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Sample records for short-stay hospital setting

  1. Cost analysis of the Dutch obstetric system: low-risk nulliparous women preferring home or short-stay hospital birth--a prospective non-randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Marijke Jc; Evers, Silvia Maa; Basten, Marloes Cm; Nijhuis, Jan G; Severens, Johan L

    2009-11-19

    In the Netherlands, pregnant women without medical complications can decide where they want to give birth, at home or in a short-stay hospital setting with a midwife. However, a decrease in the home birth rate during the last decennium may have raised the societal costs of giving birth. The objective of this study is to compare the societal costs of home births with those of births in a short-stay hospital setting. This study is a cost analysis based on the findings of a multicenter prospective non-randomised study comparing two groups of nulliparous women with different preferences for where to give birth, at home or in a short-stay hospital setting. Data were collected using cost diaries, questionnaires and birth registration forms. Analysis of the data is divided into a base case analysis and a sensitivity analysis. In the group of home births, the total societal costs associated with giving birth at home were euro3,695 (per birth), compared with euro3,950 per birth in the group for short-stay hospital births. Statistically significant differences between both groups were found regarding the following cost categories 'Cost of contacts with health care professionals during delivery' (euro138.38 vs. euro87.94, -50 (2.5-97.5 percentile range (PR)-76;-25), p home' (euro1,551.69 vs. euro1,240.69, -311 (PR -485; -150), p home birth are euro4,364 per birth, and euro4,541 per birth for short-stay hospital births. The total costs associated with pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum care are comparable for home birth and short-stay hospital birth. The most important differences in costs between the home birth group and the short-stay hospital birth group are associated with maternity care assistance, hospitalisation, and travelling costs.

  2. Cost Analysis of the Dutch Obstetric System: low-risk nulliparous women preferring home or short-stay hospital birth - a prospective non-randomised controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrix, Marijke JC; Evers, Silvia MAA; Basten, Marloes CM; Nijhuis, Jan G; Severens, Johan L

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In the Netherlands, pregnant women without medical complications can decide where they want to give birth, at home or in a short-stay hospital setting with a midwife. However, a decrease in the home birth rate during the last decennium may have raised the societal costs of giving birth. The objective of this study is to compare the societal costs of home births with those of births in a short-stay hospital setting. Methods This study is a cost analysis based on the finding...

  3. Cost Analysis of the Dutch Obstetric System: low-risk nulliparous women preferring home or short-stay hospital birth - a prospective non-randomised controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijhuis Jan G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands, pregnant women without medical complications can decide where they want to give birth, at home or in a short-stay hospital setting with a midwife. However, a decrease in the home birth rate during the last decennium may have raised the societal costs of giving birth. The objective of this study is to compare the societal costs of home births with those of births in a short-stay hospital setting. Methods This study is a cost analysis based on the findings of a multicenter prospective non-randomised study comparing two groups of nulliparous women with different preferences for where to give birth, at home or in a short-stay hospital setting. Data were collected using cost diaries, questionnaires and birth registration forms. Analysis of the data is divided into a base case analysis and a sensitivity analysis. Results In the group of home births, the total societal costs associated with giving birth at home were €3,695 (per birth, compared with €3,950 per birth in the group for short-stay hospital births. Statistically significant differences between both groups were found regarding the following cost categories 'Cost of contacts with health care professionals during delivery' (€138.38 vs. €87.94, -50 (2.5-97.5 percentile range (PR-76;-25, p Conclusion The total costs associated with pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum care are comparable for home birth and short-stay hospital birth. The most important differences in costs between the home birth group and the short-stay hospital birth group are associated with maternity care assistance, hospitalisation, and travelling costs.

  4. The management of subjective quality of life by short-stay hospital patients: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlinski Evelyn

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tested the homeostatic model of subjective quality of life in a group of 47 short stay patients as they progressed through the stages of hospitalization for surgery. Method Participants completed a questionnaire measuring subjective quality of life, positive and negative affect, self-esteem, optimism and cognitive flexibility, the day prior to admission (T1, two days post-operation (T2 and one week after discharge (T3. Neuroticism and Extroversion were measured at Time 1. Results All variables remained stable across the three times, apart from positive affect, which dropped significantly post-operation but returned to its previous level post discharge. Conclusion Although the homeostatic model of subjective quality of life was supported at Time 1, the analyses raise doubts about the stability of personality. This finding is consistent with recent discussions of personality.

  5. Predicting discharge in forensic psychiatry: the legal and psychosocial factors associated with long and short stays in forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Thomas; Querengässer, Jan; Fontao, María Isabel; Hoffmann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, both the number of patients treated in forensic psychiatric hospitals and the average inpatient treatment period have been increasing for over thirty years. Biographical and clinical factors, e.g., the number of prior offences, type of offence, and psychiatric diagnosis, count among the factors that influence the treatment duration and the likelihood of discharge. The aims of the current study were threefold: (1) to provide an estimate of the German forensic psychiatric patient population with a low likelihood of discharge, (2) to replicate a set of personal variables that predict a relatively high, as opposed to a low, likelihood of discharge from forensic psychiatric hospitals, and (3) to describe a group of other factors that are likely to add to the existing body of knowledge. Based on a sample of 899 patients, we applied a battery of primarily biographical and other personal variables to two subgroups of patients. The first subgroup of patients had been treated in a forensic psychiatric hospital according to section 63 of the German legal code for at least ten years (long-stay patients, n=137), whereas the second subgroup had been released after a maximum treatment period of four years (short-stay patients, n=67). The resulting logistic regression model had a high goodness of fit, with more than 85% of the patients correctly classified into the groups. In accordance with earlier studies, we found a series of personal variables, including age at first admission and type of offence, to be predictive of a short or long-stay. Other findings, such as the high number of immigrants among the short-stay patients and the significance of a patient's work time before admission to a forensic psychiatric hospital, are more clearly represented than has been observed in previous research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Increasing Short-Stay Unplanned Hospital Admissions among Children in England; Time Trends Analysis ’97–‘06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Sonia; Bottle, Alex; Gilbert, Ruth; Sharland, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Background Timely care by general practitioners in the community keeps children out of hospital and provides better continuity of care. Yet in the UK, access to primary care has diminished since 2004 when changes in general practitioners' contracts enabled them to ‘opt out’ of providing out-of-hours care and since then unplanned pediatric hospital admission rates have escalated, particularly through emergency departments. We hypothesised that any increase in isolated short stay admissions for childhood illness might reflect failure to manage these cases in the community over a 10 year period spanning these changes. Methods and Findings We conducted a population based time trends study of major causes of hospital admission in children 2 days. By 2006, 67.3% of all unplanned admissions were isolated short stays <2 days. The increases in admission rates were greater for common non-infectious than infectious causes of admissions. Conclusions Short stay unplanned hospital admission rates in young children in England have increased substantially in recent years and are not accounted for by reductions in length of in-hospital stay. The majority are isolated short stay admissions for minor illness episodes that could be better managed by primary care in the community and may be evidence of a failure of primary care services. PMID:19829695

  7. Home birth or short-stay hospital birth in a low risk population in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegers, T.A.; Zee, J. van der; Kerssens, J.J.; Keirse, M.J.N.C.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands women with low risk pregnancies can choose whether they want to give birth at home or in hospital, under the care of their own primary caregiver. The majority of these women prefer to give birth at home, but over the last few decades an increasing number of low risk women have

  8. [Impact of an emergency department short-stay unit on clinical management and quality of hospital care indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Espiga, Fernando; Mòdol Deltell, Josep María; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Fernández Sierra, Abel; Fernández Pérez, Cristina; Pastor, Antoni Juan

    2017-06-01

    The primary aim was to study the impact that creating a short-stay unit (SSU) had on clinical management and quality of care indicators of a hospital overall and its conventional wards. The secondary aim was to establish values for those indicators and determine the level of satisfaction of patients admitted to the SSU. Quasi-experimental before-after study of the impact of establishing a SSU in a tertiary care teaching hospital. The first period (without the SSU) was in 2012, the second (with the SSU) was from 2013 through 2015. To meet the first objective we selected cases in 2012 in which patients were hospitalized for problems related to the 5 diagnosis-related groups most often admitted to the SSU in the second period. To meet the second objective, we studied all patients admitted to the SSU in the second period Data related to quality of care and clinical management were analyzed retrospectively. and asked them to complete a questionnaire on patient satisfaction. A total of 76 241 admissions were included: 19 090 in the first period and 57 151 in the second (2705 admissions were to the SSU). The mean hospital stay decreased in the second period (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.93; 95% CI, 0.91-0.95); the mean stay also decreased on medical wards (IRR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.96) with no impact on adverse outcomes. The mean stay in the SSU was under 3 days in spite of an increase in the weighted mean (IRR,1.08; 95% CI, 1.05-1.11). A total of 320 questionnaires were received (11.8% response rate); all aspects were assessed very highly. Our experience suggests that opening a SSU could improve clinical management and quality of care indicators for a hospital overall and for its conventional wards in the context of the GRDs that most frequently lead to admissions.

  9. [Results of pulmonary embolism treatment in a tertiary hospital short stay unit. Is this the right place?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa Salazar, V; Bernal Martínez, L; García Pino, M J; Hernández Contreras, M E; García Méndez, M M; García Pérez, B; Marras Fernández-Cid, C

    2016-01-01

    To determine the mean stay (MS) of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) in a thrombosis unit (TU) with a short stay unit (SSU) in a tertiary hospital. To compare the data collected with those of other hospitals in the same region, of other regions (Autonomous Communities [AACC]), and within the same hospital in the year before the SSU opened. A descriptive retrospective observational study that included patients with a diagnosis of PE in the University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca (HCUVA) in 2012. These data were classified by hospital department, and used for calculating the mean stay. This was then compared with that of other hospitals in our region, with the rest of the regions, and with the data in 2007 (the last year without a TU). A total of 113patients with PE were included, 60 (53%) in the TU with an MS of 4.39, in Oncology, 7.45, and Internal Medicine (IM), 15.38days. There were no deaths in the TU and only 3 (5%) readmissions. Published data showed that the MS in all hospitals in our region was 8.25, 5.18 in our hospital, and higher in the rest of hospitals. The best AACC was the Basque Country with an MS of 6.85days. In 2007, there were 70patients with PE in the HCUVA, 34 (49%) in IM, with an MS of 8.50, Oncology 11 (31%) with an MS 9.64, and Chest Diseases 3 (4.3%) with an MS 19days, and with an overall mortality of 11% and a rate of readmissions in IM of 6%. The mean stay for a PE in the SSU of a TU was lower than in the rest of the hospital departments, lower than the rest hospitals of our region, lower than the rest of the regions, and lower than any department of our hospital before the SSU existed, without increasing the readmission or mortality rate. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [The development and benefits of working together in geriatric short stay units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Ambroise-Paré hospital (AP-HP, 92) set up a new work organisation based on the nurse/nursing auxiliary partnership in the geriatric short stay unit in response to the wishes of the healthcare manager and nursing team. It was introduced over three months and in several stages in order to limit sticking points and support the team in its new practice.

  11. [Medical short stay unit for geriatric patients in the emergency department: clinical and healthcare benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Teresa; Hornillos, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez, Javier; Madrigal, María; Mauleón, Coro; Alvarez, Bárbara

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of comprehensive geriatric assessment and management of high-risk elders in a medical short stay unit located in the emergency department of a general hospital. We performed a descriptive, prospective study of patients admitted to the medical short stay unit for geriatric patients of the emergency department in 2006. A total of 749 patients were evaluated, with a mean (standard deviation) stay in the unit of 37 (16) h. The mean age was 86 (7) years; 57% were women, and 50% had moderate-severe physical impairment and dementia. Thirty-five percent lived in a nursing home. The most frequent reason for admission was exacerbation of chronic cardiopulmonary disease. Multiple geriatric syndromes were identified. The most frequent were immobility, pressure sores and behavioral disorders related to dementia. Seventy percent of the patients were discharged to home after being stabilized and were followed-up by the geriatric clinic and day hospital (39%), the home care medical team (11%), or the nursing home or primary care physician (20%). During the month after discharge, 17% were readmitted and 7.7% died, especially patients with more advanced age or functional impairment. After the unit was opened, admissions to the acute geriatric unit fell by 18.2%. Medical short stay units for geriatric patients in emergency departments may be useful for geriatric assessment and treatment of exacerbations of chronic diseases. These units can help to reduce the number of admissions and optimize the care provided in other ambulatory and domiciliary geriatric settings.

  12. Modeling the effect of short stay units on patient admissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, Maartje Elisabeth; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Carter, Michael W.; Stanford, David A.

    Two purposes of Short Stay Units (SSU) are the reduction of Emergency Department crowding and increased urgent patient admissions. At an SSU urgent patients are temporarily held until they either can go home or transferred to an inpatient ward. In this paper we present an overflow model to evaluate

  13. Age and admission times as predictive factors for failure of admissions to discharge-stream short-stay units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Amith L; Shankar Raju, Savitha Banagar; Hermiz, Arsalan; Vaghasiya, Milan; Vukasovic, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    Discharge-stream emergency short-stay units (ESSU) improve ED and hospital efficiency. Age of patients and time of hospital presentations have been shown to correlate with increasing complexity of care. We aim to determine whether an age and time cut-off could be derived to subsequently improve short-stay unit success rates. We conducted a retrospective audit on 6703 (5522 inclusions) patients admitted to our discharge-stream short-stay unit. Patients were classified as appropriate or inappropriate admissions, and deemed successful if discharged out of the unit within 24 h; and failures if they needed inpatient admission into the hospital. We calculated short-stay unit length of stay for patients in each of these groups. A 15% failure rate was deemed as acceptable key performance indicator (KPI) for our unit. There were 197 out of 4621 (4.3%, 95% CI 3.7-4.9%) patients up to the age of 70 who failed admission to ESSU compared with 67 out of 901 (7.4%, 95% CI 5.9-9.3%, P 70 years of age have higher rates of failure after admission to discharge-stream ESSU. Although in appropriately selected discharge-stream patients, no age group or time-band of presentation was associated with increased failure rate beyond the stipulated KPI. © 2014 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  14. Hospitalisation in an emergency department short-stay unit compared to an internal medicine department is associated with fewer complications in older patients - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Camilla; Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Kromberg, Laurits Schou

    2017-01-01

    Medicine Department (IMD). METHODS: Observational study evaluating adverse events during hospitalisation in non-emergent, age-matched, internal medicine patients ≥75 years, acutely admitted to either the SSU or the IMD at Holbaek Hospital, Denmark, from January to August, 2014. Medical records were......, unplanned readmission, and nosocomial infection. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse events of hospitalisation were significantly less common in older patients acutely admitted to an Emergency Department Short-stay Unit as compared to admission to an Internal Medicine Department.......BACKGROUND: Older patients are at particular risk of experiencing adverse events during hospitalisation. OBJECTIVE: To compare the frequencies and types of adverse events during hospitalisation in older persons acutely admitted to either an Emergency Department Short-stay Unit (SSU) or an Internal...

  15. [Management accounting in hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzović, Z; Richter, D; Simunić, S; Bozić, R; Hadjina, N; Piacun, D; Harcet, B

    1998-12-01

    The periodic income and expenditure accounts produced at the hospital and departmental level enable successful short term management, but, in the long run do not help remove tensions between health care demand and limited resources, nor do they enable optimal medical planning within the limited financial resources. We are trying to estabilish disease category costs based on case mixing according to diagnostic categories (diagnosis related groups, DRG, or health care resource groups, HRG) and calculation of hospital standard product costs, e.g., radiology cost, preoperative nursing cost etc. The average DRG cost is composed of standard product costs plus any costs specific to a diagnostic category. As an example, current costing procedure for hip artheroplasty in the University Hospital Center Zagreb is compared to the management accounting approach based on British Health Care Resource experience. The knowledge of disease category costs based on management accounting requirements facilitates the implementation of medical programs within the given financial resources and devolves managerial responsibility closer to the clinical level where medical decisions take place.

  16. Changes in the epidemiology of gastroenteritis in a paediatric short stay unit following the introduction of rotavirus immunisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akikusa, Jonathan D; Hopper, Sandy M; Kelly, Julian J; Kirkwood, Carl D; Buttery, Jim P

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) has been a significant component of the clinical load in the short stay unit (SSU) at the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) since its establishment in 2004. Since the introduction of routine rotavirus immunisation in Australia in 2007 there has been a clinical impression of a substantial reduction in AGE managed in the SSU. This study aimed to examine changes in the epidemiology of AGE in the SSU, and RCH overall, between 2005 and 2009 and explore whether this reflects a change specifically in AGE due to rotavirus. Discharge coding data for AGE from all inpatient wards, the SSU and emergency department (ED) at the RCH were examined. Stool virology results for the same period were analysed. Since 2007 there has been a 58% reduction in AGE admissions to the SSU. The median age of patients admitted to the RCH with rotaviral enteritis has increased from 1.3 years to 3.8 years. Presentations to the ED for AGE have fallen from 53 to 34 cases per 1000 attendances between 2004 and 2009, and admission rates from the ED have fallen from 23 to 13% of AGE presentations. Detection rates of rotavirus fell from 13.1 to 6.7% between 2005 and 2009. A marked decrease in AGE-related clinical activity and reduction in rotavirus detection at the RCH has occurred since the introduction of routine rotavirus immunisation in Australia. This has significant resource planning implications for units based on short stay models of care. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Total quality management in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D F

    1994-01-01

    With the increasing demands on hospitals for improved quality and lower costs, hospitals have been forced to reevaluate their manner of operation and quality assurance (QA) programs. Hospitals have been faced with customer dissatisfaction with services, escalating costs, intense competition, and reduced reimbursement for services. As a result, many hospitals have incorporated total quality management (TQM), also known as continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality improvement (QI), to improve quality care and decrease costs. This article examines the concept of TQM, its rationale, and how it can be implemented in a hospital. A comparison of TQM and QA is made. Examples of hospital implementation of TQM and problems and issues associated with TQM in the hospital setting are explored.

  18. Mentoring Nurse Practitioners in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Rodica S

    2017-08-01

    Nursing philosophy is the foundation of nurse practitioner (NP) training. However, NP practice is based on the medical care model. Thus, the necessity of mediating between these two approaches is often problematic for new NPs who are transitioning into their new roles. Mentoring has been used successfully to facilitate role transition and role understanding for nurses, NPs, and physicians. However, mentoring has been rarely studied in NPs. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory of mentoring for new NPs in a hospital setting. Grounded theory methodology was used. The sampling approach was initially purposive and was then shifted to theoretical to ensure the collection of meaningful data. Semistructuredinterviews were recorded and transcribed into Word documents for analysis. The three-phase analysis developed by Corbin and Strauss was initiated after the second interview. Sixteen participants (eight mentors and eight mentees) were interviewed between February and June 2011. The core category that emerged from the data was "defining self," and the main categories were forming the relationship, developing the relationship, and mentoring outcomes. A well-designed formal mentoring program may greatly improve the transition of NPs into a new role. The theory generated by the data from these study participants provides clearly defined categories that may be operationally defined and utilized to develop evaluation tools for mentoring programs.

  19. Occupational health in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Blacklaws

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Health services and especially hospitals, are amongst the employers with the largest number of employees in the country. Those employed in the service have the right to as high a standard of occupational health as found in industry at its best. Health services in hospitals should use techniques of preventive employees and reduces absenteeism due to sickness and other causes. It health requirements of the employees. Hospitals should serve as examples to the public regarding health education, preventive medicine and job safety. Hospitals have a moral and legal obligation to: — provide a safe and healthful working environment for employees; — protect employees from special risks and hazards associated with their occ u p a t i o n s , su c h as c o n t a g io u s diseases; — protect patients from risks associated with unhealthy employees. Experience in other employee groups has shown that an occupational health service results in healthier, more effective employees and reduces absenteeism due to sickness and other causes. It also reduces labour turnover and Workmen’s compensation and other insurance claims.

  20. Validation of the PHEEM instrument in a Danish hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Knut; Bastholt, Lars; Bested, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) has been translated into Danish and then validated with good internal consistency by 342 Danish junior and senior hospital doctors. Four of the 40 items are culturally dependent in the Danish hospital setting. Factor analysis...... demonstrated that seven items are interconnected. This information can be used to shorten the instrument by perhaps another three items...

  1. The impact of a change in referral pathway on a paediatric short-stay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthcare systems in certain regions of SA. ... Care Unit owing to incorrect use of referral pathways or during ... Due to budget constraints, limited resources .... Hospital. Home. Primary care clinic. Fig. 2. Origin of referral for each SD for 2011.

  2. 42 CFR 412.529 - Special payment provision for short-stay outliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... deviation from the geometric ALOS of the same DRG under the inpatient prospective payment system (the IPPS... hospital inpatient prospective payment system geometric average length of stay of the specific DRG... system DRG weighting factors. (B) Is adjusted for different area wage levels based on the geographic...

  3. Leadership and priority setting: the perspective of hospital CEOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeleder, David; Goel, Vivek; Singer, Peter A; Martin, Douglas K

    2006-11-01

    The role of leadership in health care priority setting remains largely unexplored. While the management leadership literature has grown rapidly, the growing literature on priority setting in health care has looked in other directions to improve priority setting practices--to health economics and ethical approaches. Consequently, potential for improvement in hospital priority setting practices may be overlooked. A qualitative study involving interviews with 46 Ontario hospital CEOs was done to describe the role of leadership in priority setting through the perspective of hospital leaders. For the first time, we report a framework of leadership domains including vision, alignment, relationships, values and process to facilitate priority setting practices in health services' organizations. We believe this fledgling framework forms the basis for the sharing of good leadership practices for health reform. It also provides a leadership guide for decision makers to improve the quality of their leadership, and in so doing, we believe, the fairness of their priority setting.

  4. Nurse odor perception in various Japanese hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Horiguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because unpleasant hospital odors affect the nursing environment, we investigated nurses' perceptions of the odors of various hospital settings: hospital rooms, nurse stations, and human waste disposal rooms to discard the urine, stools and diapers. A questionnaire based on the Japanese Ministry of the Environment's guidelines on odor index regulation was used to assess nurses' perceptions of odor intensity, comfort, tolerability, and description in the aforementioned settings. Questionnaires were distributed to nursing department directors at three Japanese hospitals, who then disseminated the questionnaires to nursing staff. Of the 1,151 questionnaires distributed, 496 nurses participated. Human waste disposal rooms had greater odor intensity and were perceived as more uncomfortable than the other settings. Unpleasant odors in disposal rooms, hospital rooms, and nurse stations were rated as slightly intolerable in comparison. Hospital and disposal rooms were mainly described as having a “pungent odor such as of urine and stool.” In contrast, nurse stations were described as having other unpleasant odors, such as chemical, human-body-related, or sewage-like odors. Given that nurses spend much of their time in hospital rooms and nurse stations, odor management in these two settings would likely improve nurses' working conditions at hospitals. Improving odors at nurse stations is feasible. Such improvements could have indirect effects on nurse turnover and burnout.

  5. An Elder Abuse Assessment Team in an Acute Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Beth Israel Hospital Elder Assessment Team

    1986-01-01

    Describes a hospital-based multidisciplinary team designed to assess and respond to cases of suspected abuse or neglect of elders from both institutional and community settings. Presence of the team has increased the hospital staff's awareness of elder abuse and neglect, as well as their willingness to refer suspected cases for further assessment.…

  6. Setting healthcare priorities in hospitals: a review of empirical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasa, Edwine W; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike; Cleary, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Priority setting research has focused on the macro (national) and micro (bedside) level, leaving the meso (institutional, hospital) level relatively neglected. This is surprising given the key role that hospitals play in the delivery of healthcare services and the large proportion of health systems resources that they absorb. To explore the factors that impact upon priority setting at the hospital level, we conducted a thematic review of empirical studies. A systematic search of PubMed, EBSCOHOST, Econlit databases and Google scholar was supplemented by a search of key websites and a manual search of relevant papers' reference lists. A total of 24 papers were identified from developed and developing countries. We applied a policy analysis framework to examine and synthesize the findings of the selected papers. Findings suggest that priority setting practice in hospitals was influenced by (1) contextual factors such as decision space, resource availability, financing arrangements, availability and use of information, organizational culture and leadership, (2) priority setting processes that depend on the type of priority setting activity, (3) content factors such as priority setting criteria and (4) actors, their interests and power relations. We observe that there is need for studies to examine these issues and the interplay between them in greater depth and propose a conceptual framework that might be useful in examining priority setting practices in hospitals. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  7. Multifaceted Pharmacist-led Interventions in the Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Olesen, Carina Lundby; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel

    2018-01-01

    Clinical pharmacy services often comprise complex interventions. In this MiniReview, we conducted a systematic review aiming to evaluate the impact of multifaceted pharmacist-led interventions in a hospital setting. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and CINAHL for peer-reviewed articles...... published from 2006 to 1 March 2018. Controlled trials concerning hospitalized patients in any setting receiving patient-related multifaceted pharmacist-led interventions were considered. All types of outcomes were accepted. Inclusion and data extraction was performed. Study characteristics were collected......) showed no significant results. This rMiniReview indicates that multifaceted pharmacist-led interventions in a hospital setting may improve the quality of medication use, reduce hospital visits and length of stay, while no effect was seen on mortality, patient-reported outcomes and cost...

  8. Acidosis in the hospital setting: is metformin a common precipitant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K A; Martin, J H; Inder, W J

    2010-05-01

    Acidosis is commonly seen in the acute hospital setting, and carries a high mortality. Metformin has been associated with lactic acidosis, but it is unclear how frequently this is a cause of acidosis in hospitalized inpatients. The aim of this study is to explore the underlying comorbidities and acute precipitants of acidosis in the hospital setting, including the relationship between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and metformin use. Retrospective review. Cases of acidosis were identified using the hospital discharge code for acidosis for a 3-month period: October-December 2005. A total of 101 episodes of acidosis were identified: 29% had isolated respiratory acidosis, 31% had metabolic acidosis and 40% had a mixed respiratory and metabolic acidosis. There were 28 cases of confirmed lactic acidosis. Twenty-nine patients had T2DM, but only five of the subjects with T2DM had lactic acidosis; two were on metformin. The major risk factors for development of lactic acidosis were hepatic impairment (OR 33.8, P = 0.01), severe left ventricular dysfunction (OR 25.3, P = 0.074) and impaired renal function (OR 9.7, P = 0.09), but not metformin use. Most cases of metabolic and lactic acidosis in the hospital setting occur in patients not taking metformin. Hepatic, renal and cardiac dysfunction are more important predictors for the development of acidosis.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed by a Canadian Short-Stay Surgical Team in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelmilch, Michael; Rashiq, Saifee; Moreau, Barbara; Jarrín, Patricia; Tran, Bach; Chuck, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Few charitable overseas surgical missions produce cost-effectiveness analyses of their work. We compared the pre- and postoperative health status for 157 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients operated on from 2007 to 2011 attended by an annual Canadian orthopedic mission to Ecuador to determine the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. The costs of each mission are known. The cost per surgery was divided by the average lifetime QALYs gained to estimate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in Canadian dollars per QALY. The average lifetime QALYs (95% CI) gained were 1.46 (1.4-1.5), 2.5 (2.4-2.6), and 2.9 (2.7-3.1) for unilateral, bilateral, and staged (two THAs in different years) operations, respectively. The ICERs were $4,442 for unilateral, $2,939 for bilateral, and $4392 for staged procedures. Seventy percent of the mission budget was spent on the transport and accommodation of volunteers. THA by a Canadian short-stay surgical team was highly cost-effective, according to criteria from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the World Health Organization. We encourage other international missions to provide similar cost-effectiveness data to enable better comparison between mission types and between mission and nonmission care.

  10. Role of the nurse in the short stay immunotherapy Unit during the administration of intravenous anda subcutaneous gammaglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosales Sánchez Isis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing development of medical specialties, an urgent necessity of parallel specialties in the laboratories and nursing fields becomes evident. Immunology is the field of science responsible for the study of defense responses developed by an individual in the face of aggression by microorganisms or foreign particles as well as those coming from the internal environment such as neoplastic cells.1 Immunology is considered as a young discipline with an spectacular development that took place in the second half of 20th century. From then till date, there have been many important spectacular advances in the area leading to its consolidation as an independent science separate from microbiology. As part of the Immunology Service at the Instituto Nacional de Pediatria (INP, the Short-Stay Immunotherapy Unity (SSI was established. This unity has been fundamental in ensuring adequate treatment for patients with primary immunodeficiency and autoim- mune in the long term. We highlight the roles of the nursing staff of SSI in the area of drug preparation and patient care.

  11. Pressure Ulcer Prevention : Performance and Implementation in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Sving, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers are related to reduced quality of life for patients and high costs for health care. Guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention have been available for many years but the problem remains. Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate hospital setting factors that are important to the performance of pressure ulcer prevention and to evaluate an intervention focused on implementing evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention. Methods: Four studies with a qualitativ...

  12. Posttraumatic stress following childbirth in homelike- and hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramrood, Claire A I; Paarlberg, K Marieke; Huis In 't Veld, Elisabeth M J; Berger, Leonard W A R; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M; Schultz, Willibrord C M Weijmar; van Pampus, Maria G

    2011-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following childbirth in homelike versus hospital settings and to determine risk factors for the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms. METHODS.: Multi-center cross-sectional study at midwifery practices, general hospitals and a tertiary (university) referral center. An unselected population of 907 women was invited to complete questionnaires on PTSD, demographic, psychosocial, and obstetric characteristics 2 to 6 months after delivery. Prevalence of PTSD was based on women who met all criteria of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV), whereas risk factors were determined using the severity (sum-score) of posttraumatic stress symptoms. PTSD following childbirth was found in 1.2% of the respondents (5/428 women, response rate 47%), while 9.1% of women (39/428) had experienced the delivery as traumatic. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were associated with unplanned cesarean section, low sense of coherence (coping skills), and high intensity of pain. Initial differences in posttraumatic stress symptoms between home and hospital deliveries disappeared after taking into account the (by definition) uncomplicated nature of home births. In this Dutch study, 1 in 100 women had PTSD following childbirth, with no differences between home- and hospital deliveries after controlling for complications and interventions. Emergency cesarean section, severe labor pain, and poor coping skills were associated with more posttraumatic stress symptoms.

  13. Environmental qualities and patient wellbeing in hospital settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2013-01-01

    undertaken by Architecture and Design and the Danish Building Research Institute (Aalborg University) set out in 2008 to review research on the impact of the environmental qualities of health-care facilities on patients and staff. The objective of the review team was to develop a tool that would allow......Within the last decades the impacts of the physical environments of hospitals on healing and health-care outcomes have been subject to ample research. The amount of documentation linking the design of physical environments to patient and staff outcomes is increasing. A Danish research project...

  14. Methods for extracellular vesicles isolation in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías eSáenz-Cuesta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research in extracellular vesicles (EVs has been rising during the last decade. However, there is no clear consensus on the most accurate protocol to isolate and analyze them. Besides, most of the current protocols are difficult to implement in a hospital setting due to being very time consuming or to requirements of specific infrastructure. Thus, our aim is to compare five different protocols (comprising two different medium-speed differential centrifugation protocols; commercially polymeric precipitation -exoquick-; acid precipitation; and ultracentrifugation for blood and urine samples to determine the most suitable one for the isolation of EVs. Nanoparticle tracking analysis, flow cytometry, western blot, electronic microscopy and spectrophotometry were used to characterize basic aspects of EVs such us concentration, size distribution, cell-origin and transmembrane markers and RNA concentration. The highest EV concentrations were obtained using the exoquick protocol, followed by both differential centrifugation protocols, while the ultracentrifugation and acid-precipitation protocols yielded considerably lower EV concentrations. The five protocols isolated EVs of similar characteristics regarding markers and RNA concentration however standard protocol recovered only small EVs. EV isolated with exoquick presented difficult to be analyzed with western blot. The RNA concentrations obtained from urine-derived EVs were similar to those obtained from blood-derived ones, despite the urine EV concentration being 10 to 20 times lower. We consider that a medium-speed differential centrifugation could be suitable to be applied in a hospital setting due to require the simplest infrastructure and recover higher concentration of EV than standard protocol. A workflow from sampling to characterization of EVs is proposed.

  15. Psychometric properties of the postgraduate hospital educational environment measure in an Iranian hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokoohi, Shahrzad; Hossein Emami, Amir; Mohammadi, Aeen; Ahmadi, Soleiman; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the educational environment are an important construct in assessing and enhancing the quality of medical training programs. Reliable and valid measurement, however, can be problematic - especially as instruments developed and tested in one culture are translated for use in another. This study sought to explore the psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) for use in an Iranian hospital training setting. We translated the instrument into Persian and ensured its content validity by back translation and expert review prior to administering it to 127 residents of Urmia University of Medical Science. Overall internal consistency of the translated measure was good (a=0.94). Principal components analysis revealed five factors accounting for 52.8% of the variance. The Persian version of the PHEEM appears to be a reliable and potentially valid instrument for use in Iranian medical schools and may find favor in evaluating the educational environments of residency programs nationwide.

  16. Influence of multi-level anaesthesia care and patient profile on perioperative patient satisfaction in short-stay surgical inpatients: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goals of study: Patient satisfaction in relation to perioperative anesthesia care represents essential aspect of quality health-care management. We analyzed the influence of multi-level anesthesia care exposure and patient profile on perioperative patient satisfaction in short-stay surgical inpatients. Methods : 120 short-stay surgical inpatients who underwent laparoscopic surgery have been included in this prospective study. Pertaining to demographic parameters (age, gender, education, profession, duration of stay (preoperative room, recovery room, various patient problems and patient satisfaction (various levels, overall were recorded by an independent observer and analyzed. Overall, adults, male and uneducated patients experienced more problems. Conversely, elderly, females and educated patients were more dissatisfied. Female patients suffered more during immediate postoperative recovery room stay and were more dissatisfied than their male counterparts (p< 0.05. However, patient′s professional status had no bearing on the problems encountered and dissatisfaction levels. Preoperative and early postoperative period accounted for majority of the problems encountered among the study population. There was a positive correlation between problems faced and dissatisfaction experienced at respective levels of anesthesia care (p< 0.05. Conclusion(s : Patient′s demographic profile and problems faced during respective level of anesthesia care has a correlation with dissatisfaction. Interestingly, none of the above stated factors had any effect on overall satisfaction level.

  17. Biomechanical evaluation of nursing tasks in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, R; Karwowski, W; Quesada, P M; Rodrick, D; Sherehiy, B; Cronin, S N; Layer, J K

    2007-11-01

    A field study was conducted to investigate spinal kinematics and loading in the nursing profession using objective and subjective measurements of selected nursing tasks observed in a hospital setting. Spinal loading was estimated using trunk motion dynamics measured by the lumbar motion monitor (LMM) and lower back compressive and shear forces were estimated using the three-dimensional (3D) Static Strength Prediction Program. Subjective measures included the rate of perceived physical effort and the perceived risk of low back pain. A multiple logistic regression model, reported in the literature for predicting low back injury based on defined risk groups, was tested. The study results concluded that the major risk factors for low back injury in nurses were the weight of patients handled, trunk moment, and trunk axial rotation. The activities that required long time exposure to awkward postures were perceived by nurses as a high physical effort. This study also concluded that self-reported perceived exertion could be used as a tool to identify nursing activities with a high risk of low-back injury.

  18. The scale of hospital production in different settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hollingsworth, Bruce; Birch, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the productive efficiency of 141 public hospitals from 1998-2004 in two Canadian provinces; one a small province with a few small cities and a generally more rural population and the other a large province that is more urban in nature, with a population who mainly live in large...... - different hospitals may have different optimal sizes, or different efficient modes of operation, depending on location, the population they serve, and the policies their respective provincial governments wish to implement. In addition, there are lessons to be learned by comparing the hospitals across...

  19. Psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure in an Iranian hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shokoohi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students’ perceptions of the educational environment are an important construct in assessing and enhancing the quality of medical training programs. Reliable and valid measurement, however, can be problematic – especially as instruments developed and tested in one culture are translated for use in another. Materials and method: This study sought to explore the psychometric properties of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM for use in an Iranian hospital training setting. We translated the instrument into Persian and ensured its content validity by back translation and expert review prior to administering it to 127 residents of Urmia University of Medical Science. Results: Overall internal consistency of the translated measure was good (a=0.94. Principal components analysis revealed five factors accounting for 52.8% of the variance. Conclusion: The Persian version of the PHEEM appears to be a reliable and potentially valid instrument for use in Iranian medical schools and may find favor in evaluating the educational environments of residency programs nationwide.

  20. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Hospital Settings

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  1. NICU OUTCOME IN A LOW RESOURCE TEACHING HOSPITAL SETTING

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil; Adarsh; Sahana; Prema; Tamil; Purushotham; Rajanish; Sebastain

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : To study the mortality pattern in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)in a low resource teaching hospital. METHODS : A retrospective study was conducted over a period of three years from January 2011 to December 2013. The medical records of all babies who died after being admitte d to the NICU were reviewed. Survival was defined as the discharge of a live infant from the hospital. Data regarding...

  2. [Philanthropic general hospitals: a new setting for psychiatric admissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrobla, Cristina; Botega, Neury José

    2006-12-01

    To understand the process that led Brazilian philanthropic general hospitals to implement psychiatric units and to describe the main characteristics and therapeutic approaches of these services. Ten institutions in three Brazilian states (Minas Gerais, São Paulo e Santa Catarina) were assessed in 2002. Forty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with health professionals who worked at the hospitals to collect data on service implementation process, therapeutic approaches and current situation. The interviews were audio-recorded and their content was analyzed. There was no mental hospital in the cities where the institutions were located. In five hospitals, psychiatric patients were admitted to general medical wards because there was no psychiatric unit. The therapeutic approach in six hospitals was based on psychopharmacological treatment. Due to lack of resources and more appropriate therapeutic planning, the admission of patients presenting psychomotor agitation increases resistance against psychiatric patients in general hospitals. Financial constraints regarding laboratory testing is still a challenge. There is no exchange between local authorities and hospital administrators of these institutions that are compelled to exceed the allowed number of admissions to meet the demand of neighboring cities. The need for mental health care to local populations combined with individual requests of local authorities and psychiatrists made possible the implementation of psychiatric units in these localities. In spite of the efforts and flexibility of health professional working in these institutions, there are some obstacles to be overcome: resistance of hospital community against psychiatric admissions, financial constraints, limited professional training in mental health and the lack of a therapeutic approach that goes beyond psychopharmacological treatment alone.

  3. Hospital Costs Associated With Agitation in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cots, Francesc; Chiarello, Pietro; Pérez, Victor; Gracia, Alfredo; Becerra, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The study determined hospital costs associated with a diagnosis of agitation among patients at 14 general hospitals in Spain. Data from discharge records of adult patients (2008-2012) with a diagnosis of agitation (ICD-9-CM code 293.0) were analyzed. Incremental hospital costs for agitated patients and a control group of patients without agitation were quantified, and the adjusted cost and incremental cost for both groups were compared by use of a recycled-predictions approach. The analysis included 355,496 hospital discharges, 5,334 of which were of patients with a diagnosis of agitation. Among patients with a diagnosis of agitation, hospital stays were significantly longer (12 days versus nine days). A significant difference in mean costs of €472 (95% confidence interval [CI]=€351-€593) was noted between patients with agitation and those in the control group. A recycled-predictions approach showed a difference of €1,593(CI=€1,556-€1,631). Findings indicate that agitation increased the use of hospital resources by at least 8%.

  4. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: Case of smoking cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece Robin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Methods Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Results Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Conclusions Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during

  5. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: case of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sharon; Pieters, Karen; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Reece, Robin; Reid, Robert D

    2011-09-14

    The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC) is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up) were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during implementation may provide insight into issues affecting program

  6. Art viewing directives in hospital settings effect on mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Potash, Jordan S; Fang, Fan; Rollins, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect viewing directives can have when encountering art in hospitals. A secondary objective of the study was to understand the responses of viewers to an art exhibit on the theme of medical student empathy toward patient pain and suffering. Displaying art in hospitals has been credited with increasing well-being of patients, visitors, and staff. Generally, hospital curators have focused on the type of art to display (natural, symbolic, and abstract). This focus has neglected the possibility that in addition to the type of art, the way that viewers engage art may also be responsible for the healing effect. Participants (n = 97) were randomly allocated into one of the viewing directives: (1) reflecting on one artwork, (2) creating a drawing or poem in response to one artwork, or (3) no direction. Prior to looking at the art and immediately after, participants were administered the Brief Mood Introspection Scale (BMIS) and offered an opportunity to participate in an interview. Pre-post results of the BMIS demonstrated that viewers who received directions achieved some therapeutic effect. Qualitative themes from the post-exhibit interviews identified that the empathy themed exhibit was well received, although there were differences among responses from patients, visitors, and staff. The results imply that hospitals may consider offering prompts to help viewers engage with art to enhance mood and exhibiting art that demonstrates empathy for patient suffering. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Posttraumatic stress following childbirth in homelike- and hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramrood, C.A.; Paarlberg, K.M.; Huis In 't Veld, E.M.; Berger, L.W.; Vingerhoets, A.J.; Weijmar Schultz, W.C.; van Pampus, M.G.

    Methods. aEuro integral Multi-center cross-sectional study at midwifery practices, general hospitals and a tertiary (university) referral center. An unselected population of 907 women was invited to complete questionnaires on PTSD, demographic, psychosocial, and obstetric characteristics 2 to 6

  8. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  9. Spiritual Care in a Hospital Setting: Nurses’ and Patients’ Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasblom, J.P.; Steen, van der J.T.; Jochemsen, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Trent Universities Interprofessional Learning in Practice (TUILIP) project aimed to establish interprofessional learning (IPL) for healthcare students in clinical practice settings. Ten IPL facilitators were employed in eight varied practice setting pilot sites for up to a year to research,

  10. Problematics of open prostatectomy in an Ivorian District Hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgbakor, Anthony Chukwura

    2012-09-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy forms the bulk of urology workload in many sub-Saharan African hospitals. However, its management in secondary hospitals encounters specific problems that are rarely seen in the bigger tertiary institutions. We have tried to describe these difficulties across an account of open prostatectomy in regional secondary referral hospitals in the Côte d'Ivoire. This is a retrospective account of the specific difficulties encountered in the management of 327 consecutive cases of open prostatectomy carried out between August 1991 and September 2007 mainly in two secondary referral hospitals in the Côte d'Ivoire. The difficulties were at different levels: late presentation with 309 (94.5%) of the patients having experienced at least an episode of acute retention of urine, surgery while most patients were still carrying a catheter, minimal investigations carried out, scoring the patients in the IPSS scale, shortage of funds in the course of the management, and surveillance in the immediate postoperative period. The overall results were relatively satisfactory given our conditions of work. The most frequent complications were wound infection (14.7%), bleeding requiring transfusion (8.6%) and re-operation for clot retention (4.3%). We had a case (0.3%) of the rare prostato-rectal fistula which was managed conservatively. There were 4 deaths (1.2%). Open prostatectomy is the only surgical option for the management of benign prostatic hypertrophy in most of the urology centers of sub-Saharan Africa. Concerning its management away from the Tertiary Institutes, the surgery team is faced with specific problems which demand precise adaptations. Despite difficult working conditions, the results are sufficiently encouraging and gratifying to justify its pursuit while Urologists await the availability of equipments for transurethral resection of the prostate and other novel techniques.

  11. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Torunn Bjørk; Glenys A. Hamilton

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with d...

  12. Management of Gout in a Hospital Setting: A Lost Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sarah; Chapman, Peter T; Frampton, Christopher; O'Donnell, John L; Raja, Rafi; Stamp, Lisa K

    2017-10-01

    Management of gout is frequently suboptimal. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients presenting to Christchurch Hospital for a gout flare and to determine whether management for both acute flares and urate lowering was in accordance with international recommendations. A retrospective audit was undertaken of all admissions to Christchurch Hospital from June 1, 2013, to May 31, 2014, in which gout was coded as a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis. Information including demographics, comorbidities, concomitant medications, treatment of acute gout, and urate lowering was collected. A total of 235 acute admissions for gout in 216 individuals were identified. Eleven individuals had 2 admissions and 4 individuals had 3 admissions. In 95/235 admissions (40.4%), gout was the primary diagnosis. Gout accounted for 95/77,321 (0.12%) of acute admissions. The treatment of acute gout was prednisone monotherapy in 170/235 (72.3%) of admissions. Serum urate was measured at some point during 123/235 (52.3%) of admissions, with only 19/123 (15.4%) at target urate level (gout are similar to that observed in other studies. Failure to initiate, change, or recommend alterations in urate-lowering therapy to achieve target urate in people with gout admitted to hospital represents a significant lost opportunity to improve longterm gout management.

  13. Characterizing and predicting rates of delirium across general hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Thomas H; Hart, Kamber L; Perlis, Roy H

    2017-05-01

    To better understand variation in reported rates of delirium, this study characterized delirium occurrence rate by department of service and primary admitting diagnosis. Nine consecutive years (2005-2013) of general hospital admissions (N=831,348) were identified across two academic medical centers using electronic health records. The primary admitting diagnosis and the treating clinical department were used to calculate occurrence rates of a previously published delirium definition composed of billing codes and natural language processing of discharge summaries. Delirium rates varied significantly across both admitting diagnosis group (X 2 10 =12786, pdelirium (86/109764; 0.08%) and neurological admissions the greatest (2851/25450; 11.2%). Although the rate of delirium varied across the two hospitals the relative rates within departments (r=0.96, pdelirium varies significantly across admitting diagnosis and hospital department. Both admitting diagnosis and department of care are even stronger predictors of risk than age; as such, simple risk stratification may offer avenues for targeted prevention and treatment efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Your short stay at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Genevieve; Koutava, Ioanna

    2018-01-01

    Digital flyer aiming to ensure people are aware of the provisions established by CERN, to promote a respectful and inclusive work environment. The flyer can be published e.g. via Indico conference web pages; along with meeting event announcements or in other media, as considered useful.

  15. Empowering nurses for work engagement and health in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Finegan, Joan

    2005-10-01

    Employee empowerment has become an increasingly important factor in determining employee health and wellbeing in restructured healthcare settings. The authors tested a theoretical model which specified the relationships among structural empowerment, 6 areas of worklife that promote employee engagement, and staff nurses' physical and mental health. A predictive, non-experimental design was used to test the model in a random sample of staff nurses. The authors discuss their findings and the implication for nurse administrators.

  16. En plena crisis económica: coste y efectividad de las unidades de estancia corta hospitalarias Economic crisis: cost and effectiveness of short stay hospital units

    OpenAIRE

    F. Epelde; M.L. Iglesias-Lepine; L. Anarte

    2012-01-01

    Fundamento. La duración de la estancia es el principal determinante del coste de una hospitalización, por lo que se deben implementar estrategias para reducir la estancia hospitalaria convencional manteniéndose los niveles de calidad. Las Unidades de Estancia Corta (UEC) nacen con el objetivo de disminuir la estancia hospitalaria en un grupo de patologias y pacientes determinados. El objetivo de este original es evaluar la bibliografía existente sobre la evidencia de la disminución del period...

  17. A Study to Determine the Best Method of Caring for Certain Short-Stay Surgical Patients at Reynolds Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    herniorrhaphy Umbilical sinus, excision Venectomy Ventral hernia GYNECOLOGIC Adhesions of clitoris, release Cervical polypectomy Condylomata acuminata...window Arch bars, removal and placement Branchial arch appendages, excision Bronchoscopy (Rigid) Caldwell-Luc operation Cervical node biopsy Closed...Breast mass, excision Bronchoscopy with operative procedure Cervical node biopsy Debridement of wound, infection, or burn Debridement of chest wall

  18. Reiki and its journey into a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryak, Elizabeth; Vitale, Anne

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest among health care providers, especially professional nurses to promote caring-healing approaches in patient care and self-care. Health care environments are places of human caring and holistic nurses are helping to lead the way that contemporary health care institutions must become holistic places of healing. The practice of Reiki as well as other practices can assist in the creation of this transformative process. Abington Memorial Hospital (AMH) in Abington, Pennsylvania is a Magnet-designated health care facility with an Integrative Medicine Services Department. AMH's Integrative Medicine staff focuses on the integration of holistic practices, such as Reiki into traditional patient care. Reiki services at AMH were initiated about 10 years ago through the efforts of a Reiki practitioner/nurse and the vision that healing is facilitated through the nurturing of the mind, body, and spirit for healing and self-healing. AMHs-sustained Reiki program includes Reiki treatments and classes for patients, health care providers, and community members. This program has evolved to include a policy and annual competency for any Reiki-trained nurse and other employees to administer Reiki treatments at the bedside.

  19. Early breast cancer detection in the hospital setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, A.; Ortega, E.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Erasun, F.; Millan, R.; Garijo, F.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the benefits of mammography in general and particularly as a screening method in the early detection of breast cancer in our hospital. All the cases of breast carcinoma registered in our section between 1989 and 1995 were reviewed retrospectively. The total number of carcinomas was 775, 168 (22%) of which were diagnosed solely on the basis of mammography. The percentage of carcinomas detected on the basis of mammography alone increased progressively (from 13% in 1989-1990 to 28% in 1994-1995), coinciding with a progressive rise in the volume of screening mammography. Early carcinomas, referring to those in stages O or I, represented 67% of those detected by mammography in general and 17% of those detected by palpation (p<0.001). The proportion was even greater among cases of carcinoma detected exclusively by screening mammography (78 versus 17%; p<0.001). Although mammography has been instrumental in increasing the rate of early detection of breast carcinoma in our center, a large number of patients still present with palpable lesions. Thus, a greater effort should be made to increase the practice of mammography in asymptomatic women. (Author) 13 refs

  20. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  1. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers

  2. Medicare's prospective payment system for hospitals: new evidence on transitions among health care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Xufeng; Russell, Louise B.; Valiyeva, Elmira; Miller, Jane E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies of Medicare’s prospective payment system for hospitals (PPS), introduced in 1983, evaluated only its first few years, using data collected during the hospital stay to control for patients’ health. We examine transitions among health care settings over a full decade following implementation of PPS, using survival models and a national longitudinal survey with independent information on health. We find that the rate of discharge from hospitals to nursing homes continued to rise...

  3. Setting up a child eye care centre: the Mercy Eye Hospital, Abak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To document and share our experience in setting up a Child Eye Care Centre within a rural mission eye hospital and document subsequent development of services. Method: The location of the project was Mercy Eye Hospital (MEH) Abak, Akwa Ibom State in the South South zone of Nigeria). Consent to commence ...

  4. Royal london hospital set P28 plans 30th anniversary reunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorpe, Fran

    2013-04-03

    Members of Set P28 at the Royal London Hospital who began their training in February 1980 are planning a reunion on July 27 in London. The venue will be announced later. Email fran-joy@hotmail.com for details.

  5. Nursing students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in placements outside traditional hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida T; Berntsen, Karin; Brynildsen, Grethe; Hestetun, Margrete

    2014-10-01

    To explore students' opinions of the learning environment during clinical placement in settings outside traditional hospital settings. Clinical placement experiences may influence positively on nursing students attitudes towards the clinical setting in question. Most studies exploring the quality of clinical placements have targeted students' experience in hospital settings. The number of studies exploring students' experiences of the learning environment in healthcare settings outside of the hospital venue does not match the growing importance of such settings in the delivery of health care, nor the growing number of nurses needed in these venues. A survey design was used. The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory was administered to two cohorts of undergraduate nursing students (n = 184) after clinical placement in mental health care, home care and nursing home care. Nursing students' overall contentment with the learning environment was quite similar across all three placement areas. Students in mental health care had significantly higher scores on the subscale individualisation, and older students had significantly higher scores on the total scale. Compared with other studies where the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory has been used, the students' total scores in this study are similar or higher than scores in studies including students from hospital settings. Results from this study negate the negative views on clinical placements outside the hospital setting, especially those related to placements in nursing homes and mental healthcare settings. Students' experience of the learning environment during placements in mental health care, home care and nursing homes indicates the relevance of clinical education in settings outside the hospital setting. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. SARS and hospital priority setting: a qualitative case study and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Priority setting is one of the most difficult issues facing hospitals because of funding restrictions and changing patient need. A deadly communicable disease outbreak, such as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS in Toronto in 2003, amplifies the difficulties of hospital priority setting. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting in a hospital in response to SARS using the ethical framework 'accountability for reasonableness'. Methods This study was conducted at a large tertiary hospital in Toronto, Canada. There were two data sources: 1 over 200 key documents (e.g. emails, bulletins, and 2 35 interviews with key informants. Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation. Results Participants described the types of priority setting decisions, the decision making process and the reasoning used. Although the hospital leadership made an effort to meet the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness', they acknowledged that the decision making was not ideal. We described good practices and opportunities for improvement. Conclusions 'Accountability for reasonableness' is a framework that can be used to guide fair priority setting in health care organizations, such as hospitals. In the midst of a crisis such as SARS where guidance is incomplete, consequences uncertain, and information constantly changing, where hour-by-hour decisions involve life and death, fairness is more important rather than less.

  7. SARS and hospital priority setting: a qualitative case study and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jennifer A H; Hyland, Sylvia; DePellegrin, Tania; Upshur, Ross E G; Bernstein, Mark; Martin, Douglas K

    2004-12-19

    Priority setting is one of the most difficult issues facing hospitals because of funding restrictions and changing patient need. A deadly communicable disease outbreak, such as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Toronto in 2003, amplifies the difficulties of hospital priority setting. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting in a hospital in response to SARS using the ethical framework 'accountability for reasonableness'. This study was conducted at a large tertiary hospital in Toronto, Canada. There were two data sources: 1) over 200 key documents (e.g. emails, bulletins), and 2) 35 interviews with key informants. Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation. Participants described the types of priority setting decisions, the decision making process and the reasoning used. Although the hospital leadership made an effort to meet the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness', they acknowledged that the decision making was not ideal. We described good practices and opportunities for improvement. 'Accountability for reasonableness' is a framework that can be used to guide fair priority setting in health care organizations, such as hospitals. In the midst of a crisis such as SARS where guidance is incomplete, consequences uncertain, and information constantly changing, where hour-by-hour decisions involve life and death, fairness is more important rather than less.

  8. Manual cleaning of hospital mattresses: an observational study comparing high- and low-resource settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, J.; Hakizimana, B.; Meintjes, W.A.; Nillessen, M.; Both, E. de; Voss, A.; Mehtar, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are more frequently encountered in low- than in high-resource settings. There is a need to identify and implement feasible and sustainable approaches to strengthen HAI prevention in low-resource settings. AIM: To evaluate the biological contamination

  9. Implementing managed alcohol programs in hospital settings: A review of academic and grey literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Hannah L; Kassam, Shehzad; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Hyshka, Elaine

    2018-04-01

    People with severe alcohol use disorders are at increased risk of poor acute-care outcomes, in part due to difficulties maintaining abstinence from alcohol while hospitalised. Managed alcohol programs (MAP), which administer controlled doses of beverage alcohol to prevent withdrawal and stabilise drinking patterns, are one strategy for increasing adherence to treatment, and improving health outcomes for hospital inpatients with severe alcohol use disorders. Minimal research has examined the implementation of MAPs in hospital settings. We conducted a scoping review to describe extant literature on MAPs in community settings, as well as the therapeutic provision of alcohol to hospital inpatients, to assess the feasibility of implementing formal MAPs in hospital settings and identify knowledge gaps requiring further study. Four academic and 10 grey literature databases were searched. Evidence was synthesised using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Forty-two studies met review inclusion criteria. Twenty-eight examined the administration of alcohol to hospital inpatients, with most reporting positive outcomes related to prevention or treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Fourteen studies examined MAPs in the community and reported that they help stabilise drinking patterns, reduce alcohol-related harms and facilitate non-judgemental health and social care. MAPs in the community have been well described and research has documented effective provision of alcohol in hospital settings for addressing withdrawal. Implementing MAPs as a harm reduction approach in hospital settings is potentially feasible. However, there remains a need to build off extant literature and develop and evaluate standardised MAP protocols tailored to acute-care settings. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and rates of re-hospitalization in a general hospital setting in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Silmara AO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients is known to be related to a higher incidence of clinical and surgical complications and poorer outcomes. Adequate glycemic control and earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during hospitalization are cost-effective measures. Methods This prospective cohort study was designed to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality in a general hospital setting during a 3-month period by reviewing patients' records. The primary purposes of this trial were to verify that hyperglycemia was diagnosed properly and sufficiently early and that it was managed during the hospital stay; we also aimed to evaluate the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia control and outcomes such as complications during the hospital stay, extent of hospitalization, frequency of re-hospitalization, death rates and number of days in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit after admission. Statistical analyses utilized the Kruskall-Wallis complemented by the "a posteriori" d.m.s. test, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, with a level of significance of 5% (p Results We reviewed 779 patient records that fulfilled inclusion criteria. The patients were divided into 5 groups: group (1 diabetic with normal glycemic levels according to American Diabetes Association criteria for in-hospital patients (n = 123; group (2 diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 76; group (3 non-diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 225; group (4diabetics and non-diabetics with persistent hyperglycemia during 3 consecutive days (n = 57 and group (5 those with normal glucose control (n = 298. Compared to patients in groups 1 and 5, patients in groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher mortality rates (17.7% vs. 2.8% and Intensive Care Unit admissions with complications (23.3% vs. 4.5%. Patients in group 4 had the longest hospitalizations (mean 15.5 days, and group 5 had the lowest re-hospitalization rate (mean of 1.28 hospitalizations. Only

  11. Measuring The Impact Of Innovations On Efficiency In Complex Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonća Petra Došenović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors propose an approach for measuring the impact of innovations on hospital efficiency. The suggested methodology can be applied to any type of innovation, including technology-based innovations, as well as consumer-focused and business model innovations. The authors apply the proposed approach to measure the impact of transcanalicular diode laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR, i.e. an innovation introduced in the surgical procedure for treating a tear duct blockage, on the efficiency of general hospitals in Slovenia. They demonstrate that the impact of an innovation on hospital efficiency depends not only on the features of the studied innovation but also on the characteristics of hospitals adopting the innovation and their external environment represented by a set of comparable hospitals.

  12. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: dispensing and administration--2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2012-05-01

    Results of the 2011 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and administration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1401 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 40.1%. Decentralization of the medication-use system continues, with 40% of hospitals using a decentralized system and 58% of hospitals planning to use a decentralized model in the future. Automated dispensing cabinets were used by 89% of hospitals, robots were used by 11%, carousels were used in 18%, and machine-readable coding was used in 34% of hospitals to verify doses before dispensing. Overall, 65% of hospitals had a United States Pharmacopeia chapter 797 compliant cleanroom for compounding sterile preparations. Medication administration records (MARs) have become increasingly computerized, with 67% of hospitals using electronic MARs. Bar-code-assisted medication administration was used in 50% of hospitals, and 68% of hospitals had smart infusion pumps. Health information is becoming more electronic, with 67% of hospitals having partially or completely implemented an electronic health record and 34% of hospitals having computerized prescriber order entry. The use of these technologies has substantially increased over the past year. The average number of full-time equivalent staff per 100 occupied beds averaged 17.5 for pharmacists and 15.0 for technicians. Directors of pharmacy reported declining vacancy rates for pharmacists. Pharmacists continue to improve medication use at the dispensing and administration steps of the medication-use system. The adoption of new technology is changing the philosophy of medication distribution, and health information is rapidly becoming electronic.

  13. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids......-treated patients in hospital settings: however, focussing on average pain intensity, the outcome seems favourable compared with other countries. Pain mechanisms were seldom examined and adjuvant drugs were not specifically used for neuropathic pain. Opioid dosing intervals and supplemental opioid doses were most...

  14. Data linkage of inpatient hospitalization and workers' claims data sets to characterize occupational falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Terry L; Slavova, Svetla; Bathke, Arne

    2007-07-01

    The identification of industry, occupation, and associated injury costs for worker falls in Kentucky have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between industry and occupation and 1) hospitalization length of stay; 2) hospitalization charges; and 3) workers' claims costs in workers suffering falls, using linked inpatient hospitalization discharge and workers' claims data sets. Hospitalization cases were selected with ICD-9-CM external cause of injury codes for falls and payer code of workers' claims for years 2000-2004. Selection criteria for workers'claims cases were International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions Electronic Data Interchange Nature (IAIABCEDIN) injuries coded as falls and/or slips. Common data variables between the two data sets such as date of birth, gender, date of injury, and hospital admission date were used to perform probabilistic data linkage using LinkSolv software. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests. Construction falls were the most prevalent for male workers and incurred the highest hospitalization and workers' compensation costs, whereas most female worker falls occurred in the services industry. The largest percentage of male worker falls was from one level to another, while the largest percentage of females experienced a fall, slip, or trip (not otherwise classified). When male construction worker falls were further analyzed, laborers and helpers had longer hospital stays as well as higher total charges when the worker fell from one level to another. Data linkage of hospitalization and workers' claims falls data provides additional information on industry, occupation, and costs that are not available when examining either data set alone.

  15. Application of smart phone and supporting set for fundus imaging in primary hospital of rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Feng Jing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe the application of smart phone and supporting set for acquiring fundus images with slitlamp examination and non-contact lens in primary hospital of the rural area. METHODS: The supporting set for smart phone was purchased from taobao and securely connected to the ocular lens of slitlamp microscopy. The fundus photos were imaged with assistance of non-contact slitlamp lens from Volk. RESULTS: High quality images of various retinal diseases could be successfully taken with smart phone and supporting set by slitlamp examination. The fundus images were send to patients with Wechat as medical records or used for telconsultant. CONCLUSION: High resolution smart phones are wildly used nowadays and supporting sets are very accessible; thus high quality of images could be obtained with minimal cost in rural hospitals. The digital fundus images will be beneficial for medical record and rapid diagnosis with telconsultant.

  16. Health professional perspectives on lifestyle behaviour change in the paediatric hospital setting: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Laura; Powell, Jane; Wordsworth, Sharon; Cummins, Carole

    2014-03-13

    Research exists examining the challenges of delivering lifestyle behaviour change initiatives in practice. However, at present much of this research has been conducted with primary care health professionals, or in acute adult hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators associated with implementing routine lifestyle behaviour change brief advice into practice in an acute children's hospital. Thirty-three health professionals (nurses, junior doctors, allied health professionals and clinical support staff) from inpatient and outpatient departments at a UK children's hospital were interviewed about their attitudes and beliefs towards supporting lifestyle behaviour change in hospital patients and their families. Responses were analysed using thematic framework analysis. Health professionals identified a range of barriers and facilitators to supporting lifestyle behaviour change in a children's hospital. These included (1) personal experience of effectiveness, (2) constraints associated with the hospital environment, (3) appropriateness of advice delivery given the patient's condition and care pathway and (4) job role priorities, and (5) perceived benefits of the advice given. Delivery of lifestyle behaviour change advice was often seen as an educational activity, rather than a behaviour change activity. Factors underpinning the successful delivery of routine lifestyle behaviour change support must be understood if this is to be implemented effectively in paediatric acute settings. This study reveals key areas where paediatric health professionals may need further support and training to achieve successful implementation.

  17. Opportunities and Design Considerations for Peer Support in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shefali; Mishra, Sonali R; Khelifi, Maher; Pollack, Ari H; Pratt, Wanda

    2017-05-01

    Although research has demonstrated improved outcomes for outpatients who receive peer support-such as through online health communities, support groups, and mentoring systems-hospitalized patients have few mechanisms to receive such valuable support. To explore the opportunities for a hospital-based peer support system, we administered a survey to 146 pediatric patients and caregivers, and conducted semi-structured interviews with twelve patients and three caregivers in a children's hospital. Our analysis revealed that hospitalized individuals need peer support for five key purposes: (1) to ask about medical details-such as procedures, treatments, and medications; (2) to learn about healthcare providers; (3) to report and prevent medical errors; (4) to exchange emotional support; and (5) to manage their time in the hospital. In this paper, we examine these themes and describe potential barriers to using a hospital-based peer support system. We then discuss the unique opportunities and challenges that the hospital environment presents when designing for peer support in this setting.

  18. Adventure Counseling as an Adjunct to Group Counseling in Hospital and Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Mark C.; Balkin, Richard S.

    2006-01-01

    Adventure counseling has been thought of as a highly specialized application of group counseling skills in a wilderness environment. In fact, adventure counseling is based on a developmental theory of group, can be useful for a variety of clients, and can be thoughtfully integrated into clinical and hospital settings. This article describes the…

  19. Safety of Intranasal Fentanyl in the Out-of-Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders P H; Pedersen, Danny M B; Trautner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    : In this prospective observational study, we administered intranasal fentanyl in the out-of-hospital setting to adults and children older than 8 years with severe pain resulting from orthopedic conditions, abdominal pain, or acute coronary syndrome refractory to nitroglycerin spray. Patients received 1 to 3 doses...

  20. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  1. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: a multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  2. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  3. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace : A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P. P.; Francke, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  4. Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, A

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +\\/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +\\/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +\\/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +\\/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.

  5. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Dispensing and administration--2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2015-07-01

    The results of the 2014 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and administration are described. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1435 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 29.7%. Ninety-seven percent of hospitals used automated dispensing cabinets in their medication distribution systems, 65.7% of which used individually secured lidded pockets as the predominant configuration. Overall, 44.8% of hospitals used some form of machine-readable coding to verify doses before dispensing in the pharmacy. Overall, 65% of hospital pharmacy departments reported having a cleanroom compliant with United States Pharmacopeia chapter 797. Pharmacists reviewed and approved all medication orders before the first dose was administered, either onsite or by remote order view, except in procedure areas and emergency situations, in 81.2% of hospitals. Adoption rates of electronic health information have rapidly increased, with the widespread use of electronic health records, computer prescriber order entry, barcodes, and smart pumps. Overall, 31.4% of hospitals had pharmacists practicing in ambulatory or primary care clinics. Transitions-of-care services offered by the pharmacy department have generally increased since 2012. Discharge prescription services increased from 11.8% of hospitals in 2012 to 21.5% in 2014. Approximately 15% of hospitals outsourced pharmacy management operations to a contract pharmacy services provider, an increase from 8% in 2011. Health-system pharmacists continue to have a positive impact on improving healthcare through programs that improve the efficiency, safety, and clinical outcomes of medication use in health systems. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Manual cleaning of hospital mattresses: an observational study comparing high- and low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, J; Hakizimana, B; Meintjes, W A J; Nillessen, M; de Both, E; Voss, A; Mehtar, S

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are more frequently encountered in low- than in high-resource settings. There is a need to identify and implement feasible and sustainable approaches to strengthen HAI prevention in low-resource settings. To evaluate the biological contamination of routinely cleaned mattresses in both high- and low-resource settings. In this two-stage observational study, routine manual bed cleaning was evaluated at two university hospitals using adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Standardized training of cleaning personnel was achieved in both high- and low-resource settings. Qualitative analysis of the cleaning process was performed to identify predictors of cleaning outcome in low-resource settings. Mattresses in low-resource settings were highly contaminated prior to cleaning. Cleaning significantly reduced biological contamination of mattresses in low-resource settings (P cleaning in both the high- and low-resource settings seemed comparable. Cleaning with appropriate type of cleaning materials reduced the contamination of mattresses adequately. Predictors for mattresses that remained contaminated in a low-resource setting included: type of product used, type of ward, training, and the level of contamination prior to cleaning. In low-resource settings mattresses were highly contaminated as noted by ATP levels. Routine manual cleaning by trained staff can be as effective in a low-resource setting as in a high-resource setting. We recommend a multi-modal cleaning strategy that consists of training of domestic services staff, availability of adequate time to clean beds between patients, and application of the correct type of cleaning products. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutritional screening for improving professional practice for patient outcomes in hospital and primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Vali, Yasaman; Murray, Susan M; Wonderling, David; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-06-06

    Given the prevalence of under-nutrition and reports of inadequate nutritional management of patients in hospitals and the community, nutritional screening may play a role in reducing the risks of malnutrition. Screening programmes can invoke costs to health systems and patients. It is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes. To examine the effectiveness of nutritional screening in improving quality of care (professional practice) and patient outcomes compared with usual care. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June 2012 to find relevant studies. Randomised controlled studies, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies assessing the effectiveness of nutritional screening were eligible for inclusion in the review. We considered process outcomes (for example patient identification, referral to dietitian) and patient outcomes (for example mortality, change in body mass index (BMI)). Participants were adult patients aged 16 years or over. We included studies conducted in different settings, including hospitals, out-patient clinics, primary care or long term care settings. We independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included studies. Meta-analysis was considered but was not conducted due to the discrepancies between the studies. The studies were heterogeneous in their design, setting, intervention and outcomes. We analysed the data using a narrative synthesis approach. After conducting initial searches and screening the titles and abstracts of the identified literature, 77 full text papers were retrieved and read. Ultimately three studies were included. Two controlled before-after studies were conducted in hospital settings (one in the UK and one in the Netherlands) and one cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary care setting (in the USA).The study conducted in

  8. [A set of quality and safety indicators for hospitals of the "Agencia Valenciana de Salud"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot-Marzal, C M; Mira-Solves, J J; Guilabert-Mora, M; Pérez-Jover, V; Pablo-Comeche, D; Quirós-Morató, T; Cuesta Peredo, D

    2014-01-01

    To prepare a set of quality and safety indicators for Hospitals of the «Agencia Valenciana de Salud». The qualitative technique Metaplan® was applied in order to gather proposals on sustainability and nursing. The catalogue of the «Spanish Society of Quality in Healthcare» was adopted as a starting point for clinical indicators. Using the Delphi technique, 207 professionals were invited to participate in the selecting the most reliable and feasible indicators. Lastly, the resulting proposal was validated with the managers of 12 hospitals, taking into account the variability, objectivity, feasibility, reliability and sensitivity, of the indicators. Participation rates varied between 66.67% and 80.71%. Of the 159 initial indicators, 68 were prioritized and selected (21 economic or management indicators, 22 nursing indicators, and 25 clinical or hospital indicators). Three of them were common to all three categories and two did not match the specified criteria during the validation phase, thus obtaining a final catalogue of 63 indicators. A set of quality and safety indicators for Hospitals was prepared. They are currently being monitored using the hospital information systems. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors for geriatric patient falls in rehabilitation hospital settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie; da Costa, Bruno R

    2011-09-01

    To review the literature to identify and synthesize the evidence on risk factors for patient falls in geriatric rehabilitation hospital settings. Eligible studies were systematically searched on 16 databases from inception to December 2010. The search strategies used a combination of terms for rehabilitation hospital patients, falls, risk factors and older adults. Cross-sectional, cohort, case-control studies and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published in English that investigated risks for falls among patients ≥65 years of age in rehabilitation hospital settings were included. Studies that investigated fall risk assessment tools, but did not investigate risk factors themselves or did not report a measure of risk (e.g. odds ratio, relative risk) were excluded. A total of 2,824 references were identified; only eight articles concerning six studies met the inclusion criteria. In these, 1,924 geriatric rehabilitation patients were followed. The average age of the patients ranged from 77 to 83 years, the percentage of women ranged from 56% to 81%, and the percentage of fallers ranged from 15% to 54%. Two were case-control studies, two were RCTs and four were prospective cohort studies. Several intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for falls were identified. Carpet flooring, vertigo, being an amputee, confusion, cognitive impairment, stroke, sleep disturbance, anticonvulsants, tranquilizers and antihypertensive medications, age between 71 and 80, previous falls, and need for transfer assistance are risk factors for geriatric patient falls in rehabilitation hospital settings.

  10. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  11. Impact of the Syrian Crisis on the Hospitalization of Syrians in a Psychiatric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Souaiby; François, Kazour; Marwan, Zoghbi; Sami, Richa

    2016-01-01

    Determine the impact of the Syrian crisis on the hospitalization of Syrians in a psychiatric setting. All Syrians admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Lebanon between the 1st of January 2009 and the 31st of December 2013 were included. Number of admissions, psychiatric disorders and demographic and clinical data relative to patients were compared between those admitted before and after the crisis. 44 patients were admitted before the crisis and 106 after it. The distribution of diagnosis varied significantly after the crisis (p = 0.056) with the majority of patients being admitted for schizophrenia (37.7 %). The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher after the crisis (p = 0.03) but suicidal attempts, need for electroconvulsive therapy and length of hospitalization did not differ significantly between both groups. Clinicians should be aware of the possible burden of mental illness in Syrians after the beginning of the Syrian crisis.

  12. [Improvement approaches in the hospital setting: From total quality management to Lean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, N; Lamouri, S; Huet, J-C; Rieutord, A

    2015-07-01

    Hospitals have to deal strong with economic constraints and increasing requirements in terms of quality and safety of care. To address these constraints, one solution could be the adoption of approaches from the industry sector. Following the decree of April 6, 2011 on the quality management of the medication use process, some of these approaches, such as risk management, are now part of the everyday work of healthcare professionals. However, other approaches, such as business process improvement, are still poorly developed in the hospital setting. In this general review, we discuss the main approaches of business process improvements that have been used in hospitals by focusing specifically on one of the newest and most currently used: Lean. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Mobile Phones as a Potential Vehicle of Infection in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Foong, Yi; Green, Mark; Zargari, Ahmad; Siddique, Romana; Tan, Vanessa; Brain, Terry; Ogden, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the potential role of mobile phones as a reservoir for bacterial colonization and the risk factors for bacterial colonization in a hospital setting. We screened 226 staff members at a regional Australian hospital (146 doctors and 80 medical students) between January 2013 and March 2014. The main outcomes of interest were the types of microorganisms and the amount of contamination of the mobile phones. This study found a high level of bacterial contamination (n = 168/226, 74%) on the mobile phones of staff members in a tertiary hospital, with similar organisms isolated from the staff member's dominant hand and mobile phones. While most of the isolated organisms were normal skin flora, a small percentage were potentially pathogenic (n = 12/226, 5%). Being a junior medical staff was found to be a risk factor for heavy microbial growth (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.54, 10.37). Only 31% (70/226) of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely, and only 21% (47/226) reported using alcohol containing wipes on their phones. This study demonstrates that mobile phones are potentially vehicles for pathogenic bacteria in a hospital setting. Only a minority of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely. Disinfection guidelines utilizing alcohol wipes should be developed and implemented.

  14. Suicidal behaviour characteristics and factors associated with mortality in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Esteban-Vasallo, María; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas

    2016-04-29

    Suicide is a major public health problem worldwide, and an approach is necessary due to its high potential for prevention. This paper examines the main characteristics of people admitted to hospitals in the Community of Madrid (Spain) with suicidal behaviour, and the factors associated with their hospital mortality. A study was conducted on patients with E950-E959 codes of suicide and self-inflicted injuries of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, contained in any diagnostic field of the minimum basic data set at hospital discharge between 2003 and 2013. Sociodemographic, clinical and health care variables were assessed by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis in the evaluation of factors associated with hospital mortality. Hospital suicidal behaviour predominates in women (58.7%) and in middle-age. Hospital mortality is 2.2% (1.6% in women and 3.2% in men), increasing with age. Mental disorders are detected 3-4 times more in secondary diagnoses. The main primary diagnosis (>74%) is poisoning with substances, with lower mortality (∼1%) than injury by hanging and jumping from high places (≥12%), which have the highest numbers. Other factors associated with increased mortality include different medical comorbidities and severity of the injury, while length of stay and mental disorders are protective factors. Type of hospital, poisoning, and Charlson index are associated differently with mortality in men and women. Hospitalised suicidal acts show a low mortality, mainly related to comorbidities and the severity of injuries. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of portable electronic devices in a hospital setting and their potential for bacterial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amber; Rao, Amitha; Reyes-Sacin, Carlos; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Szpunar, Susan; Riederer, Kathleen; Kaye, Keith; Fishbain, Joel T; Levine, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Portable electronic devices are increasingly being used in the hospital setting. As with other fomites, these devices represent a potential reservoir for the transmission of pathogens. We conducted a convenience sampling of devices in 2 large medical centers to identify bacterial colonization rates and potential risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Healthy Settings in Hospital - How to Prevent Burnout Syndrome in Nurses: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friganović, Adriano; Kovačević, Irena; Ilić, Boris; Žulec, Mirna; Krikšić, Valentina; Grgas Bile, Cecilija

    2017-06-01

    Healthy settings involve a holistic and multidisciplinary method that integrates actions towards risk factors. In hospital settings, a high level of stress can lead to depression, anxiety, decreased job satisfaction and lower loyalty to the organization. Burnout syndrome can be defined as physical, psychological and emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low sense of personal accomplishment. The aim of this literature review was to make systematic literature analysis to provide scientific evidence for the consequences of constant exposure to high levels of stress and for the methods to be used to prevent burnout syndrome among health care workers. The Medline database was searched to identify relevant studies and articles published during the last 15 years. The key words used in this survey were burnout syndrome, prevention, nurses, and healthy settings. The 6 eligible studies were included in literature review. Evidence showed nurses to be exposed to stress and to have symptoms of burnout syndrome. As a result of burnout syndrome, chronic fatigue and reduced working capacity occur, thus raising the risk of adverse events. In conclusion, the occurrence of burnout syndrome is a major problem for hospitals and healthcare system. Action plan for hospital burnout syndrome prevention would greatly reduce the incidence and improve the quality of health care.

  17. Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Innes, Anthea; Scerri, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Although literature describing and evaluating training programmes in hospital settings increased in recent years, there are no reviews that summarise these programmes. This review sought to address this, by collecting the current evidence on dementia training programmes directed to staff working in general hospitals. Literature from five databases were searched, based on a number of inclusion criteria. The selected studies were summarised and data was extracted and compared using narrative synthesis based on a set of pre-defined categories. Methodological quality was assessed. Fourteen peer-reviewed studies were identified with the majority being pre-test post-test investigations. No randomised controlled trials were found. Methodological quality was variable with selection bias being the major limitation. There was a great variability in the development and mode of delivery although, interdisciplinary ward based, tailor-made, short sessions using experiential and active learning were the most utilised. The majority of the studies mainly evaluated learning, with few studies evaluating changes in staff behaviour/practices and patients' outcomes. This review indicates that high quality studies are needed that especially evaluate staff behaviours and patient outcomes and their sustainability over time. It also highlights measures that could be used to develop and deliver training programmes in hospital settings.

  18. Retail food reform: How to effectively bridge what we say and what we do in our hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojeiji, Laurie; Taylor, Andra; Boland, Cholly; Brennan, Carolyn; Penney, Randy

    2017-03-01

    Hospital leaders in Eastern Ontario, Canada, have acknowledged the critical role of food to health and the need for progressive change that goes beyond personal responsibility paradigms. The Healthy Foods in Champlain Hospitals program aims to create supportive, healthy nutrition environments in hospital retail food settings. Twenty independent hospital corporations have collectively initiated a plan to transition cafeteria, vending, franchise, and volunteer operations towards healthier offerings. Hospitals are actively implementing a set of progressively phased, evidence-based nutrition criteria, which cover food and beverage categories, preparation methods, product placement, and provision of nutrition information. Implementation strategies and successes, as well as challenges and limitations, are discussed.

  19. Friendliness, functionality and freedom: Design characteristics that support midwifery practice in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Athena; Homer, Caroline S E; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-07-01

    to identify and describe the design characteristics of hospital birth rooms that support midwives and their practice. this study used a qualitative exploratory descriptive methodology underpinned by the theoretical approach of critical realism. Data was collected through 21 in-depth, face-to-face photo-elicitation interviews and a thematic analysis guided by study objectives and the aims of exploratory research was undertaken. the study was set at a recently renovated tertiary hospital in a large Australian city. participants were 16 registered midwives working in a tertiary hospital; seven in delivery suite and nine in birth centre settings. Experience as a midwife ranged from three to 39 years and the sample included midwives in diverse roles such as educator, student support and unit manager. three design characteristics were identified that supported midwifery practice. They were friendliness, functionality and freedom. Friendly rooms reduced stress and increased midwives' feelings of safety. Functional rooms enabled choice and provided options to better meet the needs of labouring women. And freedom allowed for flexible, spontaneous and responsive midwifery practice. hospital birth rooms that possess the characteristics of friendliness, functionality and freedom offer enhanced support for midwives and may therefore increase effective care provision. new and existing birth rooms can be designed or adapted to better support the wellbeing and effectiveness of midwives and may thereby enhance the quality of midwifery care delivered in the hospital. Quality midwifery care is associated with positive outcomes and experiences for labouring women. Further research is required to investigate the benefit that may be transmitted to women by implementing design intended to support and enhance midwifery practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Gual, Antoni; Nieva, Gemma; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain). To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals -the early adopters- based on Rogers' theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units). Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals' awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Nutrition screening tools: Does one size fit all? A systematic review of screening tools for the hospital setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Guaitoli, P.R.; Jansma, E.P.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims: Numerous nutrition screening tools for the hospital setting have been developed. The aim of this systematic review is to study construct or criterion validity and predictive validity of nutrition screening tools for the general hospital setting. Methods: A systematic review of

  2. Perfectionism Group Treatment for Eating Disorders in an Inpatient, Partial Hospitalization, and Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A; Brosof, Leigh C; Vanzhula, Irina A; Bumberry, Laura; Zerwas, Stephanie; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-11-01

    Perfectionism is elevated in individuals with eating disorders and is posited to be a risk factor, maintaining factor, and treatment barrier. However, there has been little literature testing the feasibility and effectiveness of perfectionism interventions in individuals specifically with eating disorders in an open group format. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of (a) a short cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism intervention delivered in an inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient for eating disorders setting (combined N = 28; inpatient n = 15; partial hospital n = 9; outpatient n = 4), as well as (b) a training for disseminating the treatment in these settings (N = 9). Overall, we found that it was feasible to implement a perfectionism group in each treatment setting, with both an open and closed group format. This research adds additional support for the implementation of perfectionism group treatment for eating disorders and provides information on the feasibility of implementing such interventions across multiple settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  3. Establishing a general medical outpatient clinic for cancer survivors in a public city hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goytia, Elliott J; Lounsbury, David W; McCabe, Mary S; Weiss, Elisa; Newcomer, Meghan; Nelson, Deena J; Brennessel, Debra; Rapkin, Bruce D; Kemeny, M Margaret

    2009-11-01

    Many cancer centers and community hospitals are developing novel models of survivorship care. However, few are specifically focused on services for socio-economically disadvantaged cancer survivors. To describe a new model of survivorship care serving culturally diverse, urban adult cancer patients and to present findings from a feasibility evaluation. Adult cancer patients treated at a public city hospital cancer center. The clinic provides comprehensive medical and psychosocial services for patients within a public hospital cancer center where they receive their oncology care. Longitudinal data collected over a 3-year period were used to describe patient demographics, patient needs, and services delivered. Since inception, 410 cancer patients have been served. Demand for services has grown steadily. Hypertension was the most frequent comorbid condition treated. Pain, depression, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, and bowel dysfunction were the most common post-treatment problems experienced by the patients. Financial counseling was an important patient resource. This new clinical service has been well-integrated into its public urban hospital setting and constitutes an innovative model of health-care delivery for socio-economically challenged, culturally diverse adult cancer survivors.

  4. Factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting: a review of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Bonner, Ann; Pryor, Julie

    2010-10-01

    To explore and discuss from recent literature the common factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting. Nursing dissatisfaction is linked to high rates of nurses leaving the profession, poor morale, poor patient outcomes and increased financial expenditure. Understanding factors that contribute to job satisfaction could increase nurse retention. A literature search from January 2004 to March 2009 was conducted using the keywords nursing, (dis)satisfaction, job (dis)satisfaction to identify factors contributing to satisfaction for nurses working in acute hospital settings. This review identified 44 factors in three clusters (intra-, inter- and extra-personal). Job satisfaction for nurses in acute hospitals can be influenced by a combination of any or all of these factors. Important factors included coping strategies, autonomy, co-worker interaction, direct patient care, organizational policies, resource adequacy and educational opportunities. Research suggests that job satisfaction is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon. Collaboration between individual nurses, their managers and others is crucial to increase nursing satisfaction with their job. Recognition and regular reviewing by nurse managers of factors that contribute to job satisfaction for nurses working in acute care areas is pivotal to the retention of valued staff. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Challenges of implementing routine health behavior change support in a children's hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Laura; Powell, Jane; Wordsworth, Sharon; Cummins, Carole

    2014-07-01

    Evidence indicates that health behavior change initiatives are often not implemented successfully. This qualitative study aims to understand the barriers and facilitators to implementation of health behavior change brief advice into routine practice in an acute children's hospital setting. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals working at a UK children's hospital (n=33). Participants were purposively sampled to incorporate a range of specialties, job roles and training. An inductive thematic framework analysis identified two emergent themes. These capture the challenges of implementing routine health behavior change support in a children's hospital setting: (1) 'health professional knowledge, beliefs and behaviors' and (2) 'patient and family related challenges'. This study enhances findings from previous research by outlining the challenges pediatric health professionals face in relation to supporting health behavior change. Challenges include failure to assume responsibility, low confidence, prioritization of the health provider relationship with patients and families, health provider and patient knowledge, and low patient and family motivation. Skills-based behavior change training is needed for pediatric health professionals to effectively support health behavior change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risoer, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Soerensen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. Methods An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary...... outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent...... variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number...

  7. The relationship between personal growth and psychological functioning in individuals treated in a partial hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danitz, Sara B; Orsillo, Susan M; Beard, Courtney; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2018-04-26

    We examined whether current level of personal growth and changes in personal growth predicted treatment response among participants in a partial hospital setting. Patients (N = 269; aged 18-70 years, M = 33.6; 52.4% female) completed measures of personal growth initiative (PGI), valuing personal growth (VPG), and psychological functioning measures at treatment admission and discharge from a partial hospital. PGI and VPG were negatively associated with depression and positively associated with psychological well-being. Baseline PGI and VPG did not predict changes in psychological functioning at discharge. PGI and VPG significantly increased following treatment, and increases were associated with decreases in depression and increases in well-being over and above previously established predictors. Valuing personal growth for intrinsic reasons and active engagement in the personal growth process may be important characteristics to cultivate in psychotherapy as they are malleable and negatively related to depression. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Health professionals' experience of teamwork education in acute hospital settings: a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kylie; Jordan, Zoe; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is seen as an important element of patient care in acute hospital settings. The complexity of the journey of care for patients highlights the need for health professionals to collaborate and communicate clearly with each other. Health organizations in western countries are committed to improving patient safety through education of staff and teamwork education programs have been integral to this focus. There are no current systematic reviews of the experience of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The objective of this systematic review was to search for the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. This review considered studies reporting on experiences of registered health professionals who work in acute hospitals. This included medical, nursing and midwifery and allied health professionals. The focus of the meta-synthesis was the experiences and reflections of health professionals who were involved in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The geographical context for this review was acute hospitals in rural or metropolitan settings in Australia and overseas countries. The review focused on the experiences of health professionals who work in acute hospitals and participated in teamwork education programs. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research.In the absence of research studies, other text such as opinion papers, discussion papers and reports were considered. Studies published in English and from 1990 to 2013 were included in this review. The literature search for relevant papers occurred between 13 September and 26 October 2013. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched were PubMed, CINAHL, Embase and Scopus. The

  9. The difference in pharmacists' interventions across the diverse settings in a children's hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesty Utami Ramadaniati

    Full Text Available This study aimed to document and compare the nature of clinical pharmacists' interventions made in different practice settings within a children's hospital.The primary investigator observed and documented all clinical interventions performed by clinical pharmacists for between 35-37 days on each of the five study wards from the three practice settings, namely general medical, general surgical and hematology-oncology. The rates, types and significance of the pharmacists' interventions in the different settings were compared.A total of 982 interventions were documented, related to the 16,700 medication orders reviewed on the five wards in the three practice settings over the duration of the study. Taking medication histories and/or patient counselling were the most common pharmacists' interventions in the general settings; constituting more than half of all interventions. On the Hematology-Oncology Ward the pattern was different with drug therapy changes being the most common interventions (n = 73/195, 37.4% of all interventions. Active interventions (pharmacists' activities leading to a change in drug therapy constituted less than a quarter of all interventions on the general medical and surgical wards compared to nearly half on the specialty Hematology-Oncology Ward. The majority (n = 37/42, 88.1% of a random sample of the active interventions reviewed were rated as clinically significant. Dose adjustment was the most frequent active interventions in the general settings, whilst drug addition constituted the most common active interventions on the Hematology-Oncology Ward. The degree of acceptance of pharmacists' active interventions by prescribers was high (n = 223/244, 91.4%.The rate of pharmacists' active interventions differed across different practice settings, being most frequent in the specialty hematology-oncology setting. The nature and type of the interventions documented in the hematology-oncology were also different

  10. Recent Trends in Imaging Use in Hospital Settings: Implications for Future Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Parker, Laurence; Rao, Vijay M

    2017-03-01

    To compare trends in utilization rates of imaging in the three hospital-based settings where imaging is conducted. The nationwide Medicare Part B databases for 2004-2014 were used. All discretionary noninvasive diagnostic imaging (NDI) CPT codes were selected and grouped by modality. Procedure volumes of each code were available from the databases and converted to utilization rates per 1,000 Medicare enrollees. Medicare's place-of-service codes were used to identify imaging examinations done in hospital inpatients, hospital outpatient departments (HOPDs), and emergency departments (EDs). Trends were observed over the life of the study. Trendlines were strongly affected by code bundling in echocardiography in 2009, nuclear imaging in 2010, and CT in 2011. However, even aside from these artifactual effects, important trends could be discerned. Inpatient imaging utilization rates of all modalities are trending downward. In HOPDs, the utilization rate of conventional radiographic examinations (CREs) is declining but rates of CT, MRI, echocardiography, and noncardiac ultrasound (US) are increasing. In EDs, utilization rates of CREs, CT, and US are increasing. In the 3 years after 2011, when no further code bundling occurred, the total inpatient NDI utilization rate dropped 15%, whereas the rate in EDs increased 12% and that in HOPDs increased 1%. The trends in utilization of NDI in the three hospital-based settings where imaging occurs are distinctly different. Radiologists and others who are involved in deciding what kinds of equipment to purchase and where to locate it should be cognizant of these trends in making their decisions. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Can patients report patient safety incidents in a hospital setting? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jane K; Armitage, Gerry

    2012-08-01

    Patients are increasingly being thought of as central to patient safety. A small but growing body of work suggests that patients may have a role in reporting patient safety problems within a hospital setting. This review considers this disparate body of work, aiming to establish a collective view on hospital-based patient reporting. This review asks: (a) What can patients report? (b) In what settings can they report? (c) At what times have patients been asked to report? (d) How have patients been asked to report? 5 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, (Kings Fund) HMIC and PsycINFO) were searched for published literature on patient reporting of patient safety 'problems' (a number of search terms were utilised) within a hospital setting. In addition, reference lists of all included papers were checked for relevant literature. 13 papers were included within this review. All included papers were quality assessed using a framework for comparing both qualitative and quantitative designs, and reviewed in line with the study objectives. Patients are clearly in a position to report on patient safety, but included papers varied considerably in focus, design and analysis, with all papers lacking a theoretical underpinning. In all papers, reports were actively solicited from patients, with no evidence currently supporting spontaneous reporting. The impact of timing upon accuracy of information has yet to be established, and many vulnerable patients are not currently being included in patient reporting studies, potentially introducing bias and underestimating the scale of patient reporting. The future of patient reporting may well be as part of an 'error detection jigsaw' used alongside other methods as part of a quality improvement toolkit.

  12. Economic impact of electronic prescribing in the hospital setting: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zamzam; Barber, Nick; Jani, Yogini; Garfield, Sara; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2016-04-01

    To examine evidence on the economic impact of electronic prescribing (EP) systems in the hospital setting. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, the NHS Economic Evaluation Database, the European Network of Health Economic Evaluation Database and Web of Science from inception to October 2013. Full and partial economic evaluations of EP or computerized provider order entry were included. We excluded studies assessing prescribing packages for specific drugs, and monetary outcomes that were not related to medicines. A checklist was used to evaluate risk of bias and evidence quality. The search yielded 1160 articles of which three met the inclusion criteria. Two were full economic evaluations and one a partial economic evaluation. A meta-analysis was not appropriate as studies were heterogeneous in design, economic evaluation method, interventions and outcome measures. Two studies investigated the financial impact of reducing preventable adverse drug events. The third measured savings related to various aspects of the system including those related to medication. Two studies reported positive financial effects. However the overall quality of the economic evidence was low and key details often not reported. There seems to be some evidence of financial benefits of EP in the hospital setting. However, it is not clear if evidence is transferable to other settings. Research is scarce and limited in quality, and reported methods are not always transparent. Further robust, high quality research is required to establish if hospital EP is cost effective and thus inform policy makers' decisions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Exploring the effect of sound and music on health in hospital settings: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyendo, Timothy Onosahwo

    2016-11-01

    positive emotion, and decreasing the levels of stressful conditions. Whilst sound holds both negative and positive aspects of the hospital ecosystem and may be stressful, it also possesses a soothing quality that induces positive feelings in patients. Conceptualizing the nature of sound in the hospital context as a soundscape, rather than merely noise can permit a subtler and socially useful understanding of the role of sound and music in the hospital setting, thereby creating a means for improving the hospital experience for patients and nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasa, Edwine W; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities

  15. The impact of the board's strategy-setting role on board-management relations and hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Vera Antonia; Schreyögg, Jonas; Schultz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate governance of hospitals largely depends on effective cooperation between governing boards and hospital management. Governing boards play an important role in strategy-setting as part of their support for hospital management. However, in certain situations, this active strategic role may also generate discord within this relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of the roles, attributes, and processes of governing boards on hospital performance. We examine the impact of the governing board's strategy-setting role on board-management collaboration quality and on financial performance while also analyzing the interaction effects of board diversity and board activity level. The data are derived from a survey that was sent simultaneously to German hospitals and their associated governing board, combined with objective performance information from annual financial statements and quality reports. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that different board characteristics have a significant impact on hospital performance (R = .37). The strategy-setting role and board-management collaboration quality have a positive effect on hospital performance, whereas the impact of strategy-setting on collaboration quality is negative. We find that the positive effect of strategy-setting on performance increases with decreasing board diversity. When board members have more homogeneous backgrounds and exhibit higher board activity levels, the negative effect of the strategy-setting on collaboration quality also increases. Active strategy-setting by a governing board may generally improve hospital performance. Diverse members of governing boards should be involved in strategy-setting for hospitals. However, high board-management collaboration quality may be compromised if managerial autonomy is too highly restricted. Consequently, hospitals should support board-management collaboration about

  16. Are laboratory tests always needed? Frequency and causes of laboratory overuse in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadamuro, Janne; Gaksch, Martin; Wiedemann, Helmut; Lippi, Giuseppe; von Meyer, Alexander; Pertersmann, Astrid; Auer, Simon; Mrazek, Cornelia; Kipman, Ulrike; Felder, Thomas K; Oberkofler, Hannes; Haschke-Becher, Elisabeth

    2018-04-01

    Inappropriate utilization of laboratory resources is an increasing concern especially in high-throughput facilities. Until now, no reliable information has been published addressing to which extent laboratory results are actually used for clinical decision-making. Therefore, we aimed to close this gap using a novel retrospective approach including a survey of clinicians and nurses. We retrospectively evaluated the number of re-orders for potassium (K), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate-aminotransferase (AST), activated partial thromboplastin-time (APTT) and prothrombin-time/INR (PT/INR), after the initial order had to be cancelled due to preanalytical non-conformities. We analyzed subgroups regarding time to re-order, ward and sample priority (urgent vs. routine). Subsequently, we surveyed clinicians and nurses, asking for their estimate of the amount of failed re-orders as well as for possible reasons. From initially cancelled tests, only ~20% of K, LD, AST and ~30% of APTT and PT/INR tests were re-ordered within 24 h. 70% of the investigated clinical chemistry and 60% of coagulation tests were re-ordered one week after cancellation or not at all. Survey participants quite accurately estimated these numbers. Routine laboratory panels, short stay of out-patients, obsolete test results and avoiding additional phlebotomies were the main reasons for not re-ordering cancelled tests. Overall, 60-70% of test results in the investigated assays ordered in a high throughput laboratory are potentially inappropriate or of doubtful clinically importance. Although clinicians and nurses are aware of this situation, it is the duty of laboratory specialists to overcome overutilization in close collaboration with all involved healthcare workers. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Attitudes towards patient safety culture in a hospital setting and related variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Abellán, Ramon; Falcó-Pegueroles, Anna; de la Puente-Martorell, María Luisa

    To describe attitudes towards patient safety culture among workers in a hospital setting and determine the influence of socio-demographic and professional variables. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed among a sample of professionals and nursing assistants. A dimension was considered a strength if positive responses exceeded 75% and an opportunity for improvement if more than 50% of responses were negative. 59% (n=123) of respondents rated safety between 7 and 8. 53% (n=103) stated that they had not used the notification system to report any incidents in the previous twelve months. The strength identified was "teamwork in the unit/service" and the opportunity for improvement was "staffing". A more positive attitude was observed in outpatient services and among nursing professionals and part-time staff. This study has allowed us to determine the rating of the hospital in patient safety culture. This is vital for developing improvement strategies. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The Burden of Child Maltreatment Leading to Hospitalization in a Provincial Setting in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rero, Allanie; Aipit, Jimmy; Yarong-Kote, Tina; Watch, Villa; Bolnga, John W; Vei, Robert; Morris, Marilyn; Lufele, Elvin; Laman, Moses

    2016-08-01

    Child maltreatment is prevalent globally. In Papua New Guinea (PNG), child maltreatment remains an under-reported problem. As part of a 10 month prospective observational study conducted at Modilon Hospital in PNG, we investigated the burden of child maltreatment in the form of sexual abuse, physical abuse and neglect, leading to hospitalization in children ≤14 years. Of 1061 screened admissions, 107 (10%) fulfilled the definition of child maltreatment. The in-hospital admission prevalence of sexual abuse was 5.7% [60 of 1061; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-7.3]. Neglect accounted for 3.4% (36 of 1061; 95% CI: 2.4-4.7) of admissions, while physical abuse accounted for 1.0% (11 of 1061; 95% CI: 0.6-1.9). Mortality was highest in the neglected group, with severe acute malnutrition accounting for 89% of deaths. Improved awareness, establishment of appropriate channels for addressing child maltreatment and enforcement of child protection laws in PNG and other epidemiologically similar settings are urgently needed. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Scleroderma in hospital settings in Lomé: 50 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakpo, A S; Teclessou, J N; Mouhari-Touré, A; Saka, B; Matakloe, H; Kakpovi, K; Kombate, K; Pitché, P

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to document the epidemiological and clinical profile, treatment used, and outcome of patients with scleroderma in hospital settings in Lomé. This descriptive study examined the records of all patients seen as outpatients or admitted for scleroderma in hospital dermatology and rheumatology departments in Lomé during the 20-year period of 1993-2012. During the study period, 50 (0.04%) of the 121,021 patients seen in these departments had scleroderma. There were 29 cases of localized scleroderma and 21 systemic cases, predominantly women (sex-ratio=0.2). The patients' mean age was 36 years. All patients with systemic scleroderma had speckled achromia (100%), and most (90.48%) had cutaneous sclerosis. After a mean follow-up period of 43.5 days, 71.43% of the patients had been lost to follow-up. All of the patients with localized scleroderma had cutaneous sclerosis, and the rate of loss to follow-up (after a mean of 17 days) was 96.55%. The results of this study confirm the extreme rarity of scleroderma in the teaching hospitals in Lomé and a clear female predominance. It points out the difficulty of management, which both influences and is aggravated by the high rate of loss to follow-up.

  20. [Proposal of a method for collective analysis of work-related accidents in the hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Claudia; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet; Minayo-Gomez, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The article presents a method for the analysis of work-related accidents in hospitals, with the double aim of analyzing accidents in light of actual work activity and enhancing the vitality of the various professions that comprise hospital work. This process involves both research and intervention, combining knowledge output with training of health professionals, fostering expanded participation by workers in managing their daily work. The method consists of stimulating workers to recreate the situation in which a given accident occurred, shifting themselves to the position of observers of their own work. In the first stage of analysis, workers are asked to show the work analyst how the accident occurred; in the second stage, the work accident victim and analyst jointly record the described series of events in a diagram; in the third, the resulting record is re-discussed and further elaborated; in the fourth, the work accident victim and analyst evaluate and implement measures aimed to prevent the accident from recurring. The article concludes by discussing the method's possibilities and limitations in the hospital setting.

  1. Assessment of Barriers to Providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs in the Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Gibson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary objective of the study is to identify the barriers to providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs in the hospital setting. Methods: Potential barriers to IPPEs were identified via literature review and interviews with current IPPE preceptors from various institutions. Based on this information, an electronic survey was developed and distributed to IPPE preceptors in order to assess student, preceptor, logistical and college or school of pharmacy related barriers that potentially exist for providing IPPE in the hospital setting. Results: Sixty-eight of the 287 eligible survey respondents (24% completed the electronic survey. Seventy-six percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that available time was a barrier to precepting IPPE students even though a majority of respondents reported spending a third or more of their day with an IPPE student when on rotation. Seventy-three percent of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed that all preceptors have consistent performance expectations for students, while just 46% agreed or strongly agreed that they had adequate training to precept IPPEs. Sixty-five percent of respondents agreed that IPPE students have the ability to be a participant in patient care and 70% of preceptors believe that IPPE students should be involved in patient care. Conclusions: Conducting IPPEs in the institutional setting comes with challenges. Based on the results of this study, experiential directors and colleges/schools of pharmacy could make a positive impact on the quality and consistency of IPPEs by setting student expectations and training preceptors on appropriate and consistent expectations for students.   Type: Original Research

  2. SGLT2-I in the Hospital Setting: Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Other Benefits and Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua A; Karam, Susan L; Aleppo, Grazia

    2017-07-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are the newest class of antihyperglycemic agents. They are increasingly being prescribed in the outpatient diabetic population. In this review, we examine the risks and benefits of continuation and initiation of SGLT2 inhibitors in the inpatient setting. There are currently no published data regarding safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitor use in the hospital. Outpatient data suggests that SGLT2 inhibitors have low hypoglycemic risk. They also decrease systolic blood pressure and can prevent cardiovascular death. The EMPA-REG study also showed a decrease in admissions for acute decompensated heart failure. There have been increasing cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, and specifically the euglycemic manifestation, associated with SGLT2 inhibitors use. We present two cases of inpatient SGLT2 inhibitor use, one of continuation of outpatient therapy and one of new initiation of therapy. We then discuss potential risks and methods to mitigate these as well as benefits of these medications in the inpatient setting. We cautiously suggest the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in the hospital. However, these must be used judiciously and the practitioner must be aware of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis and its risk factors in this population.

  3. The relationship between healthy work environments and retention of nurses in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Desiree

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to determine the effect a healthy work environment has on the retention of nurses in a hospital setting. There is a nursing shortage that has been ongoing and is expected to continue, resulting in challenges for the healthcare system in the United States. The significance of this issue is the impact the nursing shortage will have on healthcare organizations and patients. The present paper included an extensive review of the current literature. The literature reviewed encompassed scholarly peer-reviewed journal articles. This article focused on nurses, work environments and the impact of the work environments on retention. Important issues that emerged from this analysis were the dangers of an unhealthy environment, the impact a healthy work environment has on patient outcomes and retention, the Magnet link to healthy work environments and the manager's role in creating and sustaining a healthy work environment. The literature provided evidence of the link between healthy work environments and the retention of nurses in a hospital setting. The implications for management are to implement changes now to create a healthy work environment that will recruit and retain nurses to secure their position in the future. © 2010 The Author. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Higher surgical training opportunities in the general hospital setting; getting the balance right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, I; Traynor, O; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2013-12-01

    The general hospital can play an important role in training of higher surgical trainees (HSTs) in Ireland and abroad. Training opportunities in such a setting have not been closely analysed to date. The aim of this study was to quantify operative exposure for HSTs over a 5-year period in a single institution. Analysis of electronic training logbooks (over a 5-year period, 2007-2012) was performed for general surgery trainees on the higher surgical training programme in Ireland. The most commonly performed adult and paediatric procedures per trainee, per year were analysed. Standard general surgery operations such as herniae (average 58, range 32-86) and cholecystectomy (average 60, range 49-72) ranked highly in each logbook. The most frequently performed emergency operations were appendicectomy (average 45, range 33-53) and laparotomy for acute abdomen (average 48, range 10-79). Paediatric surgical experience included appendicectomy, circumcision, orchidopexy and hernia/hydrocoele repair. Overall, the procedure most commonly performed in the adult setting was endoscopy, with each trainee recording an average of 116 (range 98-132) oesophagogastroduodenoscopies and 284 (range 227-354) colonoscopies. General hospitals continue to play a major role in the training of higher surgical trainees. Analysis of the electronic logbooks over a 5-year period reveals the high volume of procedures available to trainees in a non-specialist centre. Such training opportunities are invaluable in the context of changing work practices and limited resources.

  5. Environmental survey to assess viral contamination of air and surfaces in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, A; Verani, M; Lombardi, R; Casini, B; Privitera, G

    2011-03-01

    The presence of pathogenic viruses in healthcare settings represents a serious risk for both staff and patients. Direct viral detection in the environment poses significant technical problems and the indirect indicators currently in use suffer from serious limitations. The aim of this study was to monitor surfaces and air in hospital settings to reveal the presence of hepatitis C virus, human adenovirus, norovirus, human rotavirus and torque teno virus by nucleic acid assays, in parallel with measurements of total bacterial count and haemoglobin presence. In total, 114 surface and 62 air samples were collected. Bacterial contamination was very low (air was 282 cfu/m(3). Overall, 19 (16.7%) surface samples tested positive for viral nucleic acids: one for norovirus, one for human adenovirus and 17 (14.9%) for torque teno virus (TTV). Only this latter virus was directly detected in 10 air samples (16.1%). Haemoglobin was found on two surfaces. No relationship was found between viral, biochemical or bacterial indicators. The data obtained confirm the difficulty of assessing viral contamination using bacterial indicators. The frequent detection of TTV suggests its possible use as an indicator for general viral contamination of the environment. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Barriers to antenatal psychosocial assessment and depression screening in private hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Tanya; Barnett, Bryanne; Waters, Donna

    2017-10-11

    The evidence of benefit for antenatal psychosocial assessment and depression screening has been sufficient to lead the implementation of screening in public hospitals in all states of Australia. Details of the implementation of perinatal screening in private obstetric settings is less well known. As any successful implementation relies on the identification of local barriers, we aimed to determine what perceived or actual barriers may exist for the implementation of evidence-based perinatal screening interventions in private obstetric care, and specifically within small private hospitals. The integrative literature review method offers a structured systematic approach to organise, synthesize and critique research from a range of sources. This method was used to determine what barriers have been identified in implementing psychosocial assessment and depression screening with women receiving obstetric care in private hospital settings. The integrative review findings suggest that barriers to implementing psychosocial screening in the private sector are similar to those experienced in the public sector but may also be influenced by the corporate focus of private services. Barriers were identified among health professionals, within the personal and psychosocial context of women and their families, and at provider or system level. Once identified, barriers can be systematically addressed to enhance the success of implementing psychosocial and depression screening in the private sector. Screening is likely to be influenced by the business models and operating systems of private service providers. Health professionals working within this environment need more support to conduct perinatal assessment within this context. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling antecedents of electronic medical record system implementation success in low-resource setting hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Binyam; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing implementation of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMR) in developing countries, there is a growing need to identify antecedents of EMR success to measure and predict the level of adoption before costly implementation. However, less evidence is available about EMR success in the context of low-resource setting implementations. Therefore, this study aims to fill this gap by examining the constructs and relationships of the widely used DeLone and MacLean (D&M) information system success model to determine whether it can be applied to measure EMR success in those settings. A quantitative cross sectional study design using self-administered questionnaires was used to collect data from 384 health professionals working in five governmental hospitals in Ethiopia. The hospitals use a comprehensive EMR system since three years. Descriptive and structural equation modeling methods were applied to describe and validate the extent of relationship of constructs and mediating effects. The findings of the structural equation modeling shows that system quality has significant influence on EMR use (β = 0.32, P quality has significant influence on EMR use (β = 0.44, P service quality has strong significant influence on EMR use (β = 0.36, P effect of EMR use on user satisfaction was not significant. Both EMR use and user satisfaction have significant influence on perceived net-benefit (β = 0.31, P mediating factor in the relationship between service quality and EMR use (P effect on perceived net-benefit of health professionals. EMR implementers and managers in developing countries are in urgent need of implementation models to design proper implementation strategies. In this study, the constructs and relationships depicted in the updated D&M model were found to be applicable to assess the success of EMR in low resource settings. Additionally, computer literacy was found to be a mediating factor in EMR use and user satisfaction of

  8. Introduction of a breast cancer care programme including ultra short hospital stay in 4 early adopter centres: framework for an implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kok, Mascha; Frotscher, Caroline N A; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kessels, Alfons G H; Dirksen, Carmen D; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Roukema, Jan A; Bell, Antoine V R J; van der Ent, Fred W; von Meyenfeldt, Maarten F

    2007-07-02

    Whereas ultra-short stay (day care or 24 hour hospitalisation) following breast cancer surgery was introduced in the US and Canada in the 1990s, it is not yet common practice in Europe. This paper describes the design of the MaDO study, which involves the implementation of ultra short stay admission for patients after breast cancer surgery, and evaluates whether the targets of the implementation strategy are reached. The ultra short stay programme and the applied implementation strategy will be evaluated from the economic perspective. The MaDO study is a pre-post-controlled multi-centre study, that is performed in four hospitals in the Netherlands. It includes a pre and post measuring period of six months each with six months of implementation in between in at least 40 patients per hospital per measurement period. Primary outcome measure is the percentage of patients treated in ultra short stay. Secondary endpoints are the percentage of patients treated according to protocol, degree of involvement of home care nursing, quality of care from the patient's perspective, cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme and cost-effectiveness of the implementation strategy. Quality of care will be measured by the QUOTE-breast cancer instrument, cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme will be measured by means of the EuroQol (administered at four time-points) and a cost book for patients. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed from a societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness of the implementation strategy will be measured by determination of the costs of implementation activities. This study will reveal barriers and facilitators for implementation of the ultra short stay programme. Moreover, the results of the study will provide information about the cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme and the implementation strategy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77253391.

  9. Advocacy for the Provision of Dental Hygiene Services Within the Hospital Setting: Development of a Dental Hygiene Student Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, Jacqueline A; Stedman, Lynn

    2016-06-01

    Educational preparation of dental hygiene students for hospital-based practice, and advocacy efforts promote inclusion of dental hygienists within hospital-based interdisciplinary health care teams. Although the value of attending to the oral care needs of patients in critical care units has been recognized, the potential impact of optimal oral health care for the general hospital population is now gaining attention. This article describes a hospital-based educational experience for dental hygiene students and provides advocacy strategies for inclusion of dental hygienists within the hospital interdisciplinary team. The dental hygienist authors, both educators committed to evidence-based oral health care and the profession of dental hygiene, studied hospital health care and recognized a critical void in oral health care provision within that setting. They collaboratively developed and implemented a hospital-based rotation within the curriculum of a dental hygiene educational program and used advocacy skills to encourage hospital administrators to include a dental hygiene presence within hospital-based care teams. Hospital-based dental hygiene practice, as part of interprofessional health care delivery, has the potential to improve patient well-being, shorten hospital stays, and provide fiscal savings for patients, institutions, and third party payers. Advocacy efforts can promote dental hygienists as members of hospital-based health care teams. Further research is needed to document: (1) patient outcomes resulting from optimal oral care provision in hospitals; (2) best ways to prepare dental hygienists for career opportunities within hospitals and other similar health care settings; and (3) most effective advocacy strategies to promote inclusion of dental hygienists within care teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intrapartum and Postpartum Transfers to a Tertiary Care Hospital from Out-of-Hospital Birth Settings: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeen, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the reasons for and outcomes of maternal transfers from private homes and freestanding birthing suites to a large academic hospital in order to better understand and meet the needs of transferring women and their families. The convenience sample included all adult women admitted to the labor and birth unit or emergency room within a 5-year period who: 1) had planned to give birth out-of-hospital but developed complications at term before the onset of labor and were admitted to the hospital for labor induction; 2) had planned to give birth at home or in a birthing suite but transferred to the hospital during labor; or 3) arrived at the hospital for care within 24 hours after a planned birth at home or in a birthing suite. Descriptive data for each transfer were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-one transfers were identified: 11 prior to labor, 38 during labor, and 2 postpartum. Only 4 transfers were considered urgent by the referring provider. The most common reasons for intrapartum transfer were prolonged labor (n = 19) and desire for epidural analgesia (n = 10). Only 25% of the medical records had documentation that the referring provider accompanied the woman to the hospital during the care transition or was involved in her hospital course; however, the prenatal and/or intrapartum records had been delivered by the referring provider, were referenced in the hospital admission note, and had become part of the permanent hospital medical record for 85% of the women. On average, one transfer per year was complicated by neonatal morbidity, and one transfer per year involved significant disagreement between hospital providers and the women presenting for care. Collecting and reviewing data about a facility's perinatal transfer events can help the local multi-stakeholder group appraise current practice and plan for quality improvement. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  11. [Checklist Development for Women-Doctor-Friendly Working Conditions in a Hospital Setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Saki; Takeuchi, Masumi; Yamaoka, Kazue; Nohara, Michiko; Hasunuma, Naoko; Okinaga, Hiroko; Nomura, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop a scale of "women-doctor-friendly working conditions in a hospital setting". A task team consisting of relevant people including a medical doctor and a hospital personnel identified 36 items related to women-doctor-friendly working conditions. From December in 2012 to January in 2013, we sent a self-administered questionnaire to 807 full-time employees including faculty members and medical doctors who worked for a university-affiliated hospital. We asked them to score the extent to which they think it is necessary for women doctors to balance between work and gender role responsibilities on the basis of the Likert scale. We carried out a factor analysis and computed Cronbach's alpha to develop a scale and investigated its construct validity and reliability. Of the 807 employees, 291 returned the questionnaires (response rate, 36.1%). The item-total correlation (between an individual item score and the total score) coefficient was in the range from 0.44 to 0.68. In factor analysis, we deleted six items, and five factors were extracted on the basis of the least likelihood method with the oblique Promax rotation. The factors were termed "gender equality action in an organization", "the compliance of care leave in both sexes and parental leave in men", "balance between life events and work", "childcare support at the workplace", and "flexible employment status". The Cronbach's alpha values of all the factors and the total items were 0.82-0.89 and 0.93, respectively, suggesting that the scale we developed has high reliability. The result indicated that the scale of women-doctor-friendly working conditions consisting of five factors with 30 items is highly validated and reliable.

  12. Public health safety and environment in inadequate hospital and healthcare settings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguma, D

    2017-03-01

    Public health safety and environmental management are concerns that pose challenges worldwide. This paper briefly assesses a selected impact of the environment on public health. The study used an assessment of environmental mechanism to analyse the underlying different pathways in which the health sector is affected in inadequate hospital and health care settings. We reviewed the limited available evidence of the association between the health sector and the environment, and the likely pathways through which the environment influences health. The paper also models the use of private health care as a function of costs and benefits relative to public care and no care. The need to enhancing policies to improve the administration of health services, strengthening interventions on environment using international agreements, like Rio Conventions, including measures to control hospital-related infection, planning for human resources and infrastructure construction development have linkage to improve environment care and public health. The present study findings partly also demonstrate the influence of demand for health on the environment. The list of possible interventions includes enhancing policies to improve the administration of health services, strengthening Rio Conventions implementation on environmental concerns, control of environmental hazards and public health. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy among Children and Young Adults in Office-Based or Hospital Outpatient Department Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minji Sohn

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was three-fold: (1 to estimate the national trends in antipsychotic (AP polypharmacy among 6- to 24-year-old patients in the U.S.; (2 to identify frequently used AP agents and mental disorder diagnoses related to AP polypharmacy; and (3 to assess the strength of association between AP polypharmacy and patient/provider characteristics. We used publicly available ambulatory health care datasets to evaluate AP polypharmacy in office-based or hospital outpatient department settings to conduct a cross-sectional study. First, national visit rates between 2007 and 2011 were estimated using sampling weights. Second, common diagnoses and drugs used in AP polypharmacy were identified. Third, a multivariate logistic regression model was developed to assess the strength of association between AP polypharmacy and patient and provider characteristics. Between 2007 and 2011, approximately 2% of office-based or hospital outpatient department visits made by 6- to 24-year-old patients included one or more AP prescriptions. Of these visits, 5% were classified as AP polypharmacy. The most common combination of AP polypharmacy was to use two or more second-generation APs. Also, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia were the two most frequent primary mental disorder diagnoses among AP polypharmacy visits. The factors associated with AP polypharmacy were: older age (young adults, black, having one or more non-AP prescriptions, and having schizophrenia or ADHD.

  14. Factors affecting length of stay in forensic hospital setting: need for therapeutic security and course of admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davoren, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Patients admitted to a secure forensic hospital are at risk of a long hospital stay. Forensic hospital beds are a scarce and expensive resource and ability to identify the factors predicting length of stay at time of admission would be beneficial. The DUNDRUM-1 triage security scale and DUNDRUM-2 triage urgency scale are designed to assess need for therapeutic security and urgency of that need while the HCR-20 predicts risk of violence. We hypothesized that items on the DUNDRUM-1 and DUNDRUM-2 scales, rated at the time of pre-admission assessment, would predict length of stay in a medium secure forensic hospital setting.

  15. [Nursing students' perception of the learning process in a hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Elcilene Andreíne Terra Durgante; Cogo, Ana Luísa Petersen

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identijf how nursing students perceive and experience the learning process during curricular practice in a hospital setting. A qualitative, retrospective, documentary study was developed in an undergraduate nursing course. Data were comprised of 162 posts made by 34 students in the online discussion forum of the Learning Management System Moodle, during the first half of 2011. The following themes emergedfrom t he thematic content analysis: "nursing students' understanding about the professional practice," and "the teaching and learning process in the perspective of nursing students." The study demonstrated that the forum was a place for reporting experiences such as the description of the physical area, performing procedures, perception of nursing care activities, conJlicts with peers, coping with death and learning evaluation. The online discussion forum needs to be used by professors as a space of interaction so as to contribute to professional training.

  16. Impact of electronic prescribing in a hospital setting: a process-focused evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas R; Geller, E Scott; Clarke, Steven W

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate effects of a natural CPOE implementation in a hospital setting and inform the efficacy of using CPOE rather than traditional paper medication orders. A multiple-baseline, quasi-experimental study of a naturally occurring CPOE intervention, with a non-equivalent control site. Compliance with medication-ordering protocols and time to first dose of antibiotics. Medication orders placed using CPOE were significantly more compliant than paper-based medication orders, and first doses of antibiotics were delivered significantly faster when ordered with CPOE than when placed using the standard paper-based system (p<.01). Findings support the use of CPOE and justify the need for interventions to increase CPOE adoption and consistent use among physicians.

  17. An Integrative Literature Review of Patient Turnover in Inpatient Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Hye; Weaver, Lindsay; Mejia-Johnson, Lydia; Vukas, Rachel; Zimmerman, Julie

    2016-05-01

    High patient turnover can result in fragmentation of nursing care. It can also increase nursing workload and thus impede the ability of nurses to provide safe and high-quality care. We reviewed 20 studies that examined patient turnover in relation to nursing workload, staffing, and patient outcomes as well as interventions in inpatient hospital settings. The studies consistently addressed the importance of accounting for patient turnover when estimating nurse staffing needs. They also showed that patient turnover varied by time, day, and unit type. Researchers found that higher patient turnover was associated with adverse events; however, further research on this topic is needed because evidence on the effect of patient turnover on patient outcomes is not yet strong and conclusive. We suggest that researchers and administrators need to pay more attention to patterns and levels of patient turnover and implement managerial strategies to reduce nursing workload and improve patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Inertial Sensor-Based Robust Gait Analysis in Non-Hospital Settings for Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Tunca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The gold standards for gait analysis are instrumented walkways and marker-based motion capture systems, which require costly infrastructure and are only available in hospitals and specialized gait clinics. Even though the completeness and the accuracy of these systems are unquestionable, a mobile and pervasive gait analysis alternative suitable for non-hospital settings is a clinical necessity. Using inertial sensors for gait analysis has been well explored in the literature with promising results. However, the majority of the existing work does not consider realistic conditions where data collection and sensor placement imperfections are imminent. Moreover, some of the underlying assumptions of the existing work are not compatible with pathological gait, decreasing the accuracy. To overcome these challenges, we propose a foot-mounted inertial sensor-based gait analysis system that extends the well-established zero-velocity update and Kalman filtering methodology. Our system copes with various cases of data collection difficulties and relaxes some of the assumptions invalid for pathological gait (e.g., the assumption of observing a heel strike during a gait cycle. The system is able to extract a rich set of standard gait metrics, including stride length, cadence, cycle time, stance time, swing time, stance ratio, speed, maximum/minimum clearance and turning rate. We validated the spatio-temporal accuracy of the proposed system by comparing the stride length and swing time output with an IR depth-camera-based reference system on a dataset comprised of 22 subjects. Furthermore, to highlight the clinical applicability of the system, we present a clinical discussion of the extracted metrics on a disjoint dataset of 17 subjects with various neurological conditions.

  19. Pride and confidence at work: potential predictors of occupational health in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petterson Inga-Lill

    2005-09-01

    the general negative effects of downsizing observed elsewhere in the hospital, and in the literature. Conclusion Research illuminating health-promoting aspects is rather unusual. This study could be seen as explorative. The themes and core dimensions we found could be used as a basis for further intervention studies in similar health-care settings. The result could also be used in future health promotion studies in larger populations. One of the first steps in such a strategy is to formulate relevant questions, and we consider that this study contributes to this.

  20. Adaption and validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire for the Danish hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Solvejg Kristensen,1–3 Svend Sabroe,4 Paul Bartels,1,5 Jan Mainz,3,5 Karl Bang Christensen6 1The Danish Clinical Registries, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Aalborg University Hospital, Psychiatry, Aalborg, Denmark; 4Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 5Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 6Department of Biostatistics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Purpose: Measuring and developing a safe culture in health care is a focus point in creating highly reliable organizations being successful in avoiding patient safety incidents where these could normally be expected. Questionnaires can be used to capture a snapshot of an employee's perceptions of patient safety culture. A commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ. The purpose of this study was to adapt the SAQ for use in Danish hospitals, assess its construct validity and reliability, and present benchmark data.Materials and methods: The SAQ was translated and adapted for the Danish setting (SAQ-DK. The SAQ-DK was distributed to 1,263 staff members from 31 in- and outpatient units (clinical areas across five somatic and one psychiatric hospitals through meeting administration, hand delivery, and mailing. Construct validity and reliability were tested in a cross-sectional study. Goodness-of-fit indices from confirmatory factor analysis were reported along with inter-item correlations, Cronbach's alpha (α, and item and subscale scores.Results: Participation was 73.2% (N=925 of invited health care workers. Goodness-of-fit indices from the confirmatory factor analysis showed: c2=1496.76, P<0.001, CFI 0.901, RMSEA (90%CI 0.053 (0.050-0056, Probability RMSEA (p close=0.057. Inter-scale correlations between the factors showed moderate-to-high correlations. The scale stress recognition had significant

  1. Persisting high hospital and community childhood mortality in an urban setting in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Jens Erik; Biai, Sidu; Jakobsen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe paediatric hospitalization in a West African capital in relation to overall childhood mortality in the community and to evaluate the potential impact of improved management at the hospital. METHODS: Hospital data on child admissions in a 6-year period were linked to information...... been hospitalized, and 24% of all deaths in the community occurred in-hospital. Community infant and under-three mortality rates were 110 and 207 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In-hospital mortality remained persistently high from 1991 to 1996 and the overall in-hospital mortality was 12...... minor improvements in acute case management of sick children attending the hospital would be expected to result in substantial reduction in overall childhood mortality. Persistently high acute in-hospital mortality reflects the need of immediate and appropriate care at the hospital. Treatment should...

  2. Do nurses provide a safe sleep environment for infants in the hospital setting? An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carla; Stiltner, Denise; Wright, Kelly Barnhardt; Kautz, Donald D

    2015-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may be the most preventable cause of death for infants 0 to 6 months of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) first published safe sleep recommendations for parents and healthcare professionals in 1992. In 1994, new guidelines were published and they became known as the "Back to Sleep" campaign. After this, a noticeable decline occurred in infant deaths from SIDS. However, this number seems to have plateaued with no continuing significant improvements in infant deaths. The objective of this review was to determine whether nurses provide a safe sleep environment for infants in the hospital setting. Research studies that dealt with nursing behaviors and nursing knowledge in the hospital setting were included in the review. A search was conducted of Google Scholar, CINAHL, PubMed, and Cochrane, using the key words "NICU," "newborn," "SIDS," "safe sleep environment," "nurse," "education," "supine sleep," "prone sleep," "safe sleep," "special care nursery," "hospital policy for safe sleep," "research," "premature," "knowledge," "practice," "health care professionals," and "parents." The review included research reports on nursing knowledge and behaviors as well as parental knowledge obtained through education and role modeling of nursing staff. Only research studies were included to ensure that our analysis was based on rigorous research-based findings. Several international studies were included because they mirrored findings noted in the United States. All studies were published between 1999 and 2012. Healthcare professionals and parents were included in the studies. They were primarily self-report surveys, designed to determine what nurses, other healthcare professionals, and parents knew or had been taught about SIDS. Integrative review. Thirteen of the 16 studies included in the review found that some nurses and some mothers continued to use nonsupine positioning. Four of the 16 studies discussed nursing knowledge and

  3. Frontal assessment battery (FAB) performance following traumatic brain injury hospitalized in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Natalia; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Belisle, Arielle; Lamoureux, Julie; AlSideiri, Ghusn; Marcoux, Judith; Maleki, Mohammed; Alturki, Abdulrahman Y; Anchouche, Sonia; Alquraini, Hanan; Feyz, Mitra; Guise, Elaine de

    2018-01-19

    The Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) has been shown to be useful in several clinical settings. The aim of the present study was to examine the performance of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the FAB and to predict their acute outcome. The FAB was administered to 89 patients with mild (27 = uncomplicated and 39 = complicated) and moderate (n = 23) TBI during hospitalization in an acute care setting. The length of stay in days (LOS), Glasgow Outcome Scale-Revised score (GOSE) and Disability Rating Scale (DRS) score were collected. Results showed no significant differences between the three groups on the FAB score, but age and education were significantly associated with the FAB score. Parietal lesions were associated with lower total FAB score, and with the Similarities, Motor series and Conflicting instructions subscales, while frontal lesions were associated with lower performance on the Motor series and Conflicting instructions subscales. Total FAB score was significantly correlated with all outcome measures, and together the FAB total score and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score explained 30.8% of the variance in the DRS score. The FAB may be useful clinically to acutely assess frontal and parietal lobe functions at bedside in patients with TBI and, in combination with the GCS score to measure TBI severity, can enable clinicians to predict early outcome.

  4. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Marika; McKinley, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery. PMID:25785497

  5. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Demers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery.

  6. Environmental scan of infection prevention and control practices for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Wrechelle; Geransar, Rose; Clayden, Nancy; Jones, Jessica; de Grood, Jill; Joffe, Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Missaghi, Bayan; Pearce, Craig; Ghali, William; Conly, John

    2017-10-01

    Ward closure is a method of controlling hospital-acquired infectious diseases outbreaks and is often coupled with other practices. However, the value and efficacy of ward closures remains uncertain. To understand the current practices and perceptions with respect to ward closure for hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada. A Web-based environmental scan survey was developed by a team of infection prevention and control (IPC) experts and distributed to 235 IPC professionals at acute care sites across Canada. Data were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A total of 110 completed responses showed that 70% of sites reported at least 1 outbreak during 2013, 44% of these sites reported the use of ward closure. Ward closure was considered an "appropriate," "sometimes appropriate," or "not appropriate" strategy to control outbreaks by 50%, 45%, and 5% of participants, respectively. System capacity issues and overall risk assessment were main factors influencing the decision to close hospital wards following an outbreak. Results suggest the use of ward closure for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in Canadian acute care health settings is mixed, with outbreak control methods varying. The successful implementation of ward closure was dependent on overall support for the IPC team within hospital administration. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number of avoided administration errors was related to the incremental costs to obtain the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided administration error. The AMS resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the proportion of errors in the intervention ward compared with the control ward. The cost analysis showed that the AMS increased the ward's 6-month cost by €16,843. The cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated at €2.01 per avoided administration error, €2.91 per avoided procedural error, and €19.38 per avoided clinical error. The AMS was effective in reducing errors in the medication administration process at a higher overall cost. The cost-effectiveness analysis showed that the AMS was associated with affordable cost-effectiveness rates. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease.

  9. Pressure mapping to prevent pressure ulcers in a hospital setting: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Sedin, Inga-Maj; Andersson, Sara; Pingel, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Pressure ulcers cause suffering to patients and costs to society. Reducing pressure at the interface between the patient's body and the support surface is a valid clinical intervention for reducing the risk of pressure ulcers. However, studies have shown that knowledge of how to reduce pressure and shear and to prevent pressure ulcers is lacking. To evaluate the effect of a pressure mapping system on pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence in a hospital setting. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A geriatric/internal medical ward with 26 beds in a Swedish university hospital. 190 patients were recruited (intervention: n=91; control: n=99) over a period of 9 months. Patients were eligible if they were over 50 years old, admitted to the ward between Sunday 4pm and Friday 4pm, and expected to stay in the ward ≥3 days. The continuous bedside pressure mapping system displays the patient's pressure points in real-time colour imagery showing how pressure is distributed at the body-mat interface. The system gives immediate feedback to staff about the patient's pressure points, facilitating preventive interventions related to repositioning. It was used from admittance to discharge from the ward (or 14 days at most). Both intervention and control groups received standard pressure ulcer prevention care. No significant difference in the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers was shown between intervention and control groups. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in the intervention group was 24.2% on day 1 and 28.2% on day 14. In the control group the corresponding numbers were 18.2% and 23.8%. Seven of 69 patients (10.1%) in the intervention group and seven of 81 patients (8.6%) in the control group who had no pressure ulcers on admission developed category 1 and category 2 ulcers during their hospital stay. The incidence rate ratio between the intervention and control groups was 1.13 (95% CI: 0.34-3.79). This study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of a

  10. Using a verbal prompt to increase protein consumption in a hospital setting: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van der L.D.T.; Essen, van H.; Kleef, van E.; Wijk, de R.A.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sufficient protein intake among hospitalized patients may contribute to faster recovery and a decrease in healthcare costs. Nevertheless, hospitalized patients are often found to consume too little protein. This field study explored the success of a small, inexpensive intervention

  11. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Guedes dos Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. Method: a mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Results: based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. Conclusion: it is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses.

  12. Governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2015-01-01

    To elaborate an interpretative model for the governance of professional nursing practice in a hospital setting. A mixed methods study with concurrent triangulation strategy, using data from a cross-sectional study with 106 nurses and a Grounded Theory study with 63 participants. The quantitative data were collected through the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised and underwent descriptive statistical analysis. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed through initial, selective and focused coding. Based on the results obtained with the Brazilian Nursing Work Index - Revised, it is possible to state that nurses perceived that they had autonomy, control over the environment, good relationships with physicians and organizational support for nursing governance. The governance of the professional nursing practice is based on the management of nursing care and services carried out by the nurses. To perform these tasks, nurses aim to get around the constraints of the organizational support and develop management knowledge and skills. It is important to reorganize the structures and processes of nursing governance, especially the support provided by the organization for the management practices of nurses.

  13. Between two worlds medical student perceptions of humor and slang in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, G N; Kinsman, S B; Bosk, C L; Sankar, P; Ubel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Residents frequently use humor and slang at the expense of patients on the clinical wards. We studied how medical students react to and interpret the "appropriateness" of derogatory and cynical humor and slang in a clinical setting. Semistructured, in-depth interviews. Informal meeting spaces. Thirty-three medical students. Qualitative content analysis of interview transcriptions. Students' descriptions of the humorous stories and their responses reveal that students are able to take the perspective of both outsiders and insiders in the medical culture. Students' responses to these stories show that they can identify the outsider's perspective both by seeing themselves in the outsider's role and by identifying with patients. Students can also see the insider's perspective, in that they identify with residents' frustrations and disappointments and therefore try to explain why residents use this kind of humor. Their participation in the humor and slang--often with reservations--further reveals their ability to identify with the perspective of an insider. Medical students describe a number of conflicting reactions to hospital humor that may enhance and exacerbate tensions that are already an inevitable part of training for many students. This phenomenon requires greater attention by medical educators.

  14. 'Being a conduit' between hospital and home: stakeholders' views and perceptions of a nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasalu, Munikumar Ramasamy; Clarke, Amanda; Atkinson, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    To explore and critically examine stakeholders' views and perceptions concerning the nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Service in an acute hospital setting and to inform sustainability, service development and future service configuration. The drive in policy and practice is to enable individuals to achieve their preferred place of care during their last days of life. However, most people in UK die in acute hospital settings against their wishes. To facilitate individuals' preferred place of care, a large acute hospital in northeast England implemented a pilot project to establish a nurse-led Macmillan Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service. A pluralistic evaluation design using qualitative methods was used to seek stakeholders' views and perceptions of this service. In total, 12 participants (five bereaved carers and seven health professionals) participated in the evaluation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with bereaved carers who used this service for their relatives. A focus group and an individual interview were undertaken with health professionals who had used the service since its inception. Individual interviews were also conducted with the Discharge Facilitator and service manager. Analysis of all data was guided by Framework Analysis. Four key themes emerged relating to the role of the Discharge Facilitator Service: achieving preferred place of care; the Discharge Facilitator as the 'conduit' between hospital and community settings; delays in hospital discharge and stakeholders' perceptions of the way forward for the service. The Discharge Facilitator Service acted as a reliable resource and support for facilitating the fast-tracking of end-of-life patients to their preferred place of care. Future planning for hospital-based palliative care discharge facilitating services need to consider incorporating strategies that include: increased profile of the service, expansion of service provision and the Discharge Facilitator's earlier

  15. Single-site community consultation for emergency research in a community hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Kyle L; Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Little, Charletta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate community member feedback from community consultation and public disclosure activities performed for a clinical investigation involving a device designed to treat traumatic brain injury in prehospital contexts. The clinical investigation of that device was to be performed under the federal regulations providing an exception from prospective informed consent requirements in emergency settings. Secondarily, we sought to assess the community consultation process by measuring the levels of outreach provided by the different communication methods used in these activities, with special attention to the effectiveness of social media for community outreach. The medical device investigation consists of a single-site pilot study based at a 345-bed community hospital in east central Illinois, which also serves as the area's only level I trauma center. Investigators, in collaboration with the local institutional review board, fulfilled community consultation and public disclosure requirements through four public town hall meetings, seven targeted focus groups, targeted mailings to 884 community leaders and researchers, a press conference and press release, internal and external websites, and multiple postings to the hospital's Facebook and Twitter accounts. Community members provided feedback by completing paper or electronic comment cards. A total of 428 community members attended the four town hall meetings and seven focus group sessions. Attendance at each meeting ranged from 4 to 20 attendees for the town hall meetings and 8 to 140 attendees for the focus groups. The investigation's external website received 626 unique visitors and the intranet website received 528 unique visits. Social media postings on Facebook and Twitter received six comments and eight "likes" to indicate that an individual read the posting. In total, attendees completed 175 comment cards to provide their feedback. Community member attitudes regarding the

  16. Junior doctor psychiatry placements in hospital and community settings: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Sharon; Crampton, Paul E S; Schwarzlose, Cathleen; Kumar, Namita; Cornwall, Peter L

    2017-09-27

    The proportion of junior doctors required to complete psychiatry placements in the UK has increased, due in part to vacant training posts and psychiatry career workforce shortages, as can be seen across the world. The aim of this study was to understand the lived experience of a Foundation Year 1 junior doctor psychiatry placement and to understand how job components influence attitudes. The study was conducted using a cross-sectional qualitative phenomenological approach. Hospital and community psychiatry department settings in the North East of England, UK. In total, 14 Foundation Year 1 junior doctors were interviewed including seven men and seven women aged between 23 and 34 years. The majority had completed their medical degree in the UK and were White British. The lived experience of a junior doctor psychiatry placement was understood by three core themes: exposure to patient recovery, connectedness with others in the healthcare team and subjective interpretations of psychiatry. The experiences were moderated by instances of role definition, reaction to the specialty and the organisational fit of the junior doctor capacity in the specialty. The study reinforces and adds to the literature by identifying connectedness as being important for both job satisfaction and morale, which is currently damaged within the junior doctor population. The study provides in-depth insights into the lived experience of psychiatry placements and can be taken forward by educationalists to ensure the placements are meaningful experiences for junior doctors by developing role definition, belonging, structure and psychiatric care responsibility. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Crisis Team Management in a Scarce Resource Setting: Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alynn Henker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionA crisis team management (CTM simulation course was developed by volunteers from Health Volunteers Overseas for physicians and nurses at Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The framework for the course was adapted from crisis resource management (1, 2, crisis team training (3, and TeamSTEPPs© models (4. The CTM course focused on teaching physicians and nurses on the development of team performance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Challenges to providing this course at AHC included availability of simulation equipment, cultural differences in learning, and language barriers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a CTM simulation course at AHC on attitudes and perceptions of participants on concepts related to team performance.MethodsEach of the CTM courses consisted of three lectures, including team performance concepts, communication, and debriefing followed by rotation through four simulation scenarios. The evaluation instrument used to evaluate the AHC CTM course was developed for Cambodian staff at AHC based on TeamSTEPPs© instruments evaluating attitude and perceptions of team performance (5. CTM team performance concepts included in lectures, debriefing sessions, and the evaluation instrument were: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze pre- and post-test paired data from participants in the course.ResultsOf the 54 participants completing the three CTM courses at AHC, 27 were nurses, 6 were anesthetists, and 21 were physicians. Attitude and perception scores were found to significantly improve (p < 0.05 for team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, and communication. Team performance areas that improved the most were: discussion of team performance, communication, and exchange of information.ConclusionTeaching of non-technical skills can be effective in a setting with scarce

  18. Crisis Team Management in a Scarce Resource Setting: Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henker, Richard Alynn; Henker, Hiroko; Eng, Hor; O'Donnell, John; Jirativanont, Tachawan

    2017-01-01

    A crisis team management (CTM) simulation course was developed by volunteers from Health Volunteers Overseas for physicians and nurses at Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The framework for the course was adapted from crisis resource management (1, 2), crisis team training (3), and TeamSTEPPs© models (4). The CTM course focused on teaching physicians and nurses on the development of team performance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Challenges to providing this course at AHC included availability of simulation equipment, cultural differences in learning, and language barriers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a CTM simulation course at AHC on attitudes and perceptions of participants on concepts related to team performance. Each of the CTM courses consisted of three lectures, including team performance concepts, communication, and debriefing followed by rotation through four simulation scenarios. The evaluation instrument used to evaluate the AHC CTM course was developed for Cambodian staff at AHC based on TeamSTEPPs© instruments evaluating attitude and perceptions of team performance (5). CTM team performance concepts included in lectures, debriefing sessions, and the evaluation instrument were: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze pre- and post-test paired data from participants in the course. Of the 54 participants completing the three CTM courses at AHC, 27 were nurses, 6 were anesthetists, and 21 were physicians. Attitude and perception scores were found to significantly improve ( p  < 0.05) for team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, and communication. Team performance areas that improved the most were: discussion of team performance, communication, and exchange of information. Teaching of non-technical skills can be effective in a setting with scarce resources in a Southeastern Asian country.

  19. Medical leaders or masters?-A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghout, Mathilde A; Fabbricotti, Isabelle N; Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; Hilders, Carina G J M

    2017-01-01

    Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal-and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal 'leaders' in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care.

  20. Medical leaders or masters?—A systematic review of medical leadership in hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbricotti, Isabelle N.; Buljac-Samardžić, Martina; Hilders, Carina G. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Medical leadership is increasingly considered as crucial for improving the quality of care and the sustainability of healthcare. However, conceptual clarity is lacking in the literature and in practice. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to reveal the different conceptualizations of medical leadership in terms of definitions, roles and activities, and personal–and context-specific features. Eight databases were systematically searched for eligible studies, including empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals that included physicians carrying out a manager or leadership role in a hospital setting. Finally, 34 articles were included and their findings were synthesized and analyzed narratively. Medical leadership is conceptualized in literature either as physicians with formal managerial roles or physicians who act as informal ‘leaders’ in daily practices. In both forms, medical leaders must carry out general management and leadership activities and acts to balance between management and medicine, because these physicians must accomplish both organizational and medical staff objectives. To perform effectively, credibility among medical peers appeared to be the most important factor, followed by a scattered list of fields of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Competing logics, role ambiguity and a lack of time and support were perceived as barriers. However, the extent to which physicians must master all elicited features, remains ambiguous. Furthermore, the extent to which medical leadership entails a shift or a reallocation of tasks that are at the core of medical professional work remains unclear. Future studies should implement stronger research designs in which more theory is used to study the effect of medical leadership on professional work, medical staff governance, and subsequently, the quality and efficiency of care. PMID:28910335

  1. A profile of babies born before arrival to hospital in a peri-urban setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Parag*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of BBAs is comparable to other developing countries, and is associated with poor antenatal attendance, prematurity, delay in presentation to hospital and lengthier hospital stays. These factors have implications on prehospital care of newborns and access to maternal and child health care in general.

  2. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting: the Irish results of the ENDORSE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, O

    2012-05-01

    ENDORSE (Epidemiologic International Day for the Evaluation of Patients at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism in the Acute Hospital Care Setting), is a multinational, cross-sectional survey of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk prevalence and effective prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting. Three Irish hospitals enrolled in the study. The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines were employed to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis. Of 552 patients, 297 (53.8%) and 255 (46.2%) were categorised as surgical or medical, respectively, with 175 (59%) surgical and 109 (43%) medical patients deemed to be at risk for VTE. Of these, only 112 (64%) and 51 (47%) received recommended VTE prophylaxis, respectively. The results are consistent with those observed in other countries and demonstrate a high prevalence of risk for VTE and a low rate of prophylaxis use, particularly in medical patients. Awareness of VTE guidelines should be an integral component of health policy.

  3. Why a successful task substitution in glaucoma care could not be transferred from a hospital setting to a primary care setting: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer-Goor Kim M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare systems are challenged by a demand that exceeds available resources. One policy to meet this challenge is task substitution-transferring tasks to other professions and settings. Our study aimed to explore stakeholders’ perceived feasibility of transferring hospital-based monitoring of stable glaucoma patients to primary care optometrists. Methods A case study was undertaken in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital (REH using semi-structured interviews and document reviews. They were inductively analysed using three implementation related theoretical perspectives: sociological theories on professionalism, management theories, and applied political analysis. Results Currently it is not feasible to use primary care optometrists as substitutes for optometrists and ophthalmic technicians working in a hospital-based glaucoma follow-up unit (GFU. Respondents’ narratives revealed that: the glaucoma specialists’ sense of urgency for task substitution outside the hospital diminished after establishing a GFU that satisfied their professionalization needs; the return on investments were unclear; and reluctant key stakeholders with strong power positions blocked implementation. The window of opportunity that existed for task substitution in person and setting in 1999 closed with the institutionalization of the GFU. Conclusions Transferring the monitoring of stable glaucoma patients to primary care optometrists in Rotterdam did not seem feasible. The main reasons were the lack of agreement on professional boundaries and work domains, the institutionalization of the GFU in the REH, and the absence of an appropriate reimbursement system. Policy makers considering substituting tasks to other professionals should carefully think about the implementation process, especially in a two-step implementation process (substitution in person and in setting such as this case. Involving the substituting professionals early on to ensure all

  4. The effect of hand hygiene compliance on hospital-acquired infections in an ICU setting in a Kuwaiti teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa Y; Mousa, Haifa Al; Al-Abdulghani, Khaled A; Rotimi, Vincent O

    2013-02-01

    Hand washing is widely accepted as the cornerstone of infection control in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nosocomial infections are frequently viewed as indicating poor compliance with hand washing guidelines. To determine the hand hygiene (HH) compliance rate among healthcare workers (HCWs) and its effect on the nosocomial infection rates in the ICU of our hospital, we conducted an interventional study. The study spanned a period of 7 months (February 2011-August 2011) and consisted of education about HH indications and techniques, workplace reminder posters, focused group sessions, and feedback on the HH compliance and infection rates. The WHO HH observation protocol was used both before and after a hospital-wide HH campaign directed at all staff members, particularly those in the ICU. Compliance was measured by direct observation of the HCWs, using observation record forms in a patient-directed manner, with no more than two patients observed simultaneously. The overall HH compliance rate was calculated by dividing the number of HH actions by the total number of HH opportunities. The nosocomial infection rates for the pre- and post-interventional periods were also compared to establish the effect of the intervention on rate of infections acquired within the unit. The overall rate of HH compliance by all the HCWs increased from 42.9% pre-intervention to 61.4% post-intervention, P<0.001. Individually, the compliance was highest among the nurses, 49.9 vs. 82.5%, respectively (P<0.001) and lowest among the doctors, 38.6 vs. 43.2%, respectively (P=0.24). The effect of the increase in the HH compliance rate on the nosocomial infection rate was remarkable. There were significant reductions in the following: the rate of overall health care-associated infections/1000 patient-days, which fell from 37.2 pre-intervention to 15.1 post-intervention (P<0.001); the rate of bloodstream infections, which fell from 18.6 to 3.4/1000 central-line-days (P<0.001); and the rate of lower

  5. Convergent and divergent country trends in coordinated wage-setting and collective bargaining in the public hospitals sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimshaw, D.; Jaehrling, K.; van der Meer, M.; Méhaut, P.; Shimron, N.

    2007-01-01

    Drawing on the findings of research in the public hospitals sector in five European countries1—France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the UK—this article assesses the character of change in wage setting and collective bargaining. It demonstrates the diversity of national arrangements by

  6. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  7. Total direct cost, length of hospital stay, institutional discharges and their determinants from rehabilitation settings in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S K; Ng, T P; Yong, D; Fong, N P; Gerald, K

    2006-11-01

    Length of hospital stay (LOHS) is the largest determinant of direct cost for stroke care. Institutional discharges (acute care and nursing homes) from rehabilitation settings add to the direct cost. It is important to identify potentially preventable medical and non-medical reasons determining LOHS and institutional discharges to reduce the direct cost of stroke care. The aim of the study was to ascertain the total direct cost, LOHS, frequency of institutional discharges and their determinants from rehabilitation settings. Observational study was conducted on 200 stroke patients in two rehabilitation settings. The patients were examined for various socio-demographic, neurological and clinical variables upon admission to the rehabilitation hospitals. Information on total direct cost and medical complications during hospitalization were also recorded. The outcome variables measured were total direct cost, LOHS and discharges to institutions (acute care and nursing home facility) and their determinants. The mean and median LOHS in our study were 34 days (SD = 18) and 32 days respectively. LOHS and the cost of hospital stay were significantly correlated. The significant variables associated with LOHS on multiple linear regression analysis were: (i) severe functional impairment/functional dependence Barthel Index institutional discharges (22 to acute care and 17 to nursing homes). On multivariate analysis the significant predictors of discharges to institutions from rehabilitation hospitals were medical complications (OR = 4.37; 95% CI 1.01-12.53) and severe functional impairment/functional dependence. (OR = 5.90, 95% CI 2.32-14.98). Length of hospital stay and discharges to institutions from rehabilitation settings are significantly determined by medical complications. Importance of adhering to clinical pathway/protocol for stroke care is further discussed.

  8. Infection prevention needs assessment in Colorado hospitals: rural and urban settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Sara M; Gilmartin, Heather; Rich, Karen L; Price, Connie S

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to conduct a needs assessment for infection prevention programs in both rural and urban hospitals in Colorado. Infection control professionals (ICPs) from Colorado hospitals participated in an online survey on training, personnel, and experience; ICP time allocation; and types of surveillance. Responses were evaluated and compared based on hospital status (rural or urban). Additionally, rural ICPs participated in an interview about resources and training. Surveys were received from 62 hospitals (77.5% response); 33 rural (75.0% response) and 29 urban (80.6% response). Fifty-two percent of rural ICPs reported multiple job responsibilities compared with 17.2% of urban ICPs. Median length of experience for rural ICPs was 4.0 years compared with 11.5 years for urban ICPs (P = .008). Fifty-one percent of rural ICPs reported no access to infectious disease physicians (0.0% urban) and 81.8% of rural hospitals reported no antimicrobial stewardship programs (31.0% urban). Through the interviews it was revealed that priorities for rural ICPs were training and communication. Our study revealed numerous differences between infection prevention programs in rural versus urban hospitals. An infection prevention outreach program established in Colorado could potentially address the challenges faced by rural hospital infection prevention departments. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency of hospital acquired hyponatremia in a pediatric tertiary care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Haq, A.U.; Billo, A.G.; Bibi, S.; Gilani, S.Y.H.; Shah, S.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is the most commonly encountered electrolyte disorder in children. In our country the epidemiology of hospital acquired hyponatremia has hardly ever been explored whereas the administration of hypotonic IV fluids is widely practiced here. Therefore we pioneered to conduct this study to determine the frequency of hospital acquired hyponatremia. Method: This was a cross sectional study carried out at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi in paediatric ward and ICU over a period of 12 months. All children (>1 month and <15 years of age) admitted in paediatric units and on maintenance IV fluids who had serum sodium level measured on admission were included in the study and followed to identify patients who had a drop in serum sodium during hospitalization. Informed consent was taken from parents and collected data was recorded on a proforma. Results: A total of 865 patients were enrolled in the study. Hyponatremia was recorded in 405 patients on admission (46.8 percentage) while hospital acquired hyponatremia was documented in 240. children (27.7 percentage). Out of these 142 (59.2 percentage) were male and 98 (40.8 percentage) were female. Mean age of children in hospital acquired hyponatremia group was 60.67 months. Severity of hospital acquired hyponatremia was recorded as mild in 191 (79.6 percentage), moderate in 35 (14.6 percentage) and severe in 14 (5.8) children. Major disease categories included gastrointestinal disorder (30.4 percentage), respiratory illness (12.5 percentage), oncological disease (16.3 percentage), cardiovascular disease (11.7 percentage), infectious disease (9.2 percentage) and neurological illness (8.3 percentage). Conclusion: Hospital acquired hyponatremia is frequently encountered in our hospitalized children with majority of them receiving hypotonic IV solutions. (author)

  10. How organizational context affects bioethical decision-making: pharmacists' management of gatekeeping processes in retail and hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    Social science studies of bioethics demonstrate that ethics are highly contextual, functioning differently across local settings as actors make daily decisions "on the ground." Sociological studies that demonstrate the key role organizations play in shaping ethical decision-making have disproportionately focused on physicians and nurses working in hospital settings where they contend with life and death issues. This study broadens our understanding of the contexts of ethical decision-making by empirically examining understudied healthcare professionals - pharmacists - working in two organizational settings, retail and hospital, where they act as gatekeepers to regulated goods and services as they contend with ethical issues ranging from the serious to the mundane. This study asks: How do organizations shape pharmacists' identification, negotiation, and resolution of ethical challenges; in other words, how do organizations shape pharmacists' gatekeeping processes? Based on 95 semi-structured interviews with U.S. pharmacists practicing in retail and hospital pharmacies conducted between September 2009 and May 2011, this research finds that organizations influence ethical decision-making by shaping how pharmacists construct four gatekeeping processes: medical, legal, fiscal, and moral. Each gatekeeping process manifests differently across organizations due to how these settings structure inter-professional power dynamics, proximity to patients, and means of accessing information. Findings suggest new directions for theorizing about ethical decision-making in medical contexts by drawing attention to new ethical actors, new organizational settings, an expanded definition of ethical challenges, and a broader conceptualization of gatekeeping. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of organizational policies and practices on workplace injuries in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveito, T H; Sembajwe, G; Boden, L I; Dennerlein, J T; Wagner, G R; Kenwood, C; Stoddard, A M; Reme, S E; Hopcia, K; Hashimoto, D; Shaw, W S; Sorensen, G

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to assess relationships between perceptions of organizational practices and policies (OPP), social support, and injury rates among workers in hospital units. A total of 1230 hospital workers provided survey data on OPP, job flexibility, and social support. Demographic data and unit injury rates were collected from the hospitals' administrative databases. Injury rates were lower in units where workers reported higher OPP scores and high social support. These relationships were mainly observed among registered nurses. Registered nurses perceived coworker support and OPP as less satisfactory than patient care associates (PCAs). Nevertheless, because of the low number of PCAs at each unit, results for the PCAs are preliminary and should be further researched in future studies with larger sample sizes. Employers aiming to reduce injuries in hospitals could focus on good OPP and supportive work environment.

  12. Laparoscopic Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy, Setting Up a Service at a Peripheral Teaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Tsaltas, Jim; Kovacs, Gab; Dennis, Jenny; Pratt, Amanda

    1996-01-01

    The establishment of a laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy program at Box Hill Hospital is described. The first eight cases have been reviewed and recommendations are made to other gynaecology units who wish to establish a minimally invasive gynaecological surgery unit.

  13. Laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy, setting up a service at a peripheral teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaltas, J; Kovacs, G; Dennis, J; Pratt, A

    1996-01-01

    The establishment of a laparoscopically assisted hysterectomy program at Box Hill Hospital is described. The first eight cases have been reviewed and recommendations are made to other gynaecology units who wish to establish a minimally invasive gynaecological surgery unit.

  14. The control gap : the role of budgets, accounting information and (non-) decisions in hospital settings

    OpenAIRE

    Nyland, Kari; Pettersen, Inger Johanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the link between budgets, accounting information and the decisionmaking processes at both strategic and operational levels in a large Norwegian hospital, as this hospital now is facing the New Public Management reforms which are introduced in Norway. The study has examined the use of budget and accounting information in the management control process. The empirical data are based on interviews with key actors in the decision-making process at all management levels in t...

  15. Implementation of nursing process in clinical settings: the case of three governmental hospitals in Ethiopia, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semachew, Ayele

    2018-03-13

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the implementation of the nursing process at three randomly selected governmental hospitals found in Amhara Region North West Ethiopia. From the total 338 reviewed documents, 264 (78.1%) have a nursing process format attached with the patient's profile/file, 107 (31.7%) had no nursing diagnosis, 185 (54.7%) of nurses stated their plan of care based on priority, 173 (51.2%) of nurses did not document their interventions based on plan and 179 (53.0%) of nurses did not evaluate their interventions. The overall implementation of nursing process among Felege Hiwot Referal hospital, Debretabor general hospital and Finoteselam general hospitals were 49.12, 68.18, and 69.42% respectively. Nursing professionals shall improve documentation required in implementing the nursing process. Nursing managers (matron, ward heads) shall supervise the overall implementation of nursing process. Hospital nursing services managers (matrons) shall arrange and facilitate case presentations by the nursing staffs which focus on documentation and updates on nursing process. Hospitals need to establish and support nursing process coordinating staff in their institution.

  16. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  17. Factors contributing to fecal incontinence in older people and outcome of routine management in home, hospital and nursing home settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asangaedem Akpan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asangaedem Akpan1,2,3, Margot A Gosney2, James Barrett3,4, 1Directorate of Medicine and Elderly Care, Warrington Hospital, Warrington, Cheshire, UK; 2School of Food Biosciences, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, UK; 3Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; 4Directorate of Elderly Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clatterbridge Hospital, Merseyside, UKObjective: Fecal loading, cognitive impairment, loose stools, functional disability, comorbidity and anorectal incontinence are recognized as factors contributing to loss of fecal continence in older adults. The objective of this project was to assess the relative distribution of these factors in a variety of settings along with the outcome of usual management. Methods: One hundred and twenty adults aged 65 years and over with fecal incontinence recruited by convenience sampling from four different settings were studied. They were either living at home or in a nursing home or receiving care on an acute or rehabilitation elderly care ward. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit which factors associated with fecal incontinence were present from subjects who had given written informed consent or for whom assent for inclusion in the study had been obtained.Results: Fecal loading (Homes 6 [20%]; Acute care wards 17 [57%]; Rehabilitation wards 19 [63%]; Nursing homes 21 [70%] and functional disability (Homes 5 [17%]; Acute care wards 25 [83%]; Rehabilitation wards 25 [83%]; Nursing homes 20 [67%] were significantly more prevalent in the hospital and nursing home settings than in those living at home (P < 0.01. Loose stools were more prevalent in the hospital setting than in the other settings (Homes 11 [37%]; Acute care wards 20 [67%]; Rehabilitation wards 17 [57%]; Nursing homes 6 [20%] (P < 0.01. Cognitive impairment was significantly more common in the nursing home than in the other settings (Nursing homes 26 [87%], Homes 5 [17%], Acute care wards 13 [43%], Rehabilitation

  18. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestin Hategeka

    Full Text Available Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+-a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program-in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children.A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children.Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services. However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated.Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies to enhance the capacity of

  19. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoveller, Jean; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+)–a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program–in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children. Results Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services). However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated. Conclusions Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies

  20. Emission of extensively-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from hospital settings to the natural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seruga Music, M; Hrenovic, J; Goic-Barisic, I; Hunjak, B; Skoric, D; Ivankovic, T

    2017-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading emerging pathogen that is frequently recovered from patients during hospital outbreaks. The role of environmental A. baumannii reservoirs is therefore of great concern worldwide. To investigate the connection between A. baumannii causing hospital outbreaks and environmental isolates from hospital wastewater, urban sewage and river water as the final natural recipient of wastewaters. Clinical isolates from patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia and environmental isolates from water were collected during a two-month monitoring period. Recovery of A. baumannii was performed using CHROMagar Acinetobacter plates, incubated at 42°C for 48 h. Identification was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and analyses of rpoB gene. The antibiotic resistance profiles were interpreted according to criteria given for clinical isolates of A. baumannii. The sequence types (ST) were retrieved by multi-locus sequence typing. Fourteen of 19 isolates recovered from patients, hospital wastewaters, urban sewage and river water belonged to ST-195. The remaining five isolates recovered from patients and river water were assigned to ST-1421. All isolates showed very strong relatedness and clustered into CC92, which corresponds to IC2. All isolates were non-susceptible to at least one agent in all but two or fewer antimicrobial categories, and thus were classified as 'extensively-drug-resistant' (XDR). Heteroresistance to colistin was found in two isolates from hospital wastewater. Close relatedness of clinical and environmental isolates suggests the emission of XDR A. baumannii via the untreated hospital wastewater in the natural environment. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  2. Author! author!: creating a digital archive of publications in a hospital library setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Diane; Samsundar, Devica Ramjit; Shalini, Channapatna

    2005-01-01

    Baptist Hospital of Miami has been honoring its staff authors annually during National Library Week since 1979, at the time the library was relocated. Upon "doing the math" and realizing that twenty-five years had passed, a special event was planned to celebrate the occasion in 2004. A merger of four hospitals in 1995 to form Baptist Health South Florida, and an addition of a fifth hospital in 2003 added into the complexity of these publications. Organizing the event led to the conclusion that there had to be a "better way" to manage the publication archive. This paper will include a look back at the event's past, present efforts to develop an archival database, and future plans to make articles available electronically to users, copyright permitting.

  3. Cooperation between Japanese and Cambodian Dietitians in Setting up a Hospital Diet Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Koung Ry; Saito, Shino; Kusama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia faces a considerably high percentage of the stunted under 5 (Unicef, 2014). Despite the National Nutrition Strategy Launched by the Ministry of Health in cooperation with development partners, nutrition improvement projects have not always been effective. It is generally said these issues are addressed in many other developing nations, and the literature largely documented that successful nutrition programmes are community-based programmes because of their sustainability and the intensive communications between health workers and beneficiaries. Learning from the past experiences, the Foundation for International Development/Relief organized a project team with a Cambodian dietitian and an experienced Japanese dietitian to implement a hospital diet programme for children from April 2006 to March 2014 in the National Pediatric Hospital (NPH) in Cambodia. The project has two objectives: establishing a hospital diet management system, and developing the capacity of NPH staff. Hospital food menus were created paying particular attention to Cambodian culture, eating habits and accessibility to the ingredients for the purpose of continuous supply. We have also put emphasis on the communication between dietitians and family members of the children to let them understand the importance of a nutritious diet. After 8 y of project implementation, the hospital diet management system was established providing 7 types of menu with nutritious diets. The final evaluation of the project showed that NPH staff have the intention to continue hospital food supply with their acquired knowledge and capacity. In practice, a Cambodian dietitian currently takes the initiative for a continuous nutritional diet in NPH. The key to this success is the collaboration between Japanese dietitians with experience and Cambodian dietitians with knowledge of Cambodian eating habits. Taking our experience into account, it is highly recommended to educate Cambodian dietitians, as they are

  4. Using lean methodology to improve efficiency of electronic order set maintenance in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idemoto, Lori; Williams, Barbara; Blackmore, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Order sets, a series of orders focused around a diagnosis, condition, or treatment, can reinforce best practice, help eliminate outdated practice, and provide clinical guidance. However, order sets require regular updates as evidence and care processes change. We undertook a quality improvement intervention applying lean methodology to create a systematic process for order set review and maintenance. Root cause analysis revealed challenges with unclear prioritization of requests, lack of coordination between teams, and lack of communication between producers and requestors of order sets. In March of 2014, we implemented a systematic, cyclical order set review process, with a set schedule, defined responsibilities for various stakeholders, formal meetings and communication between stakeholders, and transparency of the process. We first identified and deactivated 89 order sets which were infrequently used. Between March and August 2014, 142 order sets went through the new review process. Processing time for the build duration of order sets decreased from a mean of 79.6 to 43.2 days (pLean production principles to the order set review process resulted in significant improvement in processing time and increased quality of orders. As use of order sets and other forms of clinical decision support increase, regular evidence and process updates become more critical.

  5. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level.

  6. Implementation and adoption of mechanical patient lift equipment in the hospital setting: The importance of organizational and cultural factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Myers, Douglas J; Pompeii, Lisa A; Lipscomb, Hester J

    2011-12-01

    Work focused on understanding implementation and adoption of interventions designed to prevent patient-handling injuries in the hospital setting is lacking in the injury literature and may be more insightful than more traditional evaluation measures. Data from focus groups with health care workers were used to describe barriers and promoters of the adoption of patient lift equipment and a shift to a "minimal-manual lift environment" at two affiliated hospitals. Several factors influencing the adoption of the lift equipment and patient-handling policy were noted: time, knowledge/ability, staffing, patient characteristics, and organizational and cultural aspects of work. The adoption process was complex, and considerable variability by hospital and across units was observed. The use of qualitative data can enhance the understanding of factors that influence implementation and adoption of interventions designed to prevent patient-handling injuries among health care workers. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Childhood astrovirus-associated diarrhea in the ambulatory setting in a Public Hospital in Cordoba city, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Miguel O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Human astroviruses have been increasingly identified as important agents of diarrheal disease in children. However, the disease burden of astrovirus infection is still incompletely assessed. This paper reports results on the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of astrovirus-associated diarrhea, as well as the impact of astrovirus infection on the ambulatory setting at a Public Hospital in Córdoba city, Argentina. From February 2001 through January 2002, 97 randomly selected outpatient visits for diarrhea among children 0.05. According to our estimation about one out of seventy-four children in this cohort would be assisted annually for an astroviral-diarrheal episode in the Public Hospital and one out of eight diarrheal cases could be attributed to astrovirus infection. Astrovirus is a common symptomatic infection in pediatric outpatient visits in the public hospital in the study area, contributing 12.37% of the overall morbidity from diarrhea.

  8. The ethical leadership challenge: creating a culture of patient- and family-centered care in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2011-01-01

    The growing number of medical errors and resulting preventable deaths in hospitals presents an ethical dilemma that must be addressed by health care leaders and managers. These medical errors and deaths raise questions about safety and quality issues resulting in rising public mistrust and patient dissatisfaction. Many of these medical errors and deaths could have been avoided by including the patient and family in the care. The ethical challenge for leadership is creating a culture of patient- and family-centered care as a means to improve quality, safety, patient satisfaction, and public trust. This article addresses ways to improve safety, quality, patient satisfaction, and cost and thereby reduce medical errors and deaths by implementing a patient- and family-centered care culture. The first critical step for improvement is for hospital leaders and managers to answer the ethical call to create a culture centered on patient- and family-centered care in the hospital setting.

  9. Hospital ethics committees in Israel: structure, function and heterogeneity in the setting of statutory ethics committees

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, N; Golan, O; Shalev, C; Glick, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Hospital ethics committees increasingly affect medical care worldwide, yet there has been little evaluation of these bodies. Israel has the distinction of having ethics committees legally required by a Patients' Rights Act. We studied the development of ethics committees in this legal environment.

  10. Initial experience with transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy in an Irish hospital setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, J C

    2009-08-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy has gained widespread acceptance as a treatment for both benign and malignant conditions and is becoming increasingly popular in Irish hospitals. We report a single surgeon, single centre experience with 20 consecutive laparoscopic nephrectomies comparing them to 20 open cases performed prior to the establishment of a laparoscopic service.

  11. Validation of dipslides as a tool for environmental sampling in a real-life hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, T; Foged, Charlotte Bernhardt Laiho; Andersen, L P

    2014-01-01

    Environmental sampling in hospitals is becoming increasingly important because of the rise in nosocomial infections. In order to monitor and track these infections and optimize cleaning and disinfection, we need to be able to locate the fomites with the highest amount of microorganisms, but the o...

  12. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Norovirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial norovirus infections among inpatients tested...

  13. Economic analysis of an epilepsy outreach model of care in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Eimer; McGinty, Ronan N; Costello, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disability is higher than in the general population and prevalence rates increase with increasing levels of disability. Prevalence rates of epilepsy are highest among those living in residential care. The healthcare needs of people with intellectual disability and epilepsy are complex and deserve special consideration in terms of healthcare provision and access to specialist epilepsy clinics, which are usually held in acute hospital campuses. This patient population is at risk of suboptimal care because of significant difficulties accessing specialist epilepsy care which is typically delivered in the environs of acute hospitals. In 2014, the epilepsy service at Cork University Hospital established an Epilepsy Outreach Service providing regular, ambulatory outpatient follow up at residential care facilities in Cork city and county in an effort to improve access to care, reduce the burden and expense of patient and carer travel to hospital outpatient appointments, and to provide a dedicated specialist phone service for epilepsy related queries in order to reduce emergency room visits when possible. We present the findings of an economic analysis of the outreach service model of care compared to the traditional hospital outpatient service and demonstrate significant cost savings and improved access to care with this model. Ideally these cost savings should be used to develop novel ways to enhance epilepsy care for persons with disability. We propose that this model of care can be more suitable for persons with disability living in residential care who are at risk of losing access to specialist epilepsy care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A cost-analysis model for anticoagulant treatment in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Samir H; Huynh, Lynn; Zhuo, Daisy Y; Tran, Kevin N; Lefebvre, Patrick; Bookhart, Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Rivaroxaban is the first oral factor Xa inhibitor approved in the US to reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots among people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT), treat pulmonary embolism (PE), reduce the risk of recurrence of DVT and PE, and prevent DVT and PE after knee or hip replacement surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the costs from a hospital perspective of treating patients with rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents across these five populations. An economic model was developed using treatment regimens from the ROCKET-AF, EINSTEIN-DVT and PE, and RECORD1-3 randomized clinical trials. The distribution of hospital admissions used in the model across the different populations was derived from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. The model compared total costs of anticoagulant treatment, monitoring, inpatient stay, and administration for patients receiving rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents. The length of inpatient stay (LOS) was determined from the literature. Across all populations, rivaroxaban was associated with an overall mean cost savings of $1520 per patient. The largest cost savings associated with rivaroxaban was observed in patients with DVT or PE ($6205 and $2742 per patient, respectively). The main driver of the cost savings resulted from the reduction in LOS associated with rivaroxaban, contributing to ∼90% of the total savings. Furthermore, the overall mean anticoagulant treatment cost was lower for rivaroxaban vs the reference groups. The distribution of patients across indications used in the model may not be generalizable to all hospitals, where practice patterns may vary, and average LOS cost may not reflect the actual reimbursements that hospitals received. From a hospital perspective, the use of rivaroxaban may be associated with cost savings when compared to other anticoagulant treatments due to lower drug cost and shorter LOS associated with

  15. The Characteristics of Personal Order Sets in a Computerized Physician Order Entry System at a Community Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sean M.; Davis, Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    Personal order sets (POS) have been touted as important for the success of a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system1. However, POS may systematize practice variability and are difficult to centrally administer. Few studies have looked at the characteristics and use of POS in a community hospital. We examined how POS are used at the Queen’s Medical Center (QMC). POS are an important part of the success of the QMC CPOE, but have definite disadvantages.

  16. Nursing Education Interventions for Managing Acute Pain in Hospital Settings: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes and Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Gareth; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the effects of nursing education interventions on clinical outcomes for acute pain management in hospital settings, relating interventions to health care behavior change theory. Three databases were searched for nursing education interventions from 2002 to 2015 in acute hospital settings with clinical outcomes reported. Methodological quality was rated as strong, moderate, or weak using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. The 12 eligible studies used varied didactic and interactive teaching methods. Several studies had weaknesses attributable to selection biases, uncontrolled confounders, and lack of blinding of outcome assessors. No studies made reference to behavior change theory in their design. Eight of the 12 studies investigated nursing documentation of pain assessment as the main outcome, with the majority reporting positive effects of education interventions on nursing pain assessment. Of the remaining studies, two reported mixed findings on patient self-report of pain scores as the key measure, one reported improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management after a nursing intervention, and one study found an increase in nurses' delivery of a relaxation treatment following an intervention. Improvements in design and evaluation of nursing education interventions are suggested, drawing on behavior change theory and emphasizing the relational, contextual, and emotionally demanding nature of nursing pain management in hospital settings. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The prevalence and correlates of alcohol use disorder amongst bipolar patients in a hospital setting, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Hway Ann; Loh, Huai Seng; Ng, Chong Guan

    2013-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of alcohol-use disorder and associated correlates amongst bipolar patients in a university hospital in Malaysia. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 121 bipolar disorder patients were included. Their alcohol use disorders were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (plus version) and the Addiction Severity Index-Lite-Clinical Factors version. The number of lifetime hospitalizations and the survival days (the number of days between the last discharge and the most current readmission) were calculated. The prevalence of alcohol-use disorder amongst bipolar patients was 18.2%. Indian ethnicity was the only demographic factor that was statistically associated with alcohol-use disorder (p rate of suicidal attempt (p Malaysia. Since alcohol-use disorder, as well as the potential interactions with the course of the disorder, is highly prevalent amongst bipolar patients, alcohol use should be addressed in these patients.

  18. Pilot trial of diabetes self-management education in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytkowski, Mary T; Koerbel, Glory L; Kotagal, Lindsey; Donihi, Amy; DiNardo, Monica M

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Current estimates indicate that patients receive DSME, increasing risk for hospitalization which occurs more frequently with diabetes. Hospitalization presents opportunities to provide DSME, potentially decreasing readmissions. To address this, we investigated the feasibility of providing DSME to inpatients with diabetes. Patients hospitalized on four medicine units were randomized to receive DSME (Education Group) (n=9) prescribed by a certified diabetes educator and delivered by a registered nurse, or Usual Care (n=12). Participants completed Diabetes Knowledge Tests (DKT), Medical Outcomes Short Form (SF-36), Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ), and the DTSQ-inpatient (DTSQ-IP). Bedside capillary blood glucoses (CBG) on day of admission, randomization and discharge were compared. There were no group differences in demographics, diabetes treatment, admission CBG (186±93 mg/dL vs. 219±84 mg/dL, p=0.40), DKT scores (Education vs. Usual Care 48±25 vs. 68±19, p=0.09), SF-36, and DTSQ scores (28±6 vs. 25±7, p=0.41). Patients receiving education reported more satisfaction with inpatient treatment (83±13 vs. 65±19, p=0.03), less hyperglycemia prior to (2.7±4.5 vs. 4.5±1.4, p=0.03) and during hospitalization (3.9±1.9 vs. 5.5±1.2, p=0.04); and had lower mean discharge CBG (159±38 mg/dL vs. 211±67 mg/dL, p=0.02). Inpatient diabetes education has potential to improve treatment satisfaction, and reduce CBG. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effectiveness of individualized fall prevention program in geriatric rehabilitation hospital setting: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, Efraim; Lutsyk, Galina; Wainer, Lea; Carmeli, Sarit

    2015-10-01

    There is no conclusive evidence that hospital fall prevention programs can reduce the number of falls. We aimed to investigate the effect of a targeted individualized falls prevention program in a geriatric rehabilitation hospital. This was a two-stage cluster-controlled trial carried out in five geriatric rehabilitation wards. Participants were 752 patients with mean age 83.2 years. The intervention was a two-phase targeted intervention falls prevention program. The intervention included an assessment of patient's risk by a risk assessment tool and an individual management that includes medical, behavioral, cognitive and environmental modifications. Patients with moderate risk received additionally orientation guidance, and mobility restriction. Patients determined as high risk were additionally placed under permanent personal supervision. Outcome measures were falls during hospital stay. In both stages of the trial, intervention and control wards were almost similar at baseline for individual patient characteristics. Overall, 37 falls occurred during the study. No significant difference was found in fall rates during follow-up between intervention and control wards: 1.306 falls per 1000 bed days in the intervention groups and 1.763-1.826 falls per 1000 bed days in the control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio for falls in the intervention groups was 1.36 (95 % confidence interval 0.89-1.77) (P = 0.08) in the first stage and 1.27 (95 % confidence interval 0.92-1.67) (P = 0.12) in the second stage. These results suggest that in a geriatric rehabilitation hospital a targeted individualized intervention falls prevention program is not effective in reducing falls.

  20. Weekend admission to hospital has a higher risk of death in the elective setting than in the emergency setting: a retrospective database study of national health service hospitals in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mohammed A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although acute hospitals offer a twenty-four hour seven day a week service levels of staffing are lower over the weekends and some health care processes may be less readily available over the weekend. Whilst it is thought that emergency admission to hospital on the weekend is associated with an increased risk of death, the extent to which this applies to elective admissions is less well known. We investigated the risk of death in elective and elective patients admitted over the weekend versus the weekdays. Methods Retrospective statistical analysis of routinely collected acute hospital admissions in England, involving all patient discharges from all acute hospitals in England over a year (April 2008-March 2009, using a logistic regression model which adjusted for a range of patient case-mix variables, seasonality and admission over a weekend separately for elective and emergency (but excluding zero day stay emergency admissions discharged alive admissions. Results Of the 1,535,267 elective admissions, 91.7% (1,407,705 were admitted on the weekday and 8.3% (127,562 were admitted on the weekend. The mortality following weekday admission was 0.52% (7,276/1,407,705 compared with 0.77% (986/127,562 following weekend admission. Of the 3,105,249 emergency admissions, 76.3% (2,369,316 were admitted on the weekday and 23.7% (735,933 were admitted on the weekend. The mortality following emergency weekday admission was 6.53% (154,761/2,369,316 compared to 7.06% (51,922/735,933 following weekend admission. After case-mix adjustment, weekend admissions were associated with an increased risk of death, especially in the elective setting (elective Odds Ratio: 1.32, 95% Confidence Interval 1.23 to 1.41; vs emergency Odds Ratio: 1.09, 95% Confidence Interval 1.05 to 1.13. Conclusions Weekend admission appears to be an independent risk factor for dying in hospital and this risk is more pronounced in the elective setting. Given the planned

  1. Measuring the safety culture in a hospital setting: a concept whose time has come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Gillian; Seddon, Mary

    2010-05-14

    Getting the right 'patient safety culture' is thought to be an important component in improving patient safety in hospitals, however there is a lack of clarity in how best to measure and improve it, and whether such improvement actually translates to better patient outcomes. This paper reflects on the Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB) experience with a patient safety survey and attempts to answer questions other organisations may ask when deciding whether to invest in such survey. A literature search was undertaken to identify valid and reliable patient safety culture survey tools. These were reviewed with respect to how best to interpret and use the results. If hospitals decide to undertake a patient safety culture survey, the recommended survey tools are the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS). Both have been widely used and have sound and comprehensive psychometrics. Only the SAQ has established links with patient safety outcomes such as reduced healthcare associated infections. Surveys can provide some insights into the patient safety culture within an organisation, but the opportunity costs of undertaking a survey should be carefully considered. Much of their value lies in raising the profile of patient safety and promoting conversations; making patient safety 'the way we do business around here'.

  2. Do organizational and clinical ethics in a hospital setting need different venues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førde, Reidun; Hansen, Thor Willy Ruud

    2014-06-01

    The structure of ethics work in a hospital is complex. Professional ethics, research ethics and clinical ethics committees (CECs) are important parts of this structure, in addition to laws and national and institutional codes of ethics. In Norway all hospital trusts have a CEC, most of these discuss cases by means of a method which seeks to include relevant guidelines and laws into the discussion. In recent years many committees have received more cases which have concerned questions of principle. According to Ellen Fox and co-authors the traditional CEC model suffers from a number of weaknesses. Therefore, in their organization a separate body deals with organizational matters. In this paper, we discuss what is gained and what is lost by creating two separate bodies doing ethics consultation. We do this through an analysis of detailed minutes of CEC discussions in one CEC during a 6-year period. 30 % of all referrals concerned matters of principle. Some of these discussions originated in a dilemma related to a particular patient. Most of the discussions had some consequences within the hospital organization, for clinical practice, for adjustment of guidelines, or may have influenced national policy. We conclude that a multiprofessional CEC with law and ethics competency and patient representation may be well suited also for discussion of general ethical principles. A CEC is a forum which can help bridge the gap between clinicians and management by increasing understanding for each others' perspectives.

  3. Does HIPE data capture the complexity of stroke patients in an acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, B

    2010-01-01

    The Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) system is currently used as a principle source of national data on discharges from acute hospitals. The Casemix Programme is used to calculate funding for patient care (HIPE activity and Specialty Costs Returns). Th coding is usually undertaken by clerical personnel. We were concerned that the medical complexity of our stroke patients was not captured by the process. The aims of this study were to compare activity coded by HIPE coding staff and medical staff in consecutive stroke patients discharged from the hospital. One hundred consecutive discharged patients with stroke as primary diagnosis were coded by clerical staff [usual practice] and by medical staff. We compared the coding and any differences. We calculated the financial comparison of subsequent differences in Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Relative Values (RVs). Clinician coded DRGs resulted in a higher assigned RV in 45 cases. The total RV value for HIPE using clerical coding was 595,268.94 euros and using medical coding was 725,252.16 euros. We conclude that medical input is useful in detailing the complications arising in stroke patients. We suggest that physicians should assist in the HIPE coding process in order to capture clinical complexity, so that funding can be appropriately assigned to manage these complex patients.

  4. Exclusive contracts in the hospital setting: a two-edged sword, part 1: legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, Robert M

    2007-05-01

    Hospitals routinely enter into contracts with radiology groups for the right to be the exclusive provider of radiology services at the facility in exchange for the group agreeing to provide and manage all aspects of that service within the hospital. These "exclusive contracts" generally result in the radiology department and associated equipment being closed off to physicians who are not part of the contracting group. Exclusive contracts are generally considered to be good for physicians who have them and bad for those excluded by them. In fact, while exclusive contracts offer obvious benefits to the physicians who receive them and obvious disadvantages for those who are excluded, they also present pitfalls for physicians in the chosen group. Part I of this article discusses the legal issues raised by exclusive contracts. Although these agreements appear to be anti-competitive, most courts have rejected antitrust challenges to exclusive contracts. Excluded physicians have had much greater success in attacking exclusive contracting arrangements on breach of contract and procedural/due process grounds. Exclusive contracting arrangements can also raise concerns under the Medicare-Medicaid anti-kickback statute if the contracting physicians are required to pay consideration or accept less than fair market value compensation in exchange for exclusive contracts. These agreements can also raise issues under the Stark II physician self-referral law if the contracting physicians are in a position to refer Medicare or Medicaid patients to the hospital. Part II of this article will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of exclusive contracts for physicians covered and not covered by such contracts, as well as strategies for avoiding them or minimizing their potential adverse impact. It also will discuss specific provisions of exclusive contracts that should be included or avoided.

  5. Review of two years of experiences with SPECT among psychiatric patients in a rural hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, William; Thurber, Steven

    2008-09-01

    We summarize single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings from 63 psychiatric patients in a small rural hospital in western Minnesota. SPECT scans were ordered only for patients in whom documentation of hypoperfusion and functional deficits might be helpful in clarifying diagnoses and treatment planning. The patients referred for SPECT scans had histories of traumatic brain injuries, atypical psychiatric symptom presentations, or conditions that were refractory to standard treatments. In the context of strict referral guidelines and close psychiatrist-radiologist collaboration, a much higher yield of significant findings was obtained compared with those noted in other reports in the literature.

  6. [Implementation of computerized phisician order entry in a hospital setting: what are the keys to success?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garçous, R; Remy, G; Bary, M; Amant, F; Cauwe, F; De Beusscher, L; Bouzette, A; De Coster, P; Hecq, J-D

    2013-06-01

    A software of computerized physician order entry [CPOE] was developed by a data-processing company in collaboration with the Mont-Godinne University Hospital By 2006, parallel to the evolution of the software, the progressive implementation of CPOE was carried out, and currently covers 16 wards, the emergency room, the recovery rooms and the center of medical care [day hospital] as well as the day surgical center Complete computerization of the drug supply chain, including the regulation by the physician, the pharmaceutical validation, the delivery and the follow-up of stocks by pharmacy, the validation of the administration by the nurse and the tariffing of the drugs. In 2006, a working group was created in order to validate specifications allowing the development of a software of CPOE, Linked to the computerized medical record. A data-processing company was selected in order to develop this software. Two beds were computerized in the pneumology ward, in order to test and validate the software. From 2007 to 2009, 3 additional wards were computerized [geriatrics, neurosurgery, revalidation]. A steering committee of CPOE, composed of various members (direction, doctors, pharmacists, nurses, data processing specialistsl is created. This committee allows the installation of the means necessary to the deployment of CPOE in the Institution. Structured teams for the deployment are created: medical and nurse coaches. From 2009 to 2012, the deployment of the software is carried out, covering 16 wards, the emergency room, the recovery room and the day-hospitals. The computerization of the drug supply chain is a challenge which concerns the institutional level. The assets of our hospital and our project were: - a strong management committee, making of this project a priority entering the strategical planning of the institution; - a steering committee allowing each type of actor to express his needs, and of prioriser requests; - a closer medical coaching; - teams of nurses

  7. Patient-Centered Goal Setting in a Hospital-Based Outpatient Stroke Rehabilitation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Danielle B; McIntyre, Amanda; Mirkowski, Magdalena; Janzen, Shannon; Viana, Ricardo; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2017-09-01

    Goal-setting can have a positive impact on stroke recovery during rehabilitation. Patient participation in goal formulation can ensure that personally relevant goals are set, and can result in greater satisfaction with the rehabilitation experience, along with improved recovery of stroke deficits. This, however, not yet been studied in a stroke outpatient rehabilitation setting. To assess patient satisfaction of meeting self-selected goals during outpatient rehabilitation following a stroke. Retrospective chart review. Stroke patients enrolled in a multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation program, who set at least 1 goal during rehabilitation. Patients recovering from a stroke received therapy through the outpatient rehabilitation program between January 2010 and December 2013. Upon admission and discharge from rehabilitation, patients rated their satisfaction with their ability to perform goals that they wanted to achieve. Researchers independently sorted and labeled recurrent themes of goals. Goals were further sorted into International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) categories. To compare the perception of patients' goal satisfaction, repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted across the 3 ICF goal categorizations. Goal satisfaction scores. A total of 286 patients were included in the analysis. Patient goals concentrated on themes of improving hand function, mobility, and cognition. Goals were also sorted into ICF categories in which impairment-based and activity limitation-based goals were predominant. Compared to activity-based and participation-based goals, patients with impairment-based goals perceived greater satisfaction with meeting their goals at admission and discharge (P rehabilitation program (P stroke rehabilitation setting, patients set heterogeneous goals that were predominantly impairment based. Satisfaction in achieving goals significantly improved after receiving therapy. The type of goals that patients

  8. Shifting hospital care to primary care: An evaluation of cardiology care in a primary care setting in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjel, Tessa C C; Struijs, Jeroen N; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Baan, Caroline A; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2018-05-09

    In an attempt to deal with the pressures on the healthcare system and to guarantee sustainability, changes are needed. This study is focused on a cardiology Primary Care Plus intervention in which cardiologists provide consultations with patients in a primary care setting in order to prevent unnecessary referrals to the hospital. This study explores which patients with non-acute and low-complexity cardiology-related health complaints should be excluded from Primary Care Plus and referred directly to specialist care in the hospital. This is a retrospective observational study based on quantitative data. Data collected between January 1 and December 31, 2015 were extracted from the electronic medical record system. Logistic regression analyses were used to select patient groups that should be excluded from referral to Primary Care Plus. In total, 1525 patients were included in the analyses. Results showed that male patients, older patients, those with the referral indication 'Stable Angina Pectoris' or 'Dyspnoea' and patients whose reason for referral was 'To confirm disease' or 'Screening of unclear pathology' had a significantly higher probability of being referred to hospital care after Primary Care Plus. To achieve efficiency one should exclude patient groups with a significantly higher probability of being referred to hospital care after Primary Care Plus. NTR6629 (Data registered: 25-08-2017) (registered retrospectively).

  9. Contact among healthcare workers in the hospital setting: developing the evidence base for innovative approaches to infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Krista M; Langley, Joanne M; McGeer, Allison; Hupert, Nathaniel; Tellier, Raymond; Henry, Bonnie; Halperin, Scott A; Johnston, Lynn; Pourbohloul, Babak

    2018-04-17

    Nosocomial, or healthcare-associated infections (HAI), exact a high medical and financial toll on patients, healthcare workers, caretakers, and the health system. Interpersonal contact patterns play a large role in infectious disease spread, but little is known about the relationship between health care workers' (HCW) movements and contact patterns within a heath care facility and HAI. Quantitatively capturing these patterns will aid in understanding the dynamics of HAI and may lead to more targeted and effective control strategies in the hospital setting. Staff at 3 urban university-based tertiary care hospitals in Canada completed a detailed questionnaire on demographics, interpersonal contacts, in-hospital movement, and infection prevention and control practices. Staff were divided into categories of administrative/support, nurses, physicians, and "Other HCWs" - a fourth distinct category, which excludes physicians and nurses. Using quantitative network modeling tools, we constructed the resulting HCW "co-location network" to illustrate contacts among different occupations and with locations in hospital settings. Among 3048 respondents (response rate 38%) an average of 3.79, 3.69 and 3.88 floors were visited by each HCW each week in the 3 hospitals, with a standard deviation of 2.63, 1.74 and 2.08, respectively. Physicians reported the highest rate of direct patient contacts (> 20 patients/day) but the lowest rate of contacts with other HCWs; nurses had the most extended (> 20 min) periods of direct patient contact. "Other HCWs" had the most direct daily contact with all other HCWs. Physicians also reported significantly more locations visited per week than nurses, other HCW, or administrators; nurses visited the fewest. Public spaces such as the cafeteria had the most staff visits per week, but the least mean hours spent per visit. Inpatient settings had significantly more HCW interactions per week than outpatient settings. HCW contact patterns and spatial

  10. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS. Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7% patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient’s awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7% uneducated patients, 85 (59.4% were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients.

  11. Examining the structural challenges to communication as experienced by nurse managers in two US hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Marcia

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the structural barriers to communication for first-line nurse managers with their staff nurses. The delivery of quality care depends on effective communication in hospital units. First-line nurse managers are central figures in networks whose responsibility is to communicate information from the senior management to staff nurses. The data were collected using face-to-face interviews with first-line managers at two US hospitals The interviews were transcribed and coded with limited use of the qualitative software atlas Interview questions focused on work experiences of managers with special emphases on communication. Structural barriers that influenced managers' communication included the amount of face-to-face interaction with nurses, the amount of information to communicate, levels of formalization, outreach to all nurses, time constraints and nurses' subcultural networks These factors compromised managers' ability to communicate effectively with nurses. Managers should carefully examine how structure affects communication recognizing that some dynamics of structure cannot be changed but that they can influence others, such as formalization and communication networks. Managers should examine their own positioning within nurses' networks and demonstrate to nurses that their expertise contributes to the collaborative capital upon which nursing practice depends. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Work accidents and self-esteem of nursing professional in hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Valverde Marques dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to analyze the occurrence of work accidents and the self-esteem of nurses in hospitals of a municipality of Minas Gerais. Method: descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study developed with 393 nursing professionals from three hospitals of a municipality in southern Minas Gerais. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire to characterize the population and work accidents were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using Person's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Cronbach's alpha, odds ratio and logistic regression. Results: of the professionals studied, 15% had suffered an accident at work and 70.2% presented high self-esteem. Through the analysis, it was observed that smoking, religious belief and an outstanding event in the career were significantly associated with work accidents. In relation to self-esteem, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career presented significant associations. Conclusion: factors such as smoking, religious belief, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career can cause professionals to have accidents and/or cause changes in self-esteem, which can compromise their physical and mental health and their quality of life and work.

  13. Influence of Psychological Empowerment on Organizational Commitment among Medical Employees in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebriaei, A; Rakhshaninejad, M; Mohseni, M

    2014-12-01

    People within organizations are a key factor for efficiency. Thus employee empowerment has become a popular management strategy. The study aimed to investigate the relationship between psychological empowerment and organizational commitment among medical staff of a hospital in Zahedan city. This cross sectional study was carried out in 2013. A random sample of 172 medical employees in Khatam-ol-Anbia hospital at Zahedan city was selected and responded to items of the questionnaires using a 7-point Likert scale ranging from 1 to 7. For measuring psychological empowerment and organizational commitment, Mishra & Spreitzer's scale and Meyer and Allen's questionnaire were used. A higher score means a higher degree of psychological empowerment or organizational commitment. Analysis was carried out using SPSS. The level of organizational commitment and psychological empowerment significantly were higher than average. There was a significant positive relationship between employees' empowerment and their commitment to organization. Psychological empowerment was a significant predictor of organizational commitment (β = .524). Out of the five dimensions of empowerment three dimensions are significant predictors of commitment and explain 37.1% of the variance in commitment. Due to The positive influence of psychological empowerment on organizational commitment, programs for in-service education should focus on facilitating psychological empowerment to improve and increase organizational commitment. Also, since impact of employees psychological empowerment on organizational commitment partially supported, there are other variables that influence the organizational commitment.

  14. Work accidents and self-esteem of nursing professional in hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Sérgio Valverde Marques; Macedo, Flávia Ribeiro Martins; da Silva, Luiz Almeida; Resck, Zelia Marilda Rodrigues; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Terra, Fábio de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the occurrence of work accidents and the self-esteem of nurses in hospitals of a municipality of Minas Gerais. Method: descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study developed with 393 nursing professionals from three hospitals of a municipality in southern Minas Gerais. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire to characterize the population and work accidents were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using Person's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Cronbach's alpha, odds ratio and logistic regression. Results: of the professionals studied, 15% had suffered an accident at work and 70.2% presented high self-esteem. Through the analysis, it was observed that smoking, religious belief and an outstanding event in the career were significantly associated with work accidents. In relation to self-esteem, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career presented significant associations. Conclusion: factors such as smoking, religious belief, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career can cause professionals to have accidents and/or cause changes in self-esteem, which can compromise their physical and mental health and their quality of life and work. PMID:28443993

  15. Rational use of antibiotics: a quality improvement initiative in hospital setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nausheen, S.; Hammad, R.; Khan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To minimise irrational use of antibiotics by implementing guidelines for antibiotic usage in obstetrics and Gynaecology. Methods: The observational study was conducted from January to December 2010 at the maternity unit of Aga Khan Hospital for Women and children, Kharadar, a secondary care facility in Karachi, Pakistan. Data was collected from medical records related to the study period. Prophylactic antibiotics were given according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists recommendation 2009. Surveillance was done by surgical site infection rates and infectious morbidity. Data was analysed on SPSS 13. Results: Therapeutic antibiotic use was rationalized, reducing the use of therapeutic antibiotics from 97% (n= 160/165) in January 2010 to 8% (n=10/125) in December 2010. Surgical site infection rates were less than 5%. Cost of antibiotics per patient decreased by 90%. Decrease in the length of stay and workload on nursing staff was also observed. Conclusion: Implementing guidelines for antibiotic use in obstetrics and gynaecology and translating it into our protocols was effective in decreasing the irrational antibiotic consumption and increasing the rational use of antibiotics in the hospital. (author)

  16. Work accidents and self-esteem of nursing professional in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sérgio Valverde Marques Dos; Macedo, Flávia Ribeiro Martins; Silva, Luiz Almeida da; Resck, Zelia Marilda Rodrigues; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Terra, Fábio de Souza

    2017-04-20

    to analyze the occurrence of work accidents and the self-esteem of nurses in hospitals of a municipality of Minas Gerais. descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study developed with 393 nursing professionals from three hospitals of a municipality in southern Minas Gerais. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a questionnaire to characterize the population and work accidents were used for data collection. Data analysis was performed using Person's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Cronbach's alpha, odds ratio and logistic regression. of the professionals studied, 15% had suffered an accident at work and 70.2% presented high self-esteem. Through the analysis, it was observed that smoking, religious belief and an outstanding event in the career were significantly associated with work accidents. In relation to self-esteem, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career presented significant associations. factors such as smoking, religious belief, family income, length of time working in the profession and an outstanding event in the career can cause professionals to have accidents and/or cause changes in self-esteem, which can compromise their physical and mental health and their quality of life and work.

  17. Online Education for Improving Communication and Documentation of Dietary Supplements Among Health Professionals Practicing in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C; Kabbara, Karim; Lin, Steven C; Sadikova, Ekaterina; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Kemper, Kathi

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the feasibility of online education in improving communication and documentation of dietary supplements (DS) among clinicians. This prospective educational study included clinicians at an urban teaching hospital. The curriculum included video streams, didactics, and interactive case presentations to discuss (1) DS safety and effectiveness, (2) cultural competency, (3) managing DS in a hospital setting, and (4) DS adverse events. Participants were surveyed, at baseline and after training, about DS knowledge, confidence, communication, and documentation practices. Thirty-nine of 61 (64%) recruited clinicians completed all four patient cases and post-tests. Most (82%) were women and 59% were physicians. The mean DS knowledge test score increased after the curriculum (p online curriculum is an effective tool for presenting DS education to clinicians with the goal of improving clinicians' knowledge, confidence, and documentation practices about DS.

  18. Thermal comfort assessment in a Dutch hospital setting – model applicability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, E.M.M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Kort, H.S.M.; Trip, A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Limited information is available on thermal comfort performance of the indoor environment in health care facilities both for staff and patients. Thermal comfort models such as Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC), have not been applied extensively for this setting. In

  19. Adaption and validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire for the Danish hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Measuring and developing a safe culture in health care is a focus point in creating highly reliable organizations being successful in avoiding patient safety incidents where these could normally be expected. Questionnaires can be used to capture a snapshot of an employee's perceptions...... of patient safety culture. A commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The purpose of this study was to adapt the SAQ for use in Danish hospitals, assess its construct validity and reliability, and present benchmark data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The SAQ...... tested in a cross-sectional study. Goodness-of-fit indices from confirmatory factor analysis were reported along with inter-item correlations, Cronbach's alpha (α), and item and subscale scores. RESULTS: Participation was 73.2% (N=925) of invited health care workers. Goodness-of-fit indices from...

  20. An exploratory study of the pattern of consent for autopsy in a regional hospital setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaar, T K

    2012-02-03

    A prospective study of the pattern of responses to requests for autopsy in a general surgical unit was performed. Information on the characteristics of the deceased, of the requestee and of the requester was documented in the case of 66 patients who died while in hospital. Permission to perform autopsy was not requested in 39 out of 66 cases and this was the most frequent contributory factor to the low rate of autopsy. Once a decision to grant or refuse autopsy is made by relatives of the deceased, the decision is unlikely to be reversed. Permission to perform autopsy was more likely to be sought when the deceased was male than when deceased was female. The relatives of patients who had recently undergone surgery were more likely to refuse permission for autopsy than were those of patients who had not had recent surgery.

  1. Development and validation of a taxonomy of adverse handover events in hospital settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Boje; Siemsen, Inger Margrete D.; Petersen, Lene Funck

    2015-01-01

    Patient Safety Database, 200 events) and 47 interviews with staff conducted at a large hospital in the Capital Region (232 events). The most prevalent causes of adverse events are inadequate competence (30 %), inadequate infrastructure (22 %) and busy ward (18 %). Inter-rater reliability (kappa) was 0.......76 and 0.87 for reports and interviews, respectively. Communication in clinical contexts has been widely recognized as giving rise to potentially hazardous events, and handover situations are particularly prone to failures of communication or unclear allocation of responsibility. The taxonomy provides...... a tool for analyzing adverse handover events to identify frequent causes among reported handover failures. In turn, this provides a basis for selecting safety measures including handover protocols and training programmes....

  2. Patient and organisational variables associated with pressure ulcer prevalence in hospital settings: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Ida Marie; Bjøro, Karen; Gunningberg, Lena; Hofoss, Dag

    2015-08-27

    To investigate the association of ward-level differences in the odds of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) with selected ward organisational variables and patient risk factors. Multilevel approach to data from 2 cross-sectional studies. 4 hospitals in Norway were studied. 1056 patients at 84 somatic wards. HAPU. Significant variance in the odds of HAPUs was found across wards. A regression model using only organisational variables left a significant variance in the odds of HAPUs across wards but patient variables eliminated the across-ward variance. In the model including organisational and patient variables, significant ward-level HAPU variables were ward type (rehabilitation vs surgery/internal medicine: OR 0.17 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.66)), use of preventive measures (yes vs no: OR 2.02 (95% CI 1.12 to 3.64)) and ward patient safety culture (OR 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99)). Significant patient-level predictors were age >70 vs organisation of care improvements, that is, by improving the patient safety culture and implementation of preventive measures. Some wards may prevent pressure ulcers better than other wards. The fact that ward-level variation was eliminated when patient-level HAPU variables were included in the model indicates that even wards with the best HAPU prevention will be challenged by an influx of high-risk patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Pharmacy-Driven Dexmedetomidine Stewardship and Appropriate Use Guidelines in a Community Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickli, M Alexandra; Eberwein, Kip A; Short, Marintha R; Ratliff, Patrick D

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a widely utilized agent in the intensive care unit (ICU) because it does not suppress respiratory drive and may be associated with less delirium than midazolam or propofol. Cost of dexmedetomidine therapy and debate as to the proper duration of use has brought its use to the forefront of discussion. To validate the efficacy and cost savings associated with pharmacy-driven dexmedetomidine appropriate use guidelines and stewardship in mechanically ventilated patients. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients who received dexmedetomidine for ICU sedation while on mechanical ventilation at a 433-bed not-for-profit community hospital. Included patients were divided into pre-enactment (PRE) and postenactment (POST) of dexmedetomidine guideline groups. A total of 100 patients (50 PRE and 50 POST) were included in the analysis. A significant difference in duration of mechanical ventilation (11.1 vs 6.2 days, P = 0.006) and incidence of reintubation (36% vs 18% of patients, P = 0.043) was seen in the POST group. Aggregate use of dexmedetomidine 200-µg vials (37.1 vs 18.4 vials, P = 0.010) and infusion days (5.4 vs 2.5 days, P = 0.006) were significantly lower in the POST group. Dexmedetomidine acquisition cost savings were calculated at $374 456.15 in the POST group. There was no difference between the PRE and POST groups with regard to ICU length of stay, expected mortality, and observed mortality. Pharmacy-driven dexmedetomidine appropriate use guidelines decreased the use of dexmedetomidine and increased cost savings at a community hospital without adversely affecting clinical outcomes.

  4. The Case for Using Evidence Based Guidelines in Setting Hospital and Public Health Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Hutchison Francis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hospital systems and regulating agencies enforce strict guidelines barring personal items from entering the Operating Room - touting surgical site infections and patient safety as the rationale. We sought to determine whether or not evidence supporting this recommendation exists by reviewing available literature.Background data: Rules and guidelines that are not evidence based may lead to increased hospital expenses and limitations on healthcare provider autonomyMethods: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL were searched in order to find articles that correlated personal items in the OR to documented surgical site infections. Articles that satisfied the following criteria were included: (1 studies looking at personal items in the OR such as handbags, purses, badges, pagers, backpacks, jewelry phones, and eyeglasses, etc., but not just operating room equipment; and (2 the primary outcome measure was infection at the surgical site.Results: Seventeen articles met inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Of the 17, the majority did not determine if personal items increased risk for surgical site infection. Only 1 article examined the correlation between a personal item near the operative site and surgical site infection, concluding that wedding rings worn in the OR had no impact on surgical site infections. Most studies examined colonization rates on personal items as potential infection risk; however, no personal items were causally linked to surgical site infection in any of these studies.Conclusion: There is no objective evidence to suggest that personal items in the OR increase risk for surgical site infections.

  5. Nature and pattern of primary teeth extractions in a tertiary care hospital setting in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shini Susan Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have been carried out on the prevalence of dental diseases in children although not much information is available regarding its outcome among Indian children. Aim: The aim of the present study was to analyze the type of primary tooth extracted and the reasons for the extraction among children attending a tertiary care hospital in the Southern part of India. Materials and Methods: The dental records of pediatric patients who had visited the dental clinic of a tertiary care hospital located in Tamil Nadu, South India from December 2013 to November 2016 were reviewed. Patients who underwent extraction of at least one primary tooth under local or general anesthesia were included in the study. Results: A total of 943 primary teeth were extracted from 447 patients over 3 years. The most commonly extracted tooth type was the first primary molar followed by the primary central incisor. Grouping by age, the most frequently extracted tooth type between 2 and 5 years was the primary central incisor, the first primary molar among the 6–9-year-old and the second primary molar among 10–15-year-old. The majority of primary teeth extractions were performed in the age group of 6–9 years. No significant gender differences were noted. The most common reason for extraction of primary teeth in children was dental caries. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of untimely primary teeth extractions in young children and dental caries continues to be the leading cause. It clearly reflects on the lack of infant oral health care, the inadequacy of awareness and underutilization of oral health services among children in India.

  6. Registered nurses' attention to and perceptions of pressure ulcer prevention in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sving, Eva; Gunningberg, Lena; Högman, Marieann; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta

    2012-05-01

    To describe how registered nurses perform, document and reflect on pressure ulcer prevention in a specific nurse-patient care situation, as well as generally, on hospital wards. Registered nurses should provide safe and qualified pressure ulcer prevention, but pressure ulcers remain a problem. Compliance with evidence-based guidelines impedes pressure ulcer formation. A descriptive design with a multimethods approach. Nine registered nurses at three wards and hospitals participated. The registered nurses were observed in a specific nurse-patient care situation with patients at risk for pressure ulcers. Interviews followed and patients' records were reviewed. Quantitative and qualitative data analysis methods were used. Pressure ulcer prevention performed by the registered nurses was dependent on the cultural care, which ranged from planned to unplanned prevention. Diversity was found in compliance with evidence-based guidelines across the wards. Although all patients involved were at risk and the nurses described pressure ulcer prevention as basic care, the nurses' attention to prevention was lacking. Few prevention activities and no structured risk assessments using risk assessment tools were observed, and few care plans were identified. The lack of attention was explained by registered nurses' trust in assistant nurses' knowledge, and prevention was seen as an assistant nurse task. Registered nurses paid little attention to pressure ulcer prevention among patients at risk. The planned and unplanned care structures affected the prevention. The nurses trusted and largely delegated their responsibility to the assistant nurses. Evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention is fundamental to patient safety. Care quality is created in situations where patients and care providers meet. How registered nurses work with pressure ulcer prevention, their role and communication, particularly with assistant nurses, should be of major concern to them as well as to healthcare

  7. Nurse Continuity and Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers: A Comparative Analysis Using an Electronic Health Record "Big Data" Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stifter, Janet; Yao, Yingwei; Lodhi, Muhammad Kamran; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Khokhar, Ashfaq; Wilkie, Diana J; Keenan, Gail M

    2015-01-01

    Little research demonstrating the association between nurse continuity and patient outcomes exists despite an intuitive belief that continuity makes a difference in care outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the association of nurse continuity with the prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU). A secondary use of data from the Hands on Automated Nursing Data System (HANDS) was performed for this comparative study. The HANDS is a nursing plan of care data set containing 42,403 episodes documented by 787 nurses, on nine units, in four hospitals and includes nurse staffing and patient characteristics. The HANDS data set resides in a "big data" relational database consisting of 89 tables and 747 columns of data. Via data mining, we created an analytic data set of 840 care episodes, 210 with and 630 without HAPUs, matched by nursing unit, patient age, and patient characteristics. Logistic regression analysis determined the association of nurse continuity and additional nurse-staffing variables on HAPU occurrence. Poor nurse continuity (unit mean continuity index = .21-.42 [1.0 = optimal continuity]) was noted on all nine study units. Nutrition, mobility, perfusion, hydration, and skin problems on admission, as well as patient age, were associated with HAPUs (p data, showing that it offers rich potential for future study of nurse continuity and its effect on patient outcomes.

  8. [Crisis unit at the general hospital: Determinants of further hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norotte, C; Omnès, C; Crozier, C; Verlyck, C; Romanos, M

    2017-10-01

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admission (less than 72hours) of crisis patients presenting to the emergency room is a model that has gained a growing interest because it allows time for developing alternatives to psychiatric hospitalization and favors a maintained functioning in the community. Still, the determinants influencing the disposition decision at discharge after crisis intervention remain largely unexplored. The primary objective of this study was to determine the factors predicting aftercare dispositions at crisis unit discharge: transfer for further hospitalization or return to the community. Secondary objectives included the description of clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of patients admitted to the crisis unit upon presentation to the emergency room. All patients (n=255) admitted to the short-stay unit of the emergency department of Rambouillet General Hospital during a one-year period were included in the study. Patient characteristics were collected in a retrospective manner from medical records: patterns of referral, acute stressors, presenting symptoms, initial patient demand, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5) disorders, psychiatric history, and socio-demographic characteristics were inferred. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with hospitalization decision upon crisis intervention at discharge. Following crisis intervention at the short-stay unit, 100 patients (39.2%) required further hospitalization and were transferred. Statistically significant factors associated with a higher probability of hospitalization (P<0.05) included the patient's initial wish to be hospitalized (OR=4.28), the presence of a comorbid disorder (OR=3.43), a referral by family or friends (OR=2.89), a history of psychiatric hospitalization (OR=2.71) and suicidal ideation on arrival in the emergency room (OR=2.26). Conversely, significant factors associated with a lower probability of

  9. [Case-Mix of hospital emergencies in the Andalusian Health Service based on the 2012 Minimum Data Set. Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea Salazar, Juan Antonio; Nieto García, María Adoración; Laguna Téllez, Antonio; Larrocha Mata, Daniel; Canto Casasola, Vicente David; Murillo Cabezas, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of digital health records in emergency departments (ED) in hospitals in the Andalusian Health Service and the development of an automatic encoder for this area have allowed us to establish a Minimum Data Set for Emergencies (MDS-ED). The aim of this article is to describe the case mix of hospital EDs using various dimensions contained in the MDS-ED. 3.235.600 hospital emergency records in 2012 were classified in clinical categories from the ICD-9-CM codes generated by the automatic encoder. Operating rules to obtain response time and length of stay were defined. A descriptive analysis was carried out to obtain demographic and chronological indicators as well as hospitalization, return and death rates and response time and length of stay in the Eds. Women generated 54,26% of all occurrences and their average age (39,98 years) was higher than men's (37,61). Paediatric emergencies accounted for 21,49% of the total. The peak hours were from 10:00 to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 17:00. Patients who did not undergo observation (92,67%) remained in the ED an average of 153 minutes. Injuries and poisoning, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal diseases and symptoms and signs generated over 50% of all visits. 79.191 cases of chest pain, 28.741 episodes of heart failure and 27.989 episodes of serious infections were identified among the most relevant disorders. The MDS-ED makes it possible to address systematically the analysis of hospital emergencies by identifying the activity developed, the case-mix attended, the response times, the time spent in ED and the quality of the care.

  10. Nutrition screening tools: does one size fit all? A systematic review of screening tools for the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Guaitoli, Patrícia Realino; Jansma, Elise P; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2014-02-01

    Numerous nutrition screening tools for the hospital setting have been developed. The aim of this systematic review is to study construct or criterion validity and predictive validity of nutrition screening tools for the general hospital setting. A systematic review of English, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch articles identified via MEDLINE, Cinahl and EMBASE (from inception to the 2nd of February 2012). Additional studies were identified by checking reference lists of identified manuscripts. Search terms included key words for malnutrition, screening or assessment instruments, and terms for hospital setting and adults. Data were extracted independently by 2 authors. Only studies expressing the (construct, criterion or predictive) validity of a tool were included. 83 studies (32 screening tools) were identified: 42 studies on construct or criterion validity versus a reference method and 51 studies on predictive validity on outcome (i.e. length of stay, mortality or complications). None of the tools performed consistently well to establish the patients' nutritional status. For the elderly, MNA performed fair to good, for the adults MUST performed fair to good. SGA, NRS-2002 and MUST performed well in predicting outcome in approximately half of the studies reviewed in adults, but not in older patients. Not one single screening or assessment tool is capable of adequate nutrition screening as well as predicting poor nutrition related outcome. Development of new tools seems redundant and will most probably not lead to new insights. New studies comparing different tools within one patient population are required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Preliminary Study on Prevalence and Associated Factors with Sarcopenia in a Geriatric Hospitalized Rehabilitation Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongpipatpaiboon, K; Kondo, I; Onogi, K; Mori, S; Ozaki, K; Osawa, A; Matsuo, H; Itoh, N; Tanimoto, M

    2018-01-01

    The reported prevalence of sarcopenia has shown a wide range, crucially based on the diagnostic criteria and setting. This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of sarcopenia and sought to identify factors associated with sarcopenia on admission in a specialized geriatric rehabilitation setting based on the newly developed the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia algorithm. Among 87 participants (mean age, 76.05 ± 7.57 years), 35 (40.2%) were classified as showing sarcopenia on admission. Prevalence was high, particularly among participants ≥80 years old, with tendencies toward lower body mass index, smoking habit, lower cognitive function, and greater functional impairment compared with the non-sarcopenic group. Identification of sarcopenia in elderly patients before rehabilitation and consideration of risk factors may prove helpful in achieving rehabilitation outcomes.

  12. Hospital preparedness in community measles outbreaks—challenges and recommendations for low-resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sadia; Mir, Fatima; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Zafar, Afia

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed various strategies involved in containment of measles in healthcare facilities during community outbreaks. The strategies that are more applicable to resource-poor settings, such as natural ventilation, mechanical ventilation with heating and air-conditioning systems allowing unidirectional air-flow, and protection of un-infected patients and healthcare workers (HCWs), have been examined. Ventilation methods need innovative customization for resource-poor settings followed by validation and post-implementation analysis for impact. Mandatory vaccination of all HCWs with two doses of measles-containing vaccine, appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis of immunocompromised inpatients, and stringent admission criteria for measles cases can contribute toward reduction of nosocomial and secondary transmission within facilities. PMID:25882388

  13. The mental health of nurses in acute teaching hospital settings: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Lin; Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Gallagher, Robyn; Duffield, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Nursing is an emotionally demanding profession and deficiencies in nurses' mental wellbeing, characterised by low vitality and common mental disorders, have been linked to low productivity, absenteeism and presenteeism. Part of a larger study of nurses' health, the aim of this paper was to describe the mental health status and related characteristics of nurses working in two acute metropolitan teaching hospitals. A cross sectional survey design was used. The Registered and Enrolled Nurse workforce, employed on any form of contract, at two teaching hospitals in Sydney Australia were invited to participate. The survey tool was compiled of validated tools and questions. Family and medical history and health risk-related characteristics, current psycho-active medications, smoking status, alcohol intake, eating disorders, self-perceived general health, mental health and vitality, demographic, social and occupational details were collected. A total of 1215 surveys were distributed with a usable response rate of 382 (31.4%). Altogether 53 nurses (14%) reported a history of mental health disorders, of which n = 49 (13%) listed diagnoses of anxiety and/or depression; 22 (6%) were currently taking psychoactive medication. Symptoms that could potentially indicate a mental health issue were more common, with 248 (65.1%) reporting they had experienced symptoms sometimes or often in the last 12 month. Nurses had better mental health if they had better general health, lived with a spouse/ partner rather than alone, had fewer symptoms, sleep problems or disordered eating behaviours, were not an informal carer and did not work nights. Nurses had greater vitality if they were male, had better general health, fewer sleep problems or symptoms generally and lived with a spouse/ partner rather than alone; less vitality if they were an informal carer or had disordered eating. Nurses and their managers should strive to create workplaces where working practices promote nurses' health

  14. Liaison psychiatry professionals' views of general hospital care for patients with mental illness: The care of patients with mental illness in the general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblett, J; Caffrey, A; Deb, T; Khan, A; Lagunes-Cordoba, E; Gale-Grant, O; Henderson, C

    2017-04-01

    Explore the experiences of liaison psychiatry professionals, to gain a greater understanding of the quality of care patients with mental illness receive in the general hospital setting; the factors that affect the quality of care; and their insights on interventions that could improve care. A survey questionnaire and qualitative in depth interviews were used to collect data. Data collection took place at the Royal College of Psychiatrists Faculty of Liaison Psychiatry Annual conference. Qualitative analysis was done using thematic analysis. Areas of concern in the quality of care of patients with co-morbid mental illness included 'diagnostic overshadowing', 'poor communication with patient', 'patient dignity not respected' and 'delay in investigation or treatment'. Eleven contributing factors were identified, the two most frequently mentioned were 'stigmatising attitudes of staff towards patients with co-morbid mental illness' and 'complex diagnosis'. The general overview of care was positive with areas for improvement highlighted. Interventions suggested included 'formal education' and 'changing the liaison psychiatry team'. The cases discussed highlighted several areas where the quality of care received by patients with co-morbid mental illness is lacking, the consequences of which could be contributing to physical health disparities. It was acknowledged that it is the dual responsibility of both the general hospital staff and liaison staff in improving care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparing for the aged in investigative medicine in a General Hospital setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, P.A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The inequalities which exist today between the health of various sectors of society have grown partly out of the different rates of improvement experienced during the 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries. This is especially so for social class, racial and regional differences. Differential health problems between various age groups and disease groups have probably arisen for other reasons. People can now expect to live well into their 70s or early 80s. Many things have contributed to these health gains, including improved public health measures, high quality clinical treatment services, social and environmental conditions and lifestyle changes. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the major health problems of the community served by the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Launceston General Hospital (Northern Regional Health) with the following perspectives: (i) How an ageing population is impacting in the level of service; (ii) How the aged are to be managed during investigation, after care and follow-up; and (iii) Major areas of investigations and age group analysis

  16. Accommodation set in a university hospital: postpartum depression in nurses’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Rodrigues de Freitas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conhecer o entendimento dos enfermeiros do alojamento conjunto sobre depressão pós-parto; e identificar a percepção desses enfermeiros relativa à importância das orientações sobre depressão pós-parto às puérperas. Métodos: Trata-se de uma pesquisa descritiva, exploratória, de natureza qualitativa, com 5 enfermeiros do Alojamento Conjunto de um Hospital da cidade de Niterói/RJ, no ano de 2011. Os dados foram coletados por entrevistas semiestruturadas e tratados de acordo com os preceitos da análise de conteúdo, obedecendo à Técnica de Análise Temática, após aprovação do projeto de pesquisa pelo Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa da Faculdade de Medicina/HUAP/UFF, CAAE n. 0215.0.258.000-11, mediante parecer favorável n° 206/11. Resultados: Os enfermeiros encontram dificuldades em prestar uma assistência especifica e qualificada à puérpera por falta de conhecimentos sobre esse transtorno. Conclusão: O enfermeiro precisa ter o conhecimento sobre a depressão pós-parto para facilitar a abordagem e os cuidados à puérpera e a família.

  17. Exploring the impacts of personal factors on self-leadership in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurluoglu, Ozgur; Saygılı, Meltem; Ozer, Ozlem; Santas, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Self-leadership may be defined as a self-effecting process that individuals experience by maintaining the motivation they require for fulfilling their roles and duties. The self-leadership process comprises three key strategies: behaviour-oriented strategies, natural reward strategies and constructive thought pattern strategies. What is intended herein is to inquire about the implementation of self-leadership within organisations and to examine the effects of such variables as age, gender, total terms of employment, marital status and education on self-leadership strategies. The primary data collection instrument was a survey distributed to 450 personnel working at a state hospital in Kırıkkale, Turkey, and feedback thereto was received from 308 (68.4%) of those surveyed. As a result of the findings taken from the analyses, age, total terms of employment and receipt of education in leadership affect the use of self-leadership strategies. Although age and total terms of employment display a negative-directional correlation with the self-leadership strategies, female employees and those who receive education in leadership are more inclined towards self-leadership strategies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Setting up a Tissue Bank in India: The Tata Memorial Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajiwala, A L

    2003-01-01

    In India, the procurement of tissues for transplantation is governed by the Transplantation of Human Organs Act, 1994. However, although this law exists, it is primarily applied to organ transplantation and rules and regulations that are specific to tissue banking have yet to be developed.The Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) Tissue Bank was started in 1988 as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) programme to promote the use of ionising radiation for the sterilisation of biological tissues. It represents the Government of India within this project and was the first such facility in the country. It is registered with the Health Services Maharashtra State and provides lyophilised amnion, dura mater, skin and bone that have been terminally sterilised with exposure to 25 kGy of gamma radiation from a Cobalt 60 source. These are obtained either from cadavers or live donors.To date the TMH Tissue Bank has provided 6328 allografts for use as biological dressings or in various reconstructive procedures.The TMH Tissue Bank has helped initiate a Tissue Bank at the Defence Laboratory (DL), Jodhpur. At present these are the only two Banks in the country using radiation for terminal sterilisation of banked tissues.The availability of safe, clinically useful and cost effective grafts have resulted in changes in surgical treatment with a concomitant increase in demand for grafts and an interest in developing more tissue banks. The availability of donor tissue however, continues to be a major limitation.

  19. Perceptions of nursing care quality, in acute hospital settings measured by the Karen instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Inger S; Lindgren, Margareta

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the quality of nursing care from the perspectives of patients and personnel and to compare these perspectives. The perception of quality in nursing care is affected by patient needs and it is common that patients and personnel disagree on the nature of the quality. Thus, it is important to measure the quality from both perspectives. A total of 95 patients and 120 personnel from surgical and medical wards at a hospital in Sweden participated. The Karen instruments were used for data collection. A scale index was used for comparison of the perspectives. The patients and personnel were satisfied with the quality of care and there were no obvious differences in the total index. The different subscales indicated areas of lower care quality in need of improvement. The quality of the care seemed to be satisfactory from the perspectives of both the patients and the personal. Further analysis from the subscale or a variable level is needed to define areas of lower care quality. Measurements have to be carried out continuously to guarantee care quality over time, as a result of organisational changes and financial cutbacks. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Usefullness of routine use of fecal occult blood test in a hospital setting

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    Simona Ravnik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fecal occult blood test, hematest, is a well excepted non-invasive method used for detecting different diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. It was proven in different randomized studies that usage of this simple method may facilitate further diagnostic and therapeutic treatment.Patients and methods: The retrospective analysis includes patients, which were admitted to the gastroenterological and endoscopy department of the General hospital Maribor in the last quarter of the year 2005. In all patients fecal occult blood test was performed.Results: We examined 200 patients, 104 women and 96 men, average age 63.9 years, SD±16.9, ranging from 21 to 97 years. Positive hematest was discovered in 76 patients (38 %. The source of hemorrhage from the upper digestive tract was confirmed in 37 patients (48.6 % of all positive tests and from the lower digestive tract in 34 patients (46 % of all positive tests. The most frequent causes of hemorrhage from the lower digestive tract were chronic inflammatory bowel disease (13.1 % of all positive tests, colorectal cancer (10.5 % and polyps (6.6 %. The source of hemorrhage was not located in five patients (6.6 % of all positive tests despite the accurate diagnostic procedure.Conclusions: By performing a fecal occult blood screening in non-symptomatic patients, we can make an essential step towards discovering different gastrointestinal diseases, even colorectal cancer in its early, limited form, when the effect of treatment is greatest.

  1. Peer pressure and public reporting within healthcare setting: improving accountability and health care quality in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specchia, Maria Lucia; Veneziano, Maria Assunta; Cadeddu, Chiara; Ferriero, Anna Maria; Capizzi, Silvio; Ricciardi, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, the need of public reporting of health outcomes has acquired a great importance. The public release of performance results could be a tool for improving health care quality and many attempts have been made in order to introduce public reporting programs within the health care context at different levels. It would be necessary to promote the introduction of a standardized set of outcome and performance measures in order to improve quality of health care services and to make health care providers aware of the importance of transparency and accountability.

  2. The Dynamics of Visual Art Dialogues: Experiences to Be Used in Hospital Settings with Visual Art Enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt-Maj Wikström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Given that hospitals have environmental enrichment with paintings and visual art arrangement, it would be meaningful to develop and document how hospital art could be used by health professionals. Methods. The study was undertaken at an art site in Sweden. During 1-hour sessions, participants (=20 get together in an art gallery every second week five times. Results. According to the participants a new value was perceived. From qualitative analyses, three themes appear: raise association, mentally present, and door-opener. In addition 72% of the participants reported makes me happy and gives energy and inspiration, and 52% reported that dialogues increase inspiration, make you involved, and stimulate curiosity. Conclusion. The present study supported the view that visual art dialogue could be used by health care professionals in a structured manner and that meaningful art stimulation, related to a person’s experiences, could be of importance for the patients. Implementing art dialogues in hospital settings could be a fruitful working tool for nurses, a complementary manner of patient communication.

  3. HIV rapid testing in a Veterans Affairs hospital ED setting: a 5-year sustainability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Herschel; Hagedorn, Hildi; Anaya, Henry D

    2014-08-01

    Routine HIV testing in primary care settings is now recommended in the United States. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has increased the number of patients tested for HIV, but overall HIV testing rates in VA remain low. A proven strategy for increasing such testing involves nurse-initiated HIV rapid testing (HIV RT). The purpose of this work was to use a mixed methodology approach to evaluate the 5-year sustainability of an intervention that implemented HIV RT in a VA emergency department setting in a large, urban VA medical center to reduce missed diagnostic and treatment opportunities in this vulnerable patient population. In-person semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and stakeholders. Interview notes were qualitatively coded for emerging themes. Quarterly testing rates were evaluated for a 5-year time span starting from the launch in July 2008. Findings indicate that HIV RT was sustained by the enthusiasm of 2 clinical champions who oversaw the registered nurses responsible for conducting the testing. The departure of the clinical champions was correlated with a substantial drop-off in testing. Findings also indicate potential strategies for improving sustainability including engaging senior leadership in the project, engaging line staff in the implementation planning from the start to increase ownership over the innovation, incorporating information into initial training explaining the importance of the innovation to quality patient care, providing ongoing training to maintain skills, and providing routine progress reports to staff to demonstrate the ongoing impact of their efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The influence of power and actor relations on priority setting and resource allocation practices at the hospital level in Kenya: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasa, Edwine W; Cleary, Susan; English, Mike; Molyneux, Sassy

    2016-09-30

    Priority setting and resource allocation in healthcare organizations often involves the balancing of competing interests and values in the context of hierarchical and politically complex settings with multiple interacting actor relationships. Despite this, few studies have examined the influence of actor and power dynamics on priority setting practices in healthcare organizations. This paper examines the influence of power relations among different actors on the implementation of priority setting and resource allocation processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine priority setting and resource allocation practices in two public hospitals in coastal Kenya. We collected data by a combination of in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), review of documents such as hospital plans and budgets, minutes of meetings and accounting records, and non-participant observations in case study hospitals over a period of 7 months. We applied a combination of two frameworks, Norman Long's actor interface analysis and VeneKlasen and Miller's expressions of power framework to examine and interpret our findings RESULTS: The interactions of actors in the case study hospitals resulted in socially constructed interfaces between: 1) senior managers and middle level managers 2) non-clinical managers and clinicians, and 3) hospital managers and the community. Power imbalances resulted in the exclusion of middle level managers (in one of the hospitals) and clinicians and the community (in both hospitals) from decision making processes. This resulted in, amongst others, perceptions of unfairness, and reduced motivation in hospital staff. It also puts to question the legitimacy of priority setting processes in these hospitals. Designing hospital decision making structures to strengthen participation and inclusion of relevant stakeholders could

  5. El paciente pluripatológico en el ámbito hospitalario Patients with multimorbidity in the hospital setting

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    Manuel Francisco Fernández Miera

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Los hospitales atienden a pacientes pluripatológicos que sufren de forma simultánea varias enfermedades crónicas. En este estudio se estima la prevalencia, así como las principales características demográficas y de gestión asociadas. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo a partir del conjunto mínimo básico de datos (CMBD y de una definición funcional de paciente pluripatológico. Se recogen los datos sobre el sexo, la edad, el servicio de ingreso, el motivo de ingreso, el alta y los días de estancia en los pacientes de un hospital universitario durante el año 2003. Resultados: El 16,9% (intervalo de confianza del 95%, 15,8-18,1 de los ingresos fueron pacientes pluripatológicos. Éstos eran de mayor edad, varones, ingresaron más frecuentemente de forma urgente y en el área de especialidades médicas, fueron derivados en menos ocasiones a su domicilio y generaron mayor estancia. Conclusiones: Los pacientes pluripatológicos presentan características diferenciales que permiten su identificación retrospectiva mediante el análisis del CMBD. Aunque casi todos los servicios dieron de alta a estos pacientes, la mayoría fueron atendidos en servicios de especialidades médicas.Objectives: Hospitals attend patients with multiple chronic diseases. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of these patients, as well as their main sociodemographic and management characteristics. Methods: We performed a descriptive study based on information from the minimum data set and a functional definition of patients with multimorbidity. Age, sex, admitting specialty, cause of admission, discharge and days of hospital stay were estimated for patients discharged from a university hospital in 2003. Results: Patients with multimorbidity represented 16.9% (95% CI: 15.8-18.1% of admissions. These patients were mainly elderly men who tended to be admitted urgently to medical specialties. Discharge to home was less frequent and days of

  6. Impact of Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction and Postintroduction Etiology of Diarrhea Requiring Hospital Admission in Haydom, Tanzania, a Rural African Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts-Mills, James A.; Amour, Caroline; Gratz, Jean; Nshama, Rosemary; Walongo, Thomas; Mujaga, Buliga; Maro, Athanasia; McMurry, Timothy L; Liu, Jie; Mduma, Estomih; Houpt, Eric R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background No data are available on the etiology of diarrhea requiring hospitalization after rotavirus vaccine introduction in Africa. The monovalent rotavirus vaccine was introduced in Tanzania on 1 January 2013. We performed a vaccine impact and effectiveness study as well as a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)–based etiology study at a rural Tanzanian hospital. Methods We obtained data on admissions among children <5 years to Haydom Lutheran Hospital between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2015 and estimated the impact of vaccine introduction on all-cause diarrhea admissions. We then performed a vaccine effectiveness study using the test-negative design. Finally, we tested diarrheal specimens during 2015 by qPCR for a broad range of enteropathogens and calculated pathogen-specific attributable fractions (AFs). Results Vaccine introduction was associated with a 44.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.6%–97.4%) reduction in diarrhea admissions in 2015, as well as delay of the rotavirus season. The effectiveness of 2 doses of vaccine was 74.8% (95% CI, –8.2% to 94.1%) using an enzyme immunoassay–based case definition and 85.1% (95% CI, 26.5%–97.0%) using a qPCR-based case definition. Among 146 children enrolled in 2015, rotavirus remained the leading etiology of diarrhea requiring hospitalization (AF, 25.8% [95% CI, 24.4%–26.7%]), followed by heat-stable enterotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (AF, 18.4% [95% CI, 12.9%–21.9%]), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (AF, 14.5% [95% CI, 10.2%–22.8%]), and Cryptosporidium (AF, 7.9% [95% CI, 6.2%–9.3%]). Conclusions Despite the clear impact of vaccine introduction in this setting, rotavirus remained the leading etiology of diarrhea requiring hospitalization. Further efforts to maximize vaccine coverage and improve vaccine performance in these settings are warranted. PMID:28575304

  7. Analysis of Internet Usage Among Cancer Patients in a County Hospital Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Lisa; Lodrigues, William; Dreadin-Pulliam, Julie; Xie, Xian-Jin; Mathur, Sakshi; Rao, Madhu; Harvey, Valorie; Leitch, Ann Marilyn; Rao, Roshni

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the most common diseases that patients research on the Internet. The Commission on Cancer (CoC) recommended that Parkland Memorial Hospital (PMH) improve the oncology services website. PMH is Dallas County’s public health care facility, serving a largely uninsured, minority population. Most research regarding patient Internet use has been conducted in insured, Caucasian populations, raising concerns that the needs of PMH patients may not be extrapolated from available data. The PMH Cancer Committee, therefore, adopted a quality improvement initiative to understand patients’ Internet usage. Objective The objective of the study was to obtain and analyze data regarding patients’ Internet usage in order to make targeted improvements to the oncology services section of the institutional website. Methods A task force developed an 11-question survey to ascertain what proportion of our patients have Internet access and use the Internet to obtain medical information as well as determine the specific information sought. Between April 2011 and August 2011, 300 surveys were administered to newly diagnosed cancer patients. Multivariate analyses were performed. Results Of 300 surveys, 291 were included. Minorities, primarily African-American and Hispanic, represented 78.0% (227/291) of patients. Only 37.1% (108/291) of patients had Internet access, most (256/291, 87.9%) having access at home. Younger patients more commonly had Internet access, with a mean age of 47 versus 58 years for those without (PInternet research was to develop questions for discussion with one’s physician. Patients most frequently sought information regarding cancer treatment options, outcomes, and side effects. Conclusions Less than one-half of PMH oncology patients have Internet access. This is influenced by age, educational level, and ethnicity. Those with access use it to obtain information related to their cancer diagnosis. The most effective way of addressing our

  8. The effectiveness of consultation-liaison psychiatry in the general hospital setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rebecca; Wand, Anne P F

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to review how the effectiveness of consultation liaison psychiatry (CLP) services has been measured and to evaluate the strength of the evidence for effectiveness. Systematic review of medical databases using broad search terms as well as expert opinion was sought. The literature search was restricted to studies of general, whole-of-hospital inpatient CLP services. Forty articles were found and grouped into five measurements of effectiveness: cost effectiveness including length of stay, concordance, staff and patient feedback, and follow-up outcome studies. All measurements contributed to the evaluation of CLP services, but no one measure in isolation could adequately cover the multifaceted roles of CLP. Concordance was the only measurement with an established, consistent approach for evaluation. Cost effectiveness and follow-up outcome studies were the only measures with levels of evidence above four, however the three follow-up outcome studies reported conflicting results. Subjective evidence derived from patient and staff feedback is important but presently lacking due to methodological problems. The effectiveness of CLP services was demonstrated by cost-effectiveness, earlier referrals to CLP predicting shorter length of stay, and concordance with some management recommendations. There is evidence that some CLP services are cost-effective and reduce length of stay when involved early and that referrers follow certain recommendations. However, many studies had disparate results and were methodologically flawed. Future research should focus on standardising patient and staff feedback, and short-term patient outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE WASTE IN THE HOSPITAL SETTING. UNDERSTANDING RISK MANAGEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimany-Masclans, Jordi; Torres-Egea, Pilar; Sancho-Agredano, Raúl; Girbau-García, Ma Rosa; Fabrellas, Núria; Torrens-Garcia, Ma Llum; Martínez-Estalella, Gemma

    2015-05-01

    The sanitary waste represents a potential hazard for health workers. Given the high risk of infection in labor accidents, the correct management of sanitary waste minimizes this risk and improves labor and environment conditions. To identify risk perception with health professionals in relation to the advanced sorting and management of healthcare waste (HW). The current study is a descriptive, cross-sectional. The sample size was 177 health workers (nurse assistants, nurses, physicians, lab technicians) from three hospitals in Barcelona (Catalonia). Homemade questionnaire and questions with a free and spontaneous association and incomplete sentences were used to analyze labor variables, perception of risk and personal security through a Likert scale. Using a score from 1 (the lowest perception of risk) to 5 (the high perception of risk) to assess the risk perception, the average value for nurse assistants, nurses, physicians, and lab technicians was 3.71, 3.75, 3.83 and 4.03, respectively. Referring to items with free and spontaneous response association, 44.8% of workers consider HW as a biohazard, 29.6% consider it as waste material, 22.1% state that it must be managed properly and 3.5% described it as unknown residues. The results suggest that all health professionals generally have a perception of high risk. The lab technicians have a higher perception of the real risk of inadequate management of HW A 63.2% report that everyone has to make a proper management to preserve their occupational health; the 59% consider that the HW are a biological risk to the general population and only the 47.8% that are harmful to public health. Although it should be noted that only 44.8% think that HW are toxic and dangerous.

  10. A randomised controlled trial of extended brief intervention for alcohol dependent patients in an acute hospital setting (ADPAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Paula

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol dependence affects approximately 3% of the English population, and accounts for significant medical and psychiatric morbidity. Only 5.6% of alcohol-dependent individuals ever access specialist treatment and only a small percentage ever seek treatment. As people who are alcohol dependent are more likely to have experienced health problems leading to frequent attendance at acute hospitals it would seem both sensible and practical to ensure that this setting is utilised as a major access point for treatment, and to test the effectiveness of these treatments. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial with a primary hypothesis that extended brief interventions (EBI delivered to alcohol-dependent patients in a hospital setting by an Alcohol Specialist Nurse (ASN will be effective when compared to usual care in reducing overall alcohol consumption and improving on the standard measures of alcohol dependence. Consecutive patients will be screened for alcohol misuse in the Emergency Department (ED of a district general hospital. On identification of an alcohol-related problem, following informed written consent, we aim to randomize 130 patients per group. The ASN will discharge to usual clinical care all control group patients, and plan a programme of EBI for treatment group patients. Follow-up interview will be undertaken by a researcher blinded to the intervention at 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is level of alcohol dependence as determined by the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ score. Secondary outcome measures include; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT score, quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, health-related quality of life measures, service utilisation, and patient experience. The trial will also allow an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of EBI in an acute hospital setting. In addition, patient experience will be assessed using qualitative methods

  11. Comparison between ultrasound and noncontrast helical computed tomography for identification of acute ureterolithiasis in a teaching hospital setting

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    Luís Ronan Marquez Ferreira de Souza

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown noncontrast computed tomography (NCT to be more effective than ultrasound (US for imaging acute ureterolithiasis. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies directly comparing these techniques in an emergency teaching hospital setting. The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of US and NCT performed by senior radiology residents for diagnosing acute ureterolithiasis; and to assess interobserver agreement on tomography interpretations by residents and experienced abdominal radiologists. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study of 52 consecutive patients, who underwent both US and NCT within an interval of eight hours, at Hospital São Paulo. METHODS: US scans were performed by senior residents and read by experienced radiologists. NCT scan images were read by senior residents, and subsequently by three abdominal radiologists. The interobserver variability was assessed using the kappa statistic. RESULTS: Ureteral calculi were found in 40 out of 52 patients (77%. US presented sensitivity of 22% and specificity of 100%. When collecting system dilatation was associated, US demonstrated 73% sensitivity, 82% specificity. The interobserver agreement in NCT analysis was very high with regard to identification of calculi, collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat. CONCLUSIONS: US has limited value for identifying ureteral calculi in comparison with NCT, even when collecting system dilatation is present. Residents and abdominal radiologists demonstrated excellent agreement rates for ureteral calculi, identification of collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat on NCT.

  12. Interactional aspects of care during hospitalization: perspectives of family caregivers of psychiatrically ill in a tertiary care setting in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinakaran, P; Mehrotra, Seema; Bharath, Srikala

    2014-12-01

    There are very few studies on user-perspectives about mental health care services that explore perspectives of family caregivers in India. An exploratory study was undertaken to understand the perceived importance of various aspects of interactions with mental health service providers during hospitalization, from the perspectives of family caregivers. In addition, it also aimed at documenting their actual experience of interactional aspects of care during the hospitalization of their relatives. The study was conducted on fifty family caregivers of patients with varied psychiatric diagnoses hospitalized in a tertiary psychiatric care setting in South India. Measures of Interactional aspects of care were developed to assess perceived importance of six different interactional domains of care and the actual experience of care in these domains. Provision of informational inputs and addressing of concerns raised emerged as the domains of care given highest importance. The item pertaining to 'sharing with the caregiver about different alternatives for treatment' received negative ratings in terms of actual experience by maximum number of participants (18%). Significant differences on perceived importance of four domains of interactional aspects of care (dignity, confidentiality and fairness, addressing concerns raised, informational inputs and prompt attention and consistent care) emerged between caregiver subgroups based on educational level of the caregiver, socio-economic status, hospitalization history and broad diagnostic categories. In addition, the care givers of patients with psychoses assigned significantly more positive ratings on actual experience for all the domains of interactional aspects of care. The findings have implications for further research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Cost of Nurse-Midwifery Care: Use of Interventions, Resources, and Associated Costs in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Molly R; Murphy, Sean M; Fitzgerald, Cynthia E; Andersen, H Frank; Daratha, Kenn B

    Obstetrical care often involves multiple expensive, and often elective, interventions that may increase costs to patients, payers, and the health care system with little effect on patient outcomes. The objectives of this study were to examine the following hospital related outcomes: 1) use of labor and birth interventions, 2) inpatient duration of stay, and 3) total direct health care costs for patients attended by a certified nurse-midwife (CNM) compared with those attended by an obstetrician-gynecologist (OB-GYN), within an environment of safe and high-quality care. Electronic health records for 1,441 medically low-risk women who gave birth at a hospital located in the U.S. Pacific Northwest between January and September 2013 were sampled. Multilevel regression and generalized linear models were used for analysis. Reduced use of selected labor and birth interventions (cesarean delivery, vacuum-assisted delivery, epidural anesthesia, labor induction, and cervical ripening), reduced maternal duration of stay, and reduced overall costs associated with CNM-led care relative to OB-GYN-led care were observed for medically low-risk women in a hospital setting. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were comparable across groups. This study supports consideration of increased use of CNMs as providers for the care of women at low risk for complications to decrease costs for the health care system. The use of CNMs to the fullest extent within state-regulated scopes of practice could result in more efficient use of hospital resources. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Everyone's business: developing an integrated model of care to respond to child abuse in a pediatric hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In pediatric hospitals, social work plays a central role in the prevention, identification, and management of child abuse. Children who are suspected of having been abused or neglected require an evaluation of their psychosocial situation. As an integral member of the health care team, the social worker is well placed to undertake comprehensive psychosocial assessments including information on the child's development, parental capacity, family, and community supports. Current practice approaches have seen a shift away from a narrow, "expert" approach to child protection. This article describes the development of an integrated model of social work service delivery to better respond to vulnerable and at-risk children in a pediatric hospital setting. Developing a new model of service required strategic planning, consultation, and endorsement from senior hospital management. The new model aimed to ensure a high quality, responsive social work service to children at risk of physical abuse, neglect, or cumulative harm. The change necessitated understanding of current research evidence, development of best practice guidelines, and effective communication with staff and external stakeholders. Policy development, implementation of practice guidelines, staff training, data collection, and service evaluation are described. The role of social work management and leadership were central in creating change. Visionary leadership is widely regarded as key to successful organizational change. The management approach included consultation with staff, building commitment to the need for change, addressing staff concerns, and providing a vision of enhanced client outcomes as a result of the change process. This article provides a candid overview of challenges and barriers to change. Change strategies described are easily transferable to other social work settings. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  15. Validation of a pediatric early warning system for hospitalized pediatric oncology patients in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulnik, Asya; Méndez Aceituno, Alejandra; Mora Robles, Lupe Nataly; Forbes, Peter W; Soberanis Vasquez, Dora Judith; Mack, Ricardo; Antillon-Klussmann, Federico; Kleinman, Monica; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2017-12-15

    Pediatric oncology patients are at high risk of clinical deterioration, particularly in hospitals with resource limitations. The performance of pediatric early warning systems (PEWS) to identify deterioration has not been assessed in these settings. This study evaluates the validity of PEWS to predict the need for unplanned transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) among pediatric oncology patients in a resource-limited hospital. A retrospective case-control study comparing the highest documented and corrected PEWS score before unplanned PICU transfer in pediatric oncology patients (129 cases) with matched controls (those not requiring PICU care) was performed. Documented and corrected PEWS scores were found to be highly correlated with the need for PICU transfer (area under the receiver operating characteristic, 0.940 and 0.930, respectively). PEWS scores increased 24 hours prior to unplanned transfer (P = .0006). In cases, organ dysfunction at the time of PICU admission correlated with maximum PEWS score (correlation coefficient, 0.26; P = .003), patients with PEWS results ≥4 had a higher Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 (PIM2) (P = .028), and PEWS results were higher in patients with septic shock (P = .01). The PICU mortality rate was 17.1%; nonsurvivors had higher mean PEWS scores before PICU transfer (P = .0009). A single-point increase in the PEWS score increased the odds of mechanical ventilation or vasopressors within the first 24 hours and during PICU admission (odds ratio 1.3-1.4). PEWS accurately predicted the need for unplanned PICU transfer in pediatric oncology patients in this resource-limited setting, with abnormal results beginning 24 hours before PICU admission and higher scores predicting the severity of illness at the time of PICU admission, need for PICU interventions, and mortality. These results demonstrate that PEWS aid in the identification of clinical deterioration in this high-risk population, regardless of a hospital

  16. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenge could be briefly seen in these terms: hospitals as places for treatment where there’s a technology focus and hospitals for healing where there’s a human focus. In the 60s - 70s wave of new hospital building, an emphasis on technology can be seen. It’s time to move from the technology...... focus. It is not enough to consider only the factors of function within architecture, hygiene, economy and logistics. We also need to look at aspects of aesthetics, bringing nature into the building, art, color, acoustics, volume and space as we perceive them. Contemporary methods and advances...... placed, accessible, provided with plenty of greenery, and maximize sensory impressions, providing sounds, smells, sight and the possibility to be touched. This is a very well documented area I can say. Hygiene, in terms of architecture can give attention to hand wash facilities and their positioning...

  17. Faecal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the hospital and community setting: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantelle eClaassen-Weitz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and rationale: Staphylococcus aureus faecal carriage has been identified as a potential source for nosocomial transmission and a risk factor for disease development. This systematic review determined the overall S. aureus (including methicillin susceptible and resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA faecal carriage rates within the community and healthcare settings.Methodology: Peer-reviewed articles indexed in Medline, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Africa-Wide Information, CINAHL, and Web of Science were identified using applicable and controlled vocabulary through to 11 November 2015. Eligible studies were ascertained by three independent reviewers. Random-effects meta-analyses of proportions were performed to determine S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA faecal carriage rates reported by eligible studies.Results: Twenty six studies were included in this review. The pooled estimates for S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA faecal carriage were 26 % (95 % confidence interval (CI: 16.8 % - 36.3 %, 86 % (95 % confidence interval (CI: 65.9 % - 97.9 % and 10 % (95 % CI: 0.7 % - 27.0 %, respectively. Faecal S. aureus carriage rates increased on average from 10 % to 65 % during the first eight weeks of life, followed by an average carriage rate of 64 % at six months and 46 % at one year of life. Genotyping techniques were employed mainly in studies conducted in developed countries and comprised largely of gel-based techniques. Six studies reported on the role of S. aureus faecal strains in diarrhoea (n = 2 and the risk for acquiring infections (n = 4. Eight of the 26 studies included in this review performed antibiotic susceptibility testing of S. aureus faecal isolates.Conclusion: This study provides evidence that screening for S. aureus faecal carriage, at least in populations at high risk, could be an effective measure for the prevention of S. aureus transmission and infection in the healthcare and community setting. More well-structured studies need to be

  18. Observed Handwashing with Soap Practices among Cholera Patients and Accompanying Household Members in a Hospital Setting (CHoBI7 Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Zohura, Fatema; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Monira, Shirajum; Begum, Farzana; Biswas, Shwapon K.; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, David; Sack, R. Bradley; Leontsini, Elli; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M.; Rashid, Mahamud-ur; Sharmin, Rumana; Zhang, Xiaotong; Alam, Munirul; George, Christine Marie

    2016-01-01

    Household members of cholera patients are at a 100 times higher risk of cholera than the general population. Despite this risk, there are only a handful of studies that have investigated the handwashing practices among hospitalized diarrhea patients and their accompanying household members. To investigate handwashing practices in a hospital setting among this high-risk population, 444 hours of structured observation was conducted in a hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh, among 148 cholera patients ...

  19. Age-Related Changes of the Ocular Surface: A Hospital Setting-Based Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ottobelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the effects of age on the prevalence of ocular surface diseases (OSD, adherence to treatment, and recovery rates. Patients and Methods. Retrospective analysis of 3000 clinical records from a first-level general ophthalmology clinic. Patients with OSD were prospectively submitted a questionnaire to assess compliance and recovery rates. Results. OSD prevalence was 10.3%. Patients with OSD were significantly older than patients without it: 67.5±20.3 versus 57.0±22.0 years (P=0.036. No significant difference in season distribution was shown. Dry eye disease (DED represented 58% of OSD; its prevalence increased with age until 80 years old and suddenly decreased thereafter. Asymptomatic DED was 37%. Adherence to treatment in OSD was very high (94%; recovery rates were lower in patients aged 21–40 and 61–80 (resp., 65.5% and 77.8% and this was associated with higher OSDI scores. Tear substitutes represented 50% of all prescribed medications; their use increased with age. Discussion. In a “real-life” low-tech setting, OSD showed a prevalence of 10.3%. DED was the most prevalent disease, and it was asymptomatic in more than 1/3 of cases.

  20. Pentraxin-3 level at admission is a strong predictor of short-term mortality in a community-based hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastrup-Birk, S; Munthe-Fog, L; Skjødt, Mikkel-Ole

    2015-01-01

    hospital setting is unknown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 1326 unselected, consecutive patients (age >40 years) admitted to a community hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark. Patients were followed until death or for a median of 11.5 years after admission. The main outcome measure was all...

  1. Evaluation of the appropriate use of a CIWA-Ar alcohol withdrawal protocol in the general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloma, Amanda S; Tucciarone, Jason M; Hayes, Edmund M; Bronson, Brian D

    2018-01-01

    The Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment-Alcohol, Revised (CIWA-Ar) is an assessment tool used to quantify alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) severity and inform benzodiazepine treatment for alcohol withdrawal. To evaluate the prescribing patterns and appropriate use of the CIWA-Ar protocol in a general hospital setting, as determined by the presence or absence of documented AWS risk factors, patients' ability to communicate, and provider awareness of the CIWA-Ar order. This retrospective chart review included 118 encounters of hospitalized patients placed on a CIWA-Ar protocol during one year. The following data were collected for each encounter: patient demographics, admitting diagnosis, ability to communicate, and admission blood alcohol level; and medical specialty of the clinician ordering CIWA-Ar, documentation of the presence or absence of established AWS risk factors, specific parameters of the protocol ordered, service admitted to, provider documentation of awareness of the active protocol within 48 h of initial order, total benzodiazepine dose equivalents administered and associated adverse events. 57% of patients who started on a CIWA-Ar protocol had either zero or one documented risk factor for AWS (19% and 38% respectively). 20% had no documentation of recent alcohol use. 14% were unable to communicate. 19% of medical records lacked documentation of provider awareness of the ordered protocol. Benzodiazepine associated adverse events were documented in 15% of encounters. The judicious use of CIWA-Ar protocols in general hospitals requires mechanisms to ensure assessment of validated alcohol withdrawal risk factors, exclusion of patients who cannot communicate, and continuity of care during transitions.

  2. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  3. An historical document analysis of the introduction of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative into the Australian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchan, Marjorie; Davis, Deborah; Foureur, Maralyn

    2017-02-01

    Breastfeeding has many known benefits yet its support across Australian health systems was suboptimal throughout the 20th Century. The World Health Organization launched a global health promotion strategy to help create a 'breastfeeding culture'. Research on the programme has revealed multiple barriers since implementation. To analyse the sociopolitical challenges associated with implementing a global programme into a national setting via an examination of the influences on the early period of implementation of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative in Australia. A focused historical document analysis was attended as part of an instrumental case study. A purposeful sampling strategy obtained a comprehensive sample of public and private documents related to the introduction of the BFHI in Australia. Analysis was informed by a 'documents as commentary' approach to gain insight into individual and collective social practices not otherwise observable. Four major themes were identified: "a breastfeeding culture"; "resource implications"; "ambivalent support for breastfeeding and the BFHI" and "business versus advocacy". "A breastfeeding culture" included several subthemes. No tangible support for breastfeeding generally, or the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative specifically, was identified. Australian policy did not follow international recommendations. There were no financial or policy incentives for BFHI implementation. Key stakeholders' decisions negatively impacted on the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative at a crucial time in its implementation in Australia. The potential impact of the programme was not realised, representing a missed opportunity to establish and provide sustainable standardised breastfeeding support to Australian women and their families. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Beneficial Effects of Two Types of Personal Health Record Services Connected With Electronic Medical Records Within the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisan; Kim, James G Boram; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Kiwhan; Kim, Byungjun; Kim, Sukwha; Kim, Jeongeun

    2017-11-01

    Healthcare consumers must be able to make decisions based on accurate health information. To assist with this, we designed and developed an integrated system connected with electronic medical records in hospitals to ensure delivery of accurate health information. The system-called the Consumer-centered Open Personal Health Record platform-is composed of two services: a portal for users with any disease and a mobile application for users with cleft lip/palate. To assess the benefits of these services, we used a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design, assigning participants to the portal (n = 50) and application (n = 52) groups. Both groups showed significantly increased knowledge, both objective (actual knowledge of health information) and subjective (perceived knowledge of health information), after the intervention. Furthermore, while both groups showed higher information needs satisfaction after the intervention, the application group was significantly more satisfied. Knowledge changes were more affected by participant characteristics in the application group. Our results may be due to the application's provision of specific disease information and a personalized treatment plan based on the participant and other users' data. We recommend that services connected with electronic medical records target specific diseases to provide personalized health management to patients in a hospital setting.

  5. SPECIFIC FEATURES OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS DURING INTENSIVE CHEMOTHERAPY (IN THE HOSPITAL SETTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Streltsov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychological trauma of pulmonary tuberculosis and long-term treatment may cause the development and progression of different borderline neuropsychic disorders in patients, lower therapeutic effectiveness, and prematurely discontinue therapy. The main practical tasks of psychological rehabilitation during intensive treatment are to render care for a patient during his adaptation to the hospital setting, to correct inadequate attitude towards disease, and to motivate active cooperation with specialists. Competent psychological support of drug therapy promotes a reduction in the intensity of psychic and somatic experiences in the patient and an increase in his psychological resources. A respective microclimate in the tuberculosis control facility and a patient-centered doctorpatient model should be considered as the most important rehabilitation factors.

  6. Dose and Duration of Opioid Use in Patients with Cancer and Noncancer Pain at an Outpatient Hospital Setting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Che S; Rahman, Norny A; Ismail, Che R; Choy, Leong W

    2017-07-01

    There are currently limited data available on the patterns of opioid prescribing in Malaysia. This study investigated the patterns of opioid prescribing and characterized the dosing and duration of opioid use in patients with noncancer and cancer pain. This retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted at an outpatient hospital setting in Malaysia. All prescriptions for opioids (dihydrocodeine, fentanyl, morphine, and oxycodone) issued between January 2013 and December 2014 were examined. The number of prescriptions and patients, the distribution of mean daily dose, annual total days covered with opioids, and annual total opioid dose at the individual level were calculated and stratified by noncancer and cancer groups. A total of 1015 opioid prescriptions were prescribed for 347 patients from 2013 to 2014. Approximately 41.5% of patients (N = 144/347) and 58.5% (N = 203/347) were associated with noncancer and cancer diagnosis, respectively. Oxycodone (38.0%) was the highest prescribed primarily for the noncancer group. The majority of patients in both noncancer (74.3%) and cancer (60.4%) groups were receiving mean daily doses of 90 days per year) was associated with 21.8% of patients in the noncancer group and 17.5% in the cancer group. The finding from this study showed that 41.5% of opioid users at an outpatient hospital setting in Malaysia received opioids for noncancer pain and 21.8% of these users were using opioids for longer than 90 days. The average daily dose in the majority of patients in both groups of noncancer and cancer was modest. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  7. Workplace violence in different settings and among various health professionals in an Italian general hospital: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Paola; Silvestri, Monica; Artoni, Cecilia; Di Lorenzo, Rosaria

    2016-01-01

    Background Workplace violence (WPV) against health professionals is a global problem with an increasing incidence. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to examine the frequency and characteristics of WPV in different settings and professionals of a general hospital and 2) to identify the clinical and organizational factors related to this phenomenon. Methods The study was cross-sectional. In a 1-month period, we administered the “Violent Incident Form” to 745 professionals (physicians, head nurses, nurses, nursing assistants), who worked in 15 wards of a general hospital in northern Italy. Results With a response rate of 56%, 45% of professionals reported WPV. The most frequently assaulted were nurses (67%), followed by nursing assistants (18%) and physicians (12%). The first two categories were correlated, in a statistically significant way, with the risk of WPV (P=0.005, P=0.004, multiple logistic regression). The violent incidents more frequently occurred in psychiatry department (86%), emergency department (71%), and in geriatric wards (57%). The assailants more frequently were males whereas assaulted professionals more often were females. Men committed physical violence more frequently than women, in a statistically significant way (P=0.034, chi-squared test). Verbal violence (51%) was often committed by people in a lucid and normal state of consciousness; physical violence (49%) was most often perpetrated by assailants affected by dementia, mental retardation, drug and substance abuse, or other psychiatric disorders. The variables positively related to WPV were “calling for help during the attack” and “physical injuries suffered in violent attack” (P=0.02, P=0.03, multiple logistic regression). Conclusion This study suggests that violence is a significant phenomenon and that all health workers, especially nurses, are at risk of suffering aggressive assaults. WPV presented specific characteristics related to the health care settings, where

  8. Structured sedation programs in the emergency department, hospital and other acute settings: protocol for systematic review of effects and events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Siobhán; Wakai, Abel; Blackburn, Carol; Barrett, Michael; Murphy, Adrian; Brenner, Maria; Larkin, Philip; Crispino-O'Connell, Gloria; Ratnapalan, Savithiri; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2013-10-01

    The use of procedural sedation outside the operating theatre has increased in hospital settings and has gained popularity among non-anesthesiologists. Sedative agents used for procedural pain, although effective, also pose significant risks to the patient if used incorrectly. There is currently no universally accepted program of education for practitioners using or introducing procedural sedation into their practice. There is emerging literature identifying structured procedural sedation programs (PSPs) as a method of ensuring a standardized level of competency among staff and reducing risks to the patient. We hypothesize that programs of education for healthcare professionals using procedural sedation outside the operating theatre are beneficial in improving patient care, safety, practitioner competence and reducing adverse event rates. Electronic databases will be systematically searched for studies (randomized and non-randomized) examining the effectiveness of structured PSPs from 1966 to present. Database searches will be supplemented by contact with experts, reference and citation checking, and a grey literature search. No language restriction will be imposed. Screening of titles and abstracts, and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. All disagreements will be resolved by discussion with an independent third party. Data analysis will be completed adhering to procedures outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. If the data allows, a meta-analysis will be performed. This review will cohere evidence on the effectiveness of structured PSPs on sedation events and patient outcomes within the hospital and other acute care settings. In addition, it will examine key components identified within a PSP associated with patient safety and improved patient outcomes. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013003851.

  9. Development of Hospital-based Data Sets as a Vehicle for Implementation of a National Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keikha, Leila; Farajollah, Seyede Sedigheh Seied; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar

    2018-01-01

    In developing countries such as Iran, international standards offer good sources to survey and use for appropriate planning in the domain of electronic health records (EHRs). Therefore, in this study, HL7 and ASTM standards were considered as the main sources from which to extract EHR data. The objective of this study was to propose a hospital data set for a national EHR consisting of data classes and data elements by adjusting data sets extracted from the standards and paper-based records. This comparative study was carried out in 2017 by studying the contents of the paper-based records approved by the health ministry in Iran and the international ASTM and HL7 standards in order to extract a minimum hospital data set for a national EHR. As a result of studying the standards and paper-based records, a total of 526 data elements in 174 classes were extracted. An examination of the data indicated that the highest number of extracted data came from the free text elements, both in the paper-based records and in the standards related to the administrative data. The major sources of data extracted from ASTM and HL7 were the E1384 and Hl7V.x standards, respectively. In the paper-based records, data were extracted from 19 forms sporadically. By declaring the confidentiality of information, the ASTM standards acknowledge the issue of confidentiality of information as one of the main challenges of EHR development, and propose new types of admission, such as teleconference, tele-video, and home visit, which are inevitable with the advent of new technology for providing healthcare and treating diseases. Data related to finance and insurance, which were scattered in different categories by three organizations, emerged as the financial category. Documenting the role and responsibility of the provider by adding the authenticator/signature data element was deemed essential. Not only using well-defined and standardized data, but also adapting EHR systems to the local facilities and

  10. Workplace violence in different settings and among various health professionals in an Italian general hospital: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferri P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paola Ferri,1 Monica Silvestri,1 Cecilia Artoni,2 Rosaria Di Lorenzo3 1Department of Diagnostic, Clinical and Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing, 2School of Psychiatry, University of Modena and Reggio, 3Department of Mental Health, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment, Modena, Italy Background: Workplace violence (WPV against health professionals is a global problem with an increasing incidence. The aims of this study were as follows: 1 to examine the frequency and characteristics of WPV in different settings and professionals of a general hospital and 2 to identify the clinical and organizational factors related to this phenomenon. Methods: The study was cross-sectional. In a 1-month period, we administered the “Violent Incident Form” to 745 professionals (physicians, head nurses, nurses, nursing assistants, who worked in 15 wards of a general hospital in northern Italy. Results: With a response rate of 56%, 45% of professionals reported WPV. The most frequently assaulted were nurses (67%, followed by nursing assistants (18% and physicians (12%. The first two categories were correlated, in a statistically significant way, with the risk of WPV (P=0.005, P=0.004, multiple logistic regression. The violent incidents more frequently occurred in psychiatry department (86%, emergency department (71%, and in geriatric wards (57%. The assailants more frequently were males whereas assaulted professionals more often were females. Men committed physical violence more frequently than women, in a statistically significant way (P=0.034, chi-squared test. Verbal violence (51% was often committed by people in a lucid and normal state of consciousness; physical violence (49% was most often perpetrated by assailants affected by dementia, mental retardation, drug and substance abuse, or other psychiatric disorders. The variables positively related to WPV were “calling for help during the attack” and “physical injuries suffered in violent

  11. National Hospital Discharge Survey: 2002 annual summary with detailed diagnosis and procedure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Lola J; Owings, Maria F; Hall, Margaret J

    2005-03-01

    This report presents 2002 national estimates and selected trend data on the use of non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the United States. Estimates are provided by selected patient and hospital characteristics, diagnoses, and surgical and nonsurgical procedures performed. Estimates of diagnoses and procedures are presented according to International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. The estimates are based on data collected through the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The survey has been conducted annually since 1965. In 2002, data were collected for approximately 327,000 discharges. Of the 474 eligible non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the sample, 445 (94 percent) responded to the survey. An estimated 33.7 million inpatients were discharged from non-Federal short-stay hospitals in 2002. They used 164.2 million days of care and had an average length of stay of 4.9 days. Common first-listed discharge diagnoses included delivery, ischemic heart disease, psychoses, pneumonia, and malignant neoplasms. Inpatients had 6.8 million cardiovascular procedures and 6.6 million obstetric procedures. Males had higher rates for cardiac procedures such as cardiac catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft, but males and females had similar rates of pacemaker procedures. The number and rate of all cesarean deliveries, primary and repeat, rose from 1995 to 2002; the rate of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery dropped from 35.5 in 1995 to 15.8 in 2002.

  12. Serving high-risk foods in a high-risk setting: survey of hospital food service practices after an outbreak of listeriosis in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokes, Carolyn; France, Anne Marie; Reddy, Vasudha; Hanson, Heather; Lee, Lillian; Kornstein, Laura; Stavinsky, Faina; Balter, Sharon

    2011-04-01

    Prepared ready-to-eat salads and ready-to-eat delicatessen-style meats present a high risk for Listeria contamination. Because no foodborne illness risk management guidelines exist specifically for US hospitals, a survey of New York City (NYC) hospitals was conducted to characterize policies and practices after a listeriosis outbreak occurred in a NYC hospital. From August through October 2008, a listeriosis outbreak in a NYC hospital was investigated. From February through April 2009, NYC's 61 acute-care hospitals were asked to participate in a telephone survey regarding food safety practices and policies, specifically service of high-risk foods to patients at increased risk for listeriosis. Five patients with medical conditions that put them at high risk for listeriosis had laboratory-confirmed Listeria monocytogenes infection. The Listeria outbreak strain was isolated from tuna salad prepared in the hospital. Fifty-four (89%) of 61 hospitals responded to the survey. Overall, 81% of respondents reported serving ready-to-eat deli meats to patients, and 100% reported serving prepared ready-to-eat salads. Pregnant women, patients receiving immunosuppressive drugs, and patients undergoing chemotherapy were served ready-to-eat deli meats at 77%, 59%, and 49% of hospitals, respectively, and were served prepared ready-to-eat salads at 94%, 89%, and 73% of hospitals, respectively. Only 4 (25%) of 16 respondents reported having a policy that ready-to-eat deli meats must be heated until steaming hot before serving. Despite the potential for severe outcomes of Listeria infection among hospitalized patients, the majority of NYC hospitals had no food preparation policies to minimize risk. Hospitals should implement policies to avoid serving high-risk foods to patients at risk for listeriosis.

  13. Complementary alternative medicine use among patients with dengue fever in the hospital setting: a cross-sectional study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, SiewMooi; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Gew, Lai Teck; Lim, Sazlyna Mohd Sazlly; Sulaiman, Wan Aliaa Wan; Foo, Yoke Loong; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Samsudin, Nurul Huda; Lau, Paul Chih Ming Chih; Veettil, Sajesh K; Hoo, Fankee

    2016-01-29

    In Malaysia, the number of reported cases of dengue fever demonstrates an increasing trend. Since dengue fever has no vaccine or antiviral treatment available, it has become a burden. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become one of the good alternatives to treat the patients with dengue fever. There is limited study on the use of CAM among patients with dengue fever, particularly in hospital settings. This study aims to determine the prevalence, types, reasons, expenditure, and resource of information on CAM use among patients with dengue fever. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 306 patients with dengue fever, which was carried out at the dengue clinic of three hospitals. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics version 21.0 and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with CAM use. The prevalence of CAM use was 85.3% among patients with dengue fever. The most popular CAMs were isotonic drinks (85.8%), crab soup (46.7%) and papaya leaf extract (22.2%). The most common reason for CAM use was a good impression of CAM from other CAM users (33.3%). The main resource of information on CAM use among patients with dengue fever was family (54.8%). In multiple logistic regression analysis, dengue fever patients with a tertiary level are more likely to use CAM 5.8 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.62-20.45) and 3.8 (95% CI 1.12-12.93) times than secondary level and primary and below respectively. CAM was commonly used by patients with dengue fever. The predictor of CAM use was a higher level of education.

  14. Esophagus and contralateral lung-sparing IMRT for locally advanced lung cancer in the community hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny eKao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal technique for performing lung IMRT remains poorly defined. We hypothesize that improved dose distributions associated with normal tissue sparing IMRT can allow for safe dose escalation resulting in decreased acute and late toxicity. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 consecutive lung cancer patients treated with curative intent from 1/10 to 9/14. From 1/10 to 4/12, 44 patients were treated with the community standard of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or IMRT without specific esophagus or contralateral lung constraints (standard RT. From 5/12 to 9/14, 38 patients were treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT with selective sparing of contralateral lung and esophagus. The study endpoints were dosimetry, toxicity and overall survival.Results: Despite higher mean prescribed radiation doses in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT cohort (64.5 Gy vs. 60.8 Gy, p=0.04, patients treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT had significantly lower lung V20, V10, V5, mean lung, maximum esophagus and mean esophagus doses compared to patients treated with standard RT (p≤0.001. Patients in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT group had reduced acute grade ≥3 esophagitis (0% vs. 11%, p<0.001, acute grade ≥2 weight loss (2% vs. 16%, p=0.04, late grade ≥2 pneumonitis (7% vs. 21%, p=0.02. The 2-year overall survival was 52% with normal tissue-sparing IMRT arm compared to 28% for standard RT (p=0.015.Conclusion: These data provide proof of principle that suboptimal radiation dose distributions are associated with significant acute and late lung and esophageal toxicity that may result in hospitalization or even premature mortality. Strict attention to contralateral lung and esophageal dose volume constraints are feasible in the community hospital setting without sacrificing disease control.

  15. Getting evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention into practice: a process evaluation of a multifaceted intervention in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sving, Eva; Fredriksson, Lennart; Gunningberg, Lena; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta

    2017-10-01

    To describe registered nurses', assistant nurses' and first-line managers' experiences and perceptions of a multifaceted hospital setting intervention focused on implementing evidence-based pressure ulcer prevention. Pressure ulcer prevention is deficient. Different models exist to support implementation of evidence-based care. Little is known about implementation processes. A descriptive qualitative approach. Five focus-group nurse interviews and five individual first-line manager interviews were conducted at five Swedish hospital units. Qualitative content analysis was used. The findings support that the intervention and the implementation process changed the understanding and way of working with pressure ulcer prevention: from treating to preventing. This became possible as 'Changed understanding enables changed actions - through one's own performance and reflection on pressure ulcer prevention'. Having a common outlook on pressure ulcer prevention, easy access to pressure-reducing equipment, and external and internal facilitator support were described as important factors for changed practices. Bedside support, feedback and discussions on current results increased the awareness of needed improvements. The multifaceted intervention approach and the participants' positive attitudes seemed to be crucial for changing understanding and working more preventatively. The strategies used and the skills of the facilitators need to be tailored to the problems surrounding the context. Feedback discussions among the staff regarding the results of the care provided also appear to be vital. It is crucial that dedicated facilitators are involved to promote the implementation process. A preventative mindset should be strived for. Creating an implementation plan with an outcome and a process evaluation should be emphasised. It is important to give the staff regular feedback on the quality of care and on those occasions allocate time for discussion and reflection. © 2016 John

  16. Gloves, gowns and masks for reducing the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Alcalde, Jesús; Mateos-Mazón, Marta; Guevara, Marcela; Conterno, Lucieni O; Solà, Ivan; Cabir Nunes, Sheila; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2015-07-16

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; also known as methicillin-resistant S aureus) is a common hospital-acquired pathogen that increases morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Its control continues to be an unresolved issue in many hospitals worldwide. The evidence base for the effects of the use of gloves, gowns or masks as control measures for MRSA is unclear. To assess the effectiveness of wearing gloves, a gown or a mask when contact is anticipated with a hospitalised patient colonised or infected with MRSA, or with the patient's immediate environment. We searched the Specialised Registers of three Cochrane Groups (Wounds Group on 5 June 2015; Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group on 9 July 2013; and Infectious Diseases Group on 5 January 2009); CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6); DARE, HTA, NHS EED, and the Methodology Register (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6); MEDLINE and MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations (1946 to June week 1 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 4 June 2015); Web of Science (WOS) Core Collection (from inception to 7 June 2015); CINAHL (1982 to 5 June 2015); British Nursing Index (1985 to 6 July 2010); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database (1639 to 11 June 2015). We also searched three trials registers (on 6 June 2015), references list of articles, and conference proceedings. We finally contacted relevant individuals for additional studies. Studies assessing the effects on MRSA transmission of the use of gloves, gowns or masks by any person in the hospital setting when contact is anticipated with a hospitalised patient colonised or infected with MRSA, or with the patient's immediate environment. We did not assess adverse effects or economic issues associated with these interventions.We considered any comparator to be eligible. With regard to study design, only randomised controlled trials (clustered or not) and the following non-randomised experimental studies were eligible: quasi

  17. Epidemiology and treatment of mood disorders in a day hospital setting from 1996 to 2007: an Italian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Luca,1 Giuseppa Prossimo,1 Vincenzo Messina,1 Antonina Luca,2 Salvatore Romeo,1 Carmela Calandra11Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, 2Department of Neuroscience, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, ItalyBackground: The present study aimed: to assess prescribing patterns in the treatment of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, and dysthymia from 1996 to 2007 in a day hospital setting; to evaluate the prevalence of the above-mentioned mood disorders and gender distribution; and to relate familiality, comorbidity, and marital status to each diagnosis.Methods: Medical records for 777 day hospital patients with a diagnosis of major depression, bipolar disorder type I, cyclothymia, or dysthymia were grouped into two 6-year periods so as to compare the prescribing patterns of tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers. Gender, prevalence, familiality, comorbidity, and marital status were related to each diagnosis.Results: The most common mood disorder, with a female preponderance, was major depression, regardless of marital status. High percentages of familiality and comorbidity were found for major depression, while a reduction was found in the utilization of tricyclic antidepressants. There was no statistically significant difference in rates of prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, but some irregularities were found upon evaluating each diagnosis (eg, increased utilization of these agents in dysthymia and major depression, respectively. There was an increase in prescriptions for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, but no marked differences in

  18. 'I do the best I can': an in-depth exploration of the aphasia management pathway in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Abby M; Worrall, Linda E; Rose, Miranda L; O'Halloran, Robyn

    2016-09-01

    While research has begun to explore the management of aphasia across the continuum of care, to date there is little in-depth, context specific knowledge relating to the speech pathology aphasia management pathway. This research aimed to provide an in-depth understanding of the current aphasia management pathway in the acute hospital setting, from the perspective of speech pathologists. Underpinned by a social constructivist paradigm, the researchers implemented an interpretive phenomenological method when conducting in-depth interviews with 14 Australian speech pathologists working in the acute hospital setting. Interview transcripts and interviewer field notes were subjected to a qualitative content analysis. Analysis identified a single guiding construct and five main categories to describe the management of aphasia in the acute hospital setting. The guiding construct, First contact with the profession, informed the entire management pathway. Five additional main categories were identified: Referral processes; Screening and assessment; Therapeutic intervention; Educational and affective counselling; and Advocacy. Findings suggest significant diversity in the pathways of care for people with aphasia and their families in the acute hospital setting. Additional support mechanisms are required in order to support speech pathologists to minimise the evidence-practice gap. Implications for Rehabilitation Significant diversity exists in the current aphasia management pathway for people with acute post-stroke aphasia and their families in the acute hospital setting. Mechanisms that support speech pathologists to minimise the evidence-practice gap, and consequently reduce their sense of professional dissonance, are required.

  19. Insights about the process and impact of implementing nursing guidelines on delivery of care in hospitals and community settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploeg Jenny

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the impact of implementing nursing-oriented best practice guidelines on the delivery of patient care in either hospital or community settings. Methods A naturalistic study with a prospective, before and after design documented the implementation of six newly developed nursing best practice guidelines (asthma, breastfeeding, delirium-dementia-depression (DDD, foot complications in diabetes, smoking cessation and venous leg ulcers. Eleven health care organisations were selected for a one-year project. At each site, clinical resource nurses (CRNs worked with managers and a multidisciplinary steering committee to conduct an environmental scan and develop an action plan of activities (i.e. education sessions, policy review. Process and patient outcomes were assessed by chart audit (n = 681 pre-implementation, 592 post-implementation. Outcomes were also assessed for four of six topics by in-hospital/home interviews (n = 261 pre-implementation, 232 post-implementation and follow-up telephone interviews (n = 152 pre, 121 post. Interviews were conducted with 83/95 (87% CRN's, nurses and administrators to describe recommendations selected, strategies used and participants' perceived facilitators and barriers to guideline implementation. Results While statistically significant improvements in 5% to 83% of indicators were observed in each organization, more than 80% of indicators for breastfeeding, DDD and smoking cessation did not change. Statistically significant improvements were found in > 50% of indicators for asthma (52%, diabetes foot care (83% and venous leg ulcers (60%. Organizations with > 50% improvements reported two unique implementation strategies which included hands-on skill practice sessions for nurses and the development of new patient education materials. Key facilitators for all organizations included education sessions as well as support from champions and managers while key barriers were lack

  20. Comparison of the prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory infections at different hospital settings in North China, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxing; Xie, Zhengde; Zhang, Tiegang; Lu, Yanqin; Fan, Hongwei; Yang, Donghong; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe; Shen, Kunling; Huang, Fang; Han, Jinxiang; Li, Taisheng; Gao, Zhancheng; Ren, Lili; Wang, Jianwei

    2018-02-08

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are a great public health challenge globally. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with ARIs attending at different hospital settings is fully undetermined. Laboratory-based surveillance for ARIs was conducted at inpatient and outpatient settings of 11 hospitals in North China. The first 2-5 patients with ARIs were recruited in each hospital weekly from 2012 through 2015. The presence of respiratory viruses was screened by PCR assays. The prevalence of respiratory viruses was determined and compared between patients at different hospital settings. A total of 3487 hospitalized cases and 6437 outpatients/Emergency Department (ED) patients were enrolled. The most commonly detected viruses in the hospitalized cases were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 33.3%) in children less than two years old, adenoviruses (13.0%) in patients 15-34 years old, and influenza viruses (IFVs, 9.6%) in patients ≥65 years. IFVs were the most common virus in outpatient/ED patients across all age groups (22.7%). After controlling for the confounders caused by other viruses and covariates, adenoviruses (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97, 99% confidence interval [99% CI]: 2.19-7.20) and RSV (aOR: 2.04, 99% CI: 1.34-3.11) were independently associated with increased hospitalization in children, as well as adenoviruses in adults (aOR: 2.14, 99% CI: 1.19-3.85). Additionally, co-infection of RSV with IFVs was associated with increased hospitalization in children (aOR: 12.20, 99% CI: 2.65-56.18). A substantial proportion of ARIs was associated with respiratory viruses in North China. RSV, adenoviruses, and co-infection of RSV and IFVs were more frequent in hospitalized children (or adenoviruses in adults), which might predict the severity of ARIs. Attending clinicians should be more vigilant of these infections.

  1. [Interdisciplinary pain assessment in the hospital setting : Merely a door-opener to multimodal pain therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, E; Mothes-Lasch, M; Lutz, J F

    2017-12-01

    Chronic pain is characterized by a complex interaction of somatic, mental and social factors. Assessing these factors in patients with chronic pain is vital during the diagnostic work-up and when making a structured treatment plan. Interdisciplinary pain assessment (ISA) is the most promising method to deal with these challenges. This article presents our experience in performing pain assessments in the hospital setting and also illustrates the characteristic features of chronic pain patients undergoing such assessments. This study reviews and evaluates patient data from 2704 ISAs performed at the Interdisciplinary Pain Centre of the Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany, between 2008 and 2015. The majority of our ISA patients are severely handicapped and show distinct signs of chronic disease. A large proportion of patients is either unable to work or receiving benefits (invalidity pension or retirement pension). In addition, patients reported long disease durations and high emotional distress. Treatment recommendations were based on the patients' individual clinical presentations and examination results. More than half of the patients required multimodal pain management, while adjustments or therapeutic withdrawal of pain medications, in particular of opioids, were indicated in many patients. Our study shows that ISA enables fast, high-quality diagnostic assessments of chronic pain while taking the biopsychosocial model of pain in particular into account. In addition, ISA is not biased with regard to outcome results and recommends the further treatment that appears best for the individual patient. ISA leads not only to inpatient treatment, but also to treatment in other therapeutic settings and, as such, is not merely a door-opener to multimodal pain therapy.

  2. Time and cost analysis: pediatric dental rehabilitation with general anesthesia in the office and the hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board-approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36-60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P average total time (anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance.

  3. Implementation and evaluation of a peer review process for advanced practice nurses in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergum, Shelly K; Canaan, Talitha; Delemos, Christi; Gall, Elizabeth Funke; McCracken, Bonnie; Rowen, Dave; Salvemini, Steve; Wiens, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    Over the past decade, implementation of the peer review process for the development of the advanced practice nurse (APN) has been emphasized. However, little exists in the literature regarding APN peer review. The peer review process is intended to help demonstrate competency of care, enhance quality improvement measures, and foster the professional growth of the APN. APNs serving on a professional governance council within a university teaching hospital developed a model of peer review for APNs. Nine months after the tool was implemented, an anonymous follow-up survey was conducted. A follow-up request was sent 4 weeks later to increase the number of respondents. Likert scales were used to elicit subjective data regarding the process. Of 81 APNs who participated in the survey, more than half (52%) felt that the process would directly improve their professional practice. Survey results show that the peer review process affected APN professional practice positively. Additional research might include pathways for remediation and education of staff, evaluation of alternate methods to improve application to clinical practice, and collection of outcome data. The models presented provide a foundation for future refinement to accommodate different APN practice settings. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. Entry into Nursing: An Ethnographic Study of Newly Qualified Nurses Taking on the Nursing Role in a Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Skancke Bjerknes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition from student to working nurse has long been recognized as challenging. This paper presents the findings of research into the opportunities and limitations encountered by newly qualified nurses when taking on the nursing role. The study had an ethnographic design. Observation, interviews, and document analysis were used to gain insight into nurses' daily work from the perspective of recently graduated nurses. Thirteen nurses were monitored closely during their first year in a hospital setting in Norway. These new nurses generally entered the field with empathy for their patients, enthusiasm for the profession, and readiness to learn more about being a good nurse. However, their more experienced colleagues seemed to neither respect nor nurture this attitude. The new nurses experienced heavier responsibilities than expected, fragmentation of patient care, and stressful interactions with colleagues. The lack of a supportive work environment and role models increased the new nurses' experience of overwhelming responsibility in their daily work situations. The nurses learned to cope the hard way, despite the organizational culture, not because of it. Adjusting the profession's expectations of new nurses, and offering good role models and more comprehensive support programmes, would markedly ease the transition for new nurses.

  5. High prevalence of missed opportunities for secondary fracture prevention in a regional general hospital setting in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Linsey; Reddy, Saripalli K; Alsuwaigh, Rayan; Khoo, Joan; King, Thomas F J

    2017-12-01

    This study aims at assessing the gap in secondary fracture prevention at a regional general hospital setting in Singapore. Male patients have significantly lower rate of being investigated and treated for osteoporosis than their female counterparts. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in our population. Secondary fracture prevention services are not routine in Singapore; we seek to assess the treatment gap that exists in the lack of diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in fragility fracture patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of all admissions for fragility fractures between December 2013 and December 2014. Demographic data, rates of BMD performance, serum vitamin D investigation and calcium and vitamin D supplementation as well as antiresorptive initiation 1 year post admission were analysed. There were 125 fragility fractures in patients below 65 and 615 fractures in older patients. There was a slightly higher proportion of males in the younger population, whereas females predominated in the older population. Median vitamin D levels were low in both younger (19.1 μg/L) and older (22.0 μg/L) groups, but supplementation was lower in younger patients (4.8 versus 16.6%, p = 0.003). Rate of BMD performance was lower in younger patients (34.4 versus 64.6%, p Singapore. Male osteoporosis remains inadequately investigated and treated in both age groups.

  6. Antenatal maternal education for improving postnatal perineal healing for women who have birthed in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Sonia M; Moore, Zena Eh

    2017-12-04

    The female perineum becomes suffused and stretched during pregnancy, and further strain during vaginal childbirth contributes to approximately 85% of women experiencing some degree of trauma to the perineal region. Multiple factors play a role in the type and severity of trauma experienced, including parity, delivery method, and local practices. There is ongoing debate about best midwifery practice to reduce perineal trauma. Once perineal trauma has occurred, treatment also varies greatly, depending on its degree and severity, local practice and customs, and personal preference. In order to optimise wound-healing outcomes, it is important that wounds are assessed and managed in an appropriate and timely manner. A perineal wound may cause significant physical and/or psychological impact in the short or long term, however little evidence is available on this subject.Antenatal education serves to prepare women and their partners for pregnancy, delivery and the postpartum period. The delivery of this education varies widely in type, content, and nature. This review examined antenatal education which is specifically tailored towards perineal care and wound healing in the postnatal period via formal channels. Appropriate patient education positively impacts on wound-healing rates and compliance with wound care. Risk factors that contribute to the breakdown of wounds and poor healing rates may be addressed antenatally in order to optimise postnatal wound healing. It is important to assess whether or not antenatal wound-care education positively affects perineal healing, in order to empower women to incorporate best practice, evidence-based treatment with this important aspect of self-care in the immediate postnatal period. To evaluate the effects of antenatal education on perineal wound healing in postnatal women who have birthed in a hospital setting, and who have experienced a break in the skin of the perineum as a result of a tear or episiotomy, or both. We searched

  7. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed.

  8. The value of multimodality imaging in the investigation of a PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy in the Irish hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, L C; Inder, S; Moran, D; O'Rourke, C; Manecksha, R P; Lynch, T H

    2018-02-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of a PSA recurrence after RP in the Irish hospital setting involves multimodality imaging with MRI, CT, and bone scanning, despite the low diagnostic yield from imaging at low PSA levels. We aim to investigate the value of multimodality imaging in PC patients after RP with a PSA recurrence. Forty-eight patients with a PSA recurrence after RP who underwent multimodality imaging were evaluated. Demographic data, postoperative PSA levels, and imaging studies performed at those levels were evaluated. Eight (21%) MRIs, 6 (33%) CTs, and 4 (9%) bone scans had PCa-specific findings. Three (12%) patients had a positive MRI with a PSA PSA ≥1.1 ng/ml (p = 0.05). Zero patient had a positive CT TAP at a PSA level PSA levels PSA levels PSA levels ≥1.1 ng/ml. MRI alone is of investigative value at PSA <1.0 ng/ml. The indication for CT, MRI, or isotope bone scanning should be carefully correlated with the clinical question and how it will affect further management.

  9. Urban Rural Comparisons of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Burden among Adolescent Girls in a Hospital Setting in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS is a multifaceted disorder characterized by varying clinical presentations. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine urban and rural differences in the burden of polycystic ovarian syndrome among Indian adolescent females aged 12 to 19 years. Methods. A pilot cross-sectional study was conducted for a period of one month (August-September 2013 at Balaji Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India. The final sample included 126 study participants located in various urban (50%, n=63 and rural (50%, n=63 settings. Information was gathered on sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics, clinical history, occurrence of acne and hirsutism, serum testosterone levels, obstetric history, family history of chronic diseases, menstrual history, physical activity, and dietary intake. Results. Eighteen percent of the participants were confirmed of having PCOS by recent guidelines of Rotterdam Consensus for adolescent diagnosis of PCOS (presence of all three elements. Majority of the individuals with PCOS had an average age of 16 (SD = 2 (P=.02 years with an average age of menarche 12 years (SD = 1. Conclusion. The proportion of participants diagnosed with PCOS was higher among urban participants in comparison to rural participants.

  10. Self-efficacy scale for the establishment of good relationships with families in neonatal and pediatric hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cascaes Cruz

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy Scale for the Establishment of Good Relationships with Families in Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital Settings. METHOD Methodological study grounded on self-efficacy theory was conducted in three phases: conceptual and operational definition (review of the literature and interviews with the target population, content validity (opinion of five experts e three clinical nurses, and exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability (cross-sectional survey with a valid sample of 194 nurses. RESULTS A ten-point Likert scale with 40-item was designed and one item was excluded after review by experts. Three factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha for all items was 0.983 with item-total correlations in the range 0.657 to 0.847. Cronbach's alpha value if item deleted were less than or equal to 0.983. CONCLUSION The final version of the scale demonstrated psychometric adequacy. It is a useful tool to be administered in the clinical, educational and research nursing fields to measure nurses’ self-efficacy beliefs concerning the establishment of good relationships with families.

  11. The cost utility of a multi-disciplinary foot protection clinic (MDFPC) in an Irish hospital setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, G J

    2012-04-21

    BACKGROUND: Foot ulceration which may result in lower limb amputation is one of the most feared complications among patients with diabetes and the prevention of both ulceration and amputation is a major challenge facing the health service. Many studies have proposed dedicated diabetic foot teams as the future of diabetic foot care. AIMS: We aimed to quantify the cost benefit and sustainability of a multi-disciplinary foot protection clinic (MDFPC) in an Irish university hospital setting. METHODS: A dedicated bi-weekly consultant-led MDFPC including Vascular Surgery, Endocrinology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Podiatry, Orthotics and Tissue Viability was established in June 2008. RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 221 lower limb procedures (major\\/minor amputations and debridement) were performed. The number of major amputations decreased from 12 during the control period (2 years before the clinic) to 7 in the study period (2 years after the clinic). After costing all activity associated with the clinic, there was an overall saving of 114,063 per year associated with the introduction of the MDFPC. CONCLUSION: This is the first study in an Irish context, and one of few international studies, to demonstrate that an aggressive-coordinated approach to diabetic foot care is both cost effective and clinically efficient in reducing the burden of foot-related complications in a diabetic population.

  12. Outcomes of scleral-sutured conventional and aniridia intraocular lens implantation performed in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockington, David; Ali, Noor Q; Al-Taie, Rasha; Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of transscleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) implantation. Public university hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrospective case series. A modified no-touch transscleral sutured PC IOL implantation technique with a 1-piece monofocal IOL (Alcon CZ70BD) or an aniridia IOL (type 67G, Morcher) was assessed. Seventy-eight cases (80.8% men; 53.9% aphakic) were identified. The mean follow-up was 35.5 months and the mean age at surgery, 41 years±21 (SD). The preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was worse than 6/30 in 66.7%. Indications included ocular trauma (46.2%), nontraumatic crystalline lens subluxation (16.7%), post-complicated cataract surgery (10.3%), idiopathic IOL dislocation (10.3%), and congenital cataract/aphakia (10.3%). An aniridia IOL was required in 39.7% of eyes. There were no significant intraoperative complications in 74.4% of eyes. Postoperative complications included transient corneal edema (15.4%), wound leak requiring resuturing (7.7%), retinal detachment (7.7%), and cystoid macular edema (6.4%). One eye (1.3%) developed suture breakage-related late IOL dislocation. Overall, 91.3% of eyes had improved visual acuity or were within 1 line of the presenting CDVA. In eyes with a guarded prognosis, 34.8% achieved a CDVA of 6/12 or better and 43.5% a CDVA of 6/15 to 6/48. In the better prognosis group, 73.9% achieved a CDVA of better than 6/12 and all achieved better than 6/30. Scleral-sutured IOLs achieved good visual outcomes in a public hospital setting. The rate of complications was moderate in this series with a high proportion of severe ocular trauma and a large percentage of aniridia IOLs. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comprehensive evaluation of electronic medical record system use and user satisfaction at five low-resource setting hospitals in ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Binyam; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-05-25

    Electronic medical record (EMR) systems are increasingly being implemented in hospitals of developing countries to improve patient care and clinical service. However, only limited evaluation studies are available concerning the level of adoption and determinant factors of success in those settings. The objective of this study was to assess the usage pattern, user satisfaction level, and determinants of health professional's satisfaction towards a comprehensive EMR system implemented in Ethiopia where parallel documentation using the EMR and the paper-based medical records is in practice. A quantitative, cross-sectional study design was used to assess the usage pattern, user satisfaction level, and determinant factors of an EMR system implemented in Ethiopia based on the DeLone and McLean model of information system success. Descriptive statistical methods were applied to analyze the data and a binary logistic regression model was used to identify determinant factors. Health professionals (N=422) from five hospitals were approached and 406 responded to the survey (96.2% response rate). Out of the respondents, 76.1% (309/406) started to use the system immediately after implementation and user training, but only 31.7% (98/309) of the professionals reported using the EMR during the study (after 3 years of implementation). Of the 12 core EMR functions, 3 were never used by most respondents, and they were also unaware of 4 of the core EMR functions. It was found that 61.4% (190/309) of the health professionals reported over all dissatisfaction with the EMR (median=4, interquartile range (IQR)=1) on a 5-level Likert scale. Physicians were more dissatisfied (median=5, IQR=1) when compared to nurses (median=4, IQR=1) and the health management information system (HMIS) staff (median=2, IQR=1). Of all the participants, 64.4% (199/309) believed that the EMR had no positive impact on the quality of care. The participants indicated an agreement with the system and information

  14. Physician perspectives on collaborative working relationships with team-based hospital pharmacists in the inpatient medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowsky, Mark J; Madill, Helen M; Schindel, Theresa J; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2013-04-01

    Collaborative care between physicians and pharmacists has the potential to improve the process of care and patient outcomes. Our objective was to determine whether team-based pharmacist care was associated with higher physician-rated collaborative working relationship scores than usual ward-based pharmacist care at the end of the COLLABORATE study, a 1 year, multicentre, controlled clinical trial, which associated pharmacist intervention with improved medication use and reduced hospital readmission rates. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all team-based and usual care physicians (attending physicians and medical residents) who worked on the participating clinical teaching unit or primary healthcare teams during the study period. They were invited to complete an online version of the validated Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration Index (PPCI) survey at the end of the study. The main endpoint of interest was the mean total PPCI score. Only three (response rate 2%) of the usual care physicians responded and this prevented us from conducting pre-specified comparisons. A total of 23 team-based physicians completed the survey (36%) and reported a mean total PPCI score of 81.6 ± 8.6 out of a total of 92. Mean domain scores were highest for relationship initiation (14.0 ± 1.4 out of 15), and trustworthiness (38.9 ± 3.7 out of 42), followed by role specification (28.7 ± 4.3 out of 35). Pharmacists who are pursuing collaborative practice in inpatient settings may find the PPCI to be a meaningful tool to gauge the extent of collaborative working relationships with physician team members. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Intestinal parasitoses in a tertiary-care hospital located in a non-endemic setting during 2006–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of intestinal parasitoses during a 5-year period in patients attending a tertiary-care hospital in a non-endemic setting. Methods In the period 2006–2010, 15,752 samples from 8,886 patients with clinically suspected parasitosis were subjected to macroscopic and microscopic examination, to parasitic antigen detection assays, and to cultures for protozoa and nematodes. Real-time PCR assays for the differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar and for the detection of Dientamoeba fragilis were also used. A statistical analysis evaluating the demographic data of the patients with intestinal parasitic infections was performed. Results Intestinal parasitic infections were diagnosed in 1,477 patients (16.6% prevalence), mainly adults and immigrants from endemic areas for faecal-oral infections; protozoa were detected in 93.4% and helminths in 6.6% of the cases, the latter especially in immigrants. Blastocystis hominis was the most common intestinal protozoan, and G. intestinalis was the most frequently detected among pathogenic protozoa, prevalent in immigrants, males, and pediatric patients. Both single (77.9%) and mixed (22.1%) parasitic infections were observed, the latter prevalent in immigrants. Conclusions Despite the importance of the knowledge about the epidemiology of intestinal parasitoses in order to adopt appropriate control measures and adequate patient care all over the world, data regarding industrialized countries are rarely reported in the literature. The data presented in this study indicate that intestinal parasitic infections are frequently diagnosed in our laboratory and could make a contribution to stimulate the attention by physicians working in non-endemic areas on the importance of suspecting intestinal parasitoses. PMID:24886502

  16. Intestinal parasitoses in a tertiary-care hospital located in a non-endemic setting during 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Adriana; Montecchini, Sara; Rossi, Sabina; Gorrini, Chiara; De Conto, Flora; Medici, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina

    2014-05-16

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of intestinal parasitoses during a 5-year period in patients attending a tertiary-care hospital in a non-endemic setting. In the period 2006-2010, 15,752 samples from 8,886 patients with clinically suspected parasitosis were subjected to macroscopic and microscopic examination, to parasitic antigen detection assays, and to cultures for protozoa and nematodes. Real-time PCR assays for the differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar and for the detection of Dientamoeba fragilis were also used.A statistical analysis evaluating the demographic data of the patients with intestinal parasitic infections was performed. Intestinal parasitic infections were diagnosed in 1,477 patients (16.6% prevalence), mainly adults and immigrants from endemic areas for faecal-oral infections; protozoa were detected in 93.4% and helminths in 6.6% of the cases, the latter especially in immigrants. Blastocystis hominis was the most common intestinal protozoan, and G. intestinalis was the most frequently detected among pathogenic protozoa, prevalent in immigrants, males, and pediatric patients. Both single (77.9%) and mixed (22.1%) parasitic infections were observed, the latter prevalent in immigrants. Despite the importance of the knowledge about the epidemiology of intestinal parasitoses in order to adopt appropriate control measures and adequate patient care all over the world, data regarding industrialized countries are rarely reported in the literature. The data presented in this study indicate that intestinal parasitic infections are frequently diagnosed in our laboratory and could make a contribution to stimulate the attention by physicians working in non-endemic areas on the importance of suspecting intestinal parasitoses.

  17. AMTA Monograph Series. Effective Clinical Practice in Music Therapy Medical Music Therapy for Pediatrics in Hospital Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The impact of hospitalization on children and their families is becoming more clearly understood in today's changing healthcare environment. Pediatric inpatient services are focused on children with more critical illnesses, shorter hospital stays, and a culture of family-centered care. This publication clearly exemplifies the role of music…

  18. The patient experience of patient-centered communication with nurses in the hospital setting: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Stephanie; Jordan, Zoe

    2015-01-01

    care. However, current methods used to collect and use information from patients about their care is often retrospective, provides inadequate real time data and is not effective in creating action to produce change at the individual patient level. Methods which focus on including the patient and their information in real-time are considered by many to be crucial to the advancement of improved health outcomes and the reduced costs that are required of health care to be sustainable. One such method is patient-centered communication.The nurse-patient interaction is a core component of nursing science and high quality nursing care. Fleisher et al. contend that 'the main intention of communication and interaction, in the health setting, is to influence the patient's health status or state of well-being'. As a profession, nursing predominately requires communicating with, and relating to, patients at the individual level. In the hospital setting nurses undertake many of their patient related duties in a face-to-face manner with the patient at the bedside and these moments can facilitate effective interaction to occur between the nurse and the patient, which is patient-centered. McCabe et al. state that patient-centered communication as "defined by Langewitz et al. as 'communication that invites and encourages the patient to participate and negotiate in decision-making regarding their own care'.''However, qualitative studies by McCabe and Wellard et al, highlighted that nurses interact with patients only when performing administrative or functional activities and nursing 'practice was predominately task-orientated'. The outcome of these studies are supported by Maurer et al. in their report on the tools and strategies available to support patient and family engagement in the hospital setting. Maurer et al. identified that current strategies 'are not attuned to patient and family member experiences of hospitalization' and that most tools and strategies were 'more reflective of

  19. Development and validation of a Hospital Frailty Risk Score focusing on older people in acute care settings using electronic hospital records: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Thomas; Neuburger, Jenny; Kraindler, Joshua; Keeble, Eilis; Smith, Paul; Ariti, Cono; Arora, Sandeepa; Street, Andrew; Parker, Stuart; Roberts, Helen C; Bardsley, Martin; Conroy, Simon

    2018-05-05

    Older people are increasing users of health care globally. We aimed to establish whether older people with characteristics of frailty and who are at risk of adverse health-care outcomes could be identified using routinely collected data. A three-step approach was used to develop and validate a Hospital Frailty Risk Score from International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) diagnostic codes. First, we carried out a cluster analysis to identify a group of older people (≥75 years) admitted to hospital who had high resource use and diagnoses associated with frailty. Second, we created a Hospital Frailty Risk Score based on ICD-10 codes that characterised this group. Third, in separate cohorts, we tested how well the score predicted adverse outcomes and whether it identified similar groups as other frailty tools. In the development cohort (n=22 139), older people with frailty diagnoses formed a distinct group and had higher non-elective hospital use (33·6 bed-days over 2 years compared with 23·0 bed-days for the group with the next highest number of bed-days). In the national validation cohort (n=1 013 590), compared with the 429 762 (42·4%) patients with the lowest risk scores, the 202 718 (20·0%) patients with the highest Hospital Frailty Risk Scores had increased odds of 30-day mortality (odds ratio 1·71, 95% CI 1·68-1·75), long hospital stay (6·03, 5·92-6·10), and 30-day readmission (1·48, 1·46-1·50). The c statistics (ie, model discrimination) between individuals for these three outcomes were 0·60, 0·68, and 0·56, respectively. The Hospital Frailty Risk Score showed fair overlap with dichotomised Fried and Rockwood scales (kappa scores 0·22, 95% CI 0·15-0·30 and 0·30, 0·22-0·38, respectively) and moderate agreement with the Rockwood Frailty Index (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0·41, 95% CI 0·38-0·47). The Hospital Frailty Risk Score provides hospitals and health

  20. Health care staffs’ perception of patient safety culture in hospital settings and factors of importance for this

    OpenAIRE

    Nordin, Anna; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Nordström, Gun

    2013-01-01

    Vitenskapelig, fagfellevurdert artikkel Many hospital patients are affected by adverse events. Managers are important when improving safety. The perception of patient safety culture varies among health care staff. Health care staff (n = 1023) working in medical, surgical or mixed medical-surgical health care divisions answered the 51 items (14 dimensions) Swedish Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (S-HSOPSC). Respondents with a managerial func- tion scored higher than non-managers f...

  1. Perceptions of organizational justice among nurses working in university hospitals of shiraz: a comparison between general and specialty settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Nahid; Fardid, Mozhgan; Kavosi, Zahra

    2013-12-01

    Justice has gained much attention in social and human studies and has many consequences on employees and the organizations, especially on health system workers such as nurses who are among the key factors in health care systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate perception of organizational justice among nurses in educational hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS), and to compare the results of general and specialty hospitals. In this research, 400 nurses at SUMS hospitals were selected by random sampling method. A 19-item questionnaire was applied to measure distributive, procedural and interactional justice. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including percentage, frequency, mean, and standard deviation. Also, the t-test and one way ANOVA were used to measure the differences between different hospitals and wards. Of 400 nurses, 66% perceived a high level of organizational justice. In this study the mean scores of total perceived organizational justice (P = 0.035), procedural justice (P = 0.031), and interactional justice (P = 0.046) in specialty hospitals were higher than general ones. Furthermore, the mean score of interactional justice was higher than the other components of organizational justice, respectively 3.58 ± 1.02 for general and 3.76 ± 0.86 for specialty hospitals. Significant differences were observed between overall perceived justice (P = 0.013) and its components (P = 0.024, P = 0.013, and P = 0.036) in different wards. Most nurses who participated in this study had a high perception of organizational justice. The mean score of organizational justice was higher in specialty hospitals. Health care policy makers and hospital managers should support their employees, especially nurses through fairness in distributions, procedures, and interactions.

  2. A Systematic Review on the Effectiveness of Interventions to Improve Hand Hygiene Compliance of Nurses in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rn, Olena Doronina; Jones, Denise; Martello, Marianna; Biron, Alain; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review is to identify the interventions that improve hand hygiene compliance (HHC) specifically among nurses. A systematic review was performed guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses to evaluate the short and long-term effects of interventions to promote hand hygiene practices among nurses in the hospital setting. A search of the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline Global Health, and Embase was conducted in addition to studies identified by the most recent systematic review. Six studies met inclusion criteria: three randomized controlled trials (RCTs), one controlled before and after studies (CBAs), and two interrupted times series (ITS). One RCT reported effectiveness and 6-month sustainability of the effect related to multimodal-directed and multimodal with team leadership-directed strategies. The other two RCTs found positive effect of education and feedback on compliance; however, compliance rates declined after 1 month. Education was also found to improve HHC up to 3 months postintervention. An electronic reminder and feedback system evaluated by an ITS improved HHC and detected variation in HHC through the day. This review showed that single and combined interventions do improve hand hygiene practices among nurses; however, there is a need for more methodologically robust studies to define the most effective and sustainable interventions. Although hand hygiene is the most effective measure to prevent healthcare-associated infections, compliance with hand hygiene remains low. Nurses are among the healthcare providers who spend the most time in direct patient contact. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify the interventions that improve HHC in this group. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Barriers to healthy eating by National Health Service (NHS hospital doctors in the hospital setting: results of a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sue

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With high levels of obesity and related illness, improving the health of the nation is a major public health concern. This study aimed to identify factors that prevent healthy eating among doctors, and that are associated with satisfaction with catering services. Findings Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 328 NHS doctors working in two NHS Trusts with on-site hospital canteen. Questionnaire to establish perceived barriers to healthy eating, weekly use and satisfaction with the hospital canteen, lifestyle and dietary habits, gender, age, height, weight, job details, and affect. Results: 70% of doctors reported using their hospital canteen each week, with 2 visits per week on average. Canteen opening times, lack of selection and lack of breaks were the most commonly perceived barriers to healthy eating. Availability of healthy options caused the most dissatisfaction. Only 12% felt the NHS was supportive of healthy eating. 74% did not feel their canteen advocated healthy eating. Canteen use is associated with younger age (r = -0.254, p Conclusion Interventions to encourage regular meal breaks, eating breakfast and drinking more water each day need developing. Improved canteen accessibility and availability of healthy options at evenings and weekends may be beneficial.

  4. Managing in-hospital quality improvement: An importance-performance analysis to set priorities for ST-elevation myocardial infarction care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeyels, Daan; Seys, Deborah; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Claeys, Marc J; Gevaert, Sofie; Schoors, Danny; Sermeus, Walter; Panella, Massimiliano; Bruyneel, Luk; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2018-02-01

    A focus on specific priorities increases the success rate of quality improvement efforts for broad and complex-care processes. Importance-performance analysis presents a possible approach to set priorities around which to design and implement effective quality improvement initiatives. Persistent variation in hospital performance makes ST-elevation myocardial infarction care relevant to consider for importance-performance analysis. The purpose of this study was to identify quality improvement priorities in ST-elevation myocardial infarction care. Importance and performance levels of ST-elevation myocardial infarction key interventions were combined in an importance-performance analysis. Content validity indexes on 23 ST-elevation myocardial infarction key interventions of a multidisciplinary RAND Delphi Survey defined importance levels. Structured review of 300 patient records in 15 acute hospitals determined performance levels. The significance of between-hospital variation was determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test. A performance heat-map allowed for hospital-specific priority setting. Seven key interventions were each rated as an overall improvement priority. Priority key interventions related to risk assessment, timely reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention and secondary prevention. Between-hospital performance varied significantly for the majority of key interventions. The type and number of priorities varied strongly across hospitals. Guideline adherence in ST-elevation myocardial infarction care is low and improvement priorities vary between hospitals. Importance-performance analysis helps clinicians and management in demarcation of the nature, number and order of improvement priorities. By offering a tailored improvement focus, this methodology makes improvement efforts more specific and achievable.

  5. Integrating the hospital library with patient care, teaching and research: model and Web 2.0 tools to create a social and collaborative community of clinical research in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Blanca San José; Garcia Carretero, Rafael; Varela Entrecanales, Manuel; Pozuelo, Paz Martin

    2010-09-01

    Research in hospital settings faces several difficulties. Information technologies and certain Web 2.0 tools may provide new models to tackle these problems, allowing for a collaborative approach and bridging the gap between clinical practice, teaching and research. We aim to gather a community of researchers involved in the development of a network of learning and investigation resources in a hospital setting. A multi-disciplinary work group analysed the needs of the research community. We studied the opportunities provided by Web 2.0 tools and finally we defined the spaces that would be developed, describing their elements, members and different access levels. WIKINVESTIGACION is a collaborative web space with the aim of integrating the management of all the hospital's teaching and research resources. It is composed of five spaces, with different access privileges. The spaces are: Research Group Space 'wiki for each individual research group', Learning Resources Centre devoted to the Library, News Space, Forum and Repositories. The Internet, and most notably the Web 2.0 movement, is introducing some overwhelming changes in our society. Research and teaching in the hospital setting will join this current and take advantage of these tools to socialise and improve knowledge management.

  6. Tackling the climate targets set by the Paris Agreement (COP 21: Green leadership empowers public hospitals to overcome obstacles and challenges in a resource-constrained environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Weimann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The healthcare sector itself contributes to climate change, the creation of hazardous waste, use of toxic metals such as mercury, and water and air pollution. To mitigate the effect of healthcare provision on the deteriorating environment and avoid creating further challenges for already burdened health systems, Global Green Hospitals was formed as a global network. Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH, as the leading academic hospital in Africa, joined the network in 2014. Since then, several projects have been initiated to reduce the amount of general waste, energy consumption and food waste, and create an environmentally friendlier and more sustainable hospital in a resource-constrained public healthcare setting. We outline the various efforts made to reduce the carbon footprint of GSH and reduce waste and hazardous substances such as mercury and polystyrene, and elaborate how obstacles and resistance to change were overcome. The hospital was able to halve the amount of coal and water used, increase recycling by 50% over 6 months, replace polystyrene cups and packaging with Forest Stewardship Council recyclable paper-based products, reduce the effect of food wastage by making use of local farmers, and implement measures to reduce the amount of expired pharmaceutical drugs. To improve commitment from all involved roleplayers, political leadership, supportive government policies and financial funding is mandatory, or public hospitals will be unable to tackle the exponentially increasing costs related to climate change and its effects on healthcare.

  7. Tackling the climate targets set by the Paris Agreement (COP 21): Green leadership empowers public hospitals to overcome obstacles and challenges in a resource-constrained environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimann, E; Patel, B

    2016-12-21

    The healthcare sector itself contributes to climate change, the creation of hazardous waste, use of toxic metals such as mercury, and water and air pollution. To mitigate the effect of healthcare provision on the deteriorating environment and avoid creating further challenges for already burdened health systems, Global Green Hospitals was formed as a global network. Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH), as the leading academic hospital in Africa, joined the network in 2014. Since then, several projects have been initiated to reduce the amount of general waste, energy consumption and food waste, and create an environmentally friendlier and more sustainable hospital in a resource-constrained public healthcare setting. We outline the various efforts made to reduce the carbon footprint of GSH and reduce waste and hazardous substances such as mercury and polystyrene, and elaborate how obstacles and resistance to change were overcome. The hospital was able to halve the amount of coal and water used, increase recycling by 50% over 6 months, replace polystyrene cups and packaging with Forest Stewardship Council recyclable paper-based products, reduce the effect of food wastage by making use of local farmers, and implement measures to reduce the amount of expired pharmaceutical drugs. To improve commitment from all involved roleplayers, political leadership, supportive government policies and financial funding is mandatory, or public hospitals will be unable to tackle the exponentially increasing costs related to climate change and its effects on healthcare.

  8. Management of HAPE with bed rest and supplemental oxygen in hospital setting at high altitude (11,500 ft): A review of 43 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Singhal; Srinivasa A Bhattachar; Sumit Rungta

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of treating high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) by bed rest and supplemental oxygen in hospital setting at high altitude. Materials and Methods: In a prospective case series, all patients who were diagnosed clinically with HAPE on admission to our hospital located at a height of 11,500 ft were evaluated and managed with bed rest and oxygen supplementation. Results: A total of 43 patients of HAPE with mean age of 31 years (range 20–48 years) wer...

  9. National Hospital Discharge Survey: 2005 annual summary with detailed diagnosis and procedure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFrances, Carol J; Cullen, Karen A; Kozak, Lola Jean

    2007-12-01

    This report presents 2005 national estimates and selected trend data on the use of nonfederal short-stay hospitals in the United States. Estimates are provided by selected patient and hospital characteristics, diagnoses, and surgical and nonsurgical procedures performed. Estimates of diagnoses and procedures are presented according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. The estimates are based on data collected through the National Hospital Discharge Survey. The survey has been conducted annually since 1965. In 2005, data were collected for approximately 375,000 discharges. Of the 473 eligible nonfederal short-stay hospitals in the sample, 444 (94 percent) responded to the survey. An estimated 34.7 million discharges from nonfederal short-stay hospitals occurred in 2005. Discharges used 165.9 million days of care and had an average length of stay of 4.8 days. Persons 65 years and over accounted for 38 percent of the hospital discharges and 44 percent of the days of care. The proportion of discharges whose status was described as routine discharge or discharged to the patient's home declined with age, from 91 percent for inpatients under 45 years of age to 41 percent for those 85 years and over. Hospitalization for malignant neoplasms decreased from 1990-2005. The hospitalization rate for asthma was the highest for children under 15 years of age and those 65 years of age and over. The rate was lowest for those 15-44 years of age. Thirty-eight percent of hospital discharges had no procedures performed, whereas 12 percent had four or more procedures performed. An episiotomy was performed during a majority of vaginal deliveries in 1980 (64 percent), but by 2005, it was performed during less than one of every five vaginal deliveries (19 percent).

  10. Self-efficacy scale for the establishment of good relationships with families in neonatal and pediatric hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andréia Cascaes; Angelo, Margareth; Santos, Bernardo Pereira Dos

    2017-05-25

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Self-efficacy Scale for the Establishment of Good Relationships with Families in Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital Settings. Methodological study grounded on self-efficacy theory was conducted in three phases: conceptual and operational definition (review of the literature and interviews with the target population), content validity (opinion of five experts e three clinical nurses), and exploratory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability (cross-sectional survey with a valid sample of 194 nurses). A ten-point Likert scale with 40-item was designed and one item was excluded after review by experts. Three factors emerged from the exploratory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha for all items was 0.983 with item-total correlations in the range 0.657 to 0.847. Cronbach's alpha value if item deleted were less than or equal to 0.983. The final version of the scale demonstrated psychometric adequacy. It is a useful tool to be administered in the clinical, educational and research nursing fields to measure nurses' self-efficacy beliefs concerning the establishment of good relationships with families. El propósito de este estudio fue desarrollar y probar las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Autoeficacia para el Establecimiento de Buenas Relaciones con las Familias en Ambientes Neonatales y Pediátricos. Estudio metodológico fundamentado en la teoría de la auto-eficacia se realizó en tres fases: conceptual y definición operacional (revisión de la literatura y entrevistas con la población objetivo), la validez de contenido (opinión de cinco expertos y tres enfermeras clínicas), y el factor de análisis exploratorio e fiabilidad interna de consistencia (estudio transversal con una muestra válida de 194 enfermeras). La escala de Likert de diez puntos con 40 ítems fue diseñada y un elemento fue excluido después de la revisión por expertos. Hay tres factores que

  11. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Community in Luanda, Angola: Blurred Boundaries with the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Teresa; Coelho, Céline; Santos Silva, Isabel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Although the nosocomial prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Angola is over 60% and one of the highest in Africa, the extent of MRSA in the community is unknown. To fill this gap, we conducted a hospital-based study in which 158 children attending the emergency ward and ambulatory services of a pediatric hospital in Luanda, the capital of Angola, were screened for S. aureus nasal colonization. Overall, 70 (44.3%) individuals were colonized with S. aureus, of which 20 (28.6%) carried MRSA, resulting in a prevalence of 12.7% (20/158) of MRSA in the population screened. Molecular characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing distributed the isolates into two major MRSA clones and one dominant methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) lineage, corresponding to the main clones circulating in hospitals in Luanda. The MRSA isolates mainly belonged to clones A (PFGE type A, spa type t105, ST5-IVa-65%) and B (PFGE B, t3869, ST88-IVa-30%), while MSSA isolates mainly belonged to clone L (PFGE type L, t861, ST508-42%). S. aureus isolates showed resistance to penicillin (96%), rifampin (87%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (21%). In conclusion, the prevalence of MRSA among children in the community in Luanda is high and seems to originate from hospitals, warranting continuous monitoring and implementation of additional infection control measures.

  13. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) and Potential Cost Savings and Shortened Bed Stays In an Acute Hospital Setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Brien, C

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral inserted central catheters (PICCs) have increasingly become the mainstay of patients requiring prolonged treatment with antibiotics, transfusions, oncologic IV therapy and total parental nutrition. They may also be used in delivering a number of other medications to patients. In recent years, bed occupancy rates have become hugely pressurized in many hospitals and any potential solutions to free up beds is welcome. Recent introductions of doctor or nurse led intravenous (IV) outpatient based treatment teams has been having a direct effect on early discharge of patients and in some cases avoiding admission completely. The ability to deliver outpatient intravenous treatment is facilitated by the placement of PICCs allowing safe and targeted treatment of patients over a prolonged period of time. We carried out a retrospective study of 2,404 patients referred for PICCs from 2009 to 2015 in a university teaching hospital. There was an exponential increase in the number of PICCs requested from 2011 to 2015 with a 64% increase from 2012 to 2013. The clear increase in demand for PICCs in our institution is directly linked to the advent of outpatient intravenous antibiotic services. In this paper, we assess the impact that the use of PICCs combined with intravenous outpatient treatment may have on cost and hospital bed demand. We advocate that a more widespread implementation of this service throughout Ireland may result in significant cost savings as well as decreasing the number of patients on hospital trollies.

  14. The acceptability of volunteer, repeat blood donations in a hospital setting in the Adamaoua region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolseth, S; Stange, P; Adamou, D; Roald, B; Danki-Sillong, F; Jourdan, P

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of factors that may influence blood donation in Cameroon is limited. The objectives of this study are to assess the characteristics of previous and potential blood donors by exploring the religious beliefs, and knowledge and understanding of blood donations among individuals present at a district hospital. Forty-nine in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted among consenting, randomly selected 18 years or older community members present at a district hospital in the Adamaoua region during October and November 2011. Ninety-eight per cent (48/49) of the individuals present at this district hospital had heard of blood transfusions. Forty-seven per cent (23/49) had not previously been asked to donate blood; however, 94% (44/47) said that they would donate if given the opportunity. Thirty-three per cent (16/49) had previously donated blood to family members or for replacement, and 81% of these said they would repeat donations. The majority of both donors and non-donors were motivated to donate blood for altruistic reasons. The findings suggest that community members present at this district hospital in Cameroon may be recruited for repeat blood donations. Although the altruistic motivation to donate blood suggests that donors could be recruited from a district hospital population, targeted information about blood donations and accessible blood transfusion services need to be put in place. The study may add to the understanding of the preconditions for blood donations and the possibility to establish sustainable blood transfusion services in the Adamaoua region in Cameroon. © 2014 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. Using a public hospital funding model to strengthen a case for improved nutritional care in a cancer setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltong, Anna G; Loeliger, Jenelle M; Steer, Belinda L

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to measure the prevalence of malnutrition risk and assessed malnutrition in patients admitted to a cancer-specific public hospital, and to model the potential hospital funding opportunity associated with implementing routine malnutrition screening. A point-prevalence audit of malnutrition risk and diagnosable malnutrition was conducted. A retrospective audit of hospital funding associated with documented cases of malnutrition was conducted. Audit results were used to estimate annual malnutrition prevalence, associated casemix-based reimbursement potential and the clinical support resources required to adequately identify and treat malnutrition. Sixty-four percent of inpatients were at risk of malnutrition. Of these, 90% were assessed as malnourished. Twelve percent of malnourished patients produced a positive change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) and increased allocated financial reimbursement. Identifying and diagnosing all cases of malnutrition could contribute an additional AU$413644 reimbursement funding annually. Early identification of malnutrition may expedite appropriate nutritional management and improve patient outcomes in addition to contributing to casemix-based reimbursement funding for health services. A successful business case for additional clinical resources to improve nutritional care was aided by demonstrating the link between malnutrition screening, hospital reimbursements and improved nutritional care. What is known about the topic? It is known that between 20 and 50% of hospital patients are malnourished and oncology patients are 1.7 times more likely to be malnourished than are other hospitalised patients. Despite the existence of practice guidelines for malnutrition screening of at-risk oncology patients, these are not routinely implemented. Identification of malnutrition in hospitalised patients is linked to casemix funding via DRG. Casemix reimbursement for malnutrition can be enhanced if: (1) malnutrition risk is

  16. Molecular epidemiology of clinical and carrier strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in the hospital settings of north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dar Mohammad J

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study was conducted between 2000 and 2003 on 750 human subjects, yielding 850 strains of staphylococci from clinical specimens (575, nasal cultures of hospitalized patients (100 and eye & nasal sources of hospital workers (50 & 125 respectively in order to determine their epidemiology, acquisition and dissemination of resistance genes. Methods Organisms from clinical samples were isolated, cultured and identified as per the standard routine procedures. Susceptibility was measured by the agar diffusion method, as recommended by the Nat ional Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS. The modified method of Birnboin and Takahashi was used for isolation of plasmids from staphylococci. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing of clinical and carrier Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains isolated during our study was performed as described previously. Results It was shown that 35.1% of Staphylococcus aureus and 22.5% of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates were resistant to methicillin. Highest percentage of MRSA (35.5% was found in pus specimens (n = 151. The multiple drug resistance of all MRSA (n = 180 and Methicillin resistant Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (MRCNS (n = 76 isolates was detected. In case of both methicillin-resistant as well as methicillin-sensitive Saphylococcal isolates zero resistance was found to vancomycin where as highest resistance was found to penicillin G followed by ampicillin. It was shown that the major reservoir of methicillin resistant staphylococci in hospitals are colonized/infected inpatients and colonized hospital workers, with carriers at risk for developing endogenous infection or transmitting infection to health care workers and patients. The results were confirmed by molecular typing using PFGE by SmaI-digestion. It was shown that the resistant markers G and T got transferred from clinical S. aureus (JS-105 to carrier S. aureus (JN-49

  17. Prospective Validation of the Decalogue, a Set of Doctor-Patient Communication Recommendations to Improve Patient Illness Experience and Mood States within a Hospital Cardiologic Ambulatory Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piercarlo Ballo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to improve doctor-patient communication may have a beneficial impact on patient’s illness experience and mood, with potential favorable clinical effects. We prospectively tested the psychometric and clinical validity of the Decalogue, a tool utilizing 10 communication recommendations for patients and physicians. The Decalogue was administered to 100 consecutive patients referred for a cardiologic consultation, whereas 49 patients served as controls. The POMS-2 questionnaire was used to measure the total mood disturbance at the end of the consultation. Structural equation modeling showed high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha 0.93, good test-retest reproducibility, and high validity of the psychometric construct (all > 0.80, suggesting a positive effect on patients’ illness experience. The total mood disturbance was lower in the patients exposed to the Decalogue as compared to the controls (1.4±12.1 versus 14.8±27.6, p=0.0010. In an additional questionnaire, patients in the Decalogue group showed a trend towards a better understanding of their state of health (p=0.07. In a cardiologic ambulatory setting, the Decalogue shows good validity and reliability as a tool to improve patients’ illness experience and could have a favorable impact on mood states. These effects might potentially improve patient engagement in care and adherence to therapy, as well as clinical outcome.

  18. Hospital-based pandemic influenza preparedness and response: strategies to increase surge capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfone, Richard J; Coffin, Susan; Fieldston, Evan S; Falkowski, Grace; Cooney, Mary G; Grenfell, Stephanie

    2011-06-01

    In the spring of 2009, the first patients infected with 2009 H1N1 virus were arriving for care in hospitals in the United States. Anticipating a second wave of infection, our hospital leaders initiated multidisciplinary planning activities to prepare to increase capacity by expansion of emergency department (ED) and inpatient functional space and redeployment of medical personnel. During the fall pandemic surge, this urban, tertiary-care children's hospital experienced a 48% increase in ED visits and a 12% increase in daily peak inpatient census. However, several strategies were effective in mitigating the pandemic's impact including using a portion of the hospital's lobby for ED waiting, using a subspecialty clinic and a 24-hour short stay unit to care for ED patients, and using physicians not board certified in pediatric emergency medicine and inpatient-unit medical nurses to care for ED patients. The average time patients waited to be seen by an ED physician and the proportion of children leaving the ED without being seen by a physician was less than for the period when seasonal influenza peaked in the winter of 2008-2009. Furthermore, the ED did not go on divert status, no elective medical or surgical admissions required cancellation, and there were no increases in serious patient safety events. Our health center successfully met the challenges posed by the 2009 H1N1 outbreak. The intent in sharing the details of our planning and experience is to allow others to determine which elements of this planning might be adapted for managing a surge of patients in their setting.

  19. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  20. Outbreak of a cluster with epidemic behavior due to Serratia marcescens after colistin administration in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkier, Andrea Karina; Rodríguez, María Cecilia; Togneri, Ana; Brengi, Silvina; Osuna, Carolina; Pichel, Mariana; Cassini, Marcelo H; Centrón, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated infections with important morbidity and mortality. Particularly, outbreaks produced by multidrug-resistant isolates of this species, which is already naturally resistant to several antibiotics, including colistin, are usually described with high rates of fatal outcomes throughout the world. Thus, it is important to survey factors associated with increasing frequency and/or emergence of multidrug-resistant S. marcescens nosocomial infections. We report the investigation and control of an outbreak with 40% mortality due to multidrug-resistant S. marcescens infections that happened from November 2007 to April 2008 after treatment with colistin for Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis was started at hospital H1 in 2005. Since that year, the epidemiological pattern of frequently recovered species has changed, with an increase of S. marcescens and Proteus mirabilis infections in 2006 in concordance with a significant decrease of the numbers of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii isolates. A single pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) cluster of S. marcescens isolates was identified during the outbreak. When this cluster was compared with S. marcescens strains (n = 21) from 10 other hospitals (1997 to 2010), it was also identified in both sporadic and outbreak isolates circulating in 4 hospitals in Argentina. In132::ISCR1::blaCTX-M-2 was associated with the multidrug-resistant cluster with epidemic behavior when isolated from outbreaks. Standard infection control interventions interrupted transmission of this cluster even when treatment with colistin continued in several wards of hospital H1 until now. Optimizing use of colistin should be achieved simultaneously with improved infection control to prevent the emergence of species naturally resistant to colistin, such as S. marcescens and P. mirabilis.

  1. Googling Service Boundaries for Endovascular Clot Retrieval Hub Hospitals in a Metropolitan Setting: Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thanh G; Beare, Richard; Chen, Jian; Clissold, Benjamin; Ly, John; Singhal, Shaloo; Ma, Henry; Srikanth, Velandai

    2017-05-01

    There is great interest in how endovascular clot retrieval hubs provide services to a population. We applied a computational method to objectively generate service boundaries for such endovascular clot retrieval hubs, defined by traveling time to hub. Stroke incidence data merged with population census to estimate numbers of stroke in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Traveling time from randomly generated addresses to 4 endovascular clot retrieval-capable hubs (Royal Melbourne Hospital [RMH], Monash Medical Center [MMC], Alfred Hospital [ALF], and Austin Hospital [AUS]) estimated using Google Map application program interface. Boundary maps generated based on traveling time at various times of day for combinations of hubs. In a 2-hub model, catchment was best distributed when RMH was paired with MMC (model 1a, RMH 1765 km 2 and MMC 1164 km 2 ) or with AUS (model 1c, RMH 1244 km 2 and AUS 1685 km 2 ), with no statistical difference between models ( P =0.20). Catchment was poorly distributed when RMH was paired with ALF (model 1b, RMH 2252 km 2 and ALF 676 km 2 ), significantly different from both models 1a and 1c (both P AUS was superior to that of RMH, MMC, and ALF in catchment distribution and travel time. The method was also successfully applied to the city of Adelaide demonstrating wider applicability. We provide proof of concept for a novel computational method to objectively designate service boundaries for endovascular clot retrieval hubs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Mobile Display of Information about Aggregated Antibiotic Resistance in the Hospital Setting Supported by Near Field Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Philipp; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a heterogeneous phenomenon. It does not only differ between countries or states, but also between wards of hospitals, where different resistance patterns have been found. To support clinicians in administering empiric antibiotic therapy, we developed software to present information about antibiotic resistance using a mobile concept. A pre-existing infrastructure was deployed as the server component. The systems analyze and aggregate data from laboratory information systems, generating statistical data on antibiotic resistance. The information is presented to the Android client using a Representational State Transfer (REST) interface. Geographical localization is performed using near field communication (NFC) tags. The prototype provides tabulated data concerning antibiotic resistance patterns in the wards of a hospital. Using Android, NFC, and data caching, the usability of the system is estimated to be high. We hypothesize that antibiotic stewardship in hospitals can be supported by this software, thus improving medical monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Future studies in a productive environment are needed to measure the impact of the system on the outcome of patient care.

  3. Impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction and post-introduction etiology of diarrhea requiring hospital admission in Haydom, Tanzania, a rural African setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts-Mills, James A; Amour, Caroline; Gratz, Jean; Nshama, Rosemary; Walongo, Thomas; Mujaga, Buliga; Maro, Athanasia; McMurry, Timothy L; Liu, Jie; Mduma, Estomih; Houpt, Eric R

    2017-05-29

    No data are available on the etiology of diarrhea requiring hospitalization after rotavirus vaccine introduction in Africa. The monovalent rotavirus vaccine was introduced in Tanzania on January 1, 2013. We performed a vaccine impact and effectiveness study as well as a qPCR-based etiology study at a rural Tanzanian hospital. We obtained data on admissions among children under 5 years to Haydom Lutheran Hospital between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2015, and estimated the impact of vaccine introduction on all-cause diarrhea admissions. We then performed a vaccine effectiveness study using the test-negative design. Finally, we tested diarrheal specimens during 2015 by qPCR for a broad range of enteropathogens and calculated pathogen-specific attributable fractions. Vaccine introduction was associated with a 44.9% (95% CI 17.6 - 97.4) reduction in diarrhea admissions in 2015, as well as delay of the rotavirus season. The effectiveness of two doses of vaccine was 74.8% (-8.2 - 94.1) using an enzyme immunoassay-based case definition and 85.1% (26.5 - 97.0) using a qPCR-based case definition. Among 146 children enrolled in 2015, rotavirus remained the leading etiology of diarrhea requiring hospitalization (AF 25.8%, 95% CI: 24.4 - 26.7), followed by heat-stabile enterotoxin-producing E. coli (18.4%, 12.9 - 21.9), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (14.5%, 10.2 - 22.8), and Cryptosporidium (7.9%, 6.2 - 9.3). Despite the clear impact of vaccine introduction in this setting, rotavirus remained the leading etiology of diarrhea requiring hospitalization. Further efforts to maximize vaccine coverage and improve vaccine performance in these settings are warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. National hospital discharge survey: 2004 annual summary with detailed diagnosis and procedure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Lola Jean; DeFrances, Carol Jean; Hall, Margaret Jean

    2006-10-01

    This report presents 2004 national estimates and selected trend data on the use of nonfederal short-stay hospitals in the United States. Estimates are provided by selected patient and hospital characteristics, diagnoses, and surgical and nonsurgical procedures performed. Estimates of diagnoses and procedures are presented according to International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. The estimates are based on data collected through the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The survey has been conducted annually since 1965. In 2004, data were collected for approximately 371,000 discharges. Of the 476 eligible nonfederal short-stay hospitals in the sample, 439 (92 percent) responded to the survey. An estimated 34.9 million inpatients were discharged from nonfederal short-stay hospitals in 2004. They used 167.9 million days of care and had an average length of stay of 4.8 days. Hospital use by age ranged from 4.3 million days of care for patients 5-14 years of age to 31.8 million days of care for 75-84 year olds. Almost a third of patients 85 years and over were discharged from hospitals to long-term care institutions. Diseases of the circulatory system was the leading diagnostic category for males. Childbirth was the leading category for females, followed by circulatory diseases. The proportion of HIV discharges who were 40 years of age and over increased from 40 percent in 1995 to 67 percent in 2004. The rate of cardiac catheterizations was higher for males than for females and higher for patients 65-74 and 75-84 years of age than for older or younger groups. The average length of stay for both vaginal and cesarean deliveries decreased from 1980 through 1995 but stays for vaginal deliveries increased 24 percent during the period from 1995 to 2004.

  5. Analysis of residents' willingness to pay to reduce air pollution to improve children's health in community and hospital settings in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Keran; Wu, Jinyi; Wang, Rui; Yang, Yingying; Chen, Renjie; Maddock, Jay E; Lu, Yuanan

    2015-11-15

    Shanghai, along with many major cities in China, faces deterioration of air quality and increases in air pollution-related respiratory diseases (RDs) in children due to rapid industrialization and urbanization. The Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) was used to qualitatively and quantitatively measure the willingness to pay (WTP) for reducing children's RDs through air quality improvement. Between April and May, 2014, 975 face-to-face interviews were collected from parents in a community-based and a hospital-setting in Shanghai. Multiple imputation and the Probit model were used to determine the relationship between the WTP and the related environmental factors, child health factors and the socio-economic status. Most respondents reported being willing to make a financial contribution to improve air quality in both the community (52.6%) and hospital (70.2%) samples. Those in the hospital setting were willing to pay significantly more ¥504 (USD$80.7) compared to the community sample ¥428 ($68.5) as expected. Reasons for those not being willing to pay included lack of disposable income and believing that responsibility of the air quality was a community issue. These did not differ by sample. Annual household income and education were related to WTP. This study indicated that parents in Shanghai would be willing to pay for improved air quality. Children's health can be the incentive for the citizens' participation and support in the air quality improvement, therefore, hospital settings may present unique places to improve education about air quality and enhance advocacy efforts. This study also suggested that future environmental policies be addressed more rigorously for targeted populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing the economic value of avoiding hospital admissions by shifting the management of gram+ acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections to an outpatient care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektare, V; Khachatryan, A; Xue, M; Dunne, M; Johnson, K; Stephens, J

    2015-01-01

    To estimate, from a US payer perspective, the cost offsets of treating gram positive acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI) with varied hospital length of stay (LOS) followed by outpatient care, as well as the cost implications of avoiding hospital admission. Economic drivers of care were estimated using a literature-based economic model incorporating inpatient and outpatient components. The model incorporated equal efficacy, adverse events (AE), resource use, and costs from literature. Costs of once- and twice-daily outpatient infusions to achieve a 14-day treatment were analyzed. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Costs were adjusted to 2015 US$. Total non-drug medical cost for treatment of ABSSSI entirely in the outpatient setting to avoid hospital admission was the lowest among all scenarios and ranged from $4039-$4924. Total non-drug cost for ABSSSI treated in the inpatient setting ranged from $9813 (3 days LOS) to $18,014 (7 days LOS). Inpatient vs outpatient cost breakdown was: 3 days inpatient ($6657)/11 days outpatient ($3156-$3877); 7 days inpatient ($15,017)/7 days outpatient ($2495-$2997). Sensitivity analyses revealed a key outpatient cost driver to be peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) costs (average per patient cost of $873 for placement and $205 for complications). Drug and indirect costs were excluded and resource use was not differentiated by ABSSSI type. It was assumed that successful ABSSSI treatment takes up to 14 days per the product labels, and that once-daily and twice-daily antibiotics have equal efficacy. Shifting ABSSSI care to outpatient settings may result in medical cost savings greater than 53%. Typical outpatient scenarios represent 14-37% of total medical cost, with PICC accounting for 28-43% of the outpatient burden. The value of new ABSSSI therapies will be driven by eliminating the need for PICC line, reducing length of stay and the ability to completely avoid a hospital stay.

  7. [Road traffic injuries in Catalonia (Spain): an approach using the minimum data set for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clèries, Montse; Bosch, Anna; Vela, Emili; Bustins, Montse

    2015-09-01

    To verify the usefulness of the minimum data set (MDS) for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources for the study of road traffic injuries and to describe the use of health resources in Catalonia (Spain). The study population consisted of patients treated in any kind of emergency service and patients admitted for acute hospitalization in Catalonia in 2013. A descriptive analysis was performed by age, gender, time and clinical variables. A total of 48,150 patients were treated in hospital emergency departments, 6,210 were attended in primary care, and 4,912 were admitted to hospital. There was a higher proportion of men (56.2%), mainly aged between 20 and 40 years. Men accounted for 54.9% of patients with minor injuries and 75.1% of those with severe injuries. Contusions are the most common injury (30.2%), followed by sprains (28.7%). Fractures mostly affected persons older than 64 years, internal injuries particularly affected men older than 64 years, and wounds mainly affected persons younger than 18 years and older than 64 years. In the adult population, the severity of the injuries increased with age, leading to longer length of stay and greater complexity. Hospital mortality was 0.2%. Fractures, internal injuries and wounds were more frequent in the group of very serious injuries, and sprains and contusions in the group of minor injuries. MDS records (acute hospitals and emergency resources) provide information that is complementary to other sources of information on traffic accidents, increasing the completeness of the data. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of HAPE with bed rest and supplemental oxygen in hospital setting at high altitude (11,500 ft: A review of 43 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singhal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of treating high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE by bed rest and supplemental oxygen in hospital setting at high altitude. Materials and Methods: In a prospective case series, all patients who were diagnosed clinically with HAPE on admission to our hospital located at a height of 11,500 ft were evaluated and managed with bed rest and oxygen supplementation. Results: A total of 43 patients of HAPE with mean age of 31 years (range 20–48 years were admitted to our hospital. Infections followed by unaccustomed physical exertion were the predominant risk factors. 95.35% of the patients improved successfully with oxygen and bed rest alone with mean hospital stay of 2.67 ± 1.06 (1–6 days. Two patients (4.65% required nifedipine and evacuation to lower altitude. Of this, one patient suffering from concomitant viral infection expired 4 days after evacuation to near sea level. Conclusion: Majority of the patients with HAPE where medical facilities are available can be safely treated with bed rest and oxygen supplementation at moderate high altitude without descent.

  9. Assistance at mealtimes in hospital settings and rehabilitation units for older adults from the perspective of patients, families and healthcare professionals: a mixed methods systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Deborah; Carrier, Judith; Hopkinson, Jane

    2015-11-01

    The review question is: assistance at mealtimes for older adults in hospital settings and rehabilitation units: what goes on, what works and what do patients, families and healthcare professionals think about it?The specific objectives are:This mixed methods review seeks to develop an aggregated synthesis of quantitative and qualitative data on assistance at mealtimes for older adults in hospital settings and rehabilitation units in order to derive conclusions and recommendations useful for clinical practice and policy decision making. Worldwide, it is estimated that between 20% and 50% of all adult patients admitted to hospital wards are malnourished. Reported prevalence occurs, depending on the specific patient group of interest, type of healthcare setting, disease state and criteria used to assess malnutrition. For older adults in hospital (over 65 years) the prevalence of malnutrition has been reported as being as high as 60% and can continue to deteriorate during the hospital stay. This is an area of concern as it is associated with prolonged hospital stays and increased morbidity (pressure ulcers, infections and falls) and mortality, especially for those with chronic conditions.Malnutrition in adults in developed countries is frequently associated with disease and may occur because of reduced dietary intake, malabsorption, increased nutrient losses or altered metabolic demands, with reduced dietary intake being considered the single most important aetiological factor. For the hospitalized older adult patient with pre-existing malnutrition, further nutritional problems are often encountered due to a reduced dietary intake. Poor food intake for older patients in hospital may be due to the effects of acute illness, poor appetite, nausea or vomiting, "nil by mouth" orders, medication side effects, catering limitations, swallowing and/or oral problems, difficulty with vision and opening containers, the placement of food out of the patients' reach, limited access

  10. A Mobile App Development Guideline for Hospital Settings: Maximizing the Use of and Minimizing the Security Risks of "Bring Your Own Devices" Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ayubi, Soleh U; Pelletier, Alexandra; Sunthara, Gajen; Gujral, Nitin; Mittal, Vandna; Bourgeois, Fabienne C

    2016-05-11

    built into the app. Phase 3 involved deployment of TaskList on a clinical floor at BCH. Lastly, Phase 4 gathered the lessons learned from the pilot to refine the guideline. Fourteen practical recommendations were identified to create the BCH Mobile Application Development Guideline to safeguard custom applications in hospital BYOD settings. The recommendations were grouped into four categories: (1) authentication and authorization, (2) data management, (3) safeguarding app environment, and (4) remote enforcement. Following the guideline, the TaskList app was developed and then was piloted with an inpatient ward team. The Mobile Application Development guideline was created and used in the development of TaskList. The guideline is intended for use by developers when addressing integration with hospital information systems, deploying apps in BYOD health care settings, and meeting compliance standards, such as Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.

  11. Influencing Nursing Knowledge and Attitudes to Positively Affect Care of Patients with Persistent Pain in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Alyson; McCrate, Brian; McLennon, Susan; Ellis, Alexis; Wall, Donna; Jones, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Hospitalized patients with persistent pain are among the most challenging populations to effectively manage because of coexistence with acute pain. Nurses play a vital role in pain management; however, gaps in knowledge and detrimental attitudes exist. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a targeted evidence-based pain education program to increase nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain management. One group, paired, pretest/posttest educational intervention. A convenience sample of nurses from three medical and surgical inpatient units were recruited. Participants completed a pretest, the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain Scale, to assess education needs. Identified gaps were targeted during program design. The program consisted of two 30-minute interactive educational sessions approximately 1 month apart. The first session, delivered by a pharmacist, covered pharmacology and pathophysiology content. The second session, delivered by trained registered nurses, used case studies paired with video scenarios. A total of 51 nurses completed the pretest. The final sample consisted of 24 nurses who completed both the pretest and posttest. The mean age was 30 years; 88% were female, and 92% were baccalaureate prepared. Paired t tests indicated higher posttest total scores (p pain management knowledge and attitudes among direct care nurses caring for hospitalized patients. A targeted educational program may be an effective and efficient delivery method. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Detecting familial hypercholesterolemia by serum lipid profile screening in a hospital setting: Clinical, genetic and atherosclerotic burden profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicali, R; Di Pino, A; Platania, R; Purrazzo, G; Ferrara, V; Giannone, A; Urbano, F; Filippello, A; Rapisarda, V; Farruggia, E; Piro, S; Rabuazzo, A M; Purrello, F

    2018-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is underdiagnosed and public cholesterol screening may be useful to find new subjects. In this study, we aim to investigate the prevalence of FH patients in a hospital screening program and evaluate their atherosclerotic burden using intima-media thickness (IMT). We screened 1575 lipid profiles and included for genetic analysis adults with a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol >190 mg/dL and triglycerides 160 mg/dL and triglycerides 8 it was 100%. Mean IMT was higher in FH patients compared to non FH (0.73 [0.61-0.83] vs 0.71 [0.60-0.75] mm, p 190 mg/dL and corneal arcus (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively). A hospital screening was useful to detect FH subjects with increased atherosclerosis. Also, next-generation sequencing was able to detect new FH mutations. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Malnutrition is independently associated with skin tears in hospital inpatient setting-Findings of a 6-year point prevalence audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Emma L; Hickling, Donna F; Williams, Damian M; Bell, Jack J

    2018-05-24

    Skin tears cause pain, increased length of stay, increased costs, and reduced quality of life. Minimal research reports the association between skin tears, and malnutrition using robust measures of nutritional status. This study aimed to articulate the association between malnutrition and skin tears in hospital inpatients using a yearly point prevalence of inpatients included in the Queensland Patient Safety Bedside Audit, malnutrition audits and skin tear audits conducted at a metropolitan tertiary hospital between 2010 and 2015. Patients were excluded if admitted to mental health wards or were <18 years. A total of 2197 inpatients were included, with a median age of 71 years. The overall prevalence of skin tears was 8.1%. Malnutrition prevalence was 33.5%. Univariate analysis demonstrated associations between age (P ˂ .001), body mass index (BMI) (P < .001) and malnutrition (P ˂ .001) but not gender (P = .319). Binomial logistic regression analysis modelling demonstrated that malnutrition diagnosed using the Subjective Global Assessment was independently associated with skin tear incidence (odds ratio, OR: 1.63; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.13-2.36) and multiple skin tears (OR 2.48 [95% CI 1.37-4.50]). BMI was not independently associated with skin tears or multiple skin tears. This study demonstrated independent associations between malnutrition and skin tear prevalence and multiple skin tears. It also demonstrated the limitations of BMI as a nutritional assessment measure. © 2018 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. National Hospital Discharge Survey: 2003 annual summary with detailed diagnosis and procedure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Lola Jean; Lees, Karen A; DeFrances, Carol J

    2006-05-01

    This report presents 2003 national estimates and trend data on the use of non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the United States. Estimates are provided by patient and hospital characteristics, diagnoses, and surgical and nonsurgical procedures performed. Estimates of diagnoses and procedures are presented according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. The estimates are based on data collected through the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The survey has been conducted annually since 1965. In 2003, data were collected for approximately 320,000 discharges. Of the 479 eligible non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the sample, 426 (89 percent) responded to the survey. An estimated 34.7 million inpatients were discharged from non-Federal short-stay hospitals in 2003. They used 167.3 million days of care and had an average length of stay of 4.8 days. Females used almost one-third more days of hospital care than males. Patients with five or more diagnoses rose from 29 percent of discharges in 1990 to 57 percent in 2003. The leading diagnostic category was respiratory diseases for children under 15 years, childbirth for 15-44 year olds, and circulatory diseases for patients 45 years of age and over. Only surgical procedures were performed for 27 percent of discharges, 18 percent had surgical and nonsurgical procedures, and 16 percent had only nonsurgical procedures. A total of 664,000 coronary angioplasties were performed, and stents were inserted during 86 percent of these procedures with drug-eluting stents used in 28 percent. The number and rate of total and primary cesarean deliveries rose from 1995 to 2003. The rate of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery dropped 58 percent, from 35.5 in 1995 to 14.8 in 2003.

  15. National Hospital Discharge Survey: 2001 annual summary with detailed diagnosis and procedure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Lola Jean; Owings, Maria F; Hall, Margaret J

    2004-06-01

    This report presents 2001 national estimates and selected trend data on the use of non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the United States. Estimates are provided by selected patient and hospital characteristics, diagnoses, and surgical and nonsurgical procedures performed. Admission source and type, collected for the first time in the 2001 National Hospital Discharge Survey, are shown. The estimates are based on data collected through the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The survey has been conducted annually since 1965. In 2001, data were collected for approximately 330,000 discharges. Of the 477 eligible non-Federal short-stay hospitals in the sample, 448 (94 percent) responded to the survey. Estimates of diagnoses and procedures are presented according to International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code numbers. Rates are computed with 2001 population estimates based on the 2000 census. The appendix includes a comparison of rates computed with 1990 and 2000 census-based population estimates. An estimated 32.7 million inpatients were discharged from non-Federal short-stay hospitals in 2001. They used 159.4 million days of care and had an average length of stay of 4.9 days. Common first-listed discharge diagnoses included delivery, psychoses, pneumonia, malignant neoplasm, and coronary atherosclerosis. Males had higher rates for procedures such as cardiac catheterization and coronary artery bypass graft, and females had higher rates for procedures such as cholecystectomy and total knee replacement. The rates of all cesarean deliveries, primary and repeat, rose from 1995 to 2001; the rate of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery dropped 37 percent during this period.

  16. Examination of Routine Practice Patterns in the Hospital Information Data Warehouse: Use of OLAP and Rough Set Analysis with Clinician Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Andrew; Grant, Gwyneth; Gagné, Jean; Blanchette, Carl; Comeau, Émilie; Brodeur, Guillaume; Dionne, Jonathon; Ayite, Alphonse; Synak, Piotr; Wroblewski, Jakub; Apanowitz, Cas

    2001-01-01

    The patient centred electronic patient record enables retrospective analysis of practice patterns as one means to assist clinicians adjust and improve their practice. An interrogation of the data-warehouse linking test use to Diagnostic Related Group (DRG) of one years data of the Sherbrooke University Hospital showed that one-third of patients used two-thirds of these diagnostic tests. Using RoughSets analysis, zones of repeated tests were demonstrated where results remained within stable limits. It was concluded that 30% of fluid and electrolyte testing was probably unnecessary. These findings led to an endorsement of changing the test request formats in the hospital information system from profiles to individual tests requiring justification.

  17. Medication Use in the Last Days of Life in Hospital, Hospice, and Home Settings in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arevalo, J.J.; Geijteman, E.C.; Huisman, B.A.H.; Dees, M.K.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Zuylen, L. van; Heide, A. van der; Perez, R.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of medication management in the last days of life is to optimize patient's comfort. Little is known about the medication use in the days before death and how this relates to the care setting. OBJECTIVE: To describe medication use in the last week of life for patients dying in

  18. Protecting and Promoting Mental Health of Nurses in the Hospital Setting: Is It Cost-Effective from An Employer'S Perspective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noben, C.; evers, s.; Nieuwenhuijsen, K.; Ketelaar, S.; Gartner, F.; Sluiter, J.; Smit, H.F.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nurses are at elevated risk of burnout, anxiety and depressive disorders, and may then become less productive. This begs the question if a preventive intervention in the work setting might be cost-saving from a business perspective. Material and Methods: A cost-benefit analysis was

  19. A hospital-based child and adolescent overweight and obesity treatment protocol transferred into a community healthcare setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Pernille Maria; Gamborg, Michael Orland; Trier, Cæcilie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the pandemic of child and adolescent overweight and obesity, improvements in overweight and obesity treatment availability and accessibility are needed. METHODS: In this prospective study, we investigated if reductions in body mass index (BMI) standard deviation scores (SDS......) and waist circumference (WC) would occur during 1.5 years of community-based overweight and obesity treatment based upon an effective hospital-based overweight and obesity treatment protocol, The Children's Obesity Clinics' Treatment protocol. Height, weight, and WC were measured at all consultations...... was invested per child per year. CONCLUSION: BMI SDS and WC were reduced after 1.5 years of treatment. Hence, this community-based overweight and obesity treatment program may help accommodate the need for improvements in treatment availability and accessibility....

  20. Factors Affecting Professional Autonomy of Japanese Nurses Caring for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Patients in a Hospital Setting in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Noriko; Fukuda, Hiromi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to analyze the professional autonomy of Japanese nurses when caring for non-Japanese patients and to identify its contributing factors. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Participants included 238 clinical nurses working at 27 hospitals in Japan. The Intercultural Sensitivity Scale (Chen and Starosta), and the Scale for Professional Autonomy in Nursing (Kikuchi and Harada) were used to measure intercultural sensitivity and professional autonomy. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to identify the most significant factors affecting professional autonomy. Professional autonomy of Japanese nurses caring for non-Japanese patients was significantly lower than when caring for Japanese patients (142.84 vs. 172.85; p autonomy of Japanese nurses by promoting intercultural sensitivity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Introducing the electronic patient record (EPR) in a hospital setting: boundary work and shifting constructions of professional identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håland, Erna

    2012-06-01

    Today's healthcare sector is being transformed by several ongoing processes, among them the introduction of new technologies, new financial models and new ways of organising work. The introduction of the electronic patient record (EPR) is representative and part of these extensive changes. Based on interviews with health personnel and office staff in a regional hospital in Norway, and with health administrators and information technology service-centre staff in the region, the article examines how the introduction of the EPR, as experienced by the participants, affects the work practices and boundaries between various professional groups in the healthcare system and discusses the implications this has for the understanding of medical practice. The article shows how the EPR has become part of the professionals' boundary work; expressing shifting constructions of professional identities. © 2011 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2011 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. An alcohol-focused intervention versus a healthy living intervention for problem drinkers identified in a general hospital setting (ADAPTA): study protocol for a randomized, controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Judith; Tober, Gillian; Raistrick, Duncan; Mdege, Noreen; Dale, Veronica; Crosby, Helen; Godfrey, Christine; Lloyd, Charlie; Toner, Paul; Parrott, Steve

    2013-04-30

    Alcohol misuse is a major cause of premature mortality and ill health. Although there is a high prevalence of alcohol problems among patients presenting to general hospital, many of these people are not help seekers and do not engage in specialist treatment. Hospital admission is an opportunity to steer people towards specialist treatment, which can reduce health-care utilization and costs to the public sector and produce substantial individual health and social benefits. Alcohol misuse is associated with other lifestyle problems, which are amenable to intervention. It has been suggested that the development of a healthy or balanced lifestyle is potentially beneficial for reducing or abstaining from alcohol use, and relapse prevention. The aim of the study is to test whether or not the offer of a choice of health-related lifestyle interventions is more acceptable, and therefore able to engage more problem drinkers in treatment, than an alcohol-focused intervention. This is a pragmatic, randomized, controlled, open pilot study in a UK general hospital setting with concurrent economic evaluation and a qualitative component. Potential participants are those admitted to hospital with a diagnosis likely to be responsive to addiction interventions who score equal to or more than 16 on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). The main purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the acceptability of two sorts of interventions (healthy living related versus alcohol focused) to the participants and to assess the components and processes of the design. Qualitative research will be undertaken to explore acceptability and the impact of the approach, assessment, recruitment and intervention on trial participants and non-participants. The effectiveness of the two treatments will be compared at 6 months using AUDIT scores as the primary outcome measure. There will be additional economic, qualitative and secondary outcome measurements. Development of the study was a

  3. Using sense-making theory to aid understanding of the recognition, assessment and management of pain in patients with dementia in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn; Lichtner, Valentina; Allcock, Nick; Briggs, Michelle; James, Kirstin; Keady, John; Lasrado, Reena; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Swarbrick, Caroline; José Closs, S

    2016-01-01

    The recognition, assessment and management of pain in hospital settings is suboptimal, and is a particular challenge in patients with dementia. The existing process guiding pain assessment and management in clinical settings is based on the assumption that nurses follow a sequential linear approach to decision making. In this paper we re-evaluate this theoretical assumption drawing on findings from a study of pain recognition, assessment and management in patients with dementia. To provide a revised conceptual model of pain recognition, assessment and management based on sense-making theories of decision making. The research we refer to is an exploratory ethnographic study using nested case sites. Patients with dementia (n=31) were the unit of data collection, nested in 11 wards (vascular, continuing care, stroke rehabilitation, orthopaedic, acute medicine, care of the elderly, elective and emergency surgery), located in four NHS hospital organizations in the UK. Data consisted of observations of patients at bedside (170h in total); observations of the context of care; audits of patient hospital records; documentary analysis of artefacts; semi-structured interviews (n=56) and informal open conversations with staff and carers (family members). Existing conceptualizations of pain recognition, assessment and management do not fully explain how the decision process occurs in clinical practice. Our research indicates that pain recognition, assessment and management is not an individual cognitive activity; rather it is carried out by groups of individuals over time and within a specific organizational culture or climate, which influences both health care professional and patient behaviour. We propose a revised theoretical model of decision making related to pain assessment and management for patients with dementia based on theories of sense-making, which is reflective of the reality of clinical decision making in acute hospital wards. The revised model recognizes the

  4. Was it easy to use an Asthma Control Test (ACT) in different clinical practice settings in a tertiary hospital in Singapore?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Lathy; Earnest, Arul; Abisheganaden, John; Chee, Jane

    2009-12-01

    The Asthma Control Test (ACT) is a 5-item self-administered tool designed to assess asthma control. It is said to be simple, easy and can be administered quickly by patients in the clinical practice setting. This stated benefit has yet to be demonstrated in our local clinical practice setting. The aim was to identify factors associated with difficulty in the administration of the ACT in different clinical practice settings in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. This is a prospective study performed from April to June 2008. All patients diagnosed with asthma and referred to an asthma nurse from the in-patient and out-patient clinical practice setting in Tan Tock Seng Hospital were enrolled. Four hundred and thirty-four patients were asked to complete the ACT tool. In the univariate model, we found that age, clinical setting and medical history to be significantly associated with the completion of the ACT. The odds of completion decreased by a factor of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.89 to 0.94) for every year's increase in age, and this was statistically significant (P <0.001). Similarly, the odds ratio of completion for those with more than 3 medical conditions by history were 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48 to 0.71) as compared to those with less than 3 medical conditions by history, and this was also significant (P <0.001). In the multivariate model, we only found age to be an independent and significant factor. After adjusting for age, none of the other variables initially significant in the univariate model remained significant. The results show that the ACT was simple and easy to be administered in younger-aged patients.

  5. COMPARISON OF MEDICAL COSTS AND CARE OF APPENDECTOMY PATIENTS BETWEEN FEE-FOR-SERVICE AND SET FEE FOR DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUP SYSTEMS IN 20 CHINESE HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin-hua; He, Guo-ping; Liu, Jing-wei

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the fee-for-service and set fee for diagnosis-related group systems with regard to quality of medical care and cost to appendectomy patients. We conducted a retrospective study of 208 inpatients (from 20 hospitals) who undergone appendectomy in Changsha, China during 2013. Data were obtained from databases of medical insurance information systems directly connected to the hospital information systems. We collected and compared patient ages, length of study, and total medical costs for impatient appendectomies between patients using fee-for-service and set fee for diagnosisrelated group systems. One hundred thirty-three patients used the fee for service system and 75 used the set fee diagnosis related group system. For those using the diagnosis-related group system, the mean length of hospitalization (6.2 days) and mean number of prescribed antimicrobials (2.4) per patient were significantly lower than those of the patients who used the fee-for-service system (7.3 days and 3.0, respectively; p = 0.018; p < 0.05) and were accompanied by lower medical costs and cost of antimicrobials (RMB 2,518 versus RMB 4,484 and RMB476 versus RMB1,108, respectively; p = 0.000, p = 0.000). There were no significant differences in post-surgical complications between the two systems. The diagnosis-related group system had significantly medical costs for appendectomy compared to the fee-for-service system, without sacrificing quality of medical care.

  6. The experiences of chronically ill patients and registered nurses when they negotiate patient care in hospital settings: a feminist poststructural approach: A qualitative study that explores negotiation of patient care between patients and chronically ill patients in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griscti, Odette; Aston, Megan; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Mcleod, Deborah; Warner, Grace

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of chronically ill patients and registered nurse in negotiating patient care in hospital. Specifically, we explored how social and institutional discourses shaped power relations and negotiation of patient care. Current literature indicates that although nurses embrace this notion, such partnerships are not easily implemented. Most existing studies focus on the role of the nurse as the leader of the partnership with little attention paid to how social and institutional values, beliefs and practices shape nurse/patient power relations; or how these relationships are negotiated between nurses and patients. The theoretical and methodological approaches used in this study are based on the precepts of Foucault and feminist poststructural theorists. In depth interviews were conducted with eight chronically ill patients and 10 registered nurses. Both nurses and patients commented about the relationships that develop between nurses and chronically ill patients and how these relationships facilitate negotiation of patient care. Both parties described challenging moments and how institutional discourses may hinder positive negotiations of care. In this paper we highlight three themes that emerged: getting to know each other, they are not the sickest patients and finding time to listen. This study offers an innovative way of unpacking negotiation of care between chronically ill patients and registered nurses. It exposes how social and institutional discourses play a pivotal role in shaping negotiations between nurses and chronically ill patients. Negotiating care with chronically ill patients is not as asymmetric as portrayed in some of the literature and tends to be based on mutual agreements between nurses and patients. Nurses make it a point to listen to patients' needs and resist institutional discourses that preclude them from spending time with patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Multidimensional evaluation of a radio frequency identification wi-fi location tracking system in an acute-care hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoniewska, Barbara; Graham, Alecia; Gavrilova, Marina; Wah, Dannel; Gilgen, Jonathan; Coke, Jason; Burden, Jack; Nayyar, Shikha; Kaunda, Joseph; Yergens, Dean; Baylis, Barry; Ghali, William A

    2012-01-01

    Real-time locating systems (RTLS) have the potential to enhance healthcare systems through the live tracking of assets, patients and staff. This study evaluated a commercially available RTLS system deployed in a clinical setting, with three objectives: (1) assessment of the location accuracy of the technology in a clinical setting; (2) assessment of the value of asset tracking to staff; and (3) assessment of threshold monitoring applications developed for patient tracking and inventory control. Simulated daily activities were monitored by RTLS and compared with direct research team observations. Staff surveys and interviews concerning the system's effectiveness and accuracy were also conducted and analyzed. The study showed only modest location accuracy, and mixed reactions in staff interviews. These findings reveal that the technology needs to be refined further for better specific location accuracy before full-scale implementation can be recommended.

  8. Early psychological reactions in parents of children with a life threatening illness within a pediatric hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscara, F; McCarthy, M C; Woolf, C; Hearps, S J C; Burke, K; Anderson, V A

    2015-07-01

    Parents of children with life threatening illness or injuries are at elevated risk of distress reactions, involving symptoms of acute stress disorder, depression and anxiety. Currently, the impact of child illness factors is unclear, and to date research systematically examining the prevalence of these psychological reactions across different illness groups with an acute life threat is sparse. This is important to explore given that studies show that parent functioning impacts on the psychological adjustment and recovery of the ill child. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: At four weeks following a child's diagnosis of a serious illness, 49-54% of parents met DSM-IV criteria for acute stress disorder, across a number of illness groups, whereas 15-27% of parents were in the moderate/severe range for depression and anxiety, and 25-31% for stress. Results from this study demonstrate that rates and severity of these psychological reactions in parents of seriously ill children do not vary according to illness type. A life threatening childhood illness/injury can lead to significant distress reactions in parents, with independent studies finding such reactions in several different illness groups. To date, there is limited research systematically comparing the prevalence of adverse parental psychological reactions across different childhood illness groups with an acute life threat. This study aimed to investigate the frequency and severity of symptoms of acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety and general stress in parents, following admission of their child to hospital for a life threatening illness. The study also aimed to explore the relationship between these symptoms, and to determine whether they differ according to illness/injury. Cross-sectional data from a prospective, longitudinal study are reported. Participants were 194 parents of 145 children (49 couples), admitted to cardiology (n=53), oncology (n=40) and pediatric intensive care units (n=52), for serious

  9. Correlation between antimicrobial consumption and antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a hospital setting: a 10-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenovic-Antic, S; Kocic, B; Velickovic-Radovanovic, R; Dinic, M; Petrovic, J; Randjelovic, G; Mitic, R

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats to human health. One of the most important factors leading to the emergence of resistant bacteria is overuse of antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between antimicrobial usage and bacterial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) over a 10-year period in the Clinical Center Niš, one of the biggest tertiary care hospitals in Serbia. We focused on possible relationships between the consumption of carbapenems and beta-lactam antibiotics and the rates of resistance of P. aeruginosa to carbapenems. We recorded utilization of antibiotics expressed as defined daily doses per 100 bed days (DBD). Bacterial resistance was reported as the percentage of resistant isolates (percentage of all resistant and intermediate resistant strains) among all tested isolates. A significant increasing trend in resistance was seen in imipenem (P resistance to amikacin (P resistance to imipenem in P. aeruginosa shows significance (P resistance to meropenem showed a trend towards significance (P > 0·05, Pearson r = 0·607). We found a very good correlation between the use of all beta-lactam and P. aeruginosa resistance to carbapenems (P antimicrobial resistance to carbapenems, significant correlations between the consumption of antibiotics, especially carbapenems and beta-lactams, and rates of antimicrobial resistance of P. aeruginosa to imipenem and meropenem. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Manager Experiences with the Return to Work Process in a Large, Publically Funded, Hospital Setting: Walking a Fine Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Myburgh, Corrie; Young, Amanda Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Previous research on the role of managers in the return to work (RTW) process has primarily been conducted in contexts where the workplace has declared organizational responsibility for the process. While this is a common scenario, in some countries, including Denmark, there is no explicit legal obligation on the workplace to accommodate RTW. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge about the potential roles and contributions of managers in supporting returning employees in a context where they have no legal obligation to actively support RTW. Nineteen Danish hospital managers participated in a one-on-one interview or focus group discussions aimed at identifying barriers and facilitators for supporting employees in their RTW. Five individual interviews and two focus group discussions were conducted. Transcripts were analysed using thematic content analysis. Four main themes were identified: (1) 'Coordinator and collaborator'; (2) 'Dilemmas of the RTW policy enforcer'; (3) 'The right to be sick and absent'; and (4) 'Keep the machinery running…'. Our findings indicated that supervisors' capacity to support returning workers was related to individual, communication, organizational, and policy factors. Instances were observed where supervisors faced the dilemma of balancing ethical and managerial principles with requirements of keeping staffing budgets. Although it is not their legislative responsibility, Danish managers play a key role in the RTW process. As has been observed in other contexts, Danish supervisors struggle to balance considerations for the returning worker with those of their teams.

  11. Hepatic Enzyme Alterations in HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case-Control Study in a Hospital Setting in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Obirikorang, Christian; Fianu, Vincent; Asare, Isaac; Dakorah, Mavis

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing hepatic injury in HIV infection can be a herculean task for clinicians as several factors may be involved. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and disease progression on hepatic enzymes in HIV patients. A case-control study conducted from January to May 2014 at the Akwatia Government Hospital, Eastern region, Ghana, The study included 209 HIV patients on ART (designated HIV-ART) and 132 ART-naive HIV patients (designated HIV-Controls). Data gathered included demography, clinical history and results of blood tests for hepatic enzymes. We employed the Fisher's, Chi-square, unpaired t-test and Pearson's correlation in analysis, using GraphPad Prism and SPSS. A P value 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between hepatic enzymes (ALP, ALT, AST and GGT) for both groups (p enzymes for both groups was small. Antiretroviral therapy amongst this population has minimal effects on hepatic enzymes and does not suggest modifications in therapy. Hepatic injury may occur in HIV, even in the absence of ART and other traditional factors. Monitoring of hepatic enzymes is still important in HIV patients.

  12. An exploratory study of knowledge brokering in hospital settings: facilitating knowledge sharing and learning for patient safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Currie, Graeme; Crompton, Amanda; Bishop, Simon

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study of intra-organisational knowledge brokers working within three large acute hospitals in the English National Health Services. Knowledge brokering is promoted as a strategy for supporting knowledge sharing and learning in healthcare, especially in the diffusion of research evidence into practice. Less attention has been given to brokers who support knowledge sharing and learning within healthcare organisations. With specific reference to the need for learning around patient safety, this paper focuses on the structural position and role of four types of intra-organisational brokers. Through ethnographic research it examines how variations in formal role, location and relationships shape how they share and support the use of knowledge across organisational and occupational boundaries. It suggests those occupying hybrid organisational roles, such as clinical-managers, are often best positioned to support knowledge sharing and learning because of their 'ambassadorial' type position and legitimacy to participate in multiple communities through dual-directed relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J; Koziol, Deloris E

    2013-01-01

    The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (Pinformation-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources.

  14. [Daily routine of informal caregivers-needs and concerns with regard to the discharge of their elderly family members from the hospital setting-a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küttel, Cornelia; Schäfer-Keller, Petra; Brunner, Corinne; Conca, Antoinette; Schütz, Philipp; Frei, Irena Anna

    2015-04-01

    The care of an elderly frail and ill family member places a great responsibility on informal caregivers. Following discharge of the older person from the hospital setting it can be observed that caregivers are often inadequately informed about aspects such as health status, prognosis, complications, and care interventions. Concerns and needs of caregivers regarding their daily living and routine following hospital discharge has not been investigated and is considered important for an optimized discharge management. To explore personal needs and concerns of informal caregivers with regard to daily living prior to discharge of their family member. Eight narrative interviews were conducted with caregivers and were analysed using Mayring's content analysing method. All caregivers had concerns regarding the maintenance of a functional daily routine. As well as caring and household duties, this functional daily routine included negotiating one's own personal time off duties, the reality of the deteriorating health status of the family member and the associated sense of hope. The intensity of family ties affected the functional daily routine. Caregivers had different expectations with regard to their integration during the hospital period. To support caregivers in their situation it is advisable to assess the functional daily routine of caregivers. Their need for time off their household and caring duties and their informational and educational needs to pertaining to disease progression, possible sources of support and symptom management should be recognised. Further inquiries into caregiver's involvement and responsibilities in the discharge process are needed.

  15. A phenomenological study into the impact of the sign-off mentor in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Trudy; Cochrane, Jill

    2014-06-01

    Mentoring provides an essential quality assurance mechanism within undergraduate support and assessment of nurses. Recent changes to the standards for supporting pre-registration learners in clinical practice have provided additional structure to this process. Existing evidence suggests there are numerous challenges such as balancing clinical and mentoring priorities and making appropriate decisions; evidence about the sign-off mentor role in particular is currently lacking. This study explores the impact of the sign-off mentor role within the acute setting utilising a phenomenological approach. A purposive sample of 6 sign-off mentors contributed to data collection via the use of semi-structured interviews. Data were collected using a digital tape recorder and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of findings allowed for the development of 3 main themes which are accountability, time and commitment. A key finding of this study is the change in focus for sign-off mentors to one of assessment of clinical competence and professional regulation as opposed to mentors who have concentrated on the teaching and pastoral aspects of this role. However, sustainability requires further investment in this new role from a managerial and educational perspective. Recommendations include further attempts to embed protected time into organisational processes, the consideration of limiting students to sign-off mentors when mentoring a final placement student and negotiating maximum number of exposures to this role within a set time frame. © 2013.

  16. Multiplex molecular testing for management of infectious gastroenteritis in a hospital setting: a comparative diagnostic and clinical utility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, E; Edgeworth, J; Bisnauthsing, K; Bible, J; Cliff, P; Aarons, E; Klein, J; Patel, A; Goldenberg, S

    2014-08-01

    Laboratory diagnosis and clinical management of inpatients with diarrhoea is complex and time consuming. Tests are often requested sequentially and undertaken in different laboratories. This causes prolonged unnecessary presumptive isolation of patients, because most cases are non-infectious. A molecular multiplex test (Luminex(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP)) was compared with conventional testing over 8 months to determine diagnostic accuracy, turnaround times, laboratory costs, use of isolation facilities and user acceptability. A total of 262 (12%) patients had a pathogen detected by conventional methods compared with 483 (22.1%) by GPP. Most additional cases were detected in patients developing symptoms in the first 4 days of admission. Additional cases were detected because of presumed improved diagnostic sensitivity but also because clinicians had not requested the correct pathogen. Turnaround time (41.8 h) was faster than bacterial culture (66.5 h) and parasite investigation (66.5 h) but slower than conventional testing for Clostridium difficile (17.3 h) and viruses (27 h). The test could allow simplified requesting by clinicians and a consolidated laboratory workflow, reducing the overall number of specimens received by the laboratory. A total of 154 isolation days were saved at an estimated cost of £30 800. Consumables and labour were estimated at £150 641 compared with £63 431 for conventional testing. Multiplex molecular testing using a panel of targets allowed enhanced detection and a consolidated laboratory workflow. This is likely to be of greater benefit to cases that present within the first 4 days of hospital admission. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  17. High burden of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) fecal carriage at a teaching hospital: cost-effectiveness of screening in low-resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidah, Abdul Rahman; Mohammad, Nurul Izzah; Suraiya, Siti; Harun, Azian

    2017-01-01

    Infections by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) have been continuously growing and pose challenge to health institution globally. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriacea (CRE) was identified as one of the MDR-GNB which has limited treatment options and higher mortality compared to those of sensitive strains. We report an increased burden of CRE fecal carriage at a hospital in the North-eastern region of Malaysia. A retrospective descriptive study from August 2013 to December 2015 was conducted in the Medical Microbiology & Parasitology laboratory of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, which is a tertiary teaching hospital with more than 700 beds. This hospital treats patients with various medical and surgical conditions. Suspected CRE from any clinical specimens received by the laboratory was identified and confirmed using standard protocols. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed to determine the genotype. Altogether, 8306 Enterobacteriaceae was isolated from various clinical specimens during the study period and 477/8306 (5.74%) were CRE. Majority of the isolated CRE were Klebsiella [408/477, (85.5%)], of which Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant species, 388/408 (95%). CRE were mainly isolated from rectal swab (screening), 235/477 (49.3%); urine, 76/477 (15.9%); blood, 46/477 (9.6%) and about 7.1% from tracheal aspirate. One hundred and thirty-six isolates were subjected to genotype determination and., 112/136 (82.4%) showed positive detection of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) gene ( bla NDM1 ). The study noted a high numbers of CRE isolated especially from rectal swabs. Active screening results in significant cost pressures and therefore should be revisited and revised, especially in low resource settings.

  18. High burden of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE fecal carriage at a teaching hospital: cost-effectiveness of screening in low-resource setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahman Zaidah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB have been continuously growing and pose challenge to health institution globally. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriacea (CRE was identified as one of the MDR-GNB which has limited treatment options and higher mortality compared to those of sensitive strains. We report an increased burden of CRE fecal carriage at a hospital in the North-eastern region of Malaysia. Methods A retrospective descriptive study from August 2013 to December 2015 was conducted in the Medical Microbiology & Parasitology laboratory of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, which is a tertiary teaching hospital with more than 700 beds. This hospital treats patients with various medical and surgical conditions. Suspected CRE from any clinical specimens received by the laboratory was identified and confirmed using standard protocols. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was performed to determine the genotype. Results Altogether, 8306 Enterobacteriaceae was isolated from various clinical specimens during the study period and 477/8306 (5.74% were CRE. Majority of the isolated CRE were Klebsiella [408/477, (85.5%], of which Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant species, 388/408 (95%. CRE were mainly isolated from rectal swab (screening, 235/477 (49.3%; urine, 76/477 (15.9%; blood, 46/477 (9.6% and about 7.1% from tracheal aspirate. One hundred and thirty-six isolates were subjected to genotype determination and., 112/136 (82.4% showed positive detection of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1 gene (bla NDM1. Conclusion The study noted a high numbers of CRE isolated especially from rectal swabs. Active screening results in significant cost pressures and therefore should be revisited and revised, especially in low resource settings.

  19. Pressure ulcer and patient characteristics--A point prevalence study in a tertiary hospital of India based on the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel minimum data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Chitra; George, Joby V; Mehta, Yatin; Wangmo, Namgyal

    2015-08-01

    Pressure ulcers is a frequent problem in hospitalized patients. Several prevalence studies have been conducted across the globe. Little information is available regarding prevalence of pressure ulcers in India. The aim was to identify the prevalence of pressure ulcers in one of the tertiary hospital in northern India and the factors associated with its development. A cross sectional point prevalence study. European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) data collection form. Ethics approval was obtained prior to start of the study. Total of 358 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients above 18 years of age admitted in intensive care units and wards were included in the study. Patients admitted in emergency, day care, coronary care unit were excluded because of their short duration of hospital stay (varies from 24 to 72 h usually). All patients admitted before midnight on the predetermined day were included. The Braden scale was used to identify the risk of developing pressure ulcers. European Pressure ulcer advisory panel (EPUAP) minimum data set was used to collect prevalence data. The overall prevalence rate was 7.8%.The sacrum and heel were more commonly affected. Grade III pressure ulcers were the most common (42.8%). The pressure ulcer prevalence rate in our hospital was lower than that published in international studies. Severe forms of pressure ulcers were commonly encountered This data provides background information that may help us in developing protocols for applying effective practices for prevention of pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient-controlled hospital admission for patients with severe mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christoffer Torgaard; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Hastrup, Lene Halling

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-controlled hospital admission for individuals with severe mental disorders is a novel approach in mental healthcare. Patients can admit themselves to a hospital unit for a short stay without being assessed by a psychiatrist or contacting the emergency department. Previous...... studies assessing the outcomes of patient-controlled hospital admission found trends towards reduction in the use of coercive measures and length of hospital stay; however, these studies have methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Larger studies are needed to estimate the effect of patient-controlled...... hospital admission on the use of coercion and of healthcare services. DESIGN AND METHODS: We aim to recruit at least 315 patients who are offered a contract for patient-controlled hospital admissions in eight different hospitals in Denmark. Patients will be followed-up for at least 1 year to compare...

  1. Contemporary utilization of antithrombotic therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: an audit in an Australian hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Ekta Yogeshkumar; Anderson, Elizabeth; Chow, Clara; Wang, Yishen; Bajorek, Beata

    2018-02-01

    To document antithrombotic utilization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), particularly, recently approved NOACs (nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants) and warfarin; and identify factors predicting the use of NOACs versus warfarin. A retrospective audit was conducted in an Australian hospital. Data pertaining to inpatients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation (AF) admitted between January and December 2014 were extracted. This included patient demographics, risk factors (stroke, bleeding), social history, medical conditions, medication history, medication safety issues, medication adherence, and antithrombotic prescribed at admission and discharge. Among 199 patients reviewed, 84.0% were discharged on antithrombotics. Anticoagulants (± antiplatelets) were most frequently (52.0%) prescribed (two-thirds were prescribed warfarin, the remainder NOACs), followed by antiplatelets (33.0%). Among 41 patients receiving NOACs, 59.0% were prescribed rivaroxaban, 24.0% dabigatran, and 17.0% apixaban. Among patients aged 75 years and over, antiplatelets were most frequently used (37.0%), followed by warfarin (33.0%), then NOACs (14.0%). Compared with their younger counterparts, patients aged 75 years and over were significantly less likely to receive NOACs (14.0% versus 28.0%, p = 0.01). Among the 'most eligible' patients (Congestive Cardiac Failure, Hypertension (, Age ⩾ 75 years, Age= 65-74 years, Diabetes Mellitus, Stroke/ Transient Ischaemic Attack/ Thromboembolism, Vascular disease, Sex female[CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc] score ⩾2 and no bleeding risk factors), 46.0% were not anticoagulated on discharge. Patients with anaemia (68.0% versus 86.0%, p = 0.04) or a history of bleeding (65.0% versus 87.0%, p = 0.01) were less likely to receive antithrombotics compared with those without these risk factors. Warfarin therapy was less frequently prescribed among patients with cognitive impairment compared with patients with no cognitive issues (12.0% versus 23

  2. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Three Different Automated Medication Systems Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Automated medication systems have been found to reduce errors in the medication process, but little is known about the cost-effectiveness of such systems. The objective of this study was to perform a model-based indirect cost-effectiveness comparison of three different, real-world automated medication systems compared with current standard practice. The considered automated medication systems were a patient-specific automated medication system (psAMS), a non-patient-specific automated medication system (npsAMS), and a complex automated medication system (cAMS). The economic evaluation used original effect and cost data from prospective, controlled, before-and-after studies of medication systems implemented at a Danish hematological ward and an acute medical unit. Effectiveness was described as the proportion of clinical and procedural error opportunities that were associated with one or more errors. An error was defined as a deviation from the electronic prescription, from standard hospital policy, or from written procedures. The cost assessment was based on 6-month standardization of observed cost data. The model-based comparative cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted with system-specific assumptions of the effect size and costs in scenarios with consumptions of 15,000, 30,000, and 45,000 doses per 6-month period. With 30,000 doses the cost-effectiveness model showed that the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided clinical error was €24 for the psAMS, €26 for the npsAMS, and €386 for the cAMS. Comparison of the cost-effectiveness of the three systems in relation to different valuations of an avoided error showed that the psAMS was the most cost-effective system regardless of error type or valuation. The model-based indirect comparison against the conventional practice showed that psAMS and npsAMS were more cost-effective than the cAMS alternative, and that psAMS was more cost-effective than npsAMS.

  3. Pediatric Heart Failure, Lagging, and Sagging of Care in Low Income Settings: A Hospital Based Review of Cases in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmon Gebremariam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Causes of acute heart failure in children range from simple myocarditis complicating chest infection to complex structural heart diseases. Objective. To describe patterns, predictors of mortality, and management outcomes of acute heart failure in children. Methods. In retrospective review, between February 2012 and October 2015 at a tertiary center, 106 admitted cases were selected consecutively from discharge records. Data were extracted from patients chart and analyzed using SPSS software package. t-test and statistical significance at P value < 0.05 with 95% CI were used. Result. Acute heart failure accounted for 2.9% of the total pediatric admissions. The age ranged from 2 months up to 14 years with mean age of 8 years. Male to female ratio is 1 : 2.1. Rheumatic heart disease accounted for 53.7%; pneumonia, anemia, infective endocarditis, and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever were the main precipitating causes. Death occurred in 19% of cases. Younger age at presentation, low hemoglobin concentration, and undernutrition were associated with death with P value of 0.00, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions and Recommendation. Pediatric heart failure in our settings is diagnosed mainly in older age groups and mostly precipitated due to preventable causes. Significant mortality is observed in relation to factors that can be preventable in children with underlying structural heart disease. Early suspicion and diagnosis of cases may reduce the observed high mortality.

  4. Nurses Need Training and Policies to Address Barriers to Use of Mobile Devices and Apps for Direct Patient Care in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Wadson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Giles-Smith, L., Spencer, A., Shaw, C., Porter, C., & Lobchuk, M. (2017. A study of the impact of an educational intervention on nurse attitudes and behaviours toward mobile device and application use in hospital settings. Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association/Journal de l'Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada, 38(1, 12-29. doi: 10.5596/c17-003 Abstract Objective - To describe nurses’ usage of and attitudes toward mobile devices and apps and assess the impact of an educational intervention by hospital librarians and educators Design - Descriptive, cross-sectional survey, one-group pre- and post-test, and post-intervention focus group Setting - One 251-bed community hospital and one 554-bed tertiary care hospital in Winnipeg, Canada Subjects - 348 inpatient medical and surgical nurses Methods – The study had two phases. In Phase I, respondents completed a survey of 21 fixed and open-ended questions offered online or in print to a convenience sample from the community hospital and a random sample of medical and surgical units from the tertiary hospital. The survey collected demographic data and included questions about mobile devices and apps covering current awareness of hospital policy, ownership, internet access, usage patterns, concerns, and attitudes toward their use for direct patient care. It also included information to recruit volunteers for Phase II. In Phase II, participants attended four 30-minute educational sessions facilitated by the researchers. The first session addressed the regional health authority’s policies, Personal Health Information Act, and infection control practices. Subsequent sessions covered relevance, features, and training exercises for one or more selected apps. Participants installed five free or low-cost apps, which were chosen by the librarians and nurse educators, on their mobile devices: Medscape, Lab Tests Online, Lexicomp, Twitter, and Evernote. Participants

  5. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for chronically ill patients with comorbid depressive disorder in the general hospital setting, a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorder is one of the most common disorders, and is highly prevalent in chronically ill patients. The presence of comorbid depression has a negative influence on quality of life, health care costs, self-care, morbidity, and mortality. Early diagnosis and well-organized treatment of depression has a positive influence on these aspects. Earlier research in the USA has reported good results with regard to the treatment of depression with a collaborative care approach and an antidepressant algorithm. In the UK 'Problem Solving Treatment' has proved to be feasible. However, in the general hospital setting this approach has not yet been evaluated. Methods/Design CC: DIM (Collaborative Care: Depression Initiative in the Medical setting is a two-armed randomised controlled trial with randomisation at patient level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in general hospitals in the Netherlands based on a collaborative care framework, including contracting, 'Problem Solving Treatment', antidepressant algorithm, and manual-guided self-help. 126 outpatients with diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiovascular diseases will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Patients will be included if they have been diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on the DSM-IV criteria in a two-step screening method. The intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach; the control group will receive 'care as usual'. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months will be performed by means of questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, as measured with the PHQ-9. The secondary outcome measure is the cost-effectiveness of these treatments according to the TiC-P, the EuroQol and the SF-36. Discussion Earlier research has indicated that depressive disorder is

  6. Communication and well-being outcomes of a hybrid service delivery model of intensive impairment-based treatment for aphasia in the hospital setting: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Rachel; Cardell, Elizabeth; Lawrie, Melissa; Gunning, Dana

    2018-06-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effects of an intensive hybrid service delivery model (i.e., combining face-to-face individual, computer and group therapy) on communication and well-being for people with aphasia (PWA) in the hospital setting. The study explored two different intensities of the hybrid model, 4 h/week (Hybrid-4) and 8 h/week (Hybrid-8) both for 8 weeks. Participants ranging from 1 month to 5 years post-onset were allocated using matched-pair randomisation to receive either Hybrid-4 (n = 5) or Hybrid-8 (n = 4) and assessed using a comprehensive language battery by a blinded assessor, as well as selected activity, participation and well-being measures before, immediately after and 4-week post-treatment. All participants in Hybrid-4 and three out of four participants in Hybrid-8 demonstrated clinically significant improvement to measures of language impairment immediately post-treatment, with the majority also demonstrating maintenance effects 4-week post-treatment. Clinically significant improvements to activity, participation and well-being measures were also observed across participants in both groups. Findings support the potential benefit of employing an intensive hybrid service model and suggest that both 4 and 8 h per week of impairment-based treatment for 8 weeks may result in improvements in communication and well-being for some PWA across different stages of recovery. Implications for rehabilitation The present findings help bridge the gap between what evidence suggests is effective intensity of rehabilitation for aphasia and what can be practically delivered in real-world hospital settings. Findings support the potential clinical value of employing a hybrid service model (using computer, group and individual therapy) to deliver intensive rehabilitation to people with aphasia in the hospital setting, and suggest that clinically significant improvements to communication and well-being can result when the model is

  7. Development and validation of a casemix classification to predict costs of specialist palliative care provision across inpatient hospice, hospital and community settings in the UK: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Dzingina, Mendwas; Firth, Alice M; Davies, Joanna M; Douiri, Abdel; O'Brien, Suzanne M; Pinto, Cathryn; Pask, Sophie; Higginson, Irene J; Eagar, Kathy; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2018-03-17

    Provision of palliative care is inequitable with wide variations across conditions and settings in the UK. Lack of a standard way to classify by case complexity is one of the principle obstacles to addressing this. We aim to develop and validate a casemix classification to support the prediction of costs of specialist palliative care provision. Phase I: A cohort study to determine the variables and potential classes to be included in a casemix classification. Data are collected from clinicians in palliative care services across inpatient hospice, hospital and community settings on: patient demographics, potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use. Cost predictors are derived using multivariate regression and then incorporated into a classification using classification and regression trees. Internal validation will be conducted by bootstrapping to quantify any optimism in the predictive performance (calibration and discrimination) of the developed classification. Phase II: A mixed-methods cohort study across settings for external validation of the classification developed in phase I. Patient and family caregiver data will be collected longitudinally on demographics, potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use. This will be triangulated with data collected from clinicians on potential complexity/casemix criteria and patient-level resource use, and with qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers about care provision across difference settings. The classification will be refined on the basis of its performance in the validation data set. The study has been approved by the National Health Service Health Research Authority Research Ethics Committee. The results are expected to be disseminated in 2018 through papers for publication in major palliative care journals; policy briefs for clinicians, commissioning leads and policy makers; and lay summaries for patients and public. ISRCTN90752212. © Article author

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of WHO verbal autopsy tool for ascertaining causes of neonatal deaths in the urban setting of Pakistan: a hospital-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Ariff, Shabina; Khan, Ubaidullah; Turab, Ali; Khan, Gul Nawaz; Habib, Atif; Sadiq, Kamran; Suhag, Zamir; Bhatti, Zaid; Ahmed, Imran; Bhal, Rajiv; Bhutta, Zulfiqar Ahmed

    2015-10-05

    Globally, clinical certification of the cause of neonatal death is not commonly available in developing countries. Under such circumstances it is imperative to use available WHO verbal autopsy tool to ascertain causes of death for strategic health planning in countries where resources are limited and the burden of neonatal death is high. The study explores the diagnostic accuracy of WHO revised verbal autopsy tool for ascertaining the causes of neonatal deaths against reference standard diagnosis obtained from standardized clinical and supportive hospital data. All neonatal deaths were recruited between August 2006 -February 2008 from two tertiary teaching hospitals in Province Sindh, Pakistan. The reference standard cause of death was established by two senior pediatricians within 2 days of occurrence of death using the International Cause of Death coding system. For verbal autopsy, trained female community health worker interviewed mother or care taker of the deceased within 2-6 weeks of death using a modified WHO verbal autopsy tool. Cause of death was assigned by 2 trained pediatricians. The performance was assessed in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Out of 626 neonatal deaths, cause-specific mortality fractions for neonatal deaths were almost similar in both verbal autopsy and reference standard diagnosis. Sensitivity of verbal autopsy was more than 93% for diagnosing prematurity and 83.5% for birth asphyxia. However the verbal autopsy didn't have acceptable accuracy for diagnosing the congenital malformation 57%. The specificity for all five major causes of neonatal deaths was greater than 90%. The WHO revised verbal autopsy tool had reasonable validity in determining causes of neonatal deaths. The tool can be used in resource limited community-based settings where neonatal mortality rate is high and death certificates from hospitals are not available.

  9. Findings from non-participant observational data concerning health promoting nursing practice in the acute hospital setting focusing on generalist nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Dympna

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports on the non-participant observational findings from a study, which examined hospital-based nurses' health promoting nursing practice in an acute setting. Nurses are considered to have a key role in health promotion. However, the development of the role of the generalist hospital-based nurse in health promotion has been slow and is not well-understood. The conceptual framework used was based on the Ottawa Charter (WHO 1986). A single qualitative embedded case study, employing data source and methodological triangulation was used. A framework for identifying nurse's use of health promotion methods was developed and used to collect non-participant observations on a purposive sample of eight nurses working on an acute hospital ward. Following the observations a semi structured one-to-one interview was conducted with each observed nurse. One randomly selected patient that the observed nurse had cared for during the observations was also interviewed. Qualitative data analysis based on the work of Miles and Huberman was employed. Two categories were identified 'health promotion strategies and content' and 'patient participation'. The findings indicated that, overall, the strategies used by nurses to promote health were prescriptive and individualistic. The main strategy observed was information giving and the content was 'preparatory information'. Predominantly, nurses practised traditional health education. Overall, patient participation was limited to minor personal aspects of care as nurses focused on the routine and getting the tasks completed. There was no evidence of a ward culture which valued health promotion. Ward managers are key in creating a culture for health promotion. A review of the methods of organizing nursing care is warranted. Nursing programmes must highlight health promotion as integral to practice and emphasis the socio-political dimensions of health promotion.

  10. Training a Chest Compression of 6-7 cm Depth for High Quality Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Hospital Setting: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaehoon; Lim, Tae Ho; Cho, Youngsuk; Kang, Hyunggoo; Kim, Wonhee; Chee, Youngjoon; Song, Yeongtak; Kim, In Young; Lee, Juncheol

    2016-03-01

    During cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), chest compression (CC) depth is influenced by the surface on which the patient is placed. We hypothesized that training healthcare providers to perform a CC depth of 6-7 cm (instead of 5-6 cm) on a manikin placed on a mattress during CPR in the hospital might improve their proper CC depth. This prospective randomised controlled study involved 66 premedical students without CPR training. The control group was trained to use a CC depth of 5-6 cm (G 5-6), while the experimental group was taught to use a CC depth of 6-7 cm (G 6-7) with a manikin on the floor. All participants performed CCs for 2 min on a manikin that was placed on a bed 1 hour and then again 4 weeks after the training without a feedback. The parameters of CC quality (depth, rate, % of accurate depth) were assessed and compared between the 2 groups. Four students were excluded due to loss to follow-up and recording errors, and data of 62 were analysed. CC depth and % of accurate depth were significantly higher among students in the G 6-7 than G 5-6 both 1 hour and 4 weeks after the training (p0.05). Training healthcare providers to perform a CC depth of 6-7 cm could improve quality CC depth when performing CCs on patients who are placed on a mattress during CPR in a hospital setting.

  11. 'Spiritual care is not the hospital's business': a qualitative study on the perspectives of patients about the integration of spirituality in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Nicolas; Jobin, Guy; Beloucif, Sadek

    2016-08-24

    Several studies have investigated the relationship between spirituality and health. They claim the need to develop spiritual care to answer patients' spiritual suffering and to promote spiritual well-being. However, the present study critically analyses the following idea: we ought to take care of the spiritual dimension of patients. Does this interest for spirituality not come from healthcare professionals' desire more than from the patients themselves? To answer this question, we explored the perspectives of individuals with cancer regarding the integration of spirituality in the healthcare setting. Qualitative design using semistructured interviews to focus on subjective experience. One of the major public hospitals of Paris, France. 20 participants (n=11 men and n=9 women) with advanced cancer (stage IV). Age ranges from 37 to 80 years with a mean age of 58.7 years. Findings demonstrated that participants do not expect help from the hospital to handle spiritual issues but they wish for their spiritual dimension to be simply recognised as a part of their identity and dignity. Findings invite us to view the question of spirituality not as a new dimension of care but as a new challenge for healthcare institutions to recognise that the persons they are working for are not just 'patients' but human beings with a precious interior life. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Evaluation of a primary-care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital by a student business group: implementing business training within the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisa Poon, W Y; Covington, Jennifer P; Dempsey, Lauren S; Goetgeluck, Scott L; Marscher, William F; Morelli, Sierra C; Powell, Jana E; Rivers, Elizabeth M; Roth, Ira G

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the use of students' business skills in optimizing teaching opportunities, student learning, and client satisfaction in a primary health care setting at a veterinary teaching hospital. Seven veterinary-student members of the local chapter of the Veterinary Business Management Association (VBMA) evaluated the primary-care service at the University of Georgia (UGA) veterinary teaching hospital and assessed six areas of focus: (1) branding and marketing, (2) client experience, (3) staff and staffing, (4) student experience, (5) time management, and (6) standard operating procedures and protocols. For each area of focus, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were identified. Of the six areas, two were identified as areas in need of immediate improvement, the first being the updating of standard operating protocols and the second being time management and the flow of appointments. Recommendations made for these two areas were implemented. Overall, the staff and students provided positive feedback on the recommended changes. Through such a student-centered approach to improving the quality of their education, students are empowered and are held accountable for their learning environment. The fact that the VBMA functions without a parent organization and that the primary-care service at UGA functions primarily as a separate entity from the specialty services at the College of Veterinary Medicine allowed students to have a direct impact on their learning environment. We hope that this model for advancing business education will be studied and promoted to benefit both veterinary education and business practice within academia.

  13. Investigation of the international comparability of population-based routine hospital data set derived comorbidity scores for patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Morris, Eva J A; Tataru, Daniela; Coupland, Victoria H; Smith, Andrew; Milne, Roger L; Te Marvelde, Luc; Baker, Deborah; Young, Jane; Turner, Donna; Nishri, Diane; Earle, Craig; Shack, Lorraine; Gavin, Anna; Fitzpatrick, Deirdre; Donnelly, Conan; Lin, Yulan; Møller, Bjørn; Brewster, David H; Deas, Andrew; Huws, Dyfed W; White, Ceri; Warlow, Janet; Rashbass, Jem; Peake, Michael D

    2018-04-01

    The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership (ICBP) identified significant international differences in lung cancer survival. Differing levels of comorbid disease across ICBP countries has been suggested as a potential explanation of this variation but, to date, no studies have quantified its impact. This study investigated whether comparable, robust comorbidity scores can be derived from the different routine population-based cancer data sets available in the ICBP jurisdictions and, if so, use them to quantify international variation in comorbidity and determine its influence on outcome. Linked population-based lung cancer registry and hospital discharge data sets were acquired from nine ICBP jurisdictions in Australia, Canada, Norway and the UK providing a study population of 233 981 individuals. For each person in this cohort Charlson, Elixhauser and inpatient bed day Comorbidity Scores were derived relating to the 4-36 months prior to their lung cancer diagnosis. The scores were then compared to assess their validity and feasibility of use in international survival comparisons. It was feasible to generate the three comorbidity scores for each jurisdiction, which were found to have good content, face and concurrent validity. Predictive validity was limited and there was evidence that the reliability was questionable. The results presented here indicate that interjurisdictional comparability of recorded comorbidity was limited due to probable differences in coding and hospital admission practices in each area. Before the contribution of comorbidity on international differences in cancer survival can be investigated an internationally harmonised comorbidity index is required. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. The effect of facility characteristics on patient safety, patient experience, and service availability for procedures in non-hospital-affiliated outpatient settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglas, Nancy F; Battistelli, Molly F; Nicholson, Wanda K; Sobota, Mindy; Urman, Richard D; Roberts, Sarah C M

    2018-01-01

    Over recent decades, numerous medical procedures have migrated out of hospitals and into freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and physician offices, with possible implications for patient outcomes. In response, states have passed regulations for office-based surgeries, private organizations have established standards for facility accreditation, and professional associations have developed clinical guidelines. While abortions have been performed in office setting for decades, states have also enacted laws requiring that facilities that perform abortions meet specific requirements. The extent to which facility requirements have an impact on patient outcomes-for any procedure-is unclear. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effect of outpatient facility type (ASC vs. office) and specific facility characteristics (e.g., facility accreditation, emergency response protocols, clinician qualifications, physical plant characteristics, other policies) on patient safety, patient experience and service availability in non-hospital-affiliated outpatient settings. To identify relevant research, we searched databases of the published academic literature (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science) and websites of governmental and non-governmental organizations. Two investigators reviewed 3049 abstracts and full-text articles against inclusion/exclusion criteria and assessed the quality of 22 identified articles. Most studies were hampered by methodological challenges, with 12 of 22 not meeting minimum quality criteria. Of 10 studies included in the review, most (6) examined the effect of facility type on patient safety. Existing research appears to indicate no difference in patient safety for outpatient procedures performed in ASCs vs. physician offices. Research about specific facility characteristics is insufficient to draw conclusions. More and higher quality research is needed to determine if there is a public health problem to be addressed through facility

  15. Creating opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred care: how nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use communication strategies when managing medications in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    management in an acute hospital setting. Language discourses shaped and were shaped by complex power relations between patients and clinicians and among clinicians themselves. Clinicians need to be encouraged to have regular conversations to talk about and challenge each other's practices. More emphasis should be placed on ensuring that patients are given opportunities to voice their concerns about how their medications are managed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of the performance of C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE and its usefulness in a hospital setting with a high prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Lee, Miae

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is crucial for patient care, infection control, and efficient surveillance. We evaluated C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE (QCC; TechLab), which detects glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen (QCC-Ag) and toxin A/B (QCC-Tox) simultaneously, and compared it to the laboratory diagnostics for CDI currently in use in a tertiary hospital setting with a high prevalence of CDI. QCC, RIDASCREEN C. difficile toxin A/B assay (Toxin EIA; R-Biopharm AG), chromID C. difficile agar (bioMérieux) culture (ChromID culture), and Xpert C. difficile PCR assay (Xpert PCR; Cepheid) were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. Performances of the assays were compared against that of Xpert PCR as a reference. Of the 231 loose stool specimens, 83 (35.9%) were positive by Xpert PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 97.6%, 93.9%, 90.0%, and 98.6%, respectively, for QCC-Ag and 55.4%, 100%, 100%, and 80.0%, respectively, for QCC-Tox. The median threshold cycle values of the QCC-Tox(+) specimens were lower than those of the QCC-Tox(-) specimens. Results of QCC as an initial screening test were confirmed in 81.0% (187/231) of samples; these specimens did not require further testing. QCC is a rapid, easy, and cost-effective method that would be a useful first-line screening assay for laboratory diagnosis of CDI in a tertiary hospital with a high prevalence of CDI. A two-step algorithm using QCC as an initial screening tool, followed by Xpert PCR as a confirmatory test, is a practical and cost-effective approach. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  17. Gender Inequalities in Remote Settings: Analysis of 105,025 Medical Records of a Rural Hospital in Ethiopia (2005-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, Sandro; Somigliana, Edgardo; Farese, Pasquale; Ademe, Tsegaye; Desta, Yonas; Putoto, Giovanni; Manenti, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    Gender inequalities in Sub-Saharan Africa are deemed relevant but data to support this view are scanty. Retrospective analysis of a large dataset of 105,025 patients admitted to an Ethiopian rural private, non-for-profit hospital over a 11 years period (2005-2015). Since 2001, the hospital and the local community are involved in a long-term, comprehensive and externally-supported health care intervention. The total number of admissions was higher for females (61.9% of the total) mainly because of the high frequency of admissions for obstetrics conditions. The total male-to-female ratio (M:F) was 0.6. Except for malaria, men had more admissions for the other leading causes, with the highest M:F being found for injuries (2.7) and musculoskeletal diseases (1.7). Overall, excluding admissions for pregnancy-related issues, the M:F was 1.4. The frequency of admissions changed with age and gender. Female admissions prevailed in the reproductive age period (from 15 to 44 years of age) while males admissions prevailed in the younger and older age groups. The case fatality rate was higher for men (M:F = 2.0). The total M:F and the M:F excluding pregnancy-related admissions did not change during the study period. Gender inequalities do exist in rural remote setting but tend to affect women differently during their lifespan. Even if gender inequalities generally favor males, the substantial proportion of admissions for pregnancy-related situations is encouraging.

  18. [Predictive factors of seclusion duration in patients hospitalized in psychiatry settings. A prospective multisite study in the DTRF Paris-Sud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costemale-Lacoste, J-F; Cerboneschi, V; Trichard, C; De Beaurepaire, R; Villemain, F; Metton, J-P; Debacq, C; Ghanem, T; Martelli, C; Baup, E; Loeb, E; Hardy, P

    2018-03-23

    In psychiatric inpatient settings seclusion is a last resort to ensure the safety of the patient, other patients, and staff from disturbed behaviors. Despite its major interest for patients, seclusion could negatively impact treatment adherence and patient/staff relationships. Indeed, some secluded patients report a feeling of guilt during the measure and do not consider seclusion to be a healthcare intervention. To be more beneficial and to reduce the feeling by patients of being forced, seclusions should be as short and rare as possible. In other words, measures to reduce seclusion are available and have been clearly identified. Such measures could be applied, in the first instance, in patients with longer duration. In this way, the aim of this study was to investigate predictive factors of a seclusion of long duration. Our study was based on the dataset of the EPIC study, an observational prospective French multicenter study of seclusion and restraint. The EPIC study occurred in seven French psychiatric hospitals in the southern region of Paris. Inclusions were realized for 73days and allowed a data collection of 302 seclusion measures. Of these measures 236 were effectively a seclusion in a standardized room. Because the median duration was 7days, we defined two groups of patients: duration<7days and duration ≥ 7 days. Our variable to be explicated was duration ≥ 7 days. Explicative variables available in EPIC study were age, sex, forced hospitalization, autoagressivity, heteroagressivity, use of sedative treatment (oral or intramuscular), history of seclusion and patient diagnoses. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to explore the association between a seclusion duration ≥ 7 days and explicative variables. Diagnoses were classified as psychotic disorders, mood disorders and others diagnoses. To be included in multivariate logistic regressions, diagnoses were treated as dummy variables (mood disorder vs psychotic disorders; psychotic

  19. Proposição de um método de análise coletiva dos acidentes de trabalho no hospital Proposal of a method for collective analysis of work-related accidents in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Osório

    2005-04-01

    described series of events in a diagram; in the third, the resulting record is re-discussed and further elaborated; in the fourth, the work accident victim and analyst evaluate and implement measures aimed to prevent the accident from recurring. The article concludes by discussing the method's possibilities and limitations in the hospital setting.

  20. Comparison of cardiovascular disease patterns in two data sets of patients admitted at a tertiary care public hospital in Karachi five years apart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazim, S.F.; Itrat, A.; Butt, N.W.; Ishaq, M.

    2009-01-01

    To compare the disease patterns in two data sets of patients, five years apart, at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), a tertiary care cardiac hospital in Karachi. The underlying objective was to determine any changes in cardiovascular disease patterns at an acute cardiac unit over a period of five years. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted on patients admitted in West Ward, National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), Karachi in September, 2000 and September, 2005. Patient's record files were reviewed and the relevant information was recorded on a proforma designed for the purpose. In September, 2000, a total of 414 patients were admitted. Of these 71.25% were males. Majority of patients (72.92%) were in the fifth decade of life or beyond. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was the commonest presentation, present in 39.8% of the patients. 27.3% had myocardial infarction (MI) while 10.34% were diagnosed with heart muscle diseases. The overall mortality was 3.4%. In September, 2005, a total of 446 patients were admitted. Of these, 63% were males. 71.29% were in the fifth, sixth, and seventh decades of life. 43.04% patients were admitted with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 26% with myocardial infarction (MI) and 13.45% with heart muscle diseases. The overall mortality was 1.34%. The almost similar results in two data sets of patients five years apart suggests that the cardiovascular disease burden and pattern has not changed significantly at this center. There is a preponderance of cardiovascular illnesses in males and older age groups. ACS and MI account for majority of admissions. (author)

  1. Open wounds of the Achilles tendon in tropical settings: 36 cases at the Donka University Hospital in Guinea Conakry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamah, L; Diallo, M; Tékpa, J B D; Bah, M L; Keita, K; Sidime, S; Soumah, M T; Diallo, I

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the epidemiologic, etiologic, and therapeutic aspects of open wounds of the Achilles tendon managed in the Donka University Hospital. This 3-year prospective included all patients admitted for an Achilles tendon injury. Closed injuries, suppurating wounds, and those that occurred more than 24 hours before admission were excluded. Surgical treatment consisted in debridement and tendon repair, with plaster cast protection for 6 weeks. The study included 36 patients with a mean age of 23.4 years, 29 of whom were male. The primary cause was traffic accidents (n = 21), mainly due to motorcycle taxis (n = 18). The mean follow-up was 9 months. Infection (7 cases) and skin necrosis (5 cases) were the main postoperative complications. The functional result, evaluated by the McComis score, was excellent in 20 cases, good or satisfactory in 10, and poor in 6 cases. Open injuries of the Achilles tendon are common in Guinea-Conakry and mostly due to motorcycle taxis. Outcome of surgical treatment depends on the severity of the injury. Infection and skin necrosis are frequent complications, and their management is challenging in this setting.

  2. Protecting and promoting mental health of nurses in the hospital setting: Is it cost-effective from an employer’s perspective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Noben

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Nurses are at elevated risk of burnout, anxiety and depressive disorders, and may then become less productive. This begs the question if a preventive intervention in the work setting might be cost-saving from a business perspective. Material and Methods: A cost-benefit analysis was conducted to evaluate the balance between the costs of a preventive intervention among nurses at elevated risk of mental health complaints and the cost offsets stemming from improved productivity. This evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomized trial in a Dutch academic hospital. The control condition consisted of screening without feedback and unrestricted access to usual care (N = 206. In the experimental condition screen-positive nurses received personalized feedback and referral to the occupational physician (N = 207. Results: Subtracting intervention costs from the cost offsets due to reduced absenteeism and presenteeism resulted in net-savings of 244 euros per nurse when only absenteeism is regarded, and 651 euros when presenteeism is also taken into account. This corresponds to a return-on-investment of 5 euros up to 11 euros for every euro invested. Conclusions: Within half a year, the cost of offering the preventive intervention was more than recouped. Offering the preventive intervention represents a favorable business case as seen from the employer’s perspective.

  3. Parental involvement in their school-aged children's post-operative pain management in the hospital setting: a comprehensive systematic review.

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    Hoon, Lim Siew; Hong-Gu, He; Mackey, Sandra

    Paediatric pain management remains a challenge in clinical settings. Parents can contribute to the effective and accurate pain assessment and management of their child. No systematic reviews regarding the parental involvement in their child's post-operative pain management have been published. To determine the best available evidence regarding parental involvement in managing their children's post-operative pain in the hospital setting. The review considered studies that included parents of all ethnic groups with children aged between 6 to 12 years old who were hospitalised and undergone surgery of any kind with post-operative surgical or incision site pain where care was provided in acute hospital settings. The phenomena of interest were the experiences of parents in managing their children's post-operative pain. A three-step search strategy was utilised in each component of this review. Major databases searched included: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane library, PubMed as well as Google Scholar. The search included published studies and papers in English from 1990 to 2009. Each included study was assessed by two independent reviewers using the appropriate appraisal checklists developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI). Quantitative and qualitative data were extracted from the included papers using standardised data extraction tools from the JBI, Meta-analysis Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument data extraction tool for descriptive/case series and the JBI-Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument data extraction tool for interpretive and critical research. The five quantitative studies included in this review were not suitable for meta-analysis due to clinical and methodological heterogeneity and therefore the findings are presented in a narrative form. The two qualitative studies were from the same study, therefore meta-synthesis was not possible. Hence the results of the studies were presented in a narrative format. Seven

  4. Improving the fundamentals of care for older people in the acute hospital setting: facilitating practice improvement using a Knowledge Translation Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechula, Rick; Kitson, Alison; Marcoionni, Danni; Page, Tammy; Zeitz, Kathryn; Silverston, Heidi

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports on a structured facilitation program where seven interdisciplinary teams conducted projects aimed at improving the care of the older person in the acute sector. Aims  To develop and implement a structured intervention known as the Knowledge Translation (KT) Toolkit to improve the fundamentals of care for the older person in the acute care sector. Three hypotheses were tested: (i) frontline staff can be facilitated to use existing quality improvement tools and techniques and other resources (the KT Toolkit) in order to improve care of older people in the acute hospital setting; (ii) fundamental aspects of care for older people in the acute hospital setting can be improved through the introduction and use of specific evidence-based guidelines by frontline staff; and (iii) innovations can be introduced and improvements made to care within a 12-month cycle/timeframe with appropriate facilitation. Methods  Using realistic evaluation methodology the impact of a structured facilitation program (the KT Toolkit) was assessed with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of how a range of tools, techniques and strategies may be used by clinicians to improve care. The intervention comprised three elements: the facilitation team recruited for specific knowledge, skills and expertise in KT, evidence-based practice and quality and safety; the facilitation, including a structured program of education, ongoing support and communication; and finally the components of the toolkit including elements already used within the study organisation. Results  Small improvements in care were shown. The results for the individual projects varied from clarifying issues of concern and planning ongoing activities, to changing existing practices, to improving actual patient outcomes such as reducing functional decline. More importantly the study described how teams of clinicians can be facilitated using a structured program to conduct practice improvement activities

  5. Public hospital bed crisis: too few or too misused?

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    Scott, Ian A

    2010-08-01

    * Increasing demand on public hospital beds has led to what many see as a hospital bed crisis requiring substantial increases in bed numbers. By 2050, if current bed use trends persist and as the numbers of frail older patients rise exponentially, a 62% increase in hospital beds will be required to meet expected demand, at a cost almost equal to the entire current Australian healthcare budget. * This article provides an overview of the effectiveness of different strategies for reducing hospital demand that may be viewed as primarily (although not exclusively) targeting the hospital sector - increasing capacity and throughput and reducing readmissions - or the non-hospital sector - facilitating early discharge or reducing presentations and admissions to hospital. Evidence of effectiveness was retrieved from a literature search of randomised trials and observational studies using broad search terms. * The principal findings were as follows: (1) within the hospital sector, throughput could be substantially improved by outsourcing public hospital clinical services to the private sector, undertaking whole-of-hospital reform of care processes and patient flow that address both access and exit block, separating acute from elective beds and services, increasing rates of day-only or short stay admissions, and curtailing ineffective or marginally effective clinical interventions; (2) in regards to the non-hospital sector, potentially the biggest gains in reducing hospital demand will come from improved access to residential care, rehabilitation services, and domiciliary support as patients awaiting such services currently account for 70% of acute hospital bed-days. More widespread use of acute care and advance care planning within residential care facilities and population-based chronic disease management programs can also assist. * This overview concludes that, in reducing hospital bed demand, clinical process redesign within hospitals and capacity enhancement of non-hospital

  6. Prevalence of supporting limb laminitis in a UK equine practice and referral hospital setting between 2005 and 2013: implications for future epidemiological studies.

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    Wylie, C E; Newton, J R; Bathe, A P; Payne, R J

    2015-01-17

    The electronic patient records of all equine patients of Rossdales Equine Practice between January 1, 2005 and November 1, 2013 were reviewed to determine the number of cases of supporting limb laminitis (SLL) in a large equine practice and referral hospital setting in the UK and to discuss the implications for future epidemiological studies. The clinical notes were searched electronically for a combination of 'laminitis AND (contralateral OR supporting OR overload OR weight bearing)'. The prevalence of SLL within each identified denominator population and the corresponding 95% CI were calculated. SLL developed in nine horses, one donkey and one pony. Thoroughbreds were the most commonly affected breed (72.7 per cent, CI 46.4 to 99.1 per cent), aged 2-14 years (median six years), and only mares (n=9) and stallions (n=2) were represented. SLL was not restricted to horses that were non-weightbearing lame, it developed within 4-100 days after injury (median 14.5 days) and occurred most commonly in a forelimb (54.6 per cent, CI 25.1 to 84.0 per cent). During the same time frame, a total of 65,327 horses were registered with Rossdales Equine Practice, resulting in an overall practice prevalence of SLL of 0.02 per cent (CI 0.01 to 0.03 per cent). Future epidemiological studies to investigate risk factors for SLL prevention will, therefore, be a logistical challenge. British Veterinary Association.

  7. Elevated gamma glutamyl transferase levels are associated with the location of acute pulmonary embolism. Cross-sectional evaluation in hospital setting

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    Ozge Korkmaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The location of embolism is associated with clinical findings and disease severity in cases of acute pulmonary embolism. The level of gamma-glutamyl transferase increases under oxidative stress-related conditions. In this study, we investigated whether gamma-glutamyl transferase levels could predict the location of pulmonary embolism. DESIGN AND SETTING: Hospital-based cross-sectional study at Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey. METHODS : 120 patients who were diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism through computed tomography-assisted pulmonary angiography were evaluated. They were divided into two main groups (proximally and distally located, and subsequently into subgroups according to thrombus localization as follows: first group (thrombus in main pulmonary artery; n = 9; second group (thrombus in main pulmonary artery branches; n = 71; third group (thrombus in pulmonary artery segmental branches; n = 34; and fourth group (thrombus in pulmonary artery subsegmental branches; n = 8. RESULTS : Gamma-glutamyl transferase levels on admission, heart rate, oxygen saturation, right ventricular dilatation/hypokinesia, pulmonary artery systolic pressure and cardiopulmonary resuscitation requirement showed prognostic significance in univariate analysis. The multivariate logistic regression model showed that gamma-glutamyl transferase level on admission (odds ratio, OR = 1.044; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.011-1.079; P = 0.009 and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (OR = 1.063; 95% CI: 1.005-1.124; P = 0.033 remained independently associated with proximally localized thrombus in pulmonary artery. CONCLUSIONS : The findings revealed a significant association between increased existing embolism load in the pulmonary artery and increased serum gamma-glutamyl transferase levels.

  8. Comparative cost-efficiency of the EVOTECH endoscope cleaner and reprocessor versus manual cleaning plus automated endoscope reprocessing in a real-world Canadian hospital endoscopy setting

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    Shum Cynthia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reprocessing of endoscopes generally requires labour-intensive manual cleaning followed by high-level disinfection in an automated endoscope reprocessor (AER. EVOTECH Endoscope Cleaner and Reprocessor (ECR is approved for fully automated cleaning and disinfection whereas AERs require manual cleaning prior to the high-level disinfection procedure. The purpose of this economic evaluation was to determine the cost-efficiency of the ECR versus AER methods of endoscopy reprocessing in an actual practice setting. Methods A time and motion study was conducted at a Canadian hospital to collect data on the personnel resources and consumable supplies costs associated with the use of EVOTECH ECR versus manual cleaning followed by AER with Medivators DSD-201. Reprocessing of all endoscopes was observed and timed for both reprocessor types over three days. Laboratory staff members were interviewed regarding the consumption and cost of all disposable supplies and equipment. Exact Wilcoxon rank sum test was used for assessing differences in total cycle reprocessing time. Results Endoscope reprocessing was significantly shorter with the ECR than with manual cleaning followed by AER. The differences in median time were 12.46 minutes per colonoscope (p Conclusions The EVOTECH ECR was more efficient and less costly to use for the reprocessing of endoscopes than manual cleaning followed by AER disinfection. Although the cost of consumable supplies required to reprocess endoscopes with EVOTECH ECR was slightly higher, the value of the labour time saved with EVOTECH ECR more than offset the additional consumables cost. The increased efficiency with EVOTECH ECR could lead to even further cost-savings by shifting endoscopy laboratory personnel responsibilities but further study is required.

  9. Person-centred interactions between nurses and patients during medication activities in an acute hospital setting: qualitative observation and interview study.

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    Bolster, Danielle; Manias, Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing emphasis on person-centred care within the literature and the health care context. It is suggested that a person-centred approach to medication activities has the potential to improve patient experiences and outcomes. This study set out to examine how nurses and patients interact with each other during medication activities in an acute care environment with an underlying philosophy of person-centred care. A qualitative approach was used comprising naturalistic observation and semi-structured interviews. The study setting was an acute care ward with a collaboratively developed philosophy of person-centre care, in an Australian metropolitan hospital. Eleven nurses of varying levels of experience were recruited to participate in observations and interviews. Nurses were eligible to participate if they were employed on the study ward in a role that incorporated direct patient care, including medication activities. A stratified sampling technique ensured that nurses with a range of years of clinical experience were represented. Patients who were being cared for by participating nurses during the observation period were recruited to participate unless they met the following exclusion criteria: those less than 18 years of age, non-English speaking patients, and those who were unable to give informed consent. Twenty-five patients were observed and 16 of those agreed to be interviewed. The results of the study generated insights into the nature of interactions between nurses and patients where person-centred care is the underlying philosophy of care. Three major themes emerged from the findings: provision of individualised care, patient participation and contextual barriers to providing person-centred care. While the participating nurses valued a person-centred approach and perceived that they were conducting medication activities in a person-centred way, some nurse-patient interactions during medication activities were centred on routines rather than

  10. PRIORITY SETTING IN AN ACUTE CARE HOSPITAL IN ARGENTINA: A QUALITATIVE CASE STUDY DISTRIBUCIÓN PRIORITARIA EN UN HOSPITAL DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS EN ARGENTINA: ESTUDIO CUALITATIVO DE UN CASO DISTRIBUIÇÃO PRIORITÁRIA EM UM HOSPITAL DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS NA ARGENTINA: ESTUDO QUALITATIVO DE UM CASO

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    Heather Gordon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe and evaluate priority setting in an Acute Care hospital in Argentina, using Accountability for Reasonableness, an ethical framework for fair priority setting. Methods: Case Study involving key informant interviews and document review. Thirty respondents were identified using a snowball sampling strategy. A modified thematic approach was used in analyzing the data. Results: Priorities are primarily determined at the Department of Health. The committee which is supposed to set priorities within the hospital was thought not to have much influence. Decisions were based on government policies and objectives, personal relationships, economic, political, historical and arbitrary reasons. Decisions at the DOH were publicized through internet; however, apart from the tenders and a general budget, details of hospital decisions were not publicized. CATA provided an accessible but ineffective forum for appeals. There were no clear mechanisms for appeals and leadership to ensure adherence to a fair process. Conclusions: In spite of their efforts to ensure fairness, Priority setting in the study hospital did not meet all the four conditions of a fair process. Policy discussions on improving legitimacy and fairness provided an opportunity for improving fairness in the hospital and Accountability for Reasonableness might be a useful framework for analysis and for identifying and improving strategies.Propósito: Describir y evaluar el establecimiento de prioridades en un hospital de cuidados intensivos en Argentina, empleando la Administración Razonable como marco ético para una justa asignación. Métodos: Estudio de un Caso que incluía entrevistas a un informante y revisión de documentos. Se identificó a treinta participantes empleando la estrategia de muestras tipo "bola de nieve". Al analizar los datos, se empleó un enfoque temático modificado. Resultados: Las prioridades se determinan principalmente en el Departamento de Salud

  11. Breast cancer in a multi-ethnic Asian setting : Results from the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah; Hartman, Mikael; Saxena, Nakul; Lau, Philip; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo Chin; Lim, Siew Eng; Wong, John E. L.; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    Two hospital-based breast cancer databases (University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia [n = 1513] and National University Hospital, Singapore [n = 2545]) were merged into a regional registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007. A review of the data found 51% of patients

  12. A novel organizational model to face the challenge of multimorbid elderly patients in an internal medicine setting: a case study from Parma Hospital, Italy.

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    Meschi, Tiziana; Ticinesi, Andrea; Prati, Beatrice; Montali, Arianna; Ventura, Antonio; Nouvenne, Antonio; Borghi, Loris

    2016-08-01

    Continuous increase of elderly patients with multimorbidity and Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding are great challenges for modern medicine. Traditional hospital organizations are often too rigid to solve them without consistently rising healthcare costs. In this paper we present a new organizational model achieved at Internal Medicine and Critical Subacute Care Unit of Parma University Hospital, Italy, a 106-bed internal medicine area organized by intensity of care and specifically dedicated to such patients. The unit is partitioned into smaller wards, each with a specific intensity level of care, including a rapid-turnover ward (mean length of stay model, compared with other peer units of the hospital and of other teaching hospitals of the region, showed a better performance, efficacy and effectiveness indexes calculated on Regional Hospital Discharge Records database system, allowing a capacity to face a massive (+22 %) rise in medical admissions from the ED. Further studies are needed to validate this model from a patient outcome point of view.

  13. Assessing process of paediatric care in a resource-limited setting: a cross-sectional audit of district hospitals in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategeka, Celestin; Shoveller, Jeannie; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Lynd, Larry D

    2018-05-01

    Routine assessment of quality of care helps identify deficiencies which need to be improved. While gaps in the emergency care of children have been documented across sub-Saharan Africa, data from Rwanda are lacking. To assess the care of sick infants and children admitted to Rwandan district hospitals and the extent to which it follows currently recommended clinical practice guidelines in Rwanda. Data were gathered during a retrospective cross-sectional audit of eight district hospitals across Rwanda in 2012/2013. Medical records were randomly selected from each hospital and were reviewed to assess the process of care, focusing on the leading causes of under-5 mortality, including neonatal conditions, pneumonia, malaria and dehydration/diarrhoea. Altogether, 522 medical records were reviewed. Overall completion of a structured neonatal admission record was above 85% (range 78.6-90.0%) and its use was associated with better documentation of key neonatal signs (median score 6/8 and 2/8 when used and not used, respectively). Deficiencies in the processes of care were identified across hospitals and there were rural/urban disparities for some indicators. For example, neonates admitted to urban district hospitals were more likely to receive treatment consistent with currently recommended guidelines [e.g. gentamicin (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.03-6.43) and fluids (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.2-6.2)] than those in rural hospitals. Likewise, children with pneumonia admitted to urban hospitals were more likely to receive the correct dosage of gentamicin (OR 4.47, 95% CI 1.21-25.1) and to have their treatment monitored (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.57-8.3) than in rural hospitals. Furthermore, children diagnosed with malaria and admitted to urban hospitals were more likely to have their treatment (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.15-6.41) monitored than those in rural hospitals. Substantial gaps were identified in the process of neonatal and paediatric care across district hospitals in Rwanda. There is a need to (i

  14. Method validation of a set of 12 GEM® Premier™ 4000 blood gas analyzers for point-of-care testing in a university teaching hospital

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    Charlotte Oris

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: Our results met standard requirements and the 12 analyzers were assessed as suitable for point-of-care testing in services of academic medical centers, as exemplified at Clermont-Ferrand hospital.

  15. Improving obstetric care in low-resource settings: implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews in five pilot hospitals in Senegal

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    Fournier Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity are major problems. Service availability and quality of care in health facilities are heterogeneous and most often inadequate. In resource-poor settings, the facility-based maternal death review or audit is one of the most promising strategies to improve health service performance. We aim to explore and describe health workers' perceptions of facility-based maternal death reviews and to identify barriers to and facilitators of the implementation of this approach in pilot health facilities of Senegal. Methods This study was conducted in five reference hospitals in Senegal with different characteristics. Data were collected from focus group discussions, participant observations of audit meetings, audit documents and interviews with the staff of the maternity unit. Data were analysed by means of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Results Health professionals and service administrators were receptive and adhered relatively well to the process and the results of the audits, although some considered the situation destabilizing or even threatening. The main barriers to the implementation of maternal deaths reviews were: (1 bad quality of information in medical files; (2 non-participation of the head of department in the audit meetings; (3 lack of feedback to the staff who did not attend the audit meetings. The main facilitators were: (1 high level of professional qualifications or experience of the data collector; (2 involvement of the head of the maternity unit, acting as a moderator during the audit meetings; (3 participation of managers in the audit session to plan appropriate and realistic actions to prevent other maternal deaths. Conclusion The identification of the barriers to and the facilitators of the implementation of maternal death reviews is an essential step for the future adaptation of this method in countries with few resources. We

  16. Use, misuse and non-use of health care assistants: understanding the work of health care assistants in a hospital setting.

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    Spilsbury, Karen; Meyer, Julienne

    2004-11-01

    This study is concerned with understanding the work of non-registered nurses (health care assistants) in a UK hospital setting. There are increasing numbers of health care assistants employed by the National Health Service in the UK to support registered nurses providing nursing care. However, little is known about the make-up of the health care assistant workforce and the changing nature of their role. This study addresses some of these gaps in the research-based literature. A single case study design using mixed methods (survey, interviews, participant observations, focus groups and documents) was used to generate an in-depth account of health care assistants' work in one organization. The study is built upon what health care assistants say they do, compared with what they actually do in practice. It explores how and whether the work of health care assistants is adequately supervised, tensions between the work of health care assistants and registered nurses and the subsequent effects on teamwork and patient care. There are policy expectations associated with the work of health care assistants. However, this study reveals significant deviations from these goals. The workplace arena and the negotiations between health care assistants and registered nurses that take place within it, actively shape the health care assistants' work. Findings suggest dynamic patterns of use, misuse and non-use of the health care assistants as a resource to patient care. The changing roles of registered nurses have direct implications for the roles of health care assistants: as registered nurses take on extra duties and responsibilities they are conceding some of their role to health care assistants. This has implications for nurse managers. The competence of health care assistants to carry out nursing work needs to be reassessed and there also needs to be ongoing monitoring and supervision of their work to maximize, and further develop, their contribution to patient care and to ensure

  17. Birth Settings and the Validation of Neonatal Seizures Recorded in Birth Certificates Compared to Medicaid Claims and Hospital Discharge Abstracts Among Live Births in South Carolina, 1996-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Jenkins, Dorothea D; Kinsman, Stephen L

    2017-05-01

    Objective Neonatal seizures in the first 28 days of life often reflect underlying brain injury or abnormalities, and measure the quality of perinatal care in out-of-hospital births. Using the 2003 revision of birth certificates only, three studies reported more neonatal seizures recorded among home births ​or planned out-of-hospital births compared to hospital births. However, the validity of recording neonatal seizures or serious neurologic dysfunction across birth settings in birth certificates has not been evaluated. We aimed to validate seizure recording in birth certificates across birth settings using multiple datasets. Methods We examined checkbox items "seizures" and "seizure or serious neurologic dysfunction" in the 1989 and 2003 revisions of birth certificates in South Carolina from 1996 to 2013. Gold standards were ICD-9-CM codes 779.0, 345.X, and 780.3 in either hospital discharge abstracts or Medicaid encounters jointly. Results Sensitivity, positive predictive value, false positive rate, and the kappa statistic of neonatal seizures recording were 7%, 66%, 34%, and 0.12 for the 2003 revision of birth certificates in 547,177 hospital births from 2004 to 2013 and 5%, 33%, 67%, and 0.09 for the 1998 revision in 396,776 hospital births from 1996 to 2003, and 0, 0, 100%, -0.002 among 660 intended home births from 2004 to 2013 and 920 home births from 1996 to 2003, respectively. Conclusions for Practice Despite slight improvement across revisions, South Carolina birth certificates under-reported or falsely reported seizures among hospital births and especially home births. Birth certificates alone should not be used to measure neonatal seizures or serious neurologic dysfunction.

  18. The effectiveness of mindfulness based programs in reducing stress experienced by nurses in adult hospital settings: a systematic review of quantitative evidence protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Elmarie; Gwin, Teri; Purpora, Christina

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of mindfulness based programs in reducing stress experienced by nurses in adult hospitalized patient care settings. Nursing professionals face extraordinary stressors in the medical environment. Many of these stressors have always been inherent to the profession: long work hours, dealing with pain, loss and emotional suffering, caring for dying patients and providing support to families. Recently nurses have been experiencing increased stress related to other factors such as staffing shortages, increasingly complex patients, corporate financial constraints and the increased need for knowledge of ever-changing technology. Stress affects high-level cognitive functions, specifically attention and memory, and this increases the already high stakes for nurses. Nurses are required to cope with very difficult situations that require accurate, timely decisions that affect human lives on a daily basis.Lapses in attention increase the risk of serious consequences such as medication errors, failure to recognize life-threatening signs and symptoms, and other essential patient safety issues. Research has also shown that the stress inherent to health care occupations can lead to depression, reduced job satisfaction, psychological distress and disruptions to personal relationships. These outcomes of stress are factors that create scenarios for risk of patient harm.There are three main effects of stress on nurses: burnout, depression and lateral violence. Burnout has been defined as a syndrome of depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and a sense of low personal accomplishment, and the occurrence of burnout has been closely linked to perceived stress. Shimizu, Mizoue, Mishima and Nagata state that nurses experience considerable job stress which has been a major factor in the high rates of burnout that has been recorded among nurses. Zangaro and Soeken share this opinion and state that work related stress is largely

  19. Rate of spontaneous voiding recovery after acute urinary retention due to bed rest in the hospital setting in a non-urological population clinical study of the relationship between lower limbs and bladder function

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    Paulo Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To understand the clinical relationship between lower limbs functions and the recovery of spontaneous voiding after an acute urinary retention (AUR in older patients admitted to hospitals for non-urological causes using clinical parameters. Materials and Methods 56 adult patients (32 men; mean age: 77.9 ± 8.3 and 24 women; mean age 82.1 ± 4.6 with AUR were prospectively followed with validated Physical Performance Mobility Exam (PPME instrument to evaluate the relationship between the recovery of mobility capacity and spontaneous voiding. After a short period of permanent bladder drainage patients started CIC along evaluation by PPME during hospitalization and at 7, 15, 30 60, 90, and 180 days of discharge. Mann-Whitney U, chi-square test and ANOVA tests were used. Results All patients were hospitalized for at least 15 days (Median 26.3 ± 4.1 days. Progressive improvement on mobility scale measured by PPME was observed after leaving ICU and along the initial 7 days of hospitalization but with a deterioration if hospitalization extends beyond 15 days (p<0.03. Prolonged hospital stay impairs mobility in all domains (p<0.05 except step-up and transfer skills (p<0.02 although a recovery rate on spontaneous voiding persistented. Restoration of spontaneous voiding was accompanied by improvement on mobility scale (p<0.02. Recovery of spontaneous voiding was markedly observed after discharging the hospital. All patients recovered spontaneous voiding until 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions Recovery to spontaneous voiding after acute urinary retention in the hospital setting may be anticipated by evaluation of lower limbs function measured by validated instruments.

  20. Combining multi-criteria decision analysis and mini-health technology assessment: A funding decision-support tool for medical devices in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Hansen, Paul; van den Brink, Hélène; Boudard, Aurélie; Cordonnier, Anne-Laure; Devaux, Capucine; Pineau, Judith; Prognon, Patrice; Borget, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    At the hospital level, decisions about purchasing new and oftentimes expensive medical devices must take into account multiple criteria simultaneously. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is increasingly used for health technology assessment (HTA). One of the most successful hospital-based HTA approaches is mini-HTA, of which a notable example is the Matrix4value model. To develop a funding decision-support tool combining MCDA and mini-HTA, based on Matrix4value, suitable for medical devices for individual patient use in French university hospitals - known as the IDA tool, short for 'innovative device assessment'. Criteria for assessing medical devices were identified from a literature review and a survey of 18 French university hospitals. Weights for the criteria, representing their relative importance, were derived from a survey of 25 members of a medical devices committee using an elicitation technique involving pairwise comparisons. As a test of its usefulness, the IDA tool was applied to two new drug-eluting beads (DEBs) for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The IDA tool comprises five criteria and weights for each of two over-arching categories: risk and value. The tool revealed that the two new DEBs conferred no additional value relative to DEBs currently available. Feedback from participating decision-makers about the IDA tool was very positive. The tool could help to promote a more structured and transparent approach to HTA decision-making in French university hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. THE CONTROL OF INTERNATIONAL NORMALISED RATIO IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION TREATED WITH WARFARIN IN OUTPATIENT AND HOSPITAL SETTINGS: DATA FROM RECVASA REGISTRIES

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    M. M. Loukianov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Am. To study in the RECVASA registers the availability of data about the international normalized ratio (INR indicator and achievement of its target values in outpatient and hospital practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF receiving anticoagulant therapy with warfarin.Material and methods. Data about the INR control and the frequency of achievement of its target values at the outpatient and hospital stages were analyzed in RECVASA (Ryazan and RECVASA FP – Yaroslavl outpatient registries, as well as in the hospital registers RECVASA FP (Moscow, Kursk, Tula in 817 patients (46.9% of men, age 68.5±9.6 years with AF and the prescribed anticoagulant therapy with warfarin.Results. INR was determined in 689 (84.3% of 817 patients. The values of INR were monitored during therapy with warfarin in RECVASA (Ryazan and RECVASA FP –Yaroslavl outpatient registries in 73.7% and 77.7% of patients, respectively, and in RECVASA FP hospital registers: 95.8% (Moscow; 81.3% (Tula and 93.5% (Kursk. The target level of INR (2.0-3.0 was achieved in a minority of patients with AF during treatment with warfarin: inRyazan – in 26.3% of cases;Yaroslavl – 38.3%;Kursk – 34.8%;Moscow – 39.5%; Tule – 26.3%. Control of INR in hospital registries during warfarin therapy in patients with AF significantly more often (p<0.05 was performed at the hospital stage, compared with prehospital (in Kursk –2.3 times more often in Moscow – 2.6 times, in Tula – in 1,8 times. The target level of INR in the hospital was achieved significantly more often (p<0.05 than before hospitalization (Moscow andKursk, but no significant differences were found in the RECVASA FP –Tula register (p=0.08. The INR was monitored by 94.9% of the patients; however, the target values of this indicator were achieved only in 33% of cases in the sample study in the RECVASA FP –Moscow registry according to a survey of 39 patients with AF who continued to receive warfarin after 2.6±0

  2. Palonosetron versus other 5-HT₃ receptor antagonists for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with emetogenic chemotherapy in a hospital outpatient setting in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Chris; Gayle, Julie; Balu, Sanjeev; Buchner, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the rate of uncontrolled chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after initiating antiemetic prophylaxis with palonosetron versus other 5-HT₃ receptor antagonists (RAs) in patients diagnosed with hematologic malignancies (lymphoma and leukemia) and receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) in a hospital outpatient setting. Patients aged ≥ 18 years and diagnosed with hematologic malignancies initiating HEC or MEC and antiemetic prophylaxis with palonosetron (Group 1) and other 5-HT₃ RAs (Group 2) for the first time in a hospital outpatient setting between 4/1/2007 and 3/31/2009 were identified from the Premier Perspective Database. Within each cycle, CINV events were identified (in the hospital outpatient, inpatient, and emergency room settings) through ICD-9 codes for nausea, vomiting, and/or volume depletion (from each CT administration day 1 until the end of the CT cycle), or use of rescue medications (day 2 until the end of the CT cycle). Negative binomial distribution generalized linear multivariate regression model estimating the CINV event rate on CT, specific CT cycles, and cancer diagnosis (leukemia/lymphoma)-matched groups in the follow-up period (first of 8 cycles or 6 months) was developed. Of 971 identified patients, 211 initiated palonosetron (Group 1). Group 1 patients comprised of more females [50.2 vs. 41.4%; p = 0.0226], Whites [74.4 vs. 70.4%, and Hispanics [7.6 vs. 6.3%; all races p = 0.0105], received more HEC treatments [89.6 vs. 84.2%; all CT types p = 0.0129], and had more lymphoma diagnosed patients [89.6 vs. 76.3%; all cancer types p = 0.0033] at baseline. After controlling for differences in several demographic and clinical variables, the regression model predicted a 20.4% decrease in CINV event rate per CT cycle for Group 1 versus Group 2 patients. Study limitations include potential lack of generalizability, absence of data on certain

  3. Unplanned Hospital Visits - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the...

  4. Effect of an interactive E-learning tool for delirium on patient and nursing outcomes in a geriatric hospital setting: findings of a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detroyer, Elke; Dobbels, Fabienne; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Deschodt, Mieke; Depaifve, Yves; Joosten, Etienne; Milisen, Koen

    2018-01-19

    Education of healthcare workers is a core element of multicomponent delirium strategies to improve delirium care and, consequently, patient outcomes. However, traditional educational strategies are notoriously difficult to implement. E-learning is hypothesised to be easier and more cost effective, but research evaluating effectiveness of delirium education through e-learning is scarce at present. Aim is to determine the effect of a nursing e-learning tool for delirium on: (1) in-hospital prevalence, duration and severity of delirium or mortality in hospitalized geriatric patients, and (2) geriatric nurses' knowledge and recognition regarding delirium. A before-after study in a sample of patients enrolled pre-intervention (non-intervention cohort (NIC); n = 81) and post-intervention (intervention cohort (IC); n = 79), and nurses (n = 17) of a geriatric ward (university hospital). The intervention included an information session about using the e-learning tool, which consisted of 11 e-modules incorporating development of knowledge and skills in the prevention, detection and management of delirium, and the completion of a delirium e-learning tool during a three-month period. Key patient outcomes included in-hospital prevalence and duration of delirium (Confusion Assessment Method), delirium severity (Delirium Index) and mortality (in-hospital; 12 months post-admission); key nurse outcomes included delirium knowledge (Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire) and recognition (Case vignettes). Logistic regression and linear mixed models were used to analyse patient data; Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests, McNemar's or paired t-tests for nursing data. No significant difference was found between the IC and NIC for in-hospital prevalence (21.5% versus 25.9%; p = 0.51) and duration of delirium (mean 4.2 ± SD 4.8 days versus 4.9 ± SD 4.8 days; p = 0.38). A trend towards a statistically significant lower delirium severity (IC versus NIC: difference estimate

  5. A Study of the Impact of an Educational Intervention on Nurse Attitudes and Behaviours toward Mobile Device Use in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Giles-Smith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mobile applications (apps provide nurses with evidence-based information at the bedside. Librarians encourage app use by purchasing licenses and promoting their features. While many high-quality nursing apps exist, there is inconsistency in published reports on whether nurses use them in patient care. The aim of this research is to describe the use of mobile apps by nurses at two urban hospitals and to examine the impact of educational sessions led by hospital librarians and educators on nurse usage, attitudes and behaviour as they relate to mobile apps. Methods: Phase I consisted of a descriptive, cross-sectional survey of in-patient nurses to determine mobile app use and attitudes. Phase II involved a one-group pre/post-test design to examine the impact of education sessions led by librarians and hospital educators on nurse attitudes, usage and behaviours. A post-intervention focus group captured thoughts on using mobile apps at the bedside. Results: Results indicate that most nurses who have a personal mobile device are interested in using them at the bedside though few are currently doing so. While nurses cite many conveniences and uses, they also highlight a number of barriers associated with using mobile devices that must be addressed in order to realize the benefits in patient-centred care. Discussion: Hospital librarians and educators should work together to provide the education and support nurses require to realize the benefits of using apps at the bedside. Larger studies are needed to determine the impact of educational sessions on patient and health provider satisfaction with mobile device use.

  6. Exclusive contracts in the hospital setting: a two-edged sword: part 2: pros and cons, avoidance strategies, and negotiating tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, Robert M

    2007-06-01

    Hospitals routinely enter into contracts with radiology groups for the right to be the exclusive providers of radiologic services at the facilities in exchange for the groups' agreeing to provide and manage all aspects of those services within the hospitals. These exclusive contracts generally result in radiology departments and associated equipment being closed off to physicians who are not part of the contracting groups. Although exclusive contracts offer obvious benefits to the physicians who receive them and obvious disadvantages for those who are excluded, they also present pitfalls for physicians in the chosen group. Part 1 of this article discussed the legal issues raised by exclusive contracts. Part 2 weighs the practical advantages and disadvantages of exclusive contracts for physicians covered and not covered by such contracts and strategies for avoiding them, as well as provisions that can be included in medical staff bylaws to protect physicians from the automatic termination of privileges when a hospital enters into or terminates an exclusive contract. The remainder of the article provides tips on specific provisions of exclusive contracts that should be included or avoided.

  7. The effect of aggression management training programmes for nursing staff and students working in an acute hospital setting. A narrative review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, B; Zeller, A; Hahn, S; Dassen, T; Schols, J M G A; Halfens, R J G

    2015-01-01

    Patient aggression is a longstanding problem in general hospital nursing. Staff training is recommended to tackle workplace aggression originating from patients or visitors, yet evidence on training effects is scarce. To review and collate current research evidence on the effect of aggression management training for nurses and nursing students working in general hospitals, and to derive recommendations for further research. Systematic, narrative review. Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, pubmed, psycArticles, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection were searched for articles evaluating training programs for staff and students in acute hospital adult nursing in a 'before/after' design. Studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 in English, French or German were eligible of inclusion. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the 'Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies'. Main outcomes i.e. attitudes, confidence, skills and knowledge were collated. Nine studies were included. Two had a weak, six a moderate, and one a strong study design. All studies reported increased confidence, improved attitude, skills, and knowledge about risk factors post training. There was no significant change in incidence of patient aggression. Our findings corroborate findings of reviews on training in mental health care, which point to a lack of high quality research. Training does not reduce the incidence of aggressive acts. Aggression needs to be tackled at an organizational level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cognition, continence and transfer status at the time of discharge from an acute hospital setting and their associations with an unfavourable discharge outcome after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Current demographic trends pose a major societal challenge due to the rising number of older people with chronic conditions such as stroke. The relative impact of various disabilities at the time of discharge from an acute unit on discharge outcome is poorly understood. To examine the association between cognition, continence and transfer status at the time of discharge from the acute stroke unit and discharge destination. A retrospective stroke register database study was conducted in an acute stroke unit in a UK hospital with a catchment population of 568,000. Consecutive acute stroke admissions between 1997 and 2003 who were discharged alive were identified and the likelihood of adverse discharge outcomes defined as institutionalization or a requirement for longer-term rehabilitation was estimated. A total of 2,521 discharges were analyzed (median length of hospital stay 8 days). The presence of confusion, urinary incontinence or the need for help with transfers at the time of discharge predicted a higher likelihood of an adverse outcome even after controlling for age, stroke subtype, premorbid Rankin score and length of hospital stay. The need for help with transfers appeared to be the most consistent and significant factor associated with an adverse outcome regardless of age, sex or stroke subtype across the sample distribution. The ability to transfer has a pivotal role in the clinical decision making of discharge destination after stroke. Understanding of the factors which may increase the potential for improving this ability after acute stroke could have an impact on clinical outcome. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Applying User-Centered Design Methods to the Development of an mHealth Application for Use in the Hospital Setting by Patients and Care Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Brittany; Lilley, Elizabeth; Chang, Frank; DeBord Smith, Ann; Cleveland, Jessica; Ergai, Awatef; Katsulis, Zachary; Benneyan, James; Gershanik, Esteban; Bates, David W; Collins, Sarah A

    2018-04-01

     Developing an optimized and user-friendly mHealth application for patients and family members in the hospital environment presents unique challenges given the diverse patient population and patients' various states of well-being.  This article describes user-centered design methods and results for developing the patient and family facing user interface and functionality of MySafeCare, a safety reporting tool for hospitalized patients and their family members.  Individual and group usability sessions were conducted with specific testing scenarios for participants to follow to test the usability and functionality of the tool. Participants included patients, family members, and Patient and Family Advisory Council (PFAC) members. Engagement rounds were also conducted on study units and lessons learned provided additional information to the usability work. Usability results were aligned with Nielsen's Usability Heuristics.  Eleven patients and family members and 25 PFAC members participated in usability testing and over 250 patients and family members were engaged during research team rounding. Specific themes resulting from the usability testing sessions influenced the changes made to the user interface design, workflow functionality, and terminology.  User-centered design should focus on workflow functionality, terminology, and user interface issues for mHealth applications. These themes illustrated issues aligned with four of Nielsen's Usability Heuristics: match between system and the real world, consistency and standards, flexibility and efficiency of use, and aesthetic and minimalist design. We identified workflow and terminology issues that may be specific to the use of an mHealth application focused on safety and used by hospitalized patients and their families. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  10. [Work setting, satisfaction and burnout of the nurses in critical care units and hospitalization units. RN4CAST-Spain project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentelsaz-Gallego, C; Moreno-Casbas, T; Gómez-García, T; González-María, E

    2013-01-01

    To know if there are differences between the critical care units and the medical-surgical care units regarding the perception of the nurses working in National Health System hospitals about their work environment, burnout level and job satisfaction. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 6,417 nurses from the medical-surgical care units and with 1,122 nurses from critical care units of 59 Spanish hospitals with more than 150 beds. Socio-demographic, job satisfaction, perception of work environment (Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index [PES-NWI questionnaire]) and burnout measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) data were collected. The PES-NWI showed differences in 4 out of its 5 factors. It showed better values in medical-surgical units in all the factors, except for Staffing and resource adequacy (P<.001), where critical care units showed a mean level of agreement of 2.41 versus 2.19 for the medical-surgical units. Regarding burnout, this was higher in the medical-surgical care units (P=.039) where 23% (952) of the nurses had high levels. Job satisfaction was lower in the critical care units (P=.044) with 70% (578) of nurses being very or strongly satisfied. The opinion of the nurses, working in critical care units about their hospital is unfavorable. They showed lower levels of burnout than those working in medical-surgical units. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  12. The 'weekend effect' in acute medicine: a protocol for a team-based ethnography of weekend care for medical patients in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Carolyn; Sutton, Elizabeth; Angell, Emma; Aldridge, Cassie P; Boyal, Amunpreet; Bion, Julian

    2017-04-05

    It is now well-recognised that patients admitted to hospital on weekends are at higher risk of death than those admitted during weekdays. However, the causes of this 'weekend effect' are poorly understood. Some contend that there is a deficit of medical staff on weekends resulting in poorer quality care, whereas others find that patients admitted to hospital on weekends are sicker and therefore at higher risk of adverse outcomes. Clarifying the causal pathway is clearly important in order to identify effective solutions. In this article we describe an ethnographic approach to evaluating the organisation and delivery of medical care on weekends compared with weekdays, with a specific focus on the role of medical staff as part of National Health Service England's plan to implement 7-day services. We will conduct an ethnographic study of 20 acute hospitals in England between April 2016 and March 2018 as part of the High-intensity Specialist-Led Acute Care project (www.hislac.org). Data will be collected through observations and shadowing, and interviews with staff, in 10 hospitals with higher intensity specialist (consultant) staffing on weekends and 10 with lower intensity specialist staffing. Interviews will be conducted with up to 20 patients sampled from two high-intensity and two low-intensity sites. We will coordinate, compare and contrast observations across our team of ethnographers. Analysis will be both in-depth and cross-cutting, exploring specific features within individual sites and making comparisons between them. We outline how data collection and analysis will be facilitated and organised. The project has received ethics approval from the South West Wales Research Ethics Committee: Reference 13/WA/0372. Informed consent will be obtained for all interview participants. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications in high-quality journals and at national and international conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  13. A Cross-sectional Study on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice in the Contemporary Hospital Setting: Implications for Nurses in Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose Bovino, Leonie; Aquila, Anne M; Bartos, Susan; McCurry, Tina; Cunningham, C Elizabeth; Lane, Todd; Rogucki, Nicole; DosSantos, Jamie; Moody, Danielle; Mealia-Ospina, Karen; Pust-Marcone, Jancee; Quiles, Jonathan

    Evidence indicates that nurses inconsistently engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). This cross-sectional study of 402 nurses at a medical-surgical hospital identifies strategies for augmenting EBP. Nurses' EBP beliefs scores were higher than their EBP implementation scores. Those with baccalaureate/postgraduate degrees had higher EBP beliefs and implementation scores than those with associate degrees or diplomas. Bedside or direct care nurses were less likely to have baccalaureate/higher degrees and had lower EBP beliefs and implementation scores than did those nurses not serving in direct care roles.

  14. Clinician user involvement in the real world: Designing an electronic tool to improve interprofessional communication and collaboration in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Terence; Lim, Morgan E; Mansfield, Elizabeth; McLachlan, Alexander; Quan, Sherman D

    2018-02-01

    User involvement is vital to the success of health information technology implementation. However, involving clinician users effectively and meaningfully in complex healthcare organizations remains challenging. The objective of this paper is to share our real-world experience of applying a variety of user involvement methods in the design and implementation of a clinical communication and collaboration platform aimed at facilitating care of complex hospitalized patients by an interprofessional team of clinicians. We designed and implemented an electronic clinical communication and collaboration platform in a large community teaching hospital. The design team consisted of both technical and healthcare professionals. Agile software development methodology was used to facilitate rapid iterative design and user input. We involved clinician users at all stages of the development lifecycle using a variety of user-centered, user co-design, and participatory design methods. Thirty-six software releases were delivered over 24 months. User involvement has resulted in improvement in user interface design, identification of software defects, creation of new modules that facilitated workflow, and identification of necessary changes to the scope of the project early on. A variety of user involvement methods were complementary and benefited the design and implementation of a complex health IT solution. Combining these methods with agile software development methodology can turn designs into functioning clinical system to support iterative improvement. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Accounting for the relationship between per diem cost and LOS when estimating hospitalization costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, K Jack; Stolar, Marilyn; Hu, Ming-yi; Alvarez, Piedad; Wang, Yamei; Getsios, Denis; Williams, Gregory C

    2012-12-01

    from over 10,000 patients. Visual inspection of PD vs. LOS revealed a non-linear relationship. A logarithmic model and a series of LOESS and piecewise-linear models with varying connection points were tested. The logarithmic model was ultimately favoured for its fit and simplicity. Using this mapping in the ECLIPSE trials, we found that good peri-operative BP control was associated with a cost savings of $5,366 when costs were derived using the mapping, compared with savings of $7,666 obtained using the traditional approach of calculating the cost. PD costs vary systematically with LOS, with short stays being associated with high PD costs that drop gradually and level off. The shape of the relationship may differ in other settings. It is important to assess this and model the observed pattern, as this may have an impact on conclusions based on derived hospitalization costs.

  16. Accounting for the relationship between per diem cost and LOS when estimating hospitalization costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak K

    2012-12-01

    -pressure control. Results The MA Case Mix dataset included data from over 10,000 patients. Visual inspection of PD vs. LOS revealed a non-linear relationship. A logarithmic model and a series of LOESS and piecewise-linear models with varying connection points were tested. The logarithmic model was ultimately favoured for its fit and simplicity. Using this mapping in the ECLIPSE trials, we found that good peri-operative BP control was associated with a cost savings of $5,366 when costs were derived using the mapping, compared with savings of $7,666 obtained using the traditional approach of calculating the cost. Conclusions PD costs vary systematically with LOS, with short stays being associated with high PD costs that drop gradually and level off. The shape of the relationship may differ in other settings. It is important to assess this and model the observed pattern, as this may have an impact on conclusions based on derived hospitalization costs.

  17. Quality Indicators for In-Hospital Pharmaceutical Care of Dutch Elderly Patients Development and Validation of an ACOVE-Based Quality Indicator Set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, Peter C.; Klopotowska, Joanna E.; Smorenburg, Susanne M.; van Kan, Hendrikus J.; Bijleveld, Yuma A.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In 2001, the ACOVE (Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elders) quality indicators (QIs) were developed in the US to measure the quality of care of vulnerable elderly patients. However, the ACOVE QI set was developed mainly to assess the overall quality of care of community-dwelling vulnerable

  18. Psychiatric conditions and general practitioner attendance prior to HPV vaccination and the risk of referral to a specialized hospital setting because of suspected adverse events following HPV vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Tina Hovgaard; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    centers, and health data for cases and controls were obtained from national registries. PARTICIPANTS: Cases were defined as women referred to an HPV center between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 (n=1,496). Each case was matched with five controls on age, region and time of first vaccine......AIM: No association between human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and numerous diseases has been found. Still, a large number of Danish women are reporting suspected adverse events. Other factors may play a role, and the aim of this study is to examine the association between psychiatric...... registration. The total study population consisted of 8,976 women. RESULTS: Overall, women above 18 years who had been referred to an HPV center were more likely to have used psychiatric medication (odds ratio [OR]: 1.88 [95% CI 1.48-2.40]) or to have been hospitalized because of a psychiatric disorder within...

  19. The role of the genetic elements bla oxa and IS Aba 1 in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in carbapenem resistance in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs, Vanessa Cristine; Ferreira, Jéssica Augustini; Bobrowicz, Thaís Alexandra; Ferreira, Leslie Ecker; Deglmann, Roseneide Campos; Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; França, Paulo Henrique Condeixa de

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Acinetobacter genus are key pathogens that cause healthcare-associated infections, and they tend to spread and develop new antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Oxacillinases are primarily responsible for resistance to carbapenem antibiotics. Higher rates of carbapenem hydrolysis might be ascribed to insertion sequences, such as the ISAba1 sequence, near bla OXA genes. The present study examined the occurrence of the genetic elements bla OXA and ISAba1 and their relationship with susceptibility to carbapenems in clinical isolates of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex. Isolates identified over 6 consecutive years in a general hospital in Joinville, Southern Brazil, were evaluated. The investigation of 5 families of genes encoding oxacillinases and the ISAba1 sequence location relative to bla OXA genes was conducted using polymerase chain reaction. All isolates presented the bla OXA-51-like gene (n = 78), and 91% tested positive for the bla OXA-23-like gene (n = 71). The presence of ISAba1 was exclusively detected in isolates carrying the bla OXA-23-like gene. All isolates in which ISAba1 was found upstream of the bla OXA-23-like gene (n = 69) showed resistance to carbapenems, whereas the only isolate in which ISAba1 was not located near the bla OXA-23-like gene was susceptible to carbapenems. The ISAba1 sequence position of another bla OXA-23-like-positive isolate was inconclusive. The isolates exclusively carrying the bla OXA-51-like gene (n = 7) showed susceptibility to carbapenems. The presence of the ISAba1 sequence upstream of the bla OXA-23-like gene was strongly associated with carbapenem resistance in isolates of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex in the hospital center studied.

  20. The role of the genetic elements bla oxa and IS Aba 1 in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in carbapenem resistance in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristine Kobs

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Members of the Acinetobacter genus are key pathogens that cause healthcare-associated infections, and they tend to spread and develop new antibiotic resistance mechanisms. Oxacillinases are primarily responsible for resistance to carbapenem antibiotics. Higher rates of carbapenem hydrolysis might be ascribed to insertion sequences, such as the ISAba1 sequence, near bla OXA genes. The present study examined the occurrence of the genetic elements bla OXA and ISAba1 and their relationship with susceptibility to carbapenems in clinical isolates of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex. METHODS: Isolates identified over 6 consecutive years in a general hospital in Joinville, Southern Brazil, were evaluated. The investigation of 5 families of genes encoding oxacillinases and the ISAba1 sequence location relative to bla OXA genes was conducted using polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: All isolates presented the bla OXA-51-like gene (n = 78, and 91% tested positive for the bla OXA-23-like gene (n = 71. The presence of ISAba1 was exclusively detected in isolates carrying the bla OXA-23-like gene. All isolates in which ISAba1 was found upstream of the bla OXA-23-like gene (n = 69 showed resistance to carbapenems, whereas the only isolate in which ISAba1 was not located near the bla OXA-23-like gene was susceptible to carbapenems. The ISAba1 sequence position of another bla OXA-23-like-positive isolate was inconclusive. The isolates exclusively carrying the bla OXA-51-like gene (n = 7 showed susceptibility to carbapenems. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of the ISAba1 sequence upstream of the bla OXA-23-like gene was strongly associated with carbapenem resistance in isolates of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex in the hospital center studied.

  1. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons’ medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients’ data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. Methods In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. Results The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients’ condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of

  2. Cost analysis of initial highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens for managing human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients according to clinical practice in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo GL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio L Colombo,1,2 Antonella Castagna,3 Sergio Di Matteo,2 Laura Galli,3 Giacomo Bruno,2 Andrea Poli,3 Stefania Salpietro,3 Alessia Carbone,3 Adriano Lazzarin3,41Department of Drug Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Pavia, Italy; 2Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche (S.A.V.E., Milan, 3Infectious Diseases Department, San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, 4Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, ItalyObjective: In the study reported here, single-tablet regimen (STR versus (vs multi-tablet regimen (MTR strategies were evaluated through a cost analysis in a large cohort of patients starting their first highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV 1-naïve patients, followed at the San Raffaele Hospital, Milan, Italy, starting their first-line regimen from June 2008 to April 2012 were included in the analysis.Methods: The most frequently used first-line HAART regimens (>10% were grouped into two classes: 1 STR of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF + emtricitabine (FTC + efavirenz (EFV and 2 MTR including TDF + FTC + EFV, TDF + FTC + atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r, TDF + FTC + darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r, and TDF + FTC + lopinavir/ritoavir (LPV/r. Data were analyzed from the point of view of the Lombardy Regional Health Service. HAART, hospitalizations, visits, medical examinations, and other concomitant non-HAART drug costs were evaluated and price variations included. Descriptive statistics were calculated for baseline demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics; associations between categorical variables and type of antiretroviral strategy (STR vs MTR were examined using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. At multivariate analysis, the generalized linear model was used to identify the predictive factors of the overall costs of the first-line HAART regimens.Results: A total of 474 naïve patients (90% male, mean age 42.2 years, mean baseline HIV-RNA 4.50 log10 copies/mL, and cluster of

  3. Implementation challenges in delivering team-based care ('TEAMcare') for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a public hospital setting: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Belinda; Foster, Jann; Boyd, Robert; Atlantis, Evan

    2016-08-03

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is considered a multisystem disease, in which comorbidities feature prominently. COPD guidelines recommend holistic assessment and management of relevant comorbid diseases but there is limited information as to how this is best achieved. This pilot study aimed to explore the views of stakeholders, including patients and the healthcare team, on the feasibility, acceptability and barriers to a collaborative, multidisciplinary team-based care intervention ('TEAMcare') to improve health outcomes in COPD patients, within the context of a local hospital outpatient clinic. A mixed methods study design was used. A COPD care algorithm was developed based on the Australasian guidelines, COPDX. COPD participants were consecutively recruited from an outer metropolitan hospital's respiratory clinic. Participants attended for follow up visits at 5 and 10 months to ascertain clinical status, algorithm compliance and to review and revise management recommendations. The intervention was conducted using existing resources, involving collaboration with general practice and the publicly-funded local chronic disease management programme (Medicare Local). Stakeholders provided qualitative feedback about the intervention in terms of feasibility, acceptability and barriers via structured and semi-structured interviews. All interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative thematic analysis to identify key concepts and themes. The study protocol was abandoned prematurely due to clear lack of feasibility. Of 12 participants, 4 withdrew and none completed pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The main reasons for non-participation or study withdrawal related to reluctance to attend PR (6 of 16) and the burden of increased appointments (4 of 16). PR conflicted with employment hours, which presented problems for some participants. Similarly, themes that emerged from qualitative data indicate healthcare provider perception of

  4. A positive psychological intervention using virtual reality for patients with advanced cancer in a hospital setting: a pilot study to assess feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, Rosa M; Espinoza, Macarena; García-Palacios, Azucena; Cervera, José M; Esquerdo, Gaspar; Barrajón, Enrique; Botella, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This study presents data on the feasibility and possible benefits of a psychological intervention that uses virtual reality to induce positive emotions on adult hospitalized patients with metastatic cancer. The patient's satisfaction and perceived utility was also examined. The sample was composed of 19 patients (53 % men, aged from 29 to 85 years old; x = 60.9; standard deviation = 14.54). The intervention consisted of four 30-min sessions during 1 week in which patients navigated through virtual environments designed to induce joy or relaxation. Mood was assessed before and after each session using the Visual Analog Scale. Patient satisfaction was assessed after each session and at the end of the intervention. Qualitative data were also collected with open-ended questions. There were no major difficulties with the use of devices, and any difficulties that did arise were solved through practice. There were adequate levels of pleasantness and perceived utility of the proposed intervention. The main perceived benefits were distraction, entertainment, and promotion of relaxation states. Regarding mood changes, an increase in positive emotions and a decrease in negative emotions were also detected. The intervention was positively assessed and rated as minimally uncomfortable. Future actions are discussed as well as the need to implement brief interventions that take into account the patients' medical state and physical discomfort level, especially with those in the advanced stages of disease.

  5. The burden of presumed tuberculosis in hospitalized children in a resource-limited setting in Papua New Guinea: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watch, Villa; Aipit, Jimmy; Kote-Yarong, Tina; Rero, Allanie; Bolnga, John W; Lufele, Elvin; Laman, Moses

    2017-11-01

    In Papua New Guinea, TB is considered to be a major public health problem, but little is known about the prevalence and prognosis of presumed TB in children. As part of a prospective hospital-based surveillance on the northern coast of mainland Papua New Guinea, the authors investigated the admission prevalence and case fatality rate associated with presumed TB over a 6-year period (2011-2016). All children admitted who were diagnosed with TB were followed-up until discharge or death. Of 8992 paediatric admissions, 734 patients (8.2%) were diagnosed with presumed TB and there were 825 deaths, with TB accounting for 102 (12.4%). Extrapulmonary TB was the final diagnosis in 384 admissions {prevalence 4.3% [384/8992 (95% CI 3.9-4.7)]} with a case fatality rate of 21.4% [82/384 (95% CI 17.4-25.9)]. TB meningitis, disseminated TB and pericardial TB had high case fatality rates of 29.0% (53/183), 28.9% (11/38) and 25% (4/16), respectively. Severe malnutrition was more common in patients with pulmonary compared with extrapulmonary TB (25.4% vs 15.6%; pPapua New Guinea. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. High prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the setting of a peripheral Dutch hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schaik, Fiona D M; Verhagen, Marc A M T; Siersema, Peter D; Oldenburg, Bas

    2008-09-01

    Osteopenia and osteoporosis are frequently encountered in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Our aims were to evaluate the actual practice of screening for low bone mineral density (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), to determine the prevalence of low BMD and to investigate the risk factors associated with a low BMD in the IBD population of a regional Dutch hospital. A retrospective chart review was performed in 474 patients (259 with ulcerative colitis, 210 with Crohn's disease and 5 with indeterminate colitis). DEXA results and potential predictive factors of low BMD were documented. Predictive factors of low BMD were assessed by logistic regression. DEXA was performed in 168 IBD patients (35.4%). A low BMD (T-score<-1) was present in 64.3%. Osteoporosis (T-score<-2.5) was found in 23.8%. Low BMI, older age at the moment of diagnosis and male gender were found to be predictive factors of low BMD. For patients with osteoporosis, disease duration was an additional predictive factor. After subgroup analysis predictive factors were found to be the same in patients with Crohn's disease. The prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in IBD patients in a regional centre is as high as the prevalence rates reported from tertiary referral centres. A low BMI, an older age at the moment of diagnosis and male gender were predictive factors of low BMD. Prediction of osteoporosis and osteopenia using risk factors identified in this and previous studies is presently not feasible.

  7. A cost-benefit analysis of the immunisation of children against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) using the English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of respiratory infection that is highly prevalent in infants, particularly those with underlying medical conditions. Severe cases of RSV require hospitalisation as well as admission to intensive care and may even result in death. The objective of the study was to measure the net benefits that could arise from an immunisation programme of infants that may well eradicate RSV to a high degree and save the direct and indirect medical care costs from hospitalisation, morbidity and the gain from potential life-time earnings by reducing the probability of mortality. In this context, the majority of existing empirical investigations are based on data from clinical trials, and where relevant facts are not available, a series of strong assumptions is derived from the published literature, whereas in this study, for the first time, the hospital episode statistics database is used to calculate the cost-benefit ratios. The methodology of the analysis adopts a cost-benefit approach to assess the impact of the immunisation and whether it is beneficial to society. The underlying assumptions of the basic model are assessed by adopting a sensitivity analysis. The results show that a number of categories are cost-effective with the use of the passive drug, which means benefits by raising the life expectancy and quality as well as reducing the resource burden on society.

  8. Interação medicamentosa associada à reinternação hospitalar: estudo retrospectivo em um hospital geral Interacción medicamentosa asociada a la reinternación hospitalaria: estudio retrospectivo en un hospital general Hospital readmissions related to drug interactions: a retrospective study in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Soares de Moura

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a relação entre interação medicamentosa potencial e reinternação hospitalar. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com 1.487 pacientes maiores de 18 anos admitidos em um hospital geral em Vitória da Conquista, BA, de janeiro a dezembro de 2007. Os dados foram extraídos da Autorização de Internação Hospitalar do Sistema de Informação Hospitalar do Sistema Único de Saúde. O relacionamento probabilístico foi empregado para combinar múltiplas autorizações de uma mesma internação em um único registro e para identificar readmissões. Informações sobre prescrições foram agregadas manualmente aos registros do Sistema de Informação Hospitalar. Regressão logística foi utilizada para quantificar a influência de interação medicamentosa potencial e reinternação. Regressão de Cox foi empregada para testar a influência dessa variável no tempo até a primeira reinternação. RESULTADOS: Foram identificadas 99 readmissões (7% dos pacientes. Interação medicamentosa potencial foi encontrada em 35% das prescrições analisadas. Pacientes com potencial de interação medicamentosa na admissão prévia foram mais propensos à reinternação. A razão de chance ajustada indicou que esses pacientes tinham chance 2,4 vezes maior de readmissão; a taxa de risco ajustada mostrou que em pacientes com interação medicamentosa esse risco foi 79% maior (p OBJETIVO: Analizar la relación entre potencial interacción medicamentosa potencial y reinternación hospitalaria. MÉTODOS: Estudio retrospectivo con 1.487 pacientes mayores de 18 años admitidos en un hospital general en Vitória da Conquista, BA, Brasil, de enero a diciembre de 2007. Los datos fueron extraídos de la Autorización de Internación Hospitalaria del Sistema de Información Hospitalaria del Sistema Único de Salud Brasileño. La relación probabilística fue empleada para combinar múltiples autorizaciones de una misma internación en un único registro

  9. Aged-care nurses in rural Tasmanian clinical settings more likely to think hypothetical medication error would be reported and disclosed compared to hospital and community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Debra; Kilpatrick, Sue; Iedema, Rick

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to determine the likelihood that rural nurses perceive a hypothetical medication error would be reported in their workplace. This employs cross-sectional survey using hypothetical error scenario with varying levels of harm. Clinical settings in rural Tasmania. Participants were 116 eligible surveys received from registered and enrolled nurses. Frequency of responses indicating the likelihood that severe, moderate and near miss (no harm) scenario would 'always' be reported or disclosed. Eighty per cent of nurses viewed a severe error would 'always' be reported, 64.8% a moderate error and 45.7% a near-miss error. In regards to disclosure, 54.7% felt this was 'always' likely to occur for a severe error, 44.8% for a moderate error and 26.4% for a near miss. Across all levels of severity, aged-care nurses were more likely than nurses in other settings to view error to 'always' be reported (ranging from 72-96%, P = 0.010 to 0.042,) and disclosed (68-88%, P = 0.000). Those in a management role were more likely to view error to 'always' be disclosed compared to those in a clinical role (50-77.3%, P = 0.008-0.024). Further research in rural clinical settings is needed to improve the understanding of error management and disclosure. © 2015 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of National Rural Health Alliance.

  10. Minimizing the Risk of Disease Transmission in Emergency Settings: Novel In Situ Physico-Chemical Disinfection of Pathogen-Laden Hospital Wastewaters.

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    Emanuele Sozzi

    Full Text Available The operation of a health care facility, such as a cholera or Ebola treatment center in an emergency setting, results in the production of pathogen-laden wastewaters that may potentially lead to onward transmission of the disease. The research presented here evaluated the design and operation of a novel treatment system, successfully used by Médecins Sans Frontières in Haiti to disinfect CTC wastewaters in situ, eliminating the need for road haulage and disposal of the waste to a poorly-managed hazardous waste facility, thereby providing an effective barrier to disease transmission through a novel but simple sanitary intervention. The physico-chemical protocols eventually successfully treated over 600 m3 of wastewater, achieving coagulation/flocculation and disinfection by exposure to high pH (Protocol A and low pH (Protocol B environments, using thermotolerant coliforms as a disinfection efficacy index. In Protocol A, the addition of hydrated lime resulted in wastewater disinfection and coagulation/flocculation of suspended solids. In Protocol B, disinfection was achieved by the addition of hydrochloric acid, followed by pH neutralization and coagulation/flocculation of suspended solids using aluminum sulfate. Removal rates achieved were: COD >99%; suspended solids >90%; turbidity >90% and thermotolerant coliforms >99.9%. The proposed approach is the first known successful attempt to disinfect wastewater in a disease outbreak setting without resorting to the alternative, untested, approach of 'super chlorination' which, it has been suggested, may not consistently achieve adequate disinfection. A basic analysis of costs demonstrated a significant saving in reagent costs compared with the less reliable approach of super-chlorination. The proposed approach to in situ sanitation in cholera treatment centers and other disease outbreak settings represents a timely response to a UN call for onsite disinfection of wastewaters generated in such

  11. Influence of patient characteristics on care time in patients hospitalized with schizophrenia

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    Sugibayashi Y

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Yukiko Sugibayashi,1 Kimio Yoshimura,1 Keita Yamauchi,1,2 Ataru Inagaki,3 Naoki Ikegami1 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 2Keio University Graduate School of Health Management, Kanagawa, 3Aoyama Gakuin University, School of International Politics, Economics and Communication, Tokyo, Japan Background: In the current Japanese payment system for the treatment of psychiatric inpatients, the length of hospital stay and nurse staffing levels are key determinants of the amount of payment. These factors do not fully reflect the costs of care for each patient. The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between patient characteristics and their care costs as measured by “care time” for patients with schizophrenia.Methods: Patient characteristics and care time were investigated in 14,557 inpatients in 102 psychiatric hospitals in Japan. Of these 14,557 inpatients, data for 8,379 with schizophrenia were analyzed using a tree-based model.Results: The factor exerting the greatest influence on care time was ”length of stay”, so subjects were divided into 2 groups, a “short stay group” with length of stay ≦104 days, and “long stay group” ≧105 days. Each group was further subdivided according to dependence with regard to “activities of daily living”, “psychomotor agitation”, “verbal abuse”, and “frequent demands/repetitive complaints”, which were critical variables affecting care time. The mean care time was shorter in the long-stay group; however, in some long-stay patients, the mean care time was considerably longer than that in patients in the short-stay group.Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that it is necessary to construct a new payment system reflecting not only length of stay and nurse staffing levels, but also individual patient characteristics. Keywords: psychiatric hospital, schizophrenia, care time, case mix, tree-based model

  12. Trial of a novel plasma gas disinfection system (Radica) to reduce mattress residual bacterial contamination in the acute hospital setting: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiely, F; Fallon, D; Casey, C; Kerins, D M; Eustace, J A

    2017-02-01

    In routine clinical practice, mattresses are manually cleaned using specialised cleaning and high-level disinfecting fluids. While effective against a wide range of organisms, the success of this approach is dependent on a thorough and complete application and is likely to be susceptible to human error and thus variable. The efficacy of available infection control measures to reduce such mattress contamination is unknown as it is not subject to quality control measures. There is a pressing need to identify more effective methods to prevent cross contamination within the medical environment, given the lack of available treatment strategies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the ability of a new technology, gaseous technology, to reduce colonization levels, compared to standard cleaning, and so attenuate superficial nosocomial infections. We conducted a prospective, single-centre, open-label, non-randomized trial with blinded outcome assessments, comparing the standard cleaning of hospital mattresses with a novel plasma based disinfection system Radica™, followed by a standard post-cleaning culturing protocol (five swabs/mattress). The median (interquartile range) maximal colony count per mattress for the 20 Radica versus 7 routinely cleaned mattresses was 1 (1-2.7) versus Too-Numerous-to-Count (TNTC) (32-TNTC), respectively, p = 0.002. Of the 20 Radica™ treated mattresses, 12 (60 %) had no positive culture result while all of the standard cleaned mattresses had at least two positive cultures. The plasma based Radica disinfection system reduces mattress bacterial colonization levels as compared to routine cleaning. This is a potentially important technology in the health care system to reduce surface colonisation and hence nosocomial infections.

  13. Hospital anxiety and depression scale assessment of 100 patients before and after using low vision care: A prospective study in a tertiary eye-care setting

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    Pukhraj Rishi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Assessment of anxiety and depression in patients attending low vision care (LVC using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Methods: In this prospective, observational study, 100 patients with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA worse than 6/18 in the better eye or limitation of field of vision to 8 denotes anxiety or depression. Results: Mean age at presentation was 38.2 years. Mean duration of symptoms was 9.6 years. Underlying etiology of visual impairment included retinal dystrophy/degeneration (n = 35, disorders of the optic nerve (n = 17, glaucoma (n = 10, diabetic retinopathy (n = 9, age-related macular degeneration (n = 5, uncorrected refractive errors (n = 5, and miscellaneous diseases (n = 19. Mean presenting BCVA in the better eye was 0.83 (±0.64 which improved significantly to 0.78 (±0.63 after LVC (P < 0.001. The HADS-Depression subscale score was comparable for severity of visual impairment for both distance (P = 0.57 and near vision (P = 0.61. Similarly, HADS-Anxiety scores were also comparable for severity of distance (P = 0.34 and near-visual impairment (NVI; P = 0.50. At baseline, mean HADS-Depression and HADS-Anxiety scores were 8.4 (±3.7 and 9.6 (±4.3 points, which improved significantly to 6.0 (±3.4 and 6.7 (±3.7, respectively, after low-vision correction (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Low vision correction can significantly improve anxiety and depression indicators in visually impaired patients.

  14. Improving Standards of Care in Obstructed Labour: A Criteria-Based Audit at a Referral Hospital in a Low-Resource Setting in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective In low-resource settings, obstructed labour is strongly associated with severe maternal morbidity and intrapartum asphyxia, and consequently maternal and perinatal deaths. This study evaluated the impact of a criteria-based audit of the diagnosis and management of obstructed labour in a low-resource setting. Methods A baseline criteria-based audit was conducted from October 2013 to March 2014, followed by a workshop in which stakeholders gave feedback on interventions agreed upon to improve obstetric care. The implemented interventions included but were not limited to introducing standard guidelines for diagnosis and management of obstructed labour, agreeing on mandatory review by specialist for cases that are assigned caesarean section, re-training and supervision on use and interpretation of partograph and, strengthening team work between doctors, mid-wives and theatre staff. After implementing these interventions in March, a re-audit was performed from July 2015 to November, 2015, and the results were compared to those of the baseline audit. Results Two hundred and sixty deliveries in the baseline survey and 250 deliveries in the follow-up survey were audited. Implementing the new criteria improved the diagnosis from 74% to 81% (p = 0.049) and also the management of obstructed labour from 4.2% at baseline audit to 9.2% at re-audit (p = 0.025). Improved detection of prolonged labour through heightened observation of regular contractions, protracted cervical dilatation, protracted descent of presenting part, arrested cervical dilation, and severe moulding contributed to improved standards of diagnosis (all p labour using available resources. Some of the observed changes in practice were of modest magnitude implying demand for further improvements, while sustaining those already put in place. PMID:27893765

  15. Typhoid intestinal perforations at a University teaching hospital in Northwestern Tanzania: A surgical experience of 104 cases in a resource-limited setting

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    Chalya Phillipo L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typhoid intestinal perforation is still prevalent in many developing countries. Despite the advances in the management, the outcome in these patients in resource limited countries is still very poor. This study was to review our experiences on the surgical management of typhoid intestinal perforation and to determine the prognostic factors for mortality in our local setting. Methods This was a combined retrospective and prospective study of patients who were operated for typhoid intestinal perforation at Bugando Medical Centre between August 2006 and September 2011. Data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer software version 15. Results A total of 104 patients were studied representing 8.7% of typhoid fever cases. Males were affected twice more than the females (2.6:1. Their ages ranged from 8 to 76 years with a median age of 18.5 years. The peak age incidence was in the 11-20 years age group. Fever and abdominal pain were the most common presenting symptoms and majority of the patients (80.8% perforated between within 14 days of illness. Chest and abdominal radiographs revealed pneumoperitonium in 74.7% of cases. Ultrasound showed free peritoneal collection in 85.7% of cases. Nine (10.2% patients were HIV positive with a median CD4+ count of 261 cells/μl. The perforation-surgery interval was more than 72 hours in 90(86.5% patients. The majority of patients (84.6% had single perforations and ileum was the most common part of the bowel affected occurring in 86.2% of cases. Simple closure of the perforations was the most commonly performed procedure accounting for 78.8% of cases. Postoperative complication rate was 39.4% and surgical site infection was the most frequent complication in 55.5% of cases. Mortality rate was 23.1% and it was statistically significantly associated with delayed presentation, inadequate antibiotic treatment prior to admission, shock on admission, HIV positivity, low CD4 count (P Conclusion

  16. Specialist palliative care services for adults with advanced, incurable illness in hospital, hospice, or community settings--protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Jan; Siemens, Waldemar; Antes, Gerd; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Xander, Carola; Schwarzer, Guido; Stock, Stephanie; Becker, Gerhild

    2015-09-25

    Specialist palliative care (SPC) interventions aim to relieve and prevent suffering in the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domain. Therefore, SPC is carried out by a multi-professional team with different occupations (e.g., physician, nurse, psychologist, and social worker). Remaining skepticism concerning the need for SPC may be based on the scarcity of high-quality evaluations about the external evidence for SPC. Therefore, we will conduct a systematic review according to Cochrane standards to examine the effects of SPC for adults with advanced illness. The comprehensive systematic literature search will include randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs. We will search the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PsycINFO. Patients must be adults suffering from life-limiting diseases. Proxy and caregiver outcomes will not be assessed in order to ensure a clear and well-defined research question for this review. Interventions may be in an in- or outpatient setting, e.g., consulting service, palliative care ward, and palliative outpatient clinic. In line with the multi-dimensional scope of palliative care, the primary outcome is quality of life (QoL). Key secondary outcomes are patients' symptom burden, place of death and survival, and health economic aspects. Subgroup analysis will assess results according to cancer type, age, early vs not early SPC, site of care, and setting. Analysis will be performed with the current RevMan software. We will use the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias assessment tool. The quality of evidence will be judged according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The available evidence will be summarized and discussed to provide a basis for decision-making among health care professionals and policy makers. For SPC, we believe that multi-professional care is of utmost importance. Therefore, single

  17. [How to Understand "Clinical Ethics" and "Research Ethics" in Clinical Settings--Incorporation of IRB, REC, and CEC in Hospital Organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    As the traditional definition of "medical ethics" has recently changed markedly with advances in medical knowledge and technology, medical doctors and researchers in Japan are required to understand and apply both research and clinical ethics. Quite frequently, ethical problems in clinical settings cannot be addressed by the simple application of good will, hard work, and perseverance by medical personnel. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) have jointly published "Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Studies;" however, clear guidelines (legal, ministerial, or governmental) outlining the expectations regarding clinical ethics do not exist. All medical personnel face deep ethical dilemmas. In these instances, if the fulfillment of 'ethics' relies solely on the capacity of personnel to apply their own individual moral efforts, the result will be burn-out among these workers who have a strong sense of responsibility. In order to avoid this, a system which comprises multiple physicians, nurses, and other personnel must be established, allowing collaboration when an appropriate response is required. A major factor supporting this approach is the offering of Clinical Ethics Consultations.

  18. Real-world hospital costs for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care associated with platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JH

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jianhua Chen,1 Shengqi Wu,2 Chenping Hu,3 Yicheng Yang,4 Narayan Rajan,5 Yun Chen,4 Canjuan Yang,6 Jianfeng Li,6 Wendong Chen7 1Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Research and Education, Hunan Province Tumor Hospital, 3Department of Respiratory, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, 4Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. Shanghai Branch, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 5Global Health Outcomes Research, Eli Lilly and Co, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 6Division of Health Outcome Research, Normin Health Changsha Representative Office, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China; 7Normin Health, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: The objective of this study was to compare hospital costs per treatment cycle (HCTC for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care associated with platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (AdvNS-NSCLC in Chinese patients. Methods: Patients receiving platinum-based doublets in the first-line setting for AdvNS-NSCLC from 2010 to 2012 in two Chinese tertiary hospitals were identified to create the retrospective study cohort. Propensity score methods were used to create matched treatment groups for head-to-head comparisons on HCTC between pemetrexed–platinum and other platinum-based doublets. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to rank studied platinum-based doublets for their associations with the log10 scale of HCTC for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care. Results: Propensity score methods created matched treatment groups for pemetrexed–platinum versus docetaxel–platinum (61 pairs, paclitaxel–platinum (39 pairs, gemcitabine–platinum (93 pairs, and vinorelbine–platinum (73 pairs, respectively. Even though the log10 scale of HCTC for nonchemotherapy drugs and nondrug care associated with pemetrexed–platinum was ranked lowest in all patients (coefficient –0.174, P=0.015, which included patients experiencing

  19. The PRESLO study: evaluation of a global secondary low back pain prevention program for health care personnel in a hospital setting. Multicenter, randomized intervention trial

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    Denis Angélique

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common low back pain represents a major public health problem in terms of its direct cost to health care and its socio-economic repercussions. Ten percent of individuals who suffer from low back pain evolve toward a chronic case and as such are responsible for 75 to 80% of the direct cost of low back pain. It is therefore imperative to highlight the predictive factors of low back pain chronification in order to lighten the economic burden of low back pain-related invalidity. Despite being particularly affected by low back pain, Hospices Civils de Lyon (HCL personnel have never been offered a specific, tailor-made treatment plan. The PRESLO study (with PRESLO referring to Secondary Low Back Pain Prevention, or in French, PREvention Secondaire de la LOmbalgie, proposed by HCL occupational health services and the Centre Médico-Chirurgical et de Réadaptation des Massues – Croix Rouge Française, is a randomized trial that aims to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of a global secondary low back pain prevention program for the low back pain sufferers among HCL hospital personnel, a population at risk for recurrence and chronification. This program, which is based on the concept of physical retraining, employs a multidisciplinary approach uniting physical activity, cognitive education about low back pain and lumbopelvic morphotype analysis. No study targeting populations at risk for low back pain chronification has as yet evaluated the efficiency of lighter secondary prevention programs. Methods/Design This study is a two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial proposed to all low back pain sufferers among HCL workers, included between October 2008 and July 2011 and followed over two years. The personnel following their usual treatment (control group and those following the global prevention program in addition to their usual treatment (intervention group are compared in terms of low back pain recurrence and the

  20. Integrated hospital emergency care improves efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, A A; Robinson, S M; Whitwell, D; Myers, S; Bennett, T J H; Hall, N; Haydock, S; Fritz, Z; Atkinson, P

    2008-02-01

    There is uncertainty about the most efficient model of emergency care. An attempt has been made to improve the process of emergency care in one hospital by developing an integrated model. The medical admissions unit was relocated into the existing emergency department and came under the 4-hour target. Medical case records were redesigned to provide a common assessment document for all patients presenting as an emergency. Medical, surgical and paediatric short-stay wards were opened next to the emergency department. A clinical decision unit replaced the more traditional observation unit. The process of patient assessment was streamlined so that a patient requiring admission was fully clerked by the first attending doctor to a level suitable for registrar or consultant review. Patients were allocated directly to specialty on arrival. The effectiveness of this approach was measured with routine data over the same 3-month periods in 2005 and 2006. There was a 16.3% decrease in emergency medical admissions and a 3.9% decrease in emergency surgical admissions. The median length of stay for emergency medical patients was reduced from 7 to 5 days. The efficiency of the elective surgical services was also improved. Performance against the 4-hour target declined but was still acceptable. The number of bed days for admitted surgical and medical cases rose slightly. There was an increase in the number of medical outliers on surgical wards, a reduction in the number of incident forms and formal complaints and a reduction in income for the hospital. Integrated emergency care has the ability to use spare capacity within emergency care. It offers significant advantages beyond the emergency department. However, improved efficiency in processing emergency patients placed the hospital at a financial disadvantage.

  1. Hospitals, Part of Community Facilities data set for all eleven counties and twenty-two cities within Middle Georgia. Updated by MGRC and maintained by the GA Dept of Community Affairs., Published in 2000, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Middle Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Hospitals dataset current as of 2000. Part of Community Facilities data set for all eleven counties and twenty-two cities within Middle Georgia. Updated by MGRC and...

  2. Relation Between Hospital Length of Stay and Quality of Care in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes (from the American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines--Coronary Artery Disease Data Set).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickoo, Sumit; Bhardwaj, Adarsh; Fonarow, Gregg C; Liang, Li; Bhatt, Deepak L; Cannon, Christopher P

    2016-01-15

    Worries regarding short length of stay (LOS) adversely impacting quality of care prompted us to assess the relation between hospital LOS and inpatient guideline adherence in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We used the American Heart Association's Get with The Guidelines (GWTG)--Coronary Artery Disease data set. Data were collected from January 2, 2000, to March 21, 2010, for patients with acute coronary syndrome from 405 different sites. Of the 119,398 patients in the study, the mean LOS was 5.5 days with a median of 4 days. There was no difference in the LOS on the basis of hospital size, hospital type, or cardiac surgery availability. The population with an LOS <4 days were younger (63.8 ± 14.1 vs 70 ± 14.5, p <0.0001), men (63.8% vs 55.3%, p <0.0001) and had fewer clinical co-morbidities. The overall adherence was high in the GWTG participating hospitals. Those with the LOS <4 days were more likely to receive aspirin (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.19; p <0.001), clopidogrel (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.95; p <0.001), lipid-lowering therapy if indicated (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.21; p <0.001), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker for left ventricular systolic dysfunction (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.21; p = 0.04) and smoking cessation counseling (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.24; p <0.001) compared to those with the LOS ≥ 4 days. In contrast, those with the LOS <4 days were less likely to receive beta blockers (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93; p <0.001). The odds of receiving defect-free care were greater for patients with the LOS <4 days (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.21; p <0.001). In conclusion, in GWTG participating hospitals, a shorter LOS did not appear to adversely affect adherence to discharge quality of care measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pilot randomized trial of therapeutic hypothermia with serial cranial ultrasound and 18-22 month follow-up for neonatal encephalopathy in a low resource hospital setting in uganda: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is now convincing evidence that in industrialized countries therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy increases survival with normal neurological function. However, the greatest burden of perinatal asphyxia falls in low and mid-resource settings where it is unclear whether therapeutic hypothermia is safe and effective. Aims Under the UCL Uganda Women's Health Initiative, a pilot randomized controlled trial in infants with perinatal asphyxia was set up in the special care baby unit in Mulago Hospital, a large public hospital with ~20,000 births in Kampala, Uganda to determine: (i The feasibility of achieving consent, neurological assessment, randomization and whole body cooling to a core temperature 33-34°C using water bottles (ii The temperature profile of encephalopathic infants with standard care (iii The pattern, severity and evolution of brain tissue injury as seen on cranial ultrasound and relation with outcome (iv The feasibility of neurodevelopmental follow-up at 18-22 months of age Methods/Design Ethical approval was obtained from Makerere University and Mulago Hospital. All infants were in-born. Parental consent for entry into the trial was obtained. Thirty-six infants were randomized either to standard care plus cooling (target rectal temperature of 33-34°C for 72 hrs, started within 3 h of birth or standard care alone. All other aspects of management were the same. Cooling was performed using water bottles filled with tepid tap water (25°C. Rectal, axillary, ambient and surface water bottle temperatures were monitored continuously for the first 80 h. Encephalopathy scoring was performed on days 1-4, a structured, scorable neurological examination and head circumference were performed on days 7 and 17. Cranial ultrasound was performed on days 1, 3 and 7 and scored. Griffiths developmental quotient, head circumference, neurological examination and assessment of gross motor function were

  4. Urgent consultations at the dermatology department of Basel University Hospital, Switzerland: characterisation of patients and setting - a 12-month study with 2,222 patients data and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, N; Itin, P H; Beltraminelli, H

    2014-01-01

    Urgent consultations for skin disorders are commonly done in different settings. Scarce data exist about the characteristics of these patients. The aim of this study was to analyse specific characteristics of patients receiving an urgent consultation at a dermatology department in a university hospital. We prospectively recorded the data of all patients having had an urgent consultation during a period of 12 months. We registered 2,222 urgent consultations. The most frequent diagnoses were eczemas (24.8%), dermatomycoses (5.1%) and dermatitis not otherwise specified (4.8%). The most frequent treatments were topical steroids, emollients, topical antibiotics, systemic antihistamines, antibiotics and virostatics. 2.2% of patients were hospitalized, 78.8% asked for a consultation for a disease lasting less than 4 weeks, and 6.9% presented the same day as the skin disease appeared. This study shows the characteristics of patients receiving an urgent dermatologic consultation. It underlines the need for collaboration between dermatologists, other physicians, general practitioners and nurses. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Comfort Measures Order Set at a Tertiary Care Academic Hospital: Is There a Comparable Difference in End-of-Life Care Between Patients Dying in Acute Care When CMOS Is Utilized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine; Stilos, Kalli; Nowell, Allyson; Lau, Fanchea; Moore, Jennifer; Wynnychuk, Lesia

    2018-04-01

    Standardized protocols have been previously shown to be helpful in managing end-of-life (EOL) care in hospital. The comfort measures order set (CMOS), a standardized framework for assessing imminently dying patients' symptoms and needs, was implemented at a tertiary academic hospital. We assessed whether there were comparable differences in the care of a dying patient when the CMOS was utilized and when it was not. A retrospective chart review was completed on patients admitted under oncology and general internal medicine, who were referred to the inpatient palliative care team for "EOL care" between February 2015 and March 2016. Of 83 patients, 56 (67%) received intiation of the CMOS and 27 (33%) did not for EOL care. There was significant involvement of spiritual care with the CMOS (66%), as compared to the group without CMOS (19%), P care, which was significantly less than the number of symptom management adjustments per patient when CMOS was not used (3.3), P care and assessment across the organization is still required.

  6. Hospitals; hospitals13

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Hospital Facilities information was compiled from several various sources. Main source was the RI Department of Health Facilities Regulation database, License 2000....

  7. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  8. Teenage pregnancy in an urban hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J K; Fink, R; Yesupria, A; Rajegowda, B; Lala, R

    1986-01-01

    Recent research suggests that adverse consequences of teenage pregnancy are largely a function of social background factors and adequacy of prenatal care. This study examines the situation of young mothers with new babies in a low income, urban environment. The study explores the relationship between age and ethnicity and various life circumstance and life style differences which might effect long term developmental outcome. 475 Hispanic and black mothers were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The majority are poorly educated, single parents. Educational attainment is higher for blacks than for Hispanics and for older mothers than for younger. Older mothers are more likely to be living with the father, to be married, and to have received adequate prenatal care. Hispanic parents are more likely than Blacks to be planning to live together. Hispanic mothers are more likely than blacks to be planning to be the primary caretaker for their babies. Adequacy of prenatal care is related to both prematurity and low birth weight. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to pregnancy prevention and parenting education programs.

  9. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has