MRI. While it does cause streak artefacts, it affects diagnosis to a lesser extent.

  18. Imaging of the coracoglenoid ligament: a third ligament in the rotator interval of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappia, Marcello [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Varelli Institute, Naples (Italy); Castagna, Alessandro [Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Barile, Antonio [University of L' Aquila, Applied Clinical Science and Biotechnology, L' Aquila (Italy); Chianca, Vito [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Brunese, Luca [University of Molise, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Campobasso (Italy); Pouliart, Nicole [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Basic Biomedical Sciences - Human Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium); Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-08-15

    The coracoglenoid ligament (CGL) forms part of the anterosuperior capsuloligamentous complex of the shoulder. Although it has received attention in the anatomical literature, it has not been investigated on imaging. The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage value and the interobserver agreement of identification and classification of the CGL on MR and MR arthrography (MRA) imaging. Retrospectively, 280 MR and 150 MRA examinations were evaluated for detection of the CGL by two musculoskeletal radiologists. On the MRA examinations the CGL configuration in relation to the superior glenohumeral (SGHL) and coracohumeral ligament (CHL) was classified into five types. Additionally, the percentage of intra-articular appearance of the CGL and its mean thickness value were calculated. Finally, a possible correlation between pathological condition and anatomical type was evaluated on MRA. The CGL could be identified in 56%/54% of MRI and in 76%/77% of MRA examinations. On MRA, the CGL was detected as distinct structures in 37%/35% of cases and it appeared fused (partially or totally) with the SGHL and/or CHL in 39%/42%; it was absent in 12%/12% and it appears undistinguishable in the remaining cases. The interobserver agreement was excellent (κ = 0.98 for detection on MRI; p = 0.927 for classification of anterosuperior anatomy on MRA; κ = 0.873 and 0.978 for identification on sagittal and axial external rotation MRA respectively; κ = 0.943 for classification as intra- or extra-articular on MRA). The CGL can be reliably identified on MRI and MRA. (orig.)

  19. Scapulohumeral rhythm in shoulders with reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Matsuki, Keisuke; Struk, Aimee M; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about kinematic function of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). Scapulohumeral rhythm (SHR) is a common metric for assessing muscle function and shoulder joint motion. The purpose of this study was to compare SHR in shoulders with RTSA to normal shoulders. Twenty-eight subjects, more than 12 months after unilateral RTSA, were recruited for an Institutional Review Board-approved study. Subjects performed arm abduction in the coronal plane with and without a 1.4-kg hand-held weight. Three-dimensional model-image registration techniques were used to measure orientation and position for the humerus and scapula from fluoroscopic images. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used to assess groupwise and pairwise differences. SHR in RTSA shoulders (1.3:1) was significantly lower than in normal shoulders (3:1). Below 30° abduction, RTSA and normal shoulders show a wide range of SHR (1.3:1 to 17:1). Above 30° abduction, SHR in RTSA shoulders was 1.3:1 for unweighted abduction and 1.3:1 for weighted abduction. Maximum RTSA shoulder abduction in weighted trials was lower than in unweighted trials. SHR variability in RTSA shoulders decreased with increasing arm elevation. RTSA shoulders show kinematics that are significantly different from normal shoulders. SHR in RTSA shoulders was significantly lower than in normal shoulders, indicating that RTSA shoulders use more scapulothoracic motion and less glenohumeral motion to elevate the arm. With these observations, it may be possible to improve rehabilitation protocols, with particular attention to the periscapular muscles, and implant design or placement to optimize functional outcomes in shoulders with RTSA. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Therapy relevant imaging in modern surgical treatment of arthrosis of the shoulder: interesting facts for orthopedic surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifter, R M; Zweiger, C; Lick-Schiffer, W; Mattiassich, G; Schüller-Weidekamm, C; Radl, R

    2013-03-01

    Imaging for shoulder surgery varies a lot nowadays. Advantages and disadvantages of possible imaging methods according to the pathology and treatment options are described. Digital projection radiography in 3 planes, ultrasonography, MRI, CT scanning and scintigrams. Special axial view to visualize the glenoid situation, as well as 3-D CT scanning for larger defects and classification. Imaging of the glenoid situation, the version and erosion in axial view x-ray is mandatory to plan and control glenoid replacement. Useful application of imaging methods for the daily routine of orthopedic surgeons. Digital 3 plane x-ray imaging in arthroplasty surgery is the minimum requirement. For rotator cuff lesions ultrasonography is good. In order to gain information on fatty infiltration of rotator muscles MRI is needed as well as for intra-articular lesions. For bony defects CT and reconstruction 3-D are recommended.

  1. Promenade Among Words and Things: The Gallery as Catalogue, the Catalogue as Gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Lending

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the mid nineteenth century new casting techniques allowed for the production of huge architectural fragments. Well-selected collections could ideally display perfect series in galleries in which the visitor could wander among monuments and experience architecture history on full scale. The disembodied material of plaster was considered capable of embodying a number of modern historical taxonomies and aesthetical programs, most importantly chronology, comparison, style, and evolution. Veritable showcases of historicism, the casts could illustrate in spatial arrangements new conceptions on the history, contemporaneity and future of architecture. Plaster cast became a main medium in which to publish antiquities as novelties for grand audiences, taking the printed and published beyond the two-dimensional space of words and images. However, due to the increasing market of casts and their sheere size and weight, the reproductions as mounted in the galleries often behaved as unruly as architecture does outside curatorial control. In the end only the catalogues, the paper versions of these imaginary museums were capable to create the orders that their plaster referents constantly aspired to destroy. An important chapter in the history of the architecture museum these plaster monuments belong to a part of architectural print culture in which catalogues were curated and galleries edited. Metaphors drawn from the realm of writing saturated the discourse on the display of casts. Images and texts fluctuated and the image-objects were compared to books, paper, pages, documents and libraries but above all to illustrations inviting promenades in time and space.

  2. Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hit hard with your shoulder in a football game or serve a volleyball really hard. Diagnosis How ... editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, WomenTags: laxity, out of place, shakiness, shoulder, subluxation ...

  3. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007206.htm Shoulder arthroscopy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Shoulder arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera called ...

  4. The effectiveness of diagnostic imaging methods for the assessment of soft tissue and articular disorders of the shoulder and elbow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, M. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: Maryam@shahabpour.uzbrussel; Kichouh, M.; Laridon, E. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Gielen, J.L. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, Universiteit Antwerpen, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem (Belgium); De Mey, J. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    There are no clear guidelines for diagnostic imaging of articular and soft tissue pathologies of the shoulder and elbow. Several methods are used, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and ultrasound (US). Their cost-effectiveness is still unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of the relevant literature and discussed the role of MR imaging of the shoulder and elbow compared with other diagnostic imaging modalities. For the shoulder impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, MRI and US have a comparable accuracy for detection of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. MRA and US might be more accurate for the detection of partial-thickness tears than MRI. Given the large difference in cost of MR and US, ultrasound may be the most cost-effective diagnostic method for identification of full-thickness tears in a specialist hospital setting (Evidence level 3). Both MRA and CT arthrography (CTA) are effective methods for the detection of labrum tears. More recently, multidetector CTA has offered the advantages of thinner slices than with MRA in a shorter examination time. Still, MRA has the advantage towards CTA to directly visualize the affected structures with a better evaluation of extent and location and to detect associated capsuloligamentous injuries. For the elbow pathologies, plain MRI or MRA have the advantage towards CTA to detect occult bone injuries. CTA is better for the assessment of the thin cartilage of the elbow. Both US and MRI are reliable methods to detect chronic epicondylitis; US is more available and far more cost-effective (Evidence level 2). MRA can differentiate complete from partial tears of the medial collateral ligament. US or MRI can detect partial and complete biceps tendon tears and/or bursitis. MRI can provide important diagnostic information in lesions of the ulnar, radial, or median nerve.

  5. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Chur (Switzerland); Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Schroeder, Michael [Center for Sports Orthopedics and Medicine, Orthosportiv, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, Andreas B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. (orig.)

  6. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.; Krogsgaard, M.; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    long latency (300 ms) excitatory reflex has been found when nerves in the capsule were stimulated electrically during shoulder surgery. In addition, when the anterior-inferior capsule was excited in conscious humans with modest amplitude electrical stimuli during muscle activity, a strong inhibition...... activity around the shoulder. This has implications for rehabilitation and shoulder surgery.......Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings after shoulder surgery: What the radiologist needs to know; Besonderheiten der Magnetresonanztomographie nach operativer Schulterintervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahlenkamp, U.L.; Hermann, K.G.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite - Campus Mitte, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Gerhardt, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite - Campus Mitte, Centrum fuer muskuloskeletale Chirurgie, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Even primary diagnostic evaluation of the shoulder is a challenge for radiologists. Many imaging findings that definitely indicate abnormal findings in the untreated shoulder should be evaluated carefully in postoperative patients. Artifacts caused by implants or metal abrasion pose considerable problems in postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Classic approaches to minimizing artifacts caused by foreign bodies include using turbo spin echo sequences, increasing bandwidth, and reducing voxel size. In recent years, several vendors have developed dedicated pulse sequences for reducing metal artifacts. Different postoperative imaging findings will be encountered, depending on the kind of surgery done. This review article describes typical postoperative MRI findings, focusing on subacromial decompression, reconstruction of the rotator cuff, labrum procedures, and biceps tenodesis. (orig.) [German] Das Schultergelenk stellt fuer jeden Radiologen bereits in der primaeren Diagnostik eine Herausforderung dar. Viele Bildbefunde, welche bei einer nicht therapierten Schulter als eindeutig pathologisch zu bewerten sind, muessen im postoperativen Setting als kritisch bewertet werden. Artefakte durch Implantate oder Metallabrieb stellen eine grosse Huerde der postoperativen Magnetresonanztomographie dar. Klassische Methoden, um Artefakte durch Fremdmaterial so gering wie moeglich zu halten, bestehen in der Anwendung von Turbo-Spin-Echo-Sequenzen sowie in der Erhoehung der Bandbreite oder der Reduktion der Voxelgroesse. Mittlerweile haben einige Anbieter jedoch spezielle Sequenzen zur Reduktion von Metallartefakten entwickelt. In Abhaengigkeit von der erfolgten Schulteroperation muessen verschiedene Bildbefunde beruecksichtigt werden. Dieser Uebersichtsartikel geht insbesondere auf die subakromiale Dekompression, die Rekonstruktion der Rotatorenmanschette, Operationen am Labrum sowie Bizepstenodesen ein und beschreibt typische postoperative Befunde. (orig.)

  8. Acute shoulder injury with a normal x-ray: a simple algorithm of patient assessment to guide the need for further imaging

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Rourke, S

    2012-09-20

    Purpose: Patients presenting to their General Practitioner or to the Emergency Department following an acute shoulder injury but a normal x-ray may have a significant underlying injury to the Rotator Cuff. Imaging (whether by ultrasound or MRI) is often indicated but available clinical evidence has yet to establish what group of patients benefit most from early imaging.\\r\

  9. The reverse shoulder prosthesis: a review of imaging features and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, Edward G.; Sanguanjit, Prakasit; Tasaki, Atsushi [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Lutherville, MD (United States); Keyurapan, Ekavit [Mahidol University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bangkok (Thailand); Fishman, Elliot K.; Fayad, Laura M. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2006-07-15

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis is a prosthesis that has been in clinical use in Europe since 1985 and was approved for use in the United States in 2004. This unique prosthesis has a baseplate attached to the glenoid, which holds a spherical component, while the humeral component includes a polyethylene insert that is flat. This design is the ''reverse'' configuration of that seen with a conventional arthroplasty, in which the spherical component is part of the humeral component. The indications for the reverse prosthesis are: (1) painful arthritis associated with irreparable rotator cuff tears (cuff tear arthropathy), (2) failed hemiarthroplasty with irreparable rotator cuff tears, (3) pseudoparalysis due to massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears, (4) some reconstructions after tumor resection, and (5) some fractures of the shoulder not repairable or reconstructable with other techniques. This prosthesis can produce a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in function for most of the indications mentioned. However, the unique configuration and the challenge of its insertion can result in a high incidence of a wide variety of unusual complications. Some of these complications, such as dislocation of the components, are similar to conventional shoulder replacement. Other complications, such as notching of the scapula and acromial stress fractures, are unique to this prosthesis. (orig.)

  10. The reverse shoulder prosthesis: a review of imaging features and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, Edward G.; Sanguanjit, Prakasit; Tasaki, Atsushi; Keyurapan, Ekavit; Fishman, Elliot K.; Fayad, Laura M.

    2006-01-01

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis is a prosthesis that has been in clinical use in Europe since 1985 and was approved for use in the United States in 2004. This unique prosthesis has a baseplate attached to the glenoid, which holds a spherical component, while the humeral component includes a polyethylene insert that is flat. This design is the ''reverse'' configuration of that seen with a conventional arthroplasty, in which the spherical component is part of the humeral component. The indications for the reverse prosthesis are: (1) painful arthritis associated with irreparable rotator cuff tears (cuff tear arthropathy), (2) failed hemiarthroplasty with irreparable rotator cuff tears, (3) pseudoparalysis due to massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears, (4) some reconstructions after tumor resection, and (5) some fractures of the shoulder not repairable or reconstructable with other techniques. This prosthesis can produce a significant reduction in pain and some improvement in function for most of the indications mentioned. However, the unique configuration and the challenge of its insertion can result in a high incidence of a wide variety of unusual complications. Some of these complications, such as dislocation of the components, are similar to conventional shoulder replacement. Other complications, such as notching of the scapula and acromial stress fractures, are unique to this prosthesis. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of muscle thickness of the serratus anterior and lower trapezius using ultrasound imaging in competitive recreational adult swimmers, with and without current shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Leanda J; de Ronde, Mandy; Le, Minyang; Burke, William; Graves, Anna; Williams, Sian A

    2018-02-01

    To compare serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle thickness between swimmers with and without current shoulder pain, and between sides when measured by real-time ultrasound imaging. A single blinded age and gender-matched case-control study with 26 symptomatic and 26 asymptomatic recreational swimmers. Muscle thickness of serratus anterior and lower trapezius were measured using previously validated real-time ultrasound imaging protocols. Serratus anterior thickness was measured in side lying with 90° of glenohumeral flexion at rest and during a scapular protraction contraction. Lower trapezius thickness was measured in prone with 145° of glenohumeral abduction whilst at rest and when holding the weight of the arm. There was no statistically significant difference between the muscle thickness of serratus anterior and lower trapezius between the symptomatic shoulder and the dominance-matched shoulder in the asymptomatic group of swimmers. There was also no significant difference in muscle thickness between the symptomatic side and asymptomatic side within the symptomatic group. There appears to be no difference in serratus anterior and lower trapezius thickness between swimmers who have mild to moderate shoulder pain, who continue to swim and those who do not have shoulder pain. When imaging the serratus anterior and lower trapezius in swimmers with mild shoulder pain, clinicians should expect no differences between sides. If muscle thickness differences between sides are detected in recreational swimmers, this may indicate that the swimmer is participating in other asymmetrical activities or has a higher level of shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Navigating the Alphabet Soup of Labroligamentous Pathology of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Darren; Grubin, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    Because of the widespread use of eponyms and acronyms to describe labroligamentous findings in the shoulder, interpreting shoulder magnetic resonance imaging reports can be challenging. A summary of the appearance of these lesions on shoulder magnetic resonance images can help the orthopedic surgeon to understand these entities as imaging findings and to determine the appropriate treatment for patients with shoulder injuries.

  13. MR imaging of subscapularis tendon injury in the setting of anterior shoulder dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Carpenter, Elizabeth; Kazam, Jonathan; Babb, James; Bencardino, Jenny [NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate the degree and location patterns of subscapularis tendon injury in patients with prior anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD). Forty-five consecutive MR shoulder examinations in patients with a history of ASD and 20 consecutive MR examinations in patients without prior dislocation were reviewed. Two readers assessed for the presence and location of tendinosis and tearing in the subscapularis tendon, which was divided into three segments: superior, middle, and inferior. The readers also documented the presence of anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects and Hill-Sachs lesions. Fisher's exact tests were performed to analyze the different types of pathology and their locations. Subscapularis tendinosis, and partial thickness and full thickness tears were more common in patients with a history of ASD. Tendinosis was found in 60-64.4% of the dislocation patients compared with 40% of the non-dislocation group. When stratified by location, the middle and inferior thirds were the most commonly affected with statistical significance (p < 0.05) found in tearing of the inferior third. Anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects, and Hill-Sachs lesions were more common in the dislocation group with statistically significant associations with tendinosis in the middle and inferior thirds and tearing of the middle third (p < 0.05). Our study suggests an association between middle and inferior subscapularis tendon pathology and prior anterior shoulder dislocation. Based on our results, careful MR assessment of the subscapularis tendon by the radiologist is indicated in the setting of ASD as injury of this structure can be symptomatic and may be amenable to treatment. (orig.)

  14. MR imaging of subscapularis tendon injury in the setting of anterior shoulder dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Carpenter, Elizabeth; Kazam, Jonathan; Babb, James; Bencardino, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the degree and location patterns of subscapularis tendon injury in patients with prior anterior shoulder dislocation (ASD). Forty-five consecutive MR shoulder examinations in patients with a history of ASD and 20 consecutive MR examinations in patients without prior dislocation were reviewed. Two readers assessed for the presence and location of tendinosis and tearing in the subscapularis tendon, which was divided into three segments: superior, middle, and inferior. The readers also documented the presence of anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects and Hill-Sachs lesions. Fisher's exact tests were performed to analyze the different types of pathology and their locations. Subscapularis tendinosis, and partial thickness and full thickness tears were more common in patients with a history of ASD. Tendinosis was found in 60-64.4% of the dislocation patients compared with 40% of the non-dislocation group. When stratified by location, the middle and inferior thirds were the most commonly affected with statistical significance (p < 0.05) found in tearing of the inferior third. Anterior labral tears, osseous Bankart defects, and Hill-Sachs lesions were more common in the dislocation group with statistically significant associations with tendinosis in the middle and inferior thirds and tearing of the middle third (p < 0.05). Our study suggests an association between middle and inferior subscapularis tendon pathology and prior anterior shoulder dislocation. Based on our results, careful MR assessment of the subscapularis tendon by the radiologist is indicated in the setting of ASD as injury of this structure can be symptomatic and may be amenable to treatment. (orig.)

  15. A gallery approach for off-angle iris recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Yoldash, Rashiduddin; Boehnen, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    It has been proven that hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images of same eye differs in iris recognition system. The distinction of hamming distance score is caused by many factors such as image acquisition angle, occlusion, pupil dilation, and limbus effect. In this paper, we first study the effect of the angle variations between iris plane and the image acquisition systems. We present how hamming distance changes for different off-angle iris images even if they are coming from the same iris. We observe that increment in acquisition angle of compared iris images causes the increment in hamming distance. Second, we propose a new technique in off-angle iris recognition system that includes creating a gallery of different off-angle iris images (such as, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 degrees) and comparing each probe image with these gallery images. We will show the accuracy of the gallery approach for off-angle iris recognition.

  16. Synovial response to intraarticular injections of hyaluronate in frozen shoulder. A quantitative assessment with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Kazuya; Mashitori, Hirotaka; Ohno, Wataru; Hamada, Jun'ichiro; Sakai, Hiroya; Saotome, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the response of frozen shoulder (FS) to intraarticular injections of high-molecular-weight sodium hyaluronate (HA), a mixture of 2.5 ml of HA and 1.5 ml of 1% lidocaine was injected into the glenohumeral joint of 11 patients with FS, 8 of whom received five weekly injections. The patients were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score (JOA score) before the first injection, 1 week after the first injection, and 1 week after the final injection. Following each clinical evaluation, the patients underwent dynamic magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with Gd-DTPA, and the coefficient of enhancement (CE) in the glenohumeral synovium was calculated, with the examiners blinded to the clinical information. The JOA score tended to be greater and the CE smaller after injection than before injection. The changes in the CE following both single and repeated injections were negatively correlated with changes in the JOA score. Thus, clinical improvement in patients with FS was associated with a decrease in the CE. Because the CE depends on the degree of synovitis, the therapeutic effect of intraarticular HA injection for FS results, at least in part, from suppression of synovitis in the glenohumeral joint through an antiinflammatory effect. (author)

  17. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  18. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  19. Shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, William

    2013-03-01

    The frequency of shoulder dystocia in different reports has varied, ranging 0.2-3% of all vaginal deliveries. Once a shoulder dystocia occurs, even if all actions are appropriately taken, there is an increased frequency of complications, including third- or fourth-degree perineal lacerations, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Health care providers have a poor ability to predict shoulder dystocia for most patients and there remains no commonly accepted model to accurately predict this obstetric emergency. Consequently, optimal management of shoulder dystocia requires appropriate management at the time it occurs. Multiple investigators have attempted to enhance care of shoulder dystocia by utilizing protocols and simulation training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medical image of the week: urothelial carcinoma with pulmonary metastases presenting with shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrett B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 68 year old man with a past medical history significant only for mild hyperlipidemia and distant cigar smoking presented to this primary physician’s office with a chief complaint of left sided shoulder pain for more than 6 months duration. His only other complaint was a hacking morning cough that was attributed to GERD after resolution with omperazole therapy. He was without any other complaints such as weight loss, fevers, chills, night sweats, shortness of breath, or dyspnea on exertion. His physical exam was without any abnormality. An initial radiograph of the rileft shoudler was obtained which was without any obvious bony abnormality but demonstrated numerous potential pulmonary nodules (Figure 1. He was then referred to pulmonology for further assessment. A chest CT scan peformed with contrast again demonstrated numerous pulmonary nodules with thick walled central cavitations throughout the lung parenchyma bilaterally (Figures 2 & 3. Additional testing performed included …

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in children with brachial plexus birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudinchet, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Maeder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Oberson, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Schnyder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Five patients suffering from Erb-Duchenne brachial plexus birth palsy were prospectively studied with MRI. A group of 11 healthy children was used as a control to understand the MRI anatomy of the normal growing glenohumeral joint. A hypoplastic and flattened posterior part of the glenoid fossa and a blunt posterior labrum were found in all patients. Four patients had a blunt anterior labrum and a flattened humeral head. Three patients presented with a posterior subluxation of the humeral head. These results suggest that MRI provides a non-ionising and non-invasive method of demonstrating the early abnormalities of the shoulder associated with obstetrical brachial plexus paralysis, which may prompt orthopaedic correction. (orig.)

  2. Lab, Field, Gallery and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Koskinen, Ilpo; Redström, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Over the last ten years we have seen a growing number of researchers integrating design experiments in their research inquiries. Initially, this work borrowed heavily from neighboring fields, employing a dual strategy in which design experiments and their evaluation were largely treated as separate...... processes that were often carried out by different people. More recently, design researchers have developed several approaches that integrate design-specific work methods to research. This paper takes a methodological look at three such established approaches that we call Lab, Field, and Gallery. We...

  3. Shoulder replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Many people are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder joint will last longer if less stress is placed on it. With normal use, a ...

  4. Shoulder MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery References Hanypsiak B, DeLong JM, Lowe WR. Scapulothoracic ...

  5. MR imaging appearance of 180-360 labral tears of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindauer, Kelly R.; Major, Nancy M.; Rougier-Chapman, Duncan P.; Helms, Clyde A.

    2005-01-01

    Glenoid labral tears exceeding 180 are an uncommon entity in which characteristic clinical and MR imaging features can lead to a more accurate preoperative diagnosis. We provide a description of glenoid labral tears that exceed 180 , and their characteristic magnetic resonance imaging features. In the young, heavily muscled male athlete, the identification of multiple sites of labral pathology and isolated, extensive posterior labral injuries are features that should raise suspicion for labral tears that exceed 180 . (orig.)

  6. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  7. A prospective study of shoulder pain in primary care: Prevalence of imaged pathology and response to guided diagnostic blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNair Peter J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of imaged pathology in primary care has received little attention and the relevance of identified pathology to symptoms remains unclear. This paper reports the prevalence of imaged pathology and the association between pathology and response to diagnostic blocks into the subacromial bursa (SAB, acromioclavicular joint (ACJ and glenohumeral joint (GHJ. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain recruited from primary care underwent standardised x-ray, diagnostic ultrasound scan and diagnostic injections of local anaesthetic into the SAB and ACJ. Subjects who reported less than 80% reduction in pain following either of these injections were referred for a magnetic resonance arthrogram (MRA and GHJ diagnostic block. Differences in proportions of positive and negative imaging findings in the anaesthetic response groups were assessed using Fishers test and odds ratios were calculated a for positive anaesthetic response (PAR to diagnostic blocks. Results In the 208 subjects recruited, the rotator cuff and SAB displayed the highest prevalence of pathology on both ultrasound (50% and 31% respectively and MRA (65% and 76% respectively. The prevalence of PAR following SAB injection was 34% and ACJ injection 14%. Of the 59% reporting a negative anaesthetic response (NAR for both of these injections, 16% demonstrated a PAR to GHJ injection. A full thickness tear of supraspinatus on ultrasound was associated with PAR to SAB injection (OR 5.02; p p p p ≤ 0.05. Conclusions Rotator cuff and SAB pathology were the most common findings on ultrasound and MRA. Evidence of a full thickness supraspinatus tear was associated with symptoms arising from the subacromial region, and a biceps tendon sheath effusion and an intact rotator cuff were associated with an intra-articular GHJ pain source. When combined with clinical information, these results may help guide diagnostic decision making in primary care.

  8. Whispering gallery mode emission from a composite system of J-aggregates and photonic microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana [Centro de Física de Materiales (MPC, CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Po Manuel de Lardizabal 5, Donostia, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Rusakov, Konstantin I. [Department of Physics, Brest State Technical University, Brest 224017 (Belarus); Rakovich, Yury P., E-mail: Yury.Rakovich@ehu.es [Centro de Física de Materiales (MPC, CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Po Manuel de Lardizabal 5, Donostia, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    We report on development and characterization of Whispering Gallery Modes spherical microcavities integrated with organic dye molecules in a J-aggregate state. The microcavities are studied using micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging confocal microscopy. Directional emission of light from the microcavity is also experimentally demonstrated and attributed to the photonic jets generated in the microsphere. -- Highlights: • Report on the development and characterization of hybrid system consisting of thin shell of J-aggregates and spherical Whispering Gallery Mode microcavity. • An investigation of spontaneous emission rate in the shell of J-aggregates integrated with a Whispering Gallery Mode cavity. • Demonstration of directional emission from Whispering Gallery Mode cavity with J-aggregates which is highly desirable functionality for both micro- and nano-scale cavities.

  9. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Wolf, Petra

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  10. Tears at the rotator cuff footprint: Prevalence and imaging characteristics in 305 MR arthrograms of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Wolf, Petra [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence, imaging characteristics and anatomical distribution of tears at the rotator cuff (RC) footprint with MR arthrography (MR-A) of the shoulder. MR arthrograms obtained in 305 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Partial articular-sided supraspinatus tendon avulsions (PASTA), concealed interstitial delaminations (CID), reverse PASTA lesions and full-thickness tears (FT) at the humeral tendon insertion were depicted. Anatomical locations were determined and depths of tears were classified. 112/305 patients showed RC tears, including 63 patients with 68 footprint tears. 34 PASTA lesions were detected with 20/34 involving the anterior supraspinatus (SSP) tendon and 17/34 PASTA lesions were grade I lesions. Most CID lesions (14/23) occurred at the posterior SSP and 20/23 were classified as grade I or II. 9 FT and 2 reverse PASTA lesions were found. Statistical analysis revealed no difference in anatomical location (p = 0.903) and no correlation with overhead sports activity (p = 0.300) or history of trauma (p=0.928). There were significantly more PASTA lesions in patients <40 years of age (p = 0.029). Most RC tears detected with MR-A involve the SSP footprint and are articular-sided with predominance in younger patients, but concealed lesions are not as uncommon as previously thought. (orig.)

  11. The significance of imaging methods in the diagnosis of periarticular diseases of the shoulder caused by sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerous kinds of sports lead to lesions of the periarticular tissue of the shoulder, which can result in the supraspinatus syndrome or incomplete and complete rupture of the rotator cuff. Standard radiography is of limited use in the diagnosis of periarticular diseases of the shoulder. Osseous alterations in the greater tubercle and undersurface of the acromion can be explained as a supraspinatus syndrome or a long-standing rupture of the rotator cuff in connection with high positioning of the head of the humerus. A rupture of the rotator cuff is demonstrated by arthrography of the shoulder joint, a diagnostic method that we think is necessary despite regular examinations with ultrasonography. (orig.) [de

  12. Imaging characteristics of lipofibromatosis presenting as a shoulder mass in a 16-month-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, James R.; Donaldson, Matthew M.; Mazuru, Dana G.; Green, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatosis is a rare, benign fibrofatty tumor of childhood. Since the tumor was first characterized in 2000, only a few additional cases have been reported. The classic presentation of lipofibromatosis is a slow-growing mass arising in a distal extremity, with boys more commonly affected than girls. We report a 16-month-old girl who presented with a lipofibromatosis in her left scapular region that increased 30% in size during a 6-week period. Although previous case reports of lipofibromatosis have emphasized immunohistological findings, this paper focuses on imaging findings and discusses the utility of imaging in the differential diagnosis of pediatric soft-tissue tumors. (orig.)

  13. Imaging characteristics of lipofibromatosis presenting as a shoulder mass in a 16-month-old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, James R.; Donaldson, Matthew M.; Mazuru, Dana G. [University of Missouri School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Columbia, MO (United States); Green, Brian A. [University of Missouri School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Columbia, MO (United States); Memphis Radiological, PC, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Lipofibromatosis is a rare, benign fibrofatty tumor of childhood. Since the tumor was first characterized in 2000, only a few additional cases have been reported. The classic presentation of lipofibromatosis is a slow-growing mass arising in a distal extremity, with boys more commonly affected than girls. We report a 16-month-old girl who presented with a lipofibromatosis in her left scapular region that increased 30% in size during a 6-week period. Although previous case reports of lipofibromatosis have emphasized immunohistological findings, this paper focuses on imaging findings and discusses the utility of imaging in the differential diagnosis of pediatric soft-tissue tumors. (orig.)

  14. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  15. Anatomy of the shoulder - clinical aspects for imaging and anatomical varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of anatomic details is important for interpretation of diagnostic imaging particularly MRI and CT. New findings even in macroscopy in the last years increased our knowledge significantly. In this article the findings are summarized with emphasis on clinical aspects. (orig.) [de

  16. Long bicipital tendon of the shoulder: normal anatomy and pathologic findings on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, S J; Fitzgerald, S W; Quinn, S F; Carrera, G F; Black, K P; Lawson, T L

    1992-05-01

    The tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle (long bicipital tendon) has a complex course from its muscle belly to its insertion onto the supraglenoid tubercle/glenoid labrum. It is stabilized by numerous tendinous and ligamentous structures and is, in turn, partly responsible for maintenance of normal glenohumeral function. In this report we describe the anatomy of this tendon, correlating high-resolution MR images with cryomicrotome sections. We illustrate typical MR findings in pathologic conditions affecting the long bicipital tendon sheath, the substance of the tendon, and finally the tendon position.

  17. Impact of outpatient clinic ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis and treatment for shoulder impingement: a randomized prospective study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, Aamir

    2013-11-05

    The use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) in guiding subdeltoid injection has been shown to improve outcome up to 6 weeks in a few small studies. A recent meta-analysis identified the need for further studies with longer-term outcome and larger sample size. This randomized prospective study assessed whether clinic-based MSUS can significantly improve diagnostic accuracy in shoulder pain and whether MSUS-guided shoulder injection results in improved long-term outcomes. One hundred consecutive patients with 125 painful shoulders were recruited. Patients were randomized to receive either sonographic assessment with consequent palpation-guided injection (Group 1, n = 66) or sonographic assessment with a MSUS-guided injection of 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate (Group 2, n = 59). A blinded rheumatologist (ADF) performed clinical assessments at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks including shoulder function tests (SFTs) (Hawkins-Kennedy test, supraspinatus tendon tenderness), physician global assessment (PGA) and patient visual analogue scores (VAS) for pain (0-10). Eighty patients with 90 symptomatic shoulders completed 12-week follow-up. Twenty patients, 11 (20 shoulders) from the palpation-guided group and 9 (15 shoulders) from the MSUS-guided group, were excluded at 6 weeks either due to requirement for repeat injection or due to surgical referral. Mean age for patients was 57.7 years, and 65 % patients were female; mean shoulder pain duration was 18 weeks (range 14-22 weeks). SFTs, patient VAS and PGA scores for pain improved significantly from baseline in both groups with significantly greater improvements in the MSUS-guided group (44 shoulders) compared to the palpation-guided group (46 shoulders) in all parameters at 6 (p < 0.01) and 12 weeks (p < 0.05). The use of MSUS in guiding subdeltoid injection has been shown to improve outcome up to 6 weeks in a few small studies. A recent meta-analysis identified the need for further studies with longer

  18. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [de

  19. [Shoulder injuries in overhead sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörtler, K

    2010-05-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence.This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes.

  20. Location of Rotator Cuff Tear Initiation: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of 191 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Min, Seul Ki; Park, Keun Min; Park, Yong Bok; Han, Kwang Joon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2018-03-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are generally thought to originate at the anterior margin of the supraspinatus tendon. However, a recent ultrasonography study suggested that they might originate more posteriorly than originally thought, perhaps even from the isolated infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, and propagate toward the anterior supraspinatus. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that this finding could be reproduced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose was to determine the most common location of degenerative RCTs by using 3-dimensional multiplanar MRI reconstruction. It was assumed that the location of the partial-thickness tears would identify the area of the initiation of full-thickness tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective analysis was conducted including 245 patients who had RCTs (nearly full- or partial-thickness tears) at the outpatient department between January 2011 and December 2013. RCTs were measured on 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction MRI with OsiriX software. The width and distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear were measured on T2-weighted sagittal images. In a spreadsheet, columns of consecutive numbers represented the size of each tear (anteroposterior width) and their locations with respect to the biceps brachii tendon. Data were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of all tears. Frequency histograms of the columns were made to visualize the distribution of tears. The tears were divided into 2 groups based on width (group A, location related to size. The mean width of all RCTs was 11.9 ± 4.1 mm, and the mean length was 11.1 ± 5.0 mm. Histograms showed the most common location of origin to be 9 to 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. The histograms of groups A and B showed similar tear location distributions, indicating that the region approximately 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon is the most common site of tear initiation. These

  1. Landslide Caused Damages in a Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisel, R.; Mair am Tinkhof, K.; Preh, A.

    2016-06-01

    On October 5th, 2010, cracks were found in a gallery 1.8 m high and 1.4 m wide. The gallery is 100 years old, runs parallel to a valley flank and was excavated in a tectonically strongly stressed, weathered and slightly dipping sandwich of clayey shales, sandstones and marls. The cracks in the roof as well as in the invert ran parallel to the axis of the gallery. Monitoring showed that crack widths were increasing 1.5 mm per year, sidewall distances were increasing 3.5 mm per year, whereas the height of the gallery was decreasing 2.5 mm per year. After eliminating several possible causes of cracking, a landslide producing the damages had to be taken into consideration. Monitoring of the valley flank surface as well as inclinometer readings revealed that a landslide was occurring, loading the gallery lining. Most probably the landslide had been reactivated by excessive rainfall in 2009 as well as by works for the renewal of a weir in the valley bottom. As stabilization of the slope was not an option for several reasons, it was decided to replace the gallery by a new one deeper inside the slope, which will be ready for operation in 2017. Thus the old gallery has to be kept in operation till then and it was decided to reinforce the old gallery by a heavily reinforced shotcrete lining 10 cm thick. As slope displacements went on, cracks in the shotcrete lining developed with a completely different pattern: in the section where the gallery lies completely in the landslide shear zone no cracks formed until now due to heavy reinforcement, whereas in the transition sections stable ground-landslide and landslide-stable ground diagonal tension cracks in the roof due to shear by the landslide developed. Numerical models showed that cracking and spalling of the shotcrete lining would occur only after some centimetres of additional displacements of the slope, which hopefully will not occur before 2017.

  2. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennafirme, Simone F.; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles within the

  3. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  4. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Search Menu About Leadership Mission Social Media Community Diversity Social Media Careers View All Jobs Students & Postdocs Benefits & Perks Hiring Process Deployment Centers New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program Sandia's Economic Impact Sandia Science &

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography of the shoulder: dependence on the level of training of the performing radiologist for diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, John S. [University of Toronto, Division of Orthopaedics, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Andreisek, Gustav [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Hospital Zuerich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Harvey, Edward J. [McGill University, Division of Orthopaedics, MUHC - Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wolin, Preston [Center for Athletic Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Discrepancies were identified between magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical findings in patients who had MR imaging examinations evaluated by community-based general radiologists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of MR imaging examinations of the shoulder with regard to the training level of the performing radiologist. A review of patient charts identified 238 patients (male/female, 175/63; mean age, 40.4 years) in whom 250 arthroscopies were performed and who underwent MR imaging or direct MR arthrography in either a community-based or hospital-based institution prior to surgery. All MR imaging and surgical reports were reviewed and the diagnostic performance for the detection of labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions was determined. Kappa and Student's t test analyses were performed in a subset of cases in which initial community-based MR images were re-evaluated by hospital-based musculoskeletal radiologists, to determine the interobserver agreement and any differences in image interpretation. The diagnostic performance of community-based general radiologists was lower than that of hospital-based sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists. A sub-analysis of re-evaluated cases showed that musculoskeletal radiologists performed better. {kappa} values were 0.208, 0.396, 0.376, and 0.788 for labral, rotator cuff, biceps, and Hill-Sachs lesions (t test statistics: p =<0.001, 0.004, 0.019, and 0.235). Our results indicate that the diagnostic performance of MR imaging and MR arthrography of the shoulder depends on the training level of the performing radiologist, with sub-specialized musculoskeletal radiologists having a better diagnostic performance than general radiologists. (orig.)

  7. Opportunities for Innovation Adoption in Art Galleries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva VITKAUSKAITĖ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the opportunities for innovation adoption in art galleries. It provides systematised information on innovation processes and innovations used in business models of art galleries. The empirical research conducted has revealed the attitude of art galleries towards innovations, as well as the benefits and opportunities to realise them. The first part of the article distinguishes the stages of innovation process and management. The following part describes the factors that influence the management of innovation process. The final part of the article analyses the application of innovations for the improvement of a business model, with Business Model Canvas by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur selected as the starting point for analysis and, finally, the outcomes of empirical research are provided.

  8. The Habitable Zone Gallery and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery (www.hzgallery.org) is a service to the exoplanet community which provides Habitable Zone (HZ) information for each of the exoplanetary systems with known planetary orbital parameters. The service includes a sortable table, a plot with the period and eccentricity of each of the planets with respect to their time spent in the HZ, a gallery of known systems which plot the orbits and the location of the HZ with respect to those orbits, and orbital movies. Here we discuss various educational and scientific applications of the site such as target selection, exploring planets with eccentric orbits, and investigating habitability.

  9. Rael Artel Gallery Tartus ja Varssavis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Rael Artel Gallery : Non-Profit Project Space'i tegevusest Tartus. 27.04-27.05. 2006 Varssavis Warszawski Aktyw Artystov'i ruumides näitus "Estonian Video Art. The blood project", osalesid Flo Kasearu, Gert Hatsukov, Külli K. Kaats, Allan Tõnissoo, Marko Nautras, Tanja Muravskaja ja Airi Triisberg

  10. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    coracoid, marked limitation of abduction, and complete absence of external rotation with a fixed internal rotation deformity.2 Lesions commonly associated with traumatic posterior subluxation/dislocation are the reverse Hill-Sachs,3 a posterior labral detachment, glenohumeral ligament lesions,4 rotator cuff tears or posterior bony fractures.1 In order to make an accurate diagnosis it is important to obtain adequate x-ray imaging, including a “Y” view.2 Anteroposterior x-rays may show widening of the glenohumeral joint resembling a “light bulb” shape of the humeral head. However, definitive diagnosis is made by the “Y” view which shows the humeral head displaced posteriorly and no longer covering the glenoid fossa6. Irreducible acute posterior dislocation of the shoulder is extremely rare5 and only one other case has been reported in the literature.7

  11. Dimensioning of lining galleries in deep clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernaud, D.; Rousset, G.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this report is to study the mechanical behaviour of lining galleries in deep clays. This text constitutes a part of the researches on the feasibility of a geological disposal of radioactive waste, which the scope is to assure the gallery long term stabilization and also to optimize its dimensioning. In particular, we are interested here in the study of a closure controlled lining, that constitutes a direct application of the convergence-confinement method, especially well fitted to deep clays. The presentation and interpretation of the convergence controlled lining test, which was performed in the experimental gallery of Mol in Belgium, is given in this report. The instrumentation was conceived in order to find out the stress field exerced by the rockmass on the lining, the internal stress field inside the lining and the gallery closure. The analysis of all measurements results, obtained between november 1987 and December 1989, shows that they are all in good agreement and that the lining design was well chosen. Two years after the gallery construction, the average closure is of the order of 2% and the average confinement pressure is about 1.6 MPa (the third of the lithostatic pressure). The time dependent effects of the rockmass are very well modelled by the non linear elasto-viscoplastic law developed at L.M.S. with the laboratory tests. The elastic-plastic model of the lining are shown to be well fitted to simulate the sliding of the ribs. Finally, the numerical results have shown a very good agreement with the measurements results

  12. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fuerst, Josef U.; Förtsch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMR...

  13. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  14. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  15. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe ...

  16. Computational reverse shoulder prosthesis model: Experimental data and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A; Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J; Sarmento, M

    2015-09-18

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis aims to restore the stability and function of pathological shoulders, but the biomechanical aspects of the geometrical changes induced by the implant are yet to be fully understood. Considering a large-scale musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, the aim of this study is to evaluate how the Delta reverse shoulder prosthesis influences the biomechanical behavior of the shoulder joint. In this study, the kinematic data of an unloaded abduction in the frontal plane and an unloaded forward flexion in the sagittal plane were experimentally acquired through video-imaging for a control group, composed of 10 healthy shoulders, and a reverse shoulder group, composed of 3 reverse shoulders. Synchronously, the EMG data of 7 superficial muscles were also collected. The muscle force sharing problem was solved through the minimization of the metabolic energy consumption. The evaluation of the shoulder kinematics shows an increase in the lateral rotation of the scapula in the reverse shoulder group, and an increase in the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to the shoulder joint. Regarding the muscle force sharing problem, the musculoskeletal model estimates an increased activity of the deltoid, teres minor, clavicular fibers of the pectoralis major, and coracobrachialis muscles in the reverse shoulder group. The comparison between the muscle forces predicted and the EMG data acquired revealed a good correlation, which provides further confidence in the model. Overall, the shoulder joint reaction force was lower in the reverse shoulder group than in the control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000179.htm Shoulder surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had shoulder surgery to repair the tissues inside or around your ...

  18. Shoulder Ultrasonography: Performance and Common Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US of the shoulder is the most commonly requested examination in musculoskeletal US diagnosis. Sports injuries and degenerative and inflammatory processes are the main sources of shoulder pain and functional limitations. Because of its availability, low cost, dynamic examination process, absence of radiation exposure, and ease of patient compliance, US is the preferred mode for shoulder imaging over other, more sophisticated, and expensive methods. Operator dependence is the main disadvantage of US examinations. Use of high range equipment with high resolution transducers, adhering to a strict examination protocol, good knowledge of normal anatomy and pathological processes and an awareness of common pitfalls are essential for the optimal performance and interpretation of shoulder US. This article addresses examination techniques, the normal sonographic appearance of tendons, bursae and joints, and the main pathological conditions found in shoulder ultrasonography.

  19. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the canine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C D; Nyland, T G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of the canine shoulder. Fourteen shoulders from 7 clinically normal mid-sized dogs were radiographed and imaged using high frequency ultrasound. Each shoulder was isolated postmortem, and the ultrasonographic and gross anatomy was studied during dissection. The ultrasonographic appearance of the shoulder specimens was similar to that found in the live dogs. Twenty-four shoulders isolated postmortem from 12 variably sized dogs were also used to characterize the normal ultrasound anatomy over a range of sizes. Important anatomic structures that could be consistently evaluated were the biceps tendon and bursa, the bicipital groove surface, the supraspinatous tendon, the infraspinatous tendon, the teres minor tendon, and the caudal aspect of the humeral head. Results of ultrasonographic examination of 4 dogs with shoulder lameness are described to illustrate some applications of canine shoulder ultrasonography in the evaluation of the canine shoulder. In these dogs, ultrasound was a valuable tool to evaluate effusion and synovial proliferation within the bicipital bursa, supraspinatous and biceps tendinitis, biceps tendon strain, and dystrophic calcification.

  1. Proton Density Fat-Fraction of Rotator Cuff Muscles Is Associated With Isometric Strength 10 Years After Rotator Cuff Repair: A Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Holwein, Christian; Buchmann, Stefan; Baum, Thomas; Ruschke, Stefan; Gersing, Alexandra S; Sutter, Reto; Imhoff, Andreas B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Jungmann, Pia M

    2017-07-01

    Quantitative muscle fat-fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques correlate with semiquantitative Goutallier scores with failure after rotator cuff (RC) repair. To investigate the relationship of proton density fat fraction (PDFF) of the RC muscles with semiquantitative MR scores, cartilage T2 relaxation times, and clinical isometric strength measurements in patients 10 years after unilateral RC repair. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Bilateral shoulder MR imaging was performed in 13 patients (11 male, 2 female; age, 72 ± 8 years) 10.9 ± 0.4 years after unilateral autologous periosteal flap augmented RC repair (total shoulders assessed, N = 26). Goutallier classification, muscle atrophy, RC tendon integrity, and cartilage defects were determined based on morphological MR sequences. A paracoronal 2D multi-slice multi-echo sequence was used for quantitative cartilage T2 mapping. A chemical shift-encoding-based water-fat separation technique (based on a 6-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence) was used for quantification of the PDFF of RC muscles. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was measured clinically. Mean and SD, Pearson correlation, and partial Spearman correlation were calculated. There were 6 RC full-thickness retears in ipsilateral shoulders and 6 RC full-thickness tears in contralateral shoulders. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was not significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral shoulders (50 ± 24 N vs 54 ± 24 N; P = .159). The mean PDFF of RC muscles was 11.7% ± 10.4% (ipsilateral, 14.2% ± 8.5%; contralateral, 9.2% ± 7.8%; P = .002). High supraspinatus PDFF correlated significantly with higher Goutallier scores ( R = 0.75, P isometric muscle strength ( R = -0.49, P = .011). This correlation remained significant after adjustment for muscle area measurements and tendon rupture ( R = -0.41, P = .048). More severe cartilage defects at the humerus were significantly associated with higher supraspinatus

  2. Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Lädermann, Alexandre; Kevelham, Bart; Chagué, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Holzer, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

  3. The painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past. (orig.) [de

  4. Whispering gallery effect in relativistic optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Y.; Law, K. F. F.; Korneev, Ph.; Fujioka, S.; Kojima, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Sakata, S.; Matsuo, K.; Oshima, A.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Yogo, A.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; d'Humières, E.; Santos, J. J.; Kondo, K.; Sunahara, A.; Gus'kov, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2018-03-01

    relativistic laser pulse, confined in a cylindrical-like target, under specific conditions may perform multiple scattering along the internal target surface. This results in the confinement of the laser light, leading to a very efficient interaction. The demonstrated propagation of the laser pulse along the curved surface is just yet another example of the "whispering gallery" effect, although nonideal due to laser-plasma coupling. In the relativistic domain its important feature is a gradual intensity decrease, leading to changes in the interaction conditions. The proccess may pronounce itself in plenty of physical phenomena, including very efficient electron acceleration and generation of relativistic magnetized plasma structures.

  5. Microwave oscillator with 'whispering gallery' resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, A.Ya.; Prokopenko, Yu.V.; Filippov, Yu.F.; Lonin, Yu.F.; Papkovich, V.G.; Ponomarev, A.G.; Prokopenko, Yu.V.; Uvarov, V.T.

    2010-01-01

    It was presented researches of a generation of microwave radiation into system with azimuthally periodical relativistic electron beam current that excites a high-Q quasi-optical dielectric resonator. The Eigen parameters of cylindrical Teflon resonator were determined by numerical computation. Registration of the microwave radiation realizes by a crystal set of 8-mm wavelength range. Research projects of microwave oscillators with high-Q resonators, in which 'whispering gallery' oscillations are excited by an electron flow, are presented. Multiresonator oscillators ideology is based on principles of microwave generation in klystrons with both subcritical and supercritical electron beams currents.

  6. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  7. Presence and its absences. The 17th century gallery picture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogh, Mikkel

    A discussion of how pictures made specifically for the gallery viewer in the 17th century produce certain kinds of presence in order to catch attention......A discussion of how pictures made specifically for the gallery viewer in the 17th century produce certain kinds of presence in order to catch attention...

  8. Coral Reefs: A Gallery Program, Grades 7-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. Dept. of Education.

    Gallery classes at the National Aquarium in Baltimore give the opportunity to study specific aquarium exhibits which demonstrate entire natural habitats. The coral reef gallery class features the gigantic western Atlantic coral reef (325,000 gallons) with over 1,000 fish. The exhibit simulates a typical Caribbean coral reef and nearby sandy…

  9. Genesis of a Joint Gallery of Sport Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Andrew J.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania's dual sport art gallery showcases the work of R. Taft McKenzie and Joe Brown, two of the premier sport artists of our time. This article briefly outlines the artists' careers and describes the planning which led to establishment of the gallery. (IAH)

  10. Science Outreach through Art: A Journal Article Cover Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Research faculty journal covers were used to create a gallery in the Science & Technology branch library at the University of Akron. The selection, presentation, and promotion process is shared along with copyright considerations and a review of galleries used for library outreach. The event and display was a great success attracting faculty…

  11. Identifying modes of large whispering-gallery mode resonators from the spectrum and emission pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Gerhard; Fürst, Josef U; Förtsch, Michael; Strekalov, Dmitry V; Vogl, Ulrich; Sedlmeir, Florian; Schwefel, Harald G L; Leuchs, Gerd; Marquardt, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    Identifying the mode numbers in whispering-gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) is important for tailoring them to experimental needs. Here we report on a novel experimental mode analysis technique based on the combination of frequency analysis and far-field imaging for high mode numbers of large WGMRs. The radial mode numbers q and the angular mode numbers p = ℓ-m are identified and labeled via far-field imaging. The polar mode numbers ℓ are determined unambiguously by fitting the frequency differences between individual whispering gallery modes (WGMs). This allows for the accurate determination of the geometry and the refractive index at different temperatures of the WGMR. For future applications in classical and quantum optics, this mode analysis enables one to control the narrow-band phase-matching conditions in nonlinear processes such as second-harmonic generation or parametric down-conversion.

  12. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. US of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardellin, G.; Perin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty five healty people and 25 patients with shoulder pain underwent US control over a 12-month period: 24 patients with shoulder pain had rotator cuff and/or biceps tendon lesions. The US findings on rotator cuff and biceps tendon lesions are compared with those of arthrography and/or surgery (96% sensitivity). US is rapid, safe, non invasive, inexpensive and often more accurate, and its use is recommended for the routine examination of the shoulder joint insteat of arthrography

  14. Aptasensors Based on Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtiero Nunzi Conti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the literature on optical evanescent field sensing in resonant cavities where aptamers are used as biochemical receptors. The combined advantages of highly sensitive whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR-based transducers, and of the unique properties of aptamers make this approach extremely interesting in the medical field, where there is a particularly high need for devices able to provide real time diagnosis for cancer, infectious diseases, or strokes. However, despite the superior performances of aptamers compared to antibodies and WGMR to other evanescent sensors, there is not much literature combining both types of receptors and transducers. Up to now, the WGMR that have been used are silica microspheres and silicon oxynitride (SiON ring resonators.

  15. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavora, D.G.F.; Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C.; Nakayama, M.; Silva, C.E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  16. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavora, D.G.F., E-mail: danielgurgel@sarah.b [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C. [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Nakayama, M. [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados (Brazil); Silva, C.E.P. [Department of Statistics, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  17. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  18. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder

  19. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, M.M.; van Wilgen, C.P.; de Boer, E.M.J.; de Goede, C.J.T.; Koolstra, M.; van Opzeeland, A.; Venema, P.; Sterken, M.W.; Vincent, A.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. Study Design: Prospective. Patients and Methods: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder

  20. Effect of Galleries on Thermal Conditions of Urban Open Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahab Kariminia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Computer simulations were performed by ENVI-met model along with physical measurements in two urban squares under hot summer conditions in Isfahan, central Iran. Each scenario concentrated on adding or extending galleries in each square. The results confirmed the role of galleries on thermal conditions; however, it was found that the effectiveness of this strategy depends on the square geometry. It presented higher efficiency for the small square with higher H/W ratio. This solution is advisable for smaller squares and when the peripheral parts are frequently used compared to the middle areas. Galleries are most efficient when allowing enough natural ventilation.

  1. Shoulder pain in hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L T

    1985-01-01

    Development of a painful shoulder in the hemiplegic patient is a significant and serious problem, because it can limit the patient's ability to reach his or her maximum functional potential. Several etiologies of shoulder pain have been identified, such as immobilization of the upper extremity, trauma to the joint structures, including brachial plexus injuries, and subluxation of the gleno-humeral joint. A review of the literature explains the basic anatomy and kinesiology of the shoulder complex, the various etiologies of hemiplegic shoulder pain, and the pros and cons of specific treatment techniques. This knowledge is essential for the occupational therapist to evaluate effectively techniques used to treat the patient with hemiplegic shoulder pain. More effective management of this problem will facilitate the patient's ability to reach his or her maximum functional potential.

  2. [Shoulder injuries in golf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, D; Gosheger, G; Schmidt, C

    2014-03-01

    Due to its growing popularity golf has now come into the focus of orthopedic sports medicine. With a wide range of age groups and playing levels, orthopedic surgeons will encounter a wide range of musculoskeletal problems which are usually the result of overuse rather than trauma. The shoulder joint plays an important role in the golf swing whereby not only the muscles around the glenohumeral joint but also the scapula stabilizing muscles are extremely important for an effective golf swing. Golf is strictly not considered to be an overhead sport; however, the extreme peak positions of the golf swing involve placing the shoulder joint in maximum abduction and adduction positions which can provoke impingement, lesions of the pulley system or even a special form of posterior shoulder instability. Even after complex shoulder operations, such as rotator cuff repair or shoulder arthroplasty, a return to the golf course at nearly the same level of play can be expected.

  3. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial ...

  4. Simulation and Shoulder Dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaddeau, Angela K; Deering, Shad

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an unpredictable obstetric emergency that requires prompt interventions to ensure optimal outcomes. Proper technique is important but difficult to train given the urgent and critical clinical situation. Simulation training for shoulder dystocia allows providers at all levels to practice technical and teamwork skills in a no-risk environment. Programs utilizing simulation training for this emergency have consistently demonstrated improved performance both during practice drills and in actual patients with significantly decreased risks of fetal injury. Given the evidence, simulation training for shoulder dystocia should be conducted at all institutions that provide delivery services.

  5. Advertising identities: virtual galleries as places of identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Zontea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the public presentation of self through virtual art galleries, singling out the field of photography. Photography has always been disputed as being part of the highbrow arts because of its popular character. Today, anyone who owes a photo camera can experience photography as art, without a rigorous training. Everybody is able to expose the photos freely to a large number of people, on the Internet. Consequently, the Internet opens up a virtual space, in which photo artists and amateurs can promote their works and exhibit them in a personal online gallery, which represents their place in the virtual vastness. Therefore, my research approaches the matter of the virtual gallery as an identitary place, being focused on finding out why artists choose to exhibit in virtual galleries. I asked myself what are the new functions of the virtual art galleries?Are they understood as online markers that distinguish the owners in these virtual environments? In other words, are these personal galleries a way of expressing online identities?

  6. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trunk is crucial for maximizing arm strength and power with throwing or tennis. This part of rehabilitation can usually take place while shoulder pain is subsiding. IV Restore function Resume overhead motion ...

  7. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  8. Shoulder arthroscopy: the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin W; Wright, Thomas W

    2015-04-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is a commonly performed and accepted procedure for a wide variety of pathologies. Surgeon experience, patient positioning, knowledge of surgical anatomy, proper portal placement, and proper use of instrumentation can improve technical success and minimize complication risks. This article details the surgical anatomy, indications, patient positioning, portal placement, instrumentation, and complications for basic shoulder arthroscopy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complications of shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Todd C; Rudolph, Glen H; Caswell, Kyle; Espinoza, Christopher; Burkhead, Wayne Z; Krishnan, Sumant G

    2014-07-01

    Over the past 20 to 30 years, arthroscopic shoulder techniques have become increasingly popular. Although these techniques have several advantages over open surgery, surgical complications are no less prevalent or devastating than those associated with open techniques. Some of the complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder surgery include recurrent instability, soft-tissue injury, and neurapraxia. These complications can be minimized with thoughtful consideration of the surgical indications, careful patient selection and positioning, and a thorough knowledge of the shoulder anatomy. Deep infection following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is rare; however, the shoulder is particularly susceptible to Propionibacterium acnes infection, which is mildly virulent and has a benign presentation. The surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion for this infection. Thromboemoblic complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder techniques are also rare, and studies have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis has minimal efficacy in preventing these complications. Because high-quality studies on the subject are lacking, minimal evidence is available to suggest strategies for prevention. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnumurthy H. Y; Jagdeesh K. S; Anand K; Ranoji Mane; Sanath G. Kamte; Fathima Zohra; Banerji B. H; Sathish Servegar

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS...

  11. Intra-articular elastofibroma of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang-Jin; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2002-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with an elastofibroma in his left shoulder joint. The patient had had limitation of motion in his left arm for 3 years, especially when rotating internally. Radiography of his left shoulder showed bone erosion in the neck of the humerus. On MR imaging, a soft tissue mass was noted in the shoulder joint eroding bone. The mass showed similar signal intensity to that of surrounding muscles on T1- and T2-weighted images. At surgery, a soft, encapsulated mass was found attached to the subscapularis muscle. It was pathologically confirmed as an elastofibroma. This unusual manifestation of an elastofibroma is discussed. (orig.)

  12. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Lang, Philipp

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  14. Ultrasonic sounding and monitoring of the excavation damaged zone in a soft supported gallery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balland, Cyrille; Souley, Mountaka; Morel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    gallery GCS (gallery with soft support and oriented parallel to the horizontal major stress) has predicted an extension of EDZ between 1.4 and 1.9 m according to the front advancement, the position around the gallery (roof, bottom and gallery side) and the rock characteristics. Moreover, a former experimentation showed that below the bottom of a gallery with this same orientation, ultrasonic velocity falls related to the damage were significant up to 2 m deep. The area of interest of experimentation OHZ encompasses at least this area with in addition one reference measurement in the undisturbed area. To escape heterogeneous variations of clay layers and the main anisotropy effect, two devices were selected with a triplet of horizontal drillings in the siding and a doublet of vertical drillings in the bottom of the gallery. P-wave tomographic data allowed rebuilding the images of the velocity on the 4 plans defined by the drillings. These images have shown a significant perturbation of the velocity field over 1.8 m deep in the gallery side. This area has been associated with the EDZ whose extension is of the same order of magnitude as which had been modeled during the blind predictions. Furthermore, there is an area of 0.4 m in depth on this siding with very low velocities or disappearance of ultrasonic rays in the 3 plans. That can be associated with fracturing of argillites. This very low velocity zone is not visible at the bottom, where velocity perturbations are much lower, with constant velocity over 1.6 m. The containment of the concrete floor, which is particularly thick at this location, might play a role in this observation. Finally, some anomalies of velocity are still visible beyond the end of the zone associated with the EDZ. They are probably caused by isolated fractures that occurred during excavation of the gallery and identified on extracted cores from the drillings. The magnitude of these anomalies would suggest that these fractures are closed. A program

  15. [Management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ray, C; Oury, J-F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this review is to propose recommendations on the management of shoulder dystocia. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. In case of shoulder dystocia, if the obstetrician is not present at delivery, he should be systematically informed as quickly as possible (professional consensus). A third person should also be called for help in order to realize McRoberts maneuver (professional consensus). The patient has to be properly installed in gynecological position (professional consensus). It is recommended not to pull excessively on the fetal head (grade C), do not perform uterine expression (grade C) and do not realize inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). McRoberts maneuver, with or without a suprapubic pressure, is simple to perform, effective and associated with low morbidity, thus, it is recommended in the first line (grade C). Regarding the maneuvers of the second line, the available data do not suggest the superiority of one maneuver in relation to another (grade C). We proposed an algorithm; however, management should be adapted to the experience of the operator. If the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, delivery of the posterior arm should be performed preferentially (professional consensus). Routine episiotomy is not recommended in shoulder dystocia (professional consensus). Other second intention maneuvers are described. It seems necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform in case of shoulder dystocia unresolved by the maneuver McRoberts (professional consensus). All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed quickly but without precipitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  18. Paraplegia and the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Jennifer; Goldstein, Barry

    2004-08-01

    Among consumers, families, therapists, physicians, and other rehabilitation professionals, there has been an increasing interest in shoulder pain associated with spinal cord injury. These disorders primarily affect the soft tissues, including the tendons (eg, rotator cuff tendonitis and bicipital tendinitis), muscles (eg, myalgias and myofascial pain syndromes), and bursae. Disorders of bone and joints also have been of interest (eg, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints). This article addresses the historical context, epidemiology, pathophysiology,diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of shoulder pain as it relates to patients with spinal cord injury.

  19. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...

  20. Wind galleries: an instrument for environmental impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, C.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decades wind galleries for non-aeronautic utilisation have proved to be a useful investigation tool in various fields, such as studies on environmental impact and risk assessment, associated with permanent or incidental release of harmful substances. In this framework the feasibility of a new installation has been evaluated in Italy, having as main target the reproduction of thermal stratification phenomena. The great deal of 'hazardous' industries, often in areas having a complex orography, as well as the high pollution levels in Italian cities, lead to the conclusion that a thermally stratified wind gallery might be an economically viable investment [it

  1. Whispering Gallery Mode Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Dusty Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, G.; Basner, R.; Ehlbeck, J.; Roepcke, J.; Maurer, H.; Kersten, H.; Davies, P. B.

    2008-01-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode spectroscopy is being assessed as a diagnostic method for the characterisation of size and chemical composition of spherical particles levitated in a plasma. With a pulsed laser whispering gallery modes (cavity resonances) are excited in individual microspheres leading to enhanced Raman scattering or fluorescence at characteristic wavelengths. This method can be used to gain specific information from the particle surface and is thus of great interest for the characterisation of layers deposited on microparticles, e.g. in molecular plasmas. We present investigations of different microparticles in air and results from fluorescent particles levitated in an Argon rf plasma.

  2. Cadaveric Study of the Articular Branches of the Shoulder Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Maxim S; Bickelhaupt, Brittany; Fehl, Jacob; Benfield, Jonathan A; Curley, Jonathan; Rahimi, Ohmid; Nagpal, Ameet S

    This cadaveric study investigated the anatomic relationships of the articular branches of the suprascapular (SN), axillary (AN), and lateral pectoral nerves (LPN), which are potential targets for shoulder analgesia. Sixteen embalmed cadavers and 1 unembalmed cadaver, including 33 shoulders total, were dissected. Following dissections, fluoroscopic images were taken to propose an anatomical landmark to be used in shoulder articular branch blockade. Thirty-three shoulders from 17 total cadavers were studied. In a series of 16 shoulders, 16 (100%) of 16 had an intact SN branch innervating the posterior head of the humerus and shoulder capsule. Suprascapular sensory branches coursed laterally from the spinoglenoid notch then toward the glenohumeral joint capsule posteriorly. Axillary nerve articular branches innervated the posterolateral head of the humerus and shoulder capsule in the same 16 (100%) of 16 shoulders. The AN gave branches ascending circumferentially from the quadrangular space to the posterolateral humerus, deep to the deltoid, and inserting at the inferior portion of the posterior joint capsule. In 4 previously dissected and 17 distinct shoulders, intact LPNs could be identified in 14 (67%) of 21 specimens. Of these, 12 (86%) of 14 had articular branches innervating the anterior shoulder joint, and 14 (100%) of 14 LPN articular branches were adjacent to acromial branches of the thoracoacromial blood vessels over the superior aspect of the coracoid process. Articular branches from the SN, AN, and LPN were identified. Articular branches of the SN and AN insert into the capsule overlying the glenohumeral joint posteriorly. Articular branches of the LPN exist and innervate a portion of the anterior shoulder joint.

  3. Investigation of CT picture in so-called loose shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Shigehito; Sakamaki, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Akira; Moriishi, Takeji; Takada, Keiichi.

    1985-01-01

    CT picture of the shoulder joint was analyzed in 124 shoulders (114 patients). A line perpendicular to a given line between the precornu of acetabular tegmen (A) and the postcornu of acetabular tegmen (B) was drawn and the intersection where the line and the caput humeri meet (C) was obtained. The angle of CAB was defined as the backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen. The angular aperture was 26.2 0 +-1.9 in 16 so-called loose shoulders, 17.3 0 +-1.0 in 28 loose shoulders restricted to the inward rotation, and 12.2 0 +-0.4 in 80 normal shoulders, showing a distinct correlation between the angular aperture and the degree of loose shoulder. An increased backward angular aperture of the acetabular tegmen was considered greatly attributable to the forward glenohumeral movement resulting from malformation of the acetabular tegmen and flaccidity of the joint. Glenoid osteotomy was thus performed in 9 patients, 6 of whom underwent CT scanning before and after osteotomy. Coronal and transverse CT images of the shoulder joint disclosed a noticeable improvement of the glenohumeral alignment. The angular aperture shown on CT seems to be of major importance not only in the diagnosis of so-called loose shoulder but also in surgical choice. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2008-01-01

    To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. Prospective. Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder droop, as well as scores on shoulder disability

  5. Application of gallery-drilling exploration in underground uranium mining and its evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ruichun; Zou Guohe

    1990-01-01

    Combination method of gallery and drilling is an effective one in production exploration. On the basis of the 20 years practice of a uranium mine using the gallery-drilling combination method in production exploration, the advantages, applications, engineering networks, principles of application of the gallery-drilling combination method and the results of its application are described

  6. Whispering gallery mode selection in optical bottle microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ming; Senthil Murugan, Ganapathy; Brambilla, Gilberto; Zervas, Michalis N.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrated a method to excite selected whispering gallery modes in optical bottle microresonators (BMR) by inscribing microgroove scars on their surface by focused ion beam milling. Substantial spectral clean-up is obtained in appropriately scarred BMRs, providing the potential for high performance sensors and other optical devices.

  7. Engaging Families in the Galleries Using Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    The Palo Alto Art Center sought a solution to the challenge that loyal family audiences, visiting weekly for art studio classes, rarely visit the contemporary art exhibition galleries. This article relates the experience of using the human-centered design process, often called Design Thinking, as the methodology to create a solution for family…

  8. Thermal simulation of storage in TSS-Galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lain Huerta, R.; Martinez Santiago, T.; Ramirez Oyangueren, P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the experiment ''thermal simulation of storage in TSS-galleries'' what is been developed in salt mine of Asse, Germany. The report has 3 part: 1) Analysis of objectives and general description of boundary layers. 2) Geomechanics parameters of salt mine. 3) Thermal modelization, thermomechanics modelization and data acquisition

  9. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. IV. SMOOTH LENS MODELS FOR THE BELLS GALLERY SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Yiping [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Bolton, Adam S.; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Cornachione, Matthew A.; Zheng, Zheng; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Mao, Shude [Physics Department and Tsinghua Centre for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Marques-Chaves, Rui [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Oguri, Masamune [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ménard, Brice, E-mail: yiping.shu@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope F606W-band imaging observations of 21 galaxy-Ly α emitter lens candidates in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS) for the GALaxy-Ly α EmitteR sYstems (BELLS GALLERY) survey. Seventeen systems are confirmed to be definite lenses with unambiguous evidence of multiple imaging. The lenses are primarily massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts of approximately 0.55, while the lensed sources are Ly α emitters (LAEs) at redshifts from two to three. Although most of the lens systems are well fit by smooth lens models consisting of singular isothermal ellipsoids in an external shear field, a thorough exploration of dark substructures in the lens galaxies is required. The Einstein radii of the BELLS GALLERY lenses are, on average, 60% larger than those of the BELLS lenses because of the much higher source redshifts. This will allow for a detailed investigation of the radius evolution of the mass profile in ETGs. With the aid of the average ∼13× lensing magnification, the LAEs are frequently resolved into individual star-forming knots with a wide range of properties. They have characteristic sizes from less than 100 pc to several kiloparsecs, rest-frame far-UV apparent AB magnitudes from 29.6 to 24.2, and typical projected separations of 500 pc to 2 kpc.

  10. Electrical resistivity tomography survey for delineating uncharted mine galleries in West Bengal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillol, J.M.; Sen, N.

    1999-01-01

    The history of subsidence, fires, flooding and other kinds of environmental hazards related to shallow coal workings in India goes back to colonial times some 300 years ago. As coal production accelerated in modern times, so did the environmental and socio-economic drawbacks related to exploitation. In the mid-1980s, a hydropneumatic sand-stowing method was developed to fill in abandoned galleries but their exact location had to be known. Unfortunately, most of these old workings are uncharted and consequently large tracts of land cannot be stabilized. A research program making use of integrated surface, borehole and cross-hole geophysical methods was undertaken over a five-year span to try to solve this problem. Surface geophysical methods, being cheaper and faster than their cross- and downhole counterparts, were used to cover larger areas on an exploratory basis, while cross-hole methods were employed to locate more accurately one or a network of galleries to be perforated by drillhole(s) and used as a conduit for sand stowing. The authors report the results of one of the cross-hole geophysical methods: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). A pole-dipole configuration is used and both cross-hole and surface-borehole methodologies are tested. Forward modelling and inversion of synthetic data making use of downhole and surface physical and geometrical parameters are presented first. This phase is followed by the inversion of real data. It is concluded that ERT is not applicable for the detection of dry voids, but is effective in a waterlogged environment which is estimated to represent 85--90% of the cases. In waterlogged galleries, ERT is applicable in both cross-hole and surface-downhole modes, the latter allowing a larger surface coverage at low cost. ERT is thus a reliable geophysical tool to image water-filled voids and an adequate technique to address environmental and geotechnical problems

  11. Avaliação clínica e por ressonância magnética do ombro de pacientes lesados medulares Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pereira Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar o ombro destes indivíduos através de ressonância magnética para detectar lesões clínicas ou subclínicas para instituir programas específicos de reabilitação. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes lesados medulares, com seguimento no Laboratório de Biomecânica e Reabilitação do Aparelho Locomotor HC/UNICAMP. Foram divididos em dois grupos de acordo com a presença de paraplegia ou tetraplegia e avaliados através de anamnese e exame físico para correlação com o exame de imagem. RESULTADOS: 41% dos ombros avaliados com imagens de ressonância apresentaram resultado normal. Dentre os resultados alterados, a tendinopatia do supra-espinhal e a degeneração acrômio-clavicular foram às alterações mais encontradas e 80% dos ombros com exame alterado possuiam mais de uma lesão associada. CONCLUSÃO: Pela amostra do estudo é possível identificar uma etiologia multivariada da omalgia, com particularidades para indivíduos paraplégicos e tetraplégicos. A inclusão rotineira da avaliação clínica e radiológica do ombro nos indivíduos lesados medulares pode contribuir para a evolução das técnicas de reabilitação e redução tanto das lesões músculo-articulares quanto dos sintomas álgicos. Nível de Evidência II, Desenvolvimento de critérios diagnósticos em pacientes consecutivos com padrão de referência "ouro" aplicado.OBJECTIVE: To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. METHODS: Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. RESULTS: Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the

  12. Work related shoulder disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    and symptoms. Data were analysed by generalised estimating equation and multiple logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: For current upper arm elevation above 90°, a duration increment of 1% of the daily working hours was associated with odds ratios of 1.23 (95% CI 1.10 to 1......Aims: To determine quantitative exposure-response relations between work with highly elevated arms and supraspinatus tendinitis, shoulder pain with disability, and shoulder pain without disability. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a historical cohort of 1886 males from three...... occupational groups. Exposure measurements were performed for four consecutive working days in a random sample of 72 currently employed subjects. Individual work histories were obtained by questionnaire and register data. Health status was ascertained by physical examination blinded towards exposure...

  13. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  14. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-01-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  15. Image collection: 19 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 19 Canis_lupus_familiaris_NL.png イエイヌ Domestic dogs Canis lupus familiaris 9615 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ネコ目

  16. Image collection: 182 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 182 Physeter_macrocephalus_NL.png マッコウクジラ Sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus 9755 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,クジラ目

  17. Image collection: 152 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 152 Tursiops_truncatus_NL.png ハンドウイルカ Bottlenose Dolphin Tursiops truncatus 9739 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,クジラ目

  18. Image collection: 93 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 93 Eubalaena_japonica_NL.png セミクジラ Right whale Eubalaena japonica 302098 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,クジラ目

  19. Image collection: 101 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 101 Nyctereutes_procyonoides_NL.png タヌキ Raccoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides 34880 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ネコ目

  20. Image collection: 158 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 158 Camelus_dromedarius_NL.png ヒトコブラクダ Dromedary Camelus dromedarius 9838 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ウシ目

  1. Image collection: 44 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 44 Macaca_fascicularis_NL.png カニクイザル Cynomolgus Macaca fascicularis 9541 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

  2. Image collection: 177 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 177 Polypterus_endlicheri_NL.png ポリプテルスエンドリケリ Polypterus endlicheri Polypterus endlicheri 348150 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,魚上綱

  3. Image collection: 189 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 189 Mirounga_leonina_NL.png ミナミゾウアザラシ Southern elephant seal Mirounga leonina 9715 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ネコ目

  4. Image collection: 1 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 Daubentonia_madagascariensis_NL.png アイアイ Aye-aye Daubentonia madagascariensis 31869 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

  5. Image collection: 165 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 165 Trichosurus_vulpecula_NL.png フクロギツネ Trichosurus vulpecula Trichosurus vulpecula 9337 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,後獣下綱,

  6. Image collection: 468 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 468 201702_chicken_white_leghorn.png ニワトリ (白色レグホーン) Chicken (white leghorn) Gallus gallus domesticus 9031 モデル生物,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,鳥綱

  7. Image collection: 83 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 83 Balaenoptera_musculus_NL.png シロナガスクジラ Blue Whale Balaenoptera musculus 9771 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,クジラ目

  8. Image collection: 129 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 129 Capricornis_crispus_NL.png ニホンカモシカ Capricornis crispus Capricornis crispus 9966 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ウシ目

  9. Image collection: 168 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 168 Choloepus_didactylus_NL.png フタユビナマケモノ Toed sloth Choloepus didactylus 27675 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱

  10. Image collection: 34 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 34 Otolemur_crassicaudatus_NL.png オオガラゴ Brown Greater Galago Otolemur crassicaudatus 9463 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

  11. Image collection: 120 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 120 Triceratops_horridus_NL.png トリケラトプス Triceratops Triceratops horridus ... 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,爬虫綱,恐竜上目・翼竜上目

  12. Image-based acquisition of virtual gallery model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Slavík, P.

    č. 44 (2001), s. 15 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/00/0030 Grant - others:INCO Copernicus(XE) 960174 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1075907 Keywords : virtual reality Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  13. Image collection: 175 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 175 Pan_paniscus_NL.png ボノボ(ピグミーチンパンジー) Bonobos (pygmy chimpanzees) Pan paniscus 9597 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,霊長目

  14. Image collection: 74 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 74 Ailuropoda_melanoleuca_NL.png ジャイアントパンダ Giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca 9646 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,哺乳綱,獣亜綱,真獣下綱,ネコ目

  15. Image collection: 109 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 109 Tyrannosaurus_rex_NL.png ティラノサウルス Tyrannosaurus Tyrannosaurus rex ... 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,爬虫綱,恐竜上目・翼竜上目

  16. Image collection: 170 [Togo Picture Gallery[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 170 Brachiosaurus_altithorax_NL.png ブラキオサウルス Brachiosaurus Brachiosaurus altithorax ... 生物アイコン,脊索動物門,脊椎動物亜門,爬虫綱,恐竜上目・翼竜上目

  17. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, YeNa; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, 892, Dongnam-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 23 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  2. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, N.

    2013-01-01

    functional discomfort during the joint loading. Compression on the rotator cuff from the overlying acromion and the subsequent tissue reaction in the subacromial bursa causes suffering tendons of these muscles. Unrated its diagnostic leads to deepen the ‘subacromial conflict’ and reach rotator cuff initially partial and later progressed. The shoulder stiffness is a condition in which the passive motion restriction is combined with pain in their final phase as well as during sleep. This also affects the active movements which are also reduced. ‘The shoulder hardening’ is at the organic component expense and it must be distinguished from the functional disorders such as muscle contracture and ‘subacromial conflict’. Restoration of work capacity in patients with idiopathic ‘frozen shoulder’ is faster than in post-traumatic shoulder. Diagnostic estimated joint capsule fibrosis more quickly gives a way to the treatment, which shortens the patient’s suffering. MRI imaging is a method of choice for the diagnosis of these conditions. MRI shows not only broken integrity of the rotator cuff tendons, but also the fluid in the subacromial bursa, which means that, must have a lesion. MRI provides information about fatty degeneration of the tendon. MRI registers the distance of the torn tendon retraction, the rupture size, may advise the surgeon on its mobility, and hence the expected forecast. However in the impingement indicative are only local areas with increased signal on T 2 images and data about severe osteophytosis in the area of the acromioclavicular joint. Outlined are the areas of present calcification in the subacromial bursa and, what is more important for the process of treatment, - their density. In shoulder instability MRI demonstrates the presence of lesions type Bankart, partial rotator cuff lesions, lesions of the ligament apparatus in combination with SLAP lesions, lesions of the posterior labrum and refers to the type of instability and the choice of

  3. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...... shoulder pain. On postoperative day 4, 19 patients (32%) still suffered shoulder pain, but only 4 patients (7%) had clinically relevant pain. Four patients (8%) still suffered shoulder pain 12 months after surgery. In 26 patients (55%), the shoulder pain was classified as referred versus 21 patients (45...

  4. Shoulder Dystocia: Prediction and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  5. Shoulder dystocia: prediction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  6. Thermal Shrinkage for Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Alison P.; Warren, Russell F.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Doward, David A.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Altchek, David W.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent...

  7. Museums and art galleries as partners for public health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camic, Paul M; Chatterjee, Helen J

    2013-01-01

    The majority of public health programmes are based in schools, places of employment and in community settings. Likewise, nearly all health-care interventions occur in clinics and hospitals. An underdeveloped area for public health-related planning that carries international implications is the cultural heritage sector, and specifically museums and art galleries. This paper presents a rationale for the use of museums and art galleries as sites for public health interventions and health promotion programmes through discussing the social role of these organisations in the health and well-being of the communities they serve. Recent research from several countries is reviewed and integrated into a proposed framework for future collaboration between cultural heritage, health-care and university sectors to further advance research, policy development and evidence-based practice.

  8. InfoGallery: Informative Arts Services for Physical Library Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Rohde, Anne; Sundararajah, Balasuthas

    2006-01-01

    Much focus in digital libraries research has been devoted to new online services rather than services for the visitors in the physical library. This paper describes InfoGallery, which is a web-based infrastructure for enriching the physical library space with informative art "exhibitions......" of digital library material and other relevant information, such as RSS news streams, event announcements etc. InfoGallery presents information in an aesthetically attractive manner on a variety of surfaces in the library, including cylindrical displays and floors. The infrastructure consists of a server...... structure, an editor application and a variety of display clients. The paper discusses the design of the infrastructure and its utilization of RSS, podcasts and manually edited news. Applications in the library domain are described and the experiences are discussed....

  9. What Can the Habitable Zone Gallery Do For You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelino, Dawn M.; Kane, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery (www.hzgallery.org) came online in August 2011 as a service to the exoplanet community that provides Habitable Zone (HZ) information for each of the exoplanetary systems with known planetary orbital parameters. The service includes a sortable table, a plot with the period and eccentricity of each of the planets with respect to their time spent in the HZ, a gallery of known systems which plot the orbits and the location of the HZ with respect to those orbits, and orbital movies. Recently, we have added new features including: implementation of both conservative and optimistic HZs, more user-friendly table and movies, movies for circumbinary planets, and a count of planets whose orbits lie entirely within the system's HZ. Here we discuss various educational and scientific applications of the site such as target selection, exploring planets with eccentric or circumbinary orbits, and investigating habitability.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of capsulolabral tears after traumatic primary anterior shoulder dislocation. A prospective comparison with arthroscopy of 25 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suder, P.A.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hougaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    . Subacute MRI evaluation identified 15 labral tears, 12 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial joint side rotator cuff lesion, and 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon. Arthroscopic examination revealed 22 labral tears, 15 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial...... joint side rotator cuff tear, 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon, and 1 osseous Bankart lesion. Anterior capsulolabral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions appeared with a high incidence after acute anterior primary shoulder dislocation. Conventional MRI was only moderately reliable in the preoperative...... evaluation of labral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions, and it failed to give an accurate, differentiated preoperative diagnosis of the capsulolabral lesions....

  11. Shoulder dystocia: management and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitely, Michael L; Gherman, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs when the fetal shoulders become impacted at the pelvic inlet. Management is based on performing maneuvers to alleviate this impaction. A number of protocols and training mnemonics have been developed to assist in managing shoulder dystocia when it occurs. This article reviews the evidence regarding the performance, timing, and sequence of these maneuvers; reviews the mechanism of fetal injury in relation to shoulder dystocia; and discusses issues concerning documentation of the care provided during this obstetric emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematics of shoulder instability; Systematik der Schulterinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Maehringer-Kunz, A. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.) [German] Unter einer Schulterinstabilitaet versteht man jede zu Beschwerden fuehrende Translation des Humeruskopfs in Relation zur Gelenkpfanne waehrend einer aktiven Bewegung der Schulter. Glenohumerale Instabilitaeten werden heute nach ihrer Aetiologie eingeteilt, da bei der Wahl der Therapie der Entstehungsmechanismus der Instabilitaet eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Danach unterscheidet man primaer traumatisch von atraumatisch entstandenen Instabilitaeten sowie Mikroinstabilitaeten. Bei der Diagnostik dienen konventionelle Roentgenuebersichtsaufnahmen nur noch zur Dokumentation einer Luxation und zur Beurteilung der Reposition. Die durch eine Instabilitaet hervorgerufenen Verletzungsfolgen am labroligamentaeren Komplex und den knoechernen Strukturen werden heute bevorzugt mit der direkten MR-Arthrographie dargestellt. Hierbei koennen unterschiedliche Verletzungsmuster dargestellt werden. Nach

  13. Measurements of indoor 222Rn concentration in two art galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, Luana Gomes; Braz, Delson; Jesus, Edgar Francisco de; Cunha, Kenya Dias da; Medeiros, Geiza; Zouain, Felipe; Pitassi, Gabriel; Leite, Carlos Barros; Cardoso, Katia

    2009-01-01

    It is point out that radon and their decay products in environment give high dose to human lung. Studies indicate that the indoor radon inhalation by humans has been considered probably the second most important cause of lung cancer after of smoking. A passive-type radon detector was used for measuring indoor radon concentration in two art galleries at Rio de Janeiro city during 90 days January to March, 2009. The aim of this study is to evaluate the occupational and public radon exposure in art galleries and museums. This paper shows the preliminary results of samples collected at two art galleries located in Gavea, Rio de Janeiro city. 30 LEXAN (GE) track detectors were exposed in the air (indoor as well as outdoor). The samples were collected in the same building which is a construction of XIX century. The analysis of the results suggests that the 222 Rn concentration levels are different in both sampling site, in closed environmental, demonstrating that, although the construction materials are the same the absence of circulating air is a factor very important to increase the concentration of indoor Rn. (author)

  14. [Epidemiology of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneux-Tharaux, C; Delorme, P

    2015-12-01

    To synthetize the available evidence regarding the incidence and risk factors of shoulder dystocia (SD). Consultation of the Medline database, and of national guidelines. Shoulder dystocia is defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed. With this definition, the incidence of SD in population-based studies is about 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Many risk factors have been described but most associations are not independent, or have not been constantly found. The 2 characteristics consistently found as independent risk factors for SD in the literature are previous SD (incidence of SD of about 10% in parturients with previous SD) and foetal macrosomia. Maternal diabetes and obesity also are associated with a higher risk of SD (2 to 4 folds) but these associations may be completely explained by foetal macrosomia. However, even factors independently and constantly associated with SD do not allow a valid prediction of SD because they are not discriminant; 50 to 70% of SD cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present is not associated with SD. Shoulder dystocia is defined by the need for additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, and complicates 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Its main risk factors are previous SD and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive. SD remains a non-predictable obstetrics emergency. Knowledge of SD risk factors should increase the vigilance of clinicians in at-risk contexts. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Can we predict shoulder dystocia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revicky, Vladimir; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Morris, Edward P; Nieto, Jose J

    2012-02-01

    To analyse the significance of risk factors and the possibility of prediction of shoulder dystocia. This was a retrospective cohort study. There were 9,767 vaginal deliveries at 37 and more weeks of gestation analysed during 2005-2007. Studied population included 234 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. Shoulder dystocia was defined as a delivery that required additional obstetric manoeuvres to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. First, a univariate analysis was done to identify the factors that had a significant association with shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia, birth weight, duration of second stage of labour and mode of delivery were studied factors. All factors were then combined in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (Adj. OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 2.4% (234/9,767). Only mode of delivery and birth weight were independent risk factors for shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia and duration of second stage of labour were not independent risk factors. Ventouse delivery increases the risk of shoulder dystocia almost 3 times, forceps delivery comparing to the ventouse delivery increases risk almost 3.4 times. Risk of shoulder dystocia is minimal with the birth weight of 3,000 g or less. It is difficult to foretell the exact birth weight and the mode of delivery, therefore occurrence of shoulder dystocia is highly unpredictable. Regular drills for shoulder dystocia and awareness of increased incidence with instrumental deliveries are important to reduce fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality.

  16. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.; Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Biert, J.; Heidema, W.M.; Bekker, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia.

  17. Um caso de sinovite vilonodular do ombro em adolescente: diagnóstico por imagem e anatomopatológico A case of villonodular synovitis of the shoulder in an adolescent: imaging and pathologic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Lavras Costallat

    2009-02-01

    villonodular synovitis (PVNS, synovial hemangioma, synovial osteochondromatosis and arborescence lipoma. We report the case of a young patient with chronic right shoulder monoarthritis, who's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed synovitis. Arthroscopy was performed and the biopsy revealed PVNS. CASE REPORT: J C M, 15 years-old, female, Caucasian, student. She was sent to a Rheumatologist along with a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. The patient presented, for one year, a mild pain of insidious onset in her right shoulder, with relief of the symptoms in two days under nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory therapy (NSAIDs. During this year, the patient presented five or six episodes of pain with the same characteristics. No other signs and symptoms were related. The following tests showed normal or negative results:complete blood count, ESR, C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor and urinalysis. The antinuclear antibody (ANA was 1/80 speckled pattern. The MRI of the shoulder showed glenohumeral synovitis with joint effusion and soft tissue swelling in the subscapular bursa, which could correspond to pannus. As the medical history and physical examination were not compatible to JIA, a second MRI was performed, which showed an increase of the synovitis. The patient was submitted to an arthroscopy with biopsy and the histopathological examination showed PVNS. A complete synovectomy was performed and a new MRI, nine months later, showed no synovitis. PVNS of the shoulder is uncommon, and synovectomy was curative in this case.

  18. Detecting single viruses and nanoparticles using whispering gallery microlasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lina; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhu, Jiangang; Kim, Woosung; Yang, Lan

    2011-06-26

    There is a strong demand for portable systems that can detect and characterize individual pathogens and other nanoscale objects without the use of labels, for applications in human health, homeland security, environmental monitoring and diagnostics. However, most nanoscale objects of interest have low polarizabilities due to their small size and low refractive index contrast with the surrounding medium. This leads to weak light-matter interactions, and thus makes the label-free detection of single nanoparticles very difficult. Micro- and nano-photonic devices have emerged as highly sensitive platforms for such applications, because the combination of high quality factor Q and small mode volume V leads to significantly enhanced light-matter interactions. For example, whispering gallery mode microresonators have been used to detect and characterize single influenza virions and polystyrene nanoparticles with a radius of 30 nm (ref. 12) by measuring in the transmission spectrum either the resonance shift or mode splitting induced by the nanoscale objects. Increasing Q leads to a narrower resonance linewidth, which makes it possible to resolve smaller changes in the transmission spectrum, and thus leads to improved performance. Here, we report a whispering gallery mode microlaser-based real-time and label-free detection method that can detect individual 15-nm-radius polystyrene nanoparticles, 10-nm gold nanoparticles and influenza A virions in air, and 30 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in water. Our approach relies on measuring changes in the beat note that is produced when an ultra-narrow emission line from a whispering gallery mode microlaser is split into two modes by a nanoscale object, and these two modes then interfere. The ultimate detection limit is set by the laser linewidth, which can be made much narrower than the resonance linewidth of any passive resonator. This means that microlaser sensors have the potential to detect objects that are too small to be

  19. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H K [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  20. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Lang, Philipp; Wagner, Ulli; Moeller, Frank; Deimling, Urs van; Genant, H.K.; Schild, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T 1 -weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  1. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  2. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura; Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W.; Shellock, Frank G.; Crues, John V.; Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  3. Shoulder dystocia: definitions and incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexandra; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2014-06-01

    Though subjective in nature, both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists practice bulletin and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists green guideline are in agreement on the descriptor of shoulder dystocia: requirement of additional obstetric maneuvers when gentle downward traction has failed to affect the delivery of the shoulders. The rate of shoulder dystocia is about 1.4% of all deliveries and 0.7% for vaginal births. Compared to non-diabetics (0.6%), among diabetics, the rate of impacted shoulders is 201% higher (1.9%); newborns delivered by vacuum or forceps have 254% higher likelihood of shoulder dystocia than those born spontaneously (2.0% vs. 0.6%, respectively). When the birthweight is categorized as 4500 g, the likelihood of shoulder dystocia in the US vs. other countries varies significantly. Future studies should focus on lowering the rate of shoulder dystocia and its associated morbidities, without concomitantly increasing the rate of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Directional interacting whispering-gallery modes in coupled dielectric microdisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Chil-Min; Park, Young-Jai

    2006-01-01

    We study the optical interaction in a coupled dielectric microdisks by investigating the splitting of resonance positions of interacting whispering-gallery modes (WGM's) and their pattern change, depending on the distance between the microdisks. It is shown that the interaction between the WGM's with odd parity about the y axis becomes appreciable at a distance less than a wavelength and causes directional emissions of the resulting interacting WGM's. The directionality of the interacting WGM's can be understood in terms of an effective boundary deformation in ray dynamical analysis. We also discuss the oscillation of the splitting when the distance is greater than a wavelength

  5. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terriza, M.D.; Manzanares, R.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  6. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  7. Introducing New Library Services: Nuclear Malaysia Gallery Photos and Videos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Nasaruddin Ahmad; Habibah Adnan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the existing of library is to preserve books and journals for the organizations main business. The role of library itself is to organize the books such as borrowing and renewal services as consulting their customers on getting the best references for the customers need and demand. Nowadays, the role of library also expands and the need for storing and preserving non-monograph resources such as photo and video also increase. Follow that current situation, Nuclear Malaysia's Library also take a step forwards by introducing new services so called Photo and Video Gallery. Realizing that Nuclear Malaysia also have their valuable photo and video that contains so called memorable moment and must be preserve for future reference, the management of Nuclear Malaysia's Library have decided to buy the system so called P-Canvas. The main purpose of this paper is to explain the library new services, Photo and Video Gallery, development and advantage of this system in storing and preserving Nuclear Malaysia's photo and video. (author)

  8. Sensitivity optimization in whispering gallery mode optical cylindrical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozeymeh, F.; Razaghi, M.

    2018-01-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode resonances propagated in cylindrical resonators have two angular and radial orders of l and i. In this work, the higher radial order whispering-gallery-mode resonances, (i = 1 - 4), at a fixed l are examined. The sensitivity of theses resonances is analysed as a function of the structural parameters of the cylindrical resonator like different radii and refractive index of composed material of the resonator. A practical application where cylindrical resonators are used for the measurement of glucose concentration in water is presented as a biosensor demonstrator. We calculate the wavelength shifts of the WG1-4, in several glucose/water solutions, with concentrations spanning from 0.0% to 9.0.% (weight/weight). Improved sensitivity can be achieved using multi-WGM cylindrical resonators with radius of R = 100 μm and resonator composed material of MgF 2 with refractive index of nc = 1.38. Also the effect of polarization on sensitivity is considered for all four WGMs. The best sensitivity of 83.07 nm/RIU for the fourth WGM with transverse magnetic polarization, is reported. These results propose optimized parameters aimed to fast designing of cylindrical resonators as optical biosensors, where both the sensitivity and the geometries can be optimized.

  9. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R Sean

    2014-09-01

    Since the original Neer humeral replacement in the 1950s, the standard primary anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty design has slowly evolved. Most recently, the humeral stem has become progressively shorter to help combat stem-related complications. Currently, there are several companies who have developed and marketed a stemless humeral arthroplasty component. Manufacturers' data for 5 stemless shoulder arthroplasty components currently on the market were analyzed and reviewed. A literature review of short-term results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty was completed. Of the stemless shoulder arthroplasty systems available on the market, 3 are currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States. The Tornier Simpliciti (Tornier, Edina, MN, USA) clinical trial began in 2011. The study with 2-year minimum follow-up results is scheduled for completion in November 2014. The Arthrex Eclipse (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) clinical trial was started in January 2013. The tentative study completion date is 2017. The Biomet Nano (Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) clinical trial began in October 2013 and also has a tentative completion date of 2017. No other clinical trial is currently under way in the United States. Early results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty indicate clinical results similar to standard stemmed shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic analysis indicates implant stability without migration or subsidence at 2- to 3-year minimum follow-up.. Several stemless shoulder arthroplasty implants are available outside the United States. Early clinical and radiographic results are promising, but well-designed clinical studies and midterm results are lacking. Three clinical trials are currently under way in the United States with initial availability for use anticipated in 2015. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years. Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. Results The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Conclusion Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  11. The art of compromise: the founding of the National Gallery of British Art, 1890-1892

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Woodson-Boulton

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that the press played a key role in defining the Tate Gallery by facilitating a national debate about the siting, nature, and purpose of the proposed National Gallery of British Art. Art critics, politicians, journalists and a variety of newspaper editors weighed in on whether Britain should create a museum of modern art, a museum of national art, or both. The understanding of British art as quintessentially modern at the time of the founding of the Gallery meant that from the beginning the Tate Gallery was founded as both the National Gallery of British Art and a museum of modern art. The changing definition of modern art in the twentieth century, however, created fractures between these two identities that eventually led to the split between Tate Britain and Tate Modern.

  12. Calcifying supracoracoid bursitis as a cause of chronic shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mens, J; van der Korst, J K

    1984-01-01

    A case of chronic shoulder pain is reported with marked limitation of both active and passive elevations and a normal range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. X-ray examination demonstrated cloudy calcification in the coracoclavicular region, presumably indicating calcifying supracoracoid bursitis. Images PMID:6497468

  13. A novel ultrasound-guided shoulder arthroscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyryshkin, K.; Mousavi, P.; Beek, M.; Chen, T.; Pichora, D.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a novel ultrasound-guided computer system for arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder joint. Intraoperatively, the system tracks and displays the surgical instruments, such as arthroscope and arthroscopic burrs, relative to the anatomy of the patient. The purpose of this system is to improve the surgeon's perception of the three-dimensional space within the anatomy of the patient in which the instruments are manipulated and to provide guidance towards the targeted anatomy. Pre-operatively, computed tomography images of the patient are acquired to construct virtual threedimensional surface models of the shoulder bone structure. Intra-operatively, live ultrasound images of pre-selected regions of the shoulder are captured using an ultrasound probe whose three-dimensional position is tracked by an optical camera. These images are used to register the surface model to the anatomy of the patient in the operating room. An initial alignment is obtained by matching at least three points manually selected on the model to their corresponding points identified on the ultrasound images. The registration is then improved with an iterative closest point or a sequential least squares estimation technique. In the present study the registration results of these techniques are compared. After the registration, surgical instruments are displayed relative to the surface model of the patient on a graphical screen visible to the surgeon. Results of laboratory experiments on a shoulder phantom indicate acceptable registration results and sufficiently fast overall system performance to be applicable in the operating room.

  14. Rotational glenohumeral adaptations are associated with shoulder pathology in professional male handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Cisowski, Pawel; Breborowicz, Ewa; Grygorowicz, Monika; Dzianach, Marcin; Krupecki, Tomasz; Laver, Lior; Romanowski, Leszek

    2018-01-01

    Glenohumeral range of motion adaptations may affect throwing athletes and contribute to shoulder injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shoulder rotation deficits among elite professional handball players and its correlation to the presence of shoulder pain and morphological changes. Eighty-seven elite professional handball players and 41 healthy non-athlete volunteers participated in the study. Evaluations included measurement of range of internal and external rotation, total arch of motion, identification of shoulder pain and ultrasound scan for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and internal impingement. Glenohumeral rotational deficits (>20-25°) were found among 11 players group (13%). The throwing shoulders in the players group showed a decrease in internal rotation and an increase in external rotation with significantly larger ranges among players compared to the non-athlete group. Internal rotation deficit >20° was associated with higher incidence of shoulder pain among players. Both internal rotation deficits (>25°) and total arch of motion deficit (>20°) co-existed with higher incidence of internal impingement. Shoulder pain was common (36/97-41%) and was associated with decreased external rotation and total arch of motion. Internal impingement (found in 13/87-15%) correlated with decreased rotation ranges and a greater deficit in total arch of motion, whereas higher gain in external rotation correlated with a partial rotator cuff tear (found in 12/87-14%). Shoulder pathologies and problems commonly affected the group of handball players. Greater glenohumeral rotational deficits in throwing shoulders of handball players correlate with shoulder pain and internal impingement, while increased external rotation with partial rotator cuff tears. Such deficits affect 13% of the athlete population. Major clinical relevance of the study is to monitor handball players' shoulders both clinically and by proper imaging. Evaluation of range of rotation seems

  15. Comparison between ultrasound and plain X-ray in evaluating the cause of shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, K M; Mannan, M; Chowdhury, A Z; Haque, M A; Kaiser, M S; Nabi, S; Ferdousee, R A; Paul, B K; Ahmed, S M; Khan, M; Begum, M

    2011-01-01

    Painful shoulder is a common painful condition among patients. Apart from acute traumatic lesions such as fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains and ruptured tendons, 85 to 90% of painful shoulders are due to adhesive capsulitis, acute or chronic calcific tendinitis, bursitis, bicipital tendinitis and lesions of the musculotendinous cuff. Arthritis is the cause of less than 5% of painful shoulders. For evaluating conditions of shoulder joint, X-ray has been regarded as only method of choice for long time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an alternative procedure but the cost limits its utilization especially in Bangladesh. Ultrasonography is an effective imaging modality in the evaluation of both rotator and non-rotator cuff disorders. Because of low cost and availability, it can be an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of painful shoulder. The present study was conducted to assess ultrasonography as a useful modality in evaluating cases of shoulder pain and to compare the findings with X-ray findings. Thirty two patients with shoulder pain were evaluated by X-ray and Ultrasonography (USG). Clinical diagnosis was done for correlation. To identify the cause of shoulder pain, 100% patients were found normal in plain X-ray. On Ultrasonography (USG) 12.5% patients had displaced long head of biceps, 21.9% had biceps tendinitis, and 3.1% had bursitis. In the assessment of shoulder pathology, USG had a sensitivity of 73.3%, specificity of 88.2%, Positive predictive value (PPV) of 84.6%, Negative predictive value (NPV) of 78.9% and an accuracy of 81.3%. USG is a useful modality for evaluation the shoulder joint in case of painful shoulder even plain X-ray is non conclusive.

  16. Video gallery of educational lectures integrated in faculty's portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Majerník

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a web based educational video-clips exhibition created to share various archived lectures for medical students, health care professionals as well as for general public. The presentation of closely related topics was developed as video gallery and it is based solely on free or open source tools to be available for wide academic and/or non-commercial use. Even if the educational video records can be embedded in any websites, we preferred to use our faculty’s portal, which should be a central point to offer various multimedia educational materials. The system was integrated and tested to offer open access to infectology lectures that were captured and archived from live-streamed sessions and from videoconferences.

  17. Elementary modes of coupled oscillators as whispering-gallery microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2015-10-01

    We obtain the elementary modes of a system of parity-time reversal (PT)-symmetric coupled oscillators with balanced loss and gain. These modes are used to give a physical picture of the phase transition recently reported [C. M. Bender, M. Gianfreda, B. Peng, S. K. Özdemir and L. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 062111 (2013); L. Yang, S. K. Özdemir and B. Peng, 12th Int. Workshop and Conf. Pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonians in Quantum Physics, Istanbul, Turkey, July 2013; B. Peng, S. K. Özdemir, F. Lei, F. Monifi, M. Gianfreda, G. L. Long, S. Fan, F. Nori, C. M. Bender and L. Yang, Nat. Phys. 10, 394 (2014)] in experiments with whispering-gallery microresonators.

  18. ECHOGRAPHIC AND KINETIC CHANGES IN THE SHOULDER JOINT AFTER MANUAL WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION UNDER TWO DIFFERENT WORKLOAD SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel eGil-Agudo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractManual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury have a high prevalence of shoulder pain, due to the use of the upper extremity for independent mobility, transfers and other activities of daily living. Indeed, shoulder pain dramatically affects quality of life of these individuals. There is limited evidence obtained through radiographic techniques of a relationship between the forces acting on the shoulder during different propulsion conditions and shoulder pathologies. Today, ultrasound is widely accepted as a precise tool in diagnosis, displaying particularly effectiveness in screening the shoulder rotator cuff. Thus, we set out to perform an ultrasound-based study of the acute changes to the shoulder soft tissues after propelling a manual wheelchair in two workload settings. Shoulder joint kinetics was recorded from 14 manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury while they performed high and low intensity wheelchair propulsion tests (constant and incremental. Shoulder joint forces and moments were obtained from inverse dynamic methods, and ultrasound screening of the shoulder was performed before and immediately after the test. Kinetic changes were more relevant after the most intensive task, showing the significance of high intensity activity, yet no differences were found in ultrasound-related parameters before and after each propulsion task. It therefore appears that further studies will be needed to collect clinical data and correlate data regarding shoulder pain with both ultrasound images and data from shoulder kinetics.

  19. Echographic and Kinetic Changes in the Shoulder Joint after Manual Wheelchair Propulsion Under Two Different Workload Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Agudo, Ángel; Solís-Mozos, Marta; Crespo-Ruiz, Beatriz; del-Ama Eng, Antonio J.; Pérez-Rizo, Enrique; Segura-Fragoso, Antonio; Jiménez-Díaz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (SCI) have a high prevalence of shoulder pain due to the use of the upper extremity for independent mobility, transfers, and other activities of daily living. Indeed, shoulder pain dramatically affects quality of life of these individuals. There is limited evidence obtained through radiographic techniques of a relationship between the forces acting on the shoulder during different propulsion conditions and shoulder pathologies. Today, ultrasound is widely accepted as a precise tool in diagnosis, displaying particularly effectiveness in screening the shoulder rotator cuff. Thus, we set out to perform an ultrasound-based study of the acute changes to the shoulder soft tissues after propelling a manual wheelchair in two workload settings. Shoulder joint kinetics was recorded from 14 manual wheelchair users with SCI while they performed high- and low-intensity wheelchair propulsion tests (constant and incremental). Shoulder joint forces and moments were obtained from inverse dynamic methods, and ultrasound screening of the shoulder was performed before and immediately after the test. Kinetic changes were more relevant after the most intensive task, showing the significance of high-intensity activity, yet no differences were found in ultrasound-related parameters before and after each propulsion task. It therefore appears that further studies will be needed to collect clinical data and correlate data regarding shoulder pain with both ultrasound images and data from shoulder kinetics. PMID:25566539

  20. Microwave photonics systems based on whispering-gallery-mode resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Henriet, Rémi; Phan Huy, Kien; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Balakireva, Irina; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K

    2013-08-05

    Microwave photonics systems rely fundamentally on the interaction between microwave and optical signals. These systems are extremely promising for various areas of technology and applied science, such as aerospace and communication engineering, sensing, metrology, nonlinear photonics, and quantum optics. In this article, we present the principal techniques used in our lab to build microwave photonics systems based on ultra-high Q whispering gallery mode resonators. First detailed in this article is the protocol for resonator polishing, which is based on a grind-and-polish technique close to the ones used to polish optical components such as lenses or telescope mirrors. Then, a white light interferometric profilometer measures surface roughness, which is a key parameter to characterize the quality of the polishing. In order to launch light in the resonator, a tapered silica fiber with diameter in the micrometer range is used. To reach such small diameters, we adopt the "flame-brushing" technique, using simultaneously computer-controlled motors to pull the fiber apart, and a blowtorch to heat the fiber area to be tapered. The resonator and the tapered fiber are later approached to one another to visualize the resonance signal of the whispering gallery modes using a wavelength-scanning laser. By increasing the optical power in the resonator, nonlinear phenomena are triggered until the formation of a Kerr optical frequency comb is observed with a spectrum made of equidistant spectral lines. These Kerr comb spectra have exceptional characteristics that are suitable for several applications in science and technology. We consider the application related to ultra-stable microwave frequency synthesis and demonstrate the generation of a Kerr comb with GHz intermodal frequency.

  1. Methodics of computing the results of monitoring the exploratory gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krúpa Víazoslav

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available At building site of motorway tunnel Višòové-Dubná skala , the priority is given to driving of exploration galley that secures in detail: geologic, engineering geology, hydrogeology and geotechnics research. This research is based on gathering information for a supposed use of the full profile driving machine that would drive the motorway tunnel. From a part of the exploration gallery which is driven by the TBM method, a fulfilling information is gathered about the parameters of the driving process , those are gathered by a computer monitoring system. The system is mounted on a driving machine. This monitoring system is based on the industrial computer PC 104. It records 4 basic values of the driving process: the electromotor performance of the driving machine Voest-Alpine ATB 35HA, the speed of driving advance, the rotation speed of the disintegrating head TBM and the total head pressure. The pressure force is evaluated from the pressure in the hydraulic cylinders of the machine. Out of these values, the strength of rock mass, the angle of inner friction, etc. are mathematically calculated. These values characterize rock mass properties as their changes. To define the effectivity of the driving process, the value of specific energy and the working ability of driving head is used. The article defines the methodics of computing the gathered monitoring information, that is prepared for the driving machine Voest – Alpine ATB 35H at the Institute of Geotechnics SAS. It describes the input forms (protocols of the developed method created by an EXCEL program and shows selected samples of the graphical elaboration of the first monitoring results obtained from exploratory gallery driving process in the Višòové – Dubná skala motorway tunnel.

  2. Multivariate analyses of rotator cuff pathologies in shoulder disability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F Henseler

    Full Text Available Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability.Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA. We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39 and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30 RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52 as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively.Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (p<0.001 and discriminated between superior and posterosuperior tears. In contrast neither tear size nor fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus contributed to superior humeral translation.Our study reveals that infraspinatus atrophy has the strongest contribution to RC tear pathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability.

  3. Multivariate Analyses of Rotator Cuff Pathologies in Shoulder Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henseler, Jan F.; Raz, Yotam; Nagels, Jochem; van Zwet, Erik W.; Raz, Vered; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC) muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability. Methods Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA). We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30) RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52) as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively. Results Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (ptears. In contrast neither tear size nor fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus contributed to superior humeral translation. Conclusion Our study reveals that infraspinatus atrophy has the strongest contribution to RC tear pathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability. PMID:25710703

  4. Multivariate analyses of rotator cuff pathologies in shoulder disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henseler, Jan F; Raz, Yotam; Nagels, Jochem; van Zwet, Erik W; Raz, Vered; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-01-01

    Disability of the shoulder joint is often caused by a tear in the rotator cuff (RC) muscles. Four RC muscles coordinate shoulder movement and stability, among them the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle which are predominantly torn. The contribution of each RC muscle to tear pathology is not fully understood. We hypothesized that muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, features of RC muscle degeneration, are predictive of superior humeral head translation and shoulder functional disability. Shoulder features, including RC muscle surface area and fatty infiltration, superior humeral translation and RC tear size were obtained from a consecutive series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with arthrography (MRA). We investigated patients with superior (supraspinatus, n = 39) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus, n = 30) RC tears, and patients with an intact RC (n = 52) as controls. The individual or combinatorial contribution of RC measures to superior humeral translation, as a sign of RC dysfunction, was investigated with univariate or multivariate models, respectively. Using the univariate model the infraspinatus surface area and fatty infiltration in both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus had a significant contribution to RC dysfunction. With the multivariate model, however, the infraspinatus surface area only affected superior humeral translation (ppathologies. This suggests a pivotal role for the infraspinatus in preventing shoulder disability.

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Jan van Breemen Inst., Amsterdam; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-01-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages. (orig.) [de

  7. Alannah Coleman: 1970—A Year at Bonython’s Sydney Gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Pierse

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available When art dealer and entrepreneur Kym Bonython’s new gallery opened in Sydney in 1967, it was believed to be the largest commercial gallery in the southern hemisphere. In early 1970, Bonython brought Melbourne-born art dealer Alannah Coleman over from London to take on the management of his gallery. Sadly, her appointment was not a success and lasted less than a year. Coleman re-organised the records and accounts along European lines and tried to put the gallery on a firm financial footing, but she met with opposition from staff, artists and Bonython himself. Bonython wanted the gallery as a showcase for new talent and was always on the lookout to spot ‘the next goer’. The opening parties at Bonython’s deplored by Coleman as ‘open slather’ evenings proved to be significant social events and the focus for cultural exchange, whilst in his solo shows, Brett Whiteley made innovative use of the gallery as a ‘theatre’, combining painting and sculpture with light and sound to transform the exhibition into a completely new synesthetic experience. In 1971, with funding from John Kaldor’s Public Art Project scheme, Swiss curator and gallerist Harald Szeemann used the Bonython Gallery to stage a groundbreaking show of conceptual art that went on to show at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne. Without a regular external source of sponsorship or support, however, Coleman’s fears for the financial viability of the gallery were eventually proved right when, after several further years of losses, it finally closed in 1976.

  8. Thermal shrinkage for shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Alison P; Warren, Russell F; Petrigliano, Frank A; Doward, David A; Cordasco, Frank A; Altchek, David W; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent shoulder stabilization surgery with thermal capsular shrinkage using a monopolar radiofrequency device. Follow-up included a subjective outcome questionnaire, discussion of pain, instability, and activity level. Mean follow-up was 3.3 years (range 2.0-4.7 years). The thermal capsular shrinkage procedure failed due to instability and/or pain in 31% of shoulders at a mean time of 39 months. In patients with unidirectional anterior instability and those with concomitant labral repair, the procedure proved effective. Patients with multidirectional instability had moderate success. In contrast, four of five patients with isolated posterior instability failed. Thermal capsular shrinkage has been advocated for the treatment of shoulder instability, particularly mild to moderate capsular laxity. The ease of the procedure makes it attractive. However, our retrospective review revealed an overall failure rate of 31% in 80 patients with 2-year minimum follow-up. This mid- to long-term cohort study adds to the literature lacking support for thermal capsulorrhaphy in general, particularly posterior instability. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9187-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  9. The Cosmology Gallery: Unity through diversity in a vast and awe-inspiring universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, John

    2011-06-01

    Scientists, artists, religious and cultural leaders have come together to create the Cosmology Gallery at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC) located 70 km north of Perth, Western Australia. The Cosmology Gallery exhibitions include the multicultural cosmology artworks, Celestial Visions astronomical photography exhibition and the Timeline of the Universe. The multicultural cosmology artworks are new artworks inspired by Australian Indigenous, Christian, Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, scientific and technological perspectives of the universe. The Celestial Visions exhibition features astronomical events above famous landmarks, including Stonehenge and the Pyramids. The AUD 400,000+ project was funded by Lotterywest, Western Australia and the Cosmology Gallery was officially opened in July 2008 by the Premier of Western Australia.

  10. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  11. MRI of the postoperative shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatkin, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Performing and interpreting MRI of the shoulder in patients after surgery is a difficult task. The normal anatomic features are distorted by the surgical alterations as well as the artifacts that result from metal and other materials used in the surgical procedures. This article reviews the common surgical procedures undertaken in patients with rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability, and how they affect the appearance of the relevant anatomic structures on MRI examination. It also reviews the more common causes for residual and recurrent abnormalities seen in such patients and how MRI can be used to diagnose such lesions, thus aiding the orthopedic surgeon in treating these difficult clinical problems. (orig.)

  12. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  13. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  14. Use of soil stabilizers on highway shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated soil additives as stabilizers for aggregate and topsoil shoulders. Its purpose was to determine (1) the effect soil stabilizers have on the strength and stability of soil shoulders, and (2) the costs and benefits of using stabili...

  15. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and patients...... with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  16. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after

  17. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder: technique and normal appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tnibar, M A; Auer, J A; Bakkali, S

    1999-01-01

    This study was intended to document normal ultrasonographic appearance of the equine shoulder and anatomic landmarks useful in clinical imaging. Both forelimbs of five equine cadavers and both forelimbs of six live adult horses were used. To facilitate understanding of the images, a zoning system assigned to the biceps brachii and to the infraspinatus tendon was developed. Ultrasonography was performed with a real-time B-mode semiportable sector scanner using 7.5- and 5-MHz transducers. On one cadaver limb, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a system at 1.5 Tesla, T1-weighted spin-echo sequence. Ultrasonography images were compared to frozen specimens and MRI images to correlate the ultrasonographic findings to the gross anatomy of the shoulder. Ultrasonography allowed easy evaluation of the biceps brachii and the infraspinatus tendon and their bursae, the supraspinatus muscle and tendons, the superficial muscles of the shoulder, and the underlying humerus and scapula. Only the lateral and, partially, the caudal aspects of the humeral head could be visualized with ultrasound. Ultrasonographic appearance, orientation, and anatomic relationships of these structures are described. Ultrasonographic findings correlated well with MRI images and with gross anatomy in the cadavers' limbs.

  18. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthros...

  19. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  20. Frozen shoulder and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma B; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frozen shoulder might be a complication or a presenting symptom of cancer. We examined the risk of a cancer diagnosis after an incident diagnosis of frozen shoulder. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data from Danish registries to identify patients with frozen shoulder during 1...

  1. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  2. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro

    1997-01-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  3. Questions and Answers About Shoulder Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury. Injection of a cortisone medicine into your shoulder joint. Surgery to repair the tear if you don’t ... TENS). Injection of a corticosteroid drug if your shoulder is not better. Surgery if the shoulder does not improve with other ...

  4. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  5. Abduction and external rotation (ABER) MR arthrography of the shoulder. Benefits and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, A.; Gokan, Takehiko; Munechika, Hirotsugu; Ogawa, Takashi; El-Feky, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the benefits and limitations of using abduction and external rotation (ABER) positions of the arm during MR arthrography of the shoulder in the evaluation of the rotator-cuff tendon, the capsulolabral complex and the shoulder joint after surgery. Forty-seven patients complaining of either shoulder instability, chronic shoulder pain, pain of unknown cause or pain following shoulder surgery were studied using the direct MR arthrography technique in both the standard neutral position with the arm adducted as well as with the arm in the ABER position. A correlation was obtained between the MR arthrography findings and the surgical findings in 10 reports and clinical presentations of the examined patients. Three patients [6%] were unable to perform ABER positioning. ABER oblique axial images were better than standard oblique coronal images in revealing undersurface tears of the rotator cuff particularly of the grade I type. Four tears were missed in standard images. Oblique axial images were better than standard axial images in demonstrating non-displaced anterior labral tears. One tear was missed and two tears were suspected in the standard images. Oblique axial images were less sensitive than oblique coronal images in the diagnosis of superior labral tears. Two tears were missed in ABER images. The ABER oblique axial MR arthrogram is a useful adjunct to the standard axial and oblique coronal MR arthrograms for assessment of capsulolabral abnormalities and rotator-cuff tendon tears despite some limitations. (author)

  6. Mid-term shoulder functional and quality of life outcomes after shoulder replacement in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Heather K.; Struk, Aimee M.; Reed, Austin; Wright, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain and loss of function are directly associated with obesity. Questions/purposes We hypothesized that significant interactions would exist between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and obesity status on functional and quality of life (QOL) outcomes over the long term. Clinical and QOL outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation form, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, University of California at Los Angeles Sho...

  7. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; Van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-03-01

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery are not known. The purpose of this explorative study was to determine the incidence of postoperative frozen shoulder after various operative shoulder procedures. A second aim was to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery. 505 consecutive patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery were included in this prospective cohort study. Follow-up was 6 months after surgery. A prediction model was developed to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery using the TRIPOD guidelines. We nominated five potential predictors: gender, diabetes mellitus, type of physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score. Frozen shoulder was identified in 11% of the patients after shoulder surgery and was more common in females (15%) than in males (8%). Frozen shoulder was encountered after all types of operative procedures. A prediction model based on four variables (diabetes mellitus, specialized shoulder physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score) discriminated reasonably well with an AUC of 0.712. Postoperative frozen shoulder is a serious complication after shoulder surgery, with an incidence of 11%. Four prognostic factors were identified for postoperative frozen shoulder: diabetes mellitus, arthroscopic surgery, specialized shoulder physiotherapy and DASH score. The combination of these four variables provided a prediction rule for postoperative frozen shoulder with reasonable fit. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  8. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  9. Dislocated Shoulder: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by: Sports injuries. Shoulder dislocation is a common injury in contact sports, such as football and hockey, and in sports that may involve falls, such as downhill skiing, gymnastics and volleyball. ... is a common source of dislocation. Falls. You may dislocate your ...

  10. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  11. Interscalene block for shoulder surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Fracture dislocation of the shoulder is a common musculoskeletal injury following road traffic accident. Peripheral ... Fracture luxation de l'épaule est une commune blessures musculo-squelettiques suite route trafic accident. Périphériques nerf .... vertebral artery injection, pneumothorax, Horner's syndrome ...

  12. Krasotshnõje snõ Sed Arte Gallery / Irina Butjajeva

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Butjajeva, Irina

    2007-01-01

    Valgevene kunstnike Jelena Shlegeli, Vladimir Gontsharuki, Dmitri Zenkovitshi ja Dmitri Masli maalinäitus "Valgevene värvilised unenäod" Tallinna galeriis Aatrium. Näitust vahendas Sed Arte Gallery, galerist Olga Ljubaskina

  13. The Habitable Zone Gallery 2.0: The Online Exoplanet System Visualization Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, C. O.; Kane, S. R.; Gelino, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    The Habitable Zone Gallery 2.0 provides new and improved visualization and data analysis tools to the exoplanet habitability community and beyond. Modules include interactive habitable zone plotting and downloadable 3D animations.

  14. The influence of the whispering gallery modes resonators shape on their sensitivity to the movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Yuri V.; Govorenko, Ekaterina V.; Kukaev, Alexander S.; Shalymov, Egor V.; Venediktov, Vladimir Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The optical whispering gallery modes resonators are axially symmetrical resonators with smooth edges, supporting the existence of the whispering gallery modes by the total internal reflection on the surface of the resonator. For today various types of such resonators were developed, namely the ball-shaped, tor-shaped, bottle-shaped, disk-shaped etc. The movement of whispering gallery modes resonators in inertial space causes the changes of their shape. The result is a spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Optical methods allow to register this shift with high precision. It can be used in particular for the measurement of angular velocities in inertial orientation and navigation systems. However, different types of resonators react to the movement on a miscellaneous. In addition, their sensitivity to movement can be changed when changing the geometric parameters of these resonators. This work is devoted to a research of these aspects.

  15. Evaluation and Management of Failed Shoulder Instability Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartucho, António; Moura, Nuno; Sarmento, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Failed shoulder instability surgery is mostly considered to be the recurrence of shoulder dislocation but subluxation, painful or non-reliable shoulder are also reasons for patient dissatisfaction and should be considered in the notion. The authors performed a revision of the literature and online contents on evaluation and management of failed shoulder instability surgery. When we look at the reasons for failure of shoulder instability surgery we point the finger at poor patient selection, technical error and an additional traumatic event. More than 80% of surgical failures, for shoulder instability, are associated with bone loss. Quantification of glenoid bone loss and investigation of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion are determining facts. Adequate imaging studies are determinant to assess labrum and capsular lesions and to rule out associated pathology as rotator cuff tears. CT-scan is the method of choice to diagnose and quantify bone loss. Arthroscopic soft tissue procedures are indicated in patients with minimal bone loss and no contact sports. Open soft tissue procedures should be performed in patients with small bone defects, with hiperlaxity and practicing contact sports. Soft tissue techniques, as postero-inferior capsular plication and remplissage, may be used in patients with less than 25% of glenoid bone loss and Hill-Sachs lesions. Bone block procedures should be used for glenoid larger bone defects in the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion or in the presence of poor soft tissue quality. A tricortical iliac crest graft may be used as a primary procedure or as a salvage procedure after failure of a Bristow or a Latarjet procedure. Less frequently, the surgeon has to address the Hill-Sachs lesion. When a 30% loss of humeral head circumference is present a filling graft should be used. Reasons for failure are multifactorial. In order to address this entity, surgeons must correctly identify the causes and tailor the right solution.

  16. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  17. Reflex muscle contraction in anterior shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D A; Beard, D J; Gill, R H; Eng, B; Carr, A J

    1997-01-01

    Reduced proprioception may contribute to recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Twelve patients with unilateral shoulder instability were investigated for evidence of deficient proprioception with an activated pneumatic cylinder and surface electromyography electrodes; the contralateral normal shoulder was used as a control. The latency between onset of movement and the detection of muscle contraction was used as an index of proprioception. No significant difference in muscle contraction latency was detected between the stable and unstable shoulders, suggesting that there was no significant defect in muscular reflex activity. This study does not support the use proprioception-enhancing physiotherapy in the treatment of posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability.

  18. [Anterior shoulder instabilities: about 73 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Louaste; Bousbaa, Hicham; Cherrad, Taoufik; Wahidi, Mohammed; Amhajji, Larbi; Rachid, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2014, 73 patients (77 shoulders) underwent Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability. This retrospective study aims to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results of this surgical technique. Surgical intervention was performed to treat 69 cases with recurrent dislocation, 5 cases with recurrent painful subluxation and 3 cases with painful shoulder. All patients underwent radiographic evaluation before surgery and during the most recent medical control. According to Rowe score, 73 (94.8%) of 77 shoulders got a good or excellent result. In the longest follow-up, 74 shoulders were free from glenohumeral arthrosis.

  19. Optothermal transport behavior in whispering gallery mode optical cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Soheil [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Armani, Andrea M., E-mail: armani@usc.edu [Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Over the past century, whispering gallery mode optical cavities have enabled numerous advances in science and engineering, such as discoveries in quantum mechanics and non-linear optics, as well as the development of optical gyroscopes and add drop filters. One reason for their widespread appeal is their ability to confine light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. However, when sufficiently large amounts of optical power are coupled into these cavities, they begin to experience optothermal or photothermal behavior, in which the optical energy is converted into heat. Above the optothermal threshold, the resonance behavior is no longer solely defined by electromagnetics. Previous work has primarily focused on the role of the optothermal coefficient of the material in this instability. However, the physics of this optothermal behavior is significantly more complex. In the present work, we develop a predictive theory based on a generalizable analytical expression in combination with a geometry-specific COMSOL Multiphysics finite element method model. The simulation couples the optical and thermal physics components, accounting for geometry variations as well as the temporal and spatial profile of the optical field. To experimentally verify our theoretical model, the optothermal thresholds of a series of silica toroidal resonant cavities are characterized at different wavelengths (visible through near-infrared) and using different device geometries. The silica toroid offers a particularly rigorous case study for the developed optothermal model because of its complex geometrical structure which provides multiple thermal transport paths.

  20. Photoluminescence and lasing in whispering gallery mode glass microspherical resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristić, D. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, Division of Materials Physics, Laboratory for Molecular Physics, Bijenička c. 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials and Sensing Devices, Research unit New Functional Materials, Bijenička c. 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Berneschi, S.; Camerini, M. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Farnesi, D.; Pelli, S. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); Trono, C. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Ferrari, M. [CSMFO Group, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, IFN-CNR, Via alla Cascata 56/C, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Lukowiak, A. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, PAS, ul. Okolna 2, Wroclaw 50-950 (Poland); Dumeige, Y.; Féron, P. [Laboratoire d' Optronique, (CNRS-UMR 6082-Foton), ENSSAT, 6 rue de Kérampont, 22300 Lannion (France); Righini, G.C. [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy); Soria, S., E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Conti, G. Nunzi [IFAC-CNR Istituto di Fisica Applicata, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We report experimental results regarding the development of Er{sup 3+}-doped glass microspherical cavities for the fabrication of compact sources at 1.55 μm. We investigate several different approaches in order to fabricate the microspheres including direct melting of Er{sup 3+}-doped glass powders, synthesis of Er{sup 3+}-doped monolithic microspheres by drawing Er{sup 3+}-doped glass, and coating of silica microspheres with an Er{sup 3+}-doped sol–gel layer. Details of the different fabrication processes are presented together with the photoluminescence characterization in free space configuration of the microspheres and of the glass precursor. We have analyzed the photoluminescence spectra of the whispering gallery modes of the microspheres excited using evanescent coupling and we demonstrate tunable laser action in a wide range of wavelengths around 1.55 μm. As much as 90 μW of laser output power was measured in Er{sup 3+}-doped glass microspheres. - Highlights: • Different approaches in microsphere fabrication and various types of post-processing. • Trimming of photorefractive glass microsphere lasers with UV light. • Peak power record of 90 μW by pumping at 1480 nm.

  1. Whispering galleries and the control of artificial atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2016-04-28

    Quantum computation using artificial-atoms, such as novel superconducting circuits, can be sensitively controlled by external electromagnetic fields. These fields and the self-fields attributable to the coupled artificial-atoms influence the amount of quantum correlation in the system. However, control elements that can operate without complete destruction of the entanglement of the quantum-bits are difficult to engineer. Here we investigate the possibility of using closely-spaced-linear arrays of metallic-elliptical discs as whispering gallery waveguides to control artificial-atoms. The discs confine and guide radiation through the array with small notches etched into their sides that act as scatterers. We focus on π-ring artificial-atoms, which can generate their own spontaneous fluxes. We find that the micro-discs of the waveguides can be excited by terahertz frequency fields to exhibit whispering-modes and that a quantum-phase-gate composed of π-rings can be operated under their influence. Furthermore, we gauge the level of entanglement through the concurrence measure and show that under certain magnetic conditions a series of entanglement sudden-deaths and revivals occur between the two qubits. This is important for understanding the stability and life-time of qubit operations using, for example, a phase gate in a hybrid of quantum technologies composed of control elements and artificial-atoms.

  2. The Sulphate Effect on Lijiaxia Concrete Dam (China Gallery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufen Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concrete degradation is one of the most serious problems for a dam construct during the normal operation, which determines the dam service life. Hence, it is very important to reduce the extent of the dam concrete degradation for the safety of the dam normal operation. Here, Lijiaxia hydroelectric station is taken as an example, and a comprehensive method to assess the sulphate effect on dam gallery is proposed. Eleven samples in total were taken from three difference locations by the drill bore. The microstructural investigations including X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS were conducted to assess the sulphate attack and the degradation degree. Meanwhile, the water chemical analysis was applied to reveal the mechanism of concrete degradation. The experimental and analysis results indicate that the concrete degradation degree varies with the location of the samples. The components of the concrete change and the content of SO3 increase dramatically during degradation. Moreover, the mineral facies of the concrete change correspondingly, with the cement paste substituted by the calcite, calcium vitriol, and gypsum. The reinforcement and precaution measures are suggested based on the results of the degradation assessment.

  3. Understanding the Importance of the Teres Minor for Shoulder Function: Functional Anatomy and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew D; Edwards, Thomas Bradley; Walch, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    Although the teres minor is often overlooked in a normal shoulder, it becomes a key component in maintaining shoulder function when other rotator cuff tendons fail. The teres minor maintains a balanced glenohumeral joint and changes from an insignificant to the most significant external rotator in the presence of major rotator cuff pathology. The presence or absence of the teres minor provides prognostic information on the outcomes of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and tendon transfers. Clinical tests include the Patte test, the Neer dropping sign, the external rotation lag sign, and the Hertel drop sign. Advanced imaging of the teres minor can be used for classification using the Walch system. Understanding the function and pathology surrounding the teres minor is paramount in comprehensive management of the patient with shoulder pathology. Appropriate clinical examination and imaging of the teres minor are important for preoperative stratification and postoperative expectations.

  4. A novel graphical user interface for ultrasound-guided shoulder arthroscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyryshkin, K.; Mousavi, P.; Beek, M.; Pichora, D.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel graphical user interface developed for a navigation system for ultrasound-guided computer-assisted shoulder arthroscopic surgery. The envisioned purpose of the interface is to assist the surgeon in determining the position and orientation of the arthroscopic camera and other surgical tools within the anatomy of the patient. The user interface features real time position tracking of the arthroscopic instruments with an optical tracking system, and visualization of their graphical representations relative to a three-dimensional shoulder surface model of the patient, created from computed tomography images. In addition, the developed graphical interface facilitates fast and user-friendly intra-operative calibration of the arthroscope and the arthroscopic burr, capture and segmentation of ultrasound images, and intra-operative registration. A pilot study simulating the computer-aided shoulder arthroscopic procedure on a shoulder phantom demonstrated the speed, efficiency and ease-of-use of the system.

  5. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...... in repetitive work and 782 referents. Shoulder loads were quantified at task level and measures of exposures were assigned based on task distribution. Symptoms in combination with clinical criteria defined shoulder tendinitis. RESULTS: The prevalence of shoulder tendinitis was higher among exposed workers...

  6. The nerves around the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Alain; Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan

  7. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  8. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Grebe, P.; Kersjes, W.; Runkel, M.; Kirschner, P.; Schild, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.) [de

  9. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: is it predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Vered; Feldman, Roi; Walfisch, Asnat; Toledano, Ronen; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-11-01

    To examine the course and outcome of deliveries occurring in women who previously experienced shoulder dystocia. In addition, recurrent shoulder dystocia risk factors were assessed. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing all singleton deliveries with and without shoulder dystocia in their preceding delivery was conducted. Independent predictors of recurrent shoulder dystocia were investigated using a multiple logistic regression model. Of the 201,422 deliveries included in the analysis, 307 occurred in women with a previous shoulder dystocia (0.015 %). Women with a history of shoulder dystocia were more likely to be older, experienced higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus, polyhydramnios, prolonged second stage, operative delivery and macrosomia (>4000 g) in the following delivery. Previous shoulder dystocia was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia (OR = 6.1, 95 % CI 3.2-11.8, p value dystocia is an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia. Deliveries in women with a history of shoulder dystocia are characterized by higher rates of operative delivery, prolonged second stage of labor and macrosomia.

  10. Shoulder arthroplasty for sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthel, Jean-David; Schoch, Bradley; Sperling, John W; Cofield, Robert; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-05-01

    Polio infection can often lead to orthopedic complications such as arthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, skeletal deformation, and chronic instability of the joints. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes and associated complications of arthroplasty in shoulders with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Seven patients (average age, 70 years) were treated between 1976 and 2013 with shoulder arthroplasty for the sequelae of polio. One patient underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty, 2 had a hemiarthroplasty, and 4 had total shoulder arthroplasty. Average follow-up was 87 months. Outcome measures included pain, range of motion, and postoperative modified Neer ratings. Overall pain scores improved from 5 to 1.6 points (on a 5-point scale) after shoulder arthroplasty. Six shoulders had no or mild pain at latest follow-up, and 6 shoulders rated the result as much better or better. Mean shoulder elevation improved from 72° to 129°, and external rotation improved from 11° to 56°. Average strength in elevation decreased from 3.9 to 3.4 postoperatively, and external rotation strength decreased from 3.9 to 3.3. This, however, did not reach significance. Evidence of muscle imbalance with radiographic instability was found in 4 shoulders that demonstrated superior subluxation, anterior subluxation, or both. This remained asymptomatic. No shoulder required revision or reoperation. Shoulder arthroplasty provides significant pain relief and improved motion in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Muscle weakness may be responsible for postoperative instability, and careful selection of the patient with good upper extremity muscles must be made. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Shoulder Injury Incidence Rates in NASA Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Foy, Millennia; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the astronaut shoulder injury rates began with an operational concern at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training. An astronaut suffered a shoulder injury during an NBL training run and commented that it was possibly due to a hardware issue. During the subsequent investigation, questions arose regarding the rate of shoulder injuries in recent years and over the entire history of the astronaut corps.

  12. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    OpenAIRE

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitat...

  13. Isometric shoulder strength in young swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaine, Sally J; Ginn, Karen A; Fell, James W; Bird, Marie-Louise

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of shoulder pain in young swimmers is high. Shoulder rotation strength and the ratio of internal to external rotation strength have been reported as potential modifiable risk factors associated with shoulder pain. However, relative strength measures in elevated positions, which include flexion and extension, have not been established for the young swimmer. The aim of this study was to establish clinically useful, normative shoulder strength measures and ratios for swimmers (14-20 years) without shoulder pain. Cross-sectional, observational study. Swimmers (N=85) without a recent history of shoulder pain underwent strength testing of shoulder flexion and extension (in 140° abduction); and internal and external rotation (in 90° abduction). Strength tests were performed in supine using a hand-held dynamometer and values normalised to body weight. Descriptive statistics were calculated for strength and strength ratios (flexion:extension and internal:external rotation). Differences between groups (based on gender, history of pain, test and arm dominance) were explored using independent and paired t tests. Normative shoulder strength values and ratios were established for young swimmers. There was a significant difference (pdifferences in strength ratios. Relative strength of the dominant and non-dominant shoulders (except for extension); and for swimmers with and without a history of shoulder pain was not significantly different. A normal shoulder strength profile for the young swimmer has been established which provides a valuable reference for the clinician assessing shoulder strength in this population. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  15. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Sykhorychko; Т.G. Kovalenko; М.А. Sykhorychko

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  16. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Papalia, R.; Tecame, A.; Torre, G.; Narbona, P.; Maffulli, N.; Denaro, V.

    2014-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and ...

  17. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  18. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Can shoulder dystocia be reliably predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jodie M; Catcheside, Britt; Scheil, Wendy

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate factors reported to increase the risk of shoulder dystocia, and to evaluate their predictive value at a population level. The South Australian Pregnancy Outcome Unit's population database from 2005 to 2010 was accessed to determine the occurrence of shoulder dystocia in addition to reported risk factors, including age, parity, self-reported ethnicity, presence of diabetes and infant birth weight. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence interval) of shoulder dystocia was calculated for each risk factor, which were then incorporated into a logistic regression model. Test characteristics for each variable in predicting shoulder dystocia were calculated. As a proportion of all births, the reported rate of shoulder dystocia increased significantly from 0.95% in 2005 to 1.38% in 2010 (P = 0.0002). Using a logistic regression model, induction of labour and infant birth weight greater than both 4000 and 4500 g were identified as significant independent predictors of shoulder dystocia. The value of risk factors alone and when incorporated into the logistic regression model was poorly predictive of the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. While there are a number of factors associated with an increased risk of shoulder dystocia, none are of sufficient sensitivity or positive predictive value to allow their use clinically to reliably and accurately identify the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Shoulder dystocia: risk factors, predictability, and preventability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shobha H; Sokol, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency, striking fear in the hearts of obstetricians both novice and experienced. While outcomes that lead to permanent injury are rare, almost all obstetricians with enough years of practice have participated in a birth with a severe shoulder dystocia and are at least aware of cases that have resulted in significant neurologic injury or even neonatal death. This is despite many years of research trying to understand the risk factors associated with it, all in an attempt primarily to characterize when the risk is high enough to avoid vaginal delivery altogether and prevent a shoulder dystocia, whose attendant morbidities are estimated to be at a rate as high as 16-48%. The study of shoulder dystocia remains challenging due to its generally retrospective nature, as well as dependence on proper identification and documentation. As a result, the prediction of shoulder dystocia remains elusive, and the cost of trying to prevent one by performing a cesarean delivery remains high. While ultimately it is the injury that is the key concern, rather than the shoulder dystocia itself, it is in the presence of an identified shoulder dystocia that occurrence of injury is most common. The majority of shoulder dystocia cases occur without major risk factors. Moreover, even the best antenatal predictors have a low positive predictive value. Shoulder dystocia therefore cannot be reliably predicted, and the only preventative measure is cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shoulder distention arthrography as a treatment modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Sang Bum

    1987-01-01

    18 patients with painful stiff shoulder joint were underwent shoulder distension arthrography as a treatment modality, followed by physical therapy. Range of motion of shoulder joint was evaluated at 1 week and 4 weeks after arthrography. The results were as follows; 1. Arthrographic findings were decreased volume of joint cavity, obliteration of axillary recess, small subscapularis bursa, serrated capsular margin and non-filling of biceps tendon sheath. In 3 cases, rotator cuff tear was found. 2. Range of motion of shoulder joint was improved after distension arthrography. 3. In 3 patients have rotator cuff tear, range of motion was not improved

  4. What Does a Shoulder MRI Cost the Consumer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Robert W; Schick, Cameron; Graves, Christopher M; Duchman, Kyle R; Weinstein, Stuart L

    2017-03-01

    More than 100 MRIs per 1000 inhabitants are performed in the United States annually, more than almost every other country. Little is known regarding the cost of obtaining an MRI and factors associated with differences in cost. By surveying all hospital-owned and independent imaging centers in Iowa, we wished to determine (1) the cost to the consumer of obtaining a noncontrast shoulder MRI, (2) the frequency and magnitude of discounts provided, and (3) factors associated with differences in cost including location (hospital-owned or independent) and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services designation (rural, urban, and critical access). There were 71 hospitals and 26 independent imaging centers that offered MRI services in Iowa. Each site was contacted via telephone and posed a scripted request for the cost of the technical component of a noncontrast shoulder MRI. Radiologists' reading fees were not considered. Statistical analysis was performed using standard methods and significance was defined as a probability less than 0.05. The mean technical component cost to consumers for an MRI was USD 1874 ± USD 694 (range, USD 500-USD 4000). Discounts were offered by 49% of imaging centers, with a mean savings of 21%. Factors associated with increased cost include hospital-owned imaging centers (USD 2062 ± USD 664 versus USD 1400 ± USD 441 at independent imaging centers; p consumer of a shoulder MRI is significantly less at independent imaging centers compared with hospital-owned centers. Referring physicians and healthcare consumers should be aware that there may be substantial price discrepancies between centers that provide advanced imaging services. Level IV, Economic and decision analysis.

  5. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  6. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...

  7. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder

  8. Using Whispering-Gallery-Mode Resonators for Refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2010-01-01

    A method of determining the refractive and absorptive properties of optically transparent materials involves a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis of electromagnetic responses of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator disks made of those materials. The method was conceived especially for use in studying transparent photorefractive materials, for which purpose this method affords unprecedented levels of sensitivity and accuracy. The method is expected to be particularly useful for measuring temporally varying refractive and absorptive properties of photorefractive materials at infrared wavelengths. Still more particularly, the method is expected to be useful for measuring drifts in these properties that are so slow that, heretofore, the properties were assumed to be constant. The basic idea of the method is to attempt to infer values of the photorefractive properties of a material by seeking to match (1) theoretical predictions of the spectral responses (or selected features thereof) of a WGM of known dimensions made of the material with (2) the actual spectral responses (or selected features thereof). Spectral features that are useful for this purpose include resonance frequencies, free spectral ranges (differences between resonance frequencies of adjacently numbered modes), and resonance quality factors (Q values). The method has been demonstrated in several experiments, one of which was performed on a WGM resonator made from a disk of LiNbO3 doped with 5 percent of MgO. The free spectral range of the resonator was approximately equal to 3.42 GHz at wavelengths in the vicinity of 780 nm, the smallest full width at half maximum of a mode was approximately equal to 50 MHz, and the thickness of the resonator in the area of mode localization was 30 microns. In the experiment, laser power of 9 mW was coupled into the resonator with an efficiency of 75 percent, and the laser was scanned over a frequency band 9 GHz wide at a nominal wavelength of

  9. Prevalence and variance of shoulder injuries in elite collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Lee D; Flanigan, David C; Norwig, John; Jost, Patrick; Bradley, James

    2005-08-01

    Shoulder injuries are the fourth most common musculoskeletal injury encountered in American football players. There is little information in the literature on the role of playing position in the type of shoulder injuries seen. There is a high prevalence of shoulder injuries in elite collegiate American football players, with type of injury varying by playing position. Cohort study (prevalence); Level of evidence, 3. A total of 336 elite collegiate American football players were invited to the National Football League Combine for physical testing and medical evaluation. Current and historical data were evaluated for the purpose of this study, and all players underwent radiographic examinations, including plain radiographs and/or magnetic resonance imaging when necessary. All shoulder pathological conditions and shoulder surgical procedures were recorded. Players were categorized by position for the analysis of position-specific trends. Of the players, 50% had a history of shoulder injuries, with a total of 226 shoulder injuries (1.3 injuries per player injured); 56 players (34%) had a total of 73 surgeries. The most common injuries were acromioclavicular separation (41%), anterior instability (20%), rotator cuff injury (12%), clavicle fracture (4%), and posterior instability (4%). The most common surgeries performed were anterior instability reconstruction (48%), Mumford/Weaver-Dunn surgery (15%), posterior instability surgery (10%), and rotator cuff surgery (10%). Shoulder injuries were more common in quarterbacks and defensive backs. Surgery was more common in linebackers or linemen. A history of anterior instability was more common in defensive players, with surgery required 76% of the time. Linemen had more rotator cuff injuries and posterior instability than players in other positions. Shoulder injuries are common injuries in elite collegiate football players, with one-third undergoing surgical procedures. There are definitive trends in the types of injuries

  10. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location. (orig.)

  11. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Meskers CG, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, Janssen TW. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke. Objective: To identify a possible relationship among chronic poststroke shoulder pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose, and shoulder proprioception.

  12. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    pathological injuries, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, shoulder instability and shoulder ... and specific postural characteristics, which will be useful in future studies. ... concentric and eccentric IR and ER shoulder muscle strength in 15 club-level ...

  13. Theorizing How Art Gallery Interventions Impact People With Dementia and Their Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camic, Paul M; Baker, Erin L; Tischler, Victoria

    2016-12-01

    Dementia refers to a variety of diseases that are characterized by cognitive difficulties and an overall decline in daily living skills. Psychologically informed arts and health programs may be particularly beneficial ways of improving the lives of people with dementia and their caregivers. This study sought to better understand how programs at contemporary and traditional art galleries might play a role in the lives of people with dementia. Participants included 12 people with mild-to-moderate dementia, their 12 caregivers and 4 gallery facilitators. Those with dementia and their caregivers were engaged in art viewing followed by art making over an 8-week period. Data, collected through postintervention interviews with participants, field notes and extensive written communication between the facilitators and research team, were analyzed using grounded theory methodology to theorize how gallery-based interventions affect people with dementia and those who care for them. The emerging theory has four primary components: the art gallery is seen as being a physically valued place that provides intellectual stimulation and offers opportunities for social inclusion that can change how dementia is perceived. These components coalesced to create positive emotional and relational effects for those with dementia and caregivers. The resulting theory has potential implications for the use of gallery-based programs in dementia care within public health, healthcare, and museum/art gallery policy and practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Evaluating two infiltration gallery designs for managed aquifer recharge using secondary treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Elise; Toze, Simon; Patterson, Bradley; Fegg, Wolfgang; Shackleton, Mark; Higginson, Simon

    2013-03-15

    As managed aquifer recharge (MAR) becomes increasingly considered for augmenting water-sensitive urban areas, fundamental knowledge of the achievable scale, longevity and maintenance requirements of different options will become paramount. This paper reports on a 39 month pilot scale MAR scheme that infiltrated secondary treated wastewater through unsaturated sand into a limestone and sand aquifer. Two types of infiltration gallery were constructed to compare their hydraulic performance, one using crushed, graded gravel, the other using an engineered leach drain system (Atlantis Leach System(®)). Both galleries received 25 kL of nutrient-rich, secondary treated wastewater per day. The Atlantis gallery successfully infiltrated 17 ML of treated wastewater over three years. The slotted distribution pipe in the gravel gallery became clogged with plant roots after operating for one year. The infiltration capacity of the gravel gallery could not be restored despite high pressure cleaning, thus it was replaced with an Atlantis system. Reduction in the infiltration capacity of the Atlantis system was only observed when inflow was increased by about 3 fold for two months. The performance of the Atlantis system suggests it is superior to the gravel gallery, requiring less maintenance within at least the time frame of this study. The results from a bromide tracer test revealed a minimum transport time of 3.7 days for the recharged water to reach the water table below 9 m of sand and limestone. This set a limit on the time available for attenuation by natural treatment within the unsaturated zone before it recharged groundwater. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Shoulder X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  16. Experiences from a Real-Time Mobile Collaborative Writing System in an Art Gallery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Polli, Anna Maria; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    We present first experiences from Local Area Artworks, a system enabling collaborative art interpretation on-site, deployed during an exhibition in a local art gallery. Through the system, we explore ways to re-connect people to local places by making use of their personal mobile devices...... as interfaces to the shared physical space. With a collocated collaborative writing system in the semi-public space of a gallery, we encourage local art discussions and provide a platform for the public to actively participate in interpretations of individual artworks. In this paper, we focus on the experiences...

  17. The whispering gallery as an optical component in the X-ray region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    The whispering gallery phenomenon in acoustics has been known and studied for more than a century, and the same effect has been observed to take place with waves other than sound waves. In this paper we review the theoretical basis and attractive features of the whispering gallery as a soft x-ray optical component and indicate some of its potential applications. We then describe what may be its most unique capability which, in favorable cases, is to provide a way. to manipulate the phase difference between the s and p polarization components and thus to generate circularly or elliptically polarized soft x-rays

  18. On the Problem of Filtration to an Imperfect Gallery in a Pressureless Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereslavskii, É. N.; Dudina, L. M.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of plane steady-state filtration in a pressureless bed to an imperfect gallery in the presence of evaporation from the flow free surface is considered. To study such type of flow, a mixed boundary-value problem of the theory of analytical functions is formulated and solved with application of the Polubarinova-Kochina method. Based on the model suggested, an algorithm for computing the discharge of the gallery and the ordinate of free surface emergence to the impermeable screen is developed. A detailed hydrodynamic analysis of the influence of all physical parameters of the model on the desired filtration characteristics is given.

  19. Mechanical behavior of galleries in deep clay - Study of a concrete example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, G.; Jehan, R.A.; Bonne, A.; Fernique, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    At important depths such as those envisaged for the construction of a radioactive waste disposal, clay appears to be a material of rather weak resistance. One of the first problems to be studied is the technical feasibility of a disposal facility. The time-dependent and strain-softening behavior of the clay plays a significant role in the long term stability of the lined galleries. The in-situ measurements carried out during the digging of a gallery in Boom clay (Belgium), under a 250 m overburden are presented. The data obtained are analyzed by means of an elastoviscoplastic model including strain softening behavior of the clay

  20. Evaluation and treatment of failed shoulder instability procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anthony G; Gowda, Ashok L; Michael Wiater, J

    2016-09-01

    Management of the unstable shoulder after a failed stabilization procedure can be difficult and challenging. Detailed understanding of the native shoulder anatomy, including its static and dynamic restraints, is necessary for determining the patient's primary pathology. In addition, evaluation of the patient's history, physical exam, and imaging is important for identifying the cause for failure after the initial procedure. Common mistakes include under-appreciation of bony defects, failure to recognize capsular laxity, technical errors, and missed associated pathology. Many potential treatment options exist for revision surgery, including open or arthroscopic Bankart repair, bony augmentation procedures, and management of Hill Sachs defects. The aim of this narrative review is to discuss in-depth the common risk factors for post-surgical failure, components for appropriate evaluation, and the different surgical options available for revision stabilization. Level of evidence Level V.

  1. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 4. Doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-07-07

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts is being discussed in a series of six articles. Doctor-artists in New South Wales and Victoria, and doctors as collectors, donors, gallery supporters and writers in New South Wales, have been discussed in earlier articles. This, the fourth article, deals with doctors as supporters of art galleries and artists in Victoria.

  2. Memorializing the Wars of Religion in Early Seventeenth-Century French Picture Galleries : Protestants and Catholics Painting the Contested Past

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, David

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how Protestant and Catholic elites in early seventeenth-century France memorialized the Wars of Religion in purpose-built picture galleries. Postwar France remained a divided nation, and portrait galleries offered a sectarian memory of the conflict, glorifying party heroes.

  3. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, Angelo, E-mail: angelcoraz@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Orlandi, Davide, E-mail: theabo@libero.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Fabbro, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.fabbro@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Ferrero, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.ferrero@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Messina, Carmelo, E-mail: carmelomessina.md@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, 20097 San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sartoris, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.sartoris@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Perugin Bernardi, Silvia, E-mail: silvy-86-@hotmail.it [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Arcidiacono, Alice, E-mail: a.arcidiacono84@gmail.com [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo, E-mail: silvi.enzo@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Radiologia, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16121 Genova (Italy); and others

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material.

  4. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of the shoulder: How we do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corazza, Angelo; Orlandi, Davide; Fabbro, Emanuele; Ferrero, Giulio; Messina, Carmelo; Sartoris, Riccardo; Perugin Bernardi, Silvia; Arcidiacono, Alice; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows how to apply US technique to image soft tissues around the shoulder. • Readers will learn to recognize normal US anatomy of tendons of the shoulder. • Readers will learn to apply dynamic maneuvers to improve rotator cuff visibility. - Abstract: Ultrasonography (US) is an established and well-accepted modality that can be used to evaluate articular and peri-articular structures around the shoulder. US has been proven to be useful in a wide range of rotator cuff diseases (tendon tears, tendinosis, and bursitis) as well as non-rotator cuff abnormalities (instability problems, synovial joint diseases, and nerve entrapment syndromes). Diagnostic accuracy of shoulder US when evaluating rotator cuff tears can reach 91–100% for partial and full thickness tears detection, respectively, having been reported to be as accurate as magnetic resonance imaging in experienced hands. US is cheap, readily available, capable to provide high-resolution images, and does not use ionizing radiations. In addition, US is the only imaging modality that allows performing dynamic evaluation of musculoskeletal structures, that may help to further increase diagnostic performance. In this setting, a standardized imaging protocol is essential for an exhaustive and efficient examination, also helping reducing the intrinsic dependence from operators of US. Furthermore, knowledge of pitfalls that can be encountered when examining the shoulder may help to avoid erroneous images interpretation. In this article we use detailed anatomic schemes and high-resolution US images to describe the normal US anatomy of soft tissues, articular, and para-articular structures located in and around the shoulder. Short video clips emphasizing the crucial role of dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US examination of these structures are included as supplementary material

  5. Observational study on the pavement performance effects of shoulder rumble strip on shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Coffey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rumble strip implementation has shown a constant increase with its safety benefits. Rumble strips are milled into the roadway shoulder to produce noise and vibrations when driven on. With the milling process, the pavement performance is expected to be negatively impacted by the decreased depth, though not mathematically quantified. Using methods defined by the Long-Term Pavement Performance Program, the severity of the shoulder site’s distresses, with and without shoulder rumble strips, will be quantified. The quantification would permit the design to compensate for the impact. This design compensation allows the implementation of hard shoulder running, the use of shoulder as a travel lane during congestion, and retains the shoulder rumble strip safety instead of removing, as suggested by some proposed projects. While hard shoulder running would not impact specific time periods, the safety benefit of rumble strips could be needed at any time. This study aims to quantify the rumble strip impact to enable the full shoulder strength for hard shoulder running while retaining the safety benefits of rumble strips. Keywords: Rumble strips, Shoulder, Cracking, Pavement performance, Hard shoulder running

  6. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs. Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7-11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:114–120.

  7. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  8. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  9. [Prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-05-20

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most tragic, fatal and unexpected obstetrical events, which is mostly unpredictable and unpreventable. This clinical picture is defined as a delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. Shoulder dystocia occurs when the fetal shoulder impacts on the maternal symphysis or sacral promontory. The incidence of shoulder dystocia is 0.2-0.6%. High perinatal mortality and morbidity is associated with the condition, even when it is managed appropriately. Obstetricians should be aware of the existing risk factors, but should always be alert to the possibility of shoulder dystocia in all labors. Maternal morbidity is also increased, particularly postpartum hemorrhage, rupture of the uterus, injury of the bladder, urethra and the bowels and fourth-degree perineal tears. Complications of the newborn include asphyxia, perinatal mortality, fracture of the clavicula and the humerus. Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most important fetal complications of shoulder dystocia, complicating 4-16% of such deliveries. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence regarding the possible prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia.

  10. Eponymous terms in anterior shoulder stabilization surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, M. P.; van der Linde, J. A.; Wiegerinck, J. I.; Hoornenborg, D.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Deurzen, D. F. P.

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation and its treatment are probably as old as time. Surgical treatment has gained acceptance recently, especially in recurrent cases. Within roughly the last 100 years, numerous treatment strategies have been developed and questions elucidated regarding the entity of shoulder

  11. Diagnosing patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Krogsgaard, M R; Lorenzen, T

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the interobserver agreement of commonly used clinical tests and diagnoses in patients with shoulder pain, and the accuracy of these tests and ultrasonographic findings in comparison with arthroscopic findings. METHODS: Eighty six patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain...

  12. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of

  13. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports; Schultergelenkverletzungen bei Ueberkopfsportarten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2010-05-15

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [German] Ueberkopfsportarten stellen grosse Anforderungen an das Schultergelenk. Schulterbeschwerden bei Ueberkopf- und Wurfsportlern koennen in der Mehrzahl der Faelle auf eine chronische Ueberlastung von Sehnen und Kapsel-Band-Strukturen oder auf die Folgen einer Mikroinstabilitaet und sekundaerer Impingementsyndrome zurueckgefuehrt werden. Wegen ihres grossen Einflusses auf die Therapieentscheidung stellt die Bildgebung bei Athleten mit unklaren Schulterbeschwerden eine Herausforderung dar. Die MR-Arthrographie ist in diesem Zusammenhang als Schnittbildverfahren der ersten Wahl anzusehen, da sie den Nachweis bzw. Ausschluss pathologischer Veraenderungen aller relevanten Gelenkstrukturen mit ausreichender Sicherheit ermoeglicht. Dieser Artikel gibt eine Uebersicht ueber biomechanische und klinische Aspekte sowie MR-arthrographische Befunde der haeufigsten Schultergelenkpathologien bei Ueberkopfsportlern, wie Bizepstendinopathie, Superior-labral-anterior-posterior- (SLAP-)Laesionen, Laesionen der

  14. Whispering gallery mode resonators for frequency metrology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartel, Lukas

    This dissertation describes an investigation into the use of whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators for applications towards frequency reference and metrology. Laser stabilization and the measurement of optical frequencies have enabled myriad technologies of both academic and commercial interest. A technology which seems to span both motivations is optical atomic clocks. These devices are virtually unimaginable without the ultra stable lasers plus frequency measurement and down-conversion afforded by Fabry Perot (FP) cavities and model-locked laser combs, respectively. However, WGM resonators can potentially perform both of these tasks while having the distinct advantages of compactness and simplicity. This work represents progress towards understanding and mitigating the performance limitations of WGM cavities for such applications. A system for laser frequency stabilization to a the cavity via the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) method is described. While the laser lock itself is found to perform at the level of several parts in 1015, a variety of fundamental and technical mechanisms destabilize the WGM frequency itself. Owing to the relatively large thermal expansion coefficients in optical crystals, environmental temperature drifts set the stability limit at time scales greater than the thermal relaxation time of the crystal. Uncompensated, these drifts pull WGM frequencies about 3 orders of magnitude more than they would in an FP cavity. Thus, two temperature compensation schemes are developed. An active scheme measures and stabilizes the mode volume temperature to the level of several nK, reducing the effective temperature coefficient of the resonator to 1.7x10-7 K-1; simulations suggest that the value could eventually be as low as 3.5x10-8 K-1, on par with the aforementioned FP cavities. A second, passive scheme is also described, which employs a heterogeneous resonator structure that capitalizes on the thermo-mechanical properties of one material and the optical

  15. Physiotherapy in frozen shoulder syndrome - literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Korabiusz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The frozen shoulder syndrome is seen as civilization illness. A significant amount of people suffer from it. The frozen shoulder syndrome is one of the most frequent dysfunctions of pectoral girdle. It is seen as a second frequent reason for visits at General Practicioner. There are three stages of this illness, there are a lot of symptoms, but one that occurs most commonly is pain. This illness can be completely curable. Research goal: Goal of this dissertation is a review of literature about available physiotherapy methods used in frozen shoulder syndrome. Conclusion: Kinesiotherapy, kinesiotaping, criotherapy, LASER, Traebert’s currents, iontophoresis, magnetic fields, ultrasounds, massage, manual therapy and combined therapy   are effective physiotherapy methods used in treating frozen shoulder syndrome. Those methods reduce pain indispositions and increase range of movement in shoulder joint.

  16. Shoulder Internal Derangement and Osteoarthritis in a 25-Year-Old Female Softball Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelson, Stacey M; Hogarth, William; Ault, Daniel L; Kettner, Norman W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe osteoarthritis and internal derangement of the shoulder in a collegiate softball player. A 25-year-old female softball athlete presented with a history of chronic right shoulder pain. A thorough clinical examination and multiple imaging studies were performed. Osteoarthritis was demonstrated on radiographs, and ligamentous and rotator cuff tendon tears were displayed on magnetic resonance imaging. The patient's treatment plan included full spine manipulation, cold laser therapy, kinesiotaping, stretching, and neuromuscular reeducation of the right shoulder. The patient reported a decrease in symptoms after 1 month, although treatment was sporadic because of poor patient compliance. Osteoarthritis and internal derangement may occur in overhead-throwing athletes, and correct imaging is needed for timely and accurate diagnoses. Following a timely diagnosis, the young patient in this case had a good recovery with multimodal chiropractic care.

  17. Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the normal shoulder: assessment of the shapes and signals of the superior and inferior labra with abductive movement using an open-type imager.

    OpenAIRE

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsuro; Yabuki, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Mitani, Masahiko; Akaki, Shiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to evaluate the superior and inferior glenoid labra with abductive movement using an open-type MR unit in asymptomatic healthy volunteers. Both fast low angle shot (FLASH) and turbo spin echo (TSE) images were obtained to evaluate the shapes of both the superior and inferior labra, as well as to assess changes in signal at these sites. As the abduction angle was increased, the shape of the superior labrum changed from round or triangular to crescentic and a h...

  18. Labral-Ligamentous Complex of the Shoulder. Evaluation with double oblique axial MR arthrography. Technical Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Taisuke; Saito, Y.; Yodono, H.; Prado, G.L.M.; Miura, H.; Itabashi, Y.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of double oblique axial (DOA) MR arthrography in evaluating labral-ligamentous complex compared with conventional axial (CA) MR arthrography. Material and Methods: MR arthrography of 51 shoulders, subsequently examined with arthroscopy, were retrospectively reviewed. DOA imaging was performed in all 51 shoulders and both DOA and CA imaging in 37 using a 1.5 T unit with gradient recalled-echo T2*-weighted sequences. DOA imaging was performed using perpendicular planes to the long axis of the glenoid fossa obtained by an oblique sagittal scout image. We compared the ability of DOA with that of CA MR arthrography to assess labral injuries and to demonstrate the whole length of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL), which were shown to be intact by arthroscopy. Results: For anterior labral injuries, sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 93% with CA, and 94% and 100% with DOA imaging, respectively. For posterior labral injuries, sensitivity and specificity were 47% and 100% with CA, and 79% and 96% with DOA imaging, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between CA and DOA images, except for the ability to diagnose posterior labral injuries, where DOA imaging had a significant superior sensitivity (p = 0.0327). DOA images also demonstrated the whole length of the intact AIGHL in 10 of 11 shoulders, while CA imaging showed this in only 3 of 11. Conclusion: DOA imaging was equal or better than CA imaging for evaluating the labral-ligamentous complex

  19. Experiences from a Real-Time Mobile Collaborative Writing System in an Art Gallery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Polli, Anna Maria; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    as interfaces to the shared physical space. With a collocated collaborative writing system in the semi-public space of a gallery, we encourage local art discussions and provide a platform for the public to actively participate in interpretations of individual artworks. In this paper, we focus on the experiences...

  20. Lifelong Learning for People Aged 64+ within the Contemporary Art Gallery Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the initial findings from Contemporary Visual Art and Identity Construction--Wellbeing Amongst Older People: a two-year research project that aims to understand how the lives of older people can be improved by examining their use of contemporary visual art in the art gallery and museum. It will focus on data relating to lifelong…

  1. Durability of visitable concrete sewer gallery under the effect of domestic wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Aimed; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Tioua, Tahar; Abimiloud, Youcef; Barluenga, Gonzalo

    2016-07-01

    The durability of concrete structures for the disposal of wastewater depends on their behavior when faced to different aggressions such as mechanics, chemical and biological, causing a deterioration often cementing matrix. The deterioration of recent evacuations wastewater infrastructure, made of reinforced concrete less than 15 years ago, has become an important concern. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation and the factors responsible for the deterioration of the concrete visitable gallery of sewage from the town of Touggourt (south-east of Algeria). Thus, samples from different parts of the gallery were extracted and unaltered samples were selected as a reference. A degraded sample exposed to H2S gas and another sample of the gallery submerged into wastewater were analyzed to characterize the internal and external damage to the gallery as well as the chemical and mineralogical changes. These tests were complemented by a physical and mechanical characterization of the samples. The experimental results showed the strong anisotropy of both internal and external damage.

  2. Integrated optics nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes for picoliter volume refractometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilardi, G.; Beccherelli, R.

    2013-01-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an integrated optics refractometric nano-opto-fluidic sensor based on whispering gallery modes in sapphire microspheres. A measurand fluid is injected in a micromachined reservoir defined in between the microsphere and an optical waveguide. The wavelength shift

  3. The Spiral Gallery: Non-Market Creativity and Belonging in an Australian Country Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitt, Gordon; Gibson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore creative practice in an Australian country town, and in so doing, to unsettle market-orientated interpretations of creativity that privilege the urban. Instead of focusing on creative practice as a means to develop industries, we focus on how creativity is a means to establish a cooperative gallery space that helps to…

  4. Contemporary Adult Education Philosophies and Practices in Art Galleries and Museums in Canada and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clover, Darlene E.; Bell, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Public art galleries and museums have been mandated to become more relevant and useful to the lived experiences of the broad communities they claim to serve. Adult education has long been part of the work of these institutions, although historically the relationship has been uneasy, and they seldom feature in the adult education literature. To…

  5. A study of grandparents and grandchildren as visitors to museums and art galleries in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ela Beaumont

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses one aspect of a major research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of family group visitors to museums and galleries in the UK. Grandparents visiting with their grandchildren are a little understood phenomenon in terms of visitor research and this paper aims to address that balance. The research project focuses on three art galleries and museums in the UK where 44 sets of grandparents were interviewed during the initial stages of the research. Findings have shown a number of interesting facets, some of which are presented in this paper. Grandparents are motivated to visit the museum with their grandchildren in the main because they are seeking an entertaining visit, a day out that is also educational and linked to school projects. They are likely to be the children’s primary carers as parents are out to work and the destination might not link with their own interests but those of the parents. They have social roles to play in their grandchildren’s lives. They often seek activity or workshops in the museum/art gallery that will be of benefit for their grandchildren and encourage them to explore the activities provided. These and other aspects are discussed within the paper. We conclude by suggesting how the findings can be used to inform more sophisticated approaches to ‘family friendly’ initiatives in museums and art galleries.

  6. Retention of external and internal markers by southern pine beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) during gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas J. Rhodes; Jane Leslie Hayes; Chris Steiner

    1998-01-01

    If retained, markers used in mark-release-recapture studies of bark beetle dispersal could provide valuable tools in the determination of post-dispersal fate. Retention of the internal marker rubidium (Rb) and of the external marker fluorescent powder during egg gallery construction, oviposition, and feeding were quantified at intervals from 0 to 96 hours by allowing...

  7. Artistic Sensibility in the Studio and Gallery Model: Revisiting Process and Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the cultivation of artistic sensibility and its impact on the art therapy process and product in a community mental health center. Artistic sensibility embodies the sense of self as an artist through the integration of artistic and aesthetic attributes of self and other. The formation of a gallery to exhibit patient art was…

  8. Fra Bartolomeo della Porta detto Fra Bartolomeo, Adorazione del Bambino, National Gallery, London

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    En artikel om et maleri af Fra Bartolomeo i National Gallery i London udlånt til en udstilling i Museo Tosio Martinengo I Brescia i forbindelse med opdagelsen af et fuldstændigt overensstemmende maleri i dette museums magasiner. Hypotesen var at Bresciabilledet var et værkstedsarbejde lavet på ba...

  9. Micro-CTvlab: A web based virtual gallery of biological specimens using X-ray microtomography (micro-CT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklikoglou, Kleoniki; Faulwetter, Sarah; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Michalakis, Nikitas; Filiopoulou, Irene; Minadakis, Nikos; Panteri, Emmanouela; Perantinos, George; Gougousis, Alexandros; Arvanitidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) has seen an increasing use in biological research areas, such as functional morphology, taxonomy, evolutionary biology and developmental research. Micro-CT is a technology which uses X-rays to create sub-micron resolution images of external and internal features of specimens. These images can then be rendered in a three-dimensional space and used for qualitative and quantitative 3D analyses. However, the online exploration and dissemination of micro-CT datasets are rarely made available to the public due to their large size and a lack of dedicated online platforms for the interactive manipulation of 3D data. Here, the development of a virtual micro-CT laboratory (Micro-CT vlab ) is described, which can be used by everyone who is interested in digitisation methods and biological collections and aims at making the micro-CT data exploration of natural history specimens freely available over the internet. The Micro-CT vlab offers to the user virtual image galleries of various taxa which can be displayed and downloaded through a web application. With a few clicks, accurate, detailed and three-dimensional models of species can be studied and virtually dissected without destroying the actual specimen. The data and functions of the Micro-CT vlab can be accessed either on a normal computer or through a dedicated version for mobile devices.

  10. Effects of Repetitive Shoulder Activity on the Subacromial Space in Manual Wheelchair Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Sheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated (1 the effect of repetitive weight-relief raises (WR and shoulder external rotation (ER on the acromiohumeral distance (AHD among manual wheelchair users (MWUs and (2 the relationship between shoulder pain, subject characteristics, and AHD changes. Twenty-three MWUs underwent ultrasound imaging of the nondominant shoulder in an unloaded baseline position and while holding a WR position before and after the WR/ER tasks. Paired t-tests and Spearman correlational analysis were used to assess differences in the AHD before and after each task and the relationships between pain, subject characteristics, and the AHD measures. A significant reduction in the subacromial space (P<0.01 occurred when subjects performed a WR position compared to baseline. Individuals with increased years of disability had greater AHD percentage narrowing after WR (P=0.008. Increased shoulder pain was associated with AHD percentage narrowing after ER (P≤0.007. The results support clinical practice guidelines that recommend MWUs limit WR to preserve shoulder function. The isolated repetitive shoulder activity did not contribute to the changes of subacromial space in MWUs. The ultrasonographic measurement of the AHD may be a target for identifying future interventions that prevent pain.

  11. Frozen shoulder contracture syndrome - Aetiology, diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    Frozen shoulder is a poorly understood condition that typically involves substantial pain, movement restriction, and considerable morbidity. Although function improves overtime, full and pain free range, may not be restored in everyone. Frozen shoulder is also known as adhesive capsulitis, however the evidence for capsular adhesions is refuted and arguably, this term should be abandoned. The aim of this Masterclass is to synthesise evidence to provide a framework for assessment and management for Frozen Shoulder. Although used in the treatment of this condition, manipulation under anaesthetic has been associated with joint damage and may be no more effective than physiotherapy. Capsular release is another surgical procedure that is supported by expert opinion and published case series, but currently high quality research is not available. Recommendations that supervised neglect is preferable to physiotherapy have been based on a quasi-experimental study associated with a high risk of bias. Physiotherapists in the United Kingdom have developed dedicated care pathways that provide; assessment, referral for imaging, education, health screening, ultrasound guided corticosteroid and hydro-distension injections, embedded within physiotherapy rehabilitation. The entire pathway is provided by physiotherapists and evidence exists to support each stage of the pathway. Substantial on-going research is required to better understand; epidemiology, patho-aetiology, assessment, best management, health economics, patient satisfaction and if possible prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Shoulder disability questionnaires: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, F; Mace, Y; Lefevre-Colau, M M

    2005-07-01

    To identify all available shoulder disability questionnaires designed to measure physical functioning and to examine those with satisfactory clinimetric quality. We used the Medline database and the "Guide des outils de mesure de l'évaluation en médecine physique et de réadaptation" textbook to search for questionnaires. Analysis took into account the development methodology, clinimetric quality of the instruments and frequency of their utilization. We classified the instruments according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Thirty-eight instruments have been developed to measure disease-, shoulder- or upper extremity-specific outcome. Four scales assess upper-extremity disability and 3 others shoulder disability. We found 6 scales evaluating disability and shoulder pain, 7 scales measuring the quality of life in patients with various conditions of the shoulder, 14 scales combining objective and subjective measures, 2 pain scales and 2 unclassified scales. Older instruments developed before the advent of modern measurement development methodology usually combine objective and subjective measures. Recent instruments were designed with appropriate methodology. Most are self-administered questionnaires. Numerous shoulder outcome measure instruments are available. There is no "gold standard" for assessing shoulder function outcome in the general population.

  14. Effects of hook plate on shoulder function after treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hong; Dong, Qi-Rong; Zhou, Rong-Kui; Zhen, Hua-Qing; Jiao, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Internal fixation with hook plate has been used to treat acromioclavicular joint dislocation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of its use on shoulder function, to further analyze the contributing factors, and provide a basis for selection and design of improved internal fixation treatment of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation in the future. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated with a hook plate for acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from January 2010 to February 2013. There were 33 cases in total, including 25 males and 8 females, with mean age of 48.27 ± 8.7 years. There were 29 cases of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular dislocation, 4 cases of type V. The Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system was used to evaluate the shoulder function recovery status after surgery. Anteroposterior shoulder X-ray was used to assess the position of the hook plate, status of acromioclavicular joint reduction and the occurrence of postoperative complications. According to the Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system, the average scores were 78 ± 6 points 8 to 12 months after the surgery and before the removal of the hook plate, the average scores were 89 ± 5 minutes two months after the removal of hook plate. Postoperative X-ray imaging showed osteolysis in 10 cases (30.3%), osteoarthritis in six cases (18.1%), osteolysis associated with osteoarthritis in four cases(12.1%), and steel hook broken in one case (3%). The use of hook plate on open reduction and internal fixation of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation had little adverse effect on shoulder function and is an effective method for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Osteoarthritis and osteolysis are the two common complications after hook plate use, which are associated with the impairment of shoulder function. Shoulder function will be improved after removal of the hook plate.

  15. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  16. Patterns of age-associated degeneration differ in shoulder muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam eRaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC. The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography in subjects without (N=294 and with (N=109 RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  17. Ultrasonography of the shoulder: pitfalls and variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, L.; Finlay, K.; Popowich, T.; Jurriaans, E.

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) of the shoulder, particularly the evaluation of the rotator cuff, is the most common examination of the musculoskeletal system performed in most practices. Despite this, it remains one of the most difficult examinations to learn. There are many pitfalls and errors that can occur initially, but once mastered, US of the rotator cuff is one of the best methods available for diagnosing rotator cuff disease. The literature reports a 91%-95% sensitivity and close to 90% specificity and accuracy in the assessment of both partial and full thickness tears. This compares favourably with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where a more recent study reported an 84% sensitivity, 97% specificity and an accuracy of 93% for combined partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Advantages of US include low cost, easy access, high degree of accuracy in expert hands, ease of comparison with the opposite side, dynamic real-time examination, ability to focus on the exact site of the patient's pain and graded compression availability. It is for these reasons that we hope to outline the various pitfalls and common errors that can occur during the examination in a systematic fashion. It must also be pointed out that computed tomographic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography remain the investigations of choice for assessing labral disorders. (author)

  18. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  19. CT diagnosis with shoulder joint injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.; Hoerl, M.; Schindler, G.

    1986-01-01

    With recidivistic shoulder luxation the CT examination makes possible the objective comprehension of predisposable anatomical evidence as well as the proof of posttraumatic changes. Changes in the acetabular margin (Bankart lesion) as well as in the humerus head (Hills-Sachs lesion) are depicted with recidivistic shoulder luxation as the morphological substrate of the posttraumatic damage. Individual examinations of 83 patients with recidivistic shoulder luxations showed that the mentioned changes often appear in combinations. With the CT examination the Hills-Sachs lesion can be comprehended and its location, extension and depth can be judged as well. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome; Diagnostik des Schulterimpingementsyndroms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [Deutsch] Grundlage des Impingementsyndroms ist eine Kompression des Supraspinatus am akromioklavikularen Bogen vor allem bei Flexion

  1. Kinematic analysis of dynamic shoulder motion in patients with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young W; Pinto, Vivek J; Yoon, Jangwhon; Frankle, Mark A; Dunning, Page E; Sheikhzadeh, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) has been used to treat patients with irreparable rotator cuff dysfunction. Despite the proven clinical efficacy, there is minimal information regarding the underlying changes to the shoulder kinematics associated with this construct. Therefore, we sought to examine the kinematics of dynamic shoulder motion in patients with well-functioning rTSA. We tested 12 healthy subjects and 17 patients with rTSA. All rTSA patients were able to elevate their arms to at least 90° and received the implant as the primary arthroplasty at least 6 months before testing. On average, the rTSA patients elevated their arms to 112° ± 12° (mean ± SD) and reported an American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons outcome score of 90.6 ± 6.3. A 3-dimensional electromagnetic motion capture device was used to detect the dynamic motion of the trunk, scapula, and humerus during bilateral active shoulder elevation along the sagittal, scapular, and coronal planes. In both healthy and rTSA shoulders, the majority of the humeral-thoracic motion was provided by the glenohumeral motion. Therefore, the ratio of glenohumeral to scapulothoracic (ST) motion was always greater than 1.62 during elevation along the scapular plane. In comparison to healthy subjects, however, the contribution of ST motion to overall shoulder motion was significantly increased in the rTSA shoulders. This increased contribution was noted in all planes of shoulder elevation and was maintained when weights were attached to the arm. Kinematics of the rTSA shoulders are significantly altered, and more ST motion is used to achieve shoulder elevation. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Outcomes of an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty with a contralateral reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ryan M; Padegimas, Eric M; Abboud, Joseph A; Getz, Charles L; Lazarus, Mark D; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R; Horneff, John G

    2018-06-01

    It is common for patients to require staged bilateral shoulder arthroplasties. There is a unique cohort of patients who require an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and a contralateral reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). This study compared the outcomes of patients with a TSA in 1 shoulder and an RSA in the contralateral shoulder. Our institutional database was queried to identify all patients with a TSA and a contralateral RSA. Data collection included patient demographics, preoperative and latest follow-up shoulder range of motion, radiographic analysis, and postoperative complications. Identified patients were assessed at follow-up visits or contacted by phone for functional outcome scores. Nineteen patients met our inclusion/exclusion criteria. There was statistically significant greater internal rotation in the TSA shoulder (P= .044) but no significant difference in forward elevation (P = .573) or external rotation (P= .368). There was no radiographic evidence of humeral or glenoid component loosening of any arthroplasty implants. There were no significant differences between TSA and RSA shoulders for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment (P= .381), Simple Shoulder Test (P = .352), Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation (P = .709), and visual analog scale satisfaction (P= .448) or pain scores (P= .305). Thirteen patients (68.4%) preferred the RSA side, 1 patient (5.3%; z = 4.04, P < .001) patient preferred the TSA side, and 5 patients expressed no preference. Despite known limitations and differences between TSA and RSA designs, patients who have received both implants are highly satisfied with both. The only parameter in which the TSA had superior outcomes was internal rotation. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Do Current Recommendations for Upper Instrumented Vertebra Predict Shoulder Imbalance? An Attempted Validation of Level Selection for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, Benjamin T; Cheung, Zoe B; Shifflett, Grant D; Iyer, Sravisht; Derman, Peter B; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2015-10-01

    Shoulder balance for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients is associated with patient satisfaction and self-image. However, few validated systems exist for selecting the upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) post-surgical shoulder balance. The purpose is to examine the existing UIV selection criteria and correlate with post-surgical shoulder balance in AIS patients. Patients who underwent spinal fusion at age 10-18 years for AIS over a 6-year period were reviewed. All patients with a minimum of 1-year radiographic follow-up were included. Imbalance was determined to be radiographic shoulder height |RSH| ≥ 15 mm at latest follow-up. Three UIV selection methods were considered: Lenke, Ilharreborde, and Trobisch. A recommended UIV was determined using each method from pre-surgical radiographs. The recommended UIV for each method was compared to the actual UIV instrumented for all three methods; concordance between these levels was defined as "Correct" UIV selection, and discordance was defined as "Incorrect" selection. One hundred seventy-one patients were included with 2.3 ± 1.1 year follow-up. For all methods, "Correct" UIV selection resulted in more shoulder imbalance than "Incorrect" UIV selection. Overall shoulder imbalance incidence was improved from 31.0% (53/171) to 15.2% (26/171). New shoulder imbalance incidence for patients with previously level shoulders was 8.8%. We could not identify a set of UIV selection criteria that accurately predicted post-surgical shoulder balance. Further validated measures are needed in this area. The complexity of proximal thoracic curve correction is underscored in a case example, where shoulder imbalance occurred despite "Correct" UIV selection by all methods.

  4. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity in the Mont Terri gallery G-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Adler, A.; Nicollin, F.; Gibert, D.; Nussbaum, C.

    2012-04-01

    The characteristics of opalinus clay have been studied in the last years for its capacity to retain radionuclide transport as a low permeable rock. This formation presents thereby suitable properties for hosting repository sites of radioactive waste. The Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland) has been excavated in opalinus clay layer in order to develop experiences improving the knowledge on the physico-chemical properties of the rock. The study of electrical properties furnishes information on the rock structure, its anisotropy and the changes of these properties with time (Nicollin et al., 2010 ; Thovert et al., 2011). Here the three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity aims at monitoring the temporal evolution of the excavation damaged zone. Three rings of electrodes have been set-up around the gallery and voltage is measured between two electrodes while a current is injected between two others (Gibert et al., 2006). Measurements have been achieved from July 2004 until April 2008 before, during and after the excavation of the gallery 04. In this study we develop a computational approach to reconstruct three dimensional images of the resistivity in the vicinity of the electrodes. A finite element model is used to represent the complex geometry of the gallery. The measurements inferred from a given resistivity distribution are estimated using the software EIDORS (Adler and Lionheart, 2006), this constitutes the forward problem. The reconstruction of the media resistivity is then implemented by fitting the estimated to the measured data, via the resolution of an inverse problem. The parameters of this inverse problem are defined by mapping the forward problem elements into a coarser mesh. This allows to reduce drastically the number of unknowns and so increases the robustness of the inversion. The inversion is executed with the conjugate gradient method regularised by an analysis of the Jacobian singular values. The results show an

  5. Handball load and shoulder injury rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, R.O.; Attermann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge of injury patterns, an essential step towards injury prevention, is lacking in youth handball. Aim To investigate if an increase in handball load is associated with increased shoulder injury rates compared with a minor increase or decrease, and if an association is influenced...... by scapular control, isometric shoulder strength or glenohumeral range of motion (ROM). Methods 679 players (14-18 years) provided weekly reports on shoulder injury and handball load (training and competition hours) over 31 weeks using the SMS, phone and medical examination system. Handball load in a given...... week was categorised into (1) 60% relative to the weekly average amount of handball load the preceding 4 weeks. Assessment of shoulder isometric rotational and abduction strength, ROM and scapular control...

  6. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  7. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  9. Pseudotumors of the shoulder invited review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Suzanne E. [Department of Radiology, Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Parkville 3050, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Diagnostic, Pediatric, and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburg Str. 10, 3005 Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: andersonsembach@yahoo.com.au; Johnston, James O. [Department of Radiology, Bone Section, University of California, San Francisco (United States); Tumour Oncology, Orthopedic Surgery, Kaiser Health, Bay Area, San Francisco (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiology, Bone Section, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper discusses the main types of MRI pseudotumors in and around the shoulder region. Some unusual types of pseudotumor will also be mentioned. Suggestions on how to improve awareness and diagnosis are also given.

  10. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  11. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients' ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients' reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons. PMID:25883820

  12. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...

  13. Digital subtraction arthrography of the hips and of the shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, B.K.; Schedel, J.; Fink, U.; Hansen, M.; Hilbertz, T.; Hagena, F.W.

    1991-01-01

    In a study on 60 patients, it could be shown that very good results can be achieved in the region of the shoulder joint with the use of the digital subtraction technique and of digital image intensifier radiography. A further possibility of using the digital subtraction technique for proving endoprosthesis loosenings of the hip demonstrated its importance after a short time and has become a routine method in the meantime. These two examination techniques are displayed methodologically and their clinical possibilities of use are assessed in this contribution. (orig.)

  14. MRI of the rotator interval of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.C.; Guy, S.; Connell, D.; Saifuddin, A.; Lambert, S.

    2007-01-01

    The rotator interval of the shoulder joint is located between the distal edges of the supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons and contains the insertions of the coracohumeral and superior glenohumeral ligaments. These structures form a complex pulley system that stabilizes the long head of the biceps tendon as it enters the bicipital groove of the humeral head. The rotator interval is the site of a variety of pathological processes including biceps tendon lesions, adhesive capsulitis and anterosuperior internal impingement. This article describes the anatomy, function and pathology of the rotator interval using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  15. High Fidelity In Situ Shoulder Dystocia Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pelikan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Resident physicians, emergency department (ED staff Introduction: Precipitous deliveries are high acuity, low occurrence in most emergency departments. Shoulder dystocia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of labor that can be relieved by specific maneuvers that must be implemented in a timely manner. This simulation is designed to educate resident learners on the critical management steps in a shoulder dystocia presenting to the emergency department. A special aspect of this simulation is the unique utilization of the “Noelle” model with an instructing physician at bedside maneuvering the fetus through the stations of labor and providing subtle adjustments to fetal positioning not possible though a mechanized model. A literature search of “shoulder dystocia simulation” consists primarily of obstetrics and mid-wife journals, many of which utilize various mannequin models. None of the reviewed articles utilized a bedside provider maneuvering the fetus with the Noelle model, making this method unique. While the Noelle model is equipped with a remote-controlled motor that automatically rotates and delivers the baby either to the head or to the shoulders and can produce a turtle sign and which will prevent delivery of the baby until signaled to do so by the instructor, using the bedside instructor method allows this simulation to be reproduced with less mechanistically advanced and lower cost models.1-5 Objectives: At the end of this simulation, learners will: 1 Recognize impending delivery and mobilize appropriate resources (ie, both obstetrics [OB] and NICU/pediatrics; 2 Identify risk factors for shoulder dystocia based on history and physical; 3 Recognize shoulder dystocia during delivery; 4 Demonstrate maneuvers to relieve shoulder dystocia; 5 Communicate with team members and nursing staff during resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: High-fidelity simulation. Topics: High fidelity, in situ, Noelle model

  16. Little Leaguer's shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, J.L.; Hollingsworth, C.L.; Bisset, G.S. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Squire, D.L. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-06-01

    A case of Little Leaguer's shoulder in a skeletally immature patient is described with a review of the English literature. This entity manifests as widening of the proximal humeral physis and is well known to our orthopedic colleagues. To our knowledge, however, there is little in the current radiologic literature describing Little Leaguer's shoulder. We describe such a case. (orig.)

  17. Severe refractory hypertension during shoulder arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R O Abrons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of epinephrine-containing saline irrigating solutions during arthroscopic shoulder surgery gained popularity after it was reported that the addition of epinephrine reduced bleeding and improved visualization without adverse cardiovascular effects. We share a case of a patient undergoing shoulder arthroscopy who received a standard intra-articular infusion of epinephrine-containing normal saline (1 mcg/mL and experienced severe hemodynamic consequences.

  18. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots compromised by disk herniation: sagittal shoulder sign for the preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hee Kyung; Ryu, Jeong Ah [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Choon-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kangwon (Korea)

    2008-03-15

    The objective was to determine the importance of the ''sagittal shoulder sign'' on magnetic resonance (MR) images for the diagnosis of conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots (CLNR) that are compromised by herniated disks. Magnetic resonance images of 11 patients (6 men and 5 women; age range, 25-71 years; average age, 48.7 years) with surgically proven CLNR, which was compromised by herniated disks, were retrospectively evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists. MR images were evaluated for the presence or absence of the sagittal shoulder sign - a vertical structure connecting two consecutive nerve roots and overlying disk on the sagittal MR images. The radiologists noted the type of accompanying disk herniation and bony spinal canal changes, as well as other characteristic MR features of CLNR, the common passage of two consecutive nerve roots through the neural foramen on axial MR images. The sagittal shoulder sign was identified with a mean frequency of 90.9% by the two observers (in 10 of 11 patients). The common passage of two consecutive nerve roots through the neural foramen on axial MR images was identified with a mean frequency of 59.1% (in 7 and 6 out of 11 patients, by observers 1 and 2, respectively). Good interobserver agreement for the sagittal shoulder sign was present (k = 0.621, p < 0.05). Observation of the sagittal shoulder sign may prove helpful for diagnosing CLNR in patients with disk herniation. In particular, this sign appears to be useful when there is no evidence of CLNR on axial MR images. (orig.)

  19. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, R; Tecame, A; Torre, G; Narbona, P; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic.

  20. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Zoech, C.

    2004-01-01

    The shoulder joint has an important influence on arm- and handfunction. Therefore, activities of daily living, working and leisure time can be negatively influenced by diseases of the shoulder joint. Problems of the shoulder joint can be induced by muscular dysbalance and poor body posture. There is a strong relationship between shoulder function and body posture. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the shoulder joint aims at improving the local dysfunction of the shoulder joint as well as at improving function and social participation. Antiinflammatory and pain medication, exercise, occupational, electro-, ultrasound and shock wave therapy, massage, thermotherapy and pulsed electromagnetic fields are used as conservative treatments. Exercise therapy aims at improving muscular performance, joint mobility and body posture. Occupational therapy aims at improving functional movements for daily living and work. Electrotherapy is primarily used to relieve pain. Shock wave and ultrasound therapy proved to be an effective treatment for patients with calcific tendinitis. The subacromial impingement syndrome can be effectively treated by conservative therapy. (orig.) [de

  1. Women performing repetitive work: is there a difference in the prevalence of shoulder pain and pathology in supermarket cashiers compared to the general female population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Valerio; Bonora, Cristina; Boria, Paola; Meroni, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    Shoulder disorders in the occupational environment have been widely studied, but the quality of research and methodology applied vary. Little has been done to ascertain whether shoulder pain in female repetitive workers is due to any verifiable pathology, or to compare findings with the general population. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the prevalence of self-reported shoulder pain in a group of female supermarket cashiers and in the general female population using a standardized questionnaire. Shoulder pain prevalence was then compared to imaging findings in order to assess specific and non-specific pain prevalence. 196 cashiers and 302 controls filled in a standardized shoulder questionnaire and underwent an imaging examination of a shoulder. The prevalence of shoulder pain was significantly higher in the group of cashiers (46.4%) than in the general population (25.5%) (OR = 1.821; 95% CI: 1.426-2.325). Specific pain prevalence was higher among the controls (19.5%) than among the cashiers (13.2%). The more frequent reports of shoulder pain in the supermarket cashiers are not correlated with a higher prevalence of imaging abnormalities. The causes of these more frequent complaints should be probably sought in the psycho-social and occupational environment.

  2. From the galleries to the clinic: applying art museum lessons to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexa; Grohe, Michelle; Khoshbin, Shahram; Katz, Joel T

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, medical educators integrate art-viewing into curricular interventions that teach clinical observation-often with local art museum educators. How can cross-disciplinary collaborators explicitly connect the skills learned in the art museum with those used at the bedside? One approach is for educators to align their pedagogical approach using similar teaching methods in the separate contexts of the galleries and the clinic. We describe two linked pedagogical exercises--Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) in the museum galleries and observation at the bedside--from "Training the Eye: Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis," an elective museum-based course at Harvard Medical School. It is our opinion that while strategic interactions with the visual arts can improve skills, it is essential for students to apply them in a clinical context with faculty support-requiring educators across disciplines to learn from one another.

  3. Preparation of the PRACLAY demonstration and confirmation experiments: construction of the PRACLAY gallery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastiaens, W.

    2009-01-01

    The PRACLAY demonstration and confirmation experiments contribute to the Belgian research, development and demonstration programme to assess the safety and feasibility of geological disposal of radioactive waste in Boom Clay. Within this programme, the large scale PRACLAY heater experiment aims to verify that Boom Clay is suitable to host heat emitting radioactive waste. A 35 m long section of an experimental gallery in the underground research facility HADES (at 225 m depth) will be heated up to 95 degrees Celsius during ten years. The heater experiment focuses on the response of the host rock to the thermal load. The figure below shows the experimental lay-out. In 2007, an important milestone was reached with the realisation of the PRACLAY gallery (45 m long, external diameter 2.5 m)

  4. MR-guided MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratting, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Pretterklieber, M.; Kontaxis, G.; Rand, T.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR-guided technique for joint puncture in MR arthrography of the shoulder and to confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip by visualization of the flow of contrast media into the joint. Materials and methods: Three unfixed human shoulder joint specimens were examined on a 1.0 T unit. The optimal point of entrance and depth for joint puncture were estimated by means of MR-compatible markers on the skin. Needle orientation and localization of the needle tip (MR-compatible 22-gauge needle) in the shoulder joint were monitored by rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences in two orthogonal planes. To confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip, diluted gadolinium-DTPA was administered via a long connecting tube and the flow of contrast media into the joint was viewed directly on an LCD screen using real-time MR imaging (local look technique). Results: The MR-compatible markers on the skin allowed determination of the optimal point of entrance and estimation of the depth for joint puncture. Passive visualization of the MR-compatible needle due to spin dephasing and signal loss provided adequate localization of the intra-articular needle tip position in all specimens, although significant artefacts were present on rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences with an increase in width of the apparent needle shaft. Real-time MR imaging of the flow of contrast media was possible using the local look technique and the LCD screen of the MR unit and allowed confirmation of the intracapsular position. Conclusion: MR-guided joint puncture and real-time MR-assisted contrast media application results in improved MR arthrography and may replace conventional fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.) [de

  5. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...

  6. Advanced sensing with micro-optical whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Righini, Giancarlo C

    2017-01-01

    This Spotlight examines an increasingly popular class of optical sensors that comprises microresonators based on the propagation of whispering gallery modes (WGMs). Several 2D and 3D WGM microresonators have already proved their capabilities as general-purpose sensors (especially as biosensors), and they have potential applications outside of research laboratories. Topics include the fundamentals of WGM propagation, types and characterization of microresonators, microfabrication issues, categories of sensing (physical, chemical, and biological), and state of the art sensors.

  7. Natural regeneration in several environments of the Capetinga gallery forest at Agua Limpa Farm (DF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine Maria Felfili

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Capetinga gallery forest is located at Agua Limpa Farm, in the Federal District, Brazil. The floristic compositionand structure of the natural regeneration at the edges and in the interior of the gallery forest at the watershed of the Capetinga stream was studied to detect floristic and structural patterns related to the forest environments. Thirty (5x5m plots were placed in each environment to sample saplings, individuals from 1,0m high with diameter at the steam base under 5,0cm. Within these plots, (2x2m sub-plots were allocated to sample seedlings, individuals lower than 1,0m height. The sampled plots were distant to the stream bank to minimize the humidity effect. Shannon & Wiener diversity index varied from 2,86 (seedlings at the edges to 3,51 (saplings at the interior and it was higher in the interior for both categories. Sørensen s similarity index varied from 0.474 for seedlings (comparingedges with interior to 0.735 (seedlings and saplings at the edges. Czekanowski indices were low and reflected the high differentiationin structure from plot to plot in the same gallery forest. TWINSPAN classification suggested two distinct communities for saplings forboth conditions, formed by species accordingly to their requirements for light and water. No differentiation was detected for seedlingsbetween the environments indicating a low response of plants at an early stage to the environmental conditions within the forest. TheCapetinga gallery forest suffered disturbances by fire and the small variations in species composition and vegetation structurebetween environments suggests that most of the natural regeneration is tolerant to light.

  8. Silica hollow bottle resonators for use as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Razvan-Ionut; Bui, Khoa V.; Rosenberger, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    A simple three-step method for making silica hollow bottle resonators (HBRs) was developed. This procedure is advantageous because it uses commercially available materials, is cost effective, and is easy to implement. Additionally, the use of these HBRs as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors is demonstrated by preliminary absorption sensing results in the near infrared (1580-1660 nm) using a trace gas (CH4) in air at atmospheric pressure and a dye (SDA2072) in methanol solution.

  9. Silica hollow bottle resonators for use as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoian, Razvan-Ionut; Bui, Khoa V; Rosenberger, A T

    2015-01-01

    A simple three-step method for making silica hollow bottle resonators (HBRs) was developed. This procedure is advantageous because it uses commercially available materials, is cost effective, and is easy to implement. Additionally, the use of these HBRs as whispering gallery mode based chemical sensors is demonstrated by preliminary absorption sensing results in the near infrared (1580–1660 nm) using a trace gas (CH 4 ) in air at atmospheric pressure and a dye (SDA2072) in methanol solution. (paper)

  10. All-polymer photonic sensing platform based on whispering-gallery mode microgoblet lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Wienhold, T.; Kraemmer, S.; Wondimu, S.F.; Siegle, T.; Bog, U.; Weinzierl, U.; Schmidt, S.; Becker, H.; Kalt, H.; Mappes, T.; Koeber, S.; Koos, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an all-polymer photonic sensing platform based on whispering-gallery mode microgoblet lasers integrated into a microfluidic chip. The chip is entirely made from polymers, enabling the use of the devices as low-cost disposables. The microgoblet cavities feature quality factors exceeding 105 and are fabricated from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using spin-coating, mask-based optical lithography, wet chemical etching, and thermal reflow. In contrast to silica-based microtoroid reso...

  11. Usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Hong, Suk Ju; Suh, San Il; Yong, Hwan Suk; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Park, Cheol Min; Suh, Won Hyuck; Kim, Myung Gyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder to locate the path of access and to control the correct placement of the needle into the shoulder. Fifteen patients with suspicion of shoulder pathology were included in this study. Patients were laid in supine positions with the arm extended and slightly abducted, the palm of the hand facing upward. A sonographic unit with a high resolution transducer with 7.5 MHz linear array was used. Axial images in the anterior aspect of the shoulder were obtained to localize the coracoid process and the anteromedical portion of the humerus. Using an aseptic technique, a 21-guage needle was advanced into the shoulder joint under ultrasonographic guidance. When the needle made contract with the articular cartilage of the humeral head, the needle was tiled to position is point in the articular cavity. Solution of 0.1 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine in 25 ml of normal saline was prepared and 12-16 ml was injected into the joint cavity. The intra-articular position of the needle and the compete distension of the shoulder joint were again confirmed by sonography. The needle was accurately placed in 14 out of 15 patients without damage to neighboring structures. It took 10 to 15 minutes to complete the procedure in 14 patients. No side effects attributable to gadopentetate dimeglumine were found. Sono-guided needle puncture for the shoulder MR arthrography can be a substitutable method for fluoroscopic guidance, with easy access, advantages of lacking radiation hazard and eliminating the need for iodized contrast agents.

  12. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  13. Correlation of findings in clinical and high resolution ultrasonography examinations of the painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Micheroli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: High resolution ultrasonography is a non-painful and non-invasive imaging technique which is useful for the assessment of shoulder pain causes, as clinical examination often does not allow an exact diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the fi ndings of clinical examination and high resolution ultrasonography in patients presenting with painful shoulder. Methods: Non-interventional observational study of 100 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. Exclusion criteria were shoulder fractures, prior shoulder joint surgery and shoulder injections in the past month. The physicians performing the most common clinical shoulder examinations were blinded to the results of the high resolution ultrasonography and vice versa. Results: In order to detect pathology of the m. supraspinatus tendon, the Hawkins and Kennedy impingement test showed the highest sensitivity (0.86 whereas the Jobe supraspinatus test showed the highest specifi city (0.55. To identify m. subscapularis tendon pathology the Gerber lift off test showed a sensitivity of 1, whereas the belly press test showed the higher specifi city (0.72. The infraspinatus test showed a high sensitivity (0.90 and specifi city (0.74. All AC tests (painful arc IIa, AC joint tendernessb, cross body adduction stress testc showed high specifi cities (a0.96, b0.99, c 0.96. Evaluating the long biceps tendon, the palm up test showed the highest sensitivity (0.47 and the Yergason test the highest specifi city (0.88. Conclusion: Knowledge of sensitivity and specifi city of various clinical tests is important for the interpretation of clinical examination test results. High resolution ultrasonography is needed in most cases to establish a clear diagnosis.

  14. COMPARISON BETWEEN ULTRASONOGRAPHY RESULTS AND RESULTS OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN SHOULDER PATHOLOGY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmela Filipović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The common pathological condition of the shoulder joint is rotator cuff diseases. Patient, 68 years, had pain in the shoulder with limited joint mobility. After clinical examination, blood tests (SE >100 nmol/L, CSF normal, hypergamma- globulinemia and radiographic examination (bone dilution with deformities of the humeral head, a solitary plasmocytoma was suspected. This diagnosis was excluded after biopsy. Patient was referred to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the shoulder, so ultrasonographic (US examination was performed. Our case study points to comparability between US and MRI results regarding tendinitis of muscles in the rotator cuff. By applying both diagnostic methods, calcifications within muscle tendons were evident. Sonography is faster, cheaper, more accessible and readily available method that certainly is a valuable tool for clinicians when it comes to rotator cuff lesions.

  15. Little Leaguer's shoulder (proximal humeral epiphysiolysis): MRI findings in four boys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obembe, Olufolajimi O.; Gaskin, Cree M.; Anderson, Mark W.; Taffoni, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a common problem among adolescent athletes. A possible cause of such pain that can be diagnosed on MRI is a stress injury to the proximal humerus known as Little Leaguer's shoulder (proximal humeral epiphysiolysis). Our objective was to describe the MRI appearance of Little Leaguer's shoulder. Four patients (all boys; age range 11-15 years; median 13 years) with clinical, plain radiographic, and MR imaging findings of Little Leaguer's shoulder were studied retrospectively. MRI demonstrated focal physeal widening in all four boys with extension of physeal signal intensity into the metaphysis on T1-weighted and gradient echo coronal and sagittal sequences. T2-weighted sequences were of limited use in demonstrating the physeal widening, which is critical to the diagnosis. Abnormal high T2-signal intensity was seen in the metaphysis adjacent to the focal physeal widening in all the boys. Focal extension of normal physeal T1-weighted and gradient echo signal intensity into the adjacent metaphysis is a sign of stress injury in the proximal humeral physis (Little Leaguer's shoulder). Children should suspend the offending sport to allow healing. (orig.)

  16. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current management and prognostic factors in physiotherapy practice for patients with shoulder pain: design of a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, Yasmaine H J M; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Thoomes-de Graaf, Marloes; Duijn, Edwin; Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; van den Borne, Maaike P J; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Tetteroo, Eric; Beumer, Annechien; van Broekhoven, Joost B; Heijmans, Marcel

    2013-02-11

    Shoulder pain is disabling and has a considerable socio-economic impact. Over 50% of patients presenting in primary care still have symptoms after 6 months; moreover, prognostic factors such as pain intensity, age, disability level and duration of complaints are associated with poor outcome. Most shoulder complaints in this group are categorized as non-specific. Musculoskeletal ultrasound might be a useful imaging method to detect subgroups of patients with subacromial disorders.This article describes the design of a prospective cohort study evaluating the influence of known prognostic and possible prognostic factors, such as findings from musculoskeletal ultrasound outcome and working alliance, on the recovery of shoulder pain. Also, to assess the usual physiotherapy care for shoulder pain and examine the inter-rater reliability of musculoskeletal ultrasound between radiologists and physiotherapists for patients with shoulder pain. A prospective cohort study including an inter-rater reliability study. Patients presenting in primary care physiotherapy practice with shoulder pain are enrolled. At baseline validated questionnaires are used to measure patient characteristics, disease-specific characteristics and social factors. Physical examination is performed according to the expertise of the physiotherapists. Follow-up measurements will be performed 6, 12 and 26 weeks after inclusion. Primary outcome measure is perceived recovery, measured on a 7-point Likert scale. Logistic regression analysis will be used to evaluate the association between prognostic factors and recovery. The ShoCoDiP (Shoulder Complaints and using Diagnostic ultrasound in Physiotherapy practice) cohort study will provide information on current management of patients with shoulder pain in primary care, provide data to develop a prediction model for shoulder pain in primary care and to evaluate whether musculoskeletal ultrasound can improve prognosis.

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of any bone in the body, including the hand, wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg ( ... Image Gallery Radiological technologist preparing to take an arm x-ray on a ... Images related ...

  19. Intuitive Exploration of Volumetric Data Using Dynamic Galleries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Daniel; Falk, Martin; Ynnerman, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a volume exploration method designed to be used by novice users and visitors to science centers and museums. The volumetric digitalization of artifacts in museums is of rapidly increasing interest as enhanced user experience through interactive data visualization can be achieved. This is, however, a challenging task since the vast majority of visitors are not familiar with the concepts commonly used in data exploration, such as mapping of visual properties from values in the data domain using transfer functions. Interacting in the data domain is an effective way to filter away undesired information but it is difficult to predict where the values lie in the spatial domain. In this work we make extensive use of dynamic previews instantly generated as the user explores the data domain. The previews allow the user to predict what effect changes in the data domain will have on the rendered image without being aware that visual parameters are set in the data domain. Each preview represents a subrange of the data domain where overview and details are given on demand through zooming and panning. The method has been designed with touch interfaces as the target platform for interaction. We provide a qualitative evaluation performed with visitors to a science center to show the utility of the approach.

  20. GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up in patients with shoulder pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P G; Hesselmans, Nicolle J J M; Kemper, Anouk; Moser, Albine; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen W L

    2014-06-01

    The diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain in general practice is complex. General practitioners' (GPs) guidelines advise a pragmatic diagnostic work-up in which additional imaging has a limited role. However, diagnostic ultrasounds are increasingly ordered by GPs, which seems to reflect complexity in management of shoulder pain. This study aimed to explore GPs' perspectives on the diagnostic work-up of patients with shoulder pain. This study has a qualitative exploratory design with an inductive approach and was carried out in Dutch general practice. The study population consisted of 18 Dutch GPs who were sampled purposefully with a spread in clinical experience and ordering diagnostic ultrasound. Data were gathered by means of semi-structured interviews and analysed following principles of the constant comparative method. Three main categories with subcategories emerged that captured the diagnostic work-up of shoulder pain: variety in diagnostic classifications [(non-)specific diagnosis and interdisciplinary differences], establishing strategies for diagnostic work-up (use of existing tools and motives to deviate from existing tools), and strategies dealing with diagnostic uncertainties (accepting diagnostic uncertainties, diagnostic imaging tests, and interdisciplinary consultation and referral). Despite the availability of evidence-based shoulder guidelines, GPs experience uncertainties during diagnostic work-up and apply different strategies when dealing with these uncertainties. At some point, GPs as well as patients seem to have a need for a specific diagnosis. Currently, there appears to be little agreement if, or in which phase of shoulder pain, diagnostic ultrasound is useful or indicated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on in vivo shoulder motion and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Mende, Veronica; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears has been reported to range from 15% to 39%, but the influence of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder function is not well understood. This study assessed the effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder kinematics, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. A clinical ultrasound examination was performed in 46 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 60.3 ± 7.5 years) with normal shoulder function to document the condition of their rotator cuff. The ultrasound imaging identified the participants as healthy (n = 14) or pathologic (n = 32). Shoulder motion was measured with a biplane x-ray imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex (Biodex Medical Systems, Inc., Shirley, NY, USA), and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale pain scores. Compared with healthy volunteers, those with rotator cuff pathology had significantly less abduction (P = .050) and elevation (P = .041) strength, their humerus was positioned more inferiorly on the glenoid (P = .018), and the glenohumeral contact path length was longer (P = .007). No significant differences were detected in the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, visual analog scale, range of motion, or acromiohumeral distance. The differences observed between the healthy volunteers and those with asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology lend insight into the changes in joint mechanics, shoulder strength, and conventional clinical outcomes associated with the early stages of rotator cuff pathology. Furthermore, these findings suggest a plausible mechanical progression of kinematic and strength changes associated with the development of rotator cuff pathology. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  3. Cost Analysis in Shoulder Arthroplasty Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost in shoulder surgery has taken on a new focus with passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As part of this law, there is a provision for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs and the bundled payment initiative. In this model, one entity would receive a single payment for an episode of care and distribute funds to all other parties involved. Given its reproducible nature, shoulder arthroplasty is ideally situated to become a model for an episode of care. Currently, there is little research into cost in shoulder arthroplasty surgery. The current analyses do not provide surgeons with a method for determining the cost and outcomes of their interventions, which is necessary to the success of bundled payment. Surgeons are ideally positioned to become leaders in ACOs, but in order for them to do so a methodology must be developed where accurate costs and outcomes can be determined for the episode of care.

  4. Kinetic chain abnormalities in the athletic shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Aaron; Thigpen, Charles; Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith

    2012-03-01

    Overhead activities require the shoulder to be exposed to and sustain repetitive loads. The segmental activation of the body's links, known as the kinetic chain, allows this to occur effectively. Proper muscle activation is achieved through generation of energy from the central segment or core, which then transfers the energy to the terminal links of the shoulder, elbow, and hand. The kinetic chain is best characterized by 3 components: optimized anatomy, reproducible efficient motor patterns, and the sequential generation of forces. However, tissue injury and anatomic deficits such as weakness and/or tightness in the leg, pelvic core, or scapular musculature can lead to overuse shoulder injuries. These injuries can be prevented and maladaptations can be detected with a thorough understanding of biomechanics of the kinetic chain as it relates to overhead activity.

  5. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes.

  6. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Iida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power frequency (MDF during 3 sec performed target torque were calculated. After the fatigue task, the MDF of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased. This indicates that the infraspinatus muscle was involved in the fatigue task. In addition, the shoulder position sense of internal and external rotation significantly decreased after the fatigue task. These results suggest that the fatigue reduced the accuracy of sensory input from muscle spindles. However, no significant difference was observed in shoulder position sense of abduction before and after the fatigue task. This may be due to the fact that infraspinatus muscle did not act as prime movers in shoulder abduction. These results suggest that muscle fatigue decreased position sense during movements in which the affected muscles acted as prime movers.

  7. Electromyographical Comparison of Four Common Shoulder Exercises in Unstable and Stable Shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sciascia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines if electromyographic (EMG amplitude differences exist between patients with shoulder instability and healthy controls performing scaption, prone horizontal abduction, prone external rotation, and push-up plus shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Thirty nine subjects were categorized by a single orthopedic surgeon as having multidirectional instability (n=10, anterior instability (n=9, generalized laxity (n=10, or a healthy shoulder (n=10. Indwelling and surface electrodes were utilized to measure EMG activity (reported as a % of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in various shoulder muscles during 4 common shoulder exercises. The exercises studied effectively activated the primary musculature targeted in each exercise equally among all groups. The serratus anterior generated high activity (50–80% MVIC during a push-up plus, while the infraspinatus and teres major generated moderate-to-high activity (30–80% MVIC during both the prone horizontal and prone external rotation exercises. Scaption exercise generated moderate activity (20–50% MVIC in both rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Clinicians should feel confident in prescribing these shoulder-strengthening exercises in patients with shoulder instability as the activation levels are comparable to previous findings regarding EMG amplitudes and should improve the dynamic stabilization capability of both rotator cuff and scapular muscles using exercises designed to address glenohumeral joint instability.

  8. Proposal for SICSeG guidelines for rehabilitation after anatomical shoulder prosthesis in concentric shoulder osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, I; Orsini, S; Stignani, S; Creta, D; Cava, F C; Benedetti, M G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide up-to-date guidelines on rehabilitation after anatomical shoulder prosthesis for concentric shoulder osteoarthritis, as previous guidelines date back to late 1970s and are no longer adequate due to the evolution of prosthesis models and surgical techniques. The physiatric committee of the Italian Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (SICSeG-Società Italiana di Chirurgia della Spalla e del Gomito) performed a search for all the existing literature related to rehabilitation after shoulder replacement. A total of 29 papers concerning shoulder rehabilitation were reviewed. In addition, the main Italian orthopedic surgeons and physiatrists dealing with shoulder surgery and rehabilitation were interviewed to obtain indications when literature was not conclusive. From literature evaluation and expert consultation, we produced guidelines concerning: patient evaluation by means of adequate rating scales, preoperative treatment, early intermediate and advanced postoperative phases, rehabilitation of scapulo-thoracic joint, return to work and sports, length of rehabilitation and follow-up. This proposal for guidelines was presented during the 11th SICSeG Congress on May 2012 and to the main scientific societies concerned in shoulder surgery and rehabilitation. A consensus conference is needed in order to formalize and make them usable from all the professional figures involved in this field.

  9. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejnisman B

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benno Ejnisman,1 Gisele Barbosa,1 Carlos V Andreoli,1 A de Castro Pochini,1 Thiago Lobo,2 Rodrigo Zogaib,2 Moises Cohen,1 Mario Bizzini,3 Jiri Dvorak3 1Department of Orthopaedics, Federal University of São Paulo, 2Sports Medicine Department, Santos FC, São Paulo, Brazil; 3FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. Keywords: goalkeeper, shoulder, injury prevention, prevention program

  10. Shoulder Arthroscopy Simulator Training Improves Shoulder Arthroscopy Performance in a Cadaver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R. Frank; Shah, Neel; Warner, Jon J.P.; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of shoulder arthroscopy simulator training with a cadaver model of shoulder arthroscopy. Methods Seventeen first year medical students with no prior experience in shoulder arthroscopy were enrolled and completed this study. Each subject completed a baseline proctored arthroscopy on a cadaveric shoulder, which included controlling the camera and completing a standard series of tasks using the probe. The subjects were randomized, and nine of the subjects received training on a virtual reality simulator for shoulder arthroscopy. All subjects then repeated the same cadaveric arthroscopy. The arthroscopic videos were analyzed in a blinded fashion for time to task completion and subjective assessment of technical performance. The two groups were compared with students t-tests, and change over time within groups was analyzed with paired t-tests. Results There were no observed differences between the two groups on the baseline evaluation. The simulator group improved significantly from baseline with respect to time to completion and subjective performance (parthroscopy simulator training resulted in significant benefits in clinical shoulder arthroscopy time to task completion in this cadaver model. This study provides important additional evidence of the benefit of simulators in orthopaedic surgical training. Clinical Relevance There may be a role for simulator training in shoulder arthroscopy education. PMID:23591380

  11. Shoulder arthroscopy simulator training improves shoulder arthroscopy performance in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R Frank; Shah, Neel; Warner, Jon J P; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of shoulder arthroscopy simulator training with a cadaveric model of shoulder arthroscopy. Seventeen first-year medical students with no prior experience in shoulder arthroscopy were enrolled and completed this study. Each subject completed a baseline proctored arthroscopy on a cadaveric shoulder, which included controlling the camera and completing a standard series of tasks using the probe. The subjects were randomized, and 9 of the subjects received training on a virtual reality simulator for shoulder arthroscopy. All subjects then repeated the same cadaveric arthroscopy. The arthroscopic videos were analyzed in a blinded fashion for time to task completion and subjective assessment of technical performance. The 2 groups were compared by use of Student t tests, and change over time within groups was analyzed with paired t tests. There were no observed differences between the 2 groups on the baseline evaluation. The simulator group improved significantly from baseline with respect to time to completion and subjective performance (P arthroscopy simulator training resulted in significant benefits in clinical shoulder arthroscopy time to task completion in this cadaveric model. This study provides important additional evidence of the benefit of simulators in orthopaedic surgical training. There may be a role for simulator training in shoulder arthroscopy education. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Shoulder impairment before breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Ann Marie; Dwyer, Kathleen

    2014-09-01

    To compare pre- and post-operative shoulder active range of motion (AROM) values from female breast cancer survivors to population norm values for shoulder AROM; and to compare shoulder AROM differences pre- and post-surgery between female African American and White breast cancer survivors (BCA). This pilot study used a convenience sample and longitudinal design measuring participants 2 times (T0 = baseline, after biopsy but within 2 weeks before BCA surgery; T1 = 2 nd postoperative week). The U.S. has the largest BCA survivor population in history and yet the mortality burden remains highest among AA BCA survivors. AAs may also have greater burden of physical and functional side effects compared to whites and the general population. The data were collected from a convenience sample (n = 33; n AA = 9, n W = 24) and included data on shoulder AROM, medical chart review for pre- and co-morbid conditions, and self-reported demographics and medical history. We used t-tests to compare sample AROM means to population norms. We then compared our sample across 2 timepoints (T0 = pre-surgery; T1 = 2 weeks post-surgery) using independent samples t-tests and repeated measures analysis of variance (p shoulder abduction (at T0) and flexion (at T1) than whites. However, 100% had significantly reduced AROM for all movements at T0 (prior to surgery but after biopsy) when compared to population norms. The significant reduction in shoulder AROM after biopsy but before surgery points to a possible unmet need for early physical therapy intervention. Further research using randomized controlled trial design is recommended.

  13. Iatrogenic nerve injuries during shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carofino, Bradley C; Brogan, David M; Kircher, Michelle F; Elhassan, Bassem T; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2013-09-18

    The current literature indicates that neurologic injuries during shoulder surgery occur infrequently and result in little if any morbidity. The purpose of this study was to review one institution's experience treating patients with iatrogenic nerve injuries after shoulder surgery. A retrospective review of the records of patients evaluated in a brachial plexus specialty clinic from 2000 to 2010 identified twenty-six patients with iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to shoulder surgery. The records were reviewed to determine the operative procedure, time to presentation, findings on physical examination, treatment, and outcome. The average age was forty-three years (range, seventeen to seventy-two years), and the average delay prior to referral was 5.4 months (range, one to fifteen months). Seven nerve injuries resulted from open procedures done to treat instability; nine, from arthroscopic surgery; four, from total shoulder arthroplasty; and six, from a combined open and arthroscopic operation. The injury occurred at the level of the brachial plexus in thirteen patients and at a terminal nerve branch in thirteen. Fifteen patients (58%) did not recover nerve function after observation and required surgical management. A structural nerve injury (laceration or suture entrapment) occurred in nine patients (35%), including eight of the thirteen who presented with a terminal nerve branch injury and one of the thirteen who presented with an injury at the level of the brachial plexus. Nerve injuries occurring during shoulder surgery can produce severe morbidity and may require surgical management. Injuries at the level of a peripheral nerve are more likely to be surgically treatable than injuries of the brachial plexus. A high index of suspicion and early referral and evaluation should be considered when evaluating patients with iatrogenic neurologic deficits after shoulder surgery.

  14. Sonographic assessment of the subscapularis after reverse shoulder arthroplasty: impact of tendon integrity on shoulder function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedy, Nicolas J; Gouk, Conor J; Taylor, Fraser J; Thomas, Michael; Tan, S L Ezekiel

    2018-06-01

    The deltopectoral approach for reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) requires subscapularis tenotomy or lesser tuberosity osteotomy. Whether the subscapularis should be repaired at the conclusion of the procedure remains controversial. The present study sonographically assessed the subscapularis after RSA and evaluated the effect of tendon integrity on functional outcome. All patients who had undergone RSA in the Gold Coast University Hospital between 2005 and 2016 were included. Sonography was performed by a blinded examiner. Function was assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, the Constant-Murley, and Oxford Shoulder scores. Internal rotation ability was recorded on a 6-point scale. The study included 43 patients (48 shoulders). Median length of follow-up was 19 months (range, 4-132 months). On sonography, the subscapularis was graded intact in 6 shoulders (13%), intact with mild attenuation in 16 (33%), severely attenuated in 15 (31%), and not intact or absent in 11 (23%). Differences in Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, Constant-Murley, or Oxford Shoulder scores between intact and attenuated or absent subscapularis shoulders were not significant. Internal rotation scores were significantly higher in the intact and mildly attenuated tendon group than in the absent tendon group (U = 1.0, P = .001 and U = 28.5, P = .007, respectively). The present work is the first long-term outcome study of RSA using sonography to assess the subscapularis. Subscapularis integrity did not appear to have a measurable effect on patient outcome as measured by standard scores but was important for internal rotation ability after RSA. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Kinesiotaping and Stretching Exercise on Forward Shoulder Angle in Females with Rounded Shoulder Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Hajibashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rounded shoulder posture is a common abnormal posture in upper quarter. Kinesiotape is a new intervention that recently used in rehabilitation. There are no studies have examined the effect of kinesiotape on rounded shoulder posture. Therefore the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of scapular kinesiotaping and pectoralis minor stretching exercise on forward shoulder angle in female subjects with rounded shoulder posture. Methods: Twenty female students aged between 18 to 25 years old with rounded shoulder posture participated in this study. Then, the subjects were randomly and equally assigned to two groups: the stretch group and the stretch plus kinesiotape group. Both groups were trained for doing home exercise to stretch Pectoralis minor bilaterally for two weeks. Kinesiotape group received kinesiotape on scapular area additionally. Forward shoulder angle was measured in four sessions including pre-intervention (first session, immediately after the first intervention (second session, fourth day (third session and at the end of two weeks (fourth session. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (4×2 was used for data analysis. Results: kinesiotape group showed significant within-group decrease in forward shoulder angle between first session with three other sessions (P≤0.05.There was no significant within-group difference in stretch group and between groups (P=0.20 forward shoulder angle-by-group interaction in measurement sessions was significantly different (P=0.02 Conclusion: scapular kinesiotaping along with pectoralis minor stretching exercise improved rounded shoulder posture in subjects of the present study. kinesiotape is suggested as a complem

  16. Measurement of shoulder motion fraction and motion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Han

    2006-01-01

    This study was to understand about the measurement of shoulder motion fraction and motion ratio. We proposed the radiological criterior of glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement ratio. We measured the motion fraction of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic movement using CR (computed radiological system) of arm elevation at neutral, 90 degree, full elevation. Central ray was 15 .deg., 19 .deg., 22 .deg. to the cephald for the parallel scapular spine, and the tilting of torso was external oblique 40 .deg., 36 .deg., 22 .deg. for perpendicular to glenohumeral surface. Healthful donor of 100 was divided 5 groups by age (20, 30, 40, 50, 60). The angle of glenohumeral motion and scapulothoracic motion could be taken from gross arm angle and radiological arm angle. We acquired 3 images at neutral, 90 .deg. and full elevation position and measured radiographic angle of glenoheumeral, scapulothoracic movement respectively. While the arm elevation was 90 .deg., the shoulder motion fraction was 1.22 (M), 1.70 (W) in right arm and 1.31, 1.54 in left. In full elevation, Right arm fraction was 1.63, 1.84 and left was 1.57, 1.32. In right dominant arm (78%), 90 .deg. and Full motion fraction was 1.58, 1.43, in left (22%) 1.82, 1.94. In generation 20, 90 .deg. and Full motion fraction was 1.56, 1.52, 30' was 1.82, 1.43, 40' was 1.23, 1.16, 50' was 1.80, 1.28,60' was 1.24, 1.75. There was not significantly by gender, dominant arm and age. The criteria of motion fraction was useful reference for clinical diagnosis the shoulder instability

  17. Clinical anatomy of the elbow and shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Canoso, Juan J; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Kalish, Robert A

    The elbow patients herein discussed feature common soft tissue conditions such as tennis elbow, golfers' elbow and olecranon bursitis. Relevant anatomical structures for these conditions can easily be identified and demonstrated by cross examination by instructors and participants. Patients usually present rotator cuff tendinopathy, frozen shoulder, axillary neuropathy and suprascapular neuropathy. The structures involved in tendinopathy and frozen shoulder can be easily identified and demonstrated under normal conditions. The axillary and the suprascapular nerves have surface landmarks but cannot be palpated. In neuropathy however, physical findings in both neuropathies are pathognomonic and will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Shoulder pain: the role of diagnostic injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H M; O'Connor, F G; Nirschl, R P

    1996-04-01

    Many different shoulder disorders cause similar symptoms and pain patterns. An accurate diagnosis can generally be made by obtaining a detailed history, performing a comprehensive, directed physical examination and obtaining selected radiographs. Occasionally, shoulder injections can be of great assistance in establishing a clear diagnosis and providing relief of symptoms. Subacromial space injection, acromioclavicular joint injection, intra-articular injection and injection of the biceps tendon are helpful in identifying such disorders as subacromial bursitis, acromioclavicular arthritis, injury to the glenohumeral joint and bicipital tendinitis.

  19. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation? | Leijnen | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine ... has similarities with an idiopathic frozen shoulder masking proper diagnosis at the time of injury. ... shoulder pain which demonstrates the importance of correct initial diagnosis and management.

  20. Soft tissue disorders of the shoulder. Frozen shoulder, calcific tendintis, and bicipital tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, W H

    1975-04-01

    The painful periarticular conditions about the shoulder joint-calcific tendinitis, bicipital tendinitis, and frozen shoulder syndrome-are seen commonly in the general practice of medicine or in the practice of orthopedic surgery. Their etiologies are unknown. Their treatment is relatively simple and depends upon a knowledge of the anatomic structures involved and the proper use of rest and exercise. Operative intervention is rarely necessary in any of these conditions. The frozen shoulder syndrome, however, in our experience is best treated in the subacute or chronic stages by infiltration brisement under general anesthesia.

  1. Frozen shoulder and the Big Five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer, Philippe; Franssens, Fien; Roosen, Isabelle; Dankaerts, Wim; Claes, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    In the past, several studies have suggested the existence of a "periarthritic personality" in patients with frozen shoulder. We conducted a study to determine differences in personality traits in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. We prospectively evaluated 118 patients (84 women and 34 men; mean age, 53.8 years; SD 7.56) with a frozen shoulder. Of these patients, 48 had an idiopathic frozen shoulder and 70 had a secondary frozen shoulder. Personality traits were determined by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) scale. This questionnaire measures the 5 major personality traits and is based on the norms determined in a neutral test situation for 2415 controls. Compared with healthy controls, no differences in personality traits were found in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder, except for Conscientiousness and Extraversion, for which patients with secondary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher than healthy controls. Patients with primary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher on Openness to Experience than did patients with secondary frozen shoulder; on the other 4 Big Five personality traits, no significant differences were found between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. More specifically, patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder did not score higher on the trait Neuroticism as would be expected from previous publications. Our study results do not indicate that patients with an idiopathic frozen shoulder have a specific personality compared with healthy controls. Only a few differences were found in personality traits when the entire frozen shoulder group was compared with healthy controls and between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. The results of this study suggest that these differences are not sufficient to speak about a specific "frozen shoulder personality." Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  2. Shoulder disorders in general practice : Prognostic indicators of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Koes, Bart W.; Boeke, A. Joan P; Devillé, Walter; De Jong, Bareld A.; Bouter, Lex M.

    Background. Shoulder pain is common in primary health care. Nevertheless, information on the outcome of shoulder disorders is scarce, especially for patients encountered in general practice. Aim. To study the course of shoulder disorders in general practice and to determine prognostic indicators of

  3. Interobserver reliability of physical examination of shoulder girdle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, Jettie G.; Slagers, Anton J.; Bergman, Geert; Winters, Jan C.; Kropmans, Thomas J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    The object of this study was to assess interobserver reliability in 23 tests concerning physical examination of the shoulder girdle. A physical therapist and a physical therapist/manual therapist independently performed a physical examination of the shoulder girdle in 91 patients with shoulder

  4. The role of muscle imbalance in the pathogenesis of shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldado, Francisco; Fontecha, Cesar G; Marotta, Mario; Benito, David; Casaccia, Marcelo; Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Zlotolow, Dan; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-07-01

    An internal rotation contracture of the shoulder is common after neonatal brachial plexus injuries due to subscapularis shortening and atrophy. It has been explained by 2 theories: muscle denervation and muscle imbalance between the internal and external rotators of the shoulder. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that muscle imbalance alone could cause subscapularis changes and shoulder contracture. We performed selective neurectomy of the suprascapular nerve in 15 newborn rats to denervate only the supraspinatus and the infraspinatus muscles, leaving the subscapularis muscle intact. After 4 weeks, passive shoulder external rotation was measured and a 7.2-T magnetic resonance imaging scan of the shoulders was used to determine changes in the infraspinatus and subscapularis muscles. The subscapularis muscle was weighed to determine the degree of mass loss. An additional group of 10 newborn rats was evaluated to determine the sectional muscle fiber size and muscle area of fibrosis by use of images from type I collagen immunostaining. There was a significant decrease in passive shoulder external rotation, with a mean loss of 66°; in the thickness of the denervated infraspinatus, with a mean loss of 40%; and in the thickness and weight of the non-denervated subscapularis, with mean losses of 28% and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in subscapularis muscle fiber size and area of fibrosis between shoulders after suprascapular nerve injury. Our study supports the theory that shoulder muscle imbalance is a cause of shoulder contracture in patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of different patient positioning strategies to minimize shoulder girdle artifacts in head and neck CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stefan; Meindl, Thomas; Treitl, Marcus; Pfeifer, Klaus-Jürgen; Reiser, Maximilian

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze different patient positioning strategies for minimizing artifacts of the shoulder girdle in head and neck CT. Standardized CT examinations of three positioning groups were compared (P: patients pushed their shoulders downwards; D: similar optimization by a pulling device; N: no particular positioning optimization). Parameters analyzed were the length of the cervical spine not being superimposed by the shoulder girdle as well as noise in the supraclavicular space. In groups P and D, the portion of the cervical spine not superimposed was significantly larger than in group N (P: 10.4 cm; D: 10.6 cm; N: 8.5 cm). At the supraclavicular space, noise decreased significantly (P: 12.5 HU; D: 12.1 HU; N: 17.7 HU). No significant differences between the two position-optimized groups (P and D) were detected. Optimized shoulder positioning by the patient increases image quality in CT head and neck imaging. The use of a pulling device offers no additional advantages.

  6. Diagnosis of superior labral lesions: comparison of noncontrast MRI with indirect MR arthrography in unexercised shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinauer, Philip A.; Flemming, Donald J.; Murphy, Kevin P.; Doukas, William C.

    2007-01-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with indirect MR arthrography (I-MRa) of unexercised shoulders for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. Institutional Review Board approval and patient informed consent were obtained for this prospective study. Superior labral findings on shoulder MRI and unexercised I-MRa studies of 104 patients were correlated with findings at arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently reviewed the two sets of MR images while blinded to arthroscopic results. For each radiologist, the McNemar test was used to detect statistically significant differences between techniques. The superior labrum was intact in 24 and abnormal in 80 subjects. For detection of superior labral lesions by each radiologist, I-MRa was more sensitive (84-91%) than MRI (66-85%), with statistically significant improvement in sensitivity for one reader (p = 0.003). However, I-MRa was less specific (58-71%) than MRI (75-83%). Overall, accuracy was slightly improved on I-MRa (78-86%) compared with MRI (70-83%), but this difference was not statistically significant for either reader. Compared with noncontrast MRI, I-MRa was more sensitive for diagnosis of superior glenoid labral lesions. However, the diagnostic value of I-MRa in shoulders remaining at rest is potentially limited by decreased specificity of the technique. (orig.)

  7. Looking over the shoulders of researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Autzen, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The Galathea 3 Expedition from 2006 to 2007 combined research and online news media, allowing journalists literally to “look over the shoulders of researchers.” The authors analyze 781 news articles published online by three media partners of the expedition, all well-established media companies...

  8. Reading on the Shoulders of Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chaim, Michael; Riendeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting on his successful scientific career, Isaac Newton highlighted his intellectual debt to his predecessors. "If I have seen further," he wrote, "it was "only" by standing on the shoulders of giants." The authors have chosen the title of their article as a token of recognition of their debt to the teachings of…

  9. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    initial diagnosis and management. ... D Leijnen,1,2 MD, MMed (Sports Med); J T Viljoen,1 BSc (Physio), MPhil (Exercise Sci); J H Kirby,1 MB ChB, MSc (Sports Med); ... diagnosis of posterior shoulder dislocation at the time of injury could.

  10. ultrasound-guided shoulder arthrogram injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Using an aseptic technique and without moving the ultrasound transducer from the desired transverse plane, the needle is advanced into the joint space through the rotator cuff interval, using real-time ultrasound guidance (Fig.2). The needle is inserted into the shoulder approximately midway between the ...

  11. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, J.D.; Redondo, M.V.; Martinez, F.; Reus, M.; Alonso, J.; Parrilla, A.; Campos, P.A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca Univ. Hospital, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder.

  12. Shoulder complaints : the occurence, course and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Luime (Jolanda)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractShoulder complaints are expressed in a variety of symptoms. In many cases, the prominent symptom is pain. In some cases, pain is present most of the day and frequently also at night. In other cases, it is provoked primarily by physical activities. Often it is accompanied

  13. Radiographic analysis of shoulder anatomical arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolla, Giovanni [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)], E-mail: gmerolla@shouldertech.it; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, Naples (Italy); Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Arthroplasty is the standard treatment for advanced shoulder osteoarthritis. Modern prostheses designs have modular features whose size, shaft/head and body morphology can be adjusted. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) provides better results. A complete X-ray follow-up is essential to assess the results and evaluate the survival rates of a shoulder prosthesis. Antero-posterior at 40 deg. in both internal and external rotation (true AP view) and axillary view are recommended to assess the following parameters: orientation and translation of the humeral component, offset, size and height of the humeral head, acromio-humeral distance, distribution and fixation of the cement, stress shielding and cortical resorption, radiolucent lines, subsidence and tilt, glenoid wear and 'bone stock', prostheses instability, glenoid component shift. Shoulder hemiarthroplasty can lead to glenoid wear; the true AP film at 40 deg. of internal rotation provides the best profile of gleno-humeral joint to depict glenoid erosion. Shift of the glenoid component in TSA is identified as tilting or medial migration on true AP and axillary views in the early postoperative period (1-2 months) and at minimum of 2 years. An exhaustive radiographic analysis remains essential to monitor the prosthetic implant and detect early and late complications or risk factors of prosthetic loosening.

  14. Standing on the shoulders of giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, the author explains that the journal Temperature stands on the shoulders of giants-prominent scientists of the past and current members of the Temperature community. Temperature also uses the best tools, such as Google Scholar profiles. The editorial includes a new puzzle: why does warm water freeze faster than cold water?

  15. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement. Geotechnical and geophysical investigations in and around backfilled galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneefub, J.U.; Gommlich, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The concept for the direct disposal of spent fuel in rock salt foresees the emplacement of large waste canisters on the floor of a disposal gallery. Subsequent to emplacement the drift is backfilled with salt grit. In a demonstration test six cylindrical containments are to be emplaced within distances of 3 m from each other in two parallel galleries of 14 m 2 , separated by a pillar of 10 m thickness. They will be heated up by a power output of approx. 1 kW/m to 200 degree C surface temperature by electrical heaters. The thermal and mechanical response of the salt rock and the backfilling to the artificial heating is to be investigated as follows: (1) measurement of the temperature field at the contained surface, in the backfill and in the rock salt; (2) deformation measurements of the salt rock around the heated drifts; (3) measurements of tunnel convergence in heated and unheated sections; (4) compaction measurements of the backfilling in heated and unheated areas; (5) measurement of rock stresses in areas very close to the galleries; and (6) pressure measurements in the backfilling, between backfilling and rock, and between backfilling and containers. The rock burst monitoring system of the Asse salt mine will be expanded to this special field of the mine to detect seismic events due to thermomechanical effects. Another seismoacoustic system will be installed to observe the compaction of the backfilling. This system must be calibrated for the relation between the density and velocities of seismic waves. It is planned to monitor the density by gamma-gamma log measurements. The changes in overall density during the entire experiment will be observed by gravimeter measurements of high precision

  16. Parallel inversion of a massive ERT data set to characterize deep vadose zone contamination beneath former nuclear waste infiltration galleries at the Hanford Site B-Complex (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.; Rucker, D. F.; Wellman, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Hanford Site, located in south-central Washington, USA, originated in the early 1940's as part of the Manhattan Project and produced plutonium used to build the United States nuclear weapons stockpile. In accordance with accepted industrial practice of that time, a substantial portion of relatively low-activity liquid radioactive waste was disposed of by direct discharge to either surface soil or into near-surface infiltration galleries such as cribs and trenches. This practice was supported by early investigations beginning in the 1940s, including studies by Geological Survey (USGS) experts, whose investigations found vadose zone soils at the site suitable for retaining radionuclides to the extent necessary to protect workers and members of the general public based on the standards of that time. That general disposal practice has long since been discontinued, and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) is now investigating residual contamination at former infiltration galleries as part of its overall environmental management and remediation program. Most of the liquid wastes released into the subsurface were highly ionic and electrically conductive, and therefore present an excellent target for imaging by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) within the low-conductivity sands and gravels comprising Hanford's vadose zone. In 2006, USDOE commissioned a large scale surface ERT survey to characterize vadose zone contamination beneath the Hanford Site B-Complex, which contained 8 infiltration trenches, 12 cribs, and one tile field. The ERT data were collected in a pole-pole configuration with 18 north-south trending lines, and 18 east-west trending lines ranging from 417m to 816m in length. The final data set consisted of 208,411 measurements collected on 4859 electrodes, covering an area of 600m x 600m. Given the computational demands of inverting this massive data set as a whole, the data were initially inverted in parts with a shared memory inversion code, which

  17. Whispering Gallery Mode Based Optical Fiber Sensor for Measuring Concentration of Salt Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical fiber solution-concentration sensor based on whispering gallery mode (WGM is proposed in this paper. The WGM solution-concentration sensors were used to measure salt solutions, in which the concentrations ranged from 1% to 25% and the wavelength drifted from the left to the right. The experimental results showed an average sensitivity of approximately 0.372 nm/% and an R2 linearity of 0.8835. The proposed WGM sensors are of low cost, feasible for mass production, and durable for solution-concentration sensing.

  18. Controlled assembly of organic whispering-gallery-mode microlasers as highly sensitive chemical vapor sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Miaomiao; Wei, Cong; Lin, Xianqing; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Fengqin; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2017-03-09

    We demonstrate the fabrication of organic high Q active whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators from π-conjugated polymer by a controlled emulsion-solvent-evaporation method, which can simultaneously provide optical gain and act as an effective resonant cavity. By measuring the shift of their lasing modes on exposure to organic vapor, we successfully monitored the slight concentration variation in the chemical gas. These microlaser sensors demonstrated high detection sensitivity and good signal repeatability under continuous chemical gas treatments. The results offer an effective strategy to design miniaturized optical sensors.

  19. More efficient second harmonic generation of whispering gallery modes by selective out-coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Trainor, Luke S.; Sedlmeir, Florian; Peuntinger, Christian; Schwefel, Harald G. L.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation (SHG) in an $x$-cut congruent lithium niobate (LN) whispering gallery mode resonator. We first show theoretically that independent control of the coupling of the pump and signal modes is optimal for high conversion rates. A scheme based on our earlier work in Ref. [1] is then implemented experimentally to verify this. Thereby we are able to improve on the efficiency of SHG by more than an order of magnitude by selectively out-coupling using a LN prism...

  20. Whispering gallery modes in two-photon fluorescence from spherical DCM dye microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamonov, Evgeniy A.; Maydykovskiy, Anton I.; Mitetelo, Nikolai V.; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai; Murzina, Tatyana V.

    2018-03-01

    Organic microstructures are well known for their resonator properties, which bring about whispering gallery mode (WGM) excitation. Here we report on experimental evidence of the WGM in the two-photon fluorescence (TPF) of DCM dye microspheres made using the self-assembly method. The WGM excitation accompanying the overall TPF in the spectral range from 530\\div640 nm demonstrated a quality factor of approximately 102 for spheres that were several microns in diameter. The power dependence of the TPF intensity proved the second order nature of the interaction process involved.

  1. Rapid 3D µ-printing of polymer optical whispering-gallery mode resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jushuai; Guo, Xin; Zhang, A Ping; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2015-11-16

    A novel microfabrication method for rapid printing of polymer optical whispering-gallery mode (WGM) resonators is presented. A 3D micro-printing technology based on high-speed optical spatial modulator (SLM) and high-power UV light source is developed to fabricate suspended-disk WGM resonator array using SU-8 photoresist. The optical spectral responses of the fabricated polymer WGM resonators were measured with a biconically tapered optical fiber. Experimental results reveal that the demonstrated method is very flexible and time-saving for rapid fabrication of complex polymer WGM resonators.

  2. Victorian era esthetic and restorative dentistry: an advertising trade card gallery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Swanson, Ben Z

    2006-01-01

    A chief means of print advertising in the Victorian era was the "trade card." Innumerable products, companies, and services were highlighted on colorful chromolithographic trade cards, and these became desirable collectible objects which were pasted into scrapbooks and enjoyed by many families. Dentistry- and oral health-related subjects were often depicted on Victorian trade cards, and esthetic and restorative dentistry themes were featured. This review describes the history of advertising trade cards and offers a photographic gallery of dentistry-related cards of the era.

  3. High resolution terahertz spectroscopy of a whispering gallery mode bubble resonator using Hilbert analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2017-07-10

    We report on data processing for continuous wave (CW) terahertz (THz) spectroscopy measurements based on a Hilbert spectral analysis to achieve MHz resolution. As an example we investigate the spectral properties of a whispering gallery mode (WGM) THz bubble resonator at critical coupling. The experimental verification clearly demonstrates the significant advantages in relative frequency resolution and required acquisition time of the proposed method over the traditional data analysis. An effective frequency resolution, only limited by the precision and stability of the laser beat signal, can be achieved without complex extensions to a standard commercially available CW THz spectrometer.

  4. Ultra-high Q terahertz whispering-gallery modes in a silicon resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2018-05-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of terahertz (THz) whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) with an ultra-high quality factor of 1.5 × 104 at 0.62 THz. The WGMs are observed in a high resistivity float zone silicon spherical resonator coupled to a sub-wavelength silica waveguide. A detailed analysis of the coherent continuous wave THz spectroscopy measurements combined with a numerical model based on Mie-Debye-Aden-Kerker theory allows us to unambiguously identify the observed higher order radial THz WGMs.

  5. Wavelength shift in a whispering gallery microdisk due to bacterial sensing: A theoretical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Ghali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode microcavities have recently been studied as a means to achieve real-time label-free detection of biological targets such as virus particles, specific DNA sequences, or proteins. Binding of a biomolecule to the surface of a microresonator will increase its path length, leading to a shift in the resonance frequency according to the reactive sensing principle. In this paper, we develop a theoretical expression that will link the reactive shift to the bacteria and microdisk parameters and help quantify the number of bacteria that bind to the surface of a 200μm-diameter silica microdisk. Keywords: Optical microdisk, Wavelength shift, Bacterial sensing

  6. License - Togo Picture Gallery | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Togo Picture Gallery License License to Use This Database Last updated : 2017/05/16 You may use this database...ecifies the license terms regarding the use of this database and the requirements you must follow in using this database.... The license for this database is specified in the Creative Commons ...Attribution 4.0 International . If you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database a...e Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International is found here . With regard to this database

  7. Biomechanical comparison of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems in soft tissue-constrained shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Heath B; King, Frank K; Tashjian, Robert Z; Burks, Robert T

    2014-05-01

    Numerous studies have examined the biomechanics of isolated variables in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. This study directly compared the composite performance of two reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems; each system was designed around either a medialized or a lateralized glenohumeral center of rotation. Seven pairs of shoulders were tested on a biomechanical simulator. Center of rotation, position of the humerus, passive and active range of motion, and force to abduct the arm were quantified. Native arms were tested, implanted with a Tornier Aequalis or DJO Surgical Reverse Shoulder Prosthesis (RSP), and then retested. Differences from the native state were then documented. Both systems shifted the center of rotation medially and inferiorly relative to native. Medial shifts were greater in the Aequalis implant (P .05). Both reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems exhibited adduction deficits, but the RSP implant deficit was smaller (P = .046 between implants). Both systems reduced forces to abduct the arm compared with native, although the Aequalis required more force to initiate motion from the resting position (P = .022). Given the differences in system designs and configurations, outcome variables were generally comparable. The RSP implant allowed slightly more adduction, had a more lateralized humeral position, and required less force to initiate elevation. These factors may play roles in limiting scapular notching, improving active external rotation by normalizing the residual rotator cuff length, and limiting excessive stress on the deltoid. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, M.J.; Aziz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  9. Shoulder Dystocia: Quality, Safety, and Risk Management Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Saila; Lee, Colleen; Goffman, Dena

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a term that evokes terror and fear among many physicians, midwives, and health care providers as they recollect at least 1 episode of shoulder dystocia in their careers. Shoulder dystocia can result in significant maternal and neonatal complications. Because shoulder dystocia is an urgent, unanticipated, and uncommon event with potentially catastrophic consequences, all practitioners and health care teams must be well-trained to manage this obstetric emergency. Preparation for shoulder dystocia in a systematic way, through standardization of process, practicing team-training and communication, along with technical skills, through simulation education and ongoing quality improvement initiatives will result in improved outcomes.

  10. Assessment of shoulder position variation and its impact on IMRT and VMAT doses for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Emily

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For radiotherapy of the head and neck, 5-point mask immobilization is used to stabilize the shoulders. Still, the daily position of the shoulders during treatment may be different from the position in the treatment plan despite correct isocenter setup. The purpose of this study was to determine the interfractional displacement of the shoulders relative to isocenter over the course of treatment and the associated dosimetric effect of this displacement. Methods The extent of shoulder displacements relative to isocenter was assessed for 10 patients in 5-point thermoplastic masks using image registration and daily CT-on-rails scans. Dosimetric effects on IMRT and VMAT plans were evaluated in Pinnacle based on simulation CTs modified to represent shoulder shifts between 3 and 15 mm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left directions. The impact of clinically observed shoulder shifts on the low-neck dose distributions was examined. Results Shoulder motion was 2-5 mm in each direction on average but reached 20 mm. Superior shifts resulted in coverage loss, whereas inferior shifts increased the dose to the brachial plexus. These findings were generally consistent for both IMRT and VMAT plans. Over a course of observed shifts, the dose to 99% of the CTV decreased by up to 101 cGy, and the brachial plexus dose increased by up to 72 cGy. Conclusions he position of the shoulder affects target coverage and critical structure dose, and may therefore be a concern during the setup of head and neck patients, particularly those with low neck primary disease.

  11. ACCUMULATION OF RADIOCESIUM BY MUSHROOMS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND IMAGE GALLERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, M; Mary Ramsey, M

    2006-11-05

    During the last 50 years, a large amount of information on radionuclide accumulators or 'sentinel-type' organisms in the environment has been published. Much of this work focused on the risks of food-chain transfer of radionuclides to higher organisms such as reindeer and man. However, until the 1980's and 1990's, there has been little published data on the radiocesium ({sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) accumulation by mushrooms. This presentation will consist of a review of the published data for {sup 134,137}Cs accumulation by mushrooms in nature. The review will consider the time of sampling, sample location characteristics, the radiocesium source term and other aspects that promote {sup 134,137}Cs uptake by mushrooms. This review will focus on published data for mushrooms that demonstrate a large propensity for use in the environmental biomonitoring of radiocesium contamination. It will also provide photographs and descriptions of habitats for many of these mushrooms to facilitate their collection for biomonitoring.

  12. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: evaluation with MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Kim, Yang-Soo; Chung, Yang Guk; Kim, Jung-Man

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography for diagnosing adhesive capsulitis. Shoulder MR images of 28 patients with (n=14) and without (n=14) adhesive capsulitis were retrospectively analyzed. MR images were assessed for capsule and synovium thickness as well as the width of the axillary recess on oblique coronal fat-suppressed T1-weighted images and T2-weighted images, respectively. On oblique sagittal fat-suppressed T1-weighted images, the width of the rotator interval and the presence of abnormal tissue in the interval were evaluated. Significant differences were found between the two groups in capsule and synovium thickness on both sides of the recess on oblique coronal T2-weighted images (P=0.000), whereas thickness on the humeral aspect showed no significant difference on oblique coronal fat-suppressed T1-weighted images (P=0.109). On oblique coronal T2-weighted images, a cut-off value of 3-mm thickness gave the highest diagnostic accuracy for adhesive capsulitis with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 79% (11/14), 100% (14/14), and 89% (25/28) at the humeral side and 93% (13/14), 86% (12/14), and 89% (25/28) at the glenoid side, respectively. There were significant differences in rotator interval width, presence of abnormal tissue in the rotator interval, and axillary recess width between the two groups (P<0.05). Thickness of capsule and synovium of the axillary recess greater than 3 mm is a practical MR criterion for diagnosing adhesive capsulitis when measured on oblique coronal T2-weighted MR arthrography images without fat suppression. The presence of abnormal tissue in the rotator interval showed high sensitivity but rather low specificity. (orig.)

  13. Painful shoulder. Introduction into fundamental facts and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, P W

    1987-10-19

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past.

  14. Juicebox Gallery

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012 and 2014 IDRC Research Awardee Ahmed K. Rashid

  15. Visual events and the friendly eye: modes of educating vision in new educational settings in Danish art galleries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2009-01-01

      New, experimental educational settings such as ‘art laboratories', ‘digital workshops' and ‘theme-based tours' are important to the processes of change towards more inclusive practices, which have been initiated in many Danish art galleries. While traditional gallery education was constructed...... as visual events, and it discusses how ‘the desiring eye' of some constructivist approaches, along with traditional practices of looking, have contributed to the formation of the modern, autonomous individual. The second part of the article analyses two cases from Danish art galleries and, inspired by Mieke...... in order to stimulate the ‘disciplined eye' or the ‘aesthetic eye' of the visitors, this article aims to discuss the practices of looking encouraged by contemporary and experimental educational projects. The first part of the article develops a theoretical perspective on educational settings conceived...

  16. Optimal Design of a Bio-Inspired Anthropocentric Shoulder Rehabilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a bio-inspired anthropocentric 7-DOF wearable robotic arm for the purpose of stroke rehabilitation. The proposed arm rehabilitator synergistically utilizes the human arm structure with non-invasive kinematically under-deterministic cable-driven mechanisms to form a completely deterministic structure. It offers the advantages of being lightweight and having high dexterity. Adopting an anthropocentric design concept also allows it to conform to the human anatomical structure. The focus of this paper is on the analysis and design of the 3-DOF-shoulder module, called the shoulder rehabilitator. The design methodology is divided into three main steps: (1 performance evaluation of the cable-driven shoulder rehabilitator, (2 performance requirements of the shoulder joint based on its physiological characteristics and (3 design optimization of the shoulder rehabilitator based on shoulder joint physiological limitations. The aim is to determine a suitable configuration for the development of a shoulder rehabilitator prototype.

  17. Risk of subacromial shoulder disorder in airport baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sanne Pagh; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2018-01-01

    age,exposure variables showed close to significant associations with subacromial shoulder disorder.Results could not confirm our hypothesis that combined information on work task duration and shoulder load intensity was stronger associated with subacromial shoulder disorder than seniority.......Musculoskeletal shoulder-load among baggage handlers measured by combining duration and intensity based on biomechanical and epidemiological information may be a stronger predictor of subacromial shoulder disordersthanbaggage handler seniority.In 2012, a cohort of baggage handlers employed...... at Copenhagen Airport in 1990-2012, and a cohort of unskilledotherwise employed men answered a survey.Self-reported information on work tasks during employment in the airport in combination with work task specific biomechanically modelled forces in the shoulder joint was used to estimate shoulder-load. Exposure...

  18. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    values decreased with age (P shoulder BMD levels increased significantly with increased body mass index (BMI) (P positive relationship between the increased hip/shoulder BMD differential with BMI supports the conclusion that the shoulder is subject......The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... of osteoporosis compared with hip scans, the latter representing a weight-bearing part of the skeleton. We developed a scanning procedure, including a shoulder fixation device, and determined the most appropriate software in order to establish a reference material with the highest possible precision. Duplicate...

  19. Decreased shoulder function and pain common in recreational badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, M; Söderman, K

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and consequences of painful conditions in the shoulder region in recreational badminton players. A questionnaire study was performed on 99 players, of whom 57 were also assessed with Constant score. Previous or present pain in the dominant shoulder was reported by 52% of the players. Sixteen percent of the players had on-going shoulder pain associated with badminton play. A majority of these players reported that their training habits were affected by the pain. Total Constant score was lower in the painful shoulders. Furthermore, range of active pain-free shoulder abduction was decreased. However, isometric shoulder strength test showed no differences when compared with pain-free shoulders. Even though the pain caused functional problems, the players were still playing with on-going symptoms. The diagnoses were mostly unknown, although history and clinical tests indicate problems resembling subacromial impingement.

  20. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees......Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper...

  1. Strength asymmetry of the shoulders in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzic, Vedran; Sattler, Tine; Veselko, Matjaž; Markovic, Goran; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Volleyball players are reported to have shoulder strength imbalances. Previous authors have primarily investigated small samples of male players at a single skill level, without considering playing position, and with inconsistent findings. To evaluate shoulder strength asymmetry and a history of shoulder injury in a large sample of professional volleyball players of both sexes across different playing positions and skill levels. Descriptive laboratory study. A sample of 183 volleyball players (99 men, 84 women). We assessed shoulder internal-rotator and external-rotator concentric strength at 60°/s using an isokinetic dynamometer and dominant-nondominant differences in shoulder strength and strength ratios using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Peak torque was normalized for body mass and external-rotation/internal-rotation concentric strength. Internal-rotation strength was asymmetric in favor of the dominant side in both sexes, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. Male volleyball players had a lower shoulder strength ratio on the dominant side, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. However, this finding was valid only when hand dominance was taken into account. Female volleyball players playing at a higher level (ie, first versus second division) were 3.43 times more likely to have an abnormal strength ratio. Playing position was not associated with an abnormal shoulder strength ratio or strength asymmetry. In male volleyball players, the external-rotation/internal-rotation strength ratio of the dominant shoulder was lower, regardless of playing position, skill level, or a previous shoulder injury. In female players, the ratio was less only in those at a higher skill level. Although speculative, these findings generally suggest that female volleyball players could have a lower risk of developing shoulder-related problems than male volleyball players. Isokinetic shoulder testing may reveal important information about the possible risk

  2. The Art Gallery Test: A Preliminary Comparison between Traditional Neuropsychological and Ecological VR-Based Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gamito

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ecological validity should be the cornerstone of any assessment of cognitive functioning. For this purpose, we have developed a preliminary study to test the Art Gallery Test (AGT as an alternative to traditional neuropsychological testing. The AGT involves three visual search subtests displayed in a virtual reality (VR art gallery, designed to assess visual attention within an ecologically valid setting. To evaluate the relation between AGT and standard neuropsychological assessment scales, data were collected on a normative sample of healthy adults (n = 30. The measures consisted of concurrent paper-and-pencil neuropsychological measures [Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB, and Color Trails Test (CTT] along with the outcomes from the three subtests of the AGT. The results showed significant correlations between the AGT subtests describing different visual search exercises strategies with global and specific cognitive measures. Comparative visual search was associated with attention and cognitive flexibility (CTT; whereas visual searches involving pictograms correlated with global cognitive function (MoCA.

  3. High frequency of trypanosomatids in gallery forest bats of a Neotropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, João Lucas M; Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís T C; Silva, Larissa R; Oliveira, Amanda C; Mendonça, Vagner J; Nitz, Nadjar; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    Bats are well-known hosts of trypanosomatids, though information about their role as reservoirs of these protozoans in the Brazilian savanna is poorly known. We aimed to analyze the occurrence of trypanosomatid species in bats occurring in remnants of gallery forests of Brasília, Federal District of Brazil. We sampled bats using mist nets in six sites, and we collected blood, wing fragments and oral swab samples from all captured individuals. Trypanosomatids were identified in the captured bats through sequencing of the SSUrRNA region and kDNA qPCR. We found no parasite in blood smears of 146 individuals of 14 species captured, but blood cultures were positive for nine bats. We detected trypanosomatids molecularly in 111 (76%) specimens of all bat species in the studied areas. Most of the infected bats had Leishmania-like DNA detected in blood and swab samples of the oral mucosa. We distinguished three species of Trypanosoma (Trypanosoma dionisii, T. rangeli and T. cruzi) in Carollia perspicillata. SSUrRNA PCR of oral samples is a non-invasive and practical method for identification of trypanosomatid species in bats. Our results support our belief that bats could be potential reservoirs for Trypanosoma and Leishmania-like species in the enzootic cycle of these parasites in gallery forests of the Brazilian Cerrado biome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Telerobotic Haptic Exploration in Art Galleries and Museums for Individuals with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chung Hyuk; Ryu, Eun-Seok; Howard, Ayanna M

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a haptic telepresence system that enables visually impaired users to explore locations with rich visual observation such as art galleries and museums by using a telepresence robot, a RGB-D sensor (color and depth camera), and a haptic interface. The recent improvement on RGB-D sensors has enabled real-time access to 3D spatial information in the form of point clouds. However, the real-time representation of this data in the form of tangible haptic experience has not been challenged enough, especially in the case of telepresence for individuals with visual impairments. Thus, the proposed system addresses the real-time haptic exploration of remote 3D information through video encoding and real-time 3D haptic rendering of the remote real-world environment. This paper investigates two scenarios in haptic telepresence, i.e., mobile navigation and object exploration in a remote environment. Participants with and without visual impairments participated in our experiments based on the two scenarios, and the system performance was validated. In conclusion, the proposed framework provides a new methodology of haptic telepresence for individuals with visual impairments by providing an enhanced interactive experience where they can remotely access public places (art galleries and museums) with the aid of haptic modality and robotic telepresence.

  5. Structural characterization of the gallery forest of the Guisa Agroforestry Experimental Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Rodríguez Sosa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The work was carried out in the gallery forest of the Cupaynicú stream, belonging to the Guisa Agroforestry Experimental Station, with the objective of characterizing its structure. Eight parcels of 500 m2 were randomly raised, in them the species were identified, their height and diameter were measured. The flora was analyzed through the origin of the species and the frequency histogram. The structure of the forest was analyzed through the diametric structure and the Value Index of Ecological Importance, the vertical structure was described taking into consideration the forest strata as well as the preparation of the canopy diagram. A descriptive analysis of the parameters diameter, height and basal area was made to study the parametric structure. The richness of the riparian forest was evidenced by the registry of 25 families, 40 genera and 43 species, as well as the predominance of the Meliaceae family followed by Lauraceae, Mimosaceae and Sapindaceae, which reflects the high timber value, melliferous and ecological of the same. The species Roystonea regia, Sterculiaapetala, Dendropanaxarboreus, Andirainermis and Mangifera indica, determine the physiognomy of the gallery Forest. The trees reach 33 cm in diameter and 18.27 m in height on average, although the presence of trees with 30 m is the most frequent, which denotes the irregular structure of the forest.

  6. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar; Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Pasquardini, Laura; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Daldosso, Nicola; Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Quercioli, Franco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  7. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar [Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics Group (Nb4Dg), IQAC-CSIC, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo [ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Castelldefels, 08860 Barcelona (Spain); Pasquardini, Laura [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Lunelli, Lorenzo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); IBF-CNR, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Pederzolli, Cecilia [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Daldosso, Nicola [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Farnesi, Daniele [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Berneschi, Simone [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Righini, Giancarlo C. [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-INO National Institute of Optics, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Soria, Silvia, E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  8. Dominant vs. non-dominant shoulder morphology in volleyball players and associations with shoulder pain and spike speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Artemiou, Andreas; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    The aims of our study were to compare the dominant (DOM) and non-dominant (NDOM) shoulders of high-level volleyball athletes and identify possible associations of shoulder adaptations with spike speed (SS) and shoulder pathology. A total of 22 male volleyball players from two teams participating in the first division of the Cypriot championship underwent clinical shoulder tests and simple measurements around their shoulder girdle joints bilaterally. SS was measured with the use of a sports speed radar. Compared with the NDOM side, the DOM scapula was more lateralised, the DOM dorsal capsule demonstrated greater laxity, the DOM dorsal muscles stretching ability was compromised, and the DOM pectoralis muscle was more lengthened. Players with present or past DOM shoulder pain demonstrated greater laxity in their DOM dorsal capsule, tightening of their DOM inferior capsule, and lower SS compared with those without shoulder pain. Dorsal capsule measurements bilaterally were significant predictors of SS. None of the shoulder measurements was associated with team roles or infraspinatus atrophy, while scapular lateralisation was more pronounced with increasing years of experience, and scapular antetilting was greater with increasing age. Adaptations of the DOM shoulder may be linked to pathology and performance. We describe simple shoulder measurements that may have the potential to predict chronic shoulder injury and become part of injury prevention programmes. Detailed biomechanical and large prospective studies are warranted to assess the validity of our findings and reach more definitive conclusions.

  9. Effects of Messages Delivered by Mobile Phone on Increasing Compliance With Shoulder Exercises Among Patients With a Frozen Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Chu; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Chuang, Yeu-Hui

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of reminders, encouragement, and educational messages delivered by mobile phone on shoulder exercise compliance and improvements in shoulder function among patients with a frozen shoulder. A randomized controlled trial design was used. A convenience sample of patients with a frozen shoulder in an orthopedic outpatient clinic was recruited. All participants were instructed on how to do shoulder exercises and were provided with a printed pamphlet about shoulder exercises. Then, the intervention group received reminders, encouragement, and educational messages by mobile phone daily for the next 2 weeks, while the comparison group did not. The intervention group had higher compliance with shoulder exercises than did the comparison group (t = 2.263, p = .03) and had significant improvements in shoulder forward flexion (F = 12.067, p = .001), external rotation (F = 13.61, p = .001), and internal rotation (F = 5.903, p = .018) compared to those in the comparison group after the 2-week intervention. The text messages significantly increased patient compliance with shoulder exercises and thus improved patients' shoulder range of motion. Hospital or clinics can send appropriate messages to patients via text message platforms in order to remind and encourage them to do shoulder exercises. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. Ultrasound and PET-CT Correlation in Shoulder Pathology: A 5-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J; Walter, William R; Adler, Ronald S; Babb, James S; Sanger, Joseph; Ponzo, Fabio

    2017-10-01

    To correlate shoulder ultrasound and radiography with F-FDG PET-CT to establish FDG uptake and therefore range of metabolic activity, as defined by SUV analysis, in various symptomatic shoulder pathologies. Retrospective database query was performed for shoulder ultrasound and PET-CT scans between January 2012 and January 2017. Patients who had both studies within 1 year were included. Age- and sex-matched control patients with PET-CT scans only were also included. Retrospective image review determined shoulder pathology, and F-FDG SUVmax was measured using regions of interest placed at the glenohumeral joint, rotator cuff/bursa, and bicipital groove. Glenohumeral and acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis was assessed by radiography using the Kellgren-Lawrence classification system. Thirty-three patients had both imaging studies within 1 year. Ten patients (11 cases) were included, ranging in age from 56 to 90 years (mean, 67.9 years). Control subjects were selected among patients receiving PET-CT within 1 week of symptomatic patients. Glenohumeral osteoarthrosis was mild in 3 (27%), moderate in 2 (18%), and severe in 2 (18%). Six full-thickness rotator cuff tears (55%) were identified. SUVmax means were compared between the pathologic and control groups and were significantly higher in the former: glenohumeral joint (1.96 vs 1.32; P = 0.016), rotator cuff/bursa (2.80 vs 2.0; P = 0.005), and bicipital groove (2.19 vs 1.48; P = 0.007). The highest values were seen in full-thickness rotator cuff tear and severe biceps tenosynovitis. Increased metabolic activity about the shoulder is associated with a spectrum of rotator cuff, glenohumeral joint, and other soft tissue pathology that can be correlated with diagnostic ultrasound findings.

  11. All-in-One Magnetic Resonance Arthrography of the Shoulder in a Vertically Open Magnetic Resonance Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevenne, J.E.; Vanhoenacker, F.; Beaulieu, C.F.; Bergman, A.; Butts Pauly, K.; Dillingham, M.F.; Lang, P.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp, Edegem-Antwerp (Belgium))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography frequently involves joint injection under imaging guidance followed by MR imaging in static positions. Purpose: To evaluate if MR arthrography of the shoulder joint can be performed in a comprehensive fashion combining the MR-guided injection procedure, static MR imaging, and dynamic motion MR imaging in a single test. Material and Methods: Twenty-three shoulder joints were injected with Gd-DTPA2- under MR guidance. Static MR imaging was performed and included a three-point Dixon method to achieve water-selective images. Dynamic motion MR imaging with and without applying pressure to the upper arm was used to evaluate glenohumeral joint instability. In 10 cases, surgical correlation was available. Results: The all-in-one MR arthrography technique was successful in all patients, and took an average time of 65 min. All but one glenohumeral injection procedure were performed with a single needle pass, and no complications were observed. Out of eight labrum tears seen with static MR imaging, seven were confirmed at surgery. In 10 cases, dynamic motion MR imaging correlated well with the surgeon's intraoperative evaluation for presence and direction of instability. Conclusion: MR arthrography of the shoulder joint using a vertically open magnet can be performed as a single comprehensive test, including the injection and the static and dynamic motion MR imaging. Good diagnostic accuracy for intraarticular lesions and glenohumeral instability was found in a small sample.

  12. Comparative characteristics of shoulder blade (Scapula) and shoulder bone (Humerus) of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and sheep (Ovis aries) in order to determine the animal species

    OpenAIRE

    Blagojević Miloš; Nikolić Zora; Prokić Bogomir Bolka; Ćupić-Miladinović Dejana

    2016-01-01

    In illegal hunting it is often possible only on the basis of morphological characteristics to determine the animal species. By the method of comparison there was performed the forensic analysis of roe deer and sheep osteological features. For the purpose of investigating the shoulder blade (Scapula) and shoulder bone (Humerus) comparative characteristics, there were used 6 shoulder blades and 6 shoulder bones of roe deer and 8 shoulder blades and 8 shoulder...

  13. Multimodal assessment of sensorimotor shoulder function in patients with untreated anterior shoulder instability and asymptomatic handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornieux, Guillaume; Hirschmüller, Anja; Gollhofer, Albert; Südkamp, Norbert P; Maier, Dirk

    2018-04-01

    Functional evaluation of sensorimotor function of the shoulder joint is important for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability. Such assessment should be multimodal and comprise all qualities of sensorimotor shoulder function. This study evaluates feasibility of such multimodal assessment of glenohumeral sensorimotor function in patients with shoulder instability and handball players. Nine patients with untreated anterior instability of their dominant shoulder and 15 asymptomatic recreational handball players performed proprioceptive joint position sense and dynamic stabilization evaluations on an isokinetic device, as well as a functional throwing performance task. Outcome measures were analysed individually and equally weighted in a Shoulder-Specific Sensorimotor Index (S-SMI). Finally, isokinetic strength evaluations were conducted. We observed comparable sensorimotor functions of unstable dominant shoulders compared to healthy, contralateral shoulders (e.g. P=0.59 for S-SMI). Handball players demonstrated superior sensorimotor function of their dominant shoulders exhibiting a significantly higher throwing performance and S-SMI (P0.22). The present study proves feasibility of multimodal assessment of shoulder sensorimotor function in overhead athletes and patients with symptomatic anterior shoulder instability. Untreated shoulder instability led to a loss of dominance-related sensorimotor superiority indicating functional internal rotation deficiency. Dominant shoulders of handball players showed a superior overall sensorimotor function but weakness of dominant internal rotation constituting a risk factor for occurrence of posterior superior impingement syndrome. The S-SMI could serve as a diagnostic tool for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability.

  14. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has analgesic properties when given intravenously before surgery, but the optimal dose has not been determined. We hypothesised that a dose of 40 mg dexamethasone would improve analgesia after outpatient shoulder surgery compared with 8 mg. Methods A randomised, double...... a dose–response relationship, increasing the dexamethasone dose from 8 to 40 mg did not improve analgesia significantly after outpatient shoulder surgery.......) or placebo (D0) before surgery. The primary outcome was pain intensity 8 h after surgery rated on a numeric rating scale of 0 to 10. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, analgesic consumption and side effects during the first 3 days after surgery. Results Data from 73 patients were available for analysis...

  15. Diagnosis of tumors in the shoulder girdle by means of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlecht, I.; Gaffke, G.; Stroszczynski, C.; Felix, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the value of MRI for evaluation of tumors of the shoulder girdle. We diagnosed respectively 13 patients with lesions in the shoulder region. The imaging has been done with a 'Magnetom SP 63' (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The protocol consisted of T1- and T2-based SE-sequences in axial slice orientation, T1-based imaging in coronary respectively in sagittal slice orientation as well as T1-based sequences after application of contrast medium. The evaluation of the tumor expansion within the soft tissue was possible. The exact diagnosis in some individual cases - neurinoma, cyst of the synovia - could be found by MRI. Estimation of the dignity in the case of infiltrative growth was possible in most cases. To assess the exact type of tumor was often difficult. Especially the dignity of the cartilaginous tumors could not be precisely described. (orig.) [de

  16. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monu, J.U.V. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pruett, S. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vanarthos, W.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pope, T.L. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  17. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monu, J.U.V.; Pruett, S.; Vanarthos, W.J.; Pope, T.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  18. Double contrast arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, D.

    1991-01-01

    From 1980 to 1989 the author performed 481 double-contrast arthrographic examinations of the shoulder (DCSA). A hundred and forty-two complete and 46 partial rotator cuff tears were demonstrated; 68 of them underwent surgical exploration. Results confirmed DCSA capabilities in detecting both their location (100%) and size (95%). Moreover, thickness (89%) and erosions (94%) in tendon edges and surfaces were demonstrated - that is, all the qualitative information needed to depict degenerative processes. Such evidence may also affect treatment planning

  19. Geometrical analysis of stemless shoulder arthroplasty: a radiological study of seventy TESS total shoulder prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadum, Bakir; Hassany, Hamid; Wadsten, Mats; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sjödén, Göran

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a stemless shoulder prosthesis to restore shoulder anatomy in relation to premorbid anatomy. This prospective study was performed between May 2007 and December 2013. The inclusion criteria were patients with primary osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone stemless total anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic measurements were done on anteroposterior X-ray views of the glenohumeral joint. Sixty-nine patients (70 shoulders) were included in the study. The mean difference between premorbid centre of rotation (COR) and post-operative COR was 1 ± 2 mm (range -3 to 5.8 mm). The mean difference between premorbid humeral head height (HH) and post-operative HH was -1 ± 3 mm (range -9.7 to 8.5 mm). The mean difference between premorbid neck-shaft angle (NSA) and post-operative NSA was -3 ± 12° (range -26 to 20°). Stemless implants could be of help to reconstruct the shoulder anatomy. This study shows that there are some challenges to be addressed when attempting to ensure optimal implant positioning. The critical step is to determine the correct level of bone cut to avoid varus or valgus humeral head inclination and ensure correct head size.

  20. Posterior glenoid rim deficiency in recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, D.; Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Nyffeler, R.W.; Gerber, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To assess the shape of the posterior glenoid rim in patients with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability.Design and patients. CT examinations of 15 shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were reviewed in masked fashion with regard to abnormalities of the glenoid shape, specifically of its posterior rim. The glenoid version was also assessed. The findings were compared with the findings in 15 shoulders with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and 15 shoulders without instability. For all patients, surgical correlation was available.Results. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability had a deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim. In patients with recurrent anterior instability or stable shoulders such deficiencies were less common (60% and 73%, respectively). The craniocaudal length of the deficiencies was largest in patients with posterior instability. When a posteroinferior deficiency with a craniocaudal length of 12 mm or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were 86.7% and 83.3%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in glenoid version between shoulders with posterior instability and stable shoulders (P=0.01).Conclusion. Recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability should be considered in patients with a bony deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim with a craniocaudal length of more than 12 mm. (orig.)