WorldWideScience

Sample records for short-range atmospheric dispersion

  1. Short-Range Atmospheric Dispersion of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO2 into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO2 seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO2 seepage dispersion over relatively sho...

  2. Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, A.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO{sub 2} seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO{sub 2} seepage dispersion over relatively short distances where density effects are likely to be important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with density dependence in the gravity term. Results for a two-dimensional system show that a density dependence emerges at higher fluxes than prior estimates. A universal scaling relation is derived that allows estimation of the flux from concentrations measured downwind and vice versa.

  3. Assessment of a CFD model for short-range plume dispersion: Applications to the Fusion Field Trial 2007 (FFT-07) diffusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Ngae, Pierre; Feiz, Amir-Ali; Turbelin, Grégory

    2017-11-01

    Simulations of the short-range plume dispersion under different atmospheric conditions can provide essential information for the development of source reconstruction methodologies that allows to retrieve the location and intensity of an unknown hazardous pollutant source. This process required a comprehensive assessment of the atmospheric dispersion models with tracer diffusion experiments in various stability conditions. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of a CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE is performed with the observations from available seven trials of single releases conducted in the Fusion Field Trail 2007 (FFT-07) tracer experiment. The CFD simulations are performed for each trial and it was observed that the CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE provides good agreement of the predicted concentrations with the observations in both stable and convective atmospheric conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the simulated results is performed by computing the statistical performance measures for the dispersion model evaluation. The CFD model predicts 65.4% of the overall concentration points within a factor of two to the observations. It was observed that the CFD model is predicting better in convective stability conditions in comparison to the trials conducted in stable stability. In convective conditions, 74.6% points were predicted within a factor of two to the observations which are higher than 59.3% concentration points predicted within a factor of two in the trials in stable atmospheric conditions.

  4. The Noble Gas Dimers as a Probe of the Energetic Contributions of Dispersion and Short-Range Electron Correlation in Weakly-Bound Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Housden, Michael Philip; Pyper, Nicholas Charles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The binding of the noble gas dimers is examined using a theory in which the Hartree-Fock interaction energy is augmented with both a short-range correlation term derived from the theory of a uniform electron-gas plus a dispersion energy damped according to the theory of Jabobi and Csanak. The good agreement between the predicted and experimental binding energies and equilibrium inter-nuclear separations confirms that this approach captures the essential physics of the int...

  5. WPC's Short Range Forecast Coded Bulletin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Short Range Forecast Coded Bulletin. The Short Range Forecast Coded Bulletin describes the expected locations of high and low pressure centers, surface frontal...

  6. Remote sensing of atmospheric particulates: Technological innovation and physical limitations in applications to short-range weather prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, R. J.; Kropfil, R.; Hallett, J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for remote sensing of particles, from cloud droplet to hailstone size, using optical and microwave frequencies are reviewed. The inherent variability of atmospheric particulates is examined to delineate conditions when the signal can give information to be effectively utilized in a forecasting context. The physical limitations resulting from the phase, size, orientation and concentration variability of the particulates are assessed.

  7. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... velocity distributions that depend on height above the ground both with respect to standard deviation and skewness are substituted into the stationary Fokker/Planck equation. The particle position distribution is taken to be uniform *the well/mixed condition( and also a given dispersion coefficient...

  8. Impact of assimilation of INSAT-3D retrieved atmospheric motion vectors on short-range forecast of summer monsoon 2014 over the South Asian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Deb, Sanjib K.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its three-dimensional variational data assimilation system are used in this study to assimilate the INSAT-3D, a recently launched Indian geostationary meteorological satellite derived from atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) over the South Asian region during peak Indian summer monsoon month (i.e., July 2014). A total of four experiments were performed daily with and without assimilation of INSAT-3D-derived AMVs and the other AMVs available through Global Telecommunication System (GTS) for the entire month of July 2014. Before assimilating these newly derived INSAT-3D AMVs in the numerical model, a preliminary evaluation of these AMVs is performed with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) final model analyses. The preliminary validation results show that root-mean-square vector difference (RMSVD) for INSAT-3D AMVs is ˜3.95, 6.66, and 5.65 ms-1 at low, mid, and high levels, respectively, and slightly more RMSVDs are noticed in GTS AMVs (˜4.0, 8.01, and 6.43 ms-1 at low, mid, and high levels, respectively). The assimilation of AMVs has improved the WRF model of produced wind speed, temperature, and moisture analyses as well as subsequent model forecasts over the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, Australia, and South Africa. Slightly more improvements are noticed in the experiment where only the INSAT-3D AMVs are assimilated compared to the experiment where only GTS AMVs are assimilated. The results also show improvement in rainfall predictions over the Indian region after AMV assimilation. Overall, the assimilation of INSAT-3D AMVs improved the WRF model short-range predictions over the South Asian region as compared to control experiments.

  9. Short-range communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  10. Countering short range ballistic missiles

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, George W.; Ehiers, Mark A.; Marshall, Kneale T.

    1993-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Concepts commonly found in ASW search are used to model the flow and detection of mobile launchers for short range ballistic missiles. Emphasis is on detection and destruction of the launcher before launch. The benefit of pre-hostility intelligence and pre-missile-launch prosecution, the backbone of successful ASW, is revealed through the analysis of a circulation model which reflects the standard operations of a third world mobile mi...

  11. Atmospheric Dispersion Capability for T2VOC

    OpenAIRE

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric transport by variable-K theory dispersion has been added to T2VOC. The new code, T2VOCA, models flow and transport in the subsurface identically to T2VOC, but includes also the capability for modeling passive multicomponent variable-K theory dispersion in an atmospheric region assumed to be flat, horizontal, and with a logarithmic wind profile. The specification of the logarithmic wind profile in the T2VOC input file is automated through the use of a build code called ATMDISP...

  12. Short-range fundamental forces

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Buchner, M; Fedorov, V V; Hoedl, S; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Reynaud, S; Sobolev, Yu

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: 1) spin-independent forces, 2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Differe nt experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experim ents. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  13. Dispersion of effluents in the atmosphere; Dispersion des effluents dans l`atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `convection` section of the French association of thermal engineers with the support of the environment and energy mastery agency (ADEME). This book of proceedings contains 10 papers entitled: `physical modeling of atmospheric dispersion in wind tunnels. Some industrial examples`; `modeling of the noxious effects of a fire on the environment of an industrial site: importance of thermal engineering related hypotheses`; `atmospheric diffusion of a noxious cloud: fast evaluation method of safety areas around refrigerating installations that use ammonia`; `modeling of atmospheric flows in urban areas in order to study the dispersion of pollutants`; `use of a dispersion parameter to characterize the evolution of a diffusion process downstream of a linear source of passive contaminant placed inside a turbulent boundary layer`; `elements of reflexion around the development of an analytical methodology applied to the elaboration of measurement strategies of air quality in ambient and outdoor atmospheres around industrial sites`; `state-of-the-art about treatment techniques for VOC-rich gaseous effluents`; `characteristics of the time variation of the atmospheric pollution in the Paris region and visualization of its space distribution`; `mass-spectrometry for the measurement of atmospheric pollutants`; `volume variations in natural convection turbulence`. (J.S.)

  14. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario....... In MUD, corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion are computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns are derived....

  15. Kalman filtration of radiation monitoring data from atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, M.; Lauritzen, B.; Madsen, H.

    2004-01-01

    A Kalman filter method using off-site radiation monitoring data is proposed as a tool for on-line estimation of the source term for short-range atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. The method is based on the Gaussian plume model, in which the plume parameters including the source term...... exhibit a ‘random walk’ process. The embedded parameters of the Kalman filter are determined through maximum-likelihood estimation making the filter essentially free of external parameters. The method is tested using both real and simulated radiation monitoring data. For simulated data, the method...

  16. Impact of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Nair, Udaysankar S.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.; McNider, Richard T.; Christopher, Sundar A.; Anantharaj, Valentine G.

    2009-01-01

    Prior numerical modelling studies show that atmospheric dispersion is sensitive to surface heterogeneities, but past studies do not consider the impact of a realistic distribution of surface heterogeneities on mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. While these focussed on dispersion in the convective boundary layer, the present work also considers dispersion in the nocturnal boundary layer and above. Using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) coupled to the Eulerian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), the impact of topographic, vegetation, and soil moisture heterogeneities on daytime and nighttime atmospheric dispersion is examined. In addition, the sensitivity to the use of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived spatial distributions of vegetation characteristics on atmospheric dispersion is also studied. The impact of vegetation and terrain heterogeneities on atmospheric dispersion is strongly modulated by soil moisture, with the nature of dispersion switching from non-Gaussian to near- Gaussian behaviour for wetter soils (fraction of saturation soil moisture content exceeding 40%). For drier soil moisture conditions, vegetation heterogeneity produces differential heating and the formation of mesoscale circulation patterns that are primarily responsible for non-Gaussian dispersion patterns. Nighttime dispersion is very sensitive to topographic, vegetation, soil moisture, and soil type heterogeneity and is distinctly non-Gaussian for heterogeneous land-surface conditions. Sensitivity studies show that soil type and vegetation heterogeneities have the most dramatic impact on atmospheric dispersion. To provide more skillful dispersion calculations, we recommend the utilisation of satellite-derived vegetation characteristics coupled with data assimilation techniques that constrain soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models to generate realistic spatial distributions of surface energy fluxes.

  17. Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe - Summary Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent

    The objective of the NordRisk II project has been to derive practical means for assessing the risks from long-range atmospheric dispersion of radioac-tive materials. An atlas over different atmospheric dispersion and deposi-tion scenarios has been developed using historical numerical weather pre...

  18. Operational mesoscale atmospheric dispersion prediction using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This numerical system constitutes a parallel version of a nested grid meso-scale meteorological model MM5 coupled to a random walk particle dispersion model FLEXPART.The system provides 48-hour forecast of the local weather and radioactive plume dispersion due to hypothetical airborne releases in a range of 100 ...

  19. Data assimilation on atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin

    , radiological observations, e.g. dose rate measurements, can be used to improve these model predictions and to obtain real-time estimates of the atmospheric dispersion parameters. This thesis examines data assimilation in the context of atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. In particular, it presents...... assimilation methods in a realistic setting. New experimental studies of atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material was carried out in October 2001 at the SCK"CEN in Mol, Belgium. In the Mol experiment, the radiation field from routine releases of 41 Ar is recorded by an array of gamma detectors along...... for evaluation of gamma dose rate models and for development and testing of data assimilation methods for atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. The Mol dataset has been used for experimental evaluation of the Gaussian plume model and the RIMPUFF model; the results of these studies are presented...

  20. Short range radio research in Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    The research and education by the Telecommunication Engineering Group at the University of Twente is dedicated to physical layer topics in communications. Three research tracks have prominence: Short Range Radio, Microwave Photonics, and Electromagnetic Compatibility. Arjan is active in the Short

  1. Uncertainty modelling of atmospheric dispersion by stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The parameters associated to a environmental dispersion model may include different kinds of variability, imprecision and uncertainty. More often, it is seen that available information is interpreted in probabilistic sense. Probability theory is a well-established theory to measure such kind of variability. However, not all ...

  2. Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Atmospheric plume dispersion models are used for a variety of purposes including emergency planning and response to hazardous material releases, determining force protection actions in the event of a Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) attack and for locating sources of pollution. This study provides a review of previous studies that examine the accuracy of atmospheric plume dispersion models for chemical releases. It considers the principles used to derive air dispersion plume models and looks at three specific models currently in use: Aerial Location of Hazardous Atmospheres (ALOHA), Emergency Prediction Information Code (EPIcode) and Second Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF). Results from this study indicate over-prediction bias by the EPIcode and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

  3. A source term estimation method for a nuclear accident using atmospheric dispersion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Minsik; Ohba, Ryohji; Oura, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an operational source term estimation (STE) method applicable for a nuclear accident like the incident that occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011. The new STE method presented here is based on data from atmospheric dispersion...... models and short-range observational data around the nuclear power plants.The accuracy of this method is validated with data from a wind tunnel study that involved a tracer gas release from a scaled model experiment at Tokai Daini nuclear power station in Japan. We then use the methodology developed...... and validated through the effort described in this manuscript to estimate the release rate of radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station....

  4. A source term estimation method for a nuclear accident using atmospheric dispersion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Minsik; Ohba, Ryohji; Oura, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    models and short-range observational data around the nuclear power plants.The accuracy of this method is validated with data from a wind tunnel study that involved a tracer gas release from a scaled model experiment at Tokai Daini nuclear power station in Japan. We then use the methodology developed......The objective of this study is to develop an operational source term estimation (STE) method applicable for a nuclear accident like the incident that occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in 2011. The new STE method presented here is based on data from atmospheric dispersion...... and validated through the effort described in this manuscript to estimate the release rate of radioactive material from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station....

  5. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  6. Atmospheric dispersion modeling near a roadway under calm meteorological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Fallah Shorshani, Masoud; Seigneur, Christian; POLO REHN, Lucie; CHANUT, Hervé; PELLAN, Yann; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; CHARRON, Aurélie; Andre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutant dispersion near sources is typically simulated by Gaussian models because of their efficient compromise between reasonable accuracy and manageable com- putational time. However, the standard Gaussian dispersion formula applies downwind of a source under advective conditions with a well-defined wind direction and cannot calculate air pollutant concentrations under calm conditions with fluctuating wind direction and/or upwind of the emission source. Attempts have been made...

  7. Data assimilation on atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin

    2006-01-01

    a new method for on-line estimation of the radionuclide source term, i.e. the amount and composition of the released radionuclides, and the main dispersion parameters, based on radiation monitoring data obtained in the vicinity of the release. The method is based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF......) and a stochastic nonlinear state space model formulation, where the state variables are the significant model parameters. The atmospheric dispersion and the ensuing radiation field are modeled by a static Gaussian plume model, which is applicable up to a few kilometers from the release. The embedded parameters...... of the state space model are determined by maximum likelihood estimation, making the approach essentially free of external parameters. The proposed Kalman filter method is tested against both simulated data as well as real radiation monitoring data from a new atmospheric dispersion experiment. For a circular...

  8. Impact of prescribed diabatic heating on short range weather forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, L.; Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    Using the 9 layer general circulation model developed at the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS), several 4 to 5 day integrations were made to assess the impact that latent heating processes (supersaturation and moist convective) have on the model forecasts. In an earlier study by Shukla (1981) it was hypothesized that because of strong interaction between dynamics and moist convection, small initial errors grow very fast and make short range forecasting difficult. The purpose of this study was to examine if prescribed heating rates can improve the forecasts for a few days.

  9. Launch velocity requirements for interceptors of short range ballistic missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Geoffrey S.

    The problem of estimating the performance requirements for interceptors of short range (less than 500 nm) ballistic missiles is addressed. Classical orbit determination methods are used to parametrically study the impulsive interceptor launch velocities required to intercept incoming ballistic missiles. Atmospheric and planetary rotational effects are neglected. Dependent variables include the relative positions of the interceptor and ballistic missile launch sites to the target point, interceptor acquisition delay time and depressed ballistic missile trajectories. The resulting data is reduced to a series of curves highlighting the relative impact of each parameter. Factors limiting the interceptor time of flight are shown to have the strongest influence on interceptor launch velocity requirements.

  10. 2.3. Global-scale atmospheric dispersion of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Gonzalez-Martin, Cristina; Hoose, C.; Smith, D.J.; Delort, Anne-Marie; Amato, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This chapter addresses long-range dispersion and the survival of microorganisms across a wide range of altitudes in Earth's atmosphere. Topics include mechanisms of dispersion, survivability of microorganisms known to be associated with long-range transport, natural and artificial sources of bioaerosols, residence time estimation through the use of proxy aerosols, transport and emission models, and monitoring assays (both culture and molecular based). We conclude with a discussion of the known limits for Earth's biosphere boundary, relating aerobiology studies to planetary exploration given the large degree of overlapping requirements for in situ studies (including low biomass life detection and contamination control).

  11. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... of meteorological forecasts is produced from which uncertainties in the various meteorological parameters are estimated, e.g. probabilities for rain. Corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion can now be computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns can...

  12. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  13. Analysis on the structure of the TMT's Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhuan; Liu, Yan; Tao, Jin

    2015-10-01

    The concepts of atmospheric refraction and atmospheric dispersion are introduced and the method of how to eliminate atmospheric dispersion. This article introduces the structure of Atmospheric Dispersion Correction , the installation position of ADC in TMT telescope and the introduction to the principle of ADC in detail. Using the finite element analysis software Ansys Workbench to analyze the rationality of the ADC structure. Static analysis The ADC structure is loaded with two tape lens, which is more 400kg in weight, as well as itself weight, will deform in x, y, z directions. Dynamic analysis The dynamic performances of ADC structure are very important for the construction of the instrument, for the environmental vibration need to be tested. That is the effect of ADC dynamic deformation on optical accuracy is crucial for imaging quality. Here three order modes of dynamic performance are presented for the references of ADC design. They are 1st order mode , 2nd order mode and 3rd order mode. Thermal deformation according to the ADC working environment temperature change, the instrument temperature would be from -5 to 9 degree. So the thermal deformation of ADC is performed in this temperature fluctuation. ADC structure FEA conclusions: The ADC tapered lens are assumed as a rigid body and the mechanical analysis results are: Static analysis, Kinetics analysis and Thermodynamic analysis. Based on the FEA results, we get the image motion information in the telescope plane. Then, we draw a conclusion that: image motions induced by current structure design are very small and meet the requirements of ADC.

  14. Worldwide dispersion and deposition of radionuclides produced in atmospheric tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Burton G

    2002-05-01

    Radionuclides produced in atmospheric nuclear tests were widely dispersed in the global environment. From the many measurements of the concentrations in air and the deposition amounts, much was learned of atmospheric circulation and environmental processes. Based on these results and the reported fission and total yields of individual tests, it has been possible to devise an empirical model of the movement and residence times of particles in the various atmospheric regions. This model, applied to all atmospheric weapons tests, allows extensive calculations of air concentrations and deposition amounts for the entire range of radionuclides produced throughout the testing period. Especially for the shorter-lived fission radionuclides, for which measurement results at the time of the tests are less extensive, a more complete picture of levels and isotope ratios can be obtained, forming a basis for improved dose estimations. The contributions to worldwide fallout can be inferred from individual tests, from tests at specific sites, or by specific countries. Progress was also made in understanding the global hydrological and carbon cycles from the tritium and 14C measurements. A review of the global measurements and modeling results is presented in this paper. In the future, if injections of materials into the atmosphere occur, their anticipated motions and fates can be predicted from the knowledge gained from the fallout experience.

  15. MET-RODOS: A comprehensive atmospheric dispersion module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Astrup, P.

    1997-01-01

    for operational use in 1999, the: MET-RODOS meteorological module is intended to service the PODOS system with actual and forecast (+36 h) nuclei-specific air concentrations, deposition values, and gamma radiation estimates on the local, national, and European scale. Provisions are furthermore being made......A comprehensive meteorological dispersion module called MET-RODOS is being developed to serve the real-time RODOS(1-3) decision support system with an integrated prediction capability for airborne radioactive spread, deposition and gamma radiation exposure on all scales. Deposition, ground level...... air concentrations, and ground level gamma dose rates from up to 15 simultaneous released nuclides are calculated using a nested system of local and long range atmospheric dispersion models, driven by real-time available on-line meteorological information. The MET-PODOS module uses concurrently...

  16. Some aspects of atmospheric dispersion in the stratified atmospheric boundary layer over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1999-01-01

    The ability to simulate atmospheric dispersion with models developed for applied use under stable atmospheric stability conditions is discussed. The paper is based on model simulations of three experimental data sets reported in the literature. The Hanford data set covered weakly stable conditions......, the Prairie Grass experiments covered both weakly stable and very stable atmospheric conditions, and the Lillestrom experiment was carried out during very stable conditions. Simulations of these experiments reported in the literature for eight different models are discussed. Applied models based...

  17. Atmospheric dispersion models help to improve air quality; Los modelos de dispersion atmosferica ayudan a mejorar la calidad del aire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.

    2013-07-01

    One of the main challenges of the atmospheric sciences is to reproduce as well as possible the phenomena and processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. To do it, mathematical models based in this case on fluid dynamics and mass and energy conservation equations, equations that govern the atmospheric chemistry, etc., adapted to the spatial scales to be simulated, are developed. The dispersion models simulate the processes of transport, dispersion, chemical transformation and elimination by deposition that air pollutants undergo once they are emitted. Atmospheric dispersion models with their multiple applications have become essential tools for the air quality management. (Author)

  18. Filtering effect of wind flow turbulence on atmospheric pollutant dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a model for coupling the statistics of wind velocity distribution and atmospheric pollutant dispersion. The effect of wind velocity distribution is modeled as a three-dimensional finite-impulse response (3D-FIR) filter. A phase space representation of the 3D-FIR filter window is discussed. The resulting pollutant dispersion is the multiplication in the phase space of the 3-D Fourier transform of the pollutant concentration and the volume described by the filter window coefficients. The shape of the filter window in the phase space enables representing such effects as vortex shedding thermal currents, etc. The impact of spatial distribution of the sensors on the resulting pollutant spatial distribution and the 3-D FIR filter model employed also discuss. The case of a neutrally buoyant plume emitted from an elevated point source in a turbulent boundary layer considers. The results show that wind turbulence is an important factor in the pollutant dispersion and introduces expected random fluctuations in pollutant distribution and leads to spreading the distribution due to wind mixing.

  19. Combining 2-m temperature nowcasting and short range ensemble forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, numerical ensemble prediction systems have become an important tool for estimating the uncertainties of dynamical and physical processes as represented in numerical weather models. The latest generation of limited area ensemble prediction systems (LAM-EPSs allows for probabilistic forecasts at high resolution in both space and time. However, these systems still suffer from systematic deficiencies. Especially for nowcasting (0–6 h applications the ensemble spread is smaller than the actual forecast error. This paper tries to generate probabilistic short range 2-m temperature forecasts by combining a state-of-the-art nowcasting method and a limited area ensemble system, and compares the results with statistical methods. The Integrated Nowcasting Through Comprehensive Analysis (INCA system, which has been in operation at the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG since 2006 (Haiden et al., 2011, provides short range deterministic forecasts at high temporal (15 min–60 min and spatial (1 km resolution. An INCA Ensemble (INCA-EPS of 2-m temperature forecasts is constructed by applying a dynamical approach, a statistical approach, and a combined dynamic-statistical method. The dynamical method takes uncertainty information (i.e. ensemble variance from the operational limited area ensemble system ALADIN-LAEF (Aire Limitée Adaptation Dynamique Développement InterNational Limited Area Ensemble Forecasting which is running operationally at ZAMG (Wang et al., 2011. The purely statistical method assumes a well-calibrated spread-skill relation and applies ensemble spread according to the skill of the INCA forecast of the most recent past. The combined dynamic-statistical approach adapts the ensemble variance gained from ALADIN-LAEF with non-homogeneous Gaussian regression (NGR which yields a statistical mbox{correction} of the first and second moment (mean bias and dispersion for Gaussian distributed continuous

  20. Atomistic microstructures in short-range ordered alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Hata, S

    2002-01-01

    Short-range order (SRO) in Ni-Mo alloys and their relatives has been controversial for decades, since it causes clearly diffraction intensity maxima at positions which do not coincide with the superlattice reflections in the long-range order (LRO) state. This paper gives an overview of recent studies on the structure of SRO and the transition from SRO to LRO in Ni-Mo alloys, including our results obtained in atomic level by combination of kinetic Monte Carlo simulation and semi-quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is rationalized in our results that the SRO state is set up by local ordering of A sub 4 B, A sub 3 B and A sub 2 B types in sub-unit cell scale. The dispersed mixture of the sub-unit cell clusters gives diffraction intensity maxima at the particular positions. An LRO state is formed by selected growth of the A sub 4 B, A sub 3 B and A sub 2 B type clusters into LRO domains depending on alloy-composition.

  1. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models

    OpenAIRE

    Ádám Leelőssy; Róbert Mészáros; Attila Kovács; István Lagzi; Tibor Kovács

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was sim...

  2. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models

    OpenAIRE

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Mészáros, Róbert; Kovács, Attila; Lagzi, István; Kovács, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale, however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated wit...

  3. Very short range forecasts of visibility and ceiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrod, A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of methods for the short range forecasting of visibility and ceiling conditions is discussed. Short range forecasts of one hour or less (5 or 30 minutes), immediately after a series of local observations can be expected to be more accurate and reliable than any forecast of more than one hour. These forecasts can be accomplished by the operational implementation of fully automated aviation observation systems and the utilization of statistical techniques such as the Generalized Equivalent Markov model.

  4. Short-range order in undercooled metallic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-Moritz, D.; Schenk, T.; Simonet, V.; Bellissent, R.; Convert, P.; Hansen, T.; Herlach, D.M

    2004-07-15

    The containerless processing technique of electromagnetic levitation was combined with elastic neutron scattering in order to study the short-range order (SRO) of stable and deeply undercooled liquids of the pure elements Ni, Fe and Zr and of the quasicrystal-forming alloy Al{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Co{sub 10}. The results deliver experimental evidence for an icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) prevailing in the investigated metallic melts.

  5. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS & RADIOLOGICAL & TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2005-03-03

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farm safety analyses. The current revision also includes atmospheric dispersion coefficients used for analyses of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System. The basic equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included.

  6. Hard probes of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Arrington, D. W. Higinbotham, G. Rosner, M. Sargsian

    2012-10-01

    The strong interaction of nucleons at short distances leads to a high-momentum component to the nuclear wave function, associated with short-range correlations between nucleons. These short-range, high-momentum structures in nuclei are one of the least well understood aspects of nuclear matter, relating to strength outside of the typical mean-field approaches to calculating the structure of nuclei. While it is difficult to study these short-range components, significant progress has been made over the last decade in determining how to cleanly isolate short-range correlations in nuclei. We have moved from asking if such structures exist, to mapping out their strength in nuclei and studying their microscopic structure. A combination of several different measurements, made possible by high-luminosity and high-energy accelerators, coupled with an improved understanding of the reaction mechanism issues involved in studying these structures, has led to significant progress, and provided significant new information on the nature of these small, highly-excited structures in nuclei. We review the general issues related to short-range correlations, survey recent experiments aimed at probing these short-range structures, and lay out future possibilities to further these studies.

  7. Atmospheric dispersion modelling of particulate and gaseous pollutants affecting the trans-Manche region

    OpenAIRE

    Plainiotis, Stylianos

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of a methodology to determine large-scale and meso-scale atmospheric dispersion patterns. The research is only concerned with outdoor exposure to atmospheric pollutants and aims to identify pollution sources using dispersion modelling with the assistance of ground level measurements from British, French and other monitoring stations and remote sensing technology. \\ud \\ud Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) models compute trajectories of a large number of...

  8. Modelling of pollution dispersion in atmosphere; Modelowanie procesow propagacji skazen w atmosferze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysiewicz, M.; Stankiewicz, R.

    1994-12-31

    The paper contains the review of the mathematical foundation of atmospheric dispersion models. The atmospheric phenomena relevant to atmospheric dispersion model are discussed. In particular the parametrization of processes with time and space scales smaller than numerical grid size, limited by available computer power, is presented. The special attention was devoted to similarity theory and parametrization of boundary layer. The numerical methods are analysed and the drawbacks of the method are presented. (author). 99 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. Quasicrystals as alloys with short-range order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulston, K.W., E-mail: sulston@upei.c [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Burrows, B.L. [Mathematics Section, Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Technology, Staffordshire University, Beaconside, Stafford ST18 0DG (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    The electronic structure of quasiperiodic lattices is studied. An alloy theory, including short-range order effects, is used to approximate Fibonacci and Thue-Morse lattices. Short-range order is treated by embedding small clusters in an alloy that itself incorporates a two-site approximation, and the probabilities of these clusters are used to construct an efficient procedure for the calculation of electronic properties. This approach allows easy identification of the contributions of particular clusters to the electronic density of states. As the short-range order is increased via the number of clusters, the density of states can be clearly seen to transition from that of an alloy to that of a quasicrystal. It is shown that the techniques may be applied to other lattices defined by substitution rules.

  10. Combined search for Lorentz violation in short-range gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Luo, Jun; Tobar, Michael Edmund; Bailey, Quentin G; Long, J C; Weisman, E; Xu, Rui; Kostelecky, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Short-range experiments testing the gravitational inverse-square law at the submillimeter scale offer uniquely sensitive probes of Lorentz invariance. A combined analysis of results from the short-range gravity experiments HUST-2015, HUST-2011, IU-2012, and IU-2002 permits the first independent measurements of the 14 nonrelativistic coefficients for Lorentz violation in the pure-gravity sector at the level of $10^{-9}$ m$^2$, improving by an order of magnitude the sensitivity to numerous types of Lorentz violation involving quadratic curvature derivatives and curvature couplings.

  11. Short-Range Correlation Models in Electronic Structure Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldey, Matthew Bryant

    Correlation methods within electronic structure theory focus on recovering the exact electron-electron interaction from the mean-field reference. For most chemical systems, including dynamic correlation, the correlation of the movement of electrons proves to be sufficient, yet exact methods for capturing dynamic correlation inherently scale polynomially with system size despite the locality of the electron cusp. This work explores a new family of methods for enhancing the locality of dynamic correlation methodologies with an aim toward improving accuracy and scalability. The introduction of range-separation into ab initio wavefunction methods produces short-range correlation methodologies, which can be supplemented with much faster approximate methods for long-range interactions. First, I examine attenuation of second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis. MP2 treats electron correlation at low computational cost, but suffers from basis set superposition error (BSSE) and fundamental inaccuracies in long-range contributions. The cost differential between complete basis set (CBS) and small basis MP2 restricts system sizes where BSSE can be removed. Range-separation of MP2 could yield more tractable and/or accurate forms for short- and long-range correlation. Retaining only short-range contributions proves to be effective for MP2 in the small aug-cc-pVDZ (aDZ) basis. Using one range-separation parameter within either the complementary error function (erfc) or a sum of two error functions (terfc), superior behavior is obtained versus both MP2/aDZ and MP2/CBS for inter- and intra-molecular test sets. Attenuation of the long-range helps to cancel both BSSE and intrinsic MP2 errors. Direct scaling of the MP2 correlation energy (SMP2) proves useful as well. The resulting SMP2/aDZ, MP2(erfc, aDZ), and MP2(terfc, aDZ) methods perform far better than MP2/aDZ across systems with hydrogen-bonding, dispersion, and mixed interactions at a

  12. Small Device For Short-Range Antenna Measurements Using Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanakiev, Boyan Radkov; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a practical solution for implementing an antenna radiation pattern measurement device using optical fibers. It is suitable for anechoic chambers as well as short range channel sounding. The device is optimized for small size and provides a cheap and easy way to make optical antenna...

  13. Modeling short-range stiffness of feline lower hindlimb muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, L.; Perreault, E.J.; Maas, H.; Sandercock, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    The short-range stiffness (SRS) of skeletal muscles is a critical property for understanding muscle contributions to limb stability, since it represents a muscle's capacity to resist external perturbations before reflexes or voluntary actions can intervene. A number of studies have demonstrated that

  14. Impact of additional surface observation network on short range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conducted to assess the impact of Indian Space Research Organisation's (ISRO) Automatic Weather. Stations (AWS) surface observations (temperature and moisture) on the short range ... computer power has led to finer resolution NWP models, which are able to resolve mesoscale fea- tures and thus to give more precise ...

  15. Short range correlations in a one dimensional electron gas

    OpenAIRE

    Tas, Murat; Tomak, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    We use the SSTL (Singwi, Sjolander, Tosi, Land) approximation to investigate the short--range correlations in a one dimensional electron gas, for the first time. Although SSTL is introduced to better satisfy the compressibility sum rule in three dimensions, the widely used STLS (Singwi, Tosi, Land, Sjolander) approximation turns out to be more successful in the case of the one dimensional electron gas.

  16. Method for computing short-range forces between solid-liquid interfaces driving grain boundary premelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, J. J.; Olmsted, David; Jindal, Saryu; Asta, Mark; Karma, Alain

    2009-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics based method for accurately computing short-range structural forces resulting from the overlap of spatially diffuse solid-liquid interfaces at wetted grain boundaries close to the melting point. The method is based on monitoring the fluctuations of the liquid layer width at different temperatures to extract the excess interfacial free energy as a function of this width. The method is illustrated for a high-energy Σ9 twist boundary in pure Ni. The short-range repulsion driving premelting is found to be dominant in comparison to long-range dispersion and entropic forces and consistent with previous experimental findings that nanometer-scale layer widths may be observed only very close to the melting point.

  17. Short-range correlations in modified planar rotator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, M.; Hristopulos, D. T.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a model inspired from statistical physics that is shown to display flexible short-range spatial correlations which are potentially useful in geostatistical modeling. In particular, we consider a suitably modified planar rotator or XY model, traditionally used for modeling continuous spin systems in magnetism, and we demonstrate that it can capture spatial correlations typically present in geostatistical data. The empirical study of the spin configurations produced by Monte Carlo simulations at various temperatures and stages in the nonequilibrium regime shows that their spatial variability can be modeled by the flexible class of Matern covariance functions. The correlation range and the smoothness of these functions vary significantly in the parameter space that consists of the temperature and the simulation time. We briefly discuss the potential of the model for efficient and automatic prediction of spatial data with short-range correlations, such as commonly encountered in geophysical and environmental applications.

  18. High-Capacity Short-Range Optical Communication Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatarczak, Anna

    Over the last decade, we have observed a tremendous spread of end-user mobile devices. The user base of a mobile application can grow or shrink by millions per day. This situation creates a pressing need for highly scalable server infrastructure; a need nowadays satisfied through cloud computing...... offered by data centers. As the popularity of cloud computing soars, the demand for high-speed, short-range data center links grows. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) and multimode fibers (MMF) prove especially well-suited for such scenarios. VCSELs have high modulation bandwidths......, we achieve 10 Gbps over 400 m and then conrm the approach in an optimized system at 25 Gbps over 300 m. The techniques described in this thesis leverage additional degrees of freedom to better utilize the available resources of short-range links. The proposed schemes enable higher speeds and longer...

  19. Short range reconnaissance unmanned aerial vehicle / S.J. Kersop.

    OpenAIRE

    Kersop, Stefanus Jacobus

    2009-01-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been used increasingly over the past few years. Special Forces of various countries utilise these systems successfully in war zones such as Afghanistan. The biggest advantage is rapid information gathering without endangering human lives. The South African National Defence Force (SANDF) also identified the need for local short range aerial reconnaissance and information gathering. A detailed literature survey identified various international players inv...

  20. Computational dispersion properties of horizontal staggered grids for atmospheric and ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    The computational dispersion properties of horizontally and time-horizontally staggered grids utilizing corresponding centered-difference techniques for approximation of the adjustment, or gravity wave equations, are examined in terms of their group velocity characteristics. Results are acquired for oceanic and atmospheric models, the former being characterized by a much smaller Rossby radius of deformation. For all grids considered additional filtering is required to control and even eliminate waves with poor computational dispersion characteristics. Computational dispersion properties along with other computational characteristics and requirements give some guidance for an optimal selection of an appropriate grid for an ocean or atmospheric model.

  1. Short-range correlations in quark and nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froemel, Frank

    2007-06-15

    In the first part of this thesis, the role of short-range correlations in quark matter is explored within the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Starting from a next-to-leading order expansion in the inverse number of the quark colors, a fully self-consistent model constructed that employs the close relations between spectral functions and self-energies. In contrast to the usual quasiparticle approximations, this approach allows the investigation of the collisional broadening of the quark spectral function. Numerical calculations at various chemical potentials and zero temperature show that the short-range correlations do not only induce a finite width of the spectral function but also have some influence on the structure of the chiral phase transition. In the second part of this thesis, the temperature and density dependence of the nucleon spectral function in symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The short-range correlations can be well described by a simple, self-consistent model on the one-particle-two-hole and two-particle-one-hole level (1p2h, 2p1h). The thermodynamically consistent description of the mean-field properties of the nucleons is ensured by incorporating a Skyrme-type potential. Calculations at temperatures and densities that can also be found in heavy-ion collisions or supernova explosions and the formation of neutron stars show that the correlations saturate at high temperatures and densities. (orig.)

  2. Hanford atmospheric dispersion data: 1960 through June 1967

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickola, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Glantz, C.S.; Kerns, R.E.

    1983-11-01

    This volume presents dispersion and supporting meteorological data from experiments conducted over relatively flat terrain at Hanford, Washington from January 1960 through June 1967. The nature of the experiments, the sampling grids, and the tracer techniques used are described in the narrative portion of the document. Appendices contain the time-integrated concentrations for samplers within the plumes, summaries of the concentration distributions across the plumes, and wind and temperature profile data for each release period. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  3. A review of numerical models to predict the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Lagzi, István; Kovács, Attila; Mészáros, Róbert

    2018-02-01

    The field of atmospheric dispersion modeling has evolved together with nuclear risk assessment and emergency response systems. Atmospheric concentration and deposition of radionuclides originating from an unintended release provide the basis of dose estimations and countermeasure strategies. To predict the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides several numerical models are available coupled with numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems. This work provides a review of the main concepts and different approaches of atmospheric dispersion modeling. Key processes of the atmospheric transport of radionuclides are emission, advection, turbulent diffusion, dry and wet deposition, radioactive decay and other physical and chemical transformations. A wide range of modeling software are available to simulate these processes with different physical assumptions, numerical approaches and implementation. The most appropriate modeling tool for a specific purpose can be selected based on the spatial scale, the complexity of meteorology, land surface and physical and chemical transformations, also considering the available data and computational resource. For most regulatory and operational applications, offline coupled NWP-dispersion systems are used, either with a local scale Gaussian, or a regional to global scale Eulerian or Lagrangian approach. The dispersion model results show large sensitivity on the accuracy of the coupled NWP model, especially through the description of planetary boundary layer turbulence, deep convection and wet deposition. Improvement of dispersion predictions can be achieved by online coupling of mesoscale meteorology and atmospheric transport models. The 2011 Fukushima event was the first large-scale nuclear accident where real-time prognostic dispersion modeling provided decision support. Dozens of dispersion models with different approaches were used for prognostic and retrospective simulations of the Fukushima release. An unknown

  4. Sensitivity model study of regional mercury dispersion in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; Bieser, Johannes; Carbone, Francesco; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Matthias, Volker; Travnikov, Oleg; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg reaches marine ecosystems, where it can be methylated and enter the base of food chain. The deposition, transport and chemical interactions of atmospheric Hg have been simulated over Europe for the year 2013 in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, performing 14 different model sensitivity tests using two high-resolution three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs), varying the anthropogenic emission datasets, atmospheric Br input fields, Hg oxidation schemes and modelling domain boundary condition input. Sensitivity simulation results were compared with observations from 28 monitoring sites in Europe to assess model performance and particularly to analyse the influence of anthropogenic emission speciation and the Hg0(g) atmospheric oxidation mechanism. The contribution of anthropogenic Hg emissions, their speciation and vertical distribution are crucial to the simulated concentration and deposition fields, as is also the choice of Hg0(g) oxidation pathway. The areas most sensitive to changes in Hg emission speciation and the emission vertical distribution are those near major sources, but also the Aegean and the Black seas, the English Channel, the Skagerrak Strait and the northern German coast. Considerable influence was found also evident over the Mediterranean, the North Sea and Baltic Sea and some influence is seen over continental Europe, while this difference is least over the north-western part of the modelling domain, which includes the Norwegian Sea and Iceland. The Br oxidation pathway produces more HgII(g) in the lower model levels, but overall wet deposition is lower in comparison to the simulations which employ an O3 / OH oxidation mechanism. The necessity to perform continuous measurements of speciated Hg and to investigate the local impacts of Hg emissions and deposition, as well as interactions dependent on land use and vegetation, forests, peat

  5. OAM-enhanced transmission for multimode short-range links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatarczak, Anna; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2015-01-01

    We propose, experimentally demonstrate, and evaluate the performance of a multimode (MM) transmission fiber data link which is based on orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes. The proposed scheme uses OAM modes to increase capacity or reach without recurring to mode division multiplexing (MDM......) or special fibers: we first excite an OAM mode and couple it to a 50 m, 100 m, 200 m and 400m MM fibers. We compare three OAM modes and a conventional optical multimode under the same launch and received optical power conditions. The proposed OAM based solution is a promising candidate for the data centers...... interconnects and short range links that employ the existing multimode fiber infrastructure....

  6. Short range order in elemental liquids of column IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, M; Shor, S; Yahel, E; Makov, G

    2015-05-21

    The short range order (SRO) in liquid elements of column IV is analysed within the quasi-crystalline model across a wide range of temperatures. It is found that l-Si, Ge, and Sn are well described with a beta-tin like SRO. In contrast, Pb retains a bcc-like SRO similar to other simple elemental liquids. However, a distinction is found between the SRO in Si and Ge and that in Sn, where the latter has a more rigid structure. This difference persists across the entire temperature range examined but is overcome in Si at pressures above 8 GPa, where the liquid structure evolves towards that of Sn.

  7. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides using an Eulerian-Lagrangian modelling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Abdul; Espinosa, Francisco; Avila, Ruben; Raza, S; Irfan, N

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we present an atmospheric dispersion scenario for a proposed nuclear power plant in Pakistan involving the hypothetical accidental release of radionuclides. For this, a concept involving a Lagrangian stochastic particle model (LSPM) coupled with an Eulerian regional atmospheric modelling system (RAMS) is used. The atmospheric turbulent dispersion of radionuclides (represented by non-buoyant particles/neutral traces) in the LSPM is modelled by applying non-homogeneous turbulence conditions. The mean wind velocities governed by the topography of the region and the surface fluxes of momentum and heat are calculated by the RAMS code. A moving least squares (MLS) technique is introduced to calculate the concentration of radionuclides at ground level. The numerically calculated vertical profiles of wind velocity and temperature are compared with observed data. The results obtained demonstrate that in regions of complex terrain it is not sufficient to model the atmospheric dispersion of particles using a straight-line Gaussian plume model, and that by utilising a Lagrangian stochastic particle model and regional atmospheric modelling system a much more realistic estimation of the dispersion in such a hypothetical scenario was ascertained. The particle dispersion results for a 12 h ground release show that a triangular area of about 400 km(2) situated in the north-west quadrant of release is under radiological threat. The particle distribution shows that the use of a Gaussian plume model (GPM) in such situations will yield quite misleading results.

  8. Unsupervised learning in neural networks with short range synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnet, L. G.; Agnes, E. J.; Mizusaki, B. E. P.; Erichsen, R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Different areas of the brain are involved in specific aspects of the information being processed both in learning and in memory formation. For example, the hippocampus is important in the consolidation of information from short-term memory to long-term memory, while emotional memory seems to be dealt by the amygdala. On the microscopic scale the underlying structures in these areas differ in the kind of neurons involved, in their connectivity, or in their clustering degree but, at this level, learning and memory are attributed to neuronal synapses mediated by longterm potentiation and long-term depression. In this work we explore the properties of a short range synaptic connection network, a nearest neighbor lattice composed mostly by excitatory neurons and a fraction of inhibitory ones. The mechanism of synaptic modification responsible for the emergence of memory is Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP), a Hebbian-like rule, where potentiation/depression is acquired when causal/non-causal spikes happen in a synapse involving two neurons. The system is intended to store and recognize memories associated to spatial external inputs presented as simple geometrical forms. The synaptic modifications are continuously applied to excitatory connections, including a homeostasis rule and STDP. In this work we explore the different scenarios under which a network with short range connections can accomplish the task of storing and recognizing simple connected patterns.

  9. Dispersion of Fukushima radionuclides in the global atmosphere and the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, P P; Gera, M; Holý, K; Hirose, K; Lujaniené, G; Nakano, M; Plastino, W; Sýkora, I; Bartok, J; Gažák, M

    2013-11-01

    Large quantities of radionuclides were released in March-April 2011 during the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant to the atmosphere and the ocean. Atmospheric and marine modeling has been carried out to predict the dispersion of radionuclides worldwide, to compare the predicted and measured radionuclide concentrations, and to assess the impact of the accident on the environment. Atmospheric Lagrangian dispersion modeling was used to simulate the dispersion of (137)Cs over America and Europe. Global ocean circulation model was applied to predict the dispersion of (137)Cs in the Pacific Ocean. The measured and simulated (137)Cs concentrations in atmospheric aerosols and in seawater are compared with global fallout and the Chernobyl accident, which represent the main sources of the pre-Fukushima radionuclide background in the environment. The radionuclide concentrations in the atmosphere have been negligible when compared with the Chernobyl levels. The maximum (137)Cs concentration in surface waters of the open Pacific Ocean will be around 20 Bq/m(3). The plume will reach the US coast 4-5 y after the accident, however, the levels will be below 3 Bq/m(3). All the North Pacific Ocean will be labeled with Fukushima (137)Cs 10 y after the accident with concentration bellow 1 Bq/m(3). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Entanglement Entropy of Quantum Hall Systems with Short Range Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Barry; Levine, Greg

    2015-03-01

    The critical value of the mobility for which the filling 5/2 quantum Hall effect is destroyed by short range disorder is determined from an earlier calculation of the entanglement entropy. The value agrees well with experiment; this agreement is particularly significant in that there are no adjustable parameters. Entanglement entropy vs. disorder strength for filling 1/2, filling 9/2 and filling 7/3 is calculated. For filling 1/2 there is no evidence for a transition for the disorder strengths considered; for filling 9/2 there appears to be a stripe-liquid transition. For filling 7/3 there again appears to be a transition at similar value of the disorder strength as the 5/2 transition but there are stronger finite size effects.

  11. Freely cooling granular gases with short-ranged attractive potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Eric; Subramaniam, Shankar, E-mail: shankar@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Multiphase Flow Research, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We treat the case of an undriven gas of inelastic hard-spheres with short-ranged attractive potentials via an extension of the pseudo-Liouville operator formalism. New evolution equations for the granular temperature and coordination number are obtained. The granular temperature exhibits deviation from both Haff’s law and the case of long-ranged potentials. We verify this departure using soft-sphere discrete element method simulations. Excellent agreement is found for the duration of the simulation even beyond where exclusively binary collisions are expected. Simulations show the emergence of strong spatial-velocity correlations on the length scale of the last peak in the pair-correlation function but do not show strong correlations beyond this length scale. We argue that molecular chaos may remain an adequate approximation if the system is modelled as a Smoluchowski type equation with aggregation and break-up processes.

  12. Structural short-range forces between solid-melt interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatschek, R.; Adland, A.; Karma, A.

    2013-01-01

    We predict the structural interaction of crystalline solid-melt interfaces using amplitude equations which are derived from classical density functional theory or phase field crystal modeling. The solid ordering decays exponentially on the scale of the interface thickness at solid-melt interfaces; the overlap of two such profiles leads to a short-range interaction, which is mainly carried by the longest-range density waves, which can facilitate grain boundary premelting. We calculate the tail of these interactions, depending on the relative translation of the two crystals, fully analytically and predict the interaction potential, and compare it to numerical simulations. For grain boundaries the interaction is predicted to decay twice as fast as for two crystals without misorientation.

  13. Pairing and Short-Range Correlations in Nuclear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, A.; Polls, A.; Dickhoff, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    The structure and density dependence of the pairing gap in infinite matter is relevant for astrophysical phenomena and provides a starting point for the discussion of pairing properties in nuclear structure. Short-range correlations can significantly deplete the available single-particle strength around the Fermi surface and thus provide a reduction mechanism of the pairing gap. Here, we study this effect in the singlet and triplet channels of both neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter. Our calculations use phase-shift equivalent interactions and chiral two-body and three-body interactions as a starting point. We find an unambiguous reduction of the gap in all channels with very small dependence on the NN force in the singlet neutron matter and the triplet nuclear matter channel. In the latter channel, SRC alone provide a 50% reduction of the pairing gap.

  14. Dispersion of atmospheric air pollution in summer and winter season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowicz, Robert; Wielgosiński, Grzegorz; Fetter, Wojciech

    2017-11-04

    Seasonal variation of air pollution is associated with variety of seasons and specificity of particular months which form the so-called summer and winter season also known as the "heating" season. The occurrence of higher values of air pollution in different months of a year is associated with the type of climate, and accordingly with different atmospheric conditions in particular months, changing state of weather on a given day, and anthropogenic activity. The appearance of these conditions results in different levels of air pollution characteristic for a given period. The study uses data collected during a seven-year period (2009-2015) in the automatic measuring station of immissions located in Eastern Wielkopolska. The analysis concerns the average and maximum values of air pollution (i.e., particulate matter PM10, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and ozone) from the perspective of their occurrence in particular seasons and months or in relation to meteorological actors such as temperature, humidity, and wind speed.

  15. Atmospheric aerosol dispersion models and their applications to environmental risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Mazur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Numerical models of dispersion of atmospheric pollutants are widely used to forecast the spread of contaminants in the air and to analyze the effects of this phenomenon. The aim of the study is to investigate the possibilities and the quality of diagnosis and prediction of atmospheric transport of aerosols in the air using the dispersion model of atmospheric pollutants, developed at the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMWM in Warsaw. Material and methods. A model of the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants, linked with meteorological models in a diagnostic mode, was used to simulate the transport of the cloud of aerosols released during the crash near the town of Ożydiw (Ukraine and of volcanic ash – during the volcanic eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. Results. Possible directions of dispersion of pollutants in the air and its concentration in the atmosphere and deposition to the soil were assessed. The analysis of temporal variability of concentrations of aerosols in the atmosphere confirmed that the model developed at IMWM is an effective tool for diagnosis of air quality in the area of Poland as well as for determination of exposure duration to the aerosol clouds for different weather scenarios. Conclusions. The results are a confirmation of the thesis, that because in the environmental risk assessment, an important element is not only current information on the level of pollution concentrations, but also the time of exposure to pollution and forecast of these elements, and consequently the predicted effects on man or the environment in general; so it is necessary to use forecasting tools, similar to presented application. The dispersion model described in the paper is an operational tool for description, analysis and forecasting of emergency situations in case of emissions of hazardous substances.

  16. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  18. Field studies of transport and dispersion of atmospheric tracers in nocturnal drainage flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gudiksen; Gilbert J. Ferber; Malcolm M. Fowler; Wynn L. Eberhard; Michael A. Fosberg; William R. Knuth

    1984-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were carried out as part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program to evaluate pollutant transport and dispersion characteristics of nocturnal drainage flows within a valley in northern California. The results indicate that the degree of interaction of the drainage flows with the larger scale regional flows are...

  19. A new formulation of the probability density function in random walk models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anne Katrine Vinther; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1997-01-01

    In this model for atmospheric dispersion particles are simulated by the Langevin Equation, which is a stochastic differential equation. It uses the probability density function (PDF) of the vertical velocity fluctuations as input. The PDF is constructed as an expansion after Hermite polynomials. ...

  20. Study on atmospheric stability to determine dispersion factor in Yonggwang Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Yoon, Duk Joo; Song, Dong Soo; Kim, In Hwan; Ha, Sang Jun [Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, KHNP Central Research Institute, Nuclear Safety Laboratory, Gueongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Air pollution models have been studied by IAEA, NRC and EPA. The aim of this study is to get more efficient methodology of explaining the behavior of atmosphere using the stability. Specially, air pollution model can be Lagrangian, Eulerian or Gaussian. The Gaussian dispersion models are usually used in estimating the stability of atmosphere. The first study and the improved method for stability have been carried out by Cramer in 1957 and Pasquil in 1961, respectively. The methodology consists of wind speed, radiation from Sun, night and cloud's clusters. In conception, the convection and the radiation affect the behavior of atmosphere. In present, this conception is generally used to calculation of stability of atmosphere. This study is focused on the relation between stability and atmosphere dispersion factor. In this study, various methods to determine the stability of atmosphere are reviewed. Especially, IAEA methodology(△T·U) is discussed and compared with other methods. △T·U methodology is very reasonable in both dynamic and static stability. Some conclusions from this study are: 1. For wind speed higher than 1.5 m/sec, △T·U is similar to δ{sub θ}. 2. For wind speed less than 1.5 m/sec, △T·U is in good agreement with △T/△Z. 3. Stability of atmosphere is generally impacted by wind speed. 4. Stability frequency has the similar trends in comparison between △T·U and δ{sub θ}.

  1. Short range spread-spectrum radiolocation system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-04-29

    A short range radiolocation system and associated methods that allow the location of an item, such as equipment, containers, pallets, vehicles, or personnel, within a defined area. A small, battery powered, self-contained tag is provided to an item to be located. The tag includes a spread-spectrum transmitter that transmits a spread-spectrum code and identification information. A plurality of receivers positioned about the area receive signals from a transmitting tag. The position of the tag, and hence the item, is located by triangulation. The system employs three different ranging techniques for providing coarse, intermediate, and fine spatial position resolution. Coarse positioning information is provided by use of direct-sequence code phase transmitted as a spread-spectrum signal. Intermediate positioning information is provided by the use of a difference signal transmitted with the direct-sequence spread-spectrum code. Fine positioning information is provided by use of carrier phase measurements. An algorithm is employed to combine the three data sets to provide accurate location measurements.

  2. Brevity is prevalent in bat short-range communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bo; Jiang, Tinglei; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Lin, Aiqing; Wei, Xuewen; Feng, Jiang

    2013-04-01

    Animal communication follows many coding schemes. Less is known about the coding strategy for signal length and rates of use in animal vocal communication. A generalized brevity (negative relation between signal length and frequency of use) is innovatively explored but remains controversial in animal vocal communication. We tested brevity for short-range social and distress sounds from four echolocating bats: adult black-bearded tomb bat Taphozous melanopogon, Mexican free-tailed bat Tadarida brasiliensis, adult greater horseshoe bat Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, and adult least horseshoe bat Rhinolophus pusillus. There was a negative association between duration and number of social but not distress calls emitted. The most frequently emitted social calls were brief, while most distress calls were long. Brevity or lengthiness was consistently selected in vocal communications for each species. Echolocating bats seem to have convergent coding strategy for communication calls. The results provide the evidence of efficient coding in bat social vocalizations, and lay the basis of future researches on the convergence for neural control on bats' communication calls.

  3. Designing tangible interaction using short-range RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Nordby

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Short-range Radio Frequency IDentification (SR-RFID technology embedded in mobile phones offers interaction design practitioners the potential to design new forms of mobile experiences. The article presents a design oriented research study that seeks to develop affordances specifically in support of such practice. To do so the authors draw on Activity Theory. They present three levels of SR-RFID related design affordances: need related design affordances, instrumental design affordances and operational design affordances. Included also is what they label ‘RFID based Tap and Hold’; a term used so as to frame tangible interaction on SR-RFID. A generative and descriptive model of Tap and Hold is proposed, as is a set of input techniques derived from the Tap and Hold model. Overall, the study suggests opening out from functional views of SR-RFID to ones that view it as a technology applicable for designers exploring potential new interactions. This is important since such work may be used to support the generation of new designs, an area often overlooked in research on RFID.

  4. Hybrid gesture recognition system for short-range use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Akihiro; Fan, Wei; Katsuyama, Yutaka; Takebe, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Noriaki; Hotta, Yoshinobu; Sun, Jun

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, various gesture recognition systems have been studied for use in television and video games[1]. In such systems, motion areas ranging from 1 to 3 meters deep have been evaluated[2]. However, with the burgeoning popularity of small mobile displays, gesture recognition systems capable of operating at much shorter ranges have become necessary. The problems related to such systems are exacerbated by the fact that the camera's field of view is unknown to the user during operation, which imposes several restrictions on his/her actions. To overcome the restrictions generated from such mobile camera devices, and to create a more flexible gesture recognition interface, we propose a hybrid hand gesture system, in which two types of gesture recognition modules are prepared and with which the most appropriate recognition module is selected by a dedicated switching module. The two recognition modules of this system are shape analysis using a boosting approach (detection-based approach)[3] and motion analysis using image frame differences (motion-based approach)(for example, see[4]). We evaluated this system using sample users and classified the resulting errors into three categories: errors that depend on the recognition module, errors caused by incorrect module identification, and errors resulting from user actions. In this paper, we show the results of our investigations and explain the problems related to short-range gesture recognition systems.

  5. Inferring short-range linkage information from sequencing chromatograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Beggel

    Full Text Available Direct Sanger sequencing of viral genome populations yields multiple ambiguous sequence positions. It is not straightforward to derive linkage information from sequencing chromatograms, which in turn hampers the correct interpretation of the sequence data. We present a method for determining the variants existing in a viral quasispecies in the case of two nearby ambiguous sequence positions by exploiting the effect of sequence context-dependent incorporation of dideoxynucleotides. The computational model was trained on data from sequencing chromatograms of clonal variants and was evaluated on two test sets of in vitro mixtures. The approach achieved high accuracies in identifying the mixture components of 97.4% on a test set in which the positions to be analyzed are only one base apart from each other, and of 84.5% on a test set in which the ambiguous positions are separated by three bases. In silico experiments suggest two major limitations of our approach in terms of accuracy. First, due to a basic limitation of Sanger sequencing, it is not possible to reliably detect minor variants with a relative frequency of no more than 10%. Second, the model cannot distinguish between mixtures of two or four clonal variants, if one of two sets of linear constraints is fulfilled. Furthermore, the approach requires repetitive sequencing of all variants that might be present in the mixture to be analyzed. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of our method on the two in vitro test sets shows that short-range linkage information of two ambiguous sequence positions can be inferred from Sanger sequencing chromatograms without any further assumptions on the mixture composition. Additionally, our model provides new insights into the established and widely used Sanger sequencing technology. The source code of our method is made available at http://bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/publications/beggel/linkageinformation.zip.

  6. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Leelőssy

    Full Text Available Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated with different models, namely the WRF-Chem Eulerian online coupled model and the HYSPLIT and the RAPTOR Lagrangian models. Although only limited data of 131I detections has been available, the accuracy of modeled plume direction could be evaluated in complex late autumn weather situations. For the studied cases, the general reliability of models has been demonstrated. However, serious uncertainties arise related to low level inversions, above all in case of an emission event on 4 November 2011, when an important wind shear caused a significant difference between simulated and real transport directions. Results underline the importance of prudent interpretation of dispersion model results and the identification of weather conditions with a potential to cause large model errors.

  7. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelőssy, Ádám; Mészáros, Róbert; Kovács, Attila; Lagzi, István; Kovács, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated with different models, namely the WRF-Chem Eulerian online coupled model and the HYSPLIT and the RAPTOR Lagrangian models. Although only limited data of 131I detections has been available, the accuracy of modeled plume direction could be evaluated in complex late autumn weather situations. For the studied cases, the general reliability of models has been demonstrated. However, serious uncertainties arise related to low level inversions, above all in case of an emission event on 4 November 2011, when an important wind shear caused a significant difference between simulated and real transport directions. Results underline the importance of prudent interpretation of dispersion model results and the identification of weather conditions with a potential to cause large model errors.

  8. Models for close-in atmospheric dispersion, explosive releases, and particle deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, S.G.

    1993-10-06

    Relatively simple models are presented to simulate close-in atmospheric dispersion, explosive releases, and particle deposition. Close-in generally refers to distances less than 50 m downwind from the source. These models assume simple gas dispersion (no chemical reactions, neutral buoyancy) and that particles behave as a gas expect they can be removed from the plume by a simple, deposition-velocity mechanism. These models have been combined into a QuickBASIC program (INEXPLC.BAS) and its PC executable form (INEXPLC.EXE). These programs, along with sample input and output files, are available from the author.

  9. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    OpenAIRE

    François Van Dorpe; Bertrand Iooss; Vladimir Semenov; Olga Sorokovikova; Alexey Fokin; Yves Margerit

    2007-01-01

    The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA), and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE). The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of...

  10. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  11. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Will [Australian Astron. Observ.; Gillingham, Peter [Australian Astron. Observ.; Smith, Greg [Australian Astron. Observ.; Kent, Steve [Fermilab; Doel, Peter [University Coll. London

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  12. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: atmospheric processes and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travnikov, Oleg; Angot, Hélène; Artaxo, Paulo; Bencardino, Mariantonia; Bieser, Johannes; D'Amore, Francesco; Dastoor, Ashu; De Simone, Francesco; Diéguez, María del Carmen; Dommergue, Aurélien; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Feng, Xin Bin; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Magand, Olivier; Martin, Lynwill; Matthias, Volker; Mashyanov, Nikolay; Pirrone, Nicola; Ramachandran, Ramesh; Read, Katie Alana; Ryjkov, Andrei; Selin, Noelle E.; Sena, Fabrizio; Song, Shaojie; Sprovieri, Francesca; Wip, Dennis; Wängberg, Ingvar; Yang, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Current understanding of mercury (Hg) behavior in the atmosphere contains significant gaps. Some key characteristics of Hg processes, including anthropogenic and geogenic emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and air-surface exchange, are still poorly known. This study provides a complex analysis of processes governing Hg fate in the atmosphere involving both measured data from ground-based sites and simulation results from chemical transport models. A variety of long-term measurements of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) and reactive Hg (RM) concentration as well as Hg wet deposition flux have been compiled from different global and regional monitoring networks. Four contemporary global-scale transport models for Hg were used, both in their state-of-the-art configurations and for a number of numerical experiments to evaluate particular processes. Results of the model simulations were evaluated against measurements. As follows from the analysis, the interhemispheric GEM gradient is largely formed by the prevailing spatial distribution of anthropogenic emissions in the Northern Hemisphere. The contributions of natural and secondary emissions enhance the south-to-north gradient, but their effect is less significant. Atmospheric chemistry has a limited effect on the spatial distribution and temporal variation of GEM concentration in surface air. In contrast, RM air concentration and wet deposition are largely defined by oxidation chemistry. The Br oxidation mechanism can reproduce successfully the observed seasonal variation of the RM / GEM ratio in the near-surface layer, but it predicts a wet deposition maximum in spring instead of in summer as observed at monitoring sites in North America and Europe. Model runs with OH chemistry correctly simulate both the periods of maximum and minimum values and the amplitude of observed seasonal variation but shift the maximum RM / GEM ratios from spring to summer. O3 chemistry does not predict significant seasonal variation of Hg

  13. Multilevel Monte Carlo and Improved Timestepping Methods in Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiolides, G; Muller, EH; Scheichl, R.; Shardlow, T.; Giles, MB; Thomson, DJ

    2017-01-01

    A common way to simulate the transport and spread of pollutants in the atmosphere is via stochastic Lagrangian dispersion models. Mathematically, these models describe turbulent transport processes with stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The computational bottleneck is the Monte Carlo algorithm, which simulates the motion of a large number of model particles in a turbulent velocity field; for each particle, a trajectory is calculated with a numerical timestepping method. Choosing an ef...

  14. A study on atmospheric relative dispersion using the transport model FLEXPART

    OpenAIRE

    Guttu, Sigmund

    2011-01-01

    Relative dispersion is a widely used measure to characterize mixing properties of atmospheric passive tracers. Numerical models allow for a large number of particles. In this thesis, the Lagrangian transport model FLEXPART has been used to generate particle trajectories. The advection velocity field was provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). 40000 particles were deployed along latitude lines, at 30N and 30S, 60N and 60S, and at two heights, (6km and 12km)....

  15. Validation of a short-range ensemble precipitation prediction system over the Iberian Peninsula and Balearics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Muñoz, D.; Martin, M. L.; Valero, F.; Luna, M. Y.; Morata, A.; Sebastian, L. I.

    2009-09-01

    A short-range ensemble precipitation forecast system has been constructed over the Iberian Peninsula and Balearics by means of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Centre for Atmospheric Research Model (MM5). The ensemble system consists of ten members, each run with a different combination of two different initial conditions from global models, IFS-ECMWF and GFS-NCEP, and five different subgrid-scale physics configurations for three months period of 2006. The mesoscale verification is made by using observational precipitation data of the Spanish Climatic Network. To ensure the quality individual members the forecast distribution of each member has been studied, showing good agreement with the observed precipitation distribution. The created short-range ensemble shows high spread-skill correlation values for daily precipitation. However, the asymmetric shape of the rank histogram indicates some underdispersion, suggesting an under-forecasting behaviour. Talagrand diagrams have been created for different precipitation thresholds to analyze more deeply the system calibration, showing a nearly flat shape on the lower bins and a clear accumulation on the higher interval, indicating that the system is well bias affected. The Relative Operating Characteristic curves show a very outstanding area indicating the good discrimination capacity for each of the thresholds. The reliability diagrams are also indicative of the good reliability of the forecasting system, depicting in general good agreement between forecast probability and the mean observed frequency. Because of that, the verification proves the usefulness of the forecasting system over the study area.

  16. On-sky Closed-loop Correction of Atmospheric Dispersion for High-contrast Coronagraphy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Kotani, T.; Takami, H.

    2018-02-01

    Adaptive optic (AO) systems delivering high levels of wavefront correction are now common at observatories. One of the main limitations to image quality after wavefront correction comes from atmospheric refraction. An atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC) is employed to correct for atmospheric refraction. The correction is applied based on a look-up table consisting of dispersion values as a function of telescope elevation angle. The look-up table-based correction of atmospheric dispersion results in imperfect compensation leading to the presence of residual dispersion in the point spread function (PSF) and is insufficient when sub-milliarcsecond precision is required. The presence of residual dispersion can limit the achievable contrast while employing high-performance coronagraphs or can compromise high-precision astrometric measurements. In this paper, we present the first on-sky closed-loop correction of atmospheric dispersion by directly using science path images. The concept behind the measurement of dispersion utilizes the chromatic scaling of focal plane speckles. An adaptive speckle grid generated with a deformable mirror (DM) that has a sufficiently large number of actuators is used to accurately measure the residual dispersion and subsequently correct it by driving the ADC. We have demonstrated with the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) system on-sky closed-loop correction of residual dispersion to direct detection of habitable exoplanets with upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) and also provide a diagnostic tool to test the performance of instruments which require sub-milliarcsecond correction.

  17. Electron density measurement of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma using dispersion interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Medical applications of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasmas have recently been attracting a great deal of attention, where many types of plasma sources have been developed to meet the purposes. For example, plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is now being studied for cancer treatment, has been produced by irradiating non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma with ultrahigh electron density to a culture medium. Meanwhile, in order to measure electron density in magnetic confinement plasmas, a CO2 laser dispersion interferometer has been developed and installed on the Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. The dispersion interferometer has advantages that the measurement is insensitive to mechanical vibrations and changes in neutral gas density. Taking advantage of these properties, we applied the dispersion interferometer to electron density diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas produced by the NU-Global HUMAP-WSAP-50 device, which is used for producing PAM. This study was supported by the Grant of Joint Research by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS).

  18. Multilevel Monte Carlo and improved timestepping methods in atmospheric dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiolides, Grigoris; Müller, Eike H.; Scheichl, Robert; Shardlow, Tony; Giles, Michael B.; Thomson, David J.

    2018-02-01

    A common way to simulate the transport and spread of pollutants in the atmosphere is via stochastic Lagrangian dispersion models. Mathematically, these models describe turbulent transport processes with stochastic differential equations (SDEs). The computational bottleneck is the Monte Carlo algorithm, which simulates the motion of a large number of model particles in a turbulent velocity field; for each particle, a trajectory is calculated with a numerical timestepping method. Choosing an efficient numerical method is particularly important in operational emergency-response applications, such as tracking radioactive clouds from nuclear accidents or predicting the impact of volcanic ash clouds on international aviation, where accurate and timely predictions are essential. In this paper, we investigate the application of the Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method to simulate the propagation of particles in a representative one-dimensional dispersion scenario in the atmospheric boundary layer. MLMC can be shown to result in asymptotically superior computational complexity and reduced computational cost when compared to the Standard Monte Carlo (StMC) method, which is currently used in atmospheric dispersion modelling. To reduce the absolute cost of the method also in the non-asymptotic regime, it is equally important to choose the best possible numerical timestepping method on each level. To investigate this, we also compare the standard symplectic Euler method, which is used in many operational models, with two improved timestepping algorithms based on SDE splitting methods.

  19. A short-range ensemble prediction system for southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Park, R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available numerical weather prediction system over southern Africa using the Conformal- Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM). An ensemble prediction system (EPS) combines several individual weather model setups into an average forecast system where each member... contributes to the final weather forecast (Atger, 1999). Four different EPSs were configured using lagged-average forecasting techniques (Kalnay, 2003) and two different cloud parameterisation schemes (McGregor, 2003; Rotstayn, 1997). Rainfall forecasts...

  20. Hand-Held Units for Short-Range Wireless Biotelemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2008-01-01

    Special-purpose hand-held radiotransceiver units have been proposed as means of short-range radio powering and interrogation of surgically implanted microelectromechanical sensors and actuators. These units are based partly on the same principles as those of the units described in "Printed Multi- Turn Loop Antennas for RF Biotelemetry" (LEW-17879-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 6 (June 2007), page 48. Like the previously reported units, these units would make it unnecessary to have wire connections between the implanted devices and the external equipment used to activate and interrogate them. Like a unit of the previously reported type, a unit of the type now proposed would include a printed-circuit antenna on a dielectric substrate. The antenna circuitry would include integrated surface-mount inductors for impedance tuning. Circuits for processing the signals transmitted and received by the antenna would be included on the substrate. During operation, the unit would be positioned near (but not in electrical contact with) a human subject, in proximity to a microelectromechanical sensor or actuator that has been surgically implanted in the subject. It has been demonstrated that significant electromagnetic coupling with an implanted device could be established at a distance of as much as 4 in. (.10 cm). During operation in the interrogation mode, the antenna of the unit would receive a radio telemetry signal transmitted by the surgically implanted device. The antenna substrate would have dimensions of approximately 3.25 by 3.75 inches (approximately 8.3 by 9.5 cm). The substrate would have a thickness of the order of 30 mils (of the order of a somewhat less than a millimeter). The substrate would be made of low-radiofrequency- loss dielectric material that could be, for example, fused quartz, alumina, or any of a number of commercially available radio-frequency dielectric composite materials. The antenna conductors would typically be made of copper or a

  1. Long- and/or short-range transportation of local Asian aerosols in DRAGON-Osaka Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    same day afternoon, large value of PM mass concentration was measured in Osaka. It is found from the simultaneous measurements of atmospheric particles, especially those on March 11, which present the maximum efficiency of DRAGON-Osaka, and numerical model simulations indicate that the long- and/or short- range transportation factors influence the characterization of atmospheric particles.

  2. A novel nuclear dependence of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Hongkai [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Rong, E-mail: rwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Yin [Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, Xurong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-06-10

    A linear correlation is found between the magnitude of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations and the nuclear binding energy per nucleon with pairing energy removed. By using this relation, the strengths of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations of some unmeasured nuclei are predicted. Discussions on nucleon–nucleon pairing energy and nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations are made. The found nuclear dependence of nucleon–nucleon short-range correlations may shed some lights on the short-range structure of nucleus.

  3. Dispersion analysis of the Pn -Pn-1DG mixed finite element pair for atmospheric modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Mixed finite element methods provide a generalisation of staggered grid finite difference methods with a framework to extend the method to high orders. The ability to generate a high order method is appealing for applications on the kind of quasi-uniform grids that are popular for atmospheric modelling, so that the method retains an acceptable level of accuracy even around special points in the grid. The dispersion properties of such schemes are important to study as they provide insight into the numerical adjustment to imbalance that is an important component in atmospheric modelling. This paper extends the recent analysis of the P2 - P1DG pair, that is a quadratic continuous and linear discontinuous finite element pair, to higher polynomial orders and also spectral element type pairs. In common with the previously studied element pair, and also with other schemes such as the spectral element and discontinuous Galerkin methods, increasing the polynomial order is found to provide a more accurate dispersion relation for the well resolved part of the spectrum but at the cost of a number of unphysical spectral gaps. The effects of these spectral gaps are investigated and shown to have a varying impact depending upon the width of the gap. Finally, the tensor product nature of the finite element spaces is exploited to extend the dispersion analysis into two-dimensions.

  4. Atmospheric dispersion of radon around uranium mill tailings of the former Pridneprovsky Chemical Plant in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalets, Ivan V; Asker, Christian; Khalchenkov, Alexander V; Persson, Christer; Lavrova, Tatyana V

    2017-06-01

    Simulations of atmospheric dispersion of radon around the uranium mill tailings of the former Pridneprovsky Chemical Plant (PChP) in Ukraine were carried out with the aid of two atmospheric dispersion models: the Airviro Grid Model and the CALMET/CALPUFF model chain. The available measurement data of radon emission rates taken in the territories and the close vicinity of tailings were used in simulations. The results of simulations were compared to the yearly averaged measurements of concentration data. Both models were able to reasonably reproduce average radon concentration at the Sukhachivske site using averaged measured emission rates as input together with the measured meteorological data. At the same time, both models significantly underestimated concentrations as compared to measurements collected at the PChP industrial site. According to the results of both dispersion models, it was shown that only addition of significant radon emission rate from the whole territory of PChP in addition to emission rates from the tailings could explain the observed concentration measurements. With the aid of the uncertainty analysis, the radon emission rate from the whole territory of PChP was estimated to be between 1.5 and 3.5 Bq·m -2 s -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predictability of the dispersion of Fukushima-derived radionuclides and their homogenization in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Róbert; Leelőssy, Ádám; Kovács, Tibor; Lagzi, István

    2016-01-01

    Long-range simulation of the dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere is one of the most challenging tasks in geosciences. Application of precise and fast numerical models in risk management and decision support can save human lives and can diminish consequences of an accidental release. Disaster at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has been the most serious event in the nuclear technology and industry in the recent years. We present and discuss the results of the numerical simulations on dispersion of Fukushima-derived particulate 131I and 137Cs using a global scale Lagrangian particle model. We compare concentrations and arrival times, using two emission scenarios, with the measured data obtained from 182 monitoring stations located all over the Northern Hemisphere. We also investigate the homogenization of isotopes in the atmosphere. Peak concentrations were predicted with typical accuracy of one order of magnitude showing a general underestimation in the case of 131I but not for 137Cs. Tropical and Arctic plumes, as well as the early detections in American and European midlatitudes were generally well predicted, however, the later regional-scale mixing could not be captured by the model. Our investigation highlights the importance of the parameterization of free atmospheric turbulence.

  6. Predictability of the dispersion of Fukushima-derived radionuclides and their homogenization in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Róbert; Leelőssy, Ádám; Kovács, Tibor; Lagzi, István

    2016-01-28

    Long-range simulation of the dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere is one of the most challenging tasks in geosciences. Application of precise and fast numerical models in risk management and decision support can save human lives and can diminish consequences of an accidental release. Disaster at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has been the most serious event in the nuclear technology and industry in the recent years. We present and discuss the results of the numerical simulations on dispersion of Fukushima-derived particulate (131)I and (137)Cs using a global scale Lagrangian particle model. We compare concentrations and arrival times, using two emission scenarios, with the measured data obtained from 182 monitoring stations located all over the Northern Hemisphere. We also investigate the homogenization of isotopes in the atmosphere. Peak concentrations were predicted with typical accuracy of one order of magnitude showing a general underestimation in the case of (131)I but not for (137)Cs. Tropical and Arctic plumes, as well as the early detections in American and European midlatitudes were generally well predicted, however, the later regional-scale mixing could not be captured by the model. Our investigation highlights the importance of the parameterization of free atmospheric turbulence.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Onsite Atmospheric Dispersion Factor in Westinghouse type NPP in KOREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Chan; Yoon, Duk Joo; Song, Dong Soo [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    ARCON96 is a NRC licensed air dispersion model to evaluate onsite atmospheric relative concentration X/Q. The purpose of this paper is to provide some results for checking and testing the functionalities of ARCON96. Specially, this code is optimized to estimate a habitability of control room. Since NUREG 0737 issue, the control room habitability has been studied for a FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report). Some assumptions and methodology is used in this paper. Some methodology is introduced in this paper. The reason of the selection of 2-loop Westinghouse NPP is because of carrying out the study project for the 2-loop Westinghouse NPP in the condition of the defueled NPP condition. Onsite atmospheric dispersion factor sensitivity is performed. Key impact factor is reviewed. Some results are below: a. Time averaged effect of X/Q is timely increased. b. ARCON96 code is more conservative at the low wind speed conditions. c. Building wake impact is significant in the condition of unstable atmospheric class with more than 7m/sec of wind speed. d. Plume meander effect is strong when the distance from the release point is small. e. The other plume meander effect is strong when the meander duration time is accumulated Finally, these results show that the appropriate conservation of ARCON96 is appeared in some conditions. Also these results seem to be in good agreement with NRC Regulatory Guide and positions.

  8. Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Alan [Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR& D), Washington, DC (United States); Chaves, Chris [Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR& D), Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has performed an evaluation of the technical bases for the default value for the atmospheric dispersion parameter χ/Q. This parameter appears in the calculation of radiological dose at the onsite receptor location (co-located worker at 100 meters) in safety analysis of DOE nuclear facilities. The results of the calculation are then used to determine whether safety significant engineered controls should be established to prevent and/or mitigate the event causing the release of hazardous material. An evaluation of methods for calculation of the dispersion of potential chemical releases for the purpose of estimating the chemical exposure at the co-located worker location was also performed. DOE’s evaluation consisted of: (a) a review of the regulatory basis for the default χ/Q dispersion parameter; (b) an analysis of this parameter’s sensitivity to various factors that affect the dispersion of radioactive material; and (c) performance of additional independent calculations to assess the appropriate use of the default χ/Q value.

  9. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon......-41 source term and the meteorological parametres. Good overall agreement is found between measurement data and model results using the mesoscale atmospheric dispersion and dose rate model RIMPUFF....

  10. Statistical Surrogate Modeling of Atmospheric Dispersion Events Using Bayesian Adaptive Splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francom, D.; Sansó, B.; Bulaevskaya, V.; Lucas, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in the inputs of complex computer models, including atmospheric dispersion and transport codes, is often assessed via statistical surrogate models. Surrogate models are computationally efficient statistical approximations of expensive computer models that enable uncertainty analysis. We introduce Bayesian adaptive spline methods for producing surrogate models that capture the major spatiotemporal patterns of the parent model, while satisfying all the necessities of flexibility, accuracy and computational feasibility. We present novel methodological and computational approaches motivated by a controlled atmospheric tracer release experiment conducted at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in California. Traditional methods for building statistical surrogate models often do not scale well to experiments with large amounts of data. Our approach is well suited to experiments involving large numbers of model inputs, large numbers of simulations, and functional output for each simulation. Our approach allows us to perform global sensitivity analysis with ease. We also present an approach to calibration of simulators using field data.

  11. Atmospheric Dispersion of Various Types of Iodine in UAE in February and August

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungyeop; Beeley, Philip A. [Khalifa Univ. of Science, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kim, Sungyeop; Chang, Soonheung; Lee, Kunjai [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The distribution ratio of these three types of iodine being released to the atmosphere under accident scenario is still not clearly reported because of its complex kinetics of chemical and physical process in the accidental condition. In this research, the dispersion behaviors of three kinds of iodine in the atmosphere have been considered in the UAE environment in winter and summer situations. Higher ground level concentration on the same downwind distance from the source appears in summer because of lower wind speed than that of winter. More lateral spreading of vertical downwind direction in summer has been confirmed because of less stable air than that of winter. Higher ground level concentrations have been appeared in order of particle type, organic gas type and elemental gas type of I-131 with given assumptions.

  12. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Modeling of High-altitude Atmospheric Dispersion Using Climate and Meteorological Forecast Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, L G; Chin, H S

    2005-03-30

    The overall objective of this study is to provide a demonstration of capability for importing both high altitude meteorological forecast and climatological datasets from NRL into the NARAC modeling system to simulate high altitude atmospheric droplet release and dispersion. The altitude of release for the proposed study is between 60 and 100km altitude. As either standard climatological data (over a period of 40 years) or daily meteorological forecasts can drive the particle dispersion model, we did a limited comparison of simulations with meteorological data and simulations with climatological data. The modeling tools used to address this problem are the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) modeling system at LLNL which are operationally employed to assist DOE/DHS/DOD emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. The interrelation of the various data feeds and codes at NARAC are illustrated in Figure 1. The NARAC scientific models are all verified to both analytic solutions and other codes; the models are validated to field data such as the Prairie Grass study (Barad, 1958). NARAC has multiple real-time meteorological data feeds from the National Weather Service, from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting, from the US Navy, and from the US Air Force. NARAC also keeps a historical archive of meteorological data partially for research purposes. The codes used in this effort were the Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Techniques (ADAPT) model (Sugiyama and Chan, 1998) and a development version of the Langrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator (LODI) model (Nasstrom et al., 2000). The use of the NASA GEOS-4 dataset required the use of a development version of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) model (Hodur, 1997; Chin and Glascoe, 2004). The specific goals of this study are the following: (1) Confirm data compatibility of NRL

  14. Atmospheric dispersion modelling of bioaerosols that are pathogenic to humans and livestock - A review to inform risk assessment studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leuken, J. P G; Swart, A. N.; Havelaar, A. H.; Van Pul, A.; Van der Hoek, W.; Heederik, D.

    In this review we discuss studies that applied atmospheric dispersion models (ADM) to bioaerosols that are pathogenic to humans and livestock in the context of risk assessment studies. Traditionally, ADMs have been developed to describe the atmospheric transport of chemical pollutants, radioactive

  15. Dispersion of aerosol particles in the free atmosphere using ensemble forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Haszpra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of aerosol particle pollutants is studied using 50 members of an ensemble forecast in the example of a hypothetical free atmospheric emission above Fukushima over a period of 2.5 days. Considerable differences are found among the dispersion predictions of the different ensemble members, as well as between the ensemble mean and the deterministic result at the end of the observation period. The variance is found to decrease with the particle size. The geographical area where a threshold concentration is exceeded in at least one ensemble member expands to a 5–10 times larger region than the area from the deterministic forecast, both for air column "concentration" and in the "deposition" field. We demonstrate that the root-mean-square distance of any particle from its own clones in the ensemble members can reach values on the order of one thousand kilometers. Even the centers of mass of the particle cloud of the ensemble members deviate considerably from that obtained by the deterministic forecast. All these indicate that an investigation of the dispersion of aerosol particles in the spirit of ensemble forecast contains useful hints for the improvement of risk assessment.

  16. Atmospheric dispersion characteristics of radioactive materials according to the local weather and emission conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hye Yeon; Kang, Yoon Hee; Kim, Yoo Keun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Keun [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study evaluated the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material according to local weather conditions and emission conditions. Local weather conditions were defined as 8 patterns that frequently occur around the Kori Nuclear Power Plant and emission conditions were defined as 6 patterns from a combination of emission rates and the total number of particles of the {sup 137}Cs, using the WRF/HYSPLIT modeling system. The highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 0900 LST under the ME4{sub 1} (main wind direction: SSW, daily average wind speed: 2.8 ms{sup -1}), with a wide region of its high concentration due to the continuous wind changes between 0000 and 0900 LST; under the ME3 (NE, 4.1 ms{sup -1}), the highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 1500 and 2100 LST with a narrow dispersion along a strong northeasterly wind. In the case of ME4{sub 4} (S, 2.7 ms{sup -1}), the highest mean concentration of {sup 137}Cs occurred at 0300 LST because {sup 137}Cs stayed around the KNPP under low wind speed and low boundary layer height. As for the emission conditions, EM1{sub 3} and EM2{sub 3} that had the maximum total number of particles showed the widest dispersion of {sup 137}Cs, while its highest mean concentration was estimated under the EM1{sub 1} considering the relatively narrow dispersion and high emission rate. This study showed that even though an area may be located within the same radius around the Kori Nuclear Power Plant, the distribution and levels of {sup 137}Cs concentration vary according to the change in time and space of weather conditions (the altitude of the atmospheric boundary layer, the horizontal and vertical distribution of the local winds, and the precipitation levels), the topography of the regions where {sup 137}Cs is dispersed, the emission rate of {sup 137}Cs, and the number of emitted particles.

  17. Comparison of the Tritium permeated from ITER Blanket in normal operation and its short range impact of HT over France, Swiss or Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, P.; Velarde, M.; Ardao, J.; Perlado, J.; Sedano, L.; Xiberta, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we assumes the hydrogen isotopes permeation from a liquid metal ITER breeder blanket (assuming normal operation and a LM as DCLL or HCLL blanket) as one of the possible sources of a leak and tritium release,mainly but not only. The paper presents a short range low impact of HT gas activity over France, Swiss or Spain from same cases in 2014 and 2015 releases from ITER. The permeation of hydrogen isotopes is an important experimental issue to take into account into the development of a Tritium Breeder Module for ITER [1]. Tritium cannot be confined -without an uncertainty of 5% in the flux permeation- and therefore HT can be detected (e.g. by ionization chamber) as permeates though the structure of RAFM steel towards the coolant [1]. HT from Pb15.7Li and permeated in Eurofer97 can contaminate the other parts of the system and may be delivered though the normal-vent detritiation system (NVDS). Real time forecast of transport of tritium in air from the fusion reactor towards off-site far downwind though extended tritium clouds into the low levels of the atmosphere is calculated for the short range (up to 24 hours) by the coupling of 2 models the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) [2] model and the FLEXPART lagrangian dispersion model [3] verified with NORMTRI simulation [4] and implemented in many different cases and scenarios [5, 6, 7]. As a function of daily weather conditions the release will affect just France or already can be delivered towards Swiss when cyclonic circulation, or towards the Iberian Peninsula or Balearic Islands (Spain) when high produce anticyclonic circulation of the air over the Mediterranean Sea. (Author)

  18. Short-range second order screened exchange correction to RPA correlation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Matthias; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Direct random phase approximation (RPA) correlation energies have become increasingly popular as a post-Kohn-Sham correction, due to significant improvements over DFT calculations for properties such as long-range dispersion effects, which are problematic in conventional density functional theory. On the other hand, RPA still has various weaknesses, such as unsatisfactory results for non-isogyric processes. This can in parts be attributed to the self-correlation present in RPA correlation energies, leading to significant self-interaction errors. Therefore a variety of schemes have been devised to include exchange in the calculation of RPA correlation energies in order to correct this shortcoming. One of the most popular RPA plus exchange schemes is the second order screened exchange (SOSEX) correction. RPA + SOSEX delivers more accurate absolute correlation energies and also improves upon RPA for non-isogyric processes. On the other hand, RPA + SOSEX barrier heights are worse than those obtained from plain RPA calculations. To combine the benefits of RPA correlation energies and the SOSEX correction, we introduce a short-range RPA + SOSEX correction. Proof of concept calculations and benchmarks showing the advantages of our method are presented.

  19. Development of NEXRAD Wind Retrievals as Input to Atmospheric Dispersion Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Copeland, Jeffrey H.; Sun, Jenny

    2007-03-06

    The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility that routinely collected data from the Doppler radars can appropriately be used in Atmospheric Dispersion Models (ADMs) for emergency response. We have evaluated the computational efficiency and accuracy of two variational mathematical techniques that derive the u- and v-components of the wind from radial velocities obtained from Doppler radars. A review of the scientific literature indicated that the techniques employ significantly different approaches in applying the variational techniques: 2-D Variational (2DVar), developed by NOAA¹s (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's) National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We designed a series of numerical experiments in which both models employed the same horizontal domain and resolution encompassing Oklahoma City for a two-week period during the summer of 2003 so that the computed wind retrievals could be fairly compared. Both models ran faster than real-time on a typical single dual-processor computer, indicating that they could be used to generate wind retrievals in near real-time. 2DVar executed ~2.5 times faster than VDRAS because of its simpler approach.

  20. Chemical short range order obtained from the atomic pair distribution function

    OpenAIRE

    Proffen, Th.; Petkov, V.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Vogt, T.

    2002-01-01

    Many crystalline materials show chemical short range order and relaxation of neighboring atoms. Local structural information can be obtained by analyzing the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) obtained from powder diffraction data. In this paper, we present the successful extraction of chemical short range order parameters from the x-ray PDF of a quenched Cu_3Au sample.

  1. Frustrated resonating valence bond states in two dimensions: classification and short-range correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yao, Hong

    2012-10-05

    Resonating valence bond (RVB) states are of crucial importance in our intuitive understanding of quantum spin liquids in 2D. We systematically classify short-range bosonic RVB states into symmetric or nematic spin liquids by examining their flux patterns. We further map short-range bosonic RVB states into projected BCS wave functions, on which we perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations without the minus sign problem. Our results clearly show that both spin and dimer correlations decay exponentially in all the short-range frustrated (nonbipartite or Z2) bosonic RVB states we studied, indicating that they are gapped Z2 quantum spin liquids. Generically, we conjecture that all short-range frustrated bosonic RVB states in 2D have only short-range correlations.

  2. Accidental benzene release risk assessment in an urban area using an atmospheric dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Son C. H.; Lee, Myong-In; Kim, Ganghan; Kim, Dongmin; Park, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Cho, Gi-Hyoug

    2016-11-01

    This study applied the American Meteorological Society and Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) to assess the risk caused by an accidental release and dispersion of the toxic chemical benzene in the vicinity of a highly populated urban area. The modeling domain encompasses the Korean megacity of Ulsan, which includes two national industrial complexes and is characterized by a complex coastal terrain. Multiple AERMOD simulations were conducted for an assumed emission scenario using background wind data from August between 2009 and 2013. The series of experiments produced the spatial accident probability patterns for different concentration levels during daytime and nighttime scenarios based on the corresponding dominant wind patterns. This study further quantifies the potential accident risk based on the number of affected individuals by combining the accident probability with the indoor and outdoor population estimates. The chemical gas dispersion characteristics depend on various local meteorological conditions, such as the land-sea breeze direction, which alternates between daytime and nighttime, and the atmospheric stability. The results reveal that benzene dispersion affects a much larger area during the nighttime owing to the presence of a nocturnal stable boundary layer with significant temperature stratification. The affected area is smaller during the daytime owing to decreased stability and enhanced vertical mixing in the boundary layer. The results include a high degree of uncertainty during the nighttime owing to weak wind speeds and the lack of a prevailing wind direction, which impact the vulnerable area. However, vulnerable areas are more effectively identified during the daytime, when more consistent meteorological conditions exist. However, the potential risk becomes much lower during the nighttime owing to a substantial reduction of the outdoor population.

  3. Atmospheric Dispersal and Dispostion of Tephra From a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Keating; W.Statham

    2004-02-12

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (ASHPLUME) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. The ASHPLUME conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The ASHPLUME mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report will improve and clarify the previous documentation of the ASHPLUME mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model.

  4. EVALUATION OF URBAN ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION MODELS USING DATA FROM THE JOINT URBAN 2003 FIELD EXPERIMENT

    OpenAIRE

    T. Urban, Jeffry; Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; F. Heagy, James

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: We have evaluated the performance of several urban atmospheric transport and dispersion models by comparing model predictions to tracer gas concentrations measured during the Joint Urban 2003 field experiment in Oklahoma City, USA. These models include the Urban Canopy, Urban Dispersion Model (UDM), and Micro-SWIFT/SPRAY (MSS) modes within the HPAC modelling suite, QUIC-URB/QUIC-PLUME models, and the MESO/RUSTIC models. We discuss some of the results of these comparisons...

  5. NKS-B NordRisk II: Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe - Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    The objective of the NordRisk II project has been to derive practical means for assessing the risks from long-range atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials. An atlas over different atmospheric dispersion and deposition scenarios has been developed using historical numerical weather prediction (NWP) model data. The NWP model data covers three years spanning the climate variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and the atlas considers radioactive releases from 16 release sites in and near the Nordic countries. A statistical analysis of the long-range dispersion and deposition patterns is undertaken to quantify the mean dispersion and deposition as well as the variability. Preliminary analyses show that the large-scale atmospheric dispersion and deposition is near-isotropic, irrespective of the release site and detailed climatology, and allows for a simple parameterization of the global dispersion and deposition patterns. The atlas and the underlying data are made available in a format compatible with the ARGOS decision support system, and have been implemented in ARGOS. (Author)

  6. Change of the short-range scattering in the graphene covered with Bi2O3 clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Chen, Taishi; Pan, Haiyang; Fu, Dongzhi; Han, Yuyan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have studied the oxidation process of the bismuth doped graphene in the ambient air. Complete oxidation of the bismuth clusters and that of the graphene are firmly confirmed. The influence of oxygen on the graphene is characterized by means of Hall measurement and SdH oscillation. All transport measurements demonstrate a hole-type doping behavior. Our work also demonstrates that the short-range scattering mechanism is enhanced in doped graphene due to accumulated O-species adsorbates after being exposed in the atmosphere for 40 days and is suppressed after annealing. This investigation may open a new perspective for fabricating the graphene metal oxide devices.

  7. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit

  8. Evaluation of radioxenon releases in Australia using atmospheric dispersion modelling tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Rick; Orr, Blake; Grzechnik, Marcus; Hoffmann, Emmy; Saey, Paul; Solomon, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    The origin of a series of atmospheric radioxenon events detected at the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) International Monitoring System site in Melbourne, Australia, between November 2008 and February 2009 was investigated. Backward tracking analyses indicated that the events were consistent with releases associated with hot commission testing of the Australian Nuclear Science Technology Organisation (ANSTO) radiopharmaceutical production facility in Sydney, Australia. Forward dispersion analyses were used to estimate release magnitudes and transport times. The estimated (133)Xe release magnitude of the largest event (between 0.2 and 34 TBq over a 2 d window), was in close agreement with the stack emission releases estimated by the facility for this time period (between 0.5 and 2 TBq). Modelling of irradiation conditions and theoretical radioxenon emission rates were undertaken and provided further evidence that the Melbourne detections originated from this radiopharmaceutical production facility. These findings do not have public health implications. This is the first comprehensive study of atmospheric radioxenon measurements and releases in Australia. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of the February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Piggott, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lobaugh, Megan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tai, Lydia [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Kristen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-22

    This report presents the results of a simulation of the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radioactivity released from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in New Mexico in February 2014. These simulations were made by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and supersede NARAC simulation results published in a previous WIPP report (WIPP, 2014). The results presented in this report use additional, more detailed data from WIPP on the specific radionuclides released, radioactivity release amounts and release times. Compared to the previous NARAC simulations, the new simulation results in this report are based on more detailed modeling of the winds, turbulence, and particle dry deposition. In addition, the initial plume rise from the exhaust vent was considered in the new simulations, but not in the previous NARAC simulations. The new model results show some small differences compared to previous results, but do not change the conclusions in the WIPP (2014) report. Presented are the data and assumptions used in these model simulations, as well as the model-predicted dose and deposition on and near the WIPP site. A comparison of predicted and measured radionuclide-specific air concentrations is also presented.

  10. A Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Dispersion in N-band Spectra: Implications for Mid-IR Systems on ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Close, Laird M.; Kendrew, Sarah; Mathar, Richard J.; Stuik, Remko; Greene, Thomas P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael S.

    This paper is modified from [A.J. Skemer, P.M. Hinz, W.F. Hoffmann, L.M. Close, S. Kendrew, R.J. Mathar, R. Stuik, T.P. Greene, C.E. Woodward, M.S. Kelley, PASP 121, 897 (2009)]. Adaptive optics will almost completely remove the effects of atmospheric turbulence at 10µm on the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) generation of telescopes. In this paper, we observationally confirm that the next most important limitation to image quality is atmospheric dispersion, rather than telescope diffraction. By using the 6.5 meter MMT with its unique mid-IR adaptive optics system, we measure atmospheric dispersion in the N-band with the newly commissioned spectroscopic mode on MIRAC4BLINC. Our results indicate that atmospheric dispersion is generally linear in the N-band, although there is some residual curvature. We compare our measurements to theory, and make predictions for ELT Strehls and image FHWM with and without an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC). We find that for many mid-IR applications, an ADC will be necessary on ELTs. The observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona

  11. Screening methods for linear-scaling short-range hybrid calculations on CPU and GPU architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuerle, Matthias; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-04-14

    We present screening schemes that allow for efficient, linear-scaling short-range exchange calculations employing Gaussian basis sets for both CPU and GPU architectures. They are based on the LinK [C. Ochsenfeld et al., J. Chem. Phys. 109, 1663 (1998)] and PreLinK [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] methods, but account for the decay introduced by the attenuated Coulomb operator in short-range hybrid density functionals. Furthermore, we discuss the implementation of short-range electron repulsion integrals on GPUs. The introduction of our screening methods allows for speedups of up to a factor 7.8 as compared to the underlying linear-scaling algorithm, while retaining full numerical control over the accuracy. With the increasing number of short-range hybrid functionals, our new schemes will allow for significant computational savings on CPU and GPU architectures.

  12. Revision to dedicated short range communication roadside equipment specification - RSU 4.1.Bench Test Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    The document describes the overall process for evaluating Dedicated Short Range Communication (DSRC) Roadside Units (RSU) against USDOT RSU Specification 4.1 in preparation for field evaluation. The Test Cases contained in this document only evaluate...

  13. Source apportionment based on an atmospheric dispersion model and multiple linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Kawashima, Hiroto; Kajihara, Hideo

    Understanding the contribution of each emission source of air pollutants to ambient concentrations is important to establish effective measures for risk reduction. We have developed a source apportionment method based on an atmospheric dispersion model and multiple linear regression analysis (MLR) in conjunction with ambient concentrations simultaneously measured at points in a grid network. We used a Gaussian plume dispersion model developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency called the Industrial Source Complex model (ISC) in the method. Our method does not require emission amounts or source profiles. The method was applied to the case of benzene in the vicinity of the Keiyo Central Coastal Industrial Complex (KCCIC), one of the biggest industrial complexes in Japan. Benzene concentrations were simultaneously measured from December 2001 to July 2002 at sites in a grid network established in the KCCIC and the surrounding residential area. The method was used to estimate benzene emissions from the factories in the KCCIC and from automobiles along a section of a road, and then the annual average contribution of the KCCIC to the ambient concentrations was estimated based on the estimated emissions. The estimated contributions of the KCCIC were 65% inside the complex, 49% at 0.5-km sites, 35% at 1.5-km sites, 20% at 3.3-km sites, and 9% at a 5.6-km site. The estimated concentrations agreed well with the measured values. The estimated emissions from the factories and the road were slightly larger than those reported in the first Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR). These results support the reliability of our method. This method can be applied to other chemicals or regions to achieve reasonable source apportionments.

  14. Revisiting the radionuclide atmospheric dispersion event of the Chernobyl disaster - modelling sensitivity and data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roustan, Yelva; Duhanyan, Nora; Bocquet, Marc; Winiarek, Victor

    2013-04-01

    A sensitivity study of the numerical model, as well as, an inverse modelling approach applied to the atmospheric dispersion issues after the Chernobyl disaster are both presented in this paper. On the one hand, the robustness of the source term reconstruction through advanced data assimilation techniques was tested. On the other hand, the classical approaches for sensitivity analysis were enhanced by the use of an optimised forcing field which otherwise is known to be strongly uncertain. The POLYPHEMUS air quality system was used to perform the simulations of radionuclide dispersion. Activity concentrations in air and deposited to the ground of iodine-131, caesium-137 and caesium-134 were considered. The impact of the implemented parameterizations of the physical processes (dry and wet depositions, vertical turbulent diffusion), of the forcing fields (meteorology and source terms) and of the numerical configuration (horizontal resolution) were investigated for the sensitivity study of the model. A four dimensional variational scheme (4D-Var) based on the approximate adjoint of the chemistry transport model was used to invert the source term. The data assimilation is performed with measurements of activity concentrations in air extracted from the Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring (REM) database. For most of the investigated configurations (sensitivity study), the statistics to compare the model results to the field measurements as regards the concentrations in air are clearly improved while using a reconstructed source term. As regards the ground deposited concentrations, an improvement can only be seen in case of satisfactorily modelled episode. Through these studies, the source term and the meteorological fields are proved to have a major impact on the activity concentrations in air. These studies also reinforce the use of reconstructed source term instead of the usual estimated one. A more detailed parameterization of the deposition process seems also to be

  15. Iterative ensemble Kalman filter for atmospheric dispersion in nuclear accidents: An application to Kincaid tracer experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.L.; Su, G.F.; Chen, J.G. [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Raskob, W. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, D-76021 (Germany); Yuan, H.Y., E-mail: hy-yuan@outlook.com [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Q.Y. [Institute of Public Safety Research, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • We integrate the iterative EnKF method into the POLYPHEMUS platform. • We thoroughly evaluate the data assimilation system against the Kincaid dataset. • The data assimilation system substantially improves the model predictions. • More than 60% of the retrieved emissions are within a factor two of actual values. • The results reveal that the boundary layer height is the key influential factor. - Abstract: Information about atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides is vitally important for planning effective countermeasures during nuclear accidents. Results of dispersion models have high spatial and temporal resolutions, but they are not accurate enough due to the uncertain source term and the errors in meteorological data. Environmental measurements are more reliable, but they are scarce and unable to give forecasts. In this study, our newly proposed iterative ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation scheme is used to combine model results and environmental measurements. The system is thoroughly validated against the observations in the Kincaid tracer experiment. The initial first-guess emissions are assumed to be six magnitudes underestimated. The iterative EnKF system rapidly corrects the errors in the emission rate and wind data, thereby significantly improving the model results (>80% reduction of the normalized mean square error, r = 0.71). Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the influence of meteorological parameters. The results indicate that the system is sensitive to boundary layer height. When the heights from the numerical weather prediction model are used, only 62.5% of reconstructed emission rates are within a factor two of the actual emissions. This increases to 87.5% when the heights derived from the on-site observations are used.

  16. A High-precision Technique to Correct for Residual Atmospheric Dispersion in High-contrast Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Takami, H.; Hayano, Y.; Narita, N.

    2016-12-01

    Direct detection and spectroscopy of exoplanets requires high-contrast imaging. For habitable exoplanets in particular, located at a small angular separation from the host star, it is crucial to employ small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs that efficiently suppress starlight. These coronagraphs, in turn, require careful control of the wavefront that directly impacts their performance. For ground-based telescopes, atmospheric refraction is also an important factor, since it results in a smearing of the point-spread function (PSF), that can no longer be efficiently suppressed by the coronagraph. Traditionally, atmospheric refraction is compensated for by an atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC). ADC control relies on an a priori model of the atmosphere whose parameters are solely based on the pointing of the telescope, which can result in imperfect compensation. For a high-contrast instrument like the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system, which employs very small IWA coronagraphs, refraction-induced smearing of the PSF has to be less than 1 mas in the science band for optimum performance. In this paper, we present the first on-sky measurement and correction of residual atmospheric dispersion. Atmospheric dispersion is measured from the science image directly, using an adaptive grid of artificially introduced speckles as a diagnostic to feedback to the telescope’s ADC. With our current setup, we were able to reduce the initial residual atmospheric dispersion from 18.8 mas to 4.2 in broadband light (y- to H-band) and to 1.4 mas in the H-band only. This work is particularly relevant to the upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) that will require fine control of their ADC to reach their full high-contrast imaging potential.

  17. Analysis of a Kalman filter based method for on-line estimation of atmospheric dispersion parameters using radiation monitoring data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drews, Martin; Lauritzen, Bent; Madsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    A Kalman filter method is discussed for on-line estimation of radioactive release and atmospheric dispersion from a time series of off-site radiation monitoring data. The method is based on a state space approach, where a stochastic system equation describes the dynamics of the plume model parame...

  18. Dutch distribution zones of stable iodine tablets based on atmospheric dispersion modelling of accidental releases from nuclear power plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok-Palma, Y.S.; Leenders, M.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid administration of stable iodine is essential for the saturation and subsequent protection of the thyroid gland against the potential harm caused by radioiodines. This paper proposes the Dutch risk analysis that uses an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate the size of the zones around

  19. Detailed source term estimation of the atmospheric release for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident by coupling simulations of an atmospheric dispersion model with an improved deposition scheme and oceanic dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katata, G.; Chino, M.; Kobayashi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-07-01

    Temporal variations in the amount of radionuclides released into the atmosphere during the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FNPS1) accident and their atmospheric and marine dispersion are essential to evaluate the environmental impacts and resultant radiological doses to the public. In this paper, we estimate the detailed atmospheric releases during the accident using a reverse estimation method which calculates the release rates of radionuclides by comparing measurements of air concentration of a radionuclide or its dose rate in the environment with the ones calculated by atmospheric and oceanic transport, dispersion and deposition models. The atmospheric and oceanic models used are WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) and SEA-GEARN-FDM (Finite difference oceanic dispersion model), both developed by the authors. A sophisticated deposition scheme, which deals with dry and fog-water depositions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation, and subsequent wet scavenging due to mixed-phase cloud microphysics (in-cloud scavenging) for radioactive iodine gas (I{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}I) and other particles (CsI, Cs, and Te), was incorporated into WSPEEDI-II to improve the surface deposition calculations. The results revealed that the major releases of radionuclides due to the FNPS1 accident occurred in the following periods during March 2011: the afternoon of 12 March due to the wet venting and hydrogen explosion at Unit 1, midnight of 14 March when the SRV (safety relief valve) was opened three times at Unit 2, the morning and night of 15 March, and the morning of 16 March. According to the simulation results, the highest radioactive contamination areas around FNPS1 were created from 15 to 16 March by complicated interactions among rainfall, plume movements, and the temporal variation of release rates. The simulation by WSPEEDI-II using the new source term reproduced the local and regional patterns of

  20. Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents: what has changed in the use of atmospheric dispersion modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamrane, Y; Wybo, J-L; Armand, P

    2013-12-01

    The threat of a major accidental or deliberate event that would lead to hazardous materials emission in the atmosphere is a great cause of concern to societies. This is due to the potential large scale of casualties and damages that could result from the release of explosive, flammable or toxic gases from industrial plants or transport accidents, radioactive material from nuclear power plants (NPPs), and chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) terrorist attacks. In order to respond efficiently to such events, emergency services and authorities resort to appropriate planning and organizational patterns. This paper focuses on the use of atmospheric dispersion modeling (ADM) as a support tool for emergency planning and response, to assess the propagation of the hazardous cloud and thereby, take adequate counter measures. This paper intends to illustrate the noticeable evolution in the operational use of ADM tools over 25 y and especially in emergency situations. This study is based on data available in scientific publications and exemplified using the two most severe nuclear accidents: Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). It appears that during the Chernobyl accident, ADM were used few days after the beginning of the accident mainly in a diagnosis approach trying to reconstruct what happened, whereas 25 y later, ADM was also used during the first days and weeks of the Fukushima accident to anticipate the potentially threatened areas. We argue that the recent developments in ADM tools play an increasing role in emergencies and crises management, by supporting stakeholders in anticipating, monitoring and assessing post-event damages. However, despite technological evolutions, its prognostic and diagnostic use in emergency situations still arise many issues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimation Of 137Cs Using Atmospheric Dispersion Models After A Nuclear Reactor Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, V.; Kindap, T.; Unal, A.; Pozzoli, L.; Karaca, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear energy will continue to have an important role in the production of electricity in the world as the need of energy grows up. But the safety of power plants will always be a question mark for people because of the accidents happened in the past. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident which happened in 26 April 1986 was the biggest nuclear accident ever. Because of explosion and fire large quantities of radioactive material was released to the atmosphere. The release of the radioactive particles because of accident affected not only its region but the entire Northern hemisphere. But much of the radioactive material was spread over west USSR and Europe. There are many studies about distribution of radioactive particles and the deposition of radionuclides all over Europe. But this was not true for Turkey especially for the deposition of radionuclides released after Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and the radiation doses received by people. The aim of this study is to determine the radiation doses received by people living in Turkish territory after Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and use this method in case of an emergency. For this purpose The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model was used to simulate meteorological conditions after the accident. The results of WRF which were for the 12 days after accident were used as input data for the HYSPLIT model. NOAA-ARL's (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory) dispersion model HYSPLIT was used to simulate the 137Cs distrubition. The deposition values of 137Cs in our domain after Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Accident were between 1.2E-37 Bq/m2 and 3.5E+08 Bq/m2. The results showed that Turkey was affected because of the accident especially the Black Sea Region. And the doses were calculated by using GENII-LIN which is multipurpose health physics code.

  2. Limited-area short-range ensemble predictions targeted for heavy rain in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sattler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherent uncertainties in short-range quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF from the high-resolution, limited-area numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM (LAM are addressed using two different approaches to creating a small ensemble of LAM simulations, with focus on prediction of extreme rainfall events over European river basins. The first ensemble type is designed to represent uncertainty in the atmospheric state of the initial condition and at the lateral LAM boundaries. The global ensemble prediction system (EPS from ECMWF serves as host model to the LAM and provides the state perturbations, from which a small set of significant members is selected. The significance is estimated on the basis of accumulated precipitation over a target area of interest, which contains the river basin(s under consideration. The selected members provide the initial and boundary data for the ensemble integration in the LAM. A second ensemble approach tries to address a portion of the model-inherent uncertainty responsible for errors in the forecasted precipitation field by utilising different parameterisation schemes for condensation and convection in the LAM. Three periods around historical heavy rain events that caused or contributed to disastrous river flooding in Europe are used to study the performance of the LAM ensemble designs. The three cases exhibit different dynamic and synoptic characteristics and provide an indication of the ensemble qualities in different weather situations. Precipitation analyses from the Deutsche Wetterdienst (DWD are used as the verifying reference and a comparison of daily rainfall amounts is referred to the respective river basins of the historical cases.

  3. Estimation of aggregate population cancer risk from dichloromethane for Japanese using atmospheric dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Higashino, Haruyuki; Yoshikado, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Junko

    2006-01-01

    The aggregate population cancer risk from dichloromethane exposure for each prefecture and for all of Japan was estimated using an atmospheric dispersion model and by considering the population within each calculation mesh (about 5 x 5 km). Indoor dichloromethane exposure was also taken into consideration. The number of lifetime dichloromethane-exposure-induced cancer cases for all of Japan was estimated to be only 1.3 (of 125 million people) using a most recently reported unit risk value. It was also found that the average ratio of the contribution to the aggregate population cancer risk attributable to outdoor emission sources (industrial factories) to the total emission sources was no more than 40% for all of Japan. From these results, it is believed that further reductions in dichloromethane emissions from industrial factories on a prefectural or a nationwide scale would not be effective in reducing cancer risk. It was also revealed that the average ambient concentration of dichloromethane measured at monitoring stations for hazardous air pollutants in each prefecture is a good measure of the average ambient dichloromethane concentration to which people in that prefecture are exposed. Therefore, it was suggested that the aggregate population cancer risk from dichloromethane exposure can be effectively estimated for entire Japan by simply using the average ambient concentration measured at monitoring stations in all of Japan taking into consideration indoor dichloromethane exposure.

  4. Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling and Spatial Analysis to Evaluate Population Exposure to Pesticides from Farming Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Costanzini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work originates from an epidemiological study aimed to assess the correlation between population exposure to pesticides used in agriculture and adverse health effects. In support of the population exposure evaluation two models implemented by the authors were applied: a GIS-based proximity model and the CAREA atmospheric dispersion model. In this work, the results of the two models are presented and compared. Despite the proximity analysis is widely used for these kinds of studies, it was investigated how meteorology could affect the exposure assessment. Both models were applied to pesticides emitted by 1519 agricultural fields and considering 2584 receptors distributed over an area of 8430 km2. CAREA output shows a considerable enhancement in the percentage of exposed receptors, from the 4% of the proximity model to the 54% of the CAREA model. Moreover, the spatial analysis of the results on a specific test site showed that the effects of meteorology considered by CAREA led to an anisotropic exposure distribution that differs considerably from the symmetric distribution resulting by the proximity model. In addition, the results of a field campaign for the definition and planning of ground measurement of concentration for the validation of CAREA are presented. The preliminary results showed how, during treatments, pesticide concentrations distant from the fields are significantly higher than background values.

  5. CFD and Gaussian atmospheric dispersion models: A comparison for leak from carbon dioxide transportation and storage facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoldi, Alberto; Hill, Tim; Colls, Jeremy J.

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is of interest to the scientific community as a way of achieving significant global reduction of atmospheric CO 2 emission in the medium term. CO 2 would be transported from large emission points (e.g. coal fired power plants) to storage sites by surface/shallow high pressure pipelines. Modelling of CO 2 atmospheric dispersion after leakages from transportation facilities will be required before starting large scale CCS projects. This paper deals with the evaluation of the atmospheric dispersion CFD tool Fluidyn-PANACHE against Prairie Grass and Kit Fox field experiments. A description of the models for turbulence generation and dissipation used ( k- ɛ and k- l) and a comparison with the Gaussian model ALOHA for both field experiments are also outlined. The main outcome of this work puts PANACHE among the "fit-for-purpose" models, respecting all the prerequisites stated by Hanna et al. [Hanna, S.R., Chang, J.C. and Strimaitis, D.G., 1993. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations. Atmospheric Environment, 27, 2265-2285] for the evaluation of atmospheric dispersion model performance. The average under-prediction has been ascribed to the usage of mean wind speed and direction, which is characteristic of all CFD models. The authors suggest a modification of performance ranges for model acceptability measures, within the field of high pressure CO 2 transportation risk assessment, with the aim of accounting for the overall simplification induced by the usage of constant wind speed and direction within CFD atmospheric dispersion models.

  6. Long-distance dispersal of eastern spruce budworm in Minnesota (USA) via the atmospheric pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Sturtevant; Gary Achtemeier; Dean Anderson; Joseph Charney; Barry. Cooke

    2011-01-01

    Long-distance dispersal is thought to play an important role in synchronizing disparate populations of forest insect defoliators, but its importance relative to other factors remains unclear due to the difficulty of quantifying dispersal.

  7. Impacts of Amazonia biomass burning aerosols assessed from short-range weather forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Kolusu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The direct radiative impacts of biomass burning aerosols (BBA on meteorology are investigated using short-range forecasts from the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM over South America during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA. The impacts are evaluated using a set of three simulations: (i no aerosols, (ii with monthly mean aerosol climatologies and (iii with prognostic aerosols modelled using the Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Simulator for Studies In Climate (CLASSIC scheme. Comparison with observations show that the prognostic CLASSIC scheme provides the best representation of BBA. The impacts of BBA are quantified over central and southern Amazonia from the first and second day of 2-day forecasts during 14 September–3 October 2012. On average, during the first day of the forecast, including prognostic BBA reduces the clear-sky net radiation at the surface by 15 ± 1 W m−2 and reduces net top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiation by 8 ± 1 W m−2, with a direct atmospheric warming of 7 ± 1 W m−2. BBA-induced reductions in all-sky radiation are smaller in magnitude: 9.0 ± 1 W m−2 at the surface and 4.0 ± 1 W m−2 at TOA. In this modelling study the BBA therefore exert an overall cooling influence on the Earth–atmosphere system, although some levels of the atmosphere are directly warmed by the absorption of solar radiation. Due to the reduction of net radiative flux at the surface, the mean 2 m air temperature is reduced by around 0.1 ± 0.02 °C. The BBA also cools the boundary layer (BL but warms air above by around 0.2 °C due to the absorption of shortwave radiation. The overall impact is to reduce the BL depth by around 19 ± 8 m. These differences in heating lead to a more anticyclonic circulation at 700 hPa, with winds changing by around 0.6 m s−1. Inclusion of climatological or prognostic BBA in the MetUM makes a small but significant improvement in forecasts of temperature and relative humidity, but improvements were

  8. PIV Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence and Pollen Dispersal Above a Corn Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; van Hout, R.; Luznik, L.; Katz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Dispersal of pollen grains by wind and gravity (Anemophilous) is one of the oldest means of plant fertilization available in nature. Recently, the growth of genetically modified foods has raised questions on the range of pollen dispersal in order to limit cross-fertilization between organically grown and transgenic crops. The distance that a pollen grain can travel once released from the anther is determined, among others, by the aerodynamic parameters of the pollen and the characteristics of turbulence in the atmosphere in which it is released. Turbulence characteristics of the flow above a pollinating corn field were measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements were performed on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, in Maryland, during July 2003. Two PIV systems were used simultaneously, each with an overall sample area of 18x18 cm. The spacing between samples was about equal to the field of view. The PIV instrumentation, including CCD cameras, power supply and laser sheets forming optics were mounted on a measurement platform, consisting of a hydraulic telescopic arm that could be extended up to 10m. The whole system could be rotated in order to align it with the flow. The flow was seeded with smoke generated about 30m upstream of the sample areas. Measurements were carried out at several elevations, from just below canopy height up to 1m above canopy. The local meteorological conditions around the test site were monitored by other sensors including sonic anemometers, Rotorod pollen counters and temperature sensors. Each processed PIV image provides an instantaneous velocity distribution containing 64x64 vectors with a vector spacing of ~3mm. The pollen grains (~100mm) can be clearly distinguished from the smoke particles (~1mm) based on their size difference. The acquired PIV data enables calculation of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics including Reynolds stresses, spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. Data

  9. One-level modeling for diagnosing surface winds over complex terrain. II - Applicability to short-range forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P.; Getenio, B.; Zak-Rosenthal, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Alpert and Getenio (1988) modification of the Mass and Dempsey (1985) one-level sigma-surface model was used to study four synoptic events that included two winter cases (a Cyprus low and a Siberian high) and two summer cases. Results of statistical verification showed that the model is not only capable of diagnosing many details of surface mesoscale flow, but might also be useful for various applications which require operative short-range prediction of the diurnal changes of high-resolution surface flow over complex terrain, for example, in locating wildland fires, determining the dispersion of air pollutants, and predicting changes in wind energy or of surface wind for low-level air flights.

  10. Simulating industrial emissions using atmospheric dispersion modeling system: model performance and source emission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fadel, M; Abi-Esber, L

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the Gaussian Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System (ADMS4) was coupled with field observations of surface meteorology and concentrations of several air quality indicators (nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM10) and sulfur dioxide (SO2)) to test the applicability of source emission factors set by the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) at an industrial complex. Best emission factors and data groupings based on receptor location, type of terrain and wind speed, were relied upon to examine model performance using statistical analyses of simulated and observed data. The model performance was deemed satisfactory for several scenarios when receptors were located at downwind sites with index of agreement 'd' values reaching 0.58, fractional bias 'FB' and geometric mean bias 'MG' values approaching 0 and 1, respectively, and normalized mean square error 'NMSE' values as low as 2.17. However, median ratios of predicted to observed concentrations 'Cp/Co' at variable downstream distances were 0.01, 0.36, 0.76 and 0.19 for NOx, CO, PM10 and SO2, respectively, and the fraction of predictions within a factor of two of observations 'FAC2' values were lower than 0.5, indicating that the model could not adequately replicate all observed variations in emittant concentrations. Also, the model was found to be significantly sensitive to the input emission factor bringing into light the deficiency in regulatory compliance modeling which often uses internationally reported emission factors without testing their applicability.

  11. Atmospheric discharge and dispersion of radionuclides during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Part II: verification of the source term and analysis of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Hiroaki; Katata, Genki; Chino, Masamichi; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2012-10-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric dispersion simulations were carried out to verify the source term of (131)I and (137)Cs estimated in our previous studies, and to analyze the atmospheric dispersion and surface deposition during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The accuracy of the source term was evaluated by comparing the simulation results with measurements of daily and monthly surface depositions (fallout) over land in eastern Japan from March 12 to April 30, 2011. The source term was refined using observed air concentrations of radionuclides for periods when there were significant discrepancies between the calculated and measured daily surface deposition, and when environmental monitoring data, which had not been used in our previous studies, were now available. The daily surface deposition using the refined source term was predicted mostly to within a factor of 10, and without any apparent bias. Considering the errors in the model prediction, the estimated source term is reasonably accurate during the period when the plume flowed over land in Japan. The analysis of regional-scale atmospheric dispersion and deposition suggests that the present distribution of a large amount of (137)Cs deposition in eastern Japan was produced primarily by four events that occurred on March 12, 15-16, 20, and 21-23. The ratio of wet deposition to the total varied widely depending on the influence by the particular event. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-range wireless communication fundamentals of RF system design and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bensky, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The Complete "Tool Kit” for the Hottest Area in RF/Wireless Design!Short-range wireless-communications over distances of less than 100 meters-is the most rapidly growing segment of RF/wireless engineering. Alan Bensky is an internationally recognized expert in short-range wireless, and this new edition of his bestselling book is completely revised to cover the latest developments in this fast moving field.You'll find coverage of such cutting-edge topics as: architectural trends in RF/wireless integrated circuits compatibility and conflict issues between differen

  13. A Confidence Index Approach Based on ERA-40 Data for Numerical Short Range Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Prenosil

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical weather related missions increasingly rely on highly automated numerical products, even if only limited computer capacities are available to generate them. This holds true especially for military tactical decision aids but also for civil requirements from firebrigades, the Red Cross or technical relief organizations. With respect to inherent atmospheric indeterminateness, a systematic quality control of numerical input turns out to become more and more essential for the users. As an economical alternative to the complex and expensive ensemble prediction method, the German Bundeswehr Geoinformation Centre has decided in favour of an analogue approach called similar synoptic situations (3s, which is based on ECMWF's ERA-40 re-analysis archive. Similarity is defined by a special distance measure for synoptic fields. The typical range of interest is 2500km×2500km$2500\\,\\text{km}\\times2500\\,\\text{km}$ in space with approximately one degree of horizontal resolution and up to 36 hours of forecast time. Historical 12, 24 and 36 hours ERA-40 forecast qualities are merged by 3s into a confidence index, indicating current anomalies of numerical quality versus monthly means in special areas of interest. As the results from the ERA-40 archive are used without any statistical adaption, this assessment is exclusively valid for trouble-free synoptic model runs in the short range. For a better understanding of the estimated anomalies in numerical forecast quality, the involved synoptic conditions are classified by a well established weather type classification. The overall method has been verified from 45 years of ERA-40 data and 10 years of GME forecasts from the Deutscher Wetterdienst. The 3s technique is highly flexible all over the globe with the exception of the tropics, because the present version includes the geostrophic approximation. At present, 3s runs operationally within four geographic areas: (1 Central Europe, (2 Kosovo with

  14. DUSTRAN 1.0 User’s Guide: A GIS-Based Atmospheric Dust Dispersion Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2006-09-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the U.S. Department of Defense in addressing particulate air quality issues at military training and testing ranges. This manual documents the DUSTRAN modeling system and includes installation instructions, a user’s guide, and detailed example tutorials.

  15. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Ragaini, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  16. Short and long term dispersion patterns of radionuclides in the atmosphere around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelossy, Adam; Meszaros, Robert [Department of Meteorology, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Lagzi, Istvan, E-mail: lagzi@vuk.chem.elte.hu [Department of Meteorology, Eoetvoes Lorand University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15

    The Chernobyl accident and unfortunately the recent accident at the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant are the most serious accidents in the history of the nuclear technology and industry. Both of them have a huge and prolonged impact on environment as well as human health. Therefore, any technological developments and strategies that could diminish the consequences of such unfortunate events are undisputedly the most important issues of research. Numerical simulations of dispersion of radionuclides in the atmosphere after an accidental release can provide with a reliable prediction of the path of the plume. In this study we present a short (one month) and a long (11 years) term statistical study for the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant to estimate the most probable dispersion directions and plume structures of radionuclides on local scale using a Gaussian dispersion model. We analyzed the differences in plume directions and structures in case of typical weather/circulation pattern and provided a statistical-climatological method for a 'first-guess' approximation of the dispersion of toxic substances. The results and the described method can support and used by decision makers in such important cases like the Fukushima accident. - Highlights: > Plume direction and structure in the atmosphere were calculated near the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant. > There are significant differences among plume directions and structures in each month and season of the year. > Developed statistical approach could be an additional extension for decision makers.

  17. Updating source term and atmospheric dispersion simulations for the dose reconstruction in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai Haruyasu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the radiological dose to the public resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS accident in Japan, especially for the early phase of the accident when no measured data are available for that purpose, the spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive materials in the environment are reconstructed by computer simulations. In this study, by refining the source term of radioactive materials discharged into the atmosphere and modifying the atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition model (ATDM, the atmospheric dispersion simulation of radioactive materials is improved. Then, a database of spatiotemporal distribution of radioactive materials in the air and on the ground surface is developed from the output of the simulation. This database is used in other studies for the dose assessment by coupling with the behavioral pattern of evacuees from the FDNPS accident. By the improvement of the ATDM simulation to use a new meteorological model and sophisticated deposition scheme, the ATDM simulations reproduced well the 137Cs and 131I deposition patterns. For the better reproducibility of dispersion processes, further refinement of the source term was carried out by optimizing it to the improved ATDM simulation by using new monitoring data.

  18. Updating source term and atmospheric dispersion simulations for the dose reconstruction in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki; Tsuduki, Katsunori; Katata, Genki; Ota, Masakazu; Furuno, Akiko; Akari, Shusaku

    2017-09-01

    In order to assess the radiological dose to the public resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) accident in Japan, especially for the early phase of the accident when no measured data are available for that purpose, the spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive materials in the environment are reconstructed by computer simulations. In this study, by refining the source term of radioactive materials discharged into the atmosphere and modifying the atmospheric transport, dispersion and deposition model (ATDM), the atmospheric dispersion simulation of radioactive materials is improved. Then, a database of spatiotemporal distribution of radioactive materials in the air and on the ground surface is developed from the output of the simulation. This database is used in other studies for the dose assessment by coupling with the behavioral pattern of evacuees from the FDNPS accident. By the improvement of the ATDM simulation to use a new meteorological model and sophisticated deposition scheme, the ATDM simulations reproduced well the 137Cs and 131I deposition patterns. For the better reproducibility of dispersion processes, further refinement of the source term was carried out by optimizing it to the improved ATDM simulation by using new monitoring data.

  19. Fluid–fluid coexistence in colloidal systems with short-ranged strongly directional attraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kern, N.; Frenkel, D.

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic numerical study of the phase behavior of square-well fluids with a "patchy" short-ranged attraction. In particular, we study the effect of the size and number of attractive patches on the fluid–fluid coexistence. The model that we use is a generalization of the hard sphere

  20. Short-Range Ultra-Wideband Imaging with Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuge, X.

    2010-01-01

    Compact, cost-efficient and high-resolution imaging sensors are especially desirable in the field of short-range observation and surveillance. Such sensors are of great value in fields of security, rescue and medical applications. Systems can be formed for various practical purposes, such as

  1. Functional framework and hardware platform for dependability study in short range wireless embedded systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senouci, B.; Annema, Anne J.; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    A new direction in short-range wireless applications has appeared in the form of high-speed data communication devices for distances of a few meters. Behind these embedded applications, a complex Hardware/Software architecture is built. Dependability is one of the major challenges in these systems.

  2. Energy saving in multi-standard mobile terminals through short-range cooperation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radwan, Ayman; Rodriguez, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    .... In this article, we use one advantage of the multiple interfaces, namely short-range (SR) communications. Mobile terminals (MTs) use SR cooperative networking to take advantage of the good channel quality of SR links to save energy in multi-standard MTs...

  3. On Optimal Placement of Short Range Base Stations for Indoor Position Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bais

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of short-range wireless for object positioning has seen a growing interest in recent years. This interest is compounded by the inherent GPS limitations especially in indoor situations and in urban canyons. In order to achieve the highest performance of short-range positioning systems it is important to optimize the placement of Base-Stations (BSs in a given area. The problems of BSs placement to minimize error and to achieve multiple coverage of the area have been addressed separately in the literature. In this paper, we discuss that using short range BSs the two problems are interrelated and need to be solved jointly. We study the impact of different influential attributes of the positioning problem as we alter the layout of BSs in the area. We investigate different scenarios for short-range BSs placement that maximize coverage and minimize positioning error. Simulation results demonstrate that better performance could be achieved using layouts that tend to distribute the BSs uniformly.

  4. Cellular Controlled Short-Range Communication for Cooperative P2P Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank H. P.; Katz, Marcos; Zhang, Qi

    2009-01-01

    This article advocates a novel communication architecture and associated collaborative framework for future wireless communication systems. In contrast to the dominating cellular architecture and the upcoming peer-to-peer architecture, the new approach envisions a cellular controlled short-range ...

  5. Computing The No-Escape Envelope Of A Short-Range Missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Method for computing no-escape envelope of short-range air-to-air missile devised. Useful for analysis of both strategies for avoidance and strategies for attack. With modifications, also useful in analysis of control strategies for one-on-one air-to-air combat, or wherever multiple control strategies considered.

  6. Link Budget Analysis and Modeling of Short-Range UWB Channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irahhauten, Z.; Dacuna, J.; Janssen, G.J.M.; Nikookar, H.; Yarovoy, A.G.; Ligthart, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrawideband (UWB) technology is an attractive alternative for short-range applications, e.g., wireless personal area networks. In these applications, transmit and receive antennas are very close to each other and the far-field condition assumed in most of the link budget models may not be

  7. Visualization of a short-range Wnt gradient in the intestinal stem-cell niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farin, Henner F; Jordens, Ingrid; Mosa, Mohammed H; Basak, Onur; Korving, Jeroen; Tauriello, Daniele V F; de Punder, Karin; Angers, Stephane; Peters, Peter J; Maurice, Madelon M; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian Wnt proteins are believed to act as short-range signals, yet have not been previously visualized in vivo. Self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation are coordinated along a putative Wnt gradient in the intestinal crypt. Wnt3 is produced specifically by Paneth cells. Here we have

  8. NKS NordRisk. Atlas of long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havskov Soerensen, J.; Baklanov, A.; Mahura, A. (Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Lauritzen, Bent; Mikkelsen, Torben (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2008-07-15

    Within the NKS NordRisk project, 'Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe', the NKS NordRisk Atlas has been developed. The atlas describes risks from hypothetical long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected nuclear risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere. A number of case studies of long-term long-range atmospheric transport and deposition of radionuclides has been developed, based on two years of meteorological data. Radionuclide concentrations in air and radionuclide depositions have been evaluated and examples of long-term averages of the dispersion and deposition and of the variability around these mean values are provided. (au)

  9. Combined dispersive solid-phase extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of aliphatic amines on atmospheric fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Lee, Hian Kee

    2017-02-24

    Short-chain aliphatic amines are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment. They play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. As such, there is a pressing need to monitor these particle-bound compounds present at trace quantities. The present work describes an efficient, one-step microextraction technique for the preconcentration and detection of trace levels of 10 aliphatic amines on fine particles (particulate matter of 2.5μm or less (PM2.5)) in the atmosphere. After extraction of amines from particles in acidified water samples, carbon-based sorbents (in dispersive solid-phase extraction mode), and vortex agitation were utilized for simultaneous derivatization-extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The approach significantly increased the recoveries and enrichment of the amine derivatives. This one-step, combined technique is proposed for the first time. Several influential factors including type and concentration of derivatization reagent (for gas chromatographic separation), type of buffer, sample pH, types and volumes of extraction and disperser solvents, type and amount of sorbent, vortex time and temperature, desorption solvent type and volume, and salt content were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, high enrichment factors (in the range of between 307 and 382) and good reproducibility (relative standard deviations, below 7.0%, n=5) were achieved. The linearity ranged from 0.1μg/L-100μg/L, and from 0.5μg/L-100μg/L, depending on the analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.02μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.01ng/m(3) in air) and 0.09μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.04ng/m(3) in air). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of PM2.5 samples collected by air sampling through polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The concentration levels of amines ranged from 1.04 to 4.16ng/m(3) in the air sampled. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. NKS NordRisk II: Atlas of long-range atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from selected risk sites in the Northern Hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith Korsholm, U.; Havskov Soerensen, J. (Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)); Astrup, P.; Lauritzen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-04-15

    The present atlas has been developed within the NKS/NordRisk-II project 'Nuclear risk from atmospheric dispersion in Northern Europe'. The atlas describes risks from hypothetical long-range dispersion and deposition of radionuclides from 16 nuclear risk sites on the Northern Hemisphere. The atmospheric dispersion model calculations cover a period of 30 days following each release to ensure almost complete deposition of the dispersed material. The atlas contains maps showing the total deposition and time-integrated air concentration of Cs-137 and I-131 based on three years of meteorological data spanning the climate variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and corresponding time evolution of the ensemble mean atmospheric dispersion. (Author)

  11. Study of the effect of short ranged ordering on the magnetism in FeCr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Ambika Prasad, E-mail: apjena@bose.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter and Materials Science, S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India); Sanyal, Biplab, E-mail: biplab.sanyal@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Mookerjee, Abhijit, E-mail: abhijit.mookerjee61@gmail.com [Department of Condensed Matter and Materials Science, S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2014-01-15

    For the study of magnetism in systems where the local environment plays an important role, we propose a marriage between the Monte Carlo simulation and Zunger's special quasi-random structures. We apply this technique on disordered FeCr alloys and show that our estimates of the transition temperature is in good agreement with earlier experiments. - Highlights: • The magnetism in FeCr is sensitively depended on the ordering of the atoms : disordered or with short ranged ordering. • This work uses the SQS technique suggested by Zunger has been used to generate various degrees of short range ordering in FeCr. • The electronic structure and pair energies have been obatined from first principles ASR and Lichtenstein methods. • The effect of chemical ordering on magnetic ordering is studied in detail. • Only those situations where the chemical ordering is complete have been studied.

  12. Short-Range Noncontact Sensors for Healthcare and Other Emerging Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhan Gu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Short-range noncontact sensors are capable of remotely detecting the precise movements of the subjects or wirelessly estimating the distance from the sensor to the subject. They find wide applications in our day lives such as noncontact vital sign detection of heart beat and respiration, sleep monitoring, occupancy sensing, and gesture sensing. In recent years, short-range noncontact sensors are attracting more and more efforts from both academia and industry due to their vast applications. Compared to other radar architectures such as pulse radar and frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW radar, Doppler radar is gaining more popularity in terms of system integration and low-power operation. This paper reviews the recent technical advances in Doppler radars for healthcare applications, including system hardware improvement, digital signal processing, and chip integration. This paper also discusses the hybrid FMCW-interferometry radars and the emerging applications and the future trends.

  13. Demonstration of short-range wind lidar in a high-performance wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Montes, Belen Fernández; Pedersen, Jens Engholm

    A short-range continuous-wave coherent laser radar (lidar) has been tested in a high-performance wind tunnel for possible use as a standard component in wind tunnels. The lidar was tested in a low as well as a high speed regime ranging from 5-35 m/s and 40-75 m/s, respectively. In both low and high......-speed regimes very good correlation with reference measurements was found. Furthermore different staring directions were tested and taking a simple geometrical correction into account very good correlation was again found. These measurements all demonstrate the high accuracy of the lidar and indicate a possible...... future for short range lidars as a complement to LDA and other standard equipment in wind tunnels....

  14. Demonstration of short-range wind lidar in a high-performance wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Montes, Belen Fernández; Pedersen, Jens Engholm

    2012-01-01

    A short-range continuous-wave coherent laser radar (lidar) has been tested in a high-performance wind tunnel for possible use as a standard component in wind tunnels. The lidar was tested in a low as well as a high speed regime ranging from 5-35 m/s and 40-75 m/s, respectively. In both low and high......-speed regimes very good correlation with reference measurements was found. Furthermore different staring directions were tested and taking a simple geometrical correction into account very good correlation was again found. These measurements all demonstrate the high accuracy of the lidar and indicate a possible...... future for short range lidars as a complement to LDA and other standard equipment in wind tunnels....

  15. Constraints on spin-dependent short-range interactions using gravitational quantum levels of ultracold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Baeßler, S; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Voronin, A Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a possibility to improve constraints on spin-dependent short-range interactions in the range of 1 - 200 micrometer significantly. For such interactions, our constraints are without competition at the moment. They were obtained through the observation of gravitationally bound states of ultracold neutrons. We are going to improve these constraints by about three orders of magnitude in a dedicated experiment with polarized neutrons using the next-generation spectrometer GRANIT.

  16. Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions and the Short-Range Structure of Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanna, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Palamara, O. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schiavilla, R. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wiringa, R. B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Improvements in theoretical modeling of Short Range structures and phenomena, and comparisons with data, will require sustained collaboration between nuclear theorists and neutrino experimentalists. The extensive history of studying this area of nuclear physics in electron- and hadron-scattering experiments, coupled with the transformative capabilities of LArTPCs to identify neutrinos, will provide a ripe opportunity for new discoveries that will further our understanding of the nucleus.

  17. Measurement of the short-range attractive force between Ge plates using a torsion balance

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, W. J.; Sushkov, A. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the short-range attractive force between crystalline Ge plates, and found contributions from both the Casimir force and an electrical force possibly generated by surface patch potentials. Using a model of surface patch effects that generates an additional force due to a distance dependence of the apparent contact potential, the electrical force was parameterized using data at distances where the Casimir force is relatively small. Extrapolating this model, to provide a correct...

  18. Short-range guiding can result in the formation of circular aggregates in myxobacteria populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertas Janulevicius

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Myxobacteria are social bacteria that upon starvation form multicellular fruiting bodies whose shape in different species can range from simple mounds to elaborate tree-like structures. The formation of fruiting bodies is a result of collective cell movement on a solid surface. In the course of development, groups of flexible rod-shaped cells form streams and move in circular or spiral patterns to form aggregation centers that can become sites of fruiting body formation. The mechanisms of such cell movement patterns are not well understood. It has been suggested that myxobacterial development depends on short-range contact-mediated interactions between individual cells, i.e. cell aggregation does not require long-range signaling in the population. In this study, by means of a computational mass-spring model, we investigate what types of short-range interactions between cells can result in the formation of streams and circular aggregates during myxobacterial development. We consider short-range head-to-tail guiding between individual cells, whereby movement direction of the head of one cell is affected by the nearby presence of the tail of another cell. We demonstrate that stable streams and circular aggregates can arise only when the trailing cell, in addition to being steered by the tail of the leading cell, is able to speed up to catch up with it. It is suggested that necessary head-to-tail interactions between cells can arise from physical adhesion, response to a diffusible substance or slime extruded by cells, or pulling by motility engine pili. Finally, we consider a case of long-range guiding between cells and show that circular aggregates are able to form without cells increasing speed. These findings present a possibility to discriminate between short-range and long-range guiding mechanisms in myxobacteria by experimentally measuring distribution of cell speeds in circular aggregates.

  19. Exploiting short-range cooperation for energy efficient vertical handover operations

    OpenAIRE

    Foukas, Xenofon; Kontovasilis, K.; Marina, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of multiple collocated wireless networks using heterogeneous technologies and the multi-access support of contemporary mobile devices have allowed wireless connectivity optimization, enabled through vertical handover (VHO) operations. However, this comes at a high energy consumption on the mobile device, due to the inherently expensive nature of some of the involved operations. This work proposes exploiting short-range cooperation among collocated mobile devices to improve th...

  20. Countering the third world mobile short range ballistic missile threat: an integrated approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Persian Gulf War introduced a new, highly effective threat in the form of the mobile short range ballistic missile (SRBM). The non-guided SCUD missile proved to be most effective in the political area as Iraq continually targeted Israel in an attempt to force them into the conflict through retaliation. Although this Iraqi objective ultimately failed, a price was paid by the Coalition forces. A significant percentage of Allied ai...

  1. Short-range airborne transmission of expiratory droplets between two people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of close proximity infection for many respiratory diseases is often cited as evidence of large droplet and/or close contact transmission. We explored interpersonal exposure of exhaled droplets and droplet nuclei of two standing thermal manikins as affected by distance, humidity, ve...... are different; their effective control methods also differ. Neither the current droplet precautions nor dilution ventilation prevents short-range airborne transmission, so new control methods are needed......., ventilation, and breathing mode. Under the specific set of conditions studied, we found a substantial increase in airborne exposure to droplet nuclei exhaled by the source manikin when a susceptible manikin is within about 1.5 m of the source manikin, referred to as the proximity effect. The threshold...... reveal that transmission occurring in close proximity to the source patient includes both droplet-borne (large droplet) and short-range airborne routes, in addition to the direct deposition of large droplets on other body surfaces. The mechanisms of the droplet-borne and short-range airborne routes...

  2. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Van Dorpe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA, and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE. The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of calculations show a rather good agreement between the two codes, and the order of magnitude of the concentrations measured on the soil is predicted. Simulation is best for sampling points located ten kilometers from the source, while we note a divergence for more distant points results (difference in concentrations by a factor 2 to 5. This divergence may be explained by the fact that, for these four experiments, only one weather station (near the point source was used on a field of 10 000 km2, generating the simulation of a uniform wind field throughout the calculation domain.

  3. Short and long term dispersion patterns of radionuclides in the atmosphere around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelossy, Adám; Mészáros, Róbert; Lagzi, István

    2011-12-01

    The Chernobyl accident and unfortunately the recent accident at the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant are the most serious accidents in the history of the nuclear technology and industry. Both of them have a huge and prolonged impact on environment as well as human health. Therefore, any technological developments and strategies that could diminish the consequences of such unfortunate events are undisputedly the most important issues of research. Numerical simulations of dispersion of radionuclides in the atmosphere after an accidental release can provide with a reliable prediction of the path of the plume. In this study we present a short (one month) and a long (11 years) term statistical study for the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant to estimate the most probable dispersion directions and plume structures of radionuclides on local scale using a Gaussian dispersion model. We analyzed the differences in plume directions and structures in case of typical weather/circulation pattern and provided a statistical-climatological method for a "first-guess" approximation of the dispersion of toxic substances. The results and the described method can support and used by decision makers in such important cases like the Fukushima accident. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Atmospheric Cooling on Vertical Velocity Dispersion and Density Distribution of Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Thorman, Paul A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cohen, Seth H.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pirzkal, Nor; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation designed to predict the vertical velocity dispersion of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way. We show that since these stars are constantly cooling, the velocity dispersion has a noticeable trend with the spectral type. With realistic assumptions for the initial mass function, star formation history, and the cooling models, we show that the velocity dispersion is roughly consistent with what is observed for M dwarfs, decreases to cooler spectral types, and increases again for the coolest types in our study (˜T9). We predict a minimum in the velocity dispersions for L/T transition objects, however, the detailed properties of the minimum predominately depend on the star formation history. Since this trend is due to brown dwarf cooling, we expect that the velocity dispersion as a function of spectral type should deviate from the constancy around the hydrogen-burning limit. We convert from velocity dispersion to vertical scale height using standard disk models and present similar trends in disk thickness as a function of spectral type. We suggest that future, wide-field photometric and/or spectroscopic missions may collect sizable samples of distant (˜ 1 kpc) dwarfs that span the hydrogen-burning limit. As such, we speculate that such observations may provide a unique way of constraining the average spectral type of hydrogen burning. Support for program #13266 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  5. The pioneering works of Professor Duzheng Ye on atmospheric dispersion, Tibetan Plateau meteorology, and air-sea interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ngar-Cheung

    2017-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of the impacts of the original works of Professor Duzheng YE on a selected set of observational and model studies with which the present author has been associated over the past several decades. The main themes of these works include atmospheric energy dispersion, air-land interactions over the Tibetan Plateau, and El Ni˜norelated air-sea coupling over East Asia. The dispersive behavior of observed atmospheric fluctuations accompanying cold surge events in East Asia is demonstrated. Cold air outbreaks over Korea and southern China are coincident with the successive downstream development of troughs and ridges, with the group velocity of such wave packets being notably faster than the phase propagation speed of individual troughs and ridges. In a more general context, dispersive features are also discernible from lagged teleconnection charts and cross-spectra of observed and model-simulated geopotential height variations on 10-30-day time scales. Using the output from a high-resolution general circulation model, the relative contributions of condensational, sensible, and radiative heating to the atmospheric energy budget over the Tibetan Plateau are documented. The rapid changes of the upper tropospheric Tibetan anticyclone and East Asian mei-yu ("plum rain") precipitation band associated with the development of the Asian monsoon system are described. The principal anomalies in sea level pressure, surface wind, precipitation and sea surface temperature over southeastern China and the Philippine Sea region during El Ni˜no events are presented. The contributions of remote El Ni˜no-related forcing and local air-sea interaction to the occurrence of these anomalies are assessed.

  6. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25-29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28-30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region.

  7. Atmospheric and dispersion modeling in areas of highly complex terrain employing a four-dimensional data assimilation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The results of this study indicate that the current data assimilation technique can have a positive impact on the mesoscale flow fields; however, care must be taken in its application to grids of relatively fine horizontal resolution. Continuous FDDA is a useful tool in producing high-resolution mesoscale analysis fields that can be used to (1) create a better initial conditions for mesoscale atmospheric models and (2) drive transport models for dispersion studies. While RAMS is capable of predicting the qualitative flow during this evening, additional experiments need to be performed to improve the prognostic forecasts made by RAMS and refine the FDDA procedure so that the overall errors are reduced even further. Despite the fact that a great deal of computational time is necessary in executing RAMS and LPDM in the configuration employed in this study, recent advances in workstations is making applications such as this more practical. As the speed of these machines increase in the next few years, it will become feasible to employ prognostic, three-dimensional mesoscale/transport models to routinely predict atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, even to highly complex terrain. For example, the version of RAMS in this study could be run in a ``nowcasting`` model that would continually assimilate local and regional observations as soon as they become available. The atmospheric physics in the model would be used to determine the wind field where no observations are available. The three-dimensional flow fields could be used as dynamic initial conditions for a model forecast. The output from this type of modeling system will have to be compared to existing diagnostic, mass-consistent models to determine whether the wind field and dispersion forecasts are significantly improved.

  8. Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2007-05-01

    Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

  9. Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) Dispersant Data for BP Spil/Deepwater Horizon - August 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) buses are self-contained mobile laboratories that conduct instant-result monitoring of air quality at particular locations....

  10. Using Atmospheric Dispersion Theory to Inform the Design of a Short-lived Radioactive Particle Release Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishel, Jeremy P; Keillor, Martin E; Arrigo, Leah M; Baciak, James E; Detwiler, Rebecca S; Kernan, Warnick J; Kirkham, Randy R; Milbrath, Brian D; Seifert, Allen; Seifert, Carolyn E; Smart, John E

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric dispersion theory can be used to predict ground deposition of particulates downwind of a radionuclide release. This paper uses standard formulations found in Gaussian plume models to inform the design of an experimental release of short-lived radioactive particles into the atmosphere. Specifically, a source depletion algorithm is used to determine the optimum particle size and release height that maximizes the near-field deposition while minimizing both the required source activity and the fraction of activity lost to long-distance transport. The purpose of the release is to provide a realistic deposition pattern that might be observed downwind of a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. The deposition field will be used, in part, to study several techniques of gamma radiation survey and spectrometry that could be used by an On-Site Inspection team investigating such an event.

  11. Atmospheric dispersion models and pre-processing of meteorological data for real-time application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Desiato, F.

    1993-01-01

    considerations, model performance and evaluation records, computational needs, user expertise, and type of sources to be modelled. Models suitable for a given accident scenario are chosen from this hierarchy in order to provide the dose assessments via the dispersion module. A forecasting feasibility...

  12. Nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-β decay: Relativity and short-range correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, L. S.; Yao, J. M.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2017-02-01

    Background:The discovery of neutrinoless double-β (0 ν β β ) decay would demonstrate the nature of neutrinos, have profound implications for our understanding of matter-antimatter mystery, and solve the mass hierarchy problem of neutrinos. The calculations for the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν of 0 ν β β decay are crucial for the interpretation of this process. Purpose: We study the effects of relativity and nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations on the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν by assuming the mechanism of exchanging light or heavy neutrinos for the 0 ν β β decay. Methods:The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are calculated within the framework of covariant density functional theory, where the beyond-mean-field correlations are included in the nuclear wave functions by configuration mixing of both angular-momentum and particle-number projected quadrupole deformed mean-field states. Results: The nuclear matrix elements M0 ν are obtained for ten 0 ν β β -decay candidate nuclei. The impact of relativity is illustrated by adopting relativistic or nonrelativistic decay operators. The effects of short-range correlations are evaluated. Conclusions: The effects of relativity and short-range correlations play an important role in the mechanism of exchanging heavy neutrinos though the influences are marginal for light neutrinos. Combining the nuclear matrix elements M0 ν with the observed lower limits on the 0 ν β β -decay half-lives, the predicted strongest limits on the effective masses are ||light neutrinos and | |-1>3.065 ×108GeV for heavy neutrinos.

  13. Short-range correlations and cooling of ultracold fermions in the honeycomb lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baoming; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Rigol, Marcos

    2012-11-16

    We use determinantal quantum Monte Carlo simulations and numerical linked-cluster expansions to study thermodynamic properties and short-range spin correlations of fermions in the honeycomb lattice. We find that, at half filling and finite temperatures, nearest-neighbor spin correlations can be stronger in this lattice than in the square lattice, even in regimes where the ground state in the former is a semimetal or a spin liquid. The honeycomb lattice also exhibits a more pronounced anomalous region in the double occupancy that leads to stronger adiabatic cooling than in the square lattice. We discuss the implications of these findings for optical lattice experiments.

  14. Short Range Correlations in Nuclei at Large xbj through Inclusive Quasi-Elastic Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhihong [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The experiment, E08-014, in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab aims to study the short-range correlations (SRC) which are necessary to explain the nuclear strength absent in the mean field theory. The cross sections for 2H, 3He, 4He, 12C, 40Ca and 48Ca, were measured via inclusive quasi-elastic electron scattering from these nuclei in a Q2 range between 0.8 and 2.8 (GeV/c)2 for x>1. The cross section ratios of heavy nuclei to 2H were extracted to study two-nucleon SRC for 1

  15. Global and short-range entanglement properties in excited, many-body localized spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Colin; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    Many-body localization is a manifestation of the violation of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis. As one of many characteristic features, eigenstates in a many-body localized regime have been observed to obey an area law in the scaling of the entanglement entropy. Consequently, such states can be efficiently represented by matrix product states (MPS). Here, we use the SIMPS algorithm proposed by Yu, Pekker, and Clark to numerically access these excited states in spin chains with disorder, and study them from the perspective of their global and short range entanglement properties, as well as through other local observables. We compare the behavior across excited states as the strength of disorder varies.

  16. Perturbation theory for short-range weakly-attractive potentials in one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Díaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernández, Francisco M., E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [INIFTA (UNLP, CONICET), Division Química Teórica, Blvd. 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    We have obtained the perturbative expressions up to sixth order for the energy of the bound state in a one dimensional, arbitrarily weak, short range finite well, applying a method originally developed by Gat and Rosenstein Ref. [1]. The expressions up to fifth order reproduce the results already known in the literature, while the sixth order had not been calculated before. As an illustration of our formulas we have applied them to two exactly solvable problems and to a nontrivial problem.

  17. The Spectrum of Particles with Short-Ranged Interactions in a Harmonic Trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metsch B. Ch.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to control short-ranged interactions of cold gases in optical traps by Feshbachresonances makes these systems ideal candidates to study universal scaling properties and Efimov physics. The spectrum of particles in a trap, idealised by a harmonic oscillator potential, in the zero range limit with 2- and 3-particle contact interactions is studied numerically. The Hamiltonian is regularised by restricting the oscillator basis and the coupling constants are tuned such that the ground state energies of the 2- and 3-particle sector are reproduced [1],[2]. Results for 2-, 3-, and 4 particle systems are presented and compared to exact results [3],[4].

  18. Electron scattering on the short-range potential of crystal lattice defects in gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyk, Orest [Semiconductor Electronics Department, Lviv Polytechnic National University, Bandera Street 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2012-03-15

    The processes of the charge carrier scattering on the short-range potential caused by interaction with polar and nonpolar optical phonons, piezoelectric and acoustic phonons, static strain, neutral and ionized impurities in wurtzite n-GaN with impurity concentration 4 x 10{sup 16}-2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} are considered. The temperature dependences of electron mobility in the range 40-500 K are calculated. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Short-Range Correlations and Their Implications for Isospin-Dependent Modification of Nuclear Quark Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrington, John

    2016-03-25

    The past decade has provided a much clearer picture of the structure of highmomentum components in nucleons, associated with hard, short-distance interactions between pairs of nucleons. Recent Jefferson Lab data on light nuclei suggest a connection between these so-called ’short-range correlations’ and the modification of the quark structure of nucleons in the nuclear environment. In light of this discovery that the detailed nuclear structure is important in describing the nuclear quark distributions, we examine the potential impact of the isospin-dependent structure of nuclei to see at what level this might yield flavor-dependent effects in nuclear quark distributions.

  20. Short-range energy budget simulator of single photon lidar demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtazin, Mark V.; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Pershin, Sergey M.; Lednev, Vasily N.

    2017-05-01

    The compact single photon lidar demonstrator dedicated for asteroid rendezvous missions has been designed and realized in our laboratory two years ago. The instrument provides crucial data on altitude and terrain profile for altitudes exceeding 5 km with a precision of less than 10 cm fulfilling the Rayleigh criterion. One of the calibration procedure of demonstrator is the positioning of receiver and transmitter optics related to detector and laser and the aligning of transmitter and receiver optical common paths. To improve this particular indoor calibration procedure the new simulator of single photon energy budget during short range operation has been created. The comparison of simulated and experimental data will be presented and discussed.

  1. Short-range correlations studies in collisions of polarized nuclei at Nuclotron-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai H.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The status and prospects of 2-nucleon and 3-nucleon short range correlations (SRCs studies at Nuclotron-M (JINR are presented. This program is focused on the investigations of the spin part of SRCs with polarized deuteron beam from new high intensity polarized deuterons ion source which is under development at JINR. The wide experimental program on the systematic studies of the polarization effects in dp- elastic scattering, dp- nonmesonic breakup, dd → 3Hen(3Hp and d3He → p4He reactions sensitive to SRCs using both internal and extracted beam at Nuclotron-M is presented.

  2. Management challenges in a short-range low-velocity gunshot injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, K V; Kumar, Sanjeev; Aggarwal, Rajat; Dubey, Prajesh

    2012-07-01

    The use of firearms is becoming more prevalent in the society and hence the number of homicidal and suicidal cases. The severity of gunshot wounds varies depending on the weapons caliber and the distance of firing. Close-range, high-velocity gunshot wounds in the head and neck region can result in devastating esthetic and functional impairment. The complexity in facial skeletal anatomy cause multiple medical and surgical challenges to an operating surgeon, demanding elaborate soft and hard tissue reconstructions. Here we present the successful management of a patient shot by a low-velocity short-range pistol with basic life support measures, wound management, reconstruction, and rehabilitation.

  3. Nuclear-spin-independent short-range three-body physics in ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Noam; Shotan, Zav; Kokkelmans, Servaas; Khaykovich, Lev

    2010-09-03

    We investigate three-body recombination loss across a Feshbach resonance in a gas of ultracold 7Li atoms prepared in the absolute ground state and perform a comparison with previously reported results of a different nuclear-spin state [N. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 163202 (2009)]. We extend the previously reported universality in three-body recombination loss across a Feshbach resonance to the absolute ground state. We show that the positions and widths of recombination minima and Efimov resonances are identical for both states which indicates that the short-range physics is nuclear-spin independent.

  4. Measurement based scenario analysis of short-range distribution system planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Peiyuan; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Chen, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    feasible scenarios are performed based on a local distribution system at Støvring in Denmark. Simulation results provide more accurate and insightful information for the decision-maker when using the probabilistic analysis than using the worst-case analysis, so that a better planning can be achieved.......This paper focuses on short-range distribution system planning using a probabilistic approach. Empirical probabilistic distributions of load demand and distributed generations are derived from the historical measurement data and incorporated into the system planning. Simulations with various...

  5. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cassiani; Vinuesa, J.F.; Galmarini, S.; Denby, B

    2010-01-01

    The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF) transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) data devised to test specifically the...

  6. Assessment of wind characteristics and atmospheric dispersion modeling of {sup 137}Cs on the Barakah NPP area in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Kuk; Lee, Kun Jai; Yun, Jong IL [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Chul; Belorid, Miloslav [Institute of Environmental Research, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Beeley, Philip A. [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Dubai (Antigua and Barbuda)

    2014-08-15

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of wind characteristics and atmosphere dispersion modeling that are based on computational simulation and part of a preliminary study evaluating environmental radiation monitoring system (ERMS) positions within the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP). The return period of extreme wind speed was estimated using the Weibull distribution over the life time of the BNPP. In the annual meteorological modeling, the winds from the north and west accounted for more than 90 % of the wind directions. Seasonal effects were not represented. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and nighttime was observed. Six variations of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) dispersion test were simulated under severe accident condition. The {sup 137}Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the {sup 137}Cs movement and accumulation. The results of the surface roughness effect demonstrated that the deposition of {sup 137}Cs was affected by surface condition. The results of these studies offer useful information for developing environmental radiation monitoring systems (ERMSs) for the BNPP and can be used to assess the environmental effects of new nuclear power plant.

  7. CFD modelling of small particle dispersion: The influence of the turbulence kinetic energy in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlé, C.; van Beeck, J.; Rambaud, P.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    When considering the modelling of small particle dispersion in the lower part of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) using Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes simulations, the particle paths depend on the velocity profile and on the turbulence kinetic energy, from which the fluctuating velocity components are derived to predict turbulent dispersion. It is therefore important to correctly reproduce the ABL, both for the velocity profile and the turbulence kinetic energy profile. For RANS simulations with the standard k- ɛ model, Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.) proposed a set of boundary conditions which result in horizontally homogeneous profiles. The drawback of this method is that it assumes a constant profile of turbulence kinetic energy, which is not always consistent with field or wind tunnel measurements. Therefore, a method was developed which allows the modelling of a horizontally homogeneous turbulence kinetic energy profile that is varying with height. By comparing simulations performed with the proposed method to simulations performed with the boundary conditions described by Richards and Hoxey (1993. Appropriate boundary conditions for computational wind engineering models using the k-ɛ turbulence model. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics 46-47, 145-153.), the influence of the turbulence kinetic energy on the dispersion of small particles over flat terrain is quantified.

  8. Atmospheric Dispersion of Radioactivity from Nuclear Power Plant Accidents: Global Assessment and Case Study for the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Theodoros Christoudias; Yiannis Proestos; Jos Lelieveld

    2014-01-01

    We estimate the contamination risks from the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released by severe nuclear power plant accidents using the ECHAM/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) atmospheric chemistry-general circulation model at high resolution (50 km). We present an overview of global risks and also a case study of nuclear power plants that are currently under construction, planned and proposed in the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, a region pron...

  9. SPRAYTRAN USER'S GUIDE: A GIS-BASED ATMOSPHERIC SPRAY DROPLET DISPERSION MODELING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The offsite drift of pesticide from spray operations is an ongoing source of concern. The SPRAY TRANsport (SPRAYTRAN) system, documented in this report, incorporates the near-field spray application model, AGDISP, into a meso-scale atmospheric transport model. The AGDISP model ...

  10. Computational fluid dynamics study on two-phase CO2 dispersion in a neutral atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijssenaar, I.J.M.; Spruijt, M.P.N.; Hulsbosch, C.E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: A large release of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is modelled with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (Fluent v12.1). Special attention is given to the modelling of a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) with gravity. Both the presence of non-vapour CO2 and the high density of CO2 require that

  11. Multi-phase-field analysis of short-range forces between diffuse interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Spatschek, R.; Karma, A.

    2010-05-01

    We characterize both analytically and numerically short-range forces between spatially diffuse interfaces in multi-phase-field models of polycrystalline materials. During late-stage solidification, crystal-melt interfaces may attract or repel each other depending on the degree of misorientation between impinging grains, temperature, composition, and stress. To characterize this interaction, we map the multiphase-field equations for stationary interfaces to a multidimensional classical mechanical scattering problem. From the solution of this problem, we derive asymptotic forms for short-range forces between interfaces for distances larger than the interface thickness. The results show that forces are always attractive for traditional models where each phase-field represents the phase fraction of a given grain. Those predictions are validated by numerical computations of forces for all distances. Based on insights from the scattering problem, we propose a multi-phase-field formulation that can describe both attractive and repulsive forces in real systems. This model is then used to investigate the influence of solute addition and a uniaxial stress perpendicular to the interface. Solute addition leads to bistability of different interfacial equilibrium states, with the temperature range of bistability increasing with strength of partitioning. Stress in turn, is shown to be equivalent to a temperature change through a standard Clausius-Clapeyron relation. The implications of those results for understanding grain boundary premelting are discussed.

  12. Distinct Short-Range Order Is Inherent to Small Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Clusters (<2 nm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shengtong [Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz Germany; School of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Multiphase Materials Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road Shanghai 200237 P.R. China; Chevrier, Daniel M. [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 Canada; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 Canada; Gebauer, Denis [Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz Germany; Cölfen, Helmut [Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz Germany

    2016-09-09

    Amorphous intermediate phases are vital precursors in the crystallization of many biogenic minerals. While inherent short-range orders have been found in amorphous calcium carbonates (ACCs) relating to different crystalline forms, it has never been clarified experimentally whether such orders already exist in very small clusters less than 2 nm in size. Here, we studied the stability and structure of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) protected ACC clusters with a core size of ca. 1.4 nm consisting of only seven CaCO3 units. Ligand concentration and structure are shown to be key factors in stabilizing the ACC clusters. More importantly, even in such small CaCO3 entities, a proto-calcite short-range order can be identified but with a relatively high degree of disorder that arises from the very small size of the CaCO3 core. Our findings support the notion of a structural link between prenucleation clusters, amorphous intermediates, and final crystalline polymorphs, which appears central to the understanding of polymorph selection.

  13. CMOS Receiver Front-ends for Gigabit Short-Range Optical Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Aznar, Francisco; Calvo Lopez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    This book describes optical receiver solutions integrated in standard CMOS technology, attaining high-speed short-range transmission within cost-effective constraints.  These techniques support short reach applications, such as local area networks, fiber-to-the-home and multimedia systems in cars and homes. The authors show how to implement the optical front-end in the same technology as the subsequent digital circuitry, leading to integration of the entire receiver system in the same chip.  The presentation focuses on CMOS receiver design targeting gigabit transmission along a low-cost, standardized plastic optical fiber up to 50m in length.  This book includes a detailed study of CMOS optical receiver design – from building blocks to the system level. Reviews optical communications, including long-haul transmission systems and emerging applications focused on short-range; Explains necessary fundamentals, such as characteristics of a data signal, system requirements affecting receiver design and key par...

  14. Passive FOG IMU for short-range missile application: from qualification toward series production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommer, Gert F.; Mueller, R.; Opitz, S.

    1996-11-01

    An inertial measurement unit (IMU) with angular rate, angular increment and linear acceleration measurement systems for short range missile application is described. It consists of a three axis fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) cluster, three linear vibrating beam accelerometers and an electronics device for signal evaluation and data transmission via a serial transputer link. The FOG cluster is realized by means of a passive all-fiber open loop configuration. Due to the inherent optical phase shift of 3 by 3 couplers, completely passive operation near the quadrature point is achieved without the need for a non- reciprocal optical phase modulation in the fiber loop. Basing on that concept more than 50 rugged IMUs have been built for implementation into a short range air to air missile. Verification tests for flight clearance with stresses simulating air carriage and missile free flight environments have been computed. The operation under extreme vibration and shock environments without the use of vibration isolator fixings due to very tight requirements on data time delay has been demonstrated. The first telemetered missile firings have been performed successfully. The line- setup for large quantity series production is progressing. The implementation of the workstations for the integration of the IMU is finished. The production equipment for calibration and acceptance testing of IMUs in parallel allowing for a rate of more than 150 unit per month has been installed and will be operational in autumn this year.

  15. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of elevated releases from point sources in Mississippi Gulf Coast with different meteorological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu; Srinivas, Challa Venkata; Dasari, Hari Prasad; Tuluri, Francis; White, Loren D; Baham, Julius M; Young, John H; Hughes, Robert; Patrick, Chuck; Hardy, Mark G; Swanier, Shelton J

    2009-03-01

    Atmospheric dispersion calculations are made using the HYSPLIT Particle Dispersion Model for studying the transport and dispersion of air-borne releases from point elevated sources in the Mississippi Gulf coastal region. Simulations are performed separately with three meteorological data sets having different spatial and temporal resolution for a typical summer period in 1-3 June 2006 representing a weak synoptic condition. The first two data are the NCEP global and regional analyses (FNL, EDAS) while the third is a meso-scale simulation generated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with nested domains at a fine resolution of 4 km. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of the combined influences of the land-sea breeze circulation, the large scale flow field and diurnal alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. The model predicted SO(2) concentrations showed that the trajectory and the concentration distribution varied in the three cases of input data. While calculations with FNL data show an overall higher correlation, there is a significant positive bias during daytime and negative bias during night time. Calculations with EDAS fields are significantly below the observations during both daytime and night time though plume behavior follows the coastal circulation. The diurnal plume behavior and its distribution are better simulated using the mesoscale WRF meteorological fields in the coastal environment suggesting its suitability for pollution dispersion impact assessment in the local scale. Results of different cases of simulation, comparison with observations, correlation and bias in each case are presented.

  16. Simulation of Atmospheric Dispersion of Elevated Releases from Point Sources in Mississippi Gulf Coast with Different Meteorological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelton J. Swanier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric dispersion calculations are made using the HYSPLIT Particle Dispersion Model for studying the transport and dispersion of air-borne releases from point elevated sources in the Mississippi Gulf coastal region. Simulations are performed separately with three meteorological data sets having different spatial and temporal resolution for a typical summer period in 1-3 June 2006 representing a weak synoptic condition. The first two data are the NCEP global and regional analyses (FNL, EDAS while the third is a meso-scale simulation generated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with nested domains at a fine resolution of 4 km. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of the combined influences of the land-sea breeze circulation, the large scale flow field and diurnal alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. The model predicted SO2 concentrations showed that the trajectory and the concentration distribution varied in the three cases of input data. While calculations with FNL data show an overall higher correlation, there is a significant positive bias during daytime and negative bias during night time. Calculations with EDAS fields are significantly below the observations during both daytime and night time though plume behavior follows the coastal circulation. The diurnal plume behavior and its distribution are better simulated using the mesoscale WRF meteorological fields in the coastal environment suggesting its suitability for pollution dispersion impact assessment in the local scale. Results of different cases of simulation, comparison with observations, correlation and bias in each case are presented.

  17. Short-range structure in (partially) crystalline potato starch determined with attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Soest, J.J.G. van; Tournois, H.; Wit, D. de

    1995-01-01

    A fast and direct method, based on infrared spectroscopy, for quantitative determination of starch short-range structure has been developed. The IR spectrum of starch is sensitive to changes in short-range structure in the C—C and C—O stretching region at 1300-800 cm−1. The IR absorbance band at

  18. High resolution meteorological modelling of the Inntal valley atmosphere, Part II: applications to dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Schicker, I.; Seibert, P.

    2009-09-01

    Orography and local meteorology play a major role in Alpine valleys, as they are linked with valley and slope wind systems, stagnation and recirculation, temperature inversions and turbulence. Thus, they have a strong influence of transport and dilution of pollutants in the valley, affecting human health, and sound propagation. Shallow stable layers at the valley floor and low wind speed conditions, especially in autumn and winter, trap pollutants and thus cause unfavourable dispersion conditions , possibly leading to exceedances of air pollution limits. Moreover, under certain synoptic conditions such as persistent high-pressure systems inversion conditions prevail for days. Emissions may accumulate in the valley from day to day and thus critical levels of pollutants may be reached. With the current computer capabilities, numerical meteorological models and particle dispersion models are powerful tools to investigate such situations and their impact on emission-side measures. Output from the limited area meteorological model MM5 for selected synoptic periods of special interest regarding air quality conditions (see contribution by Schicker et al., this session) will be used as input to the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPARTv6.2. Currently two specific versions of FLEXPART exist to work in the meso and local scale, WRF-FLEXPARTv6.2 and MM5v3-7.FLEXPARTv6.2, which use WRF and MM5 fields as meteorological input, respectively. Extensive tests will be performed with the MM5-driven version and additional preliminary ones with the WRF version. Dispersion calculations for CO and NOx will be performed in a receptor-oriented approach for three stations and with different meteorological input resolutions. The target stations will be Innsbruck, located at the bottom of the Inn valley, and Nordkette, located on the northern slopes of the valley. Source-receptor sensitivities (SRS) will be obtained to see the major sources which contribute to the measurements for

  19. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cassiani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data devised to test specifically the effect of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity on boundary layer concentration fluctuations. The sub-grid scale emission variability is assimilated in the model as a PDF of the emissions. The stochastic fields method shows excellent agreement with the LES data without adjustment of the constants used in the mesoscale model. The stochastic fields method is a stochastic solution of the transport equations for the concentration PDF of dispersing scalars, therefore it possesses the ability to handle chemistry of any complexity without the need to introduce additional closures for the high order statistics of chemical species. This study shows for the first time the feasibility of applying this method to mesoscale chemical transport models.

  20. Improving the low temperature dyeability of polyethylene terephthalate fabric with dispersive dyes by atmospheric pressure plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elabid, Amel E.A., E-mail: amelkanzi2014@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang, Jie; Shi, Jianjun; Guo, Ying; Ding, Ke [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang, Jing, E-mail: jingzh@dhu.cdu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atmospheric pressure glow-like plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge has been successfully applied to the low temperature dyeing (95 °C) of PET fabric. • Simultaneously the dye uptake was increased as twice as much and the color strength rate was increased by about 20% for less than 3 min plasma treated PET. • Dyeing mechanism research showed the significance of surface roughing and functional group introduction by this kind of discharge. • Results highlight a novel environmentally friendly dyeing process for one of the largest commodity in polymer fabric. - Abstract: Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber and textile is one of the largest synthetic polymer commodity in the world. The great energy consumption and pollution caused by the high temperature and pressure dyeing of PET fibers and fabrics with disperse dyes has been caused concern these years. In this study, an atmospheric pressure plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge operated at 20 kHz has been used to improve the low temperature dyeability of PET fabric at 95 °C with three cation disperse dyes: Red 73, Blue 183 and Yellow 211. The dyes uptake percentage of the treated PET fabrics was observed to increase as twice as much of untreated fabric. The color strength rate was increased more than 20%. The reducing of the water contact angle and the raising of the capillary height of treated PET fabric strip indicate its hydrophilicity improvement. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results display nano to micro size of etching pits appeared uniformly on the fiber surface of the treated PET. Simultaneously, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates an increase of the oxygen content in the surface caused by the introduction of polar groups such as C=O and COOH. The rough surface with improved polar oxygen groups showed hydrophilicity and affinity to C.I. dispersive dyes and is believed to be caused by the strong and very fine

  1. Integration of an atmospheric dispersion model with a dynamic multimedia fate model: development and illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Melissa; Ghirardello, Davide; Semplice, Matteo; Raspa, Giuseppe; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Growing attention is devoted to understand the influence of the short-term variations in air concentrations on the environmental fate of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These variations are ascribable to factors such as temperature-mediated air-surface exchange and variability of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and structure. But when investigating the fate of SVOCs at a local scale, further variability can derive from specific point source contributions. In this context, a new modeling approach (AirPlus) which integrates a previously developed model (AirFug) with an air dispersion model (AERMOD) is presented. The integrated model is illustrated for two PAHs in a Northern Italy scenario. Results show how chemical contributions deriving from background advective inflows, local emissions and a point source interact in an hourly-varying meteorological scenario to determine air concentration rapid changes and the consequent response of the soil compartment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Entanglement entropy of fractional quantum Hall systems with short range disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B. A.; Levine, G. C.

    2015-02-01

    The critical value of the mobility for which the ν = 5/2 quantum Hall effect is destroyed by short range disorder is determined from an earlier calculation of the entanglement entropy. The value μ = 2.0 ×106cm2/Vs agrees well with experiment. This agreement is particularly significant in that there are no adjustable parameters. Entanglement entropy versus disorder strength for ν = 1/2, ν = 9/2 and ν = 7/3 is calculated. For ν = 1/2 there is no evidence for a transition for the disorder strengths considered; for ν = 9/2 there appears to be a stripe-liquid transition. For ν = 7/3 there again appears to be a transition at similar value of the disorder strength as the ν = 5/2 transition but there are stronger finite size effects.

  3. Multi-channel, passive, short-range anti-aircraft defence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapiński, Daniel; Krzysztofik, Izabela; Koruba, Zbigniew

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a novel method for tracking several air targets simultaneously. The developed concept concerns a multi-channel, passive, short-range anti-aircraft defence system based on the programmed selection of air targets and an algorithm of simultaneous synchronisation of several modified optical scanning seekers. The above system is supposed to facilitate simultaneous firing of several self-guided infrared rocket missiles at many different air targets. From the available information, it appears that, currently, there are no passive self-guided seekers that fulfil such tasks. This paper contains theoretical discussions and simulations of simultaneous detection and tracking of many air targets by mutually integrated seekers of several rocket missiles. The results of computer simulation research have been presented in a graphical form.

  4. Local Structure and Short-Range Order in a NiCoCr Solid Solution Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. X.; Zhao, Shijun; Jin, Ke; Xue, H.; Velisa, G.; Bei, H.; Huang, R.; Ko, J. Y. P.; Pagan, D. C.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2017-05-01

    Multielement solid solution alloys are intrinsically disordered on the atomic scale, and many of their advanced properties originate from the local structural characteristics. The local structure of a NiCoCr solid solution alloy is measured with x-ray or neutron total scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The atomic pair distribution function analysis does not exhibit an observable structural distortion. However, an EXAFS analysis suggests that the Cr atoms are favorably bonded with Ni and Co in the solid solution alloys. This short-range order (SRO) may make an important contribution to the low values of the electrical and thermal conductivities of the Cr-alloyed solid solutions. In addition, an EXAFS analysis of Ni ion irradiated samples reveals that the degree of SRO in NiCoCr alloys is enhanced after irradiation.

  5. Enhanced UWB Radio Channel Model for Short-Range Communication Scenarios Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a SISO UWB radio channel model for short-range radio link scenarios between a fixed device and a dynamic user hand-held device. The channel model is derived based on novel experimental UWB radio propagation investigations carried out in typical indoor PAN scenarios...... including realistic device and user terminal antenna configurations. The radio channel measurements have been performed in the lower UWB frequency band of 3GHz to 5GHz with a 2x4 MIMO antenna configuration. Several environments, user scenarios and two types of user terminals have been used. The developed...... channel model represents an enhancement of the existing IEEE 802.15.3a/4a PAN channel model, where antenna and user-proximity effects are not included. Our investigations showed that significant variations of the received wideband power and time-delay signal clustering are possible due the human body...

  6. Improving Short-Range Ensemble Kalman Storm Surge Forecasting Using Robust Adaptive Inflation

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, Muhammad

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a robust ensemble filtering methodology for storm surge forecasting based on the singular evolutive interpolated Kalman (SEIK) filter, which has been implemented in the framework of the H∞ filter. By design, an H∞ filter is more robust than the common Kalman filter in the sense that the estimation error in the H∞ filter has, in general, a finite growth rate with respect to the uncertainties in assimilation. The computational hydrodynamical model used in this study is the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model. The authors assimilate data obtained from Hurricanes Katrina and Ike as test cases. The results clearly show that the H∞-based SEIK filter provides more accurate short-range forecasts of storm surge compared to recently reported data assimilation results resulting from the standard SEIK filter.

  7. Utilizing Context in Location-Aware Short-Range Wireless Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa A. Korhonen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how a short-range wireless communication service implemented for modern mobile communication devices can provide additional value for both the consumer and the service/product provider. When used as an information search tool, such systems allow services and products being promoted at the location they are available. For the customer, it may provide a “digitally augmented vision”, an enhanced view to the current environment. With data filtering and search rules, this may provide a self-manageable context, where the user's own personal environment and preferences to the features available in the current surroundings cooperate with a direct connection to the web-based social media. A preliminary design for such service is provided. The conclusion is that the method can generate additional revenue to the company and please the customers' buying process. In addition to the marketing, the principles described here are also applicable to other forms of human interaction.

  8. Unitarity corrections to short-range order long-range rapidity correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Capella, A

    1978-01-01

    Although the effective hadronic forces have short range in rapidity space, one nevertheless expects long-range dynamical correlations induced by unitarity constraints. This paper contains a thorough discussion of long-range rapidity correlations in high-multiplicity events. In particular, the authors analyze in detail the forward- backward multiplicity correlations, measured recently in the whole CERN ISR energy range. They find from these data that the normalized variance of the number n of exchanged cut Pomerons, ((n/(n)-1)/sup 2/) , is most probably in the range 0.32 to 0.36. They show that such a number is obtained from Reggeon theory in the eikonal approximation. The authors also predict a very specific violation of local compensation of charge in multiparticle events: The violation should appear in the fourth-order zone correlation function and is absent in the second-order correlation function, the only one measured until now. (48 refs).

  9. Attitude algorithm and initial alignment method for SINS applied in short-range aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong-Hui; He, Zhao-Cheng; You, Feng; Chen, Bo

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an attitude solution algorithm based on the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System and quaternion method. We completed the numerical calculation and engineering practice by adopting fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm in the digital signal processor. The state space mathematical model of initial alignment in static base was established, and the initial alignment method based on Kalman filter was proposed. Based on the hardware in the loop simulation platform, the short-range flight simulation test and the actual flight test were carried out. The results show that the error of pitch, yaw and roll angle is fast convergent, and the fitting rate between flight simulation and flight test is more than 85%.

  10. LGBT Students’ Short Range Narratives and Gender Performance in the EFL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Rondón Cardenas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available By means of the analysis of six short range narratives, utilizing as a methodology (Feminist Post –Structuralist Discourse Analysis FPDA,this paper unveils some significant moments which evidence the way LGBT EFL students draw on different discourses to adapt, negotiate,resist, emancipate, and reproduce heteronormativity. EFL students Methodological FrameworkConstantly shift positions and perform their gender assuming simultaneously powerful and powerless stances in the EFL classroom.The study categorizes the emancipatory discourse as a way to resist, the discourse of vulnerability as a way to reproduce and cope withmarginalization, and the homophobic discourse as a way to position LGBT individuals as abnormal. Finally, the article will reflect on themoments LGBT student mitigate their oral skills and constrain their participation in class, due to the fact that they are frequently evaluatingtheir comments to avoid accidental disclosure of their sexual identity.

  11. 79 GHz UWB automotive short range radar – Spectrum allocation and technology trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-L. Bloecher

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Automotive UWB (Ultra-Wideband short range radar (SSR is on the market as a key technology for novel comfort and safety systems. SiGe based 79 GHz UWB SRR will be a definite candidate for the long term substitution of the 24 GHz UWB SRR. This paper will give an overview of the finished BMBF joint project KOKON and the recently started successing project RoCC, which concentrate on the development of this technology and sensor demonstrators. In both projects, the responsibilities of Daimler AG deal with application based sensor specification, test and evaluation of realized sensor demonstrators. Recent UWB SRR frequency regulation approaches and activitites will be introduced. Furthermore, some first results of Daimler activities within RoCC will be presented, dealing with the packaging and operation of these sensors within the complex car environment.

  12. Image seeker simulation for short-range surface-to-surface missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Hun; Kang, Ho-Gyun

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents an image seeker simulation including image processing, servo control, target model, and missile trajectory. We propose a software architecture for a seeker embedded computer. It makes core processing algorithms including image processing reusable at the source level through multiple platforms. The embedded software simulator implemented in C/C++, the servo control simulator implemented in Matlab, and the integrated simulator combined the both simulators based on Windows Component Object Module (COM) technology is presented. The integrated simulation enables developers to practice an interactive study between image processing and servo control about missions including lock-on and target tracking. The implemented simulator can be operated in low cost computer systems. This can be used to algorithm development and analysis at the design, implementation, and evaluation. Simulation examples for a short range ground-to-ground missile seeker are presented.

  13. Observation of short range three-particle correlations in e+e- annihilations at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Barão, F; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brunet, J M; Brückman, P; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Bärring, O; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Almagne, B; Da Silva, W; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dijkstra, H; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Dönszelmann, M; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Föth, H; Fürstenau, H; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Guy, J; Guz, Yu; Górski, M; Günther, M; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katargin, A; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Królikowski, J; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Kuznetsov, O; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; La Vaissière, C de; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; López, J M; López-Aguera, M A; López-Fernandez, A; Lörstad, B; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martí i García, S; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Maréchal, B; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myagkov, A; Myatt, Gerald; Mönig, K; Møller, R; Müller, H; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Némécek, S; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rídky, J; Rückstuhl, W; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Stäck, H; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Sánchez, J; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van Eldik, J; Van der Velde, C; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; de Boer, Wim; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Åsman, B; Österberg, K; Überschär, B; Überschär, S

    1995-01-01

    \\def\\tpc{three-particle correlation} \\def\\twopc{two-particle correlation} Measurements are presented of short range three-particle correlations in e^+ e^- annihilations at LEP using data collected by the DELPHI detector. %The jet structure is studied using three-particle correlation functions. At small values of the four-momentum difference, strong three-particle correlations are observed for like-sign (+++ and ---) and for unlike-sign (++- and +--) pion combinations which are not a consequence of two-particle correlations. A possible explanation of the observed effects in like-sign combinations is the existence of higher order Bose-Einstein interference, which significantly changes the particle distributions in jets.

  14. Searching for Short Range Correlations Using (e,e'NN) Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Electron induced two nucleon knockout reactions (e,e'pp) and (e,e'np) were performed for 3He, 4He, and 12C nuclei with incident energies of 2.261 GeV and 4.461 GeV using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Events with missing momenta lower than the Fermi level and missing energies smaller than the pion threshold were studied. The residual system was assumed to be a spectator and the process was considered as a quasi-free knockout of an NN pair. The data showed that the initial momentum extends up to 800 MeV/c with considerable strength. The cross sections for 3He(e,e'pp)n were compared to the calculations of J.M. Laget. It was found that the final state interactions (FSI) and the meson exchange currents (MEC) dominate the cross sections and the short range properties of the NN pair were substantially undermined. However, the node of the S state wave function of the pp pair at around 400 MeV/c initial momentum starts to be recognizable in the 4.461 GeV data. The data and the theory suggest that with higher momentum transfers, especially in the region xBj > 1, the competing processes such as FSI and MEC will be less important and the detailed study of the short-range properties of nucleons inside nuclei will be more desirable.

  15. Very-short range forecasting system for 2018 Pyeonchang Winter Olympic and Paralympic games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ji-Eun; Park, Kyungjeen; Kim, Minyou; Kim, Changhwan; Joo, Sangwon

    2016-04-01

    The 23rd Olympic Winter and the 13th Paralympic Winter Games will be held in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea respectively from 9 to 25 February 2018 and from 9 to 18 February 2018. The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and the National Institute for Meteorological Science (NIMS) have the responsibility to provide weather information for the management of the Games and the safety of the public. NIMS will carry out a Forecast Demonstration Project (FDP) and a Research and Development Project (RDP) which will be called ICE-POP 2018. These projects will focus on intensive observation campaigns to understand severe winter weathers over the Pyeongchang region, and the research results from the RDP will be used to improve the accuracy of nowcasting and very short-range forecast systems during the Games. To support these projects, NIMS developed Very-short range Data Assimilation and Prediction System (VDAPS), which is run in real time with 1 hour cycling interval and up to 12 hour forecasts. The domain is covering Korean Peninsular and surrounding seas with 1.5km horizontal resolution. AWS, windprofiler, buoy, sonde, aircraft, scatwinds, and radar radial winds are assimilated by 3DVAR on 3km resolution inner domain. The rain rate is converted into latent heat and initialized via nudging. The visibility data are also assimilated with the addition of aerosol control variable. The experiments results show the improvement in rainfall over south sea of Korean peninsula. In order to reduce excessive rainfalls during first 2 hours due to the reduced cycling interval, the data assimilation algorithm is optimized.

  16. Spontaneous dimerization, critical lines, and short-range correlations in a frustrated spin-1 chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepiga, Natalia; Affleck, Ian; Mila, Frédéric

    2016-11-01

    We report on a detailed investigation of the spin-1 J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model, a frustrated model with nearest-neighbor coupling J1, next-nearest neighbor coupling J2, and a three-site interaction J3[(Si -1.Si) (Si.Si +1) +H .c . ] previously studied in [Phys. Rev. B 93, 241108(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.241108]. Using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and exact diagonalizations, we show that the phase boundaries between the Haldane phase, the next-nearest neighbor Haldane phase, and the dimerized phase can be very accurately determined by combining the information deduced from the dimerization, the ground-state energy, the entanglement spectrum and the Berry phase. By a careful investigation of the finite-size spectrum, we also show that the transition between the next-nearest neighbor Haldane phase and the dimerized phase is in the Ising universality class all along the critical line. Furthermore, we justify the conformal embedding of the SU (2) 2 Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theory in terms of a boson and an Ising field, and we explicitly derive a number of consequences of this embedding for the spectrum along the SU (2) 2 transition line between the Haldane phase and the dimerized phase. We also show that the solitons along the first-order transition line between the Haldane phase and the dimerized phase carry a spin-1/2, while the domain walls between different dimerization domains inside the dimerized phase carry a spin 1. Finally, we show that short-range correlations change character in the Haldane and dimerized phases through disorder and Lifshitz lines, as well as through the development of short-range dimer correlations in the Haldane phase, leading to a remarkably rich phase diagram.

  17. Atmospheric discharge and dispersion of radionuclides during the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Part I: Source term estimation and local-scale atmospheric dispersion in early phase of the accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katata, Genki; Ota, Masakazu; Terada, Hiroaki; Chino, Masamichi; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2012-07-01

    The atmospheric release of (131)I and (137)Cs in the early phase of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) accident from March 12 to 14, 2011 was estimated by combining environmental data with atmospheric dispersion simulations under the assumption of a unit release rate (1 Bq h(-1)). For the simulation, WSPEEDI-II computer-based nuclear emergency response system was used. Major releases of (131)I (>10(15) Bq h(-1)) were estimated when air dose rates increased in FNPP1 during the afternoon on March 12 after the hydrogen explosion of Unit 1 and late at night on March 14. The high-concentration plumes discharged during these periods flowed to the northwest and south-southwest directions of FNPP1, respectively. These plumes caused a large amount of dry deposition on the ground surface along their routes. Overall, the spatial pattern of (137)Cs and the increases in the air dose rates observed at the monitoring posts around FNPP1 were reproduced by WSPEEDI-II using estimated release rates. The simulation indicated that air dose rates significantly increased in the south-southwest region of FNPP1 by dry deposition of the high-concentration plume discharged from the night of March 14 to the morning of March 15. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dutch distribution zones of stable iodine tablets based on atmospheric dispersion modelling of accidental releases from nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok-Palma, Yvo; Leenders, Marianne; Meulenbelt, Jan

    2010-08-01

    Rapid administration of stable iodine is essential for the saturation and subsequent protection of the thyroid gland against the potential harm caused by radioiodines. This paper proposes the Dutch risk analysis that uses an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate the size of the zones around nuclear power plants where radiological thyroid doses for children might be sufficiently high to warrant iodine administration. Dose calculations for possible releases from the nuclear power plants of Borssele (The Netherlands), Doel (Belgium) and Emsland (Germany) are based on two scenarios in combination with a 1-y set of authentic, high-resolution meteorological data. The dimensions of the circular zones were defined for each nuclear power plant. In these zones, with a radius up to 50 km, distribution of stable iodine tablets is advised.

  19. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of 137Cs generated from Nuclear Spent Fuel under Hypothetic Accidental Condition in the BNPP Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkuk; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yook, Daesik; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Byung Soo

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the results of atmosphere dispersion modeling using CALPUFF code that are based on computational simulation to evaluate the environmental characteristics of the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP) in west area of UAE. According to meteorological data analysis (2012~2013), the winds from the north(7.68%) and west(9.05%) including NNW(41.63%), NW(28.55%), and WNW(6.31%) winds accounted for more than 90% of the wind directions. East(0.2%) and south(0.6%) direction wind, including ESE(0.31%), SE(0.38%), and SSE(0.38%) were rarely distributed during the simulation period. Seasonal effects were not showed. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and night-time was observed. Approximately 87% of the wind speed was distributed below 5.4m/s (17%, 47% and 23% between the speeds of 0.5-1.8m/s 1.8-3.3m/s and 3.3-5.4m/s, respectively) during the annual period. Seasonal wind speed distribution results presented very similar pattern of annual distribution. Wind speed distribution of day and night, on the other hand, had a discrepancy with annual modeling results than seasonal distribution in some sections. The results for high wind speed (more than 10.8m/s) showed that this wind blew from the west. This high wind speed is known locally as the 'Shamal', which occurs rarely, lasting one or two days with the strongest winds experienced in association with gust fronts and thunderstorms. Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs) dispersion test were simulated under hypothetic severe accidental condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. From the test cases, east-south area of the BNPP site was mainly influenced by 137Cs dispersion. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. Surface roughness tests were performed for the analysis of topographic conditions. According to the surface condition, there are various surface roughness length. Four types

  20. VALDRIFT 1.0: A valley atmospheric dispersion model with deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K.J.; Bian, X.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1995-05-01

    VALDRIFT version 1.0 is an atmospheric transport and diffusion model for use in well-defined mountain valleys. It is designed to determine the extent of ddft from aedal pesticide spraying activities, but can also be applied to estimate the transport and diffusion of various air pollutants in valleys. The model is phenomenological -- that is, the dominant meteorological processes goveming the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in the model, albeit in a highly parameterized fashion. The key meteorological processes treated are: (1) nonsteady and nonhomogeneous along-valley winds and turbulent diffusivities, (2) convective boundary layer growth, (3) inversion descent, (4) noctumal temperature inversion breakup, and (5) subsidence. The model is applicable under relatively cloud-free, undisturbed synoptic conditions and is configured to operate through one diumal cycle for a single valley. The inputs required are the valley topographical characteristics, pesticide release rate as a function of time and space, along-valley wind speed as a function of time and space, temperature inversion characteristics at sunrise, and sensible heat flux as a function of time following sunrise. Default values are provided for certain inputs in the absence of detailed observations. The outputs are three-dimensional air concentration and ground-level deposition fields as a function of time.

  1. Xenon-133 and caesium-137 releases into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: determination of the source term, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, A.; Seibert, P.; Wotawa, G.; Arnold, D.; Burkhart, J. F.; Eckhardt, S.; Tapia, C.; Vargas, A.; Yasunari, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation will show the results of a paper currently under review in ACPD and some additional new results, including more data and with an independent box modeling approach to support some of the findings of the ACPD paper. On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FD-NPP) developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 (137Cs), which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined the first guess with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for 137Cs, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding 133Xe, we find a total release of 16.7 (uncertainty range 13.4-20.0) EBq, which is the largest radioactive noble gas release in history not associated with nuclear bomb testing. There is strong evidence that the first strong 133Xe release started early, before active venting was performed. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1-3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. For 137Cs, the inversion results give a total emission of 35.8 (23.3-50.1) PBq, or about 42% of the estimated Chernobyl emission. Our results indicate that 137Cs emissions peaked on 14-15 March but were generally high from 12 until 19 March, when they

  2. Dispersion of atmospheric fine particulate matters in simulated lung fluid and their effects on model cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiuhua; Wang, Lixin; Cao, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Xuehua; Yang, Fan; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zhenhua; Hu, Jingtian; Ding, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected to investigate its dispersion in simulated lung fluid (SLF) and its interaction with model cell membranes. Organic acids, NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) were detected in PM2.5 soluble fraction, and heavy metals were detected from the total mass. The insoluble fraction contained kaolinite, CaCO3, aliphatic carbons, aromatic rings, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups reflected by the infrared spectra. Proteins dispersed PM2.5 in SLF, resulted in smaller hydrodynamic diameter (dH) and slower sedimentation rate. Conversely, phospholipids increased dH value and accelerated sedimentation rate. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were used as model cell membranes. PM2.5 adhered on and disrupted the membrane containing positively-charged lipids but not the membrane containing neutrally- and negatively-charged lipids, which was monitored by microscopy and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The cationic sites on membrane were necessary for PM2.5 adhesion, but membrane should be disrupted by the combined action of electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds between PM2.5 oxygen containing groups and the lipid phosphate groups. Our results specified the roles of proteins and phospholipids in PM2.5 dispersion and transport, highly suggested that the health hazard of PM2.5 was related to the biomolecules in the lung fluid and the particle surface groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A GIS-based atmospheric dispersion model for pollutants emitted by complex source areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teggi, Sergio; Costanzini, Sofia; Ghermandi, Grazia; Malagoli, Carlotta; Vinceti, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Gaussian dispersion models are widely used to simulate the concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants emitted by source areas. Very often, the calculation time limits the number of sources and receptors and the geometry of the sources must be simple and without holes. This paper presents CAREA, a new GIS-based Gaussian model for complex source areas. CAREA was coded in the Python language, and is largely based on a simplified formulation of the very popular and recognized AERMOD model. The model allows users to define in a GIS environment thousands of gridded or scattered receptors and thousands of complex sources with hundreds of vertices and holes. CAREA computes ground level, or near ground level, concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of pollutants. The input/output and the runs of the model can be completely managed in GIS environment (e.g. inside a GIS project). The paper presents the CAREA formulation and its applications to very complex test cases. The tests shows that the processing time are satisfactory and that the definition of sources and receptors and the output retrieval are quite easy in a GIS environment. CAREA and AERMOD are compared using simple and reproducible test cases. The comparison shows that CAREA satisfactorily reproduces AERMOD simulations and is considerably faster than AERMOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  5. Interferometric acquisition and fire control radar for short-range missile defense with optimized radar distribution (SWORD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-07-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept "SWORD" (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of the past investments. The Deptuy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology [DAS(R&T)] has a three-year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary Bench-Top Experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  6. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing of a Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC) System That Conforms to the Japanese Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) systems, designed to enhance the efficiency of highway travel, have been proposed for operation in the 5850- to 5925-MHz band. The successful operation of these communication systems depends upon their compa...

  7. Meta-heuristic CRPS minimization for the calibration of short-range probabilistic forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyedeh Atefeh; Rahmani, Morteza; Azadi, Majid

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the probabilistic short-range temperature forecasts over synoptic meteorological stations across Iran using non-homogeneous Gaussian regression (NGR). NGR creates a Gaussian forecast probability density function (PDF) from the ensemble output. The mean of the normal predictive PDF is a bias-corrected weighted average of the ensemble members and its variance is a linear function of the raw ensemble variance. The coefficients for the mean and variance are estimated by minimizing the continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) during a training period. CRPS is a scoring rule for distributional forecasts. In the paper of Gneiting et al. (Mon Weather Rev 133:1098-1118, 2005), Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method is used to minimize the CRPS. Since BFGS is a conventional optimization method with its own limitations, we suggest using the particle swarm optimization (PSO), a robust meta-heuristic method, to minimize the CRPS. The ensemble prediction system used in this study consists of nine different configurations of the weather research and forecasting model for 48-h forecasts of temperature during autumn and winter 2011 and 2012. The probabilistic forecasts were evaluated using several common verification scores including Brier score, attribute diagram and rank histogram. Results show that both BFGS and PSO find the optimal solution and show the same evaluation scores, but PSO can do this with a feasible random first guess and much less computational complexity.

  8. Pel promotes symmetric, short-ranged surface attachment in P. aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, B. J.; Thatcher, Travis; Hashmi, Sara; L'Her, Guillaume; Touhami, Ahmed; Provenzano, Daniele; Gordon, Vernita

    2013-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are surface mounted, multicellular communities of interacting bacteria that are often associated with chronic infections that resist antibiotics and damage host tissue. Bacteria in a biofilm are bound in a matrix of polymeric materials that adhere the bacteria to the surface, give the system spatial structure, and cluster the bacteria near each other. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is widely studied as a model biofilm-forming organism. The polymeric matrix of P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 biofilms is dominated by two bacteria-produced extracellular polymers, Pel and Psl. We use both optical and atomic force microscopy to examine the roles of these polymers in very early biofilm development, in the hours after initial surface attachment. In agreement with other researchers, we find that Psl mediates strong attachment to a glass surface. Unexpectedly, we find that Pel promotes symmetric attachment, in the form of the rod-shaped bacteria lying flat on the surface, independently of permanent attachment to the surface. Further, the presence of Pel makes adhesion forces more short-ranged than they are with Psl alone. We suggest that these effects may result through synergistic interactions of Pel and Psl in the polymeric matrix.

  9. Gelation of anisotropic silica colloids with thermoreversible short-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ryan; Wagner, Norman

    Colloidal suspensions containing anisotropic particles are widely used in particle-based technologies including pharmaceuticals, consumer products, and coatings. The rheological properties of colloidal suspensions are known to be affected by particle shape; however, the combined influence of particle shape and attraction strength is not quantitatively understood for dynamic arrest transitions such as gelation. A model system of anisotropic silica colloids with thermoreversible, short-range attractions was developed to quantify the effect of particle shape and attractions on the gelation behavior. This tunable model system aims to map a fundamental state diagram for anisotropic particle suspensions as a function of particle shape, volume fraction, and interaction strength. Macroscopic rheological properties of thermoreversible gels were explored to determine the influence of particle shape on the gel transition. Neutron and x-ray scattering methods further probed the underlying fluid and gel microstructure at various temperatures, volume fractions, and aspect ratios. Linking these fundamental macroscopic and microscopic measurements will provide practical insight into particle technologies and manufacturing processes containing anisotropic colloidal suspensions.

  10. Predicting Short-Range Order in Multicomponent Alloys from an Improved Mean-Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Johnson, Duane

    2007-03-01

    In alloys the atomic short-range order (SRO) indicates the nascent ordering to which the disordered alloy is tending at high temperatures. Direct first-principles prediction based upon KKR-CPA and mean-field thermodynamics have been successful in predicting system-specific SRO [1], if, at a minimum, corrections are included to satisfy the diffuse scattering sum rule in k-space. However, such models do not account for k-dependence of the corrections. Here, we present an analytic generalization to multicomponent alloys that includes ``cyclic diagrams'' [2,3] for composition, temperature, and k-dependent corrections to SRO. We first explore the improvement to SRO in model fcc ternary alloys via the generalized Ising model. We find that there is much better agreement to Monte Carlo simulations than with standard Bragg-Williams with(out) Onsager corrections. Then we implement this within the KKR-CPA linear-response theory of SRO.Work was supported by DOE (Award DEFG02-03ER46026 and NSF (DMR-0325939). [1] J.B. Staunton, D.D. Johnson, and F.J. Pinski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1259 (1990); Phys. Rev. B 50, 1450 (1994); ibid, 57, 15177 (1998). [2] R. Brout, Phys. Rev. 115, 824-835 (1959). [3] R.V. Chepulski, et al, Phys. Rev. 65, 064201-7 (2002).

  11. Recent studies of short-range order in alloys: The Cowley theory revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhard, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Moss, S.C. [Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-02-08

    We present comparisons of various statistical theories for effective pair interactions (EPI) in alloys. We then evaluate these EPI`s using the Cowley theory, the Krivoglaz-Clapp-Moss (KCM) approximation, the {gamma}-expansion method (GEM) of Tokar, Masanskii and coworkers, and the exact inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method, introduced by Gerold and Kern. Via a series of model calculations on a hypothetical bcc alloy with a single nearest-neighbor interaction we show that the Cowley theory is successful in evaluating the EPI`s in more dilute alloys but tends to overestimate the magnitude of the nearest neighbor energy at higher concentrations, whereas the KCM expression becomes increasingly inaccurate at lower concentrations. In general, however, the approximate mean field theories are most accurate at higher concentrations and higher temperatures. Recent studies of short-range order in single crystals are discussed in which these EPI`s have been evaluated using the IMC, KCM, GEM and Cowley theories. Examples include the bcc alloy Fe{sub 0.53}Cr{sub 0.47} and the fcc alloys Cu{sub 3} Au, CU{sub 0.69}Zn{sub 0.31} and Ni{sub 0.89}BgCr{sub 0.11}. In all cases the approximate expressions do quite well, especially the GEM.

  12. Evaluation of NCEP TIGGE short-range forecast for Indian summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirkey, Snehlata; Mukhopadhyay, P.

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on the short-range prediction of Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillations (MISOs) using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction(NCEP) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) data from The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Interactive Grand Global Ensemble (TIGGE) archive. The Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR), which plays an important role in the socio-economic growth of the country, is highly variable and is mostly governed by the MISOs. In addition to this, deterministic forecasts of ISMR are not very reliable. Hence, a probabilistic approach at daily scale is required. Keeping this in mind, the present analysis is done by using daily forecast data for up to 7-day lead time and compared with observations. The analysis shows that the ensemble forecast well captures the variability as compared to observations even up to 7 days. The spatial characteristics and the northward propagation of MISO are observed thoroughly in the EPS. The evolution of dynamical and thermodynamical parameters such as specific humidity, moist static energy, moisture divergence, and vorticity is also captured well but show deviation from the observation from 96 h lead time onwards. The tropospheric temperature forecast captures the observed gradient but with certain bias in magnitude whereas the wind shear is simulated quite well both in pattern and magnitude. These analyses bring out the biases in TIGGE EPS forecast and also point out the possible moist processes which needs to be improved.

  13. Interplay between short-range correlated disorder and Coulomb interaction in nodal-line semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Nandkishore, Rahul M.

    2017-09-01

    In nodal-line semimetals, Coulomb interactions and short-range correlated disorder are both marginal perturbations to the clean noninteracting Hamiltonian. We analyze their interplay using a weak-coupling renormalization group approach. In the clean case, the Coulomb interaction has been found to be marginally irrelevant, leading to Fermi liquid behavior. We extend the analysis to incorporate the effects of disorder. The nodal line structure gives rise to kinematical constraints similar to that for a two-dimensional Fermi surface, which plays a crucial role in the one-loop renormalization of the disorder couplings. For a twofold degenerate nodal loop (Weyl loop), we show that disorder flows to strong coupling along a unique fixed trajectory in the space of symmetry inequivalent disorder couplings. Along this fixed trajectory, all symmetry inequivalent disorder strengths become equal. For a fourfold degenerate nodal loop (Dirac loop), disorder also flows to strong coupling, however, the strengths of symmetry inequivalent disorder couplings remain different. We show that feedback from disorder reverses the sign of the beta function for the Coulomb interaction, causing the Coulomb interaction to flow to strong coupling as well. However, the Coulomb interaction flows to strong coupling asymptotically more slowly than disorder. Extrapolating our results to strong coupling, we conjecture that at low energies nodal line semimetals should be described by a noninteracting nonlinear sigma model. We discuss the relation of our results with possible many-body localization at zero temperatures in such materials.

  14. Short-range order structure and effective pair-interaction energy in Ni-Si alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takumi [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Hitachi, Ltd., Shinmachi Ome-shi, Tokyo 198-8512 (Japan); Osaka, Keiichi [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Industrial Application Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: k-osaka@spring8.or.jp; Takama, Toshihiko [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Chen, Haydn [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-09-15

    The diffuse X-ray scattering from single crystals of Ni - 11.3 at.% Si and 12.3 at.% Si, both aged at 1293 K followed by a water quench, was measured at room temperature. The measured diffuse intensities were analyzed to determine the Warren-Cowley atomic short-range order (SRO) parameters {alpha}{sub lmn}. The 17 values of {alpha}{sub lmn} obtained were fitted in a 5 x 10{sup 5} atom model crystal to simulate the SRO. It was found that the C16 and the C17 configurations are significantly enhanced in comparison to a random crystal. The pair-interaction energies V{sub lmn} were obtained using an inverse Monte Carlo method from the {alpha}{sub lmn} parameters. Assuming that V{sub lmn} are independent of temperature, the {alpha}{sub lmn} were calculated as a function of temperature on the basis of the Monte Carlo simulation. The curves of {alpha}{sub lmn} for 11.3 at.% Si showed a knee point at 1262 (19) K and for 12.3 at.% Si at 1325 (11) K. Both temperatures are higher by about 100 K than those of the (fcc/fcc + L1{sub 2}) phase boundary in an equilibrium phase diagram.

  15. A Novel Short-Range Prediction Model for Railway Track Irregularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with axle loads, train loads, transport volume, and travel speed constantly increasing and railway network steadily lengthening, shortcomings of current maintenance strategies are getting to be noticed from an economical and safety perspective. To overcome the shortcomings, permanent-of-way departments throughout the world have given a considerable attention to an ideal maintenance strategy which is to carry out appropriate maintenances just in time on track locations really requiring maintenance. This strategy is simplified as the condition-based maintenance (CBM which has attracted attentions of engineers of many industries in the recent 70 years. To implement CBM for track irregularity, there are many issues which need to be addressed. One of them focuses on predicting track irregularity of each day in a future short period. In this paper, based on track irregularity evolution characteristics, a Short-Range Prediction Model was developed to this aim and is abbreviated to TI-SRPM. Performance analysis results for TI-SRPM illustrate that track irregularity amplitude predictions on sampling points by TI-SRPM are very close to their measurements by Track Geometry Car.

  16. A short-range weather prediction system for South Africa based on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-03

    Feb 3, 2012 ... 5Agricultural Research Council – Institute for Soil, Climate and Water, Pretoria ... tional high-resolution regional atmospheric models in South Africa. ... The UM contributes 3 ensemble members, each with a different physics.

  17. Short-Range Prediction of Monsoon Precipitation by NCMRWF Regional Unified Model with Explicit Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamgain, Ashu; Rajagopal, E. N.; Mitra, A. K.; Webster, S.

    2017-12-01

    There are increasing efforts towards the prediction of high-impact weather systems and understanding of related dynamical and physical processes. High-resolution numerical model simulations can be used directly to model the impact at fine-scale details. Improvement in forecast accuracy can help in disaster management planning and execution. National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) has implemented high-resolution regional unified modeling system with explicit convection embedded within coarser resolution global model with parameterized convection. The models configurations are based on UK Met Office unified seamless modeling system. Recent land use/land cover data (2012-2013) obtained from Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) are also used in model simulations. Results based on short-range forecast of both the global and regional models over India for a month indicate that convection-permitting simulations by the high-resolution regional model is able to reduce the dry bias over southern parts of West Coast and monsoon trough zone with more intense rainfall mainly towards northern parts of monsoon trough zone. Regional model with explicit convection has significantly improved the phase of the diurnal cycle of rainfall as compared to the global model. Results from two monsoon depression cases during study period show substantial improvement in details of rainfall pattern. Many categories in rainfall defined for operational forecast purposes by Indian forecasters are also well represented in case of convection-permitting high-resolution simulations. For the statistics of number of days within a range of rain categories between `No-Rain' and `Heavy Rain', the regional model is outperforming the global model in all the ranges. In the very heavy and extremely heavy categories, the regional simulations show overestimation of rainfall days. Global model with parameterized convection have tendency to overestimate the light rainfall days and

  18. Colloidal Crystallization in 2D for Short-Ranged Attractions: A Descriptive Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín E. González

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the aid of 2D computer simulations, the whole colloidal crystallization process for particles interacting with a short-ranged attractive potential is described, emphazising the visualization of the different subprocesses at the particle level. Starting with a supercooled homogeneous fluid, the system undergoes a metastable fluid-fluid phase separation. Afterwards, crystallite nucleation is observed and we describe the obtainment of the critical crystallite size and other relevant quantities for nucleation. After the crystal formation, we notice the shrinking and eventual disappearance of the smaller crystals, which are close to larger ones; a manifestation of Ostwald ripening. When two growing crystal grains impinge on each other, the formation of grain boundaries is found; it is appreciated how a grain boundary moves, back and forth, not only on a perpendicular direction to the boundary, but with a rotation and a deformation. Subsequently, after the healing of the two extremes of the boundary, the two grains end up as a single imperfect grain that contains a number of complex dislocations. If these dislocations are close to the boundary with the fluid, they leave the crystal to make it more perfect. Otherwise, they migrate randomly inside the grain until they get close enough to the boundary to leave the grain. This last process of healing, trapping and getting rid of complex dislocations occurs preferentially for low-angle grain boundaries. If the angle between the symmetry axes of the two grains is not low, we end up with a polycrystal made of several touching crystal grains.

  19. Importance of Achromatic Contrast in Short-Range Fruit Foraging of Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Melin, Amanda D.; Aureli, Filippo; Schaffner, Colleen M.; Vorobyev, Misha; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Kawamura, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Trichromatic primates have a ‘red-green’ chromatic channel in addition to luminance and ‘blue-yellow’ channels. It has been argued that the red-green channel evolved in primates as an adaptation for detecting reddish or yellowish objects, such as ripe fruits, against a background of foliage. However, foraging advantages to trichromatic primates remain unverified by behavioral observation of primates in their natural habitats. New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are an excellent model for this evaluation because of the highly polymorphic nature of their color vision due to allelic variation of the L-M opsin gene on the X chromosome. In this study we carried out field observations of a group of wild, frugivorous black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi frontatus, Gray 1842, Platyrrhini), consisting of both dichromats (n = 12) and trichromats (n = 9) in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica. We determined the color vision types of individuals in this group by genotyping their L-M opsin and measured foraging efficiency of each individual for fruits located at a grasping distance. Contrary to the predicted advantage for trichromats, there was no significant difference between dichromats and trichromats in foraging efficiency and we found that the luminance contrast was the main determinant of the variation of foraging efficiency among red-green, blue-yellow and luminance contrasts. Our results suggest that luminance contrast can serve as an important cue in short-range foraging attempts despite other sensory cues that could be available. Additionally, the advantage of red-green color vision in primates may not be as salient as previously thought and needs to be evaluated in further field observations. PMID:18836576

  20. Importance of achromatic contrast in short-range fruit foraging of primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Hiramatsu

    Full Text Available Trichromatic primates have a 'red-green' chromatic channel in addition to luminance and 'blue-yellow' channels. It has been argued that the red-green channel evolved in primates as an adaptation for detecting reddish or yellowish objects, such as ripe fruits, against a background of foliage. However, foraging advantages to trichromatic primates remain unverified by behavioral observation of primates in their natural habitats. New World monkeys (platyrrhines are an excellent model for this evaluation because of the highly polymorphic nature of their color vision due to allelic variation of the L-M opsin gene on the X chromosome. In this study we carried out field observations of a group of wild, frugivorous black-handed spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi frontatus, Gray 1842, Platyrrhini, consisting of both dichromats (n = 12 and trichromats (n = 9 in Santa Rosa National Park, Costa Rica. We determined the color vision types of individuals in this group by genotyping their L-M opsin and measured foraging efficiency of each individual for fruits located at a grasping distance. Contrary to the predicted advantage for trichromats, there was no significant difference between dichromats and trichromats in foraging efficiency and we found that the luminance contrast was the main determinant of the variation of foraging efficiency among red-green, blue-yellow and luminance contrasts. Our results suggest that luminance contrast can serve as an important cue in short-range foraging attempts despite other sensory cues that could be available. Additionally, the advantage of red-green color vision in primates may not be as salient as previously thought and needs to be evaluated in further field observations.

  1. Signalling in ciliates: long- and short-range signals and molecular determinants for cellular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Helmut

    2017-02-01

    In ciliates, unicellular representatives of the bikont branch of evolution, inter- and intracellular signalling pathways have been analysed mainly in Paramecium tetraurelia, Paramecium multimicronucleatum and Tetrahymena thermophila and in part also in Euplotes raikovi. Electrophysiology of ciliary activity in Paramecium spp. is a most successful example. Established signalling mechanisms include plasmalemmal ion channels, recently established intracellular Ca(2+) -release channels, as well as signalling by cyclic nucleotides and Ca(2+) . Ca(2+) -binding proteins (calmodulin, centrin) and Ca(2+) -activated enzymes (kinases, phosphatases) are involved. Many organelles are endowed with specific molecules cooperating in signalling for intracellular transport and targeted delivery. Among them are recently specified soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs), monomeric GTPases, H(+) -ATPase/pump, actin, etc. Little specification is available for some key signal transducers including mechanosensitive Ca(2+) -channels, exocyst complexes and Ca(2+) -sensor proteins for vesicle-vesicle/membrane interactions. The existence of heterotrimeric G-proteins and of G-protein-coupled receptors is still under considerable debate. Serine/threonine kinases dominate by far over tyrosine kinases (some predicted by phosphoproteomic analyses). Besides short-range signalling, long-range signalling also exists, e.g. as firmly installed microtubular transport rails within epigenetically determined patterns, thus facilitating targeted vesicle delivery. By envisaging widely different phenomena of signalling and subcellular dynamics, it will be shown (i) that important pathways of signalling and cellular dynamics are established already in ciliates, (ii) that some mechanisms diverge from higher eukaryotes and (iii) that considerable uncertainties still exist about some essential aspects of signalling. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  2. Numerical investigation on three-dimensional dispersion and conversion behaviors of silicon tetrachloride release in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwen, Zhang; Xinxin, Yin; Yanan, Xin; Jian, Zhang; Xiaoping, Zheng; Chunming, Jiang

    2015-05-15

    The world has experienced heavy thirst of energy as it has to face a dwindling supply of fossil fuel and polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic solar energy technology has been assigned great importance. Silicon tetrachloride is the main byproducts of polysilicon industry, and it's volatile and highly toxic. Once silicon tetrachloride releases, it rapidly forms a dense gas cloud and reacts violently with water vapor in the atmosphere to form a gas cloud consisting of the mixture of silicon tetrachloride, hydrochloric acid and silicic acid, which endangers environment and people. In this article, numerical investigation is endeavored to explore the three dimensional dispersion and conversion behaviors of silicon tetrachloride release in the atmosphere. The k-ϵ model with buoyancy correction on k is applied for turbulence closure and modified EBU model is applied to describe the hydrolysis reaction of silicon tetrachloride. It is illustrated that the release of silicon tetrachloride forms a dense cloud, which sinks onto the ground driven by the gravity and wind and spreads both upwind and downwind. Complicated interaction occurs between the silicon tetrachloride cloud and the air mass. The main body of the dense cloud moves downwind and reacts with the water vapor on the interface between the dense cloud and the air mass to generate a toxic mixture of silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen chloride and silicic acid. A large coverage in space is formed by the toxic mixture and imposes chemical hazards to the environment. The exothermic hydrolysis reaction consumes water and releases reaction heat resulting in dehydration and temperature rise, which imposes further hazards to the ecosystem over the affected space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of chlorine and ammonia concentration field trial data with calculated results from a Gaussian atmospheric transport and dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Timothy J

    2013-06-15

    The Jack Rabbit Test Program was sponsored in April and May 2010 by the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration to generate source data for large releases of chlorine and ammonia from transport tanks. In addition to a variety of data types measured at the release location, concentration versus time data was measured using sensors at distances up to 500 m from the tank. Release data were used to create accurate representations of the vapor flux versus time for the ten releases. This study was conducted to determine the importance of source terms and meteorological conditions in predicting downwind concentrations and the accuracy that can be obtained in those predictions. Each source representation was entered into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model using simplifying assumptions regarding the source characterization and meteorological conditions, and statistics for cloud duration and concentration at the sensor locations were calculated. A detailed characterization for one of the chlorine releases predicted 37% of concentration values within a factor of two, but cannot be considered representative of all the trials. Predictions of toxic effects at 200 m are relevant to incidents involving 1-ton chlorine tanks commonly used in parts of the United States and internationally. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Atmospheric Dispersion at Spatial Resolutions Below Mesoscale for university of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David Whitfield; Dr. Daniel Hyams

    2009-09-14

    In Year 1 of this project, items 1.1 and 1.2 were addressed, as well as item 2.2. The baseline parallel computational simulation tool has been refined significantly over the timeline of this project for the purpose of atmospheric dispersion and transport problems; some of these refinements are documented in Chapter 3. The addition of a concentration transport capability (item 1.2) was completed, along with validation and usage in a highly complex urban environment. Multigrid capability (item 2.2) was a primary focus of Year 1 as well, regardless of the fact that it was scheduled for Year 2. It was determined by the authors that due to the very large nature of the meshes required for atmospheric simulations at mesoscale, multigrid was a key enabling technology for the rest of the project to be successful. Therefore, it was addressed early according to the schedule laid out in the original proposal. The technology behind the multigrid capability is discussed in detail in Chapter 5. Also in Year 1, the issue of ground topography specification is addressed. For simulations of pollutant transport in a given region, a key prerequisite is the specification of the detailed ground topography. The local topography must be placed into a form suitable for generating an unstructured grid both on the topography itself and the atmospheric volume above it; this effort is documented in Chapter 6. In Year 2 of this project, items 1.3 and 2.1 were addressed. Weather data in the form of wind speeds, relative humidity, and baseline pollution levels may be input into the code in order to improve the real-world fidelity of the solutions. Of course, the computational atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) boundary condition developed in Year 1 may still be used when necessary. Cloud cover may be simulated via the levels of actinic flux allowed in photochemical reactions in the atmospheric chemistry model. The primary focus of Year 2 was the formulation of a multispecies capability with included

  5. Research of Short-range Missile Motion in Terms of Different Wind Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Klishin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When modeling the aircraft motion it is advisable to choose a particular model of the Earth, depending both on the task and on the required accuracy of calculation. The article describes various models of the Earth, such as the flat Earth with a plane-parallel field of gravity, spherical and non-rotating Earth with a plane-parallel field of gravity, spherical and non-rotating Earth with a central gravitational field, spherical and non-rotating Earth, taking into account the polar flattening of the Earth, spherical Earth based compression and polar daily rotation. The article also considers the influence of these models on the motion of the selected aircraft.To date, there is technical equipment to provide highly accurate description of the Earthshape, gravitational field, etc. The improved accuracy of the Earth model description results in more correct description of the trajectory and motion parameters of a ballistic missile. However, for short ranges (10-20 km this accuracy is not essential, and, furthermore, it increases time of calculation. Therefore, there is a problem of choosing the optimal description of the Earth parameters.The motion in the model of the Earth, which takes into account a daily rotation of the planet and polar flattening, is discussed in more detail, and the geographical latitude impact on coordinates of the points of fall of a ballistic missile is analyzed on the basis of obtained graphs.The article individually considers a problem of the wind effect on the aircraft motion and defines dependences of the missile motion on the parameters of different wind loads, such as wind speed and height of its action.A mathematical model of the missile motion was built and numerically integrated, using the Runge-Kutta 4th order method, for implementation and subsequent analysis.Based on the analysis of the calculation results in the abovementioned models of the Earth, differences in impact of these models on the parameters of the

  6. A short-range multi-model ensemble weather prediction system for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available prediction system (EPS) at the South African Weather Service (SAWS) are examined. The ensemble consists of different forecasts from the 12-km LAM of the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM) and the Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) covering the South...

  7. Atmospheric dispersion of natural gas from a rupture in a pressurized and valved subsea pipeline; Dispersao atmosferica de gas natural por ruptura em duto submarino pressurizado e valvulado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Fabio Coimbra Moreira de Macedo; Medeiros, Jose Luiz de; Araujo, Ofelia de Queiroz Fernandes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-04-15

    This paper presents a simplified approach to the problem of transient atmospheric dispersion of natural gas released accidentally under the ocean, caused by leaks in pressurized subsea pipelines. The model aims to estimate the transient spatial distribution of gas concentration in the atmosphere for subsequent risk analysis. In this scenario, shut-off valves are used to rapidly isolate the damaged stretch of the gas pipeline (pipeline shutdown). The analysis considers the transient behavior of the remaining inventory inside the pipes through a release-by-leakage model, and the subsequent effect on the atmosphere surrounding the epicenter of release. There are also scenarios formulated with occurrences of numerous ruptures, synchronized or not, with known spatial distribution. The spatial-temporal model of atmospheric dispersion employed is based on the resolution of the tridimensional diffusion equation under turbulence in semi-infinite domains. The model includes appropriate resources to deal with: an ample range of atmospheric conditions; different wind velocities; transient conditions of gas released into the atmosphere (i.e., outflow, pressure, and temperature); many depths of emission; multi-source configuration of release. In this work a simulation tool in MATLAB environment was developed for the analyses of scenarios of transient dispersion of gas into the atmosphere. In the case of ruptures in subsea gas lines, this tool is useful to determine the conditions of maximum risk on production platforms situated close to the occurrence, as well as the impact of the localization of the shut-off valves in the release transient behavior. (author)

  8. Xenon-133 and caesium-137 releases into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant: determination of the source term, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions into the atmosphere of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 (137Cs, which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined it with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for 137Cs, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding 133Xe, we find a total release of 15.3 (uncertainty range 12.2–18.3 EBq, which is more than twice as high as the total release from Chernobyl and likely the largest radioactive noble gas release in history. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1–3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. In fact, our release estimate is higher than the entire estimated 133Xe inventory of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which we explain with the decay of iodine-133 (half-life of 20.8 h into 133Xe. There is strong evidence that the 133Xe release started before the first active venting was made, possibly indicating structural damage to reactor components and/or leaks due to overpressure which would have allowed early release of noble gases. For 137

  9. Xenon-133 and caesium-137 releases into the atmosphere from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Determination of the source term, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohl, A.; Burkhart, J.F.; Eckhardt, S. [NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Seibert, P. [Univ. of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Meteorology; Wotawa, G. [Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics, Vienna (Austria); Arnold, D. [Univ. of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Meteorology; Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. of Energy Technologies; Tapia, C. [Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Physics and Nucelar Engineering; Vargas, A. [Technical Univ. of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain). Inst. of Energy Technologies; Yasunari, T.J. [Univs. Space Research Association, Columbia, MD (United States). Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology and Research

    2012-07-01

    On 11 March 2011, an earthquake occurred about 130 km off the Pacific coast of Japan's main island Honshu, followed by a large tsunami. The resulting loss of electric power at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant developed into a disaster causing massive release of radioactivity into the atmosphere. In this study, we determine the emissions into the atmosphere of two isotopes, the noble gas xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) and the aerosol-bound caesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), which have very different release characteristics as well as behavior in the atmosphere. To determine radionuclide emissions as a function of height and time until 20 April, we made a first guess of release rates based on fuel inventories and documented accident events at the site. This first guess was subsequently improved by inverse modeling, which combined it with the results of an atmospheric transport model, FLEXPART, and measurement data from several dozen stations in Japan, North America and other regions. We used both atmospheric activity concentration measurements as well as, for {sup 137}Cs, measurements of bulk deposition. Regarding {sup 133}Xe, we find a total release of 15.3 (uncertainty range 12.2-18.3) EBq, which is more than twice as high as the total release from Chernobyl and likely the largest radioactive noble gas release in history. The entire noble gas inventory of reactor units 1-3 was set free into the atmosphere between 11 and 15 March 2011. In fact, our release estimate is higher than the entire estimated {sup 133}Xe inventory of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, which we explain with the decay of iodine-133 (half-life of 20.8 h) into {sup 133}Xe. There is strong evidence that the {sup 133}Xe release started before the first active venting was made, possibly indicating structural damage to reactor components and/or leaks due to overpressure which would have allowed early release of noble gases. For {sup 137}Cs, the inversion results give a total emission of 36

  10. Scaling Properties of the D-Short Range Order in PdDx for Higher D Concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krexner, G.; Ernst, G; Fratzl, P.

    1984-01-01

    New measurements of D-short range order (SRO) in PdDx and Pd1−yAgyDx−y are presented. A scaling behaviour of the complicated SRO- features with temperature and electronic concentration is proposed and discussed with respect to the Clapp-Moss-de Fontaine theory of ordering.......New measurements of D-short range order (SRO) in PdDx and Pd1−yAgyDx−y are presented. A scaling behaviour of the complicated SRO- features with temperature and electronic concentration is proposed and discussed with respect to the Clapp-Moss-de Fontaine theory of ordering....

  11. Short Range-Ordered Minerals: Insight into Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Short range-ordered (SRO) aluminosilicates (e.g., allophane) and nanophase ferric oxides (npOx) are common SRO minerals derived during aqueous alteration of basaltic materials. NpOx refers to poorly crystalline or amorphous alteration products that can be any combination of superparamagnetic hematite and/or goethite, akaganeite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, iddingsite, and nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles that pigment palagonitic tephra. Nearly 30 years ago, SRO phases were suggested as alteration phases on Mars based on similar spectral properties for altered basaltic tephra on the slopes of Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Martian bright regions measured by Earth-based telescopes. Detailed characterization of altered basaltic tephra on Mauna Kea have identified a variety of alteration phases including allophane, npOx, hisingerite, jarosite, alunite, hematite, goethite, ferrihydrite, halloysite, kaolinite, smectite, and zeolites. The presence of npOx and other Fe-bearing minerals (jarosite, hematite, goethite) was confirmed by the Mössbauer Spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers. Although the presence of allophane has not been definitely identified on Mars robotic missions, chemical analysis by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers and thermal infrared spectral orbital measurements suggest the presence of allophane or allophane-like phases on Mars. SRO phases form under a variety of environmental conditions on Earth ranging from cold and arid to warm and humid, including hydrothermal conditions. The formation of SRO aluminosilicates such as allophane (and crystalline halloysite) from basaltic material is controlled by several key factors including activity of water, extent of leaching, Si activity in solution, and available Al. Generally, a low leaching index (e.g., wet-dry cycles) and slightly acidic to alkaline conditions are necessary. NpOx generally form under aqueous oxidative weathering conditions, although thermal oxidative alteration may occasional be

  12. Short Range-Ordered Minerals: Insight into Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    Short range-ordered (SRO) aluminosilicates (e.g., allophane) and nanophase ferric oxides (npOx) are common SRO minerals derived during aqueous alteration of basaltic materials. NpOx refers to poorly crystalline or amorphous alteration products that can be any combination of superparamagnetic hematite and/or goethite, akaganeite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, iddingsite, and nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles that pigment palagonitic tephra. Nearly 30 years ago, SRO phases were suggested as alteration phases on Mars based on similar spectral properties for altered basaltic tephra on the slopes of Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Martian bright regions measured by Earth-based telescopes. Detailed characterization of altered basaltic tephra on Mauna Kea have identified a variety of alteration phases including allophane, npOx, hisingerite, jarosite, alunite, hematite, goethite, ferrihydrite, halloysite, kaolinite, smectite, and zeolites. The presence of npOx and other Fe-bearing minerals (jarosite, hematite, goethite) was confirmed by the M ssbauer Spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers. Although the presence of allophane has not been definitely identified on Mars robotic missions, chemical analysis by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers and thermal infrared spectral orbital measurements suggest the presence of allophane or allophane-like phases on Mars. SRO phases form under a variety of environmental conditions on Earth ranging from cold and arid to warm and humid, including hydrothermal conditions. The formation of SRO aluminosilicates such as allophane (and crystalline halloysite) from basaltic material is controlled by several key factors including activity of water, extent of leaching, Si activity in solution, and available Al. Generally, a low leaching index (e.g., wet-dry cycles) and slightly acidic to alkaline conditions are necessary. NpOx generally form under aqueous oxidative weathering conditions, although thermal oxidative alteration may occasional be

  13. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image,

  14. Effects of laser frequency chirp on modal noise in short-range radio over multimode fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Tartarini, Giovanni; Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2010-01-01

    An important effect of the frequency chirp of the optical transmitter in radio over multimode fiber links is put into evidence experimentally and modeled theoretically for the first time, to our knowledge. This effect can have an important impact in short-range connections, where, although...

  15. Real space probe of short-range interaction between Cr in a ferromagnetic semiconductor ZnCrTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Ken; Nishimura, Taku; Yoshida, Shoji; Shigekawa, Hidemi; Kuroda, Shinji

    2014-12-21

    The short-range interaction between Cr atoms was directly examined by scanning tunneling microscopy measurements on a Zn(0.95)Cr(0.05)Te film. Our measurements revealed that a Cr atom formed a localized state within the bandgap of ZnTe and this state was broadened for a pair of Cr atoms within a distance of ∼ 1 nm.

  16. Control of strength and stability of emulsion-gels by a combination of long- and short-range interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijdenstein, T.B.J.; Hendriks, W.P.G.; Linden, van der E.; Vliet, van T.; Aken, van G.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the change in phase behavior and mechanical properties of oil-in-water emulsion gels brought about by variation of long- and short-range attractive interactions. The model system studied consisted of oil droplets stabilized by the protein -lactoglobulin (-lg). A long-range

  17. On-chip patch antenna on InP substrate for short-range wireless communication at 140 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yunfeng; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an on-chip patch antenna on indium phosphide (InP) substrate for short-range wireless communication at 140 GHz. The antenna shows a simulated gain of 5.3 dBi with 23% bandwidth at 140 GHz and it can be used for either direct chip-to-chip communication or chip...

  18. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara Osamu; Kim Eunjoo; Kunishima Naoaki; Tani Kotaro; Ishikawa Tetsuo; Furuyama Kazuo; Hashimoto Shozo; Akashi Makoto

    2017-01-01

    A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM) simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II) together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul’s after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration d...

  19. Method to characterize directional changes in Arctic sea ice drift and associated deformation due to synoptic atmospheric variations using Lagrangian dispersion statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Lukovich

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A framework is developed to assess the directional changes in sea ice drift paths and associated deformation processes in response to atmospheric forcing. The framework is based on Lagrangian statistical analyses leveraging particle dispersion theory which tells us whether ice drift is in a subdiffusive, diffusive, ballistic, or superdiffusive dynamical regime using single-particle (absolute dispersion statistics. In terms of sea ice deformation, the framework uses two- and three-particle dispersion to characterize along- and across-shear transport as well as differential kinematic parameters. The approach is tested with GPS beacons deployed in triplets on sea ice in the southern Beaufort Sea at varying distances from the coastline in fall of 2009 with eight individual events characterized. One transition in particular follows the sea level pressure (SLP high on 8 October in 2009 while the sea ice drift was in a superdiffusive dynamic regime. In this case, the dispersion scaling exponent (which is a slope between single-particle absolute dispersion of sea ice drift and elapsed time changed from superdiffusive (α ∼ 3 to ballistic (α ∼ 2 as the SLP was rounding its maximum pressure value. Following this shift between regimes, there was a loss in synchronicity between sea ice drift and atmospheric motion patterns. While this is only one case study, the outcomes suggest similar studies be conducted on more buoy arrays to test momentum transfer linkages between storms and sea ice responses as a function of dispersion regime states using scaling exponents. The tools and framework developed in this study provide a unique characterization technique to evaluate these states with respect to sea ice processes in general. Application of these techniques can aid ice hazard assessments and weather forecasting in support of marine transportation and indigenous use of near-shore Arctic areas.

  20. Method to characterize directional changes in Arctic sea ice drift and associated deformation due to synoptic atmospheric variations using Lagrangian dispersion statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovich, Jennifer V.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Barber, David G.

    2017-07-01

    A framework is developed to assess the directional changes in sea ice drift paths and associated deformation processes in response to atmospheric forcing. The framework is based on Lagrangian statistical analyses leveraging particle dispersion theory which tells us whether ice drift is in a subdiffusive, diffusive, ballistic, or superdiffusive dynamical regime using single-particle (absolute) dispersion statistics. In terms of sea ice deformation, the framework uses two- and three-particle dispersion to characterize along- and across-shear transport as well as differential kinematic parameters. The approach is tested with GPS beacons deployed in triplets on sea ice in the southern Beaufort Sea at varying distances from the coastline in fall of 2009 with eight individual events characterized. One transition in particular follows the sea level pressure (SLP) high on 8 October in 2009 while the sea ice drift was in a superdiffusive dynamic regime. In this case, the dispersion scaling exponent (which is a slope between single-particle absolute dispersion of sea ice drift and elapsed time) changed from superdiffusive (α ˜ 3) to ballistic (α ˜ 2) as the SLP was rounding its maximum pressure value. Following this shift between regimes, there was a loss in synchronicity between sea ice drift and atmospheric motion patterns. While this is only one case study, the outcomes suggest similar studies be conducted on more buoy arrays to test momentum transfer linkages between storms and sea ice responses as a function of dispersion regime states using scaling exponents. The tools and framework developed in this study provide a unique characterization technique to evaluate these states with respect to sea ice processes in general. Application of these techniques can aid ice hazard assessments and weather forecasting in support of marine transportation and indigenous use of near-shore Arctic areas.

  1. Overview of the NAME model and its role as a VAAC atmospheric dispersion model during the Eyjafjallajökull Eruption April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbetter, Susan; Agnew, Paul; Burgin, Laura; Davis, Lucy; Hort, Matthew; Huggett, Lois; Jones, Andrew; Manning, Alistair; Redington, Alsion; Thomson, David; Webster, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The UK Met Office, in its role as one of nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centres (VAACs) around the world, is responsible for advising international aviation authorities in all impacted countries of the location and movement of clouds of volcanic ash which originate from the London VAAC domain. VAACs only provide advice on extent of ash to the aviation regulators and it is the regulator's decision on whether to restrict air space. The Met Office delivers this capability through a world-leading atmospheric dispersion model, NAME. In addition to its role as an emergency response guidance tool the model is used for routine air quality forecasting and meteorological research activities. NAME is a Lagrangian particle model which calculates the dispersion of pollutants by tracking ‘particles' through a modelled atmosphere. Each model particle has its own characteristics, for example, particles can represent different chemical species and can represent real particulate sizes. NAME has the flexibility to specify sources at any location in the atmosphere. Once emitted, particles move in a manner determined by the meteorology obtained from the Met Office operational numerical weather prediction model, the Unified Model. Particles are advected according to three-dimensional winds with a random component used to represent the effects of atmospheric turbulence and can be removed from the model atmosphere by various processes. For modelling the dispersion of volcanic ash during the Eyjafjallajökull eruption, NAME is configured in the following manner. Material is released between the volcano summit and the plume rise height as estimated from observations taken by the Icelandic Met Office and measurements from radar and satellites. The particles are emitted following a prescribed size distribution with a density of 2300 kg/m3. The material is subjected to gravitational settling, and is deposited due to dry and wet deposition processes. There is no attempt in NAME to model volcano

  2. Received response based heuristic LDPC code for short-range non-line-of-sight ultraviolet communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Heng; Zuo, Yong; Zhang, Dong; Li, Yinghui; Wu, Jian

    2017-03-06

    Through slight modification on typical photon multiplier tube (PMT) receiver output statistics, a generalized received response model considering both scattered propagation and random detection is presented to investigate the impact of inter-symbol interference (ISI) on link data rate of short-range non-line-of-sight (NLOS) ultraviolet communication. Good agreement with the experimental results by numerical simulation is shown. Based on the received response characteristics, a heuristic check matrix construction algorithm of low-density-parity-check (LDPC) code is further proposed to approach the data rate bound derived in a delayed sampling (DS) binary pulse position modulation (PPM) system. Compared to conventional LDPC coding methods, better bit error ratio (BER) below 1E-05 is achieved for short-range NLOS UVC systems operating at data rate of 2Mbps.

  3. Long-range alpha/beta and short-range gamma EEG synchronization distinguishes phasic and tonic REM periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simor, Péter; Gombos, Ferenc; Blaskovich, Borbála; Bódizs, Róbert

    2017-12-23

    Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep is characterized by the alternation of two markedly different microstates, phasic and tonic REM. These periods differ in awakening and arousal thresholds, sensory processing, and spontaneous cortical oscillations. Previous studies indicate that whereas in phasic REM, cortical activity is independent of the external environment, attentional functions and sensory processing are partially maintained during tonic periods. Large-scale synchronization of oscillatory activity, especially in the alpha and beta frequency ranges can accurately distinguish different states of vigilance and cognitive processes of enhanced alertness and attention. Therefore, we examined long-range inter-and intrahemispheric, as well as short-range EEG synchronization during phasic and tonic REM periods quantified by the weighted phase lag index. Based on the nocturnal polysomnographic data of 19 healthy, adult participants we showed that long-range inter-and intrahemispheric alpha and beta synchrony were enhanced in tonic REM states in contrast to phasic ones, and resembled alpha and beta synchronization of resting wakefulness. On the other hand, short-range synchronization within the gamma frequency range was higher in phasic as compared to tonic periods. Increased short-range synchrony might reflect local, and inwardly driven sensorimotor activity during phasic REM periods, whereas enhanced long-range synchrony might index frontoparietal activity that reinstates environmental alertness after phasic REM periods. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The relevance of short-range fibers to cognitive efficiency and brain activation in aging and dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Gao

    Full Text Available The integrity of structural connectivity in a functional brain network supports the efficiency of neural processing within relevant brain regions. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the short- and long-range fibers, and their differential roles in the lower cognitive efficiency in aging and dementia. Three groups of healthy young, healthy older adults and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD participated in this combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI study on prospective memory (PM. Short- and long-range fiber tracts within the PM task engaged brain networks were generated. The correlation between the fMRI signal change, PM performance and the DTI characters were calculated. FMRI results showed that the PM-specific frontal activations in three groups were distributed hierarchically along the rostrocaudal axis in the frontal lobe. In an overall PM condition generally activated brain network among the three groups, tractography was used to generate the short-range fibers, and they were found impaired in both healthy older adults and AD patients. However, the long-range fiber tracts were only impaired in AD. Additionally, the mean diffusivity (MD of short-range but not long-range fibers was positively correlated with fMRI signal change and negatively correlated with the efficiency of PM performance. This study suggests that the disintegrity of short-range fibers may contribute more to the lower cognitive efficiency and higher compensatory brain activation in healthy older adults and more in AD patients.

  5. Contaminant dispersion prediction and source estimation with integrated Gaussian-machine learning network model for point source emission in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Denglong [Fuli School of Food Equipment Engineering and Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Zaoxiao, E-mail: zhangzx@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No.28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • The intelligent network models were built to predict contaminant gas concentrations. • The improved network models coupled with Gaussian dispersion model were presented. • New model has high efficiency and accuracy for concentration prediction. • New model were applied to indentify the leakage source with satisfied results. - Abstract: Gas dispersion model is important for predicting the gas concentrations when contaminant gas leakage occurs. Intelligent network models such as radial basis function (RBF), back propagation (BP) neural network and support vector machine (SVM) model can be used for gas dispersion prediction. However, the prediction results from these network models with too many inputs based on original monitoring parameters are not in good agreement with the experimental data. Then, a new series of machine learning algorithms (MLA) models combined classic Gaussian model with MLA algorithm has been presented. The prediction results from new models are improved greatly. Among these models, Gaussian-SVM model performs best and its computation time is close to that of classic Gaussian dispersion model. Finally, Gaussian-MLA models were applied to identifying the emission source parameters with the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method. The estimation performance of PSO with Gaussian-MLA is better than that with Gaussian, Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion model and network models based on original monitoring parameters. Hence, the new prediction model based on Gaussian-MLA is potentially a good method to predict contaminant gas dispersion as well as a good forward model in emission source parameters identification problem.

  6. Comparison between conventional biofilters and biotrickling filters applied to waste bio-drying in terms of atmospheric dispersion and air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Marco; Ragazzi, Marco; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration has been widely applied to remove odours and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial off-gas and mechanical-biological waste treatments. However, conventional open biofilters cannot guarantee an efficient dispersion of air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere. The aim of this paper is to compare conventional open biofilters with biotrickling filters (BTFs) in terms of VOC dispersion in the atmosphere and air quality in the vicinity of a hypothetical municipal solid waste bio-drying plant. Simulations of dispersion were carried out regarding two VOCs of interest due to their impact in terms of odours and cancer risk: dimethyl disulphide and benzene, respectively. The use of BTFs, instead of conventional biofilters, led to significant improvements in the odour impact and the cancer risk: when adopting BTFs instead of an open biofilter, the area with an odour concentration > 1 OU m(-3) and a cancer risk > 10(-6) was reduced by 91.6% and 95.2%, respectively. When replacing the biofilter with BTFs, the annual mean concentrations of odorants and benzene decreased by more than 90% in the vicinity of the plant. These improvements are achieved above all because of the higher release height of BTFs and the higher velocity of the outgoing air flow.

  7. How displaced migratory birds could use volatile atmospheric compounds to find their migratory corridor? A test using a particle dispersion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Safi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction represents an important sensory modality for navigation of both homing pigeons and wild birds. Experimental evidence in homing pigeons showed that airborne volatile compounds carried by the winds at the home area are learned in association with wind directions. When displaced, pigeons obtain information on the direction of their displacement using local odours at the release site. Recently, the role of olfactory cues in navigation has been reported also for wild birds during migration. However, the question whether wild birds develop an olfactory navigational map similar to that described in homing pigeons or, alternatively, exploit the distribution of volatile compounds in different manners for reaching the goal is still an open question. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we evaluate the possibilities of reconstructing spatio-temporally explicit aerosol dispersion at large spatial scales using the particle dispersion model FLEXPART. By combining atmospheric information with particle dispersion models, atmospheric scientists predict the dispersion of pollutants for example, after nuclear fallouts or volcanic eruptions or wildfires, or in retrospect reconstruct the origin of emissions such as aerosols. Using simple assumptions, we reconstructed the putative origin of aerosols traveling to the location of migrating birds. We use the model to test whether the putative odour plume could have originated from an important stopover site. If the migrating birds knew this site and the associated plume from previous journeys, the odour could contribut to the reorientation towards the migratory corridor, as suggested for the model scenario in displaced Lesser black-backed gulls migrating from Northern Europe into Africa.

  8. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  9. ASSESSMENT OF WIND CHARACTERISTICS AND ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION MODELING OF 137Cs ON THE BARAKAH NPP AREA IN THE UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JONG KUK LEE

    2014-08-01

    Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs dispersion test were simulated under severe accident condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. The results of the surface roughness effect demonstrated that the deposition of 137Cs was affected by surface condition. The results of these studies offer useful information for developing environmental radiation monitoring systems (ERMSs for the BNPP and can be used to assess the environmental effects of new nuclear power plant.

  10. Dynamic response of a two-dimensional electron gas: Effect of short-range correlations in the ladder approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, K.; Lipparini, E.

    1996-09-01

    The Dyson equation for the particle-hole Green's function, including exchange matrix elements, has been solved exactly for the effective interaction between two electrons in a two-dimensional electron gas. The effective interaction is obtained numerically by solving the Bethe-Goldstone integral equation in a two-dimensional electron gas. The effect of short-range correlations on static and dynamic dielectric functions is studied. Results are compared with the normal random-phase approximation, local-field theories, and recent quantum Monte Carlo results.

  11. Assessment of oscillator strengths with multiconfigurational short-range density functional theory for electronic excitations in organic molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan

    2017-01-01

    considered the large collection of organic molecules whose excited states were investigated with a range of electronic structure methods by Thiel et al. As a by-product of our calculations of oscillator strengths, we also obtain electronic excitation energies, which enable us to compare the performance......We have in a series of recent papers investigated electronic excited states with a hybrid between a complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave function and density functional theory (DFT). This method has been dubbed the CAS short-range DFT method (CAS–srDFT). The previous papers...

  12. Digital predistortion of 75–110 GHz W-band frequency multiplier for fiber wireless short range access systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Ying; Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan

    2011-01-01

    We present a W-band fiber-wireless transmission system based on a nonlinear frequency multiplier for high-speed wireless short range access applications. By implementing a baseband digital signal predistortion scheme, intensive nonlinear distortions induced in a sextuple frequency multiplier can...... be effectively pre-compensated. Without using costly W-band components, a transmission system with 26km fiber and 4m wireless transmission operating at 99.6GHz is experimentally validated. Adjacent-channel power ratio (ACPR) improvements for IQ-modulated vector signals are guaranteed and transmission...

  13. A quark model calculation for the short-range contribution in the pion double charge exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Bingsong; Jiang Huanqing (Institute of Theoretical Physics and Institute of High Energy Physcis, Academia Sinica, Beijing (CN))

    1989-10-01

    A quark model calculation for the short-range contribution in the pion double charge exchange (DCX) reaction is presented. In the framework of this new model the angular distributions of {sup 18}O({pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup {minus}}){sup 18}Ne(g.s.) at low energies are calculated and compared with the experimental data. It is found that this model can explain the anomalous'' increasing behavior for the DCX reaction around 50 MeV quite well.

  14. Evaluation of regional and local atmospheric dispersion models for the analysis of traffic-related air pollution in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Shorshani, Masoud; Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2017-10-01

    Dispersion of road transport emissions in urban metropolitan areas is typically simulated using Gaussian models that ignore the turbulence and drag induced by buildings, which are especially relevant for areas with dense downtown cores. To consider the effect of buildings, street canyon models are used but often at the level of single urban corridors and small road networks. In this paper, we compare and validate two dispersion models with widely varying algorithms, across a modelling domain consisting of the City of Montreal, Canada accounting for emissions of more 40,000 roads. The first dispersion model is based on flow decomposition into the urban canopy sub-flow as well as overlying airflow. It takes into account the specific height and geometry of buildings along each road. The second model is a Gaussian puff dispersion model, which handles complex terrain and incorporates three-dimensional meteorology, but accounts for buildings only through variations in the initial vertical mixing coefficient. Validation against surface observations indicated that both models under-predicted measured concentrations. Average weekly exposure surfaces derived from both models were found to be reasonably correlated (r = 0.8) although the Gaussian dispersion model tended to underestimate concentrations around the roadways compared to the street canyon model. In addition, both models were used to estimate exposures of a representative sample of the Montreal population composed of 1319 individuals. Large differences were noted whereby exposures derived from the Gaussian puff model were significantly lower than exposures derived from the street canyon model, an expected result considering the concentration of population around roadways. These differences have large implications for the analyses of health effects associated with NO2 exposure.

  15. Atmospheric Dispersion of Radioactivity from Nuclear Power Plant Accidents: Global Assessment and Case Study for the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros Christoudias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the contamination risks from the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released by severe nuclear power plant accidents using the ECHAM/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC atmospheric chemistry-general circulation model at high resolution (50 km. We present an overview of global risks and also a case study of nuclear power plants that are currently under construction, planned and proposed in the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, a region prone to earthquakes. We implemented continuous emissions from each location, making the simplifying assumption that all potential accidents release the same amount of radioactivity. We simulated atmospheric transport and decay, focusing on 137Cs and 131I as proxies for particulate and gaseous radionuclides, respectively. We present risk maps for potential surface layer concentrations, deposition and doses to humans from the inhalation exposure of 131I. The estimated risks exhibit seasonal variability, with the highest surface level concentrations of gaseous radionuclides in the Northern Hemisphere during winter.

  16. Ultra-low-power and ultra-low-cost short-range wireless receivers in nanoscale CMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Zhicheng; Martins, Rui Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides readers with a description of state-of-the-art techniques to be used for ultra-low-power (ULP) and ultra-low-cost (ULC), short-range wireless receivers. Readers will learn what is required to deploy these receivers in short-range wireless sensor networks, which are proliferating widely to serve the internet of things (IoT) for “smart cities.” The authors address key challenges involved with the technology and the typical tradeoffs between ULP and ULC. Three design examples with advanced circuit techniques are described in order to address these trade-offs, which specially focus on cost minimization. These three techniques enable respectively, cascading of radio frequency (RF) and baseband (BB) circuits under an ultra-low-voltage (ULV) supply, cascoding of RF and BB circuits in current domain for current reuse, and a novel function-reuse receiver architecture, suitable for ULV and multi-band ULP applications such as the sub-GHz ZigBee. ·         Summarizes the state-of-the-art i...

  17. Proposed NRC portable target case for short-range triangulation-based 3D imaging systems characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Benjamin; MacKinnon, David; Cournoyer, Luc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo

    2011-03-01

    The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) is currently evaluating and designing artifacts and methods to completely characterize 3-D imaging systems. We have gathered a set of artifacts to form a low-cost portable case and provide a clearly-defined set of procedures for generating characteristic values using these artifacts. In its current version, this case is specifically designed for the characterization of short-range (standoff distance of 1 centimeter to 3 meters) triangulation-based 3-D imaging systems. The case is known as the "NRC Portable Target Case for Short-Range Triangulation-based 3-D Imaging Systems" (NRC-PTC). The artifacts in the case have been carefully chosen for their geometric, thermal, and optical properties. A set of characterization procedures are provided with these artifacts based on procedures either already in use or are based on knowledge acquired from various tests carried out by the NRC. Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T), a well-known terminology in the industrial field, was used to define the set of tests. The following parameters of a system are characterized: dimensional properties, form properties, orientation properties, localization properties, profile properties, repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility. A number of tests were performed in a special dimensional metrology laboratory to validate the capability of the NRC-PTC. The NRC-PTC will soon be subjected to reproducibility testing using an intercomparison evaluation to validate its use in different laboratories.

  18. Analysis of long- and short-range contribution to adhesion work in cardiac fibroblasts: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaizero, O; DelFavero, G; Martinelli, V; Long, C S; Mestroni, L

    2015-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) and Poisson statistic were used to analyze the detachment work recorded during the removal of gold-covered microspheres from cardiac fibroblasts. The effect of Cytochalasin D, a disruptor of the actin cytoskeleton, on cell adhesion was also tested. The adhesion work was assessed using a Poisson analysis also derived from single-cell force spectroscopy retracting curves. The use of Poisson analysis to get adhesion work from AFM curves is quite a novel method, and in this case, proved to be effective to study the short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work. This method avoids the difficult identification of minor peaks in the AFM retracting curves by creating what can be considered an average adhesion work. Even though the effect of actin depolymerisation is well documented, its use revealed that control cardiac fibroblasts (CT) exhibit a work of adhesion at least 5 times higher than that of the Cytochalasin treated cells. However, our results indicate that in both cells short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work are nearly equal and the same heterogeneity index describes both cells. Therefore, we infer that the different adhesion behaviors might be explained by the presence of fewer membrane adhesion molecules available at the AFM tip-cell interface under circumstances where the actin cytoskeleton has been disrupted. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The effect of Pd on the isothermal relaxation of short-range order in Au(Ag)-based ternary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziya, A.B. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan) and Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan)]. E-mail: dr.a.b.ziya@bzumail.edu.pk; Ohshima, K. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    The effect of Pd on the isothermal relaxation of short-range order (SRO) was studied in Au{sub x}Ag{sub x}Pd{sub 100-2x} (x=25, 40at%) alloys, using the residual resistometry at 77K. The short-range ordering resulted in an increase of electrical resistivity. The equilibrium values of this property characterizing the SRO-equilibrium states exhibit a linear dependence on the reciprocal of temperature. The analysis of the resistivity data using the fundamental laws of SRO-kinetics shows that the resistivity behavior can be satisfactorily explained by the two-exponentials law and leads to the determination of characteristic time constants and the activation enthalpies for the two processes. Further, it is found that both the equilibrium and kinetic behavior of these alloys are highly dependent on the concentration of Pd. The presence of Pd reduces the atomic mobility which results from a decrease in the vacancy mobility linked to the positive size effect of Pd in these alloys.

  20. Contrasting accounts of direction and shape perception in short-range motion: Counterchange compared with motion energy detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Joseph; Hock, Howard; Schöner, Gregor

    2014-07-01

    It has long been thought (e.g., Cavanagh & Mather, 1989) that first-order motion-energy extraction via space-time comparator-type models (e.g., the elaborated Reichardt detector) is sufficient to account for human performance in the short-range motion paradigm (Braddick, 1974), including the perception of reverse-phi motion when the luminance polarity of the visual elements is inverted during successive frames. Human observers' ability to discriminate motion direction and use coherent motion information to segregate a region of a random cinematogram and determine its shape was tested; they performed better in the same-, as compared with the inverted-, polarity condition. Computational analyses of short-range motion perception based on the elaborated Reichardt motion energy detector (van Santen & Sperling, 1985) predict, incorrectly, that symmetrical results will be obtained for the same- and inverted-polarity conditions. In contrast, the counterchange detector (Hock, Schöner, & Gilroy, 2009) predicts an asymmetry quite similar to that of human observers in both motion direction and shape discrimination. The further advantage of counterchange, as compared with motion energy, detection for the perception of spatial shape- and depth-from-motion is discussed.

  1. Modeling Short-Range Soil Variability and its Potential Use in Variable-Rate Treatment of Experimental Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moameni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Iran, the experimental plots under fertilizer trials are managed in such a way that the whole plot area uniformly receives agricultural inputs. This could lead to biased research results and hence to suppressing of the efforts made by the researchers. This research was conducted in a selected site belonging to the Gonbad Agricultural Research Station, located in the semiarid region, northeastern Iran. The aim was to characterize the short-range spatial variability of the inherent and management-depended soil properties and to determine if this variation is large and can be managed at practical scales. The soils were sampled using a grid 55 m apart. In total, 100 composite soil samples were collected from topsoil (0-30 cm and were analyzed for calcium carbonate equivalent, organic carbon, clay, available phosphorus, available potassium, iron, copper, zinc and manganese. Descriptive statistics were applied to check data trends. Geostatistical analysis was applied to variography, model fitting and contour mapping. Sampling at 55 m made it possible to split the area of the selected experimental plot into relatively uniform areas that allow application of agricultural inputs with variable rates. Keywords: Short-range soil variability, Within-field soil variability, Interpolation, Precision agriculture, Geostatistics

  2. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: vertical and interhemispheric distribution of mercury species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieser, Johannes; Slemr, Franz; Ambrose, Jesse; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Brooks, Steve; Dastoor, Ashu; DeSimone, Francesco; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Geyer, Beate; Gratz, Lynne E.; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Jaffe, Daniel; Kelley, Paul; Lin, Che-Jen; Jaegle, Lyatt; Matthias, Volker; Ryjkov, Andrei; Selin, Noelle E.; Song, Shaojie; Travnikov, Oleg; Weigelt, Andreas; Luke, Winston; Ren, Xinrong; Zahn, Andreas; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Yun; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric chemistry and transport of mercury play a key role in the global mercury cycle. However, there are still considerable knowledge gaps concerning the fate of mercury in the atmosphere. This is the second part of a model intercomparison study investigating the impact of atmospheric chemistry and emissions on mercury in the atmosphere. While the first study focused on ground-based observations of mercury concentration and deposition, here we investigate the vertical and interhemispheric distribution and speciation of mercury from the planetary boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. So far, there have been few model studies investigating the vertical distribution of mercury, mostly focusing on single aircraft campaigns. Here, we present a first comprehensive analysis based on various aircraft observations in Europe, North America, and on intercontinental flights. The investigated models proved to be able to reproduce the distribution of total and elemental mercury concentrations in the troposphere including interhemispheric trends. One key aspect of the study is the investigation of mercury oxidation in the troposphere. We found that different chemistry schemes were better at reproducing observed oxidized mercury patterns depending on altitude. High concentrations of oxidized mercury in the upper troposphere could be reproduced with oxidation by bromine while elevated concentrations in the lower troposphere were better reproduced by OH and ozone chemistry. However, the results were not always conclusive as the physical and chemical parameterizations in the chemistry transport models also proved to have a substantial impact on model results.

  3. Multi-model study of mercury dispersion in the atmosphere: vertical and interhemispheric distribution of mercury species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bieser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry and transport of mercury play a key role in the global mercury cycle. However, there are still considerable knowledge gaps concerning the fate of mercury in the atmosphere. This is the second part of a model intercomparison study investigating the impact of atmospheric chemistry and emissions on mercury in the atmosphere. While the first study focused on ground-based observations of mercury concentration and deposition, here we investigate the vertical and interhemispheric distribution and speciation of mercury from the planetary boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. So far, there have been few model studies investigating the vertical distribution of mercury, mostly focusing on single aircraft campaigns. Here, we present a first comprehensive analysis based on various aircraft observations in Europe, North America, and on intercontinental flights. The investigated models proved to be able to reproduce the distribution of total and elemental mercury concentrations in the troposphere including interhemispheric trends. One key aspect of the study is the investigation of mercury oxidation in the troposphere. We found that different chemistry schemes were better at reproducing observed oxidized mercury patterns depending on altitude. High concentrations of oxidized mercury in the upper troposphere could be reproduced with oxidation by bromine while elevated concentrations in the lower troposphere were better reproduced by OH and ozone chemistry. However, the results were not always conclusive as the physical and chemical parameterizations in the chemistry transport models also proved to have a substantial impact on model results.

  4. Using soil records with atmospheric dispersion modeling to investigate the effects of clean air regulations on 60 years of manganese deposition in Marietta, Ohio (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Megan R; Gaudet, Brian J; Stauffer, David R; White, Timothy S; Brantley, Susan L

    2015-05-15

    Atmospheric emissions of metals from anthropogenic activities have led to deposition and contamination of soils worldwide. We quantified addition of manganese (Mn) to soils around the largest emitter of Mn in the United States (U.S.) using chemical analyses and atmospheric dispersion modeling (Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF)). Concentrations of soil-surface Mn were enriched by 9-fold relative to that of the parent material within 1 km of the facility. Elevated concentrations of Mn and chromium (Cr), another potentially toxic element that was emitted, document contamination only within 1 m of the soil surface. Total mass of Mn added per unit land area integrated over 1 m, mMn, equals ~80 mg Mn cm(-2) near the facility. Values of mMn remained above background up to tens of kilometers from the source. Air concentrations of Mn particles of 7.5-micron diameter simulated with SCIPUFF using available data for the emission rate and local meteorological conditions for 2006 were consistent with measured air concentrations. However, the Mn deposition calculated for 2006 with SCIPUFF yielded a cumulative value over the lifetime of the refinery (60 years) that is a factor of 15 lower than the Mn observed to have been added to the soils. This discrepancy can be easily explained if Mn deposition rates before 1988 were more than an order of magnitude greater than today. Such higher emissions are probable, given the changes in metal production with time and the installation of emission controls after the Clean Air Act (1970). This work shows that atmospheric dispersion models can be used with soil profiles to understand the changes in metal emissions over decadal timescales. In addition, the calculations are consistent with the Clean Air Act accounting for a 15-fold decrease in the Mn deposition to soils around the refinery per metric ton of Mn alloy produced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigations of coal ignition in a short-range flame burner using optical measuring systems; Untersuchungen zur Kohlezuendung am Flachflammenbrenner unter Verwendung optischer Messtechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackert, G.; Kremer, H.; Wirtz, S. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik

    1999-09-01

    The short-range flame burner and the KOALA reactor of DMT are experimental facilities for realistic simulation of coal conversion processes at high temperatures and pressures in atmospheric conditions. The TOSCA system enable measurements of temperatures, sizes, shapes and velocities of the fuel particles, which serve as a basis for a three-dimensional simulation model of coal combustion. In the future, further parameter studies will deepen the present knowledge of coal dust combustion under pressure and enable optimisation of the numerical models for simulation of industrial-scale systems for coal dust combustion under pressure. [Deutsch] Mit dem Flachflammenbrenner und dem KOALA-Reaktor der DMT stehen Versuchsapparaturen zur Verfuegung, mit deren Hilfe die Kohleumwandlungsprozesse bei hohen Temperaturen unter Druck und unter atmosphaerischen Bedingungen realistisch wiedergegeben werden. Das TOSCA-System erlaubt dabei die Bestimmung von Temperaturen, Groessen, Formen und Geschwindigkeiten der Brennstoffpartikel. Diese Daten liefern die Grundlage fuer die Erstellung eines dreidimensionalen Simulationsmodells zur Modellierung der Kohleverbrennung. In Zukunft werden weitere Parameterstudien das Verstaendnis der Kohlenstaubdruckverbrennung vertiefen und ein Optimierung der numerischen Modelle ermoeglichen, so dass die Simulation grosstechnischer Kohlenstaubdruckverbrennungsanlagen realisiert werden kann. (orig.)

  6. Use of MODIS Satellite Images and an Atmospheric Dust Transport Model to Evaluate Juniperus spp. Pollen Phenology and Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, J. C.; Sprigg, W. A.; Levetin, E.; Huete, A.; Nickovic, S.; Pejanovic, G. A.; Vukovic, A.; VandeWater, P. K.; Myers, O. B.; Budge, A. M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Pollen can be transported great distances. Van de Water et. al. reported Juniperus spp. pollen was transported 200-600 km. Hence local observations of plant phenology may not be consistent with the timing and source of pollen collected by pollen sampling instruments. The DREAM (Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) is a verified model for atmospheric dust transport modeling using MODIS data products to identify source regions and quantities of dust. We are modifying the DREAM model to incorporate pollen transport. Pollen release will be estimated based on MODIS derived phenology of Juniperus spp. communities. Ground based observational records of pollen release timing and quantities will be used as verification. This information will be used to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program and the State of New Mexico environmental public health decision support for asthma and allergies alerts.

  7. Short-range correlations in hadron pair production at p sub T >= 2GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellogianni, A.; Stassinaki, M.; Vassiliadis, G.; Vichou, I. (Athens Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Nuclear Physics); Benayoun, M.; Kahane, J.; Leruste, P.; Malamant, A.; Narjoux, J.L.; Safarik, K.; Sene, M.; Sene, R.; Volte, A. (College de France, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire); Beusch, W.; French, B.R.; Jacholkowski, A.; Kirk, A.; Knudson, K.; Quereigh, E. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Bloodworth, I.J.; Carney, J.N.; Kinson, J.B.; Trainor, M.T.; Villalobos Baille, O.; Vortruba, M.F. (Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Di Bari, D.; Fini, R.; Ghidini, B.; Lenti, V.; Navach, F.; Palano, A. (Bari Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy)); Zitoun, R. (Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France). Lab. de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France). Lab. de Physique Experimentale des Hautes Energies); WA77 Collaboration

    1992-06-01

    Production of oppositely charged particle pairs at large p{sub T} is studied, where both particles are in the central rapidity region within one unit of rapidity and nearby in azimuth. The data sample, which comes from {pi}{sup -}Be interactions obtained using the CERN OMEGA spectrometer, contains events with a pair of oppositely charged particles having p{sub T}{>=}2 GeV/c recoiling against a third one with p{sub T}{>=}1 GeV/c. Our data provide new information on short range correlations involving the production of the nine possible pairs made from ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, p) and ({pi}{sup -}, K{sup -}, anti p). Comparison with Lund Monte Carlo predictions is made. Apart from proton yields, the model reproduces correctly our data. The main discrepancies observed with protons can be attributed to hard scattering of diquarks from the target nucleons. (orig.).

  8. Investigation of Proton-Proton Short-Range Correlations via the 12C(e,e'pp) Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Arrington; H. Benaoum; F. Benmokhtar; P. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; W. Boeglin; J. P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; B. Craver; C. W. de Jager; R. Feuerbach; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; O. Glamazdin; J. Gomez; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; E. Jans; X. Jiang; Y. Jiang; L. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; E. Kuchina; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; M. Mazouz; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; S. Nanda; C. F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; M. Potokar; V. Punjabi; Y. Qiang; J. Reinhold; B. Reitz; G. Ron; G. Rosner; A. Saha; B. Sawatzky; A. Shahinyan; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; V. Sulkosky; N. Thompson; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; E. Voutier; K. Wang; J. W. Watson

    2007-08-01

    We investigated simultaneously the 12C(e,e'p) and 12C(e,e'pp) reactions at Q2 = 2 [GeV/c]2, x_B = 1.2, and in an (e,e'p) missing-momentum range from 300 to 600 MeV/c. At these kinematics, with a missing-momentum greater than the Fermi momentum of nucleons in a nucleus and far from the delta excitation, short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations are predicted to dominate the reaction. For(9.5 +/- 2)% of the 12C(e,e'p) events, a recoiling partner proton was observed back-to-back to the 12C(e,e'p) missing momentum vector, an experimental signature of correlations.

  9. Structure, stability, and formation pathways of colloidal gels in systems with short-range attraction and long-range repulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schooneveld, Matti M; de Villeneuve, Volkert W A; Dullens, Roel P A; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Leunissen, Mirjam E; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-04-09

    We study colloidal gels formed upon centrifugation of dilute suspensions of spherical colloids (radius 446 nm) that interact through a long-range electrostatic repulsion (Debye length approximately 850 nm) and a short-range depletion attraction (approximately 12.5 nm), by means of confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). In these systems, at low colloid densities, colloidal clusters are stable. Upon increasing the density by centrifugation, at different stages of cluster formation, we show that colloidal gels are formed that significantly differ in structure. While significant single-particle displacements do not occur on the hour time scale, the different gels slowly evolve within several weeks to a similar structure that is at least stable for over a year. Furthermore, while reference systems without long-range repulsion collapse into dense glassy states, the repulsive colloidal gels are able to support external stress in the form of a centrifugal field of at least 9g.

  10. Short-range resonating-valence-bond state of even-spin ladders: A recurrent variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Germán; Martín-Delgado, Miguel A.

    1997-10-01

    Using a recursive method we construct dimer and nondimer variational ansatzs of the ground state for the two-legged ladder, and compute the number of dimer coverings, the energy density, and the spin-correlation functions. The number of dimer coverings are given by the Fibonacci numbers for the dimer-resonating-valence-bond state and their generalization for the nondimer states. Our method relies on the recurrent relations satisfied by the overlaps of the states with different lengths, which can be solved using generating functions. The recurrent-relation method is applicable to other short-range systems. Based on our results we make a conjecture about the bond amplitudes of the two-legged ladder.

  11. Effects of short-ranged interactions on the Kane-Mele model without discrete particle-hole symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsin-Hua; Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan

    2014-04-01

    We study the effects of short-ranged interactions on the Z2 topological insulator phase, also known as the quantum spin Hall phase, in the Kane-Mele model at half-filling with staggered potentials, which explicitly breaks the discrete particle-hole symmetry. Within Hartree-Fock mean-field analysis, we conclude that the on-site repulsive interactions help stabilize the topological phase (quantum spin Hall) against the staggered potentials by enlarging the regime of the topological phase along the axis of the ratio of the staggered potential strength and the spin-orbit coupling. In sharp contrast, the on-site attractive interactions destabilize the topological phase. We also examine the attractive interaction case by means of the unbiased determinant projector quantum Monte Carlo and the results are qualitatively consistent with the Hartree-Fock picture.

  12. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  13. A ring graph method for approximating atomic short-range order in disordered multi-component systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong

    2007-03-01

    The atomic short-range order (ASRO) in an alloy provides valuable information on the atomic structure to which the disordered alloy is tending. Mean field models with Onsager corrections have been used to calculate the ASRO in lattice models of disordered multi-component alloys. The Onsager correction is composition and temperature dependent and corrects for the over-correlation inherent to mean-field methods so that ASRO calculated satisfies the sum rule. However, it is does not take into account the k-dependence of the corrections. We present an analytical method based on ring graphs which provides for a k-dependent correction to the mean field. The ASRO in a simple ternary Ising model in a FCC lattice with nearest neighbor interactions is calculated using our method and compared to the results obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation. We find that, above the transition temperature, the analytical results are in good agreement with those obtained from simulations.

  14. Role of long- and short-range hydrophobic, hydrophilic and charged residues contact network in protein’s structural organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Dhriti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be described as a graph where nodes represent residues and the strength of non-covalent interactions between them are edges. These protein contact networks can be separated into long and short-range interactions networks depending on the positions of amino acids in primary structure. Long-range interactions play a distinct role in determining the tertiary structure of a protein while short-range interactions could largely contribute to the secondary structure formations. In addition, physico chemical properties and the linear arrangement of amino acids of the primary structure of a protein determines its three dimensional structure. Here, we present an extensive analysis of protein contact subnetworks based on the London van der Waals interactions of amino acids at different length scales. We further subdivided those networks in hydrophobic, hydrophilic and charged residues networks and have tried to correlate their influence in the overall topology and organization of a protein. Results The largest connected component (LCC of long (LRN-, short (SRN- and all-range (ARN networks within proteins exhibit a transition behaviour when plotted against different interaction strengths of edges among amino acid nodes. While short-range networks having chain like structures exhibit highly cooperative transition; long- and all-range networks, which are more similar to each other, have non-chain like structures and show less cooperativity. Further, the hydrophobic residues subnetworks in long- and all-range networks have similar transition behaviours with all residues all-range networks, but the hydrophilic and charged residues networks don’t. While the nature of transitions of LCC’s sizes is same in SRNs for thermophiles and mesophiles, there exists a clear difference in LRNs. The presence of larger size of interconnected long-range interactions in thermophiles than mesophiles, even at

  15. Short-range order in ab initio computer generated amorphous and liquid Cu–Zr alloys: A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galván-Colín, Jonathan, E-mail: jgcolin@ciencias.unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-360, México, D.F. 04510, México (Mexico); Valladares, Ariel A., E-mail: valladar@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-360, México, D.F. 04510, México (Mexico); Valladares, Renela M.; Valladares, Alexander [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-542, México, D.F. 04510, México (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics and a new approach based on the undermelt-quench method we generated amorphous and liquid samples of Cu{sub x}Zr{sub 100−x} (x=64, 50, 36) alloys. We characterized the topology of our resulting structures by means of the pair distribution function and the bond-angle distribution; a coordination number distribution was also calculated. Our results for both amorphous and liquids agree well with experiment. Dependence of short-range order with the concentration is reported. We found that icosahedron-like geometry plays a major role whenever the alloys are Cu-rich or Zr-rich disregarding if the samples are amorphous or liquid. The validation of these results, in turn would let us calculate other properties so far disregarded in the literature.

  16. Short-range order in ab initio computer generated amorphous and liquid Cu-Zr alloys: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Colín, Jonathan; Valladares, Ariel A.; Valladares, Renela M.; Valladares, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics and a new approach based on the undermelt-quench method we generated amorphous and liquid samples of CuxZr100-x (x=64, 50, 36) alloys. We characterized the topology of our resulting structures by means of the pair distribution function and the bond-angle distribution; a coordination number distribution was also calculated. Our results for both amorphous and liquids agree well with experiment. Dependence of short-range order with the concentration is reported. We found that icosahedron-like geometry plays a major role whenever the alloys are Cu-rich or Zr-rich disregarding if the samples are amorphous or liquid. The validation of these results, in turn would let us calculate other properties so far disregarded in the literature.

  17. Large-Scale Atmospheric Dispersal Simulations Identify Likely Airborne Incursion Routes of Wheat Stem Rust Into Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M; Burgin, L; Hort, M C; Hodson, D P; Gilligan, C A

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, severe wheat stem rust epidemics hit Ethiopia, sub-Saharan Africa's largest wheat-producing country. These were caused by race TKTTF (Digalu race) of the pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, which, in Ethiopia, was first detected at the beginning of August 2012. We use the incursion of this new pathogen race as a case study to determine likely airborne origins of fungal spores on regional and continental scales by means of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM). Two different techniques, LPDM simulations forward and backward in time, are compared. The effects of release altitudes in time-backward simulations and P. graminis f. sp. tritici urediniospore viability functions in time-forward simulations are analyzed. Results suggest Yemen as the most likely origin but, also, point to other possible sources in the Middle East and the East African Rift Valley. This is plausible in light of available field surveys and phylogenetic data on TKTTF isolates from Ethiopia and other countries. Independent of the case involving TKTTF, we assess long-term dispersal trends (>10 years) to obtain quantitative estimates of the risk of exotic P. graminis f. sp. tritici spore transport (of any race) into Ethiopia for different 'what-if' scenarios of disease outbreaks in potential source countries in different months of the wheat season.

  18. Toward Realization of 2.4 GHz Balunless Narrowband Receiver Front-End for Short Range Wireless Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir M. El-Desouki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for radio frequency (RF transceivers operating at 2.4 GHz band has attracted considerable research interest due to the advancement in short range wireless technologies. The performance of RF transceivers depends heavily on the transmitter and receiver front-ends. The receiver front-end is comprised of a low-noise amplifier (LNA and a downconversion mixer. There are very few designs that focus on connecting the single-ended output LNA to a double-balanced mixer without the use of on-chip transformer, also known as a balun. The objective of designing such a receiver front-end is to achieve high integration and low power consumption. To meet these requirements, we present the design of fully-integrated 2.4 GHz receiver front-end, consisting of a narrow-band LNA and a double balanced mixer without using a balun. Here, the single-ended RF output signal of the LNA is translated into differential signal using an NMOS-PMOS (n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor, p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor differential pair instead of the conventional NMOS-NMOS transistor configuration, for the RF amplification stage of the double-balanced mixer. The proposed receiver circuit fabricated using TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS technology operates at 2.4 GHz and produces an output signal at 300 MHz. The fabricated receiver achieves a gain of 16.3 dB and consumes only 6.74 mW operating at 1.5 V, while utilizing 2.08 mm2 of chip area. Measurement results demonstrate the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed receiver for short-range wireless applications, such as in wireless sensor network (WSN.

  19. Toward Realization of 2.4 GHz Balunless Narrowband Receiver Front-End for Short Range Wireless Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Desouki, Munir M; Qasim, Syed Manzoor; BenSaleh, Mohammed S; Deen, M Jamal

    2015-05-07

    The demand for radio frequency (RF) transceivers operating at 2.4 GHz band has attracted considerable research interest due to the advancement in short range wireless technologies. The performance of RF transceivers depends heavily on the transmitter and receiver front-ends. The receiver front-end is comprised of a low-noise amplifier (LNA) and a downconversion mixer. There are very few designs that focus on connecting the single-ended output LNA to a double-balanced mixer without the use of on-chip transformer, also known as a balun. The objective of designing such a receiver front-end is to achieve high integration and low power consumption. To meet these requirements, we present the design of fully-integrated 2.4 GHz receiver front-end, consisting of a narrow-band LNA and a double balanced mixer without using a balun. Here, the single-ended RF output signal of the LNA is translated into differential signal using an NMOS-PMOS (n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor, p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor) transistor differential pair instead of the conventional NMOS-NMOS transistor configuration, for the RF amplification stage of the double-balanced mixer. The proposed receiver circuit fabricated using TSMC 0.18 µm CMOS technology operates at 2.4 GHz and produces an output signal at 300 MHz. The fabricated receiver achieves a gain of 16.3 dB and consumes only 6.74 mW operating at 1.5 V, while utilizing 2.08 mm2 of chip area. Measurement results demonstrate the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed receiver for short-range wireless applications, such as in wireless sensor network (WSN).

  20. Short-range and long-range cross-linking effects of polygenipin on gelatin-based composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liming; Xu, Yongbin; Liang, Weijie; Li, Xinying; Li, Defu; Mu, Changdao

    2016-11-01

    Genipin is an ideal cross-linking agent in biomedical applications, which can undergo ring-opening polymerization in alkaline condition. The polygenipin can create short-range and long-range intermolecular cross-linking between protein chains. In this article, the polygenipin with different degree of polymerization was successfully prepared and used to fix gelatin composite materials. The short-range and long-range cross-linking effects of polygenipin were systematically studied. The results show that the composite materials present porous structure with tunable pore sizes in the gel state, which can be easily controlled by adjusting the degree of polymerization of polygenipin. Long-range cross-linking can increase the pore size of the gel. However, during the drying process, the composite films cross-linked by polygenipin with higher degree of polymerization shrank to smaller size to create more compact structure, resulting in the improvement of water resistance properties, thermal stability, tensile strength, and darker color for the composite films. It is interesting that the composite films can partly swell to the original gel structure when in contact with water and saturated water vapor. All the composite films have excellent barrier properties against UV light. However, the compatibility of gelatin and polygenipin is reduced when the degree of polymerization of polygenipin increases to a certain extent, which will result in the formation of phase separation structure. The obtained composite films are ideal candidates for food and pharmaceutical packaging materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2712-2722, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Global and regional cortical connectivity maturation index (CCMI) of developmental human brain with quantification of short-range association tracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Minhui; Jeon, Tina; Mishra, Virendra; Du, Haixiao; Wang, Yu; Peng, Yun; Huang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    From early childhood to adulthood, synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning continuously reshape the structural architecture and neural connection in developmental human brains. Disturbance of the precisely balanced strengthening of certain axons and pruning of others may cause mental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. To characterize this balance, we proposed a novel measurement based on cortical parcellation and diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography, a cortical connectivity maturation index (CCMI). To evaluate the spatiotemporal sensitivity of CCMI as a potential biomarker, dMRI and T1 weighted datasets of 21 healthy subjects 2-25 years were acquired. Brain cortex was parcellated into 68 gyral labels using T1 weighted images, then transformed into dMRI space to serve as the seed region of interest for dMRI-based tractography. Cortico-cortical association fibers initiated from each gyrus were categorized into long- and short-range ones, based on the other end of fiber terminating in non-adjacent or adjacent gyri of the seed gyrus, respectively. The regional CCMI was defined as the ratio between number of short-range association tracts and that of all association tracts traced from one of 68 parcellated gyri. The developmental trajectory of the whole brain CCMI follows a quadratic model with initial decreases from 2 to 16 years followed by later increases after 16 years. Regional CCMI is heterogeneous among different cortical gyri with CCMI dropping to the lowest value earlier in primary somatosensory cortex and visual cortex while later in the prefrontal cortex. The proposed CCMI may serve as sensitive biomarker for brain development under normal or pathological conditions.

  2. Analysis of long- and short-range contribution to adhesion work in cardiac fibroblasts: An atomic force microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbaizero, O., E-mail: sbaizero@units.it [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy); University of Colorado Cardiovascular Institute, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora (United States); DelFavero, G. [Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste (Italy); Martinelli, V. [International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy); Long, C.S.; Mestroni, L. [University of Colorado Cardiovascular Institute, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) and Poisson statistic were used to analyze the detachment work recorded during the removal of gold-covered microspheres from cardiac fibroblasts. The effect of Cytochalasin D, a disruptor of the actin cytoskeleton, on cell adhesion was also tested. The adhesion work was assessed using a Poisson analysis also derived from single-cell force spectroscopy retracting curves. The use of Poisson analysis to get adhesion work from AFM curves is quite a novel method, and in this case, proved to be effective to study the short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work. This method avoids the difficult identification of minor peaks in the AFM retracting curves by creating what can be considered an average adhesion work. Even though the effect of actin depolymerisation is well documented, its use revealed that control cardiac fibroblasts (CT) exhibit a work of adhesion at least 5 times higher than that of the Cytochalasin treated cells. However, our results indicate that in both cells short-range and long-range contributions to the adhesion work are nearly equal and the same heterogeneity index describes both cells. Therefore, we infer that the different adhesion behaviors might be explained by the presence of fewer membrane adhesion molecules available at the AFM tip–cell interface under circumstances where the actin cytoskeleton has been disrupted. - Highlights: • AFM force–deformation curve was used to characterize the cardiac fibroblast adhesion behavior. • The amount and nature of adhesion were assessed using a Poisson analysis applied to the AFM curve. • The work of adhesion for control cells was about four times higher than that of the Cyt-D treated cells. • Short- and long-range contributions to adhesion are nearly equal for both control and treated cells.

  3. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Kunishima, Naoaki; Tani, Kotaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Furuyama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Shozo; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM) simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II) together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul's after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration data for the simulation grids nearest to an individual's whereabouts using WSPEEDI-II datasets for the subsequent calculation of internal doses due to inhalation. This paper presents an overview of the developed tool and provides tentative comparisons between direct measurement-based and ATDM-based results regarding the internal doses received by 421 persons from whom personal behavior data available.

  4. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurihara Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul’s after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration data for the simulation grids nearest to an individual’s whereabouts using WSPEEDI-II datasets for the subsequent calculation of internal doses due to inhalation. This paper presents an overview of the developed tool and provides tentative comparisons between direct measurement-based and ATDM-based results regarding the internal doses received by 421 persons from whom personal behavior data available.

  5. The model SIRANE for atmospheric urban pollutant dispersion. PART III: Validation against NO2 yearly concentration measurements in a large urban agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulhac, L.; Nguyen, C. V.; Volta, P.; Salizzoni, P.

    2017-10-01

    We present a validation study of an updated version of the SIRANE model, whose results have been systematically compared to concentrations of nitrogen dioxide collected over the whole urban agglomeration of Lyon. We model atmospheric dispersion of nitrogen oxides emitted by road traffic, industries and domestic heating. The meteorological wind field is computed by a pre-processor using data collected at a ground level monitoring station. Model results are compared with hourly concentrations measured at 15 monitoring stations over the whole year (2008). Further 75 passive diffusion samplers were used during 3 periods of 2 weeks to get a detailed spatial distribution over the west part of the city. An analysis of the model results depending on the variability of the meteorological input allows us to identify the causes for peculiar bad performances of the model and to identify possible improvements of the parameterisations implemented in it.

  6. Short-time dynamics of lysozyme solutions with competing short-range attraction and long-range repulsion: Experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riest, Jonas; Nägele, Gerhard; Liu, Yun; Wagner, Norman J; Godfrin, P Douglas

    2018-02-14

    Recently, atypical static features of microstructural ordering in low-salinity lysozyme protein solutions have been extensively explored experimentally and explained theoretically based on a short-range attractive plus long-range repulsive (SALR) interaction potential. However, the protein dynamics and the relationship to the atypical SALR structure remain to be demonstrated. Here, the applicability of semi-analytic theoretical methods predicting diffusion properties and viscosity in isotropic particle suspensions to low-salinity lysozyme protein solutions is tested. Using the interaction potential parameters previously obtained from static structure factor measurements, our results of Monte Carlo simulations representing seven experimental lysoyzme samples indicate that they exist either in dispersed fluid or random percolated states. The self-consistent Zerah-Hansen scheme is used to describe the static structure factor, S(q), which is the input to our calculation schemes for the short-time hydrodynamic function, H(q), and the zero-frequency viscosity η. The schemes account for hydrodynamic interactions included on an approximate level. Theoretical predictions for H(q) as a function of the wavenumber q quantitatively agree with experimental results at small protein concentrations obtained using neutron spin echo measurements. At higher concentrations, qualitative agreement is preserved although the calculated hydrodynamic functions are overestimated. We attribute the differences for higher concentrations and lower temperatures to translational-rotational diffusion coupling induced by the shape and interaction anisotropy of particles and clusters, patchiness of the lysozyme particle surfaces, and the intra-cluster dynamics, features not included in our simple globular particle model. The theoretical results for the solution viscosity, η, are in qualitative agreement with our experimental data even at higher concentrations. We demonstrate that semi

  7. Small-angle neutron scattering study of the short-range organization of dispersed CsNi[Cr(CN){sub 6}] nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridier, Karl; Gillon, Béatrice; André, Gilles; Chaboussant, Grégory, E-mail: gregory.chaboussant@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, UMR12 CEA-CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Catala, Laure; Mazérat, Sandra; Mallah, Talal [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire et des Matériaux d' Orsay, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-09-21

    Prussian blue analogues magnetic nanoparticles (of radius R{sub 0} = 2.4–8.6 nm) embedded in PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) or CTA{sup +} (cetyltrimethylammonium) matrices have been studied using neutron diffraction and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at several concentrations. For the most diluted particles in neutral PVP, the SANS signal is fully accounted for by a “single-particle” spherical form factor with no structural correlations between the nanoparticles and with radii comparable to those inferred from neutron diffraction. For higher concentration in PVP, structural correlations modify the SANS signal with the appearance of a structure factor peak, which is described using an effective “mean-field” model. A new length scale R{sup * }≈ 3R{sub 0}, corresponding to an effective repulsive interaction radius, is evidenced in PVP samples. In CTA{sup +}, electrostatic interactions play a crucial role and lead to a dense layer of CTA{sup +} around the nanoparticles, which considerably alter the SANS patterns as compared to PVP. The SANS data of nanoparticles in CTA{sup +} are best described by a core-shell model without visible inter-particle structure factor.

  8. Assessment of the announced North Korean nuclear test using long-range atmospheric transport and dispersion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meutter, Pieter; Camps, Johan; Delcloo, Andy; Termonia, Piet

    2017-08-18

    On 6 January 2016, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea announced to have conducted its fourth nuclear test. Analysis of the corresponding seismic waves from the Punggye-ri nuclear test site showed indeed that an underground man-made explosion took place, although the nuclear origin of the explosion needs confirmation. Seven weeks after the announced nuclear test, radioactive xenon was observed in Japan by a noble gas measurement station of the International Monitoring System. In this paper, atmospheric transport modelling is used to show that the measured radioactive xenon is compatible with a delayed release from the Punggye-ri nuclear test site. An uncertainty quantification on the modelling results is given by using the ensemble method. The latter is important for policy makers and helps advance data fusion, where different nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty monitoring techniques are combined.

  9. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after transla...

  10. Accurate classical short-range forces for the study of collision cascades in Fe-Ni-Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Tamm, Artur; Mu, Sai; Samolyuk, German D.; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Aabloo, Alvo; Klintenberg, Mattias; Caro, Alfredo; Stoller, Roger E.

    2017-10-01

    The predictive power of a classical molecular dynamics simulation is largely determined by the physical validity of its underlying empirical potential. In the case of high-energy collision cascades, it was recently shown that correctly modeling interactions at short distances is necessary to accurately predict primary damage production. An ab initio based framework is introduced for modifying an existing embedded-atom method FeNiCr potential to handle these short-range interactions. Density functional theory is used to calculate the energetics of two atoms approaching each other, embedded in the alloy, and to calculate the equation of state of the alloy as it is compressed. The pairwise terms and the embedding terms of the potential are modified in accordance with the ab initio results. Using this reparametrized potential, collision cascades are performed in Ni50Fe50, Ni80Cr20 and Ni33Fe33Cr33. The simulations reveal that alloying Ni and NiCr to Fe reduces primary damage production, in agreement with some previous calculations. Alloying Ni and NiFe to Cr does not reduce primary damage production, in contradiction with previous calculations.

  11. Short range shooting distance estimation using variable pressure SEM images of the surroundings of bullet holes in textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Ruth; Frank, Paulo Ricardo Ost; Vasconcellos, M A Z

    2017-03-01

    Modifications of cotton and polyester textiles due to shots fired at short range were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM). Different mechanisms of fiber rupture as a function of fiber type and shooting distance were detected, namely fusing, melting, scorching, and mechanical breakage. To estimate the firing distance, the approximately exponential decay of GSR coverage as a function of radial distance from the entrance hole was determined from image analysis, instead of relying on chemical analysis with EDX, which is problematic in the VP-SEM. A set of backscattered electron images, with sufficient magnification to discriminate micrometer wide GSR particles, was acquired at different radial distances from the entrance hole. The atomic number contrast between the GSR particles and the organic fibers allowed to find a robust procedure to segment the micrographs into binary images, in which the white pixel count was attributed to GSR coverage. The decrease of the white pixel count followed an exponential decay, and it was found that the reciprocal of the decay constant, obtained from the least-square fitting of the coverage data, showed a linear dependence on the shooting distance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analog Circuit Design Low Voltage Low Power; Short Range Wireless Front-Ends; Power Management and DC-DC

    CERN Document Server

    Roermund, Arthur; Baschirotto, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The book contains the contribution of 18 tutorials of the 20th workshop on Advances in Analog Circuit Design.  Each part discusses a specific to-date topic on new and valuable design ideas in the area of analog circuit design. Each part is presented by six experts in that field and state of the art information is shared and overviewed. This book is number 20 in this successful series of Analog Circuit Design, providing valuable information and excellent overviews of Low-Voltage Low-Power Data Converters - Chaired by Prof. Anderea Baschirotto, University of Milan-Bicocca Short Range Wireless Front-Ends - Chaired by Prof. Arthur van Roermund, Eindhoven University of Technology Power management and DC-DC - Chaired by Prof. M. Steyaert, Katholieke University Leuven Analog Circuit Design is an essential reference source for analog circuit designers and researchers wishing to keep abreast with the latest development in the field. The tutorial coverage also makes it suitable for use in an advanced design.

  13. Iterative load-balancing method with multigrid level relaxation for particle simulation with short-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, Mikito; Nishiura, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    We developed dynamic load-balancing algorithms for Particle Simulation Methods (PSM) involving short-range interactions, such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Moving Particle Semi-implicit method (MPS), and Discrete Element method (DEM). These are needed to handle billions of particles modeled in large distributed-memory computer systems. Our method utilizes flexible orthogonal domain decomposition, allowing the sub-domain boundaries in the column to be different for each row. The imbalances in the execution time between parallel logical processes are treated as a nonlinear residual. Load-balancing is achieved by minimizing the residual within the framework of an iterative nonlinear solver, combined with a multigrid technique in the local smoother. Our iterative method is suitable for adjusting the sub-domain frequently by monitoring the performance of each computational process because it is computationally cheaper in terms of communication and memory costs than non-iterative methods. Numerical tests demonstrated the ability of our approach to handle workload imbalances arising from a non-uniform particle distribution, differences in particle types, or heterogeneous computer architecture which was difficult with previously proposed methods. We analyzed the parallel efficiency and scalability of our method using Earth simulator and K-computer supercomputer systems.

  14. Free Space Optical Interconnect (FSOI) modules for short range data transfer applied to board to board high rate communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Myriam; Mallet, Maxime; Pujol, Laurence; Claudepierre, Christian; Veyron, Johannès.; Giroud, Romain; Mousseaux, Daniel; Quentel, Francois; Foucal, Vincent; Pez, Mathias

    2017-10-01

    To provide more flexibility in inter-board communication in blade chassis, we developed a Free Space Optical Interconnect (FSOI) system for short range high speed data transfer. We designed robust and low footprint components compliant with both a use in milaero environment and an operation up to 5 and 10 Gbps. The 5Gpbs configuration demonstrated large tolerance to misalignment between emitter and receiver modules: +1.5/-1 mm along optical axis, lateral tolerance of +/-1 mm and angular tolerances of +/-1.5°. Reliable performances have been demonstrated over a temperature range from -30°C to 80°C and constraint environment as thermal and damp heat cycles and vibrations. Increase the data rate of the FSO device one step beyond up to 10 Gbps requires dealing with mode partitioning troubles generated by the use of VCSEL lasers. We designed and evaluated an improved opto-mechanical combination to overcome this drawback. The resulting device shows error free 10 Gbps data transfer while keeping large tolerance to Tx/Rx misalignments.

  15. Short-range test of the universality of gravitational constant G at the millimeter scale using a digital image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, K.; Akiyama, T.; Hata, M.; Hatori, M.; Iguri, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Inaba, S.; Kawamura, H.; Kishi, R.; Murakami, H.; Nakaya, Y.; Nishio, H.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Saiba, S.; Sakuta, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tanuma, R.; Totsuka, Y.; Tsutsui, R.; Watanabe, K.; Murata, J.

    2017-09-01

    The composition dependence of gravitational constant G is measured at the millimeter scale to test the weak equivalence principle, which may be violated at short range through new Yukawa interactions such as the dilaton exchange force. A torsion balance on a turning table with two identical tungsten targets surrounded by two different attractor materials (copper and aluminum) is used to measure gravitational torque by means of digital measurements of a position sensor. Values of the ratios \\tilde{G}_Al-W/\\tilde{G}_Cu-W -1 and \\tilde{G}_Cu-W/GN -1 were (0.9 +/- 1.1sta +/- 4.8sys) × 10-2 and (0.2 +/- 0.9sta +/- 2.1sys) × 10-2 , respectively; these were obtained at a center to center separation of 1.7 cm and surface to surface separation of 4.5 mm between target and attractor, which is consistent with the universality of G. A weak equivalence principle (WEP) violation parameter of η_Al-Cu(r∼ 1 cm)=(0.9 +/- 1.1sta +/- 4.9sys) × 10-2 at the shortest range of around 1 cm was also obtained.

  16. Effect of Ground Surface Roughness on Atmospheric Dispersion and Dry Deposition of Cs-137 in the UAE Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungyeop; Beeley, Philip A. [Khalifa Univ. of Science, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kim, Sungyeop; Chang, Soonheung; Lee, Kunjai [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The site of nuclear power plant (NPP) in the UAE has several unique characteristics as a NPP on the desert environment near coastal region. Those characteristics are represented like below: · Arid ground surface · Low ground surface roughness length · Relatively simple (flat) terrain · Extremely low precipitation · Intense solar radiation and high temperature in day time · Sea breeze · Relatively high humidity of atmosphere · Etc. From the review of this desert environment in the UAE, low ground surface roughness is regarded as one of definitively different characteristics from that of other NPP sites. In this context, surface roughness is selected as independent variables for the sensitivity analyses in this research. Another important reason of this selection is that this parameters is less dependent on the day and night change than other parameters. With ground level concentration, dry deposition rate has been chosen as a dependent variable to be considered rather than wet deposition because UAE shows almost zero rainfall especially in summer. Lower ground level concentration of Cs-137 near the site and extremely lower dry deposition of Cs-137 are predicted in the UAE environment because of the lower ground surface roughness of the desert.

  17. A short-range weather prediction system for South Africa based on a multi-model approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available African Weather Service. The UM contributed three ensemble members which differ in physics, data assimilation techniques and horisontal resolution. The second model is the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM) which is operational at the Council...

  18. Emission of gas and atmospheric dispersion of SO2 during the December 2013 eruption at San Miguel volcano (El Salvador)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Granieri, Domenico; Liuzzo, Marco; La Spina, Alessandro; Giuffrida, Giovanni B.; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Giudice, Gaetano; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Montalvo, Francisco; Burton, Michael; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    y Recursos Naturales (MARN) of El Salvador and by a network of geophysical and geochemical stations established on the volcano by the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), immediately after the December 2013 eruption, on the request of MARN. During the eruption, SO2 emissions increased from a background level of ~330 t d-1 to 2200 t d-1, dropping after the eruption to an average level of 680 t d-1. Wind measurements and SO2 fluxes during the pre-, syn- and post-eruptive stages were used to model SO2 dispersion around the volcano. Air SO2 concentration exceeds the dangerous threshold of 5 ppm in the crater region, and in some middle sectors of the highly visited volcanic cone.

  19. Single-Chip Fully Integrated Direct-Modulation CMOS RF Transmitters for Short-Range Wireless Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low power radio frequency (RF transceivers used in short-range application such as wireless sensor networks (WSNs require efficient, reliable and fully integrated transmitter architectures with minimal building blocks. This paper presents the design, implementation and performance evaluation of single-chip, fully integrated 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz RF transmitters using direct-modulation power voltage-controlled oscillators (PVCOs in addition to a 2.0 GHz phase-locked loop (PLL based transmitter. All three RF transmitters have been fabricated in a standard mixed-signal CMOS 0.18 µm technology. Measurement results of the 2.4 GHz transmitter show an improvement in drain efficiency from 27% to 36%. The 2.4 GHz and 433 MHz transmitters deliver an output power of 8 dBm with a phase noise of −122 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 15.4 mA of current and an output power of 6.5 dBm with a phase noise of −120 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, while drawing 20.8 mA of current from 1.5 V power supplies, respectively. The PLL transmitter delivers an output power of 9 mW with a locking range of 128 MHz and consumes 26 mA from 1.8 V power supply. The experimental results demonstrate that the RF transmitters can be efficiently used in low power WSN applications.

  20. Elastic strain relaxation in interfacial dislocation patterns: II. From long- and short-range interactions to local reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattré, A.

    2017-08-01

    The long- and short-range interactions as well as planar reactions between two infinitely periodic sets of crossing dislocations are investigated using anisotropic elasticity theory in face- (fcc) and body- (bcc) centered cubic materials. Two preliminary cases are proposed to examine the substantial changes in the elastic stress states and the corresponding strain energies due to a slight rearrangement in the internal dislocation geometries and characters. In general, significant differences and discrepancies resulting from the considered cubic crystal structure and the approximation of isotropic elasticity are exhibited. In a third scenario, special attention is paid to connecting specific internal dislocation structures from the previous cases with non-equilibrium configurations predicted by the quantized Frank-Bilby equation for the (111) fcc and (110) bcc twist grain boundaries. The present solutions lead to the formation of energetically favorable dislocation junctions with non-randomly strain-relaxed configurations of lower energy. In particular, the local dislocation interactions and reactions form equilibrium hexagonal-shaped patterns with planar three-fold dislocation nodes without producing spurious far-field stresses.Numerical application results are presented from a selection of cubic metals including aluminum, copper, tantalum, and niobium. In contrast to the fcc materials, asymmetric dislocation nodes occur in the anisotropic bcc cases, within which the minimum-energy paths for predicting the fully strain-relaxed dislocation patterns depend on the Zener anisotropic factor with respect to unity. The associated changes in the dislocation structures as well as the removal of the elastic strain energy upon relaxations are quantified and also discussed.

  1. Short-range precipitation forecasts using assimilation of simulated satellite water vapor profiles and column cloud liquid water amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Diak, George R.; Hayden, Cristopher M.; Young, John A.

    1995-01-01

    These observing system simulation experiments investigate the assimilation of satellite-observed water vapor and cloud liquid water data in the initialization of a limited-area primitive equations model with the goal of improving short-range precipitation forecasts. The assimilation procedure presented includes two aspects: specification of an initial cloud liquid water vertical distribution and diabatic initialization. The satellite data is simulated for the next generation of polar-orbiting satellite instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS), which are scheduled to be launched on the NOAA-K satellite in the mid-1990s. Based on cloud-top height and total column cloud liquid water amounts simulated for satellite data a diagnostic method is used to specify an initial cloud water vertical distribution and to modify the initial moisture distribution in cloudy areas. Using a diabatic initialization procedure, the associated latent heating profiles are directly assimilated into the numerical model. The initial heating is estimated by time averaging the latent heat release from convective and large-scale condensation during the early forecast stage after insertion of satellite-observed temperature, water vapor, and cloud water formation. The assimilation of satellite-observed moisture and cloud water, together withy three-mode diabatic initialization, significantly alleviates the model precipitation spinup problem, especially in the first 3 h of the forecast. Experimental forecasts indicate that the impact of satellite-observed temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud water alone in the initialization procedure shortens the spinup time for precipitation rates by 1-2 h and for regeneration of the areal coverage by 3 h. The diabatic initialization further reduces the precipitation spinup time (compared to adiabatic initialization) by 1 h.

  2. Storm Identification, Tracking and Forecasting Using High-Resolution Images of Short-Range X-Band Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rain nowcasting is an essential part of weather monitoring. It plays a vital role in human life, ranging from advanced warning systems to scheduling open air events and tourism. A nowcasting system can be divided into three fundamental steps, i.e., storm identification, tracking and nowcasting. The main contribution of this work is to propose procedures for each step of the rain nowcasting tool and to objectively evaluate the performances of every step, focusing on two-dimension data collected from short-range X-band radars installed in different parts of Italy. This work presents the solution of previously unsolved problems in storm identification: first, the selection of suitable thresholds for storm identification; second, the isolation of false merger (loosely-connected storms; and third, the identification of a high reflectivity sub-storm within a large storm. The storm tracking step of the existing tools, such as TITANand SCIT, use only up to two storm attributes, i.e., center of mass and area. It is possible to use more attributes for tracking. Furthermore, the contribution of each attribute in storm tracking is yet to be investigated. This paper presents a novel procedure called SALdEdA (structure, amplitude, location, eccentricity difference and areal difference for storm tracking. This work also presents the contribution of each component of SALdEdA in storm tracking. The second order exponential smoothing strategy is used for storm nowcasting, where the growth and decay of each variable of interest is considered to be linear. We evaluated the major steps of our method. The adopted techniques for automatic threshold calculation are assessed with a 97% goodness. False merger and sub-storms within a cluster of storms are successfully handled. Furthermore, the storm tracking procedure produced good results with an accuracy of 99.34% for convective events and 100% for stratiform events.

  3. Contribution of muscle short-range stiffness to initial changes in joint kinetics and kinematics during perturbations to standing balance: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Friedl; Allen, Jessica L; Ting, Lena H

    2017-04-11

    Simulating realistic musculoskeletal dynamics is critical to understanding neural control of muscle activity evoked in sensorimotor feedback responses that have inherent neural transmission delays. Thus, the initial mechanical response of muscles to perturbations in the absence of any change in muscle activity determines which corrective neural responses are required to stabilize body posture. Muscle short-range stiffness, a history-dependent property of muscle that causes a rapid and transient rise in muscle force upon stretch, likely affects musculoskeletal dynamics in the initial mechanical response to perturbations. Here we identified the contributions of short-range stiffness to joint torques and angles in the initial mechanical response to support surface translations using dynamic simulation. We developed a dynamic model of muscle short-range stiffness to augment a Hill-type muscle model. Our simulations show that short-range stiffness can provide stability against external perturbations during the neuromechanical response delay. Assuming constant muscle activation during the initial mechanical response, including muscle short-range stiffness was necessary to account for the rapid rise in experimental sagittal plane knee and hip joint torques that occurs simultaneously with very small changes in joint angles and reduced root mean square errors between simulated and experimental torques by 56% and 47%, respectively. Moreover, forward simulations lacking short-range stiffness produced unreasonably large joint angle changes during the initial response. Using muscle models accounting for short-range stiffness along with other aspects of history-dependent muscle dynamics may be important to advance our ability to simulate inherently unstable human movements based on principles of neural control and biomechanics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Short range DFT combined with long-range local RPA within a range-separated hybrid DFT framework

    CERN Document Server

    Chermak, E; Mussard, Bastien; Angyan, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Selecting excitations in localized orbitals to calculate long-range correlation contributions to range-separated density-functional theory can reduce the overall computational effort significantly. Beyond simple selection schemes of excited determinants, the dispersion-only approximation, which avoids counterpoise-corrected monomer calculations, is shown to be particularly interesting in this context, which we apply to the random-phase approximation. The approach has been tested on dimers of formamide, water, methane and benzene.

  5. Evaluation of ensemble atmospheric simulations in oil dispersion models at Itaguai Port region; Avaliacao do uso de resultados numericos de previsao atmosferica por conjunto na modelagem da dispersao de oleo na regiao do Porto de Itaguai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Renato Goncalves dos; Silva, Mariana P.R.; Silva, Ricardo Marcelo da; Torres Junior, Audalio R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Modelagem de Processos Marinhos e Atmosfericos (LAMMA); Landau, Luiz [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Metodos Computacinais em Engenharia (LAMCE); Sa, Reginaldo Ventura de; Hochleitner, Fabio; Correa, Eduardo Barbosa [AQUAMET Meteorologia e Projeto de Sistemas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work discusses the use of numerical prediction using ensemble as boundary condition in pollutants dispersion models, applied in a hypothetical case of an oil spill occurrence in Itaguai Port. The Princeton Ocean Model (POM) has been used to simulate hydrodynamics and NICOIL Eulerian model to forecast oil spill dispersion, and ensemble wind forecast from Global Forecast System (GFS), aiming to assess the importance of this parameter variability in oil dispersion at sea. The wind scenarios using ensemble members has showed significant dispersion when compared to control simulation, demonstrating that the uncertainty in the atmospheric modeling can generate considerable variations in the placement of the final spot of oil. The region of interest was the Sepetiba Bay, located on the southern coast of the Rio de Janeiro state; because of port operations carried out around the Port of Itaguai where they can, eventually, oil leaks occur. (author)

  6. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    In order to study atmospheric pollution and the dispersion of industrial stack emissions, a large eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky-Germano sub-grid-scale model is coupled with Lagrangian tracking of fluid particles containing scalar, solid particles and droplets. The movement of fluid particles at a sub-grid level is given by a three-dimensional Langevin model. The stochastic model is written in terms of sub-grid-scale statistics at a mesh level. By introducing a diffusion model, the coupling between the large-eddy simulation and the modified three-dimensional Langevin model is applied to passive scalar dispersion. The results are validated by comparison with the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (1982). The equation of motion of a small rigid sphere in a turbulent flow is introduced. Solid particles and droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The velocity of solid particles and droplets is considered to have a large scale component (directly computed by the large-eddy simulation) and a sub-grid scale part. Because of inertia and gravity effects, solid particles and droplets, deviate from the trajectories of the surrounding fluid particles. Therefore, a modified Lagrangian correlation timescale is introduced into the Langevin model previously developed for the sub-grid velocity of fluid particles. Two-way coupling and collisions are taken into account. The results of the large-eddy simulation with solid particles are compared with the wind-tunnel experiments of Nalpanis et al. (1993) and of Taniere et al. (1997) on sand particles in saltation and in modified saltation, respectively. A model for droplet coalescence and breakup is implemented which allows to predict droplet interactions under turbulent flow conditions in the frame of the Euler/Lagrange approach. Coalescence and breakup are considered as a stochastic process with simple scaling symmetry assumption for the droplet radius, initially proposed by Kolmogorov (1941). At high

  7. Public member dose assessment of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant under normal operation by modeling the fallout from stack using the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zali, A; Shamsaei Zafarghandi, M; Feghhi, S A; Taherian, A M

    2017-05-01

    In this work, public dose resulting from fission products released from Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) under normal operation is assessed. Due to the long range transport of radionuclides in this work (80 km) and considering terrain and meteorological data, HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYsplit) model, which uses three dimensional long-range numerical models, has been employed to calculate atmospheric dispersion. Annual effective dose calculation is carried out for inhalation, ingestion, and external exposure pathways in 16directions and within 80 km around the site for representative person. The results showed the maximum dose of inhalation and external exposure for adults is 3.8 × 10-8Sv/y in the SE direction and distance of 600 m from the BNPP site which is less than ICRP 103 recommended dose limit (1 mSv). Children and infants' doses are higher in comparison with adults, although they are less than 1 mSv. Ingestion dose percentage in the total dose is less than 0.1%. The results of this study underestimate the Final Safety Analysis Report ofBNPP-1 (FSAR)data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Two-particle short-range correlations relative to the reaction plane in Au +Au collisions at 200 GeV at RHIC/ STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haochen; STAR Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collisions can create a hot and dense nuclear medium in which local domains could obtain a chirality imbalance. The chirality imbalance, together with a strong magnetic field, can induce an electric charge separation along the magnetic field direction, owing to the chiral magnetic effect (CME). The γ correlator measures the two-particle azimuthal correlations relative to the reaction plane, and provides a probe to the electric charge separation due to the CME. However, the γ correlator contains short-range correlations caused by other physics mechanisms, such as quantum effects, Coulomb interaction and resonance decays. In this poster, we decompose the γ correlator into two parts, along and across the reaction plane, respectively, and separate the contributions of particle pairs with small relative pseudorapidity (short range). The results will be presented for 200 GeV Au +Au collisions, and the physics implications on the short-range background will be discussed.

  9. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aileen

    The term infrasound describes atmospheric sound waves with frequencies below 20 Hz, while acoustics are classified within the audible range of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasound and acoustic monitoring in the scientific community is hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and a limited number of studies on regional and short-range noise and source characterization. The JASON Report (2005) suggests the infrasound community focus on more broad-frequency, observational studies within a tactical distance of 10 km. In keeping with that recommendation, this paper presents a study of regional and short-range atmospheric acoustic and infrasonic noise characterization, at a desert site in West Texas, covering a broad frequency range of 0.2 to 100 Hz. To spatially sample the band, a large number of infrasound gauges was needed. A laboratory instrument analysis is presented of the set of low-cost infrasound sensors used in this study, manufactured by Inter-Mountain Laboratories (IML). Analysis includes spectra, transfer functions and coherences to assess the stability and range of the gauges, and complements additional instrument testing by Sandia National Laboratories. The IMLs documented here have been found reliably coherent from 0.1 to 7 Hz without instrument correction. Corrections were built using corresponding time series from the commercially available and more expensive Chaparral infrasound gauge, so that the corrected IML outputs were able to closely mimic the Chaparral output. Arrays of gauges are needed for atmospheric sound signal processing. Our West Texas experiment consisted of a 1.5 km aperture, 23-gauge infrasound/acoustic array of IMLs, with a compact, 12 m diameter grid-array of rented IMLs at the center. To optimize signal recording, signal-to-noise ratio needs to be quantified with respect to both frequency band and coherence length. The higher-frequency grid array consisted of 25 microphones arranged in a five by five pattern with 3 meter spacing, without

  10. On the effect of impurities on resistivity recovery, short-range ordering, and defect migration in electron-irradiated concentrated Fe-Cr alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaev, A L; Davletshin, A E

    1997-01-01

    The resistivity recovery of pure and impurity-doped (0.2-1.5% Si, 0.15% C+N) concentrated ferritic Fe-Cr alloys after electron irradiation at 50-60 K has been investigated over the temperature range 110-390 K. A fine recovery spectrum structure consisting of five peaks has been observed over the range 135-230 K. Short-range ordering starts with the onset of vacancy long-range migration. Doping with both types of impurity suppresses the recovery spectrum structure over the range 160-220 K in a similar manner. Additional effects of impurity doping on the resistivity recovery caused by deviation from Matthiessen's rule have been analysed. A stage III peak is found at 210 K, and two peaks - at 175 K and 195 K - are interpreted as being due to the vacancy short-range migration. It is supposed that such a manifestation of short-range vacancy migration is due to a strong immobilization of self-interstitial atoms, and suppression of short-range and long-range defect annealing processes in stage I, according to a conf...

  11. Short-range order of undercooled melts of PdZr 2 intermetallic compound studied by X-ray and neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Herlach, D. M.; Mauro, N. A.; Kelton, K. F.

    2013-05-01

    The short-range order in undercooled melts of the intermetallic Zr2Pd glass-forming alloy is investigated by combining electrostatic levitation (ESL) with high-energy X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. Experimentally determined structure factors are measured and analyzed with respect to various structures of short-range order. The comparative X-ray and neutron scattering experiments allow for investigations of topological and chemical short-range order. Based on these studies, no preference of a specific short-range order is found for the liquid Zr2Pd glass-forming alloy, even in the metastable state of the deeply undercooled melt. This is in agreement with an earlier report from X-ray diffraction and molecular-dynamics studies of a Zr75.5Pd24.5 liquid, which showed a broad distribution of cluster types. The results for the Zr2Pd liquid are discussed with respect to the glass-forming ability of this melt.

  12. How Confinement-Induced Structures Alter the Contribution of Hydrodynamic and Short-Ranged Repulsion Forces to the Viscosity of Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Meera; Lin, Neil Y. C.; Leahy, Brian D.; Ness, Christopher; Fiore, Andrew M.; Swan, James W.; Cohen, Itai

    2017-10-01

    Confined systems ranging from the atomic to the granular are ubiquitous in nature. Experiments and simulations of such atomic and granular systems have shown a complex relationship between the microstructural arrangements under confinement, the short-ranged particle stresses, and flow fields. Understanding the same correlation between structure and rheology in the colloidal regime is important due to the significance of such suspensions in industrial applications. Moreover, colloidal suspensions exhibit a wide range of structures under confinement that could considerably modify such force balances and the resulting viscosity. Here, we use a combination of experiments and simulations to elucidate how confinement-induced structures alter the relative contributions of hydrodynamic and short-range repulsive forces to produce up to a tenfold change in the viscosity. In the experiments we use a custom-built confocal rheoscope to image the particle configurations of a colloidal suspension while simultaneously measuring its stress response. We find that as the gap decreases below 15 particle diameters, the viscosity first decreases from its bulk value, shows fluctuations with the gap, and then sharply increases for gaps below 3 particle diameters. These trends in the viscosity are shown to strongly correlate with the suspension microstructure. Further, we compare our experimental results to those from two different simulations techniques, which enables us to determine the relative contributions of hydrodynamic and short-range repulsive stresses to the suspension rheology. The first method uses the lubrication approximation to find the hydrodynamic stress and includes a short-range repulsive force between the particles while the second is a Stokesian dynamics simulation that calculates the full hydrodynamic stress in the suspension. We find that the decrease in the viscosity at moderate confinements has a significant contribution from both the hydrodynamic and short-range

  13. How Confinement-Induced Structures Alter the Contribution of Hydrodynamic and Short-Ranged Repulsion Forces to the Viscosity of Colloidal Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Ramaswamy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Confined systems ranging from the atomic to the granular are ubiquitous in nature. Experiments and simulations of such atomic and granular systems have shown a complex relationship between the microstructural arrangements under confinement, the short-ranged particle stresses, and flow fields. Understanding the same correlation between structure and rheology in the colloidal regime is important due to the significance of such suspensions in industrial applications. Moreover, colloidal suspensions exhibit a wide range of structures under confinement that could considerably modify such force balances and the resulting viscosity. Here, we use a combination of experiments and simulations to elucidate how confinement-induced structures alter the relative contributions of hydrodynamic and short-range repulsive forces to produce up to a tenfold change in the viscosity. In the experiments we use a custom-built confocal rheoscope to image the particle configurations of a colloidal suspension while simultaneously measuring its stress response. We find that as the gap decreases below 15 particle diameters, the viscosity first decreases from its bulk value, shows fluctuations with the gap, and then sharply increases for gaps below 3 particle diameters. These trends in the viscosity are shown to strongly correlate with the suspension microstructure. Further, we compare our experimental results to those from two different simulations techniques, which enables us to determine the relative contributions of hydrodynamic and short-range repulsive stresses to the suspension rheology. The first method uses the lubrication approximation to find the hydrodynamic stress and includes a short-range repulsive force between the particles while the second is a Stokesian dynamics simulation that calculates the full hydrodynamic stress in the suspension. We find that the decrease in the viscosity at moderate confinements has a significant contribution from both the

  14. Fuzzy-logic detection and probability of hail exploiting short-range X-band weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vincenzo; Picciotti, Errico; Mazzarella, Vincenzo; Marzano, Frank Silvio; Budillon, Giorgio

    2018-03-01

    This work proposes a new method for hail precipitation detection and probability, based on single-polarization X-band radar measurements. Using a dataset consisting of reflectivity volumes, ground truth observations and atmospheric sounding data, a probability of hail index, which provides a simple estimate of the hail potential, has been trained and adapted within Naples metropolitan environment study area. The probability of hail has been calculated starting by four different hail detection methods. The first two, based on (1) reflectivity data and temperature measurements and (2) on vertically-integrated liquid density product, respectively, have been selected from the available literature. The other two techniques are based on combined criteria of the above mentioned methods: the first one (3) is based on the linear discriminant analysis, whereas the other one (4) relies on the fuzzy-logic approach. The latter is an innovative criterion based on a fuzzyfication step performed through ramp membership functions. The performances of the four methods have been tested using an independent dataset: the results highlight that the fuzzy-oriented combined method performs slightly better in terms of false alarm ratio, critical success index and area under the relative operating characteristic. An example of application of the proposed hail detection and probability products is also presented for a relevant hail event, occurred on 21 July 2014.

  15. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinpeng Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile’s rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile's rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Altered Long- and Short-Range Functional Connectivity in Patients with Betel Quid Dependence: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease. Brain structural abnormalities may constitute an abnormal neural network that underlies the risk of drug dependence. We hypothesized that individuals with Betel Quid Dependence (BQD have functional connectivity alterations that can be described by long- and short-range functional connectivity density(FCD maps. Methods: We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from subjects of the Han ethnic group in Hainan, China. Here, we examined BQD individuals (n = 33 and age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs (n = 32 in a rs-fMRI study to observe FCD alterations associated with the severity of BQD. Results: Compared with HCs, long-range FCD was decreased in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and increased in the left cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL and bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL in the BQD group. Short-range FCD was reduced in the right ACC and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, and increased in the left CPL. The short-range FCD alteration in the right ACC displayed a negative correlation with the Betel Quid Dependence Scale (BQDS (r=-0.432, P=0.012, and the long-range FCD alteration of left IPL showed a positive correlation with the duration of BQD(r=0.519, P=0.002 in BQD individuals. Conclusions: fMRI revealed differences in long- and short- range FCD in BQD individuals, and these alterations might be due to BQ chewing, BQ dependency, or risk factors for developing BQD.

  18. Electron scattering on the short-range potential in narrow gap Cd {sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyk, O.P. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, Semiconductor Electronics Department, Bandera Street 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)]. E-mail: omalyk@mail.lviv.ua

    2006-04-15

    Models of electron scattering on the short-range potential caused by the interaction with polar and nonpolar optical phonons, piezoelectric and acoustic phonons, ionized and neutral impurities in the narrow gap solid solution Cd {sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te (x = 0, 0.08, 0.17, 0.26 and 0.36) are proposed. The temperature dependences of electron mobility in temperature range 4.2-300 K are calculated.

  19. When opposites repel: from metastability to extended chiral spin textures in spin ice with short-range topological-defect interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Udagawa, Masafumi; Jaubert, Ludovic D.C.; Castelnovo, Claudio; Moessner, Roderich

    2016-01-01

    We study the interplay of topological bottlenecks and energetic barriers to equilibration in a Coulomb spin liquid where a short-range energetic coupling between defects charged under an emergent gauge field supplements their entropic long-range Coulomb interaction. This work is motivated by the prevalence of memory effects observed across a wide range of geometrically frustrated magnetic materials, possibly including the spontaneous Hall effect observed in Pr2Ir2O7. Our model is canonical sp...

  20. Zero Droplet Stiffness Exponent $\\theta$ is Revealed in Short Range Spin Glasses when Probed with Large Avalanches Induced by Long Range Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Pazmandi, Ferenc; Zimanyi, Gergely T.

    2009-01-01

    We probe the droplet excitations in short range spin glasses by adding a perturbative long range interaction that decays with distance as a power law: $J/r^{\\sigma}$. It is shown that if the power law exponent $\\sigma$ is smaller than the spatial dimension $d$, the perturbation induces large scale avalanches which roll until they force the system to develop a pseudo gap in the excitation spectrum of the stabilities. This makes the perturbative long range interactions relevant for $\\sigma < \\s...

  1. Deuterium short-range order in Pd0.975Ag0.025D0.685 by diffuse neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaschko, O.; Klemencic, R.; Fratzl, P.

    1983-01-01

    By diffuse neutron scattering the D short-range order in a Pd0.975Ag0.025D0.685 crystal was investigated at 50 and 70K. The results are compared with the D ordering in the PdDx system previously investigated, and it is shown that the isointensity contours around the (1/2,1,0) point are similar to...

  2. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of the short-range ordering structure of alpha-LiFeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitome, Masanori; Kohiki, Shigemi; Murakawa, Yusuke; Hori, Kyoko; Kurashima, Keiji; Bando, Yoshio

    2004-12-01

    The basic structure of alpha-LiFeO2, lithium iron oxide, is a cubic NaCl-type structure with a lattice constant of 0.42 nm; some short-range ordering characterized by octahedral clusters exists. The local structure of the short-range ordering was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. A new short-range ordering structure was found in local areas. The local structure has a cubic lattice with a doubled lattice constant. The occupation factors of cations on Wyckoff sites 4(a) and 4(b) are different from those on 24(d) sites, but the stoichiometric composition in cubic clusters is the same as the macroscopic composition. The number of pairs in which iron cations exist in nearest-neighbor sites and next nearest-neighbor sites is reduced in the structure. This means that a magnetic interaction between the iron cations is reduced by cation ordering even without spin ordering at room temperature.

  3. Extension and validation of ARTM (atmospheric radionuclide transportation model) for the application as dispersion calculation model in AVV (general administrative provision) and SBG (incident calculation bases); Erweiterung und Validierung von ARTM fuer den Einsatz als Ausbreitungsmodell in AVV und SBG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Reinhard; Bruecher, Wenzel; Richter, Cornelia; Sentuc, Florence; Sogalla, Martin; Thielen, Harald

    2012-02-15

    In the medium-term time scale the Gaussian plume model used so far for atmospheric dispersion calculations in the General Administrative Provision (AVV) relating to Section 47 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrISchV) as well as in the Incident Calculation Bases (SGB) relating to Section 49 StrISchV is to be replaced by a Lagrangian particle model. Meanwhile the Atmospheric Radionuclide Transportation Model (ARTM) is available, which allows the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion of operational releases from nuclear installations. ARTM is based on the program package AUSTAL2000 which is designed for the simulation of atmospheric dispersion of nonradioactive operational releases from industrial plants and was adapted to the application of airborne radioactive releases. In the context of the research project 3608S05005 possibilities for an upgrade of ARTM were investigated and implemented as far as possible to the program system. The work program comprises the validation and evaluation of ARTM, the implementation of technical-scientific extensions of the model system and the continuation of experience exchange between developers and users. In particular, the suitability of the model approach for simulations of radiological consequences according to the German SBG and the representation of the influence of buildings typical for nuclear power stations have been validated and further evaluated. Moreover, post-processing modules for calculation of dose-relevant decay products and for dose calculations have been developed and implemented. In order to continue the experience feedback and exchange, a web page has been established and maintained. Questions by users and other feedback have been dealt with and a common workshop has been held. The continued development and validation of ARTM has strengthened the basis for applications of this model system in line with the German regulations AVV and SBG. Further activity in this field can contribute to maintain and

  4. Charge carrier scattering on the short-range potential of the crystal lattice defects in ZnCdTe, ZnHgSe and ZnHgTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyk, Orest P., E-mail: omalyk@mail.lviv.u [Semiconductor Electronics Department, Lviv Polytechnic National University, Bandera Street 12, 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2009-12-15

    The processes of the charge carrier scattering on the short-range potential caused by interaction with polar and nonpolar optical phonons, piezoelectric and acoustic phonons, static strain, neutral and ionized impurities in Zn{sub x}Cd{sub 1-x}Te (0<=x<=1), Zn{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Se (0.02<=x<=1) and Zn{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te (x=0.15) are considered. The temperature dependences of the charge carrier mobility in temperature range 4.2-360 K are calculated.

  5. Understanding the Cu-Zn brass alloys using a short-range-order cluster model: significance of specific compositions of industrial alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, H. L.; Wang, Q.; Dong, C.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-11-01

    Metallic alloys show complex chemistries that are not yet understood so far. It has been widely accepted that behind the composition selection lies a short-range-order mechanism for solid solutions. The present paper addresses this fundamental question by examining the face-centered-cubic Cu-Zn α-brasses. A new structural approach, the cluster-plus-glue-atom model, is introduced, which suits specifically for the description of short-range-order structures in disordered systems. Two types of formulas are pointed out, [Zn-Cu12]Zn1~6 and [Zn-Cu12](Zn,Cu)6, which explain the α-brasses listed in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications. In these formulas, the bracketed parts represent the 1st-neighbor cluster, and each cluster is matched with one to six 2nd-neighbor Zn atoms or with six mixed (Zn,Cu) atoms. Such a cluster-based formulism describes the 1st- and 2nd-neighbor local atomic units where the solute and solvent interactions are ideally satisfied. The Cu-Ni industrial alloys are also explained, thus proving the universality of the cluster-formula approach in understanding the alloy selections. The revelation of the composition formulas for the Cu-(Zn,Ni) industrial alloys points to the common existence of simple composition rules behind seemingly complex chemistries of industrial alloys, thus offering a fundamental and practical method towards composition interpretations of all kinds of alloys.

  6. On the universality of the long-/short-range separation in multiconfigurational density-functional theory. II. Investigating f0 actinide species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromager, Emmanuel; Réal, Florent; Wåhlin, Pernilla

    2009-01-01

    the universality of this value by considering "extreme" study cases, namely, neutral and charged isoelectronic f0 actinide compounds (ThO2, PaO2+, UO22+, UN2, CUO, and NpO23+). We find for these compounds that μ(opt)=0.3 a.u. but show that 0.4 a.u. is still acceptable. This is a promising result...... in the investigation of a universal range separation. The accuracy of the currently best MC-srDFT (μ=0.3 a.u.) approach has also been tested for equilibrium geometries. Though it performs as well as wave function theory and DFT for static-correlation-free systems, it fails in describing the neptunyl (VII) ion NpO23......+ where static correlation is significant; bending is preferred at the MC-srDFT (μ=0.3 a.u.) level, whereas the molecule is known to be linear. This clearly shows the need for better short-range functionals, especially for the description of the short-range exchange. It also suggests that the bending...

  7. Long-range versus short-range correlations in the two-neutron transfer reaction 64Ni(18O,16O)66Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B.; Santagati, G.; Vsevolodovna, R. Magana; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cardozo, E. N.; Cavallaro, M.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Gargano, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Santopinto, E.; Vitturi, A.; Lubian, J.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, various two-neutron transfer studies using the (18O,16O) reaction were performed with a large success. This was achieved because of a combined use of the microscopic quantum description of the reaction mechanism and of the nuclear structure. In the present work we use this methodology to study the two-neutron transfer reaction of the 18O+64Ni system at 84 MeV incident energy, to the ground and first 2+ excited state of the residual 66Ni nucleus. All the experimental data were measured by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare -Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy). We have performed exact finite range cross section calculations using the coupled channel Born approximation (CCBA) and coupled reaction channel (CRC) method for the sequential and direct two-neutron transfers, respectively. Moreover, this is the first time that the formalism of the microscopic interaction boson model (IBM-2) was applied to a two-neutron transfer reaction. From our results we conclude that for two-neutron transfer to the ground state of 66Ni, the direct transfer is the dominant reaction mechanism, whereas for the transfer to the first excited state of 66Ni, the sequential process dominates. A competition between long-range and short-range correlations is discussed, in particular, how the use of two different models (Shell model and IBM's) help to disentangle long- and short-range correlations.

  8. Local breaking of fourfold rotational symmetry by short-range magnetic order in heavily overdoped Ba (Fe1 -xCux)2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyi; Song, Yu; Hu, Ding; Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui; Harriger, L. W.; Tian, Wei; Cao, Huibo; Dai, Pengcheng

    2017-10-01

    We investigate Cu-doped Ba (Fe1-xCux) 2As2 with transport, magnetic susceptibility, and elastic neutron scattering measurements. In the heavily Cu-doped regime where long-range stripe-type antiferromagnetic order in BaFe2As2 is suppressed, Ba (Fe1-xCux) 2As2 (0.145 ≤x ≤0.553 ) samples exhibit spin-glass-like behavior in magnetic susceptibility and insulating-like temperature dependence in electrical transport. Using elastic neutron scattering, we find stripe-type short-range magnetic order in the spin-glass region identified by susceptibility measurements. The persistence of short-range magnetic order over a large doping range in Ba (Fe1-xCux) 2As2 likely arises from local arrangements of Fe and Cu that favor magnetic order, with Cu acting as vacancies relieving magnetic frustration and degeneracy. These results indicate locally broken fourfold rotational symmetry, suggesting that stripe-type magnetism is ubiquitous in iron pnictides.

  9. Scalable improvement of SPME multipolar electrostatics in anisotropic polarizable molecular mechanics using a general short-range penetration correction up to quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narth, Christophe; Lagardère, Louis; Polack, Étienne; Gresh, Nohad; Wang, Qiantao; Bell, David R; Rackers, Joshua A; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu Y; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2016-02-15

    We propose a general coupling of the Smooth Particle Mesh Ewald SPME approach for distributed multipoles to a short-range charge penetration correction modifying the charge-charge, charge-dipole and charge-quadrupole energies. Such an approach significantly improves electrostatics when compared to ab initio values and has been calibrated on Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory reference data. Various neutral molecular dimers have been tested and results on the complexes of mono- and divalent cations with a water ligand are also provided. Transferability of the correction is adressed in the context of the implementation of the AMOEBA and SIBFA polarizable force fields in the TINKER-HP software. As the choices of the multipolar distribution are discussed, conclusions are drawn for the future penetration-corrected polarizable force fields highlighting the mandatory need of non-spurious procedures for the obtention of well balanced and physically meaningful distributed moments. Finally, scalability and parallelism of the short-range corrected SPME approach are addressed, demonstrating that the damping function is computationally affordable and accurate for molecular dynamics simulations of complex bio- or bioinorganic systems in periodic boundary conditions. Copyright © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Application of Short-Range LIDAR in Early Alerting for Low-Level Windshear and Turbulence at Hong Kong International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Hon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hong Kong Observatory currently uses a series of meteorological instruments, including long-range LIDAR (light detection and ranging systems, to provide alerting services of low-level windshear and turbulence for Hong Kong International Airport. For some events that are smaller in spatial dimensions and are rapidly changing, such as low altitude windshear and turbulence associated with buildings or man-made structures, it would be necessary to involve meteorological instruments that offer greater spatial resolution. Therefore, the Observatory has set up a short-range LIDAR on the roof of the AsiaWorld-Expo during the summers over the past several years, conducting field research on the feasibility of strengthening early alerting for windshear and turbulence over the north runway’s eastern arrival runway (Runway 25RA and developing an automated early alerting algorithm. This paper takes the pilot reports for Runway 25RA during the 2013 field research as verification samples, using different thresholds for radial wind velocity spatial and temporal changes detected by the short-range LIDAR to calculate the relative operating characteristic (ROC curve, and analyzes its early alerting performance.

  11. Spin dynamics, short range order and spin freezing in Y0.5Ca0.5BaCo4O7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, John Ross [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Fouquet, Peter [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Mutka, Hannu [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Payen, Christophe [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes-CNRS; Lortz, Rolf [University of Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Y0.5Ca0.5BaCo4O7 was recently introduced as a possible candidate for capturing some of the predicted classical spin kagome ground-state features. Stimulated by this conjecture, we have taken up a more complete study of the spin correlations in this compound with neutron scattering methods on a powder sample characterized with high-resolution neutron diffraction and the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility and specific heat. We have found that the frustrated near-neighbor magnetic correlations involve not only the kagome planes but concern the full Co sublattice, as evidenced by the analysis of the wave-vector dependence of the short-range order. We conclude from our results that the magnetic moments are located on the Co sublattice as a whole and that correlations extend beyond the two-dimensional kagome planes. We identify intriguing dynamical properties, observing high-frequency fluctuations with a Lorentzian linewidth G?20 meV at ambient temperature. On cooling a low-frequency ({approx}1 meV) dynamical component develops alongside the high-frequency fluctuations, which eventually becomes static at temperatures below T {approx} 50 K. The high-frequency response with an overall linewidth of {approx}10 meV prevails at T?2 K, coincident with a fully elastic short-range-ordered contribution.

  12. Special Quasi-ordered Structures: role of short-range order in the semiconductor alloy (GaN)$_{1-x}$(ZnO)$_x$

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jian; Allen, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies short-range order (SRO) in the semiconductor alloy (GaN)$_{1-x}$(ZnO)$_x$. Monte Carlo simulations performed on a density functional theory (DFT)-based cluster expansion model show that the heterovalent alloys exhibit strong SRO because of the energetic preference for the valence-matched nearest-neighbor Ga-N and Zn-O pairs. To represent the SRO-related structural correlations, we introduce the concept of Special Quasi-ordered Structure (SQoS). Subsequent DFT calculations reveal dramatic influence of SRO on the atomic, electronic and vibrational properties of the (GaN)$_{1-x}$(ZnO)$_x$ alloy. Due to the enhanced statistical presence of the energetically unfavored Zn-N bonds with the strong Zn3$d$-N2$p$ repulsion, the disordered alloys exhibit much larger lattice bowing and band-gap reduction than those of the short-range ordered alloys. Inclusion of lattice vibrations stabilizes the disordered alloy.

  13. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station: Phase I Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the results of the ANU's (Applied Meteorology Unit) Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds. The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The Keith Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A 7 year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. In all climatologies, the average and peak wind speeds were highly variable in time. This indicated that the development of a peak wind forecasting tool would be difficult. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. The climatologies and PDFs provide tools with which to make peak wind forecasts that are critical to safe operations.

  14. High resolution probabilistic precipitation forecast over Spain combining the statistical downscaling tool PROMETEO and the AEMET short range EPS system (AEMET/SREPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofino, A. S.; Santos, C.; Garcia-Moya, J. A.; Gutierrez, J. M.; Orfila, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Short-Range Ensemble Prediction System (SREPS) is a multi-LAM (UM, HIRLAM, MM5, LM and HRM) multi analysis/boundary conditions (ECMWF, UKMetOffice, DWD and GFS) run twice a day by AEMET (72 hours lead time) over a European domain, with a total of 5 (LAMs) x 4 (GCMs) = 20 members. One of the main goals of this project is analyzing the impact of models and boundary conditions in the short-range high-resolution forecasted precipitation. A previous validation of this method has been done considering a set of climate networks in Spain, France and Germany, by interpolating the prediction to the gauge locations (SREPS, 2008). In this work we compare these results with those obtained by using a statistical downscaling method to post-process the global predictions, obtaining an "advanced interpolation" for the local precipitation using climate network precipitation observations. In particular, we apply the PROMETEO downscaling system based on analogs and compare the SREPS ensemble of 20 members with the PROMETEO statistical ensemble of 5 (analog ensemble) x 4 (GCMs) = 20 members. Moreover, we will also compare the performance of a combined approach post-processing the SREPS outputs using the PROMETEO system. References: SREPS 2008. 2008 EWGLAM-SRNWP Meeting (http://www.aemet.es/documentos/va/divulgacion/conferencias/prediccion/Ewglam/PRED_CSantos.pdf)

  15. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-01

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e-r12 and erfc (0.11 ṡr12 ) /r12], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  16. Effects on ambient air caused by emissions from the Clean Harbors incinerator and underground water treatment facility in Mercier : evaluation by atmospheric dispersion modeling; Effets sur l'air ambiant des emissions de l'incinerateur Clean Harbors et de l'Unite de traitement des eaux souterraines (UTES) a Mercier : evaluation par modelisation de la dispersion atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, G.; Walsh, P.; Brault, M.P.; Couture, Y.; Briere, J.F. [Quebec Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Direction du suivi de l' etat de l' environnement; Guay, F.; Longpre, L. [Quebec Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Direction regionale de l' analyse et de l' expertise de l' Estrie de la Monteregie; Lemire, R.; Busque, D. [Quebec Ministere du Developpement durable, de l' Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Service de l' information sur le milieu atmospherique

    2010-09-15

    Clean Harbors is a leading provider of high-tech, high-temperature destruction of hazardous and industrial waste. The Quebec Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment and Parks created an atmospheric dispersion model to determine the impact of the Clean Harbors incinerator and underground water treatment facility on air quality in Mercier, Quebec. This document described the dispersion model and its inputs, including emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxin, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fine particulates, mercury, lead and arsenic. The effects of these emissions on air quality were evaluated by considering meteorological data, source characteristics, topography and land use zoning. The modeling study showed that emissions from the incinerator were well below criteria levels and do not cause significant deterioration in air quality. However, higher than allowable limits of polyvinyl chloride and benzene emissions were found 700 m from the underground water treatment facility. Nearby residential areas were not affected. 21 refs., 9 tabs., 10 figs., 1 appendix.

  17. Short-range spatial variability of soil δ15N natural abundance – effects on symbiotic N2-fixation estimates in pea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdensen, Lars; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Jensen, Erik Steen

    2007-01-01

    abundance in spring barley and N2-fixing pea was measured within the 0.15-4 m scale at flowering and at maturity. The short-range spatial variability of soil δ15N natural abundance and symbiotic nitrogen fixation were high at both growth stages. Along a 4-m row, the δ15N natural abundance in barley......-abundance are that estimates of symbiotic N2-fixation can be obtained from the natural abundance method if at least half a square meter of crop and reference plants is sampled for the isotopic analysis. In fields with small amounts of representative reference crops (weeds) it might be necessary to sow in reference crop...

  18. Short-range magnetic ordering in the geometrically frustrated layered compound YBaCo4O7 with an extended Kagomé structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, A. K.; Yusuf, S. M.; Banerjee, S.

    2013-02-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of the geometrically frustrated layered compound YBaCo4O7 have been studied by magnetization and neutron diffraction. A layered type crystal structure, with alternating tetrahedral layers of Kagomé and triangular types, along the c axis (hexagonal symmetry, space group P63mc) has been found. The oxygen content of the present compound was determined by iodometric titration to be 7.00 ± 0.01. Presence of a short-range antiferromagnetic ordering (below TN ˜ 110 K) has been concluded from the appearance of an addition broad magnetic peak (at Q ˜ 1.35 Å-1) in the neutron diffraction pattern. A staggered chiral type (√{3}×√{3}) spin structure in the Kagomé layers has been found. Presence of a significant magneto-structural coupling is concluded from the changes in lattice parameters across the magnetic ordering temperature TN ˜ 110 K.

  19. Low field induced large magnetocaloric effect in Tm2Ni0.93Si2.93 : influence of short range magnetic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R

    2017-10-31

    In this work, we report successful synthesis of a new intermetallic compound Tm2Ni0.93Si2.93 that forms in single phase only in defect crystal structure. The compound does not show any long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K. The material exhibits large magnetic entropy change (-ΔSM ~ 13.7 J/kg K) and adiabatic temperature change (ΔTad ~ 4.4 K) at 2.2 K for a field change of 20 kOe which can be realized by permanent magnets, thus being very beneficial for application purpose. In the absence of long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K, metastable nature of the low temperature spin dynamics and short range magnetic correlations are considered to be responsible for such large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) over a wide temperature region. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. Low-field induced large magnetocaloric effect in Tm2Ni0.93Si2.93: influence of short-range magnetic correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we report the successful synthesis of a new intermetallic compound Tm2 Ni0.93 Si2.93 that forms in single phase only in defect crystal structure. The compound does not show any long range magnetic ordering down to 2 K. The material exhibits a large magnetic entropy change (-Δ S_M∼13.7 J kg-1 K–1) and adiabatic temperature change (Δ T_ad∼4.4 K) at 2.2 K for a field change of 20 kOe which can be realized by permanent magnets, thus being very beneficial for application purpose. In the absence of long-range magnetic ordering down to 2 K, the metastable nature of low-temperature spin dynamics and short-range magnetic correlations are considered to be responsible for such a large magnetocaloric effect over a wide temperature region.

  1. Critical percolation phase and thermal Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in a scale-free network with short-range and long-range random bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berker, A Nihat; Hinczewski, Michael; Netz, Roland R

    2009-10-01

    Percolation in a scale-free hierarchical network is solved exactly by renormalization-group theory in terms of the different probabilities of short-range and long-range bonds. A phase of critical percolation, with algebraic [Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT)] geometric order, occurs in the phase diagram in addition to the ordinary (compact) percolating phase and the nonpercolating phase. It is found that no connection exists between, on the one hand, the onset of this geometric BKT behavior and, on the other hand, the onsets of the highly clustered small-world character of the network and of the thermal BKT transition of the Ising model on this network. Nevertheless, both geometric and thermal BKT behaviors have inverted characters, occurring where disorder is expected, namely, at low bond probability and high temperature, respectively. This may be a general property of long-range networks.

  2. Statistical analysis of long- and short-range forces involved in bacterial adhesion to substratum surfaces as measured using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem

    2011-08-01

    Surface thermodynamic analyses of microbial adhesion using measured contact angles on solid substrata and microbial cell surfaces are widely employed to determine the nature of the adhesion forces, i.e., the interplay between Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base forces. While surface thermodynamic analyses are often viewed critically, atomic force microscopy (AFM) can also provide information on the nature of the adhesion forces by means of Poisson analysis of the measured forces. This review first presents a description of Poisson analysis and its underlying assumptions. The data available from the literature for different combinations of bacterial strains and substrata are then summarized, leading to the conclusion that bacterial adhesion to surfaces is generally dominated by short-range, attractive acid-base interactions, in combination with long-range, weaker Lifshitz-van der Waals forces. This is in line with the findings of surface thermodynamic analyses of bacterial adhesion. Comparison with single-molecule ligand-receptor forces from the literature suggests that the short-range-force contribution from Poisson analysis involves a discrete adhesive bacterial cell surface site rather than a single molecular force. The adhesion force arising from these cell surface sites and the number of sites available may differ from strain to strain. Force spectroscopy, however, involves the tedious task of identifying the minor peaks in the AFM retraction force-distance curve. This step can be avoided by carrying out Poisson analysis on the work of adhesion, which can also be derived from retraction force-distance curves. This newly proposed way of performing Poisson analysis confirms that multiple molecular bonds, rather than a single molecular bond, contribute to a discrete adhesive bacterial cell surface site.

  3. New clues to the local atomic structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenate from extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Christian; Mandaliev, Petar N; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2013-04-02

    Short-range ordered ferric arsenate (FeAsO4 · xH2O) is a secondary As precipitate frequently encountered in acid mine waste environments. Two distinct structural models have recently been proposed for this phase. The first model is based on the structure of scorodite (FeAsO4 · 2H2O) where isolated FeO6 octahedra share corners with four adjacent arsenate (AsO4) tetrahedra in a three-dimensional framework (framework model). The second model consists of single chains of corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 bound in a monodentate binuclear (2)C complex (chain model). In order to rigorously test the accuracy of both structural models, we synthesized ferric arsenates and analyzed their local (absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We found that both As and Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra were most compatible with isolated FeO6 octahedra being bridged by AsO4 tetrahedra (RFe-As = 3.33 ± 0.01 Å). Our shell-fit results further indicated a lack of evidence for single corner-sharing FeO6 linkages in ferric arsenate. Wavelet-transform analyses of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra of ferric arsenates complemented by shell fitting confirmed Fe atoms at an average distance of ∼5.3 Å, consistent with crystallographic data of scorodite and in disagreement with the chain model. A scorodite-type local structure of short-range ordered ferric arsenates provides a plausible explanation for their rapid transformation into scorodite in acid mining environments.

  4. An atmospheric dispersion model for linear sources in calm wind, stable conditions; Un modello di dispersione atmosferica per sorgenti lineari in condizioni di vento debole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, M. C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Buratti, D. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Facolta' di Scienze Statistiche; Metallo, M. C.; Poli, A.A. [ESA s.a.s., Bracciano, RM (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    In this report a dispersion model is proposed that provides an estimate of concentration of gaseous pollutants emitted by an highway, or in general by a line source, in presence of low wind speed. This aim was pursued because available models have not a satisfactory behaviour in such conditions, which is critical for dispersion of gaseous pollutants. This lack is due to difficulty of simulating dispersion turbulent component which is determined by fluctuation of wind speed and wind direction, and in presence of calm conditions it assumes values comparable with transport component. The proposed model overcomes this difficulty, as it is shown by sensitivity analysis and comparison with experimental data. The capability of simulating dispersion eve in critical conditions, like the presence of low level inversion, and the absence of source geometrical approximations make the model a tool that, properly used, may contribute to the efficient planning and management of environmental resources. [Italian] In questo rapporto viene proposto un modello per la stima delle concentrazioni di inquinanti aeriformi emessi da un'arteria stradale, o in generale da una sorgente lineare, in presenza di vento debole. Questo scopo e' stato perseguito in quanto in questa condizione, nonostante la dispersione degli inquinanti risulti fortemente problematica, i modelli disponibili in letteratura non hanno un comportamento soddisfacente. Questa mancanca e' attribuibile alla difficolta' di simulare la componente turbolenta della dispersione, dovuta alla fluttuazione della direzione e della velocita' del vento che, in presenza di vento debole, assume valori confrontabili alla componente di trasporto. Il modello qui di seguito proposto supera questa difficolta', come dimostrano l'analisi di sensibilita' e il confronto con un caso reale; la capacita' di simulare la dispersione anche in condizioni fisicamente critiche quali la presenza di inversione a

  5. Parallelisation and application of a multi-layer atmospheric transport model to quantify dispersion and deposition of ammonia over the British Isles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, N; Pais, V A; Sutton, M A; Weston, K J; Dragosits, U; Tang, S Y; Aherne, J

    2002-01-01

    An atmospheric transport model, FRAME (Fine Resolution AMmonia Exchange), has been used to model the spatial pattern of ammonia concentrations and deposition over the British Isles for the first time. The model uses a multi-layer approach with diffusion through 33 layers to describe vertical concentration profiles in the atmosphere explicitly. Together with the necessary description of atmospheric reactions with sulphur and oxidised nitrogen, this imposes a major computational requirement, with the model having a run-time of 8.5 days on a mid-range workstation. Improvement in the model run-time was sought by developing a parallel implementation coded in a data-parallel approach using High Performance Fortran. Running the code on a Cray T3E with 128 processors provided a speedup by a factor of 69. The code's portability, its validation with measurements and new maps of its application to the British Isles, are presented. Good agreement is found with measured NH3 concentrations, while wet de-position is underestimated. In addition to model uncertainties, this may be due to an underestimation of the NH3 emissions input data.

  6. Structure of short-range-ordered iron(III)-precipitates formed by iron(II) oxidation in water containing phosphate, silicate, and calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegelin, A.; Frommer, J.; Vantelon, D.; Kaegi, R.; Hug, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The oxidation of Fe(II) in water leads to the formation of Fe(III)-precipitates that strongly affect the fate of nutrients and contaminants in natural and engineered systems. Examples include the cycling of As in rice fields irrigated with As-rich groundwater or the treatment of drinking water for As removal. Knowledge of the types of Fe(III)-precipitates forming in such systems is essential for the quantitative modeling of nutrient and contaminant dynamics and for the optimization of water purification techniques on the basis of a mechanistic understanding of the relevant biogeochemical processes. In this study, we investigated the local coordination of Fe, P, and Ca in Fe(III)-precipitates formed by aeration of synthetic Fe(II)-containing groundwater with variable composition (pH 7, 2-30 mg/L Fe(II), 2-20 mg/L phosphate-P, 2-20 mg/L silicate-Si, 8 mM Na-bicarbonate or 2.5 mM Ca-&1.5 mM Mg-bicarbonate). After 4 hours of oxidation, Fe(III)-precipitates were collected on 0.2 µm nylon filters and dried. The precipitates were analyzed by Fe K-edge EXAFS (XAS beamline, ANKA, Germany) and by P and Ca K-edge XANES spectroscopy (LUCIA beamline, SLS, Switzerland). The Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that local Fe coordination in the precipitates systematically shifted with water composition. As long as water contained P, mainly short-range-ordered Fe(III)-phosphate formed (with molar P/Fe ~0.5). In the absence of P, Fe(III) precipitated as hydrous ferric oxide at high Si/Fe>0.5, as ferrihydrite at intermediate Si/Fe, and mainly as lepidocrocite at Si/Fepatterns. The P K-edge XANES spectra revealed that phosphate was bound to both Fe as well as Ca (if present). The Ca K-edge XANES spectra showed that the mode of Ca uptake by the Fe(III)-precipitates shifted from mainly adsorption at high Fe/P to coprecipitation at low Fe/P ratio. Despite oversaturation, neither calcite nor hydroxyapatite formed to a significant extent. The results from this study indicated that

  7. The novel isotopically coded short-range photo-reactive crosslinker 2,4,6-triazido-1,3,5-triazine (TATA) for studying protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Nicholas I; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-10-21

    Short-distance molecular-modeling constraints are advantageous for elucidating the structures of individual proteins and protein conformational changes. Commonly used amine-reactive crosslinks are relatively long (14Å), partly due to the length of the lysine side-chain, and are sparsely distributed throughout a protein. Short-distance non-specific crosslinkers can provide a larger number of tighter molecular-modeling constraints. Here we describe the use of a short-range homo-trifunctional isotopically-coded non-specific photo-reactive crosslinking reagent, 2,4,6-triazido-1,3,5-triazine (TATA)-(12)C3/(13)C3, for MS-based protein crosslinking studies. Upon activation by 254nm UV light, TATA-(12)C3/(13)C3 generates up to three nitrene radicals capable of non-selective crosslinking at ~5Å. This reagent was validated using cyclohexane, several test peptides, and myoglobin, and was found to react with a large number of amino acids, forming multiple crosslinked products. The myoglobin crosslinks detected by MS agreed with the known structure of myoglobin; arranging the protein's secondary-structure motifs into their correct fold was possible based solely on the constraints imposed by the crosslinks. Finally, TATA was used to crosslink the α-synuclein monomer. The 10 short-distance constraints provided by TATA crosslinking led to an initial model of the molten-globule form of the native α-synuclein monomer; this provides a suggested structure for the precursor of the misfolded α-synuclein proteoforms involved in synucleopathies. The isotopically labeled short-range non-specific crosslinker TATA-(12)C3/(13)C3 was characterized for use in crosslinking-based protein structural studies. The crosslinking products of TATA can provide a distance constraint of merely 5Ǻ between crosslinked residues. TATA-(12)C3/(13)C3 had broad reactivity, crosslinking a wide variety of amino acids, including lysine, glutamic and aspartic acid, asparagine, glutamine, glycine, alanine

  8. Comparative analysis of three atmospheric dispersion coefficient systems at the Angra dos Reis, RJ, region; Analise comparativa de tres sistemas de coeficientes de dispersao atmosferica na regiao de Angra dos Reis, RJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagio, Rosa Maria de Souza

    1982-07-01

    A comparative analysis was made in this work among Pasquill-Gifford (PG) atmospheric dispersion coefficients and those determined at the Juelich and Karlsruhe sites with the purpose of suggesting which one would be the most applicable to the Angra site. Each one of the three systems was determined by different experiments, carried out over sites with diversified features. The systems of Juelich and Karlsruhe were obtained over sites with high surface roughness and from stacks (elevated releases), while the PG system was obtained over sites with a small surface roughness and from ground level releases. The results of the application of these systems at a complex site like Angra,which has a highly diversified structure encompassing sea, vegetation, predominance of light winds and stable stability classes, show that the PG system, the most used in the world, is still the best choice. (author)

  9. Atmospheric Transport Modeling Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzola, Carl A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation, Aiken, SC (United States); Addis, Robert P. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide DOE and other federal agency emergency managers with an in-depth compilation and description of atmospheric dispersion models available to DOE and other Federal sites.

  10. Short range order and stability of amorphous Ge(x)Te(100-x) alloys (12 ≤ x ≤ 44.6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóvári, P; Piarristeguy, A; Escalier, R; Kaban, I; Bednarčik, J; Pradel, A

    2013-05-15

    Amorphous Ge(x)Te(100-x) alloys were obtained over a broad composition range (12 ≤ x ≤ 44.6) by thermal co-evaporation. Their structure was investigated by x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements. Experimental datasets were fitted simultaneously by the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. It is concluded that Te is mostly twofold coordinated and the majority of Ge atoms have four neighbours. The number of Ge-Ge and Te-Te bonds evolves monotonically with composition. Ge-Ge bonding can be observed already at x = 24 while Te-Te bonds can be found even in Ge44.6Te55.4. The models obtained by simulation show that the structure of compositions with x > 24 should be considered as a random covalent network but there is chemical ordering for x ≤ 24, exactly in the composition range where glasses can be obtained from the melt by fast quenching. The composition dependences of some physical properties also point to the connection between chemical short range order and the stability of the amorphous phase: while the glass transition temperature and microhardness increase monotonically with the composition, the thermal stability of the amorphous films goes through a maximum around x = 20-24.

  11. A small-scale hyperacute compound eye featuring active eye tremor: application to visual stabilization, target tracking, and short-range odometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnier, Fabien; Manecy, Augustin; Juston, Raphaël; Mallot, Hanspeter; Leitel, Robert; Floreano, Dario; Viollet, Stéphane

    2015-02-25

    In this study, a miniature artificial compound eye (15 mm in diameter) called the curved artificial compound eye (CurvACE) was endowed for the first time with hyperacuity, using similar micro-movements to those occurring in the fly's compound eye. A periodic micro-scanning movement of only a few degrees enables the vibrating compound eye to locate contrasting objects with a 40-fold greater resolution than that imposed by the interommatidial angle. In this study, we developed a new algorithm merging the output of 35 local processing units consisting of adjacent pairs of artificial ommatidia. The local measurements performed by each pair are processed in parallel with very few computational resources, which makes it possible to reach a high refresh rate of 500 Hz. An aerial robotic platform with two degrees of freedom equipped with the active CurvACE placed over naturally textured panels was able to assess its linear position accurately with respect to the environment thanks to its efficient gaze stabilization system. The algorithm was found to perform robustly at different light conditions as well as distance variations relative to the ground and featured small closed-loop positioning errors of the robot in the range of 45 mm. In addition, three tasks of interest were performed without having to change the algorithm: short-range odometry, visual stabilization, and tracking contrasting objects (hands) moving over a textured background.

  12. The invisible cues that guide king penguin chicks home: use of magnetic and acoustic cues during orientation and short-range navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Anna P; Chiffard, Jules; Couchoux, Charline; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2013-04-15

    King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) live in large and densely populated colonies, where navigation can be challenging because of the presence of many conspecifics that could obstruct locally available cues. Our previous experiments demonstrated that visual cues were important but not essential for king penguin chicks' homing. The main objective of this study was to investigate the importance of non-visual cues, such as magnetic and acoustic cues, for chicks' orientation and short-range navigation. In a series of experiments, the chicks were individually displaced from the colony to an experimental arena where they were released under different conditions. In the magnetic experiments, a strong magnet was attached to the chicks' heads. Trials were conducted in daylight and at night to test the relative importance of visual and magnetic cues. Our results showed that when the geomagnetic field around the chicks was modified, their orientation in the arena and the overall ability to home was not affected. In a low sound experiment we limited the acoustic cues available to the chicks by putting ear pads over their ears, and in a loud sound experiment we provided additional acoustic cues by broadcasting colony sounds on the opposite side of the arena to the real colony. In the low sound experiment, the behavior of the chicks was not affected by the limited sound input. In the loud sound experiment, the chicks reacted strongly to the colony sound. These results suggest that king penguin chicks may use the sound of the colony while orienting towards their home.

  13. A new variation of the Buckingham exponential-6 potential with a tunable, singularity-free short-range repulsion and an adjustable long-range attraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werhahn, Jasper C.; Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-01-05

    We introduce new generalized (reverting to the original) and extended (not reverting to the original) 4-parameter forms of the (B-2) Potential Energy Function (PEF) of Wang etal. (L.-P. Wang, J. Chen and T. van Voorhis, J. Chem. Theor. Comp. 9, 452 (2013)), which is itself a modification of the Buckingham exponential-6 PEF. The new forms have a tunable, singularity-free short-range repulsion and an adjustable long-range attraction. They produce fits to high quality ab initio data for the X–(H2O), X=F, Cl, Br, I and M+(H2O), M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs dimers that are between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude better than the original 3-parameter (B-2) and modified Buckingham exponential-6 PEFs. They are also slightly better than the 4-parameter generalized Buckingham exponential-6(gBe-6) and of comparable quality with the 4-parameter extended Morse (eM) PEFs introduced recently by us.

  14. Numerical results on the short-range spin correlation functions in the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Mingpu; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-08-01

    Optical lattice experiments with ultracold fermion atoms and quantum gas microscopy have recently realized direct measurements of magnetic correlations at the site-resolved level. We calculate the short-range spin-correlation functions in the ground state of the two-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model with the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method. The results are numerically exact at half filling where the fermion sign problem is absent. Away from half filling, we employ the constrained path AFQMC approach to eliminate the exponential computational scaling from the sign problem. The constraint employs unrestricted Hartree-Fock trial wave functions with an effective interaction strength U , which is optimized self-consistently within AFQMC. Large supercells are studied, with twist averaged boundary conditions as needed, to reach the thermodynamic limit. We find that the nearest-neighbor spin correlation always increases with the interaction strength U , contrary to the finite-temperature behavior where a maximum is reached at a finite U value. We also observe a change of sign in the next-nearest-neighbor spin correlation with increasing density, which is a consequence of the buildup of the long-range antiferromagnetic correlation. We expect the results presented in this paper to serve as a benchmark as lower temperatures are reached in ultracold atom experiments.

  15. Unusual ferromagnetic critical behavior owing to short-range antiferromagnetic correlations in antiperovskite Cu1-xNMn3+x (0.1 <= x <= 0.4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianchao; Tong, Peng; Cui, Dapeng; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Jie; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Bosen; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Zou, Youming; Sun, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    For ferromagnets, varying from simple metals to strongly correlated oxides,the critical behaviors near the Curie temperature (TC) can be grouped into several universal classes. In this paper, we report an unusual critical behavior in manganese nitrides Cu1-xNMn3+x (0.1 <= x <= 0.4). Although the critical behavior below TC can be well described by mean field (MF) theory, robust critical fluctuations beyond the expectations of any universal classes are observed above TC in x = 0.1. The critical fluctuations become weaker when x increases, and the MF-like critical behavior is finally restored at x = 0.4. In addition, the paramagnetic susceptibility of all the samples deviates from the Curie-Weiss (CW) law just above TC. This deviation is gradually smeared as x increases. The short-range antiferromagnetic ordering above TC revealed by our electron spin resonance measurement explains both the unusual critical behavior and the breakdown of the CW law.

  16. A Multifrequency Radar System for Detecting Humans and Characterizing Human Activities for Short-Range Through-Wall and Long-Range Foliage Penetration Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram M. Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multifrequency radar system for detecting humans and classifying their activities at short and long ranges is described. The short-range radar system operates within the S-Band frequency range for through-wall applications at distances of up to 3 m. It utilizes two separate waveforms which are selected via switching: a wide-band noise waveform or a continuous single tone. The long-range radar system operating in the W-Band millimeter-wave frequency range performs at distances of up to about 100 m in free space and up to about 30 m through light foliage. It employs a composite multimodal signal consisting of two waveforms, a wide-band noise waveform and an embedded single tone, which are summed and transmitted simultaneously. Matched filtering of the received and transmitted noise signals is performed to detect targets with high-range resolution, whereas the received single tone signal is used for the Doppler analysis. Doppler measurements are used to distinguish between different human movements and gestures using the characteristic micro-Doppler signals. Our measurements establish the ability of this system to detect and range humans and distinguish between different human movements at different ranges.

  17. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations.The tool includes climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  18. Biofilm Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Like all sessile organisms, surface-attached communities of bacteria known as biofilms must release and disperse cells into the environment to colonize new sites. For many pathogenic bacteria, biofilm dispersal plays an important role in the transmission of bacteria from environmental reservoirs to human hosts, in horizontal and vertical cross-host transmission, and in the exacerbation and spread of infection within a host. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial biofilm dispersal are only beginning to be elucidated. Biofilm dispersal is a promising area of research that may lead to the development of novel agents that inhibit biofilm formation or promote biofilm cell detachment. Such agents may be useful for the prevention and treatment of biofilms in a variety of industrial and clinical settings. This review describes the current status of research on biofilm dispersal, with an emphasis on studies aimed to characterize dispersal mechanisms, and to identify environmental cues and inter- and intracellular signals that regulate the dispersal process. The clinical implications of biofilm dispersal and the potential therapeutic applications of some of the most recent findings will also be discussed. PMID:20139339

  19. Using the Wasserstein distance to compare fields of pollutants: application to the radionuclide atmospheric dispersion of the Fukushima-Daiichi accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Farchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The verification of simulations against data and the comparison of model simulation of pollutant fields rely on the critical choice of statistical indicators. Most of the scores are based on point-wise, that is, local, value comparison. Such indicators are impacted by the so-called double penalty effect. Typically, a misplaced blob of pollutants will doubly penalise such a score because it is predicted where it should not be and is not predicted where it should be. The effect is acute in plume simulations where the concentrations gradient can be sharp. A non-local metric that would match concentration fields by displacement would avoid such double penalty. Here, we experiment on such a metric known as the Wasserstein distance, which tells how penalising moving the pollutants is. We give a mathematical introduction to this distance and discuss how it should be adapted to handle fields of pollutants. We develop and optimise an open Python code to compute this distance. The metric is applied to the dispersion of cesium-137 of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. We discuss of its application in model-to-model comparison but also in the verification of model simulation against a map of observed deposited cesium-137 over Japan. As hoped for, the Wasserstein distance is less penalising, and yet retains some of the key discriminating properties of the root mean square error indicator.

  20. Short-range forecast of Shershnevskoie (South Ural) water-storage algal blooms: preliminary results of predictors' choosing and membership functions' construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayazova, Anna; Abdullaev, Sanjar

    2014-05-01

    Short-range forecasting of algal blooms in drinking water reservoirs and other waterbodies is an actual element of water treatment system. Particularly, Shershnevskoie reservoir - the source of drinking water for Chelyabinsk city (South Ural region of Russia) - is exposed to interannual, seasonal and short-range fluctuations of blue-green alga Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and other dominant species abundance, which lead to technological problems and economic costs and adversely affect the water treatment quality. Whereas the composition, intensity and the period of blooms affected not only by meteorological seasonal conditions but also by ecological specificity of waterbody, that's important to develop object-oriented forecasting, particularly, search for an optimal number of predictors for such forecasting. Thereby, firstly fuzzy logic and fuzzy artificial neural network patterns for blue-green alga Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) blooms prediction in nearby undrained Smolino lake were developed. These results subsequently served as the base to derive membership functions for Shernevskoie reservoir forecasting patterns. Time series with the total lenght about 138-159 days of dominant species seasonal abundance, water temperature, cloud cover, wind speed, mineralization, phosphate and nitrate concentrations were obtained through field observations held at Lake Smolino (Chelyabinsk) in the warm season of 2009 and 2011 with time resolution of 2-7 days. The cross-correlation analysis of the data revealed the potential predictors of M. aeruginosa abundance quasi-periodic oscillations: green alga Pediastrum duplex (P. duplex) abundance and mineralization for 2009, P. duplex abundance, water temperature and concentration of nitrates for 2011. According to the results of cross-correlation analysis one membership function "P. duplex abundance" and one rule linking M. aeruginosa and P. duplex abundances were set up for database of 2009. Analogically, for database of 2011

  1. Fe2+-Ti4+ vs. Fe2+-Fe3+ charge-transfer and short-range order in single chains of face-sharing octahedra: ellenbergerite and dumortierite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, C.; Langer, K.; Khomenko, V.

    2009-04-01

    In zoned pyrope megacrysts from the Dora-Maira UHP terrane, new, dark-violet colour varieties of the hexagonal, high-pressure silicate ellenbergerite extend the range of known Fe contents for this mineral from 0-0.1 to 0-0.4 atom pfu, for Ti contents commonly in the range 0.2-0.4 pfu. The new varieties show an extremely intense pleochroism, colourless for E perpendicular to c to deep Prussian blue for E//c, as compared to colourless to lilac or reddish purple for classical Fe-poor ellenbergerite. These features were the incentive for an electronic absorption spectroscopic study and a reappraisal of the interpretation of the charge transfers (CT), colour and ordering schemes in this group and the structurally related borosilicate dumortierite. Both structures are characterized by the presence of infinite single chains of face-sharing, partly vacant octahedra along the 6-fold screw axis and pseudo-hexad axis, respectively, in which the Fe and Ti atoms are partitioned. In the spectra of Fe-poor ellenbergerite, the presence of a single Fe2+-Ti4+ CT band near 19000 cm˘1 was taken as evidence for complete short-range ordering of Mg(Fe), Ti and vacancies in the octahedral single chain [1]. The E//c spectra of Fe-rich ellenbergerite show the same absorption band near 19000 cm˘1 but consistently flanked by another CT band near 14000 cm˘1 , the intensity of which increases with total Fe content. The latter is similar to the 12400 cm˘1 CT band observed as the single feature in E//c spectra of the isotructural (Ti-free and Fe-bearing) phosphoellenbergerite, and clearly assigned to Fe2+-Fe3+ CT in the octahedral single chain [1]. The same colour pattern occurs in the dumortierite group, with red Fe-poor, Ti-rich crystals showing a single CT band near 20000 cm˘1, blue Ti-poor crystals showing a single CT band near 16500 cm˘1, and violet Fe- and Ti-rich crystals showing a combination of the two bands [2]. In the light of the new data, we reinterpret the dumortierite colour

  2. Group unity of chimpanzees elucidated by comparison of sex differences in short-range interactions in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamaki, Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) form multi-male and multi-female unit groups with fission-fusion grouping patterns. Short-range interaction (SRI) plays an important role in the unity of these groups and in maintaining social bonds among members. This study evaluated three models of chimpanzee social structure that differed according to the emphasis each placed on social bonds between the sexes, i.e., the male-only, the bisexual, and the male-bonded unit-group model. I investigated differences in SRI between the sexes among group members in well-habituated wild chimpanzees in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania. I followed six focal adult males and six females, and quantified their respective SRI with other chimpanzees. Except between subordinate males and adult females, adults in general engaged in SRI with about 60-90% of the individuals with whom they made visual contact each day, whether in large or small parties. Although the number of social grooming (SGR) partners was limited, male-male SGR networks were wider than were either male-female or female-female SGR networks among adults. The number of contact-seeking behavior (CSB) partners was also limited, but dominant males had more CSB partners. Adult females mainly interacted by pant-grunt greeting (PGG) with adult males, but tended to do so mainly with the highest-ranking male(s) within visual contact. These results indicated that the social bonds among adult males were essential to group unity. Because of clear male dominance, adult females established peaceful coexistence with all group members despite less frequent SRI with subordinate males by maintaining affiliative social bonds with dominant males, thereby supporting the male-bonded unit-group model. Adult females had many female SRI partners, but these interactions did not involve performing conspicuous behaviors, suggesting that females maintain social bonds with other females in ways that differ from how such bonds are maintained with and between

  3. Interplay of short-range correlations and nuclear symmetry energy in hard-photon production from heavy-ion reactions at Fermi energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Gao-Chan; Li, Bao-An

    2017-12-01

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model for nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, we investigate the interplay of the nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations (SRCs) and nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ ) on hard-photon spectra in collisions of several Ca isotopes on 112Sn and 124Sn targets at a beam energy of 45 MeV/nucleon. It is found that over the whole spectra of hard photons studied, effects of the SRCs overwhelm those owing to the Esym(ρ ) . The energetic photons come mostly from the high-momentum tails (HMTs) of single-nucleon momentum distributions in the target and projectile. Within the neutron-proton dominance model of SRCs based on the consideration that the tensor force acts mostly in the isosinglet and spin-triplet nucleon-nucleon interaction channel, there are equal numbers of neutrons and protons, thus a zero isospin asymmetry in the HMTs. Therefore, experimental measurements of the energetic photons from heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies have the great potential to help us better understand the nature of SRCs without any appreciable influence by the uncertain Esym(ρ ) . These measurements will be complementary to but also have some advantages over the ongoing and planned experiments using hadronic messengers from reactions induced by high-energy electrons or protons. Because the underlying physics of SRCs and Esym(ρ ) are closely correlated, a better understanding of the SRCs will, in turn, help constrain the nuclear symmetry energy more precisely in a broad density range.

  4. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  5. Implementation of a model of atmospheric dispersion and dose calculation in the release of radioactive effluents in the Nuclear Centre; Implementacion de un modelo de dispersion atmosferica y calculo de dosis en la liberacion de efluentes radiactivos en el Centro Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz L, C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In the present thesis, the software DERA (Dispersion of Radioactive Effluents into the Atmosphere) was developed in order to calculate the equivalent dose, external and internal, associated with the release of radioactive effluents into the atmosphere from a nuclear facility. The software describes such emissions in normal operation, and not considering the exceptional situations such as accidents. Several tools were integrated for describing the dispersion of radioactive effluents using site meteorological information (average speed and wind direction and the stability profile). Starting with the calculation of the concentration of the effluent as a function of position, DERA estimates equivalent doses using a set of EPA s and ICRP s coefficients. The software contains a module that integrates a database with these coefficients for a set of 825 different radioisotopes and uses the Gaussian method to calculate the effluents dispersion. This work analyzes how adequate is the Gaussian model to describe emissions type -puff-. Chapter 4 concludes, on the basis of a comparison of the recommended correlations of emissions type -puff-, that under certain conditions (in particular with intermittent emissions) it is possible to perform an adequate description using the Gaussian model. The dispersion coefficients (σ{sub y} and σ{sub z}), that using the Gaussian model, were obtained from different correlations given in the literature. Also in Chapter 5 is presented the construction of a particular correlation using Lagrange polynomials, which takes information from the Pasquill-Gifford-Turner curves (PGT). This work also contains a state of the art about the coefficients that relate the concentration with the equivalent dose. This topic is discussed in Chapter 6, including a brief description of the biological-compartmental models developed by the ICRP. The software s development was performed using the programming language Python 2.7, for the Windows operating system (the

  6. Quantification of β-carotene, retinol, retinyl acetate and retinyl palmitate in enriched fruit juices using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    A detailed optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was carried out for developing liquid chromatographic (HPLC) techniques, using both fluorescence and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of preforms of vitamin A: retinol (R), retinyl acetate (RA), retinyl palmitate (RP) and β-carotene (β-C). The HPLC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of methanol and water, with gradient elution. The APCI-MS and fluorescence spectra permitted the correct identification of compounds in the analyzed samples. Parameters affecting DLLME were optimized using 2 mL of methanol (disperser solvent) containing 150 μL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent). The precision ranged from 6% to 8% (RSD) and the limits of detection were between 0.03 and 1.4 ng mL(-1), depending on the compound. The enrichment factor values were in the 21-44 range. Juice samples were analyzed without saponification and no matrix effect was found when using fluorescence detection, so calibration was possible with aqueous standards. However, a matrix effect appeared with APCI-MS, in which case it was necessary to apply matrix-matched calibration. There was great variability in the forms of vitamin A present in the juices, the most abundant ester being retinyl acetate (0.04 to 3.4 μg mL(-1)), followed by the amount of retinol (0.01 to 0.16 μg mL(-1)), while retinyl palmitate was not detected, except in the milk-containing juice, in which RP was the main form. The representative carotenoid β-carotene was present in the orange, peach, mango and multifruit juices in high amounts. The method was validated using two certified reference materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of vitamins D and K in foods by liquid chromatography with diode-array and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Pilar; Bravo-Bravo, María; López-García, Ignacio; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    A simple and rapid method was developed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with both diode array (DAD) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (APCI-MS) detection, for the simultaneous analysis of the vitamins ergocalciferol (D2), cholecalciferol (D3), phylloquinone (K1), menaquinone-4 (K2) and a synthetic form of vitamin K, menadione (K3). The Taguchi experimental method, an orthogonal array design (OAD), was used to optimize an efficient and clean preconcentration step based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). A factorial design was applied with six factors and three levels for each factor, namely, carbon tetrachloride volume, methanol volume, aqueous sample volume, pH of sample, sodium chloride concentration and time of the centrifugation step. The DLLME optimized procedure consisted of rapidly injecting 3 mL of acetonitrile (disperser solvent) containing 150 µL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) into the aqueous sample, thereby forming a cloudy solution. Phase separation was performed by centrifugation, and the sedimented phase was evaporated with nitrogen, reconstituted with 50 µL of acetonitrile, and injected. The LC analyses were carried out using a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile, 2-propanol and water, under gradient elution. Quantification was carried out by the standard additions method. The APCI-MS spectra, in combination with UV spectra, permitted the correct identification of compounds in the food samples. The method was validated according to international guidelines and using a certified reference material. The validated method was applied for the analysis of vitamins D and K in infant foods and several green vegetables. There was little variability in the forms of vitamin K present in vegetables, with the most abundant vitamer in all the samples being phylloquinone, while menadione could not be detected. Conversely, cholecalciferol, which is present in food of animal origin, was

  8. Symmetry energy of cold nucleonic matter within a relativistic mean field model encapsulating effects of high-momentum nucleons induced by short-range correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bao-Jun; Li, Bao-An

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations (SRC) from the tensor components and/or the repulsive core of nuclear forces lead to a high- (low-)momentum tail (depletion) in the single-nucleon momentum distribution above (below) the nucleon Fermi surface in cold nucleonic matter. Significant progress was made recently in constraining the isospin-dependent parameters characterizing the SRC-modified single-nucleon momentum distribution in neutron-rich nucleonic matter using both experimental data and microscopic model calculations. Using the constrained single-nucleon momentum distribution in a nonlinear relativistic mean field (RMF) model, we study the equation of state (EOS) of asymmetric nucleonic matter (ANM), especially the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ ) . First, as a test of the model, the average nucleon kinetic energy extracted recently from electron-nucleus scattering experiments using a neutron-proton dominance model is well reproduced by the RMF model incorporating effects of the SRC-induced high-momentum nucleons, while it is significantly under predicted by the RMF model using a step function for the single-nucleon momentum distribution as in free Fermi gas (FFG) models. Second, consistent with earlier findings within nonrelativistic models, the kinetic symmetry energy of quasinucleons is found to be Esymkin(ρ0) =-16.94 ±13.66 MeV which is dramatically different from the prediction of Esymkin(ρ0) ≈12.5 MeV by FFG models at nuclear matter saturation density ρ0=0.16 fm-3 . Third, comparing the RMF calculations with and without the high-momentum nucleons using two sets of model parameters both reproducing identically all empirical constraints on the EOS of symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) and the symmetry energy of ANM at ρ0, the SRC-modified single-nucleon momentum distribution is found to make the Esym(ρ ) more concave around ρ0 by softening it significantly at both subsaturation and suprasaturation

  9. Parameterization of a coarse-grained model with short-ranged interactions for modeling fuel cell membranes with controlled water uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jibao; Miller, Chance; Molinero, Valeria

    2017-07-21

    The design of polymer electrolyte membranes with controlled water uptake is of high importance for high-performance fuel cells, because the water content of the membranes modulates their conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical strength. The water activity aw controls the equilibrium water uptake of a system. Predicting aw of materials is currently a daunting challenge for molecular simulations, because calculations of water activity require grand canonical simulations that are extremely expensive even with classical non-polarizable force fields. Moreover, force fields do not generally reproduce aw of solutions. Here, we first present a general strategy to parameterize force fields that reproduce the experimental aw of solutions, and then implement that strategy to re-parameterize the interactions in FFcomp, a coarse-grained model for hydrated polyphenylene oxide/trimethylamine chloride (PPO/TMACl) membranes in which the TMA cation is attached to the PPO backbone and the Cl anion is in the mobile water nanophase. Coarse-grained models based on short-ranged potentials successfully model fuel cell membranes and other concentrated aqueous electrolyte solutions because electrostatic interactions are highly screened in these systems. The new force field, FFpvap, differs from the original FFcomp only in the parameters of the ion-ion interactions, yet it reproduces aw in TMACl solutions with accuracy within 0.5 and 3% of the experimental value in all the concentration range relevant to the operation of fuel cell membranes. We find that the heat needed to vaporize water in solutions with as little as five water molecules per ion pair is essentially the same as in pure water, despite the strong water-ion interactions and their impact on the water activity. We review the literature to demonstrate that this is independent of the model and a general feature of water solutions. FFpvap reproduces the radial distribution functions and captures well the relative

  10. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  11. New species of Austropurcellia, cryptic short-range endemic mite harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi) from Australia’s Wet Tropics biodiversity hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Katya R.; Popkin-Hall, Zachary R.; Coblens, Michelle J.; Oberski, Jill T.; Sharma, Prashant P.; Boyer, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genus Austropurcellia is a lineage of tiny leaf-litter arachnids that inhabit tropical rainforests throughout the eastern coast of Queensland, Australia. The majority of their diversity is found within the Wet Tropics rainforests of northeast Queensland, an area known for its exceptionally high levels of biodiversity and endemism. Studying the biogeographic history of limited-dispersal invertebrates in the Wet Tropics can provide insight into the role of climatic changes such as rainforest contraction in shaping rainforest biodiversity patterns. Here we describe six new species of mite harvestmen from the Wet Tropics rainforests, identified using morphological data, and discuss the biogeography of Austropurcellia with distributions of all known species. With this taxonomic contribution, the majority of the known diversity of the genus has been documented. PMID:27199608

  12. Uncertainty modelling of atmospheric dispersion by stochastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uncertainties can be represented in many ways. The literature describes many types of uncer- tainty representation. Among the most encountered uncertainty representations are probability distributions, interval, probability bounds and fuzzy numbers. Aleatory uncertainties are rep- resented by probability distributions and ...

  13. Bubble bursting as an aerosol generation mechanism during an oil spill in the deep-sea environment: molecular dynamics simulations of oil alkanes and dispersants in atmospheric air/salt water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Zhang, Zenghui; Ehrenhauser, Franz S; Avij, Paria; Valsaraj, Kalliat T; Hung, Francisco R

    2014-01-01

    Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the properties of oil n-alkanes [i.e., n-pentadecane (C15), n-icosane (C20) and n-triacontane (C30)], as well as several surfactant species [i.e., the standard anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and three model dispersants similar to the Tween and Span species present in Corexit 9500A] at air/salt water interfaces. This study was motivated by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, and our simulation results show that, from the thermodynamic point of view, the n-alkanes and the model dispersants have a strong preference to remain at the air/salt water interface, as indicated by the presence of deep free energy minima at these interfaces. The free energy minimum of these n-alkanes becomes deeper as their chain length increases, and as the concentration of surfactant species at the interface increases. The n-alkanes tend to adopt a flat orientation and form aggregates at the bare air/salt water interface. When this interface is coated with surfactants, the n-alkanes tend to adopt more tilted orientations with respect to the vector normal to the interface. These simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings reported in the accompanying paper [Ehrenhauser et al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts 2013, in press, (DOI: 10.1039/c3em00390f)]. The fact that these long-chain n-alkanes show a strong thermodynamic preference to remain at the air/salt water interfaces, especially if these interfaces are coated with surfactants, makes these species very likely to adsorb at the surface of bubbles or droplets and be ejected to the atmosphere by sea surface processes such as whitecaps (breaking waves) and bubble bursting. Finally, the experimental finding that more oil hydrocarbons are ejected when Corexit 9500A is present in the system is consistent with the deeper free energy minima observed for the n-alkanes at the air/salt water

  14. Modelling the dispersion energy for Van der Waals complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Garcia, A

    2002-01-01

    Strictly ab initio calculations of the dispersion energy are unfeasible in practice but for the smallest systems. A sensible alternative is to model the dispersion contribution through a damped multipolar expansion. This thesis proposes to represent the dispersion energy by means of a non-empirical, atom-atom model using damping functions scaled from 'exact' results for one electron-one electron systems. We start by investigating the scalability of ab initio calculated damping functions for closed-shell atom-atom dimers. Ab initio scaling parameters are employed to assess the quality of the damping functions yielded by a predictor scheme based on the charge overlap between the interacting monomers. The investigation of the scaling properties is extended to atom-linear molecule systems, focusing on the dependence on orientation of the short-range dispersion energy and how to account for it using isotropic damping parameters. We study the possibilities of an 'atomic' (multicentre) representation of the dispersi...

  15. Colloidal Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  16. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  17. A short-range gradient-corrected spin density functional in combination with long-range coupled-cluster methods: Application to alkali-metal rare-gas dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goll, Erich [Institut fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: goll@theochem.uni-stuttgart.de; Werner, Hans-Joachim [Institut fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Stoll, Hermann [Institut fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Leininger, Thierry [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, UMR 5626 du CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Gori-Giorgi, Paola [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, CNRS UMR7616, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris (France); Savin, Andreas [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, CNRS UMR7616, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris (France)

    2006-10-26

    We extend our recently published short-range gradient-corrected density functional from the closed-shell to Open-shell case, combine it with long-range coupled-cluster methods (CCSD, CCSD(T)), and apply it to the weakly bound alkali-metal rare-gas dimers AmRg (Am = Li-Cs; Rg = Ne-Xe). The results are shown to be superior, with medium-size basis sets, to pure DFT and pure coupled-cluster calculations.

  18. Lagrangian modeling of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides and geographical information systems as tools to support emergency planning in area of influence of nuclear complex of Angra dos Reis, RJ, Brazil; Modelagem Lagrangeana da dispersao atmoferica de radionuclideos e sistemas de informacao geografica como ferramentas de suporte ao planejamento de emergencia na area de influencia do complexo nuclear de Angra dos Reis, RJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Corbiniano

    2013-07-01

    Industrial accidents generally endanger structures and the set of environmental influence area where the enterprises are located, especially when affected by atmospheric dispersion of their pollutants, whose concern with the evacuation of the population is the main goal in emergency situations. Considering the nuclear complex Angra dos Reis - RJ, based on computer modeling analysis of the mechanisms of pollutant dispersion in conjunction with geographic information systems were developed. Thus, information about the dispersion of radionuclides - from simulations performed on the HYSPLIT; meteorological data (direction, intensity and calm on the wind regime and analysis of the wind field in the region using WRF), occurrence of landslides and data on the environmental study area were integrated into a GIS database using ArcGIS platform. Aiming at the identification and definition of escape routes in case of evacuation from accidental events in CNAAA, the results point solutions for long-term planning, based on weather and landslides, and short-term, supported by simulations of the dispersion radionuclides, in order to support actions that assist local emergency planning. (author)

  19. Evaluación del desempeño de modelos de dispersión de contaminantes aplicados a cañones urbanos Evaluation of the performance of atmospheric dispersion models applied to urban street canyons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Venegas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available En los cañones urbanos, frecuentemente, se presentan concentraciones de contaminantes en aire varias veces superiores a la contaminación de fondo urbana. En este trabajo, se comparan valores de concentraciones de monóxido de carbono (CO en aire medidas dentro de un cañón urbano con las estimadas mediante algunos modelos de dispersión atmosférica aplicables a procesos que se verifican en los cañones: STREET, STREET-BOX, OSPM y AEOLIUS. Se presenta la evaluación para condiciones de sotavento, barlovento y para direcciones intermedias del viento. En la comparación, se utilizaron los valores horarios de concentraciones de CO en aire medidas durante un año en el interior de un cañón urbano de Göttinger Strässe (Hannover, Alemania y en el techo de un edificio lindero, de velocidad y dirección del viento observadas en el techo del mismo edificio y de flujo de tránsito vehicular en la calle del cañón. Los resultados generados por el modelo STREET con una constante empírica k=7, subestimaron las concentraciones observadas, obteniéndose un mejor desempeño con k= 12,1. El modelo STREET-BOX es adecuado para condiciones de sotavento y direcciones intermedias, pero presenta diferencias importantes con las concentraciones observadas a barlovento. En general, los resultados aportados por los modelos OSPM y AEOLIUS fueron los que menos se apartaron de los valores observados.Air pollutant concentrations inside street canyons are usually several times background concentrations in urban areas. In this paper, carbon monoxide (CO concentrations observed in a street canyon are compared with estimated values obtained using four atmospheric dispersion models: STREET, STREET-BOX, OSPM and AEOLIUS. Results for leeward, windward and intermediate wind directions are analyzed. Data used in the model evaluation include one year of hourly CO concentrations measured inside a street canyon of Göttinger Strässe (Hannover, Germany and at the roof of a

  20. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  1. Short-Range Digital Optical Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Concept based on multiple optoelectronic chips. Proposed network of semiconductor lasers used for communication and radar. Network includes small integrated transmitters, receivers, and data processors placed at strategic points on station and vehicles.

  2. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Shaopeng; Haegeman, Bart; Loreau, Michel

    2015-01-01

    .... Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial...

  3. Determining the short-range spin correlations in the spin-chain Li2CuO2 and CuGeO3 compounds using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monney, Claude; Bisogni, Valentina; Zhou, Ke-Jin; Kraus, Roberto; Strocov, Vladimir N; Behr, Günter; Málek, Jiři; Kuzian, Roman; Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Johnston, Steve; Revcolevschi, Alexandre; Büchner, Bernd; Rønnow, Henrik M; van den Brink, Jeroen; Geck, Jochen; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2013-02-22

    We report a high-resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering study of the quantum magnetic spin-chain materials Li(2)CuO(2) and CuGeO(3). By tuning the incoming photon energy to the oxygen K edge, a strong excitation around 3.5 eV energy loss is clearly resolved for both materials. Comparing the experimental data to many-body calculations, we identify this excitation as a Zhang-Rice singlet exciton on neighboring CuO(4) plaquettes. We demonstrate that the strong temperature dependence of the inelastic scattering related to this high-energy exciton enables us to probe short-range spin correlations on the 1 meV scale with outstanding sensitivity.

  4. Relation of short-range and long-range lithium ion dynamics in glass-ceramics: Insights from 7Li NMR field-cycling and field-gradient studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaks, Michael; Martin, Steve W.; Vogel, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We use various 7Li NMR methods to investigate lithium ion dynamics in 70Li 2S-30 P 2S5 glass and glass-ceramic obtained from this glass after heat treatment. We employ 7Li spin-lattice relaxometry, including field-cycling measurements, and line-shape analysis to investigate short-range ion jumps as well as 7Li field-gradient approaches to characterize long-range ion diffusion. The results show that ceramization substantially enhances the lithium ion mobility on all length scales. For the 70Li 2S-30 P 2S5 glass-ceramic, no evidence is found that bimodal dynamics result from different ion mobilities in glassy and crystalline regions of this sample. Rather, 7Li field-cycling relaxometry shows that dynamic susceptibilities in broad frequency and temperature ranges can be described by thermally activated jumps governed by a Gaussian distribution of activation energies g (Ea) with temperature-independent mean value Em=0.43 eV and standard deviation σ =0.07 eV . Moreover, use of this distribution allows us to rationalize 7Li line-shape results for the local ion jumps. In addition, this information about short-range ion dynamics further explains 7Li field-gradient results for long-range ion diffusion. In particular, we quantitatively show that, consistent with our experimental results, the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient D is not described by the mean activation energy Em of the local ion jumps, but by a significantly smaller apparent value whenever the distribution of correlation times G (logτ ) of the jump motion derives from an invariant distribution of activation energies and, hence, continuously broadens upon cooling. This effect occurs because the harmonic mean, which determines the results of diffusivity or also conductivity studies, continuously separates from the peak position of G (logτ ) when the width of this distribution increases.

  5. Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosovic, B; Belles, R; Chow, F K; Monache, L D; Dyer, K; Glascoe, L; Hanley, W; Johannesson, G; Larsen, S; Loosmore, G; Lundquist, J K; Mirin, A; Neuman, S; Nitao, J; Serban, R; Sugiyama, G; Aines, R

    2007-02-22

    developed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic methodology and demonstrated its effectiveness by reconstructing a wide range of release scenarios, using synthetic as well as real-world data. Data for evaluation of our event reconstruction capability were drawn from the short-range Prairie Grass, Copenhagen, and Joint Urban 2003 field experiments and a continental-scale real-world accidental release in Algeciras, Spain. The method was tested using a variety of forward models, including a Gaussian puff dispersion model INPUFF, the regional-to-continental scale Lagrangian dispersion model LODI (the work-horse real-time operational dispersion model used by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center), the empirical urban model UDM, and the building-scale computational computational fluid dynamics code FEM3MP. The robustness of the Bayesian methodology was demonstrated via the use of subsets of the available concentration data and by introducing error into some of the measurements. These tests showed that the Bayesian approach is capable of providing reliable estimates of source characteristics even in cases of limited or significantly corrupted data. For more effective treatment of strongly time-dependent problems, we developed a Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) approach. To achieve the best performance under a wide range of conditions we combined SMC and MCMC sampling into a hybrid methodology. We compared the effectiveness and advantages of this approach relative to MCMC using a set of synthetic data examples. Our dynamic data-driven event reconstruction capability seamlessly integrates observational data streams with predictive models, in order to provide the best possible estimates of unknown source term parameters, as well as optimal and timely situation analyses consistent with both models and data.

  6. Atmospheric mercury—An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, William H.; Munthe, John

    This paper presents a broad overview and synthesis of current knowledge and understanding pertaining to all major aspects of mercury in the atmosphere. The significant physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of this element and its environmentally relebant species encountered in the atmosphere are examined. Atmospheric pathways and processes considered herein include anthropogenic as well as natural sources of Hg emissions to the atmosphere, aerial transport and dispersion (including spatial and temporal variability), atmospheric transformations (both physical and chemical types), wet and dry removal/deposition processes to Earth's surface. In addition, inter-compartmental (air-water/soil/vegetation) transfer and biogeochemical cycling of mercury are considered and discussed. The section on numerical modelling deals with atmospheric transport models as well as process-oriented models. Important gaps in our current knowledge of mercury in the atmospheric environment are identified, and suggestions for future areas of research are offered.

  7. Genetics of dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocedi, Greta; Cote, Julien; Legrand, Delphine; Guillaume, Frédéric; Wheat, Christopher W.; Fronhofer, Emanuel A.; Garcia, Cristina; Henry, Roslyn; Husby, Arild; Baguette, Michel; Bonte, Dries; Coulon, Aurélie; Kokko, Hanna; Matthysen, Erik; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Nonaka, Etsuko; Stevens, Virginie M.; Travis, Justin M. J.; Donohue, Kathleen; Bullock, James M.; del Mar Delgado, Maria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) review the empirical literature on the genetic basis of dispersal, (ii) explore how theoretical investigations of the evolution of dispersal have represented the genetics of dispersal, and (iii) discuss how the genetic basis of dispersal influences theoretical predictions of the evolution of dispersal and potential consequences. Dispersal has a detectable genetic basis in many organisms, from bacteria to plants and animals. Generally, there is evidence for significant genetic variation for dispersal or dispersal‐related phenotypes or evidence for the micro‐evolution of dispersal in natural populations. Dispersal is typically the outcome of several interacting traits, and this complexity is reflected in its genetic architecture: while some genes of moderate to large effect can influence certain aspects of dispersal, dispersal traits are typically polygenic. Correlations among dispersal traits as well as between dispersal traits and other traits under selection are common, and the genetic basis of dispersal can be highly environment‐dependent. By contrast, models have historically considered a highly simplified genetic architecture of dispersal. It is only recently that models have started to consider multiple loci influencing dispersal, as well as non‐additive effects such as dominance and epistasis, showing that the genetic basis of dispersal can influence evolutionary rates and outcomes, especially under non‐equilibrium conditions. For example, the number of loci controlling dispersal can influence projected rates of dispersal evolution during range shifts and corresponding demographic impacts

  8. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  9. Quantitative dispersion microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Yaqoob, Zahid; Ramachandra R Dasari; Feld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refractive index dispersion is an intrinsic optical property and a useful source of contrast in biological imaging studies. In this report, we present the first dispersion phase imaging of living eukaryotic cells. We have developed quantitative dispersion microscopy based on the principle of quantitative phase microscopy. The dual-wavelength quantitative phase microscope makes phase measurements at 310 nm and 400 nm wavelengths to quantify dispersion (refractive index increment ratio) of live...

  10. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  11. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijlbergh, R.A.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Heus, T.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary

  12. Unusual ferromagnetic critical behavior owing to short-range antiferromagnetic correlations in antiperovskite Cu1-xNMn3+x (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianchao; Tong, Peng; Cui, Dapeng; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Jie; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Bosen; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Zou, Youming; Sun, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    For ferromagnets, varying from simple metals to strongly correlated oxides,the critical behaviors near the Curie temperature (TC) can be grouped into several universal classes. In this paper, we report an unusual critical behavior in manganese nitrides Cu1-xNMn3+x (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.4). Although the critical behavior below TC can be well described by mean field (MF) theory, robust critical fluctuations beyond the expectations of any universal classes are observed above TC in x = 0.1. The critical fluctuations become weaker when x increases, and the MF-like critical behavior is finally restored at x = 0.4. In addition, the paramagnetic susceptibility of all the samples deviates from the Curie-Weiss (CW) law just above TC. This deviation is gradually smeared as x increases. The short-range antiferromagnetic ordering above TC revealed by our electron spin resonance measurement explains both the unusual critical behavior and the breakdown of the CW law. PMID:25604754

  13. Unusual ferromagnetic critical behavior owing to short-range antiferromagnetic correlations in antiperovskite Cu(1-x)NMn(3+x) (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianchao; Tong, Peng; Cui, Dapeng; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Jie; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Bosen; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Zou, Youming; Sun, Yuping

    2015-01-21

    For ferromagnets, varying from simple metals to strongly correlated oxides,the critical behaviors near the Curie temperature (T(C)) can be grouped into several universal classes. In this paper, we report an unusual critical behavior in manganese nitrides Cu(1-x)NMn(3+x) (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.4). Although the critical behavior below T(C) can be well described by mean field (MF) theory, robust critical fluctuations beyond the expectations of any universal classes are observed above T(C) in x = 0.1. The critical fluctuations become weaker when x increases, and the MF-like critical behavior is finally restored at x = 0.4. In addition, the paramagnetic susceptibility of all the samples deviates from the Curie-Weiss (CW) law just above T(C). This deviation is gradually smeared as x increases. The short-range antiferromagnetic ordering above T(C) revealed by our electron spin resonance measurement explains both the unusual critical behavior and the breakdown of the CW law.

  14. Modelo matemático de dispersão de poluentes na atmosfera: um instrumento técnico para a gestão ambiental Mathematical model of pollutants dispersion in the atmosphere: an instrument technique to environmental management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Moreira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Os modelos matemáticos de dispersão de poluentes na atmosfera representam um instrumento técnico importante, seja para o conhecimento do estado do ambiente, unidos à rede de monitoramento, seja para a gestão ambiental. Neste trabalho são evidenciadas as caraterísticas operacionais e teóricas dos modelos. São introduzidos os modelos de nova geração que podem representar diretamente a turbulência atmosférica através do valor do comprimento de Monin-Obukhov e da velocidade de atrito. Além disso, salienta-se que uma correta utilização dos modelos de transporte e difusão na atmosfera dependem de um estudo sobre suas capacidades de representarem corretamente situações reais confrontando os valores calculados dos modelos com observações experimentais. É aprofundado em particular, visto a grande atualidade do fenômeno, a utilização dos modelos matemáticos de dispersão na gestão da qualidade do ar em ambiente urbano.The mathematical models of pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere represent an important technical instrument, as for the knowledge of the state of the atmosphere, united to the monitoring net, as for the environmental administration. In this work the operational and theoretical characteristics of air pollution models are evidenced. Models of new generation that can represent the atmospheric turbulence directly through the value of the Monin-Obukhov length and of the friction velocity are introduced. Besides, it is pointed out that a correct use of the transport and diffusion models in the atmosphere depends of a study about their capacities of representing real situations confronting the calculated values of the models with experimental observations. It is deepened in matter, seen the great present time of the phenomenon, the use of the mathematical models of dispersion in the management of the air quality in urban environment.

  15. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Through the coupling of dispositif with atmosphere this paper engages in a discussion of the atmospherics as both a form of knowledge and a material practice. In doing so the objective is to provide an inventory of tools and methodologies deployed in the construction of atmosphere understood......, the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...

  16. Can the confidence in long range atmospheric transport models be increased? The Pan-European experience of ENSEMBLE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galmarini, S.; Bianconi, R.; Klug, W.

    2004-01-01

    Is atmospheric dispersion forecasting an important asset of the early-phase nuclear emergency response management? Is there a 'perfect atmospheric dispersion model'? Is there a way to make the results of dispersion models more reliable and trustworthy? While seeking to answer these questions...... the multi-model ensemble dispersion forecast system ENSEMBLE will be presented....

  17. Can the confidence in long range atmospheric transport models be increased? The pan-european experience of ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmarini, S; Bianconi, R; Klug, W; Mikkelsen, T; Addis, R; Andronopoulos, S; Astrup, P; Baklanov, A; Bartniki, J; Bartzis, J C; Bellasio, R; Bompay, F; Buckley, R; Bouzom, M; Champion, H; D'Amours, R; Davakis, E; Eleveld, H; Geertsema, G T; Glaab, H; Kollax, M; Ilvonen, M; Manning, A; Pechinger, U; Persson, C; Polreich, E; Potemski, S; Prodanova, M; Saltbones, J; Slaper, H; Sofiev, M A; Syrakov, D; Sørensen, J H; Van der Auwera, L; Valkama, I; Zelazny, R

    2004-01-01

    Is atmospheric dispersion forecasting an important asset of the early-phase nuclear emergency response management? Is there a 'perfect atmospheric dispersion model'? Is there a way to make the results of dispersion models more reliable and trustworthy? While seeking to answer these questions the multi-model ensemble dispersion forecast system ENSEMBLE will be presented. Copyright 2004 Oxford University Press

  18. Sound Propagation in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith

    Propagation of sound close to the ground outdoors involves geometric spreading, air absorption, interaction with the ground, barriers, vegetation and refraction associated with wind and temperature gradients. After a brief survey of historical aspects of the study of outdoor sound and its applications, this chapter details the physical principles associated with various propagation effects, reviews data that demonstrate them and methods for predicting them. The discussion is concerned primarily with the relatively short ranges and spectra of interest when predicting and assessing community noise rather than the frequencies and long ranges of concern, for example, in infrasonic global monitoring or used for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Specific phenomena that are discussed include spreading losses, atmospheric absorption, diffraction by barriers and buildings, interaction of sound with the ground (ground waves, surface waves, ground impedance associated with porosity and roughness, and elasticity effects), propagation through crops, shrubs and trees, wind and temperature gradient effects, shadow zones and incoherence due to atmospheric turbulence. The chapter concludes by suggesting a few areas that require further research.

  19. Numerical simulation of behaviour of puffs for represent the atmospheric dispersion of dense gases; Simulacao numerica do comportamento de 'puffs' para representar a dispersao de gases pesados na atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaramonte, Edson Abel dos S.; Leal, Cesar Antonio [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: edsonchi@ufrgs.vortex.br

    1997-07-01

    The releases of the heavy gases at ground level into the atmosphere can have all kinds of behaviour, that can describe these all kinds of releases. The releases continuous or intermittent are represented in the model as succession of instantaneous releases (the puff model). These puffs are summed up and combined to form continuous or intermittent. In this paper is showing a simple model, that can describe these all kinds of releases. The releases continuous or intermittent are represented in the model as succession of instantaneous releases (the puff model). This puffs sum and combination process is showing for representation of a heavy gas continuous release with constant rate. In the later of the paper the numerical results obtain with the model are compared with field experimental data available in the literature for continuous releases of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). (author)

  20. Role of Short-Range Chemical Ordering in (GaN) 1–x (ZnO) x for Photodriven Oxygen Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dennis P. [Department; Neuefeind, Joerg C. [Chemical; Koczkur, Kallum M. [Department; Bish, David L. [Department; Skrabalak, Sara E. [Department

    2017-07-21

    (GaN)1–x(ZnO)x (GZNO) is capable of visible-light driven water splitting, but its bandgap at x ≤ 0.15 (>2.7 eV) results in poor visible-light absorption. Unfortunately, methods to narrow its bandgap by incorporating higher ZnO concentrations are accompanied by extensive Urbach tailing near the absorption-edge, which is indicative of structural disorder or chemical inhomogeneities. We evaluated whether this disorder is intrinsic to the bond-length distribution in GZNO or is a result of defects introduced from the loss of Zn during nitridation. Here, the synthesis of GZNO derived from layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors is described which minimizes Zn loss and chemical inhomogeneities and enhances visible-light absorption. The average and local atomic structures of LDH-derived GZNO were investigated using X-ray and neutron scattering and are correlated with their oxygen evolution rates. An isotope-contrasted neutron-scattering experiment was conducted in conjunction with reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations. We showed that a bond-valence bias in the RMC refinements reproduces the short-range ordering (SRO) observed in structure refinements using isotope-contrasted neutron data. The findings suggest that positional disorder of cation–anion pairs in GZNO partially arises from SRO and influences local bond relaxations. Furthermore, particle-based oxygen evolution reactions (OERs) in AgNO3 solution reveal that the crystallite size of GZNO correlates more than positional disorder with oxygen evolution rate. These findings illustrate the importance of examining the local structure of multinary photocatalysts to identify dominant factors in particulate-based photodriven oxygen evolution.

  1. Preparation of Dispersion-Hardened Copper by Internal Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Povl; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1978-01-01

    Internal oxidation experiments in CO2/CO atmospheres on Cu-Al alloys for preparation of dispersion-hardened Cu are described. The oxygen pressures of the atmospheres used in the experiments were controlled with a solid electrolyte oxygen cell based on ZrO2 (CaO). The particle size distributions...

  2. Dispersion management with metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2017-03-07

    An apparatus, system, and method to counteract group velocity dispersion in fibers, or any other propagation of electromagnetic signals at any wavelength (microwave, terahertz, optical, etc.) in any other medium. A dispersion compensation step or device based on dispersion-engineered metamaterials is included and avoids the need of a long section of specialty fiber or the need for Bragg gratings (which have insertion loss).

  3. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily exper......” implications and qualities of the approach are identified through concrete examples of a design case, which also investigates the qualities and implications of addressing atmospheres both as design concern and user experience.......This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  4. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  5. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  6. "Dispersion modeling approaches for near road | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadway design and roadside barriers can have significant effects on the dispersion of traffic-generated pollutants, especially in the near-road environment. Dispersion models that can accurately simulate these effects are needed to fully assess these impacts for a variety of applications. For example, such models can be useful for evaluating the mitigation potential of roadside barriers in reducing near-road exposures and their associated adverse health effects. Two databases, a tracer field study and a wind tunnel study, provide measurements used in the development and/or validation of algorithms to simulate dispersion in the presence of noise barriers. The tracer field study was performed in Idaho Falls, ID, USA with a 6-m noise barrier and a finite line source in a variety of atmospheric conditions. The second study was performed in the meteorological wind tunnel at the US EPA and simulated line sources at different distances from a model noise barrier to capture the effect on emissions from individual lanes of traffic. In both cases, velocity and concentration measurements characterized the effect of the barrier on dispersion.This paper presents comparisons with the two datasets of the barrier algorithms implemented in two different dispersion models: US EPA’s R-LINE (a research dispersion modelling tool under development by the US EPA’s Office of Research and Development) and CERC’s ADMS model (ADMS-Urban). In R-LINE the physical features reveal

  7. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  8. Nowhere to Go but Up: Impacts of Climate Change on Demographics of a Short-Range Endemic (Crotalus willardi obscurus) in the Sky-Islands of Southwestern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark A; Douglas, Marlis R; Webb, Colleen T; Collyer, Michael L; Holycross, Andrew T; Painter, Charles W; Kamees, Larry K; Douglas, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity elements with narrow niches and restricted distributions (i.e., 'short range endemics,' SREs) are particularly vulnerable to climate change. The New Mexico Ridge-nosed Rattlesnake (Crotalus willardi obscurus, CWO), an SRE listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act within three sky islands of southwestern North America, is constrained at low elevation by drought and at high elevation by wildfire. We combined long-term recapture and molecular data with demographic and niche modeling to gauge its climate-driven status, distribution, and projected longevity. The largest population (Animas) is numerically constricted (N = 151), with few breeding adults (Nb = 24) and an elevated inbreeding coefficient (ΔF = 0.77; 100 years). Mean home range (0.07 km2) is significantly smaller compared to other North American rattlesnakes, and movements are within, not among sky islands. Demographic values, when gauged against those displayed by other endangered/Red-Listed reptiles [e.g., Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta)], are either comparable or markedly lower. Survival rate differs significantly between genders (female

  9. Nowhere to Go but Up: Impacts of Climate Change on Demographics of a Short-Range Endemic (Crotalus willardi obscurus in the Sky-Islands of Southwestern North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Davis

    Full Text Available Biodiversity elements with narrow niches and restricted distributions (i.e., 'short range endemics,' SREs are particularly vulnerable to climate change. The New Mexico Ridge-nosed Rattlesnake (Crotalus willardi obscurus, CWO, an SRE listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act within three sky islands of southwestern North America, is constrained at low elevation by drought and at high elevation by wildfire. We combined long-term recapture and molecular data with demographic and niche modeling to gauge its climate-driven status, distribution, and projected longevity. The largest population (Animas is numerically constricted (N = 151, with few breeding adults (Nb = 24 and an elevated inbreeding coefficient (ΔF = 0.77; 100 years. Mean home range (0.07 km2 is significantly smaller compared to other North American rattlesnakes, and movements are within, not among sky islands. Demographic values, when gauged against those displayed by other endangered/Red-Listed reptiles [e.g., Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta], are either comparable or markedly lower. Survival rate differs significantly between genders (female

  10. The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to short-range Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. State of the art and proposals for lines of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, F; Barbey, P; Bardiès, M; Biau, A; Blanchardon, E; Chetioui, A; Lebaron-Jacobs, L; Pasquier, J L

    2013-03-01

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system although there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that it is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures. One of the specific issues of internal exposure involves short-range radiations such as Auger and beta particles. Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to their chemical nature and the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of the low-energy electrons in biological matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions and exacerbate radiotoxic responses at cellular level. These particularities in energy distribution and cellular responses are not taken into account by the conventional methods for the assessment of risk.Alternative systems have been proposed, based on dosimetry conducted at the cellular or even molecular level, whose purpose is to determine the energy deposition occurring within the DNA molecule. However, calculation of absorbed doses at the molecular level is not sufficient to ensure a better assessment of the risks incurred. Favouring such a microdosimetric approach for the risk assessments would require a comprehensive knowledge of the biological targets of radiation, the dose-response relationships at the various levels of organisation, and the mechanisms leading from cellular energy deposition to the appearance of a health detriment. The required knowledge is not fully available today and it is not yet possible to link an intracellular energy deposition to a probability of occurrence of health effects or to use methods based on cellular

  11. Urban atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    What is an urban atmosphere? How can we differentiate an 'atmosphere' from other facets of urban consciousness and experience? This essay explores some of the wider cultural, political, and philosophical connotations of atmospheres as a focal point for critical reflections on space and subjectivity. The idea of an 'affective atmosphere' as a distinctive kind of mood or shared corporeal phenomenon is considered in relation to recent developments in phenomenology, extended conceptions of agency, and new understandings of materialism. The essay draws in particular on the changing characteristics of air and light to reflect on different forms of sensory experience and their wider cultural and political connotations. The argument highlights some of the tensions and anomalies that permeate contemporary understandings of urban atmospheres.

  12. Quasi-asymptotic Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheven, U. M.; Harris, R.; Johns, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The experimental characterization of voidspaces in porous media generally includes measurements of volume averaged scalar properties such as porosity, dispersivity, or the hydrodynamic radius rh = V/S, where V and S are the volume and surface area of the pore space respectively. Displacement encoding NMR experiments have made significant contributions to this characterization. It is clear, however, that NMR derived dispersivities in packed beds—the one random porous system for which there exist canonical but incompatible theoretical predictions with few or no adjustable parameters—can be affected by the same experimental complications which have substantially contributed to the puzzling scatter in published dispersion results based on elution experiments. Notable among these are macroscopic flow heterogeneities near walls, and inhomogeneous flow injection. Using the first three cumulants we delineate a transition from a pre-asymptotic to a quasi-asymptotic dispersion regime and determine the true dispersivity of the random pack of spheres.

  13. Numerical modelling of microorganisms dispersion in urban area : application to legionella

    OpenAIRE

    Tognet, Frédéric; Turmeau, Cyrille; HA, Thi Lan; Tarnaud, Eric; Rouil, Laurence; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Robine, Enric; Morel, Yannick

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Dispersion modelling is often used to estimate potentially contaminated areas in case of accidental release of microorganisms in the atmosphere. In the specific case of Legionella, accidental spread in the atmosphere due to contaminated cooling towers system may occur over distance larger than 10km. In addition, most cooling towers are located in urban areas where dispersion due to obstacles is complex. In this case, dispersion models have to take into account complex ...

  14. Lagrangian scale of particle dispersion in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua; Francois, Nicolas; Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Transport of mass, heat and momentum in turbulent flows by far exceeds that in stable laminar fluid motions. As turbulence is a state of a flow dominated by a hierarchy of scales, it is not clear which of these scales mostly affects particle dispersion. Also, it is not uncommon that turbulence coexists with coherent vortices. Here we report on Lagrangian statistics in laboratory two-dimensional turbulence. Our results provide direct experimental evidence that fluid particle dispersion is determined by a single measurable Lagrangian scale related to the forcing scale. These experiments offer a new way of predicting dispersion in turbulent flows in which one of the low energy scales possesses temporal coherency. The results are applicable to oceanographic and atmospheric data, such as those obtained from trajectories of free-drifting instruments in the ocean.

  15. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability.

  16. Atmospheric Infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roald, Tone; Pedersen, Ida Egmose; Levin, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    In this article we establish intersubjective meaning-making in infancy as atmospheric. Through qualitative descriptions of five mother–infant dyads in a video-recorded, experimental setting when the infant is 4, 7, 10, and 13 months, we discovered atmospheric appearances with a developmental...... pattern of atmospheric variations. These appearances, we argue, are contextual and intersubjective monologues. The monologues are similar to what Daniel Stern describes with his concept of “vitality affects,” but they arise as a unified force that envelops the mother and child. As such, we present a new...

  17. Dispersion Modeling and Characterization of Particulates from Land Application of Class B Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Abhishek S.

    analysis. To further understand the contribution of the biosolids application as a source, a detailed source apportionment study was conducted. The filter papers were analyzed using ICP-OES for elemental concentrations. The average elemental concentration of US EPA regulated elements such as arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and titanium (Ti) increased significantly during the application. Increase in the macronutrients, such as phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg); and some of the micronutrients, such as copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn), make biosolids a viable, cheap, and sustainable partial or full replacement to commercial fertilizers. The receptor modeling using the positive matrix factorization was used to identify and characterize the source profiles contributing to the emissions. Four major sources contributing to the emissions were identified as industrial source, soil/dust, biosolids, and ambient/background. The study revealed that biosolids source contributed significantly to the emissions of aluminum (85%), cadmium (59%), chromium (96%), nickel (45%), lead (49%), and silicon (62%). The short range dispersion of particulate matter from a ground level area source is difficult to simulate. The dissertation examines the particle dispersion in the nearby area from injection of the biosolids an open field. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to simulate the particle dispersion. A commercial CFD package FLUENT was used to model the physical phenomenon. The results of the simulations were compared to the observed concentrations at two different downwind distances collected during the 2009 field study. The performance of the model is evaluated using four statistical parameters (normalized mean square error (NMSE), fractional bias (FB), correlation coefficient (R), and geometric mean (GM). The results are also compared with an analytical model (BDRM 1

  18. Chemical dispersion among Apollo 15 olivine-normative mare basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Graham; Steele, Alison

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of Apollo 15 olivine-normative mare basalts for major and minor elements suggests that the hypothesis that the coarser-grained varieties (olivine microgabbros) consist of two chemical groups is incorrect. Instead, it is found that there is a single group including vesicular, coarse-grained, and fine-grained basalts. For the entire suite, the dispersion of compositions along the olivine trend is too great to be explained by short-range unmixing of an unfractionated flow. It is suggested that the general trend for the suite is olivine separation, probably through crystal settling. The textures, mineralogical characteristics, and chemical variation of the olivine-normative basalts are shown to be consistent with a sequence of thin fractionating flows, all from a common parent.

  19. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  20. Atmospheric neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki [Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2004-12-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through the study of atmospheric neutrinos. Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron neutrinos and muon neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons and electrons. Depending on the energy of the neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos are observed as fully contained events, partially contained events and upward-going muon events. The energy range covered by these events is from a few hundred MeV to >1 TeV. Data from various experiments showed zenith angle- and energy-dependent deficit of {nu}{sub {mu}} events, while {nu}{sub e} events did not show any such effect. It was also shown that the {nu}{sub {mu}} survival probability obeys the sinusoidal function as predicted by neutrino oscillations. Two-flavour {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_reversible} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations, with sin{sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 and {delta}m{sup 2} in the region of 1.9 x 10{sup -3} to 3.0 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, explain all these data. Various detailed studies using high statistics atmospheric neutrino data excluded the alternative hypotheses that were proposed to explain the {nu}{sub {mu}} deficit.

  1. Dispersion of aircraft exhaust in the late wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerbeck, T.; Gerz, T.; Doernbrack, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The dispersion of aircraft emissions is investigated at cruising levels, i.e. in the free, stably stratified atmosphere near the tropopause. The study is based on large-eddy simulations in a domain of size 4.3 x 1.1{sup 2} km{sup 3} where the combined effects of typical atmospheric stratification, shear and turbulence are considered. The effect of a breaking gravity wave on the dispersion of the exhaust is analyzed. The mixing processes during the late wake flow are evaluated, i.e. in the dispersion and diffusion regimes when the organized flow by the wing tip vortices has ceased and the atmospheric motions gradually dominate the events. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  2. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  3. Solvothermal Synthesis of Well-Disperse ZnS Nanorods with Efficient Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-disperse short-range-ordered ZnS nanorods with efficient photocatalytic property for photodegradation of Rhodamin B have been successfully synthesized through a solvothermal method. Solvent used can be recovered and reused, which makes the route environment-friendly. Dodecylamine was found effective in organizing nanorods to ordered monolayer. Characterization showed that these nanorods were uniform with the diameter of about 3 nm and length of nearly 30 nm. And it is expected that these monodisperse ZnS nanorods have potential applications in electroluminescence materials.

  4. Fiber Based Dispersion Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, Siddharth

    2007-01-01

    Dispersion management is a critical design criterion that characterizes the performance of an optical network, and has impacted almost every aspect of the physical layer of an optical transmission line. The past 10 years have seen an explosion in the variety of device effects exploited to obtain optimal performance from dispersion compensators, and this is the first book that deals exclusively with this technology. It starts with an exposition on the fundamental physics underlying dispersion and its effects on optical pulses, followed by at least one chapter devoted to each of the fiber-based dispersion-compensating devices that have either been deployed or are considered as serious candidates for future networks. The final section of this book then describes the systems-level impact of these devices, hence providing a one-stop reference for all aspects of optical-communication-network design pertaining to dispersion-management. Each chapter is written by the leading experts in the field, drawn from both acad...

  5. Ionospheric effects of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves: Dispersion relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. Michael; Ostrovsky, Lev A.; Bedard, Alfred J.

    2017-06-01

    There is extensive evidence for ionospheric effects associated with earthquake-related atmospheric disturbances. Although the existence of earthquake precursors is controversial, one suggested method of detecting possible earthquake precursors and tsunamis is by observing possible ionospheric effects of atmospheric waves generated by such events. To study magneto-acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere, we have derived a general dispersion relation including the effects of the Earth's magnetic field. This dispersion relation can be used in a general atmospheric ray tracing program to calculate the propagation of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves from the ground to the ionosphere. The presence of the Earth's magnetic field in the ionosphere can radically change the dispersion properties of the wave. The general dispersion relation obtained here reduces to the known dispersion relations for magnetoacoustic waves and acoustic-gravity waves in the corresponding particular cases. The work described here is the first step in achieving a generalized ray tracing program permitting propagation studies of magneto-acoustic-gravity waves.

  6. Coping with power dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The last decades have witnessed a significant shift in policy competences away from central governments in Europe. The reallocation of competences spans over three dimensions: upwards; sideways; and downwards. This collection takes the dispersion of powers as a starting point and seeks to assess...... how the actors involved cope with the new configurations. In this introduction, we discuss the conceptualization of power dispersion and highlight the ways in which the contributions add to this research agenda. We then outline some general conclusions and end by indicating future avenues of research....... Taken together, the collection contributes some answers to the challenge of defining and measuring – in a comparative way – the control and co-ordination mechanisms which power dispersion generates. It also explores the tension between political actors' quest for autonomy and the acknowledgement...

  7. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Nurses working in the Neuro-Intensive Care Unit at Aarhus University Hospital lack the tools to prepare children for the alarming atmosphere they will enter when visiting a hospitalised relative. The complex soundscape dominated by alarms and sounds from equipment is mentioned as the main stressor...

  8. Atmospheric humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water vapor plays a critical role in earth's atmosphere. It helps to maintain a habitable surface temperature through absorption of outgoing longwave radiation, and it transfers trmendous amounts of energy from the tropics toward the poles by absorbing latent heat during evaporation and subsequently...

  9. Pollen clumping and wind dispersal in an invasive angiosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael D; Chamecki, Marcelo; Brush, Grace S; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B

    2009-09-01

    Pollen dispersal is a fundamental aspect of plant reproductive biology that maintains connectivity between spatially separated populations. Pollen clumping, a characteristic feature of insect-pollinated plants, is generally assumed to be a detriment to wind pollination because clumps disperse shorter distances than do solitary pollen grains. Yet pollen clumps have been observed in dispersion studies of some widely distributed wind-pollinated species. We used Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed; Asteraceae), a successful invasive angiosperm, to investigate the effect of clumping on wind dispersal of pollen under natural conditions in a large field. Results of simultaneous measurements of clump size both in pollen shedding from male flowers and airborne pollen being dispersed in the atmosphere are combined with a transport model to show that rather than being detrimental, clumps may actually be advantageous for wind pollination. Initial clumps can pollinate the parent population, while smaller clumps that arise from breakup of larger clumps can cross-pollinate distant populations.

  10. Identification of atmospheric transport and dispersion of Asian dust storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Backward trajectories of individual Asian dust storm (ADS events were calculated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT at four representative stations in Korea. A total of 743 ADS events and associated 2229 (endings of altitudes at 1000, 1500, and 2000 m per ADS event backward trajectories from four stations were traced from January 2003 to August 2015. Regardless of the locations of the observed stations and the threshold time divide, a recent increase in the ADS occurrence rate was statistically significant with a 99.9 % confidence limit. Winter and spring were high-occurrence seasons for the ADS, while it rarely occurred in summer. Angular distributions of dust transport indicated a dominance of northwesterly wind, as more than two-thirds of ADS events are azimuthally confined from 290 to 340°. In addition, there is a tendency for stronger PM10 dust air concentration to be from the northwest. We found a strong inverse correlation between the number of days with ADS events and cumulative PM10 dust air concentration, indicating that the total amount of cumulative PM10 discharge was rather constant over time. If so, relatively shorter transport distances and a more continental dust passage over the Shandong peninsular would yield less PM10 in a shorter transport path but with a stronger concentration.

  11. Identification of atmospheric transport and dispersion of Asian dust storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Raegyung; Baatar, Amarjargal; Yu, Yongjae

    2017-08-01

    Backward trajectories of individual Asian dust storm (ADS) events were calculated using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) at four representative stations in Korea. A total of 743 ADS events and associated 2229 (endings of altitudes at 1000, 1500, and 2000 m per ADS event) backward trajectories from four stations were traced from January 2003 to August 2015. Regardless of the locations of the observed stations and the threshold time divide, a recent increase in the ADS occurrence rate was statistically significant with a 99.9 % confidence limit. Winter and spring were high-occurrence seasons for the ADS, while it rarely occurred in summer. Angular distributions of dust transport indicated a dominance of northwesterly wind, as more than two-thirds of ADS events are azimuthally confined from 290 to 340°. In addition, there is a tendency for stronger PM10 dust air concentration to be from the northwest. We found a strong inverse correlation between the number of days with ADS events and cumulative PM10 dust air concentration, indicating that the total amount of cumulative PM10 discharge was rather constant over time. If so, relatively shorter transport distances and a more continental dust passage over the Shandong peninsular would yield less PM10 in a shorter transport path but with a stronger concentration.

  12. Degenerate parabolic equations appearing in atmospheric dispersion of pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Shakhmurov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear and nonlinear degenerate abstract parabolic equations with variable coefficients are studied. Here the equation and boundary conditions are degenerated on all boundary and contain some parameters. The linear problem is considered on the moving domain. The separability properties of elliptic and parabolic problems in mixed $L_p$ spaces are obtained. Moreover, the existence and uniqueness of optimal regular solution of mixed problem for nonlinear parabolic equation is established. Note that, these problems arise in fluid mechanics and environmental engineering.

  13. Universally dispersible carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevoteau, Alexandre; Soulié-Ziakovic, Corinne; Leibler, Ludwik

    2012-12-12

    We show that supramolecular chemistry provides a convenient tool to prepare carbone nanotubes (CNTs) that can be dispersed in solvents of any chemical nature, easily recovered and redispersed. Thymine-modified CNTs (CNT-Thy) can be dispersed in solution in the presence of diaminotriazine (DAT) end-functionalized polymers, through supramolecular Thy/DAT association. DAT-polymer chains are selected according to the solvent chemical nature: polystyrene (PS) for hydrophobic/low polarity solvents and a propylene oxide/ethylene oxide copolymer (predominantly propylene oxide based, PPO/PEO) for polar solvents or water. Long-term stable supramolecular CNT dispersions are reversibly aggregated by adding a few droplets of a selective dissociating agent of the Thy/DAT association (DMSO). CNT-Thy, simply recycled by centrifugation or filtration, can be redispersed in another solvent in presence of a suitable soluble DAT-polymer. Dispersion and aggregation can also be switched on and off by choosing a polymer for which a given solvent is close to Θ-conditions, e.g., PS in cyclohexane or PPO/PEO in water.

  14. A dispersion control chart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    The study proposes a Shewhart-type control chart, namely Q chart, based on inter-quartile range, for monitoring changes (especially of moderate and large amounts which is major concern of Shewhart-type control charts) in process dispersion assuming normality of quality characteristic to be

  15. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  16. Turbulence and Dispersion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Turbulence and Dispersion. K S Gandhi. General Article Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 48-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/10/0048-0061. Keywords. Turbulent ...

  17. IceBridge Atmospheric Chemistry L1B Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IceBridge Atmospheric Chemistry L1B Data set (ICHEM1B) contains measurements acquired over Antarctica using the AVOCET differential Non-Dispersive Infrared...

  18. Atmospheric pollution and its implications in the Eastern Transvaal highveld

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tyson, PD

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available This report is a review of available information on the dispersion climatology, the degree of atmospheric pollution and the various impacts of that pollution on man and environment in the Eastern Transvaal Highveld (ETH) and adjacent regions...

  19. Requirements for estimation of doses from contaminants dispersed by a 'dirty bomb' explosion in an urban area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Mikkelsen, Torben; Astrup, Poul

    2009-01-01

    contributions from contaminants dispersed in the atmosphere after a ‘dirty bomb’ explosion. Conceptual methodologies are presented which describe the various dose components on the basis of knowledge of time-integrated contaminant air concentrations. Also the aerosolisation and atmospheric dispersion in a city...

  20. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-02

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth.

  1. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    A disjunction between the material and the immaterial has been at the heart of the architectural debate for decades. In this dialectic tension, the notion of atmosphere which increasingly claims attention in architectural discourse seems to be parallactic, leading to the re-evaluation of perceptual...... experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... and complex interferences revealed through our perception; ‘the atmospheric’ is explored as a spatial and affective quality as well as a sensory background, and materiality as a powerful and almost magical agency in shaping of atmosphere. Challenging existing dichotomies and unraveling intrinsic...

  2. Dispersion and fall out of heavier particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Poul

    2016-01-01

    they may like gasses and aerosols be transported more or less far by the wind. The present paper focuses on the growth of plumes of such particles larger and heavier than aerosols and transported by the wind. Implementation in existing decision support puff dispersion programs requires a parameterization......Nuclear accidents have so far been expected to release gasses and aerosols, but other CBRN events and also nuclear accidents with release of core particles can be expected to also release larger particles to the atmosphere. If not so large and heavy, that they fall to the ground immediately...... of this growth, and two reasonable describing parameterizations have been found, one in the literature, one proposed here, and both are compared to experimental work found in the literature. The parameterization from the literature has been implemented in the dispersion program RIMPUFF, which has subsequently...

  3. Flow and Dispersion in Urban Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britter, Rex; Hanna, Steven

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric flow and pollutant dispersion within and above the urban canopy are important for urban air quality, for assessing the consequences of accidental releases of hazardous material within cities, for assessing the air exchange between buildings and their environment, and consequently for rationalising energy usage. Different techniques for parameterising the urban canopy will be described including the application of digital elevation models to several European and American cities. Models have been developed, guided by theory and experiment, to describe the flow and turbulence within and above cities and some observations based on these models will be discussed as will the exchange processes between the urban canopy and the flow above. The work has been extended to the dispersion of active and passive pollutants. The results of a novel field study in the City of Birmingham will be presented.

  4. Modeling atmospheric effects - an assessment of the problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas G. Fox

    1976-01-01

    Our ability to simulate atmospheric processes that affect the life cycle of pollution is reviewed. The transport process is considered on three scales (a) the near-source or single-plume dispersion problem, (b) the multiple-source dispersion problem, and (c) the long-range transport. Modeling the first of these is shown to be well within the capability of generally...

  5. Fast Running Urban Dispersion Model for Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) Releases: Model Description and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowardhan, Akshay [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Neuscamman, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Donetti, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Walker, Hoyt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Belles, Rich [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Eme, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Homann, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC)

    2017-05-24

    Aeolus is an efficient three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code based on finite volume method developed for predicting transport and dispersion of contaminants in a complex urban area. It solves the time dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equation on a regular Cartesian staggered grid using a fractional step method. It also solves a scalar transport equation for temperature and using the Boussinesq approximation. The model also includes a Lagrangian dispersion model for predicting the transport and dispersion of atmospheric contaminants. The model can be run in an efficient Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes (RANS) mode with a run time of several minutes, or a more detailed Large Eddy Simulation (LES) mode with run time of hours for a typical simulation. This report describes the model components, including details on the physics models used in the code, as well as several model validation efforts. Aeolus wind and dispersion predictions are compared to field data from the Joint Urban Field Trials 2003 conducted in Oklahoma City (Allwine et al 2004) including both continuous and instantaneous releases. Newly implemented Aeolus capabilities include a decay chain model and an explosive Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) source term; these capabilities are described. Aeolus predictions using the buoyant explosive RDD source are validated against two experimental data sets: the Green Field explosive cloud rise experiments conducted in Israel (Sharon et al 2012) and the Full-Scale RDD Field Trials conducted in Canada (Green et al 2016).

  6. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  7. A second order Rosenbrock method applied to photochemical dispersion problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Verwer (Jan); E.J. Spee (Edwin); J.G. Blom (Joke); W. Hundsdorfer (Willem)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA 2nd-order, L-stable Rosenbrock method from the field of stiff ordinary differential equations is studied for application to atmospheric dispersion problems describing photochemistry, advective and turbulent diffusive transport. Partial differential equation problems of this type occur

  8. Taylor dispersion of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Sandor; Urban, Dominic A.; Milosevic, Ana M.; Crippa, Federica; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect and accurately characterize particles is required by many fields of nanotechnology, including materials science, nanotoxicology, and nanomedicine. Among the most relevant physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, size and the related surface-to-volume ratio are fundamental ones. Taylor dispersion combines three independent phenomena to determine particle size: optical extinction, translational diffusion, and sheer-enhanced dispersion of nanoparticles subjected to a steady laminar flow. The interplay of these defines the apparent size. Considering that particles in fact are never truly uniform nor monodisperse, we rigorously address particle polydispersity and calculate the apparent particle size measured by Taylor dispersion analysis. We conducted case studies addressing aqueous suspensions of model particles and large-scale-produced "industrial" particles of both academic and commercial interest of various core materials and sizes, ranging from 15 to 100 nm. A comparison with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy confirms that our approach is model-independent, non-parametric, and of general validity that provides an accurate account of size polydispersity—independently on the shape of the size distribution and without any assumption required a priori.

  9. Dispersal ghosts in Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Rebecca L; Lum, J Koji

    2004-01-01

    Anthropological genetics helps expand our understanding of human phenotypes in the Pacific, in part because of its focus on gene genealogies to infer past episodes of dispersal and to differentiate these events from adaptations due to long-duration directional selection. Sewall Wright's 1949 seminal paper on population structure emphasized that there were two strong forces that exerted systematic and therefore determinant pressure on the gene pool: recurrent immigration and gene flow. These are important topics to all discussions of human dispersal in any region of the world. Furthermore, Wright listed five unique kinds of events that produced indeterminate or unpredictable changes that could lead to phenotypic and genotypic effects. In this category, he placed unique selective incidents, unique hybridization events, unique reductions in number, swamping by mass immigration, and mutational drive due to an allele always being favored since its origin or introduction. This discussion of human dispersal in the Pacific will touch on these topics, since they provide a second level of complexity in knowing who moved about a region of the world found already settled when rediscovered by colonial explorers during the 16-18th centuries. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Tracer Dispersion Within an Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.; Shallcross, D.; Price, C.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P.

    2003-12-01

    The transport and dispersion of pollutants has extremely important implications for the environment on urban, regional and global scales. At the urban level localised emissions of both biogenic and anthropogenic pollutants can directly impact the health of the inhabitants. The DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollutants and their Penetration into the Local Environment) project is a consortium of six universities, which involves a multidisciplinary approach to characterise relatively small-scale urban atmospheric dispersion including wind tunnel modelling, computer simulations, fieldwork and analysis. This work describes the tracer technology used to characterise atmospheric dispersion as well as preliminary results from the first tracer release experiment in Central London. A steady state finite duration release of both perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) was performed as part of the first DAPPLE campaign. These compounds were released over a fifteen-minute integrated time period with the SF6 release staggered one and a half minutes behind the PMCH. The low background concentrations of PMCH (~ 5 x 10-3 pptv) and SF6 (~5pptv) along with non-depositing and non-reactive characteristics allow for the implementation of near ideal fluid dynamic experiments. Sampling consists of a multiport ladder fitting with solenoid valves onto which a succession of sampling bags is attached. These are electrically actuated in sequential order with an integrated sampling time of three minutes. The samplers are placed at various receptor positions in the DAPPLE zone in predefined positions designed to best validate these model simulated meteorological dispersion processes. Analysis of PMCH is carried out using sample enrichment on carbon based adsorbents, separation by capillary Gas Chromatography and Negative Ion Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry detection (GC-MS-NICI). SF6 concentrations are determined using fixed volume loop injections with Gas

  11. On the requirements to establish a European radiological preparedness for malicious airborne dispersion scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Astrup, Poul; Roos, Per

    2011-01-01

    European computerised decision support systems are currently targeted for large accidental atmospheric contaminant releases from nuclear installations. To make these systems applicable also for malicious dispersion events, such as ‘dirty bomb’ blasts, a series of modifications and extensions...

  12. Latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion of energetic auroral protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lorentzen

    Full Text Available Using a collision by collision model from Lorentzen et al., the latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion of single auroral protons are calculated. The proton energies varies from 1 to 50 keV, and are released into the atmosphere at 700 km altitude. The dipole magnetic field has a dip-angle of 8 degrees. Results show that the main dispersion region is at high altitudes (300-350 km and occurs during the first few charge exchange collisions. As the proton travels further down the atmosphere the mean free path becomes smaller, and as a result the spreading effect will not be as pronounced. This means that the first few charge exchange collisions fully determines the width of both the latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion. The volume emission rate was calculated for energies between 1 and 50 keV, and it was found that dayside auroral hydrogen emissions rates were approximately 10 times weaker than nightside emission rates. Simulations were also performed to obtain the dependence of the particle dispersion as a function of initial pitch-angle. It was found that the dispersion varies greatly with initial pitch-angle, and the results are summarized in two tables; a main and an extreme dispersion region.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; · particle precipitation · Space plasma physics · (transport processes

  13. Pollen Forecast and Dispersion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Monica; Di Giuseppe, Fabio; Medaglia, Carlo Maria; Travaglini, Alessandro; Tocci, Raffaella; Brighetti, M. Antonia; Petitta, Marcello

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is monitoring, mapping and forecast of pollen distribution for the city of Rome using in-situ measurements of 10 species of common allergenic pollens and measurements of PM10. The production of daily concentration maps, associated to a mobile phone app, are innovative compared to existing dedicated services to people who suffer from respiratory allergies. The dispersal pollen is one of the most well-known causes of allergic disease that is manifested by disorders of the respiratory functions. Allergies are the third leading cause of chronic disease and it is estimated that tens millions of people in Italy suffer from it. Recent works reveal that during the last few years there was a progressive increase of affected subjects, especially in urban areas. This situation may depend: on the ability to transport of pollutants, on the ability to react between pollutants and pollen and from a combination of other irritants, existing in densely populated and polluted urban areas. The methodology used to produce maps is based on in-situ measurements time series relative to 2012, obtained from networks of air quality and pollen stations in the metropolitan area of Rome. The monitoring station aerobiological of University of Rome "Tor Vergata" is located at the Department of Biology. The instrument used to pollen monitoring is a volumetric sampler type Hirst (Hirst 1952), Model 2000 VPPS Lanzoni; the data acquisition is carried out as reported in Standard UNI 11008:2004 - "Qualità dell'aria - Metodo di campionamento e conteggio dei granuli pollinici e delle spore fungine aerodisperse" - the protocol that describes the procedure for measuring of the concentration of pollen grains and fungal spores dispersed into the atmosphere, and reported in the "Manuale di gestione e qualità della R.I.M.A" (Travaglini et. al. 2009). All 10 allergenic pollen are monitored since 1996. At Tor Vergata university is also operating a meteorological station (SP2000, CAE

  14. What Causes Animals to Disperse?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dispersal thus produces homeless travelers (vagrants) who are in search of a new home." Dispersal has been at the forefront of research involving animal behaviour and ecology for a very long time. In a more general sense, dispersal speaks of the tendency of some animals to move away from their existing groups or from ...

  15. Estimation of air tritium concenration around Wolsung NPP site using a Lagrangian atmopsheric dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. C.; Lee, K. B.; Song, Y. I. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K. N. [KEPCO, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    A Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model(K-LADM) combining a three dimensional sea-land breeze model has been developed and applied to the estimation of the quaterly and the annual averaged air tritium concentration around Wolsung NPP site. The estimated concentrations were compared with the observed concentration data. The results showed that the present Lagrangian Atmospheric dispersion model(K-LADM) provided very good agreement with the observations.

  16. Technical note: The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART version 6.2

    OpenAIRE

    Stohl, A.; Forster, C.; Frank, A.; P. Seibert; G. Wotawa

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally (about 8 years ago) designed for calculating the long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis. Its application fields were extended from air pollution studies to other topics where atmospheric transport plays a role ...

  17. Development and test of an evaluation protocol for heavy gas dispersion models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijm, N.J.; Carissimo, B.; Mercer, A.; Bartholome, C.; Giesbrecht, H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve the quality (i.e. fitness-for-purpose) of models used to describe the atmospheric dispersion of heavy gas, an evaluation methodology has been developed and tested through a small evaluation exercise. This activity was carried out by the Heavy Gas Dispersion Expert Group, which

  18. Dispersion of a passive tracer in buoyancy- and shear-driven boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosio, A.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Builtjes, P.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    By means of finescale modeling [large-eddy simulation (LES)], the combined effect of thermal and mechanical forcing on the dispersion of a plume in a convective boundary layer is investigated. Dispersion of a passive tracer is studied in various atmospheric turbulent flows, from pure convective to

  19. Ensemble dispersion forecasting - Part 1. Concept, approach and indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galmarini, S.; Bianconi, R.; Klug, W.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an approach to the treatment and analysis of long-range transport and dispersion model forecasts. Long-range is intended here as the space scale of the order of few thousands of kilometers known also as continental scale. The method is called multi-model ensemble dispersion...... and is based on the simultaneous analysis of several model simulations by means of ad-hoc statistical treatments and parameters. The models considered in this study are operational long-range transport and dispersion models used to support decision making in various countries in case of accidental releases...... of harmful volatile substances, in particular radionuclides to the atmosphere. The ensemble dispersion approach and indicators provide a way to reduce several model results to few concise representations that include an estimate of the models' agreement in predicting a specific scenario. The parameters...

  20. Developing a dispersant spraying capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    In developing a national dispersant spraying capability, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has undertaken a modification program to enable the conventional offshore spraying gear to be mounted on almost any vessel of convenience. Smaller, more versatile inshore spraying vessels and pumps have been designed and built. With the popularization of concentrated dispersants, the inshore pumping equipment can be used aboard hovercraft for special application situations. A program of acquiring mobile dispersant storage tanks has been undertaken with auxiliary equipment that will facilitate the shipment of dispersants in bulk by air freight. Work also has commenced on extending the dispersant application program to include the CCG fleet of helicopters.