WorldWideScience

Sample records for shock wave-dominated flow

  1. Experimental Investigation of the Performance of Tilt Current Meters in Wave-Dominated Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Asger Bendix; Carstensen, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, tilt current meters (TCMs) have received renewed attention as they provide an inexpensive method for measuring currents in the coastal zone. However, previous studies focused mainly on current dominated flows or the current component of the flow. This study investigates the perfo......In recent years, tilt current meters (TCMs) have received renewed attention as they provide an inexpensive method for measuring currents in the coastal zone. However, previous studies focused mainly on current dominated flows or the current component of the flow. This study investigates...... TCMs were investigated in order to assess the effect of TCM shape on its performance. The measured TCM tilt is compared with the flow velocity measured by conventional methods. Furthermore, the ability of a TCM to measure wave orbital and wave-averaged velocities is discussed....

  2. Simulation of turbulent flows containing strong shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, Bruce; Menon, Suresh

    2008-12-01

    Simulation of turbulent flows with strong shocks is a computationally challenging problem. The requirements for a method to produce accurate results for turbulence are orthogonal to those needed to treat shocks properly. In order to prevent an unphysical rate of decay of turbulent structures, it is necessary to use a method with very low numerical dissipation. Because of this, central difference schemes are widely used. However, computing strong shocks with a central difference scheme can produce unphysical post-shock oscillations that corrupt the entire flow unless additional dissipation is added. This dissipation can be difficult to localize to the area near the shock and can lead to inaccurate treatment of the turbulence. Modern high-resolution shock-capturing methods usually use upwind algorithms to provide the dissipation necessary to stabilize shocks. However, this upwind dissipation can also lead to an unphysical rate of decay of the turbulence. This paper discusses a hybrid method for simulating turbulent flows with strong shocks that couples a high-order central difference scheme with a high-resolution shock-capturing method. The shock-capturing method is used only in the vicinity of discontinuities in the flow, whereas the central difference scheme is used in the remainder of the computational domain. Results of this new method will be shown for a variety of test problems. Preliminary results for a realistic application involving detonation in gas-particle flows will also be presented.

  3. Simulation of turbulent flows containing strong shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryxell, Bruce; Menon, Suresh

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of turbulent flows with strong shocks is a computationally challenging problem. The requirements for a method to produce accurate results for turbulence are orthogonal to those needed to treat shocks properly. In order to prevent an unphysical rate of decay of turbulent structures, it is necessary to use a method with very low numerical dissipation. Because of this, central difference schemes are widely used. However, computing strong shocks with a central difference scheme can produce unphysical post-shock oscillations that corrupt the entire flow unless additional dissipation is added. This dissipation can be difficult to localize to the area near the shock and can lead to inaccurate treatment of the turbulence. Modern high-resolution shock-capturing methods usually use upwind algorithms to provide the dissipation necessary to stabilize shocks. However, this upwind dissipation can also lead to an unphysical rate of decay of the turbulence. This paper discusses a hybrid method for simulating turbulent flows with strong shocks that couples a high-order central difference scheme with a high-resolution shock-capturing method. The shock-capturing method is used only in the vicinity of discontinuities in the flow, whereas the central difference scheme is used in the remainder of the computational domain. Results of this new method will be shown for a variety of test problems. Preliminary results for a realistic application involving detonation in gas-particle flows will also be presented.

  4. Calculating Shocks In Flows At Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Scott; Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    Boundary conditions prove critical. Conference paper describes algorithm for calculation of shocks in hypersonic flows of gases at chemical equilibrium. Although algorithm represents intermediate stage in development of reliable, accurate computer code for two-dimensional flow, research leading up to it contributes to understanding of what is needed to complete task.

  5. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  6. Flow derivatives and curvatures for a normal shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, G.

    2018-03-01

    A detached bow shock wave is strongest where it is normal to the upstream velocity. While the jump conditions across the shock are straightforward, many properties, such as the shock's curvatures and derivatives of the pressure, along and normal to a normal shock, are indeterminate. A novel procedure is introduced for resolving the indeterminacy when the unsteady flow is three-dimensional and the upstream velocity may be nonuniform. Utilizing this procedure, normal shock relations are provided for the nonunique orientation of the flow plane and the corresponding shock's curvatures and, e.g., the downstream normal derivatives of the pressure and the velocity components. These algebraic relations explicitly show the dependence of these parameters on the shock's shape and the upstream velocity gradient. A simple relation, valid only for a normal shock, is obtained for the average curvatures. Results are also obtained when the shock is an elliptic paraboloid shock. These derivatives are both simple and proportional to the average curvature.

  7. Shock stand off Calculations for Hemisphere in Hypersonic Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, M.; Ghaffar, A.; Bilal, S.; Zahir, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The shape and location of shock has been studied by solving the axi symmetric Navier Stokes Equations for a hemisphere in hypersonic flow. The effect of Mach number on shock stand-off distance has been investigated. It is found that the shock location varies with Mach number and the free stream conditions at a given nose radius. (author)

  8. Hydro-morphological modelling of small, wave-dominated estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinger, Jill H.

    2017-11-01

    Small, intermittently open or closed estuaries are characteristic of the coasts of South Africa, Australia, California, Mexico and many other areas of the world. However, modelling attention has tended to focus on big estuaries that drain large catchments and serve a wide diversity of interests e.g. agriculture, urban settlement, recreation, commercial fishing. In this study, the development of a simple, parametric, system dynamics model to simulate the opening and closure of the mouths of small, wave-dominated estuaries is reported. In the model, the estuary is conceived as a basin with a specific water volume to water level relationship, connected to the sea by a channel of fixed width, but variable sill height. Changes in the form of the basin are not treated in the model, while the dynamics of the mouth channel are central to the model. The magnitude and direction of the flow through the mouth determines whether erosion or deposition of sediment occurs in the mouth channel, influencing the sill height. The model is implemented on the Great Brak Estuary in South Africa and simulations reveal that the raised low water levels in the estuary during spring tide relative to neap tide, are occasioned by the constriction of the tidal flow through the shallow mouth. Freshwater inflows to the estuary are shown to be significant in determining the behaviour of the inlet mouth, a factor often ignored in studies on tidal inlets. Further it is the balance between freshwater inflows and wave events that determines the opening or closure of the mouth of a particular estuary.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of reactive shock-accelerated flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonazza, Riccardo [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics

    2016-12-20

    The main goal of this program was to establish a qualitative and quantitative connection, based on the appropriate dimensionless parameters and scaling laws, between shock-induced distortion of astrophysical plasma density clumps and their earthbound analog in a shock tube. These objectives were pursued by carrying out laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to study the evolution of two gas bubbles accelerated by planar shock waves and compare the results to available astrophysical observations. The experiments were carried out in an vertical, downward-firing shock tube, 9.2 m long, with square internal cross section (25×25 cm2). Specific goals were to quantify the effect of the shock strength (Mach number, M) and the density contrast between the bubble gas and its surroundings (usually quantified by the Atwood number, i.e. the dimensionless density difference between the two gases) upon some of the most important flow features (e.g. macroscopic properties; turbulence and mixing rates). The computational component of the work performed through this program was aimed at (a) studying the physics of multi-phase compressible flows in the context of astrophysics plasmas and (b) providing a computational connection between laboratory experiments and the astrophysical application of shock-bubble interactions. Throughout the study, we used the FLASH4.2 code to run hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical simulations of shock bubble interactions on an adaptive mesh.

  10. Shock tunnel measurements of surface pressures in shock induced separated flow field using MEMS sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, R; Jagadeesh, G; Ram, S N; Hegde, G M; Nayak, M M

    2015-01-01

    Characterized not just by high Mach numbers, but also high flow total enthalpies—often accompanied by dissociation and ionization of flowing gas itself—the experimental simulation of hypersonic flows requires impulse facilities like shock tunnels. However, shock tunnel simulation imposes challenges and restrictions on the flow diagnostics, not just because of the possible extreme flow conditions, but also the short run times—typically around 1 ms. The development, calibration and application of fast response MEMS sensors for surface pressure measurements in IISc hypersonic shock tunnel HST-2, with a typical test time of 600 μs, for the complex flow field of strong (impinging) shock boundary layer interaction with separation close to the leading edge, is delineated in this paper. For Mach numbers 5.96 (total enthalpy 1.3 MJ kg −1 ) and 8.67 (total enthalpy 1.6 MJ kg −1 ), surface pressures ranging from around 200 Pa to 50 000 Pa, in various regions of the flow field, are measured using the MEMS sensors. The measurements are found to compare well with the measurements using commercial sensors. It was possible to resolve important regions of the flow field involving significant spatial gradients of pressure, with a resolution of 5 data points within 12 mm in each MEMS array, which cannot be achieved with the other commercial sensors. In particular, MEMS sensors enabled the measurement of separation pressure (at Mach 8.67) near the leading edge and the sharply varying pressure in the reattachment zone. (paper)

  11. In situ insights into shock-driven reactive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Shock-driven reactions are commonplace. Examples include the detonation of high explosives, shock-driven dissociation of polymers, and transformation of carbon from graphite to diamond phases. The study of shock-driven chemical reactions is important for understanding reaction thresholds, their mechanisms and rates, and associated state sensitivities under the extreme conditions generated by shock compression. Reactions are distinguished by their thermicity - e.g. the volume and enthalpy changes along the reaction coordinate. A survey of the hallmarks of shock-driven reactivity for a variety of simple molecules and polymers will be presented, including benzene, acetylenes and nitriles, and formic acid. Many of the examples will illustrate the nature of the reactive flow through particle velocity wave profiles measured by in situ electromagnetic gauging in gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. General trends will be presented linking molecular moieties, shock temperatures, and reaction state sensitivities. Progress in applying bond-specific diagnostics will also be presented, including time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, and recent results of in situ x-ray diffraction of carbon at the Linac Coherent Light Souce (LCLS) free electron laser.

  12. Oblique shock waves in granular flows over bluff bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopan Nandu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular flows around an object have been the focus of numerous analytical, experimental and simulation studies. The structure and nature of the oblique shock wave developed when a quasi-two dimensional flow of spherical granular particles streams past an immersed, fixed cylindrical obstacle forms the focus of this study. The binary granular mixture, consisting of particles of the same diameter but different material properties, is investigated by using a modified LIGGGHTS package as the simulation engine. Variations in the solid fraction and granular temperature within the resulting flow are studied. The Mach number is calculated and is used to distinguish between the subsonic and the supersonic regions of the bow shock.

  13. Effects of Initial Conditions on Shock Driven Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Adam A.; Mula, Swathi M.; Charonko, John; Prestridge, Kathy

    2017-11-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of shock-driven, variable density flows, such as the Richtmyer Meshkov (RM) instability, are strongly influenced by the initial conditions (IC's) of the flow at the time of interaction with shockwave. We study the effects of the IC's on the Vertical Shock Tube (VST) and on flows from Mach =1.2 to Mach =9. Experiments at the VST are of an Air-SF6 (At =0.6) multimode interface. Perturbations are generated using a shear layer with a flapper plate. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) is used to characterize the IC's. New experiments are occurring using the Powder Gun driver at LANL Proton Radiography (pRad) facility. Mach number up to M =9 accelerate a Xenon-Helium (At =0.94) interface that is perturbed using a membrane supported by different sized grids. This presentation focuses on how to design and characterize different types of initial conditions for experiments.

  14. Bow shock ‘splitting’ in bi-ion flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Konrad; Dubinin, Eduard; Baumgärtel, Klaus; Bogdanov, Alexander

    This paper discusses modifications of a bow shock ahead of an obstacle in the solar wind (SW) which can occur when the flow consists of a proton plasma and a secondary ion populations. The secondary species may be composed of alpha particles, which are a natural part of the ambient SW, or of heavier particles which are picked up by the solar wind in source regions, such as at comets or Mars. By using a 2D collisionsless bi-ion fluid model which treats protons and heavy ions as distinct and which assumes that the two fluids communicate with each other by means of electromagnetic forces only, it is shown that for high enough value of the heavy ion mass density a ‘splitting’ of the bow shock takes place. Downstream from the proton bow shock, where differential streaming between ion species arises, a second discontinuity is formed which resembles a shock-like transition for the heavy ion flow. This plasma boundary, called the heavy-ion discontinuity (HID), causes also a distinct deflection of the proton flow and significant magnetic field variation. The results seem to be of importance for different types of SW obstacles, especially for planetary objects where massloading of the SW plays a dominant role in bow shock formation, as at comets and probably at Mars. It is suggested that the ‘massloading boundary (MLB)' found in the magnetosheath of Mars and the ‘mysterious boundary’ detected in the cometosheath of Halley and Grigg-Skejllerup are HID's of the described nature.

  15. Studies on shock phenomena in two-phase flow, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Koji; Fujii, Terushige; Ito, Yutaka; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Yamaguchi, Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    Shock phenomena caused by a rapid valve closure in a slug flow region were investigated. The experiment was conducted in a horizontal acrylic tube of 20.7 mm ID, 4.85 mm in thickness, and 18.5 m in length. The profiles of the transient pressure caused by a rapid valve closure in slug flow are affected by the flow configuration adjacent to the valve, and these are classified into two types according to the existence of a gas slug or a liquid slug at the valve at the instant of valve closure. The characteristics of the transient pressure in the former were analyzed by an oscillation system model composed of a mass (liquid slug) and a compressible capacity (gas slug). Those in the latter were also analyzed for a homogeneous two-phase flow model by a similar method to that in a waterhammer analysis. The experimental results were well explained by these analyses. (author)

  16. Holocene evolution of a wave-dominated fan-delta: Godavari delta, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Nageswara Rao, K.; Nagakumar, K.; Demudu, G.; Rajawat, A.; Kubo, S.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Godavari delta is one of the world's largest wave-dominated deltas. The Godavari River arises in the Western Ghats near the west coast of India and drains an area of about 3.1x10^5 km^2, flowing about 1465 km southeast across the Indian peninsula to the Bay of Bengal. The Godavari delta consists of a gentle seaward slope from its apex (12 m elevation) at Rajahmundry and a coastal beach-ridge plain over a distance of about 75 km and covers ~5200 km^2 as a delta plain. The river splits into two major distributary channels, the Gautami and the Vasishta, at a barrage constructed in the mid-1800s. The coastal environment of the deltaic coast is microtidal (~1 m mean tidal range) and wave-dominated (~1.5 m mean wave height in the June-September SW monsoon season, ~0.8 m in the NE monsoon season). Models of the Holocene evolution of the Godavari delta have changed from a zonal progradation model (e.g. Nageswara Rao & Sadakata, 1993) to a truncated cuspate delta model (Nageswara Rao et al., 2005, 2012). Twelve borehole cores (340 m total length), taken in the coastal delta plain during 2010-2013, yielded more than 100 C-14 dates. Sediment facies and C-14 dates from these and previous cores and remote-sensing data support a new delta evolution model. The Holocene coastal delta plain is divided into two parts by a set of linear beach ridges 12-14 km landward from the present shoreline in the central part of the delta. The location of the main depocenter (lobe) has shifted during the Holocene from 1) the center to 2) the west, 3) east, 4) center, 5) west, and 6) east. The linear beach ridges separate the first three from the last three stages. These lobe shifts are controlled by river channel shifts near the apex. Just as the current linear shoreline of the central part of the delta and the concave-up nearshore topography are the result of coastal erosion of a cuspate delta, the linear beach ridges indicate a former eroded shoreline. An unconformity within the deltaic

  17. STANDING SHOCK INSTABILITY IN ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Truong [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geology, Berry College, Mount Berry, GA 30149 (United States); Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael T. [High Energy Space Environment Branch, Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Becker, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Putney, Joy, E-mail: tle@berry.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Depending on the values of the energy and angular momentum per unit mass in the gas supplied at large radii, inviscid advection-dominated accretion flows can display velocity profiles with either preshock deceleration or preshock acceleration. Nakayama has shown that these two types of flow configurations are expected to have different stability properties. By employing the Chevalier and Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we discover that there are regions of parameter space where disks/shocks with outflows can be stable or unstable. In regions of instability, we find that preshock deceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation, but is always stable to the fundamental mode and overtones. Furthermore, we also find that preshock acceleration is always unstable to the zeroth mode and that the fundamental mode and overtones become increasingly less stable as the shock location moves away from the horizon when the disk half-height expands above ∼12 gravitational radii at the shock radius. In regions of stability, we demonstrate the zeroth mode to be stable for the velocity profiles that exhibit preshock acceleration and deceleration. Moreover, for models that are linearly unstable, our model suggests the possible existence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) with ratios 2:3 and 3:5. These ratios are believed to occur in stellar and supermassive black hole candidates, for example, in GRS 1915+105 and Sgr A*, respectively. We expect that similar QPO ratios also exist in regions of stable shocks.

  18. Turbulence modeling of shock separated boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Viegas, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Computations of transonic and hypersonic shock-separated boundary-layer flows using zero-equation (algebraic), one-equation (kinetic energy), and two-equation (kinetic energy plus length scale) turbulence eddy viscosity models are described and compared with measurements. The computations make use of a new Navier-Stokes computer algorithm that has reduced computing times by one to two orders of magnitude. The algorithm, and how the turbulence models are incorporated into it, are described. Results for the transonic flow show that the unmodified one-equation model is superior to the zero-equation model in skin-friction predictions. For the hypersonic flow, a highly modified one-equation model that accurately predicts surface pressure and heat transfer is described. Preliminary two-equation model results are also presented.

  19. Three-dimensional shock wave configurations induced by two asymmetrical intersecting wedges in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, G.; Wang, C.; Teng, H.; Jiang, Z.

    2018-03-01

    This study explores the three-dimensional (3D) wave configurations induced by 3D asymmetrical intersecting compression wedges in supersonic and hypersonic inviscid flows. By using the "spatial dimension reduction" approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction is converted to that of the interaction of two moving shock waves in the characteristic two-dimensional (2D) plane. Shock polar theory is used to analyze the shock configurations in asymmetrical situations. The results show that various shock configurations exist in 3D asymmetrical shock wave interactions, including regular interaction, transitioned regular interaction, single Mach interaction, inverse single Mach interaction, transitional double Mach interaction, weak shock interaction, and weak single Mach interaction. All of the above 3D steady shock/shock interactions have their corresponding 2D moving shock/shock interaction configurations. Numerical simulations are performed by solving the 3D inviscid Euler equations with the non-oscillatory, non-free parameters, dissipative (NND) numerical scheme, and good agreement with the theoretical analysis is obtained. Furthermore, the comparison of results show that the concept of the "virtual wall" in shock dynamics theory is helpful for understanding the mechanism of two-dimensional shock/shock interactions.

  20. Shock formation and structure in magnetic reconnection with a streaming flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liangneng; Ma, Zhiwei; Zhang, Haowei

    2017-08-18

    The features of magnetic reconnection with a streaming flow have been investigated on the basis of compressible resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The super-Alfvenic streaming flow largely enhances magnetic reconnection. The maximum reconnection rate is almost four times larger with super-Alfvenic streaming flow than sub-Alfvénic streaming flow. In the nonlinear stage, it is found that there is a pair of shocks observed in the inflow region, which are manifested to be slow shocks for sub-Alfvénic streaming flow, and fast shocks for super-Alfvénic streaming flow. The quasi-period oscillation of reconnection rates in the decaying phase for super-Alfvénic streaming flow is resulted from the different drifting velocities of the shock and the X point.

  1. Incident shock strength evolution in overexpanded jet flow out of rocket nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silnikov, Mikhail V.; Chernyshov, Mikhail V.

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of the incident shock in the plane overexpanded jet flow or in the axisymmetric one is analyzed theoretically and compared at the whole range of governing flow parameters. Analytical results can be applied to avoid jet flow instability and self-oscillation effects at rocket launch, to improve launch safety and to suppress shock-wave induced noise harmful to environment and personnel. The mathematical model of ;differential conditions of dynamic compatibility; was applied to the curved shock in non-uniform plane or axisymmetrical flow. It allowed us to study such features of the curved incident shock and flow downstream it as shock geometrical curvature, jet boundary curvature, local increase or decrease of the shock strength, flow vorticity rate (local pressure gradient) in the vicinity of the nozzle lip, static pressure gradient in the compressed layer downstream the shock, and many others. All these quantities sufficiently depend on the flow parameters (flow Mach number, jet overexpansion rate, nozzle throat angle, and ration of gas specific heats). These dependencies are sometimes unusual, especially at small Mach numbers. It was also surprising that there is no great difference among all these flowfield features in the plane jet and in the axisymmetrical jet flow out of a nozzle with large throat angle, but all these parameters behave in a quite different way in an axisymmetrical jet at small and moderate nozzle throat angles.

  2. Universal hydrodynamic flow in holographic planar shock collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesler, Paul M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University,Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Kilbertus, Niki [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg,D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Schee, Wilke van der [Center for Theoretical Physics, MIT,Cambridge MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We study the collision of planar shock waves in AdS{sub 5} as a function of shock profile. In the dual field theory the shock waves describe planar sheets of energy whose collision results in the formation of a plasma which behaves hydrodynamically at late times. We find that the post-collision stress tensor near the light cone exhibits transient non-universal behavior which depends on both the shock width and the precise functional form of the shock profile. However, over a large range of shock widths, including those which yield qualitative different behavior near the future light cone, and for different shock profiles, we find universal behavior in the subsequent hydrodynamic evolution. Additionally, we compute the rapidity distribution of produced particles and find it to be well described by a Gaussian.

  3. High Order Numerical Methods for LES of Turbulent Flows with Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, D. V.; Yee, H. C.; Hadjadj, A.; Wray, A.; Sjögreen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of turbulent flows with shocks employing explicit subgrid-scale (SGS) filtering may encounter a loss of accuracy in the vicinity of a shock. In this work we perform a comparative study of different approaches to reduce this loss of accuracy within the framework of the dynamic Germano SGS model. One of the possible approaches is to apply Harten's subcell resolution procedure to locate and sharpen the shock, and to use a one-sided test filter at the grid points adjacent to the exact shock location. The other considered approach is local disabling of the SGS terms in the vicinity of the shock location. In this study we use a canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem for comparison of the considered modifications of the SGS filtering procedure. For the considered test case both approaches show a similar improvement in the accuracy near the shock.

  4. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  5. Response of wave-dominated and mixed-energy barriers to storms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masselink, G.; Heteren, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Wave-dominated and mixed-energy barriers are extremely dynamic landforms, responding to processes operating over a spectrum of time scales, ranging from daily-to-monthly fluctuations related to storm and post-storm conditions, to century-to-millennium-scale evolution driven by relative sea-level

  6. Input reduction for long-term morphodynamic simulations in wave-dominated coastal settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walstra, D.J.R.; Hoekstra, R.; Tonnon, P.K.; Ruessink, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    Input reduction is imperative to long-term (> years) morphodynamic simulations to avoid excessive computation times. Here, we introduce an input-reduction framework for wave-dominated coastal settings. Our framework comprises 4 steps, viz. (1) the selection of the duration of the original (full)

  7. Numerical study of the viscous heat-conducting gas flow in a long shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Alexey; Khotyanovsky, Dmitry

    2017-10-01

    The results of numerical simulations of the propagation of the shock wave in a cylindrical shock tube of large length are presented. The results of the numerical computations agree well with the experimental data of Duff. The effects of viscous friction and heat conduction cause significant difference of the shock wave velocity from its inviscid theoretical value. The results of the computations at the considered flow parameters show that the shock wave and the contact surface, starting from a certain moment of time, propagate with equal speeds.

  8. Turbulence Models: Data from Other Experiments: Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers. This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence...

  9. Effect of shock interactions on mixing layer between co-flowing supersonic flows in a confined duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. M. V.; Asano, S.; Imani, I.; Saito, T.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments are conducted to observe the effect of shock interactions on a mixing layer generated between two supersonic streams of Mach number M _{1} = 1.76 and M _{2} = 1.36 in a confined duct. The development of this mixing layer within the duct is observed using high-speed schlieren and static pressure measurements. Two-dimensional, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the k-ω SST turbulence model in Fluent. Further, adverse pressure gradients are imposed by placing inserts of small ( boundary layer thickness) thickness on the walls of the test section. The unmatched pressures cause the mixing layer to bend and lead to the formation of shock structures that interact with the mixing layer. The mixing layer growth rate is found to increase after the shock interaction (nearly doubles). The strongest shock is observed when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow. This shock interacts with the mixing layer exciting flow modes that produce sinusoidal flapping structures which enhance the mixing layer growth rate to the maximum (by 1.75 times). Shock fluctuations are characterized, and it is observed that the maximum amplitude occurs when a wedge insert is placed in the M _{2} flow.

  10. Prediction of Shock Wave Structure in Weakly Ionized Gas Flow by Solving MGD Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. T.; Oviedo-Rojas, Ruben; Chow, Alan; Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the recent research results of shockwave structure predictions using a new developed code. The modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations across a standing normal shock wave are discussed and adopted to obtain jump conditions. Coupling a electrostatic body force to the Burnett equations, the weakly ionized flow field across the shock wave was solved. Results indicated that the Modified Rankine-Hugoniot equations for shock wave are valid for a wide range of ionization fraction. However, this model breaks down with small free stream Mach number and with large ionization fraction. The jump conditions also depend on the value of free stream pressure, temperature and density. The computed shock wave structure with ionization provides results, which indicated that shock wave strength may be reduced by existence of weakly ionized gas.

  11. Steady flow on to a conveyor belt - Causal viscosity and shear shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syer, D.; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Some hydrodynamical consequences of the adoption of a causal theory of viscosity are explored. Causality is introduced into the theory by letting the coefficient of viscosity go to zero as the flow velocity approaches a designated propagation speed for viscous signals. Consideration is given to a model of viscosity which has a finite propagation speed of shear information, and it is shown that it produces two kinds of shear shock. A 'pure shear shock' corresponds to a transition from a superviscous to a subviscous state with no discontinuity in the velocity. A 'mixed shear shock' has a shear transition occurring at the same location as a normal adiabatic or radiative shock. A generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for mixed shear shocks is derived, and self-consistent numerical solutions to a model 2D problem in which an axisymmetric radially infalling stream encounters a spinning star are presented.

  12. Gas flows in radial micro-nozzles with pseudo-shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, S. P.; Kiselev, V. P.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    In the present paper, results of an experimental and numerical study of supersonic gas flows in radial micro-nozzles are reported. A distinguishing feature of such flows is the fact that two factors, the nozzle divergence and the wall friction force, exert a substantial influence on the flow structure. Under the action of the wall friction force, in the micro-nozzle there forms a pseudo-shock that separates the supersonic from subsonic flow region. The position of the pseudo-shock can be evaluated from the condition of flow blockage in the nozzle exit section. A detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis of gas flows in radial micro-nozzles is given. It is shown that the gas flow in a micro-nozzle is defined by the complicated structure of the boundary layer in the micro-nozzle, this structure being dependent on the width-to-radius ratio of the nozzle and its inlet-to-outlet pressure ratio.

  13. Mitigation of shock-induced flow separation using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Balasubramanian

    high altitude operation of a flight vehicle, such as ramjet or scramjet-based devices, where a forebody oblique shock ... frequency with pulsing mode of operation and effectiveness for wide range of flight conditions. Here an ... aircraft and missiles for military air superiority. 3. The resistive magnetohydrodynamics governing.

  14. Shock Waves Oscillations in the Interaction of Supersonic Flows with the Head of the Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the shock wave oscillation that occurs when supersonic flows interact with conic, blunt or flat nose of aircraft, taking into account the aerospike attached to it. The main attention was paid to the problem of numerical modeling of such oscillation, flow regime classification, and cases where aerospike attachment can…

  15. Flow features that arise due to the interaction of a plane shock wave with concave profiles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    MacLucas, David A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the author's thesis was the aerodynamic flow field that develops as a result of the interaction of a moving plane shock wave with concave profiles. In this presentation, he discusses some of the interesting flow phenomena that arise...

  16. Shocks and finite-time singularities in Hele-Shaw flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorescu, Razvan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiegmann, P [UNIV OF MONTREAL; Lee, S-y [UNIV OF CHICAGO

    2008-01-01

    Hele-Shaw flow at vanishing surface tension is ill-defined. In finite time, the flow develops cusplike singularities. We show that the ill-defined problem admits a weak dispersive solution when singularities give rise to a graph of shock waves propagating in the viscous fluid. The graph of shocks grows and branches. Velocity and pressure jump across the shock. We formulate a few simple physical principles which single out the dispersive solution and interpret shocks as lines of decompressed fluid. We also formulate the dispersive solution in algebro-geometrical terms as an evolution of Krichever-Boutroux complex curve. We study in details the most generic (2,3) cusp singularity which gives rise to an elementary branching event. This solution is self-similar and expressed in terms of elliptic functions.

  17. Spatial distribution of cavitation-shock-pressure around a jet-flow gate-valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Risaburo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Yukio; Miyakura, Hideto; Nozaki, Satoru; Ishige, Tadashi; Sonoda, Shuji; Sakamoto, Kenji.

    1987-01-01

    To make clear the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the spatial distribution of cavitation shock pressures were quantitatively measured by a pressure sensitive sheet in the 1/10 scale model of a jet-flow gate-valve, for various valve-openings and cavitation numbers. The dynamic pressure response of the sheet was corrected by the shock wave generated from detonation explosives. It is made clear that the erosive shock pressures are distributed in a limited part of the whole cavitation region, and the safety region without the fatal cavitation erosion is defined. (author)

  18. Study on Performance of Detonation-Driven Shock Tube(Compressible Flow and Detonation)

    OpenAIRE

    YAMANAKA, Akio; ARIGA, Yosuke; 小原, 哲郎; CAI, Pin; 大八木, 重治

    2002-01-01

    A detonation-driven shock tube firstly designed by H.R. Yu is considered to be a useful apparatus for producing high-enthalpy flow. In this apparatus, a strong shock wave is generated by detonating an oxygen-hydrogen mixture (oxy-hydrogen) and the driver gas temperature and pressure are extremely high compared with those of a conventional shock tube. However, the structure of the detonation wave is not uniform, e.g., the detonation wave has three-dimensional cellular structures and multiple t...

  19. Analysis of Emission Spectra from Arc-jet Shock Layer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, T.; Park, C. S.; Newfield, M. E.; Fletcher, D. G.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports computational comparisons with experimental studies of a nonequilibrium blunt body shock layer in a high enthalpy arc-jet wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the existence of a thermochemical equilibrium region in the shock layer. The existence of such an equilibrium region is of interest for following reasons: (1) to understand the equilibration process behind the shock in an arc-jet flow environment; (2) to interpret measured surface heat transfer data for purpose of determining surface catalytic efficiency, and (3) to determine the total enthalpy from the spectroscopic measurements. The paper will present an analysis of the experimental data obtained in the arc-jet wind tunnel. Experimental data includes measurements of emission spectra of radiation emanating from a shock layer formed in front of a 6-inch flat-faced cylinder. The measurements, obtained using a two dimensional CCD camera mounted on a spectrograph, provide spatially resolved spectra along the stagnation streamline of the model. Computational analysis includes simulation of nonequilibrium flow in the arc-jet facility (flow in the conical nozzle and shock layer in front of a flat-faced cylinder) using 2-D/axisymmetric Navier-Stokes codes and prediction of the radiation spectra from the axisymmetric flowfield using NEQAIR radiation code. Various line-of-sight averaged flow properties such as vibrational and rotational temperatures, species number densities within the shock layer are deduced from the experimental spectra. Comparison of the computed and experimental line-of-sight averaged flow properties provides assessment of thermochemical equilibration processes in an arc-jet shock layer.

  20. Standing shocks in magnetized dissipative accretion flow around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We explore the global structure of the accretion flow around a Schwarzschild black hole where the accretion disc is threaded by toroidal magnetic fields. The accretion flow is optically thin and advection dominated. The synchrotron radiation is considered to be the active cooling mechanism in the flow. With this, we obtain ...

  1. Viscous shock layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially symmetric flow fields. Solutions are obtained using an implicit finite difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cone configurations at free stream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  2. Viscous-shock-layer solutions for turbulent flow of radiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous-shock-layer equations for hypersonic laminar and turbulent flows of radiating or nonradiating gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium are presented for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow fields. Solutions were obtained using an implicit finite-difference scheme and results are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically-blunted cone configurations at freestream conditions representative of entry into the atmosphere of Venus. These data are compared with solutions obtained using other methods of analysis.

  3. Improved Reactive Flow Modeling of the LX-17 Double Shock Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehagen, Thomas J.; Vitello, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Over driven double shock experiments provide a measurement of the properties of the reaction product states of the insensitive high explosive LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight). These experiments used two flyer materials mounted on the end of a projectile to send an initial shock through the LX-17, followed by a second shock of a higher magnitude into the detonation products. In the experiments, the explosive was initially driven by the flyer plate to pressures above the Chapman-Jouguet state. The particle velocity history was recorded by Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes pointing at an aluminum foil coated LiF window. The PDV data shows a sharp initial shock and decay, followed by a rounded second shock. Here, the experimental results are compared to 2D and 3D Cheetah reactive flow modeling. Our default Cheetah reactive flow model fails to accurately reproduce the decay of the first shock or the curvature or strength of the second shock. A new model is proposed in which the carbon condensate produced in the reaction zone is controlled by a kinetic rate. This allows the carbon condensate to be initially out of chemical equilibrium with the product gas. This new model reproduces the initial detonation peak and decay, and matches the curvature of the second shock, however, it still over-predicts the strength of the second shock. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. On the mechanism of flow evolution in shock-tube experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiverin, Alexey; Yakovenko, Ivan

    2018-02-01

    The paper studies numerically the flow development behind the shock wave propagating inside the tube. The detailed analysis of the flow patterns behind the shock wave allows determination of the gas-dynamical origins of the temperature non-uniformities responsible for the subsequent localized start of chemical reactions in the test mixture. In particular, it is shown that the temperature field structure is determined mainly by the mechanisms of boundary layer instability development. The kinetic energy dissipation related to the flow deceleration inside boundary layer results in local heating of the test gas. At the same time, the heat losses to the tube wall lead to the cooling of the gas. Therefore the temperature stratification takes place on the scales of the boundary layer. As soon as the shock wave reflected from the end-wall of the tube interacts with the developed boundary layer the localized hot regions arise at a certain distance from the end wall. The position of these hot regions is associated with the zones of shock wave interaction with roller vortices at the margin between the boundary layer and the bulk flow. Formulated mechanism of the temperature field evolution can be used to explain the peculiarities of non-steady shock-induced ignition of combustible mixtures with moderate ignition delay times, where the ignition starts inside localized kernels at distance from the end wall.

  5. Numerical investigation of turbulence models for shock separated boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, J. R.; Coakley, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for shock separated turbulent boundary-layer flows are presented. Several turbulence models are investigated and assessed by their ability to predict the physical phenomena associated with two extensively documented experiments. The experimental flows consist of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions in axisymmetric internal and external geometries at Mach numbers of 1.5 and 7, respectively. Algebraic and one-equation eddy viscosity models are used to describe the Reynolds shear stress. Calculated values of skin friction, wall pressure distribution, kinetic energy of turbulence, and heat transfer are compared with measurements.

  6. Turbulent properties of axisymmetric shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. L.; Kussoy, M. I.; Coakley, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational investigation of an axisymmetric turbulent shock-wave boundary-layer interaction flow is presented. Experimental measurements include both mean and fluctuating data obtained by LDV techniques and identify large scale unsteady motions associated with shock induced separation. Computations using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and a two-equation turbulence model are in relatively good agreement with experimental measurements. It is found that the large scale unsteady motions do not appear to have a critical impact on the ability to compute the mean properties of the flows investigated in this paper.

  7. Conical flow near singular rays. [shock generation in ideal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahalak, G. I.; Myers, M. K.

    1974-01-01

    The steady flow of an ideal gas past a conical body is investigated by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, with particular emphasis on the flow near the singular ray occurring in linearized theory. The first-order problem governing the flow in this region is formulated, leading to the equation of Kuo, and an approximate solution is obtained in the case of compressive flow behind the main front. This solution is compared with the results of previous investigations with a view to assessing the applicability of the Lighthill-Whitham theories.

  8. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  9. Standing shocks in magnetized dissipative accretion flow around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIPLOB SARKAR

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... Abstract. We explore the global structure of the accretion flow around a Schwarzschild black hole where the accretion disc is threaded by toroidal magnetic fields. The accretion flow is optically thin and advection dominated. The synchrotron radiation is considered to be the active cooling mechanism in the ...

  10. Effect of vasopressors on organ blood flow during endotoxin shock in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslow, M.J.; Miller, C.F.; Parker, S.D.; Walman, A.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A volume-resuscitated porcine endotoxin shock model was used to evaluate the effect on organ blood flow of increasing systemic arterial blood pressure with vasopressors. Administration of 0.05-0.2 mg/kg of Escherichia coli endotoxin (E) reduced mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) to 50 mmHg, decreased systemic vascular resistance to 50% of control, and did not change cardiac output or heart rate. Blood flow measured with radiolabeled microspheres to brain, kidney, spleen, and skeletal muscle was reduced during endotoxin shock, but blood flow to left ventricle, small and large intestine, and stomach remained at pre-endotoxin levels throughout the study period. Four groups of animals were used to evaluate the effect of vasopressor therapy. Vasopressors were administered starting 60 min after E exposure, and the dose of each was titrated to increase MAP to 75 mmHg. Despite the increase in MAP, brain blood flow did not increase in any group. Norepinephrine alone increased blood flow to the left ventricle. The dose of norepinephrine required to increase MAP by 20-25 mmHg during E shock was 30 times the does required for a similar increase in MAP in animals not receiving E. The authors conclude 1) that hypotension in the fluid resuscitated porcine E shock model is primarily the result of peripheral vasodilatation, 2) that the vascular response to vasoconstrictors in this model is markedly attenuated following E administration, 3) that blood pressure elevation with norepinephrine, dopamine, and phenylephrine neither decreases blood flow to any organs nor increases blood flow to organs with reduced flow, and 4) that norepinephrine, dopamine, and phenylephrine affect regional blood flow similarly in this model

  11. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions.

  12. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier’s Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions.

  13. Condensation shocks in high momentum two-phase flows in condensing injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, G.; Christensen, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    This study presents a phenomenological and mathematical model of condensation shocks in high momentum two-phase flows in condensing injectors. The characteristics of the shock were related to the mode of vapor bubble collapse. Using cavitation terminology, the bubble collapse can be classified as inertially controlled or thermally controlled. Inertial bubble collapse occurs rapidly whereas, a thermally controlled collapse results in a significantly longer collapse time. The interdependence between the bubble collapse mode and the momentum and pressure of the flow, was analyzed in this study. For low-temperature-high-velocity flows a steep pressure rise with complete condensation was obtained. For a high-temperature-low velocity flow with noncondensables, low pressure recovery with incomplete condensation was observed. These trends are in agreement with previous experimental observations

  14. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  15. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  16. Standing shocks in magnetized dissipative accretion flow around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIPLOB SARKAR

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... The consequences of large scale ordered magnetic fields in accretion disc theories are frequently inves- ... by the effect of differential rotation on the originally poloidal field lines linking layers rotating at ..... ter possesses high entropy content (Becker & Kazanas. 2001). For a dissipative accretion flow, the ...

  17. Mitigation of shock-induced flow separation using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Balasubramanian

    high altitude operation of a flight vehicle, such as ramjet or scramjet-based devices, where a forebody ... piloting of the flow control device set-up, high actuation frequency with pulsing mode of operation and .... errors, leading to unphysical evolution, thereby resulting in large values of divergence of the magnetic field. Hence ...

  18. DSMC simulation and experimental validation of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong; Shang, Yuhe; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10(-4), the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%.

  19. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-01

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  20. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  1. Sedimentary architecture and depositional controls of a Holocene wave-dominated barrier-island system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2018-01-01

    control. This study investigates the relative role of forcing conditions, such as antecedent topography, sea-level rise, sediment supply, storms and climate changes, on the evolution of a Holocene wave-dominated barrier-island system. This article presents temporal reconstruction of the depositional...... history of the barrier-island system of Rømø in the Wadden Sea in unprecedented detail, based on ground-penetration radar profiles, sediment cores, high-resolution dating and palynological investigations, and shows that ca 8000 years ago the barrier island formed on a Pleistocene topographic high. During...... the initial phase of barrier evolution the long-term sea-level rise was relatively rapid (ca 9 mm/yr) and the barrier was narrow and frequently overwashed. Sediment supply kept pace with sea-level rise and the barrier-island system mainly aggraded through the deposition of a ca 7 m thick stack of overwash...

  2. An efficient shock-capturing scheme for simulating compressible homogeneous mixture flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Son Tung; Ha, Cong Tu; Park, Warn Gyu; Jung, Chul Min

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the development of a procedure for the numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations for cavitating flows with and without ventilation based on a compressible, multiphase, homogeneous mixture model. The governing equations are discretized on a general structured grid using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme in conjunction with appropriate limiters to prevent the generation of spurious solutions near shock waves or discontinuities. Two well-known limiters are examined, and a new limiter is proposed to enhance the accuracy and stability of the numerical scheme. A sensitivity analysis is first conducted to determine the relative influences of various model parameters on the solution. These parameters are adopted for the computation of water flows over a hemispherical body, conical body and a divergent/convergent nozzle. Finally, numerical calculations of ventilated supercavitating flows over a hemispherical cylinder body with a hot propulsive jet are conducted to verify the capabilities of the numerical scheme

  3. Well-posed Euler model of shock-induced two-phase flow in bubbly liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukhvatullina, R. R.; Frolov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    A well-posed mathematical model of non-isothermal two-phase two-velocity flow of bubbly liquid is proposed. The model is based on the two-phase Euler equations with the introduction of an additional pressure at the gas bubble surface, which ensures the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for a system of governing equations with homogeneous initial conditions, and the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for radial pulsations of gas bubbles. The applicability conditions of the model are formulated. The model is validated by comparing one-dimensional calculations of shock wave propagation in liquids with gas bubbles with a gas volume fraction of 0.005-0.3 with experimental data. The model is shown to provide satisfactory results for the shock propagation velocity, pressure profiles, and the shock-induced motion of the bubbly liquid column.

  4. Interaction of single-pulse laser energy with bow shock in hypersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yanji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensing and schlieren imaging with high resolution and sensitivity are applied to the study of the interaction of single-pulse laser energy with bow shock at Mach 5. An Nd:YAG laser operated at 1.06 μm, 100 mJ pulse energy is used to break down the hypersonic flow in a shock tunnel. Three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations are solved with an upwind scheme to simulate the interaction. The pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body is measured and calculated to examine the pressure variation during the interaction. Schlieren imaging is used in conjunction with the calculated density gradients to examine the process of the interaction. The results show that the experimental pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body and schlieren imaging fit well with the simulation. The pressure at the stagnation point on the blunt body will increase when the transmission shock approaches the blunt body and decrease with the formation of the rarefied wave. Bow shock is deformed during the interaction. Quasi-stationary waves are formed by high rate laser energy deposition to control the bow shock. The pressure and temperature at the stagnation point on the blunt body and the wave drag are reduced to 50%, 75% and 81% respectively according to the simulation. Schlieren imaging has provided important information for the investigation of the mechanism of the interaction.

  5. Investigation of ALEGRA shock hydrocode algorithms using an exact free surface jet flow solution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, Bradley Wright.; Robinson, Allen C

    2014-01-01

    Computational testing of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian shock physics code, ALEGRA, is presented using an exact solution that is very similar to a shaped charge jet flow. The solution is a steady, isentropic, subsonic free surface flow with significant compression and release and is provided as a steady state initial condition. There should be no shocks and no entropy production throughout the problem. The purpose of this test problem is to present a detailed and challenging computation in order to provide evidence for algorithmic strengths and weaknesses in ALEGRA which should be examined further. The results of this work are intended to be used to guide future algorithmic improvements in the spirit of test-driven development processes.

  6. Theoretical investigation of shock stand-off distance for non-equilibrium flows over spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Hua

    2018-02-20

    We derived a theoretical solution of the shock stand-off distance for a non-equilibrium flow over spheres based on Wen and Hornung’s solution and Olivier’s solution. Compared with previous approaches, the main advantage of the present approach is allowing an analytic solution without involving any semi-empirical parameter for the whole non-equilibrium flow regimes. The effects of some important physical quantities therefore can be fully revealed via the analytic solution. By combining the current solution with Ideal Dissociating Gas (IDG) model, we investigate the effects of free stream kinetic energy and free stream dissociation level (which can be very different between different facilities) on the shock stand-off distance.

  7. Supersonic flow with shock waves. Monte-Carlo calculations for low density plasma. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almenara, E.; Hidalgo, M.; Saviron, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    This Report gives preliminary information about a Monte Carlo procedure to simulate supersonic flow past a body of a low density plasma in the transition regime. A computer program has been written for a UNIVAC 1108 machine to account for a plasma composed by neutral molecules and positive and negative ions. Different and rather general body geometries can be analyzed. Special attention is played to tho detached shock waves growth In front of the body. (Author) 30 refs

  8. Supersonic flow with shock waves. Monte-Carlo calculations for low density plasma. Part. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almenara, E.; Hidalgo, M.; Saviron, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary information about a Monte Carlo procedure to simulate supersonic flow past a body of a low density plasma in the transition regime is gived. A computer program has been written for a Univac 1108 machine to account for a plasma composed by neutral molecules and positive and negative ions. Different and rather general body geometries can be analyzed. Special attention is payed to the detached shock waves growth in front of the body. (author)

  9. A life-cycle model for wave-dominated tidal inlets along passive margin coasts of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminack, Christopher T.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2018-03-01

    A regional overview of 107 wave-dominated tidal inlets along the U.S. Atlantic coast, U.S. Gulf of Mexico coast, and Canadian Gulf of St. Lawrence coast yielded a generalized wave-dominated tidal inlet life-cycle model that recognized the rotational nature of tidal inlets. Tidal inlets are influenced by concurrently acting processes transpiring over two timescales: short-term, event-driven processes and long-term, evolutionary processes. Wave-dominated tidal inlets are classified into three rotational categories based on net longshore sediment transport direction and rotation direction along the landward (back-barrier) portion of the inlet channel: downdrift channel rotation, updrift channel rotation, or little-to-no channel rotation. Lateral shifting of the flood-tidal delta depocenter in response to available estuarine accommodation space appears to control inlet channel rotation. Flood-tidal delta deposits fill accommodation space locally within the estuary (i.e., creating bathymetric highs), causing the tidal-inlet channel to rotate. External influences, such as fluvial discharge, pre-existing back-barrier channels, and impeding salt marsh will also influence inlet-channel rotation. Storm events may rejuvenate the tidal inlet by scouring sediment within the flood-tidal delta, increasing local accommodation space. Wave-dominated tidal inlets are generally unstable and tend to open, concurrently migrate laterally and rotate, infill, and close. Channel rotation is a primary reason for wave-dominated tidal inlet closure. During rotation, the inlet channel lengthens and hydraulic efficiency decreases, thus causing tidal prism to decrease. Tidal prism, estuarine accommodation space, and sediment supply to the flood-tidal delta are the primary variables responsible for tidal inlet rotation. Stability of wave-dominated tidal inlets is further explained by: stability (S) = tidal prism (Ω) + estuarine accommodation space (V) - volume of annual sediment supply (Mt

  10. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is

  11. Direct Comparison of Particle-Tracking and Sectional Approaches for Shock Driven Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Schwer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dispersed-phase flows are important for a wide variety of problems, and several numerical approaches for the solution of dispersed-phase flows have been proposed and implemented in the past. The present research implements two popular approaches to dispersed-phase flows: the Lagrangian particle-tracking approach and the Eulerian sectional approach. A direct comparison between the two methods is made for a range of shock driven seeded flow-fields. First, different drag models are investigated using the particle-tracking method for a range of conditions, and then direct comparisons between the two methods are made for shock speed attenuation and shock-wave profiles. In addition, resolution requirements are investigated to determine the number of sections and the number of particles required to obtain good agreement between the methods, and then two-dimensional simulations are done to investigate the effect of each method on more complicated flow-fields. Results showed both methods can be used to obtain very similar results, although each method has benefits and drawbacks. The glass particles were then replaced with water droplets, and the effect of vaporization and droplet breakup were then investigated. Although vaporization was well represented with the sectional approach, different droplet breakup models had to be implemented for the different approaches, with some significant differences in the resultant droplet distributions. The reason for this is that breakup models require a droplet deformation time before breaking up, and thus a droplet history. This droplet history is difficult to implement in sectional approaches (and Eulerian methods in general, and so the breakup model must be changed. Similar profiles could be reproduced with the sectional method, but significant differences persisted. The results did show, however, that the Eulerian sectional approach is a viable method for computing complex, multi-dimensional flow-fields and can

  12. Prediction of hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Solutions of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are presented and compared with experimental surface data for a series of hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction flows. The turbulence models used include algebraic and two-equation eddy-viscosity models developed for transonic and supersonic flows. Also several additional modifications to the two-equation model to account for compressibility effects are developed and used. Although the modifications improve the agreement with the experimental data, no single model or modification correctly predicts all the test cases.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of shock-induced flow of reactive porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    In this work, the microscale processes of consolidation, deformation and reaction features of shocked porous materials are studied. Time- resolve particle velocities and stress fields associated with dispersive compaction waves are measured in gas-gun experiments. In these tests, a thin porous layer of HMX is shock-loaded at varied levels. At high impact, significant reaction is triggered by the rapid material distortion during compaction. In parallel modeling studies, continuum mixture theory is applied to describe the behavior of averaged wave-fields in heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features and interactions with viscoelastic materials in the gauge package are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Numerical simulations of impact on a collection of discrete HMX `crystals` are also presented using shock physics analysis. Three-dimensional simulations indicate that rapid distortion occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress with wavelengths of several particle diameters. Localization of energy causes `hot-spots` due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions. These numerical experiments demonstrate that `hot-spots` are strongly influenced by multiple crystal interactions. This mesoscale study provides new insights into micromechanical behavior of heterogeneous energetic materials.

  14. Emergence of three-dimensional flow structures in shock boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gs, Sidharth; Dwivedi, Anubhav; Nichols, Joseph; Jovanovic, Mihailo; Candler, Graham

    2017-11-01

    Experiments and computations point to the emergence of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures in laminar shock boundary layer interactions in various configurations. We examine a Mach 5 flow over a double compression ramp and reveal the presence of a bifurcation from a steady 2D to a steady 3D flow state. This is done by varying the relative angle of the two ramps which increases the interaction strength. We employ global linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation to characterize this bifurcation and demonstrate that global instability induces 3D flow structures. We use the direct and adjoint linear equations to further investigate the origin of this instability and examine the influence of uncertainty (including the effect of geometric irregularities in the ramp and free-stream disturbances in wind tunnel) on this bifurcation. This work was supported by Office of Naval Research through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2522.

  15. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO COLLE

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959.

  16. Modeling of skin cooling, blood flow, and optical properties in wounds created by electrical shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Jeng, James C.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-02-01

    High voltage electrical injuries may lead to irreversible tissue damage or even death. Research on tissue injury following high voltage shock is needed and may yield stage-appropriate therapy to reduce amputation rate. One of the mechanisms by which electricity damages tissue is through Joule heating, with subsequent protein denaturation. Previous studies have shown that blood flow had a significant effect on the cooling rate of heated subcutaneous tissue. To assess the thermal damage in tissue, this study focused on monitoring changes of temperature and optical properties of skin next to high voltage wounds. The burns were created between left fore limb and right hind limb extremities of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by a 1000VDC delivery shock system. A thermal camera was utilized to record temperature variation during the exposure. The experimental results were then validated using a thermal-electric finite element model (FEM).

  17. MONOTONIC DERIVATIVE CORRECTION FOR CALCULATION OF SUPERSONIC FLOWS WITH SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Numerical solution methods of gas dynamics problems based on exact and approximate solution of Riemann problem are considered. We have developed an approach to the solution of Euler equations describing flows of inviscid compressible gas based on finite volume method and finite difference schemes of various order of accuracy. Godunov scheme, Kolgan scheme, Roe scheme, Harten scheme and Chakravarthy-Osher scheme are used in calculations (order of accuracy of finite difference schemes varies from 1st to 3rd. Comparison of accuracy and efficiency of various finite difference schemes is demonstrated on the calculation example of inviscid compressible gas flow in Laval nozzle in the case of continuous acceleration of flow in the nozzle and in the case of nozzle shock wave presence. Conclusions about accuracy of various finite difference schemes and time required for calculations are made. Main Results. Comparative analysis of difference schemes for Euler equations integration has been carried out. These schemes are based on accurate and approximate solution for the problem of an arbitrary discontinuity breakdown. Calculation results show that monotonic derivative correction provides numerical solution uniformity in the breakdown neighbourhood. From the one hand, it prevents formation of new points of extremum, providing the monotonicity property, but from the other hand, causes smoothing of existing minimums and maximums and accuracy loss. Practical Relevance. Developed numerical calculation method gives the possibility to perform high accuracy calculations of flows with strong non-stationary shock and detonation waves. At the same time, there are no non-physical solution oscillations on the shock wave front.

  18. Flow-around modes for a rhomboid wing with a stall vortex in the shock layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubin, M. A.; Maximov, F. A.; Ostapenko, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of an asymmetrical hypersonic flow around a V-shaped wing with the opening angle larger than π on the modes with attached shockwaves on forward edges, when the stall flow is implemented on the leeward wing cantilever behind the kink point of the cross contour. In this case, a vortex of nonviscous nature is formed in which the velocities on the sphere exceeding the speed of sound and resulting in the occurrence of pressure shocks with an intensity sufficient for the separation of the turbulent boundary layer take place in the reverse flow according to the calculations within the framework of the ideal gas. It is experimentally established that a separation boundary layer can exist in the reverse flow, and its structure is subject to the laws inherent to the reverse flow in the separation region of the turbulent boundary layer arising in the supersonic conic flow under the action of a shockwave incident to the boundary layer.

  19. A Miocene wave-dominated estuarine system in the Paraíba Basin, northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Rosana; Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Netto, Renata Guimarães; Góes, Ana Maria

    2017-11-01

    A number of publications have documented the effect of the Miocene transgression on several coasts of the world. However, this event is incompletely documented along the Brazilian margin, despite the existence of an impressive record of Miocene deposits exposed mostly as several coastal cliffs along more than 5000 km of distance. The transgressive nature of Miocene deposits, so far recognized only in a few localities of northeastern Brazil, needs to be amplified in order to better characterize the impact of the Miocene transgression in eastern South America. In this work, we provide facies analysis of early/middle Miocene strata exposed in the Paraíba Basin, northeastern Brazil, aiming reconstruct the depositional paleoenvironments and analyze their evolution within the context of relative sea-level fluctuations data. The results revealed deposits characterized by several features that were related to the action of tidal currents, such as alternating thicker/thinner forest packages, abundant reactivation surfaces, mud drapes and oppositely-dipping (herringbone) cross sets. These sedimentary structures were associated with an ichnological assemblage indicative of marine-influenced and brackish water, best represented by Ophiomorpha, Planolites-Palaeophycus-Thalassinoides and Thallassinoides-Planolites-Palaeophycus ichnofabrics. Sedimentation occurred in environments consisting of estuarine channel, estuarine central basin, tidal inlet/tidal channel, tidal delta/washover, tidal flat/shoal and foreshore, which were related to an estuarine setting, at least in part of a wave-dominated type. Analysis of facies stratal patterns led to suggest that the estuarine deposits of the Paraíba Basin reflect a rise in relative sea level probably during the transgressive and/or highstand stage of a depositional sequence formed directly overlying Cretaceous rocks. This rise can be correlated with the worldwide early/mid Miocene marine transgression. However, while the eustatic sea

  20. Converging shock flows for a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Schmidt, Emma M.; Boyd, Zachary M.; Lilieholm, Jennifer F.; Baty, Roy S.

    2018-04-01

    Previous work has shown that the one-dimensional (1D) inviscid compressible flow (Euler) equations admit a wide variety of scale-invariant solutions (including the famous Noh, Sedov, and Guderley shock solutions) when the included equation of state (EOS) closure model assumes a certain scale-invariant form. However, this scale-invariant EOS class does not include even simple models used for shock compression of crystalline solids, including many broadly applicable representations of Mie-Grüneisen EOS. Intuitively, this incompatibility naturally arises from the presence of multiple dimensional scales in the Mie-Grüneisen EOS, which are otherwise absent from scale-invariant models that feature only dimensionless parameters (such as the adiabatic index in the ideal gas EOS). The current work extends previous efforts intended to rectify this inconsistency, by using a scale-invariant EOS model to approximate a Mie-Grüneisen EOS form. To this end, the adiabatic bulk modulus for the Mie-Grüneisen EOS is constructed, and its key features are used to motivate the selection of a scale-invariant approximation form. The remaining surrogate model parameters are selected through enforcement of the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an infinitely strong shock in a Mie-Grüneisen material. Finally, the approximate EOS is used in conjunction with the 1D inviscid Euler equations to calculate a semi-analytical Guderley-like imploding shock solution in a metal sphere and to determine if and when the solution may be valid for the underlying Mie-Grüneisen EOS.

  1. Self-similar flow behind a spherical shock wave in a non-ideal dusty gas under a gravitational field: Isothermal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2013-10-01

    Similarity solutions are obtained for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal flow of a dusty gas behind a spherical shock wave with time dependent energy input. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained, and the viscous stress and heat conduction of the mixture are negligible. The medium is taken to be under the influence of the gravitational field due to a heavy nucleus at the origin (Roche model). The total energy of the flow-field behind the shock is increasing. The effects of an increase in the mass concentration of solid particles, the ratio of the density of the solid particles to the initial density of the gas, the gravitational parameter (or shock Mach number), and the parameter of non-idealness of the gas in the mixture, are investigated. It is shown that due to presence of gravitational field the isothermal compressibility of the medium and the flow-variables increases and the shock strength decreases. A comparison has also been made between the medium with and without gravitational field. The shock waves in dusty medium can be important for description of star formation, shocks in supernova explosions, etc.

  2. Net Capital Flows, Macroeconomic Shocks and Reserve Assets. The Case of Argentina (1994-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis N. Lanteri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available International reserves have been used as a source of protection against the vulnerability of the balance of payments, or alternatively, as an attempt to keep a competitive real exchange rate and to promote exports. This paper explores the correlation between the net capital flows and reserves. Similarly, the impact of some macroeconomic shocks on that variable is assessed. Estimates are carried out through both, the VEC (Vector Error Correction models and quarterly data of the Argentine economy for the period 1994-2013. Results show a negative correlation between international reserves and net capital flows (reserve accumulation through current account surpluses. At the same time, the expansionary fiscal policies and the continuing and widespread price increases would adversely affect the reserves.

  3. Coronal Rain in Magnetic Arcades: Rebound Shocks, Limit Cycles, and Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-07-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer (>6 hr) time span. We quantify how blob-like condensations forming in situ grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona transition-region-like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy, and temperature while blobs descend, impact, and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a result, there are plenty of shear flows generated with relative velocity difference around 80 km s-1 in our simulations. These shear flows are siphon flows set up by multiple blob dynamics and they in turn affect the deformation of the falling blobs. In particular, we show how shear flows can break apart blobs into smaller fragments, within minutes.

  4. Influence of shear layers on the structure of shocks formed by rectangular and parabolic blockages placed in a subsonic flow-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeda, V. K.; Kumar, A.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2014-03-01

    Flow blockages are used to promote the transition of a flame to a detonation. The structure of shock waves formed with different configurations of blockages was experimentally determined for subsonic incoming flow. High speed subsonic flows could develop ahead of a turbulent flame and the interaction of such flows with blockages could lead to the formation of interacting shock waves, slipstreams, and expansion waves. A blow-down test setup was designed to study the interacting shock pattern formed with different configurations of blockages. The flow was found to accelerate to low supersonic velocities during its passage over the blockages. The shock structure downstream of the blockages was found to depend on the shape, size, and number of blockages as well as the spacing between them. While a parabolic-shaped blockage provided shocks of maximum strength, large blockage ratio values did not permit the formation of shocks. The shear layer, formed in the flow downstream of the blockages, reflected the expansion fan as shock waves and was found to be a major feature influencing the formation of the interacting structure of oblique shocks. The structure and strength of the shock waves are analyzed using hodograms. The formation of the interacting family of shock waves using different configurations of blockages and the spacings between them are discussed.

  5. Flow behind an exponential shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric perfect gas with magnetic field and variable density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G; Sahu, P K

    2016-01-01

    A self-similar model for one-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flows behind a strong exponential shock wave driven out by a cylindrical piston moving with time according to an exponential law in an ideal gas in the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and variable density is discussed in a rotating atmosphere. The ambient medium is assumed to possess radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The initial density, the fluid velocities and magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying with time according to an exponential law. The gas is taken to be non-viscous having infinite electrical conductivity. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector. The effects of the variation of the initial density index, adiabatic exponent of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field behind the shock wave are investigated. It is found that the presence of the magnetic field have decaying effects on the shock wave. Also, it is observed that the effect of an increase in the magnetic field strength is more impressive in the case of adiabatic flow than in the case of isothermal flow. The assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, non-dimensional azimuthal and axial components of vorticity vector distributions in comparison to those in the case of adiabatic flow. A comparison is made between isothermal and adiabatic flows. It is obtained that an increase in the initial density variation index, adiabatic exponent and strength of the magnetic field decrease the shock strength.

  6. Downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in transonic diffuser flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.; Coakley, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of downstream boundary effects on the frequency of self-excited oscillations in two-dimensional, separated transonic diffuser flows has been conducted numerically by solving the compressible, Reynolds-averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation turbulence model. It was found that the unsteady diffuser flowfields are very sensitive to the location of the downstream boundary. Extension of the diffuser downstream boundary significantly reduces the frequency and amplitude of oscillations for pressure, velocity and shock. Computational results suggest that the mechanism causing the self-excited oscillation changes from viscous convective wave dominated oscillations to inviscid acoustic wave dominated oscillations when the location of downstream boundary varies from 8.66 to 134.7 throat height. The existence of a suction slot in the experimental setup obscures the physical downstream boundary and, therefore, presents a difficulty for quantitative comparisons between computation and experiment.

  7. Research of process of shock wave flow around the lightly armored vehicles hulls

    OpenAIRE

    Васильев, Антон Юрьевич

    2009-01-01

    Решена задача разработки методики анализа процесса обтекания корпусов легкобронированных машин ударной волной от мощного взрыва. The methods of shock wave flow analysis of lightly armored vehicles hulls was developed.

  8. A shock-layer theory based on thirteen-moment equations and DSMC calculations of rarefied hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.; Dogra, V. K.

    1991-01-01

    Grad's thirteen-moment equations are applied to the flow behind a bow shock under the formalism of a thin shock layer. Comparison of this version of the theory with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo calculations of flows about a flat plate at finite attack angle has lent support to the approach as a useful extension of the continuum model for studying translational nonequilibrium in the shock layer. This paper reassesses the physical basis and limitations of the development with additional calculations and comparisons. The streamline correlation principle, which allows transformation of the 13-moment based system to one based on the Navier-Stokes equations, is extended to a three-dimensional formulation. The development yields a strip theory for planar lifting surfaces at finite incidences. Examples reveal that the lift-to-drag ratio is little influenced by planform geometry and varies with altitudes according to a 'bridging function' determined by correlated two-dimensional calculations.

  9. MacCormack's technique-based pressure reconstruction approach for PIV data in compressible flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shun; Xu, Jinglei; Yu, Kaikai

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an improved approach for extraction of pressure fields from velocity data, such as obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV), especially for steady compressible flows with strong shocks. The principle of this approach is derived from Navier-Stokes equations, assuming adiabatic condition and neglecting viscosity of flow field boundaries measured by PIV. The computing method is based on MacCormack's technique in computational fluid dynamics. Thus, this approach is called the MacCormack method. Moreover, the MacCormack method is compared with several approaches proposed in previous literature, including the isentropic method, the spatial integration and the Poisson method. The effects of velocity error level and PIV spatial resolution on these approaches are also quantified by using artificial velocity data containing shock waves. The results demonstrate that the MacCormack method has higher reconstruction accuracy than other approaches, and its advantages become more remarkable with shock strengthening. Furthermore, the performance of the MacCormack method is also validated by using synthetic PIV images with an oblique shock wave, confirming the feasibility and advantage of this approach in real PIV experiments. This work is highly significant for the studies on aerospace engineering, especially the outer flow fields of supersonic aircraft and the internal flow fields of ramjets.

  10. X-ray radiographic imaging of hydrodynamic phenomena in radiation driven materials -- shock propagation, material compression and shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, B.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.; Remington, B.A.; Kornblum, H.N.; Perry, T.S.; Phillion, D.W.; Wallace, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional, time resolved x-ray radiographic imaging at high photon energy (5-7 keV) is used to study shock propagation, material motion and compression, and the effects of shear flow in solid density samples which are driven by x-ray ablation with the Nova laser. By backlighting the samples with x-rays and observing the increase in sample areal density due to shock compression, the authors directly measure the trajectory of strong shocks (∼40 Mbar) in flight, in solid density plastic samples. Doping a section of the samples with high-Z material (Br) provides radiographic contrast, allowing the measurement of the shock induced particle motion. Instability growth due to shear flow at an interface is investigated by imbedding a metal wire in a cylindrical plastic sample and launching a shock in the axial direction. Time resolved radiographic measurements are made with either a slit-imager coupled to an x-ray streak camera or a pinhole camera coupled to a gated microchannel plate detector, providing ∼ 10-μm spatial and ∼ 100-ps temporal resolution

  11. A thin-shock-layer solution for nonequilibrium, inviscid hypersonic flows in earth, Martian, and Venusian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    An approximate inverse solution is presented for the nonequilibrium flow in the inviscid shock layer about a vehicle in hypersonic flight. The method is based upon a thin-shock-layer approximation and has the advantage of being applicable to both subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer. The relative simplicity of the method makes it ideally suited for programming on a digital computer with a significant reduction in storage capacity and computing time required by other more exact methods. Comparison of nonequilibrium solutions for an air mixture obtained by the present method is made with solutions obtained by two other methods. Additional cases are presented for entry of spherical nose cones into representative Venusian and Martian atmospheres. A digital computer program written in FORTRAN language is presented that permits an arbitrary gas mixture to be employed in the solution. The effects of vibration, dissociation, recombination, electronic excitation, and ionization are included in the program.

  12. A Numerical Scheme Based on an Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Turbulent Flows with Shocks: Application to Two-Dimensional Flows around Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational code adopting immersed boundary methods for compressible gas-particle multiphase turbulent flows is developed and validated through two-dimensional numerical experiments. The turbulent flow region is modeled by a second-order pseudo skew-symmetric form with minimum dissipation, while the monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL scheme is employed in the shock region. The present scheme is applied to the flow around a two-dimensional cylinder under various freestream Mach numbers. Compared with the original MUSCL scheme, the minimum dissipation enabled by the pseudo skew-symmetric form significantly improves the resolution of the vortex generated in the wake while retaining the shock capturing ability. In addition, the resulting aerodynamic force is significantly improved. Also, the present scheme is successfully applied to moving two-cylinder problems.

  13. X-ray radiographic imaging of hydrodynamic phenomena in radiation driven materials -- shock propagation and shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammel, B.A.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Munro, D.; Remington, B.A.; Wallace, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    One and two dimensional, time resolved x-ray radiographic imaging at high photon energy (5--7 keV) are used to study shock propagation and the effects of shear flow in solid density samples which are driven by x-ray ablation with the Nova laser. By backlighting the samples with x-rays and observing the increase in sample areal density due to shock compression, we directly measure the trajectory of strong shocks (∼ 40 Mbar) in flight, in solid density plastic samples. Doping a section of the planar samples with high-Z material (Br) provides radiographic contrast, allowing a measurement of the shock induced motion of the doped material. Instability growth due to shear flow at an interface is investigated by imbedding a metal wire in a plastic sample parallel to the direction of material motion. Time resolved radiographic measurements are made with either a slit-imager coupled to an x-ray streak camera or a pinhole camera coupled to a gated microchannel plate detector, providing ∼10 μm spatial and ∼100 ps temporal resolution

  14. Understanding the Flow Physics of Shock Boundary-Layer Interactions Using CFD and Numerical Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the University of Michigan (UM) Shock/Boundary-Layer Interaction (SBLI) experiments were performed as an extension of the CFD SBLI Workshop held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting in 2010. In particular, the UM Mach 2.75 Glass Tunnel with a semi-spanning 7.75deg wedge was analyzed in attempts to explore key physics pertinent to SBLI's, including thermodynamic and viscous boundary conditions as well as turbulence modeling. Most of the analyses were 3D CFD simulations using the OVERFLOW flow solver, with additional quasi-1D simulations performed with an in house MATLAB code interfacing with the NIST REFPROP code to explore perfect verses non-ideal air. A fundamental exploration pertaining to the effects of particle image velocimetry (PIV) on post-processing data is also shown. Results from the CFD simulations showed an improvement in agreement with experimental data with key contributions including adding a laminar zone upstream of the wedge and the necessity of mimicking PIV particle lag for comparisons. Results from the quasi-1D simulation showed that there was little difference between perfect and non-ideal air for the configuration presented.

  15. Why the coastal plain of Paraiba do Sul river not be denominated the classical model of wave dominated delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.

    1987-01-01

    Existing coastal sedimentation models have not properly incorporated the fundamental role of Holocene sea-level history in the development of modern coastal regions. For example the classical work by COLEMAN and WRIGHT (1975), although analyzing the influence of as many as 400 parameters on the geometry of deltaic sand bodies, did not address the effects of Holocene sea-level oscillations. Previous work on the central portion of the Brazilian coastline indicated that the relative construction of the coastal plains. Detailed mapping and radiocarbon dating have allowed us to establish the different phases involved in the depositional history of the plain situated at the Paraiba do Sul river mouth. This history is not in keeping with the classical model of wave dominated delta. (author)

  16. Transition from avalanche dominated transport to drift-wave dominated transport in a basic laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart; Morales, George; Maggs, James; Sydora, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated plasma pressure embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. The off-axis source is active for a period long compared to the density decay time, i.e. as time progresses the power per particle increases. Two distinct regimes are observed to take place, an initial regime dominated by avalanches, identified as sudden intermittent rearrangements of the pressure profile, and a second regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The transition between the two regimes is sudden, affects the full radial profile and is preceded by the growth of drift Alfvén waves. Langmuir probe data will be shown on the evolution of the density, temperature and flow profiles during the transition. The character of the sustained drift wave activity will also be presented. Work supported by NSF/DOE Grant 1619505, and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, sponsored jointly by DOE and NSF.

  17. Shock shapes on blunt bodies in hypersonic-hypervelocity helium, air, and CO2 flows, and calibration results in Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Shock shape results for flat-faced cylinders, spheres, and spherically blunted cones in various test gases, along with preliminary results from a calibration study performed in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube are presented. Free-stream velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec are generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Ideal-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, are compared with the measured results. The effect of model diameter is examined to provide insight to the thermochemical state of the flow in the shock layer. The regime for which equilibrium exists in the shock layer for the present air and CO2 test conditions is defined. Test core flow quality, test repeatability, and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  18. A Self-similar Flow Behind a Shock Wave in a Gravitating or Non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corona or the condensed explosives or the diaphragm containing a very high pressure driver gas, at t = 0. By sudden expansion of the stellar corona or the detonation products or the driver gas into the ambient gas, a shock wave is produced in the ambient gas, in an infinitesimal time interval t0 (say). The shocked gas is ...

  19. Interaction of the electromagnetic precursor from a relativistic shock with the upstream flow - I. Synchrotron absorption of strong electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2018-02-01

    This paper is the first in the series of papers aiming to study interaction of the electromagnetic precursor waves generated at the front of a relativistic shock with the upstream flow. It is motivated by a simple consideration showing that the absorption of such an electromagnetic precursor could yield an efficient transformation of the kinetic energy of the upstream flow to the energy of accelerated particles. Taking into account that the precursor is a strong wave, in which electrons oscillate with relativistic velocities, the standard plasma-radiation interaction processes should be reconsidered. In this paper, I calculate the synchrotron absorption of strong electromagnetic waves.

  20. Gastrointestinal perfusion in septic shock.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haren, E.M. van; Sleight, J.W.; Pickkers, P.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2007-01-01

    Septic shock is characterised by vasodilation, myocardial depression and impaired microcirculatory blood flow, resulting in redistribution of regional blood flow. Animal and human studies have shown that gastrointestinal mucosal blood flow is impaired in septic shock. This is consistent with

  1. Propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of a non-ideal gas in magnetogasdynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nath

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-similar solutions are obtained for unsteady, one-dimensional isothermal flow behind a shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal gas in the presence of an azimuthal magnetic field. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The fluid velocities and the azimuthal magnetic field in the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying a power law. The density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant. The gas is assumed to be non-ideal having infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The effects of the non-idealness of the gas and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. It is shown that the presence of azimuthal magnetic field and the rotation of the medium has decaying effect on the shock wave. Also, a comparison is made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  2. Influence of initial conditions on turbulence and mixing in Richtmyer-Meshkov flows in presence of re-shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Prestridge, Katherine P.; Orlicz, Gregory C.; Balasubramaniam, Balakumar J.

    2010-01-01

    The study of influence of initial conditions [amplitude ((delta)) and wavelength (λ) of perturbations] on variable-density flows stems from the the recent work done by Dimonte et at. 2004, Miles et al. 2005 and Balakumar et al. 2008a, where it was shown that both Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) turbulent flows are not truly self similar and have a strong initial conditions dependence on turbulence transport and mixing. However, so far most of the work on this topic has been numerical studies which suggest that for multi-mode systems, the emergence of a regime of self-similar instability growth independent of the initial conditions does not occur. Experimental evidence is needed to verify this theory. Thus, the present work focuses on conducting an experimental study at moderate Mach number (Ma = 1.2) to understand the effects of multi-mode perturbations of the shocked interface on instability growth rate and mixing for R-M flows, which are important mechanisms in inertial confinement fusion reactions, supernovae, combustion and general fluid mixing processes. The ongoing 3-D numerical simulations using ILES will be used for validation of our experimental results. The experiments to study R-M turbulence and mixing are carreid out at the Los Alamos Gas Shock Tube facility shown in Figure I and described in detail in Balakumar et al. 2008b. A heavy gas curtain of SF 6 , surrounded on both sides by ambient air, representing a light/heavy/light interface is flowed through a varicose nozzle (shown in Figure 1c). This initial interface is then accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shock, generated in the driver section. Simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics are used to characterize the initial conditions and also image the evolving flow to measure instantaneous velocity and density fields. The evolving structures are re-shocked at various times using a moveable reflecting wall to study the initial

  3. Two-phase pressurized thermal shock investigations using a 3D two-fluid modeling of stratified flow with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.; Coste, P.; Bestion, D.; Boucker, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a local 3D two-fluid model for a turbulent stratified flow with/without condensation, which can be used to predict two-phase pressurized thermal shock, is presented. A modified turbulent K- model is proposed with turbulence production induced by interfacial friction. A model of interfacial friction based on a interfacial sublayer concept and three interfacial heat transfer models, namely, a model based on the small eddies controlled surface renewal concept (HDM, Hughes and Duffey, 1991), a model based on the asymptotic behavior of the Eddy Viscosity (EVM), and a model based on the Interfacial Sublayer concept (ISM) are implemented into a preliminary version of the NEPTUNE code based on the 3D module of the CATHARE code. As a first step to apply the above models to predict the two-phase thermal shock, the models are evaluated by comparison of calculated profiles with several experiments: a turbulent air-water stratified flow without interfacial heat transfer; a turbulent steam-water stratified flow with condensation; turbulence induced by the impact of a water jet in a water pool. The prediction results agree well with the experimental data. In addition, the comparison of three interfacial heat transfer models shows that EVM and ISM gave better prediction results while HDM highly overestimated the interfacial heat transfers compared to the experimental data of a steam water stratified flow

  4. Effects of Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillations on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex-breakdown flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock which induces of the leading edge vortex cores to breakdown. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex-breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while keeping the maximum pitch and roll amplitude equal.

  5. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  6. Recruitment and connectivity influence the role of seagrass as a penaeid nursery habitat in a wave dominated estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew D; Fry, Brian; Becker, Alistair; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie

    2017-04-15

    Estuaries provide a diverse mosaic of habitats which support both juveniles and adults of exploited species. In particular, estuaries play an important role in the early life history of many penaeid prawn species. This study used a combination of stable isotope ecology and quantitative sampling to examine recruitment and the nursery function of seagrass habitats for Eastern King Prawn (Penaeus [Melicertus] plebejus), and the processes that contributed to this nursery role. Stable isotopes were used to assign prawns joining the adult stock to putative nursery habitat areas within the estuary. Emigrating prawns originated from only 11 of the 20 sites surveyed. Of these, 8 sites were designated as Effective Juvenile Habitat (EJH), and 5 sites designated as Nursery Habitat (NH). The contribution of individuals from different nursery areas to the adult stock was related to both the abundance of prawns within an area and the distance to the mouth of the estuary, and with the exception of 1 site all EJH and NH were located in the northern section of the estuary. Quantitative sampling in this area indicated that prawns were present at an average density of 165±11 per 100m 2 , and density formed non-linear relationships with the distance to the mouth of the estuary, seagrass cover and temperature. Prawn size also formed non-linear relationships with prawn density and seagrass cover. Spatial patterns in abundance were consistent with wind-driven recruitment patterns, which in turn affected the nursery role of particular areas within the system. These findings have implications for targeted fishery restoration efforts for both Eastern King Prawn and other ocean spawned species in wave dominated estuaries where circulation is primarily wind-driven. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Monitoring Microcirculatory Blood Flow with a New Sublingual Tonometer in a Porcine Model of Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Palágyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue capnometry may be suitable for the indirect evaluation of regional hypoperfusion. We tested the performance of a new sublingual capillary tonometer in experimental hemorrhage. Thirty-six anesthetized, ventilated mini pigs were divided into sham-operated (n=9 and shock groups (n=27. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP to 40 mmHg for 60 min, after which fluid resuscitation started aiming to increase MAP to 75% of the baseline value (60–180 min. Sublingual carbon-dioxide partial pressure was measured by tonometry, using a specially coiled silicone rubber tube. Mucosal red blood cell velocity (RBCV and capillary perfusion rate (CPR were assessed by orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS imaging. In the 60 min shock phase a significant drop in cardiac index was accompanied by reduction in sublingual RBCV and CPR and significant increase in the sublingual mucosal-to-arterial PCO2 gap (PSLCO2 gap, which significantly improved during the 120 min resuscitation phase. There was significant correlation between PSLCO2 gap and sublingual RBCV (r=-0.65, p<0.0001, CPR (r=-0.64, p<0.0001, central venous oxygen saturation (r=-0.50, p<0.0001, and central venous-to-arterial PCO2 difference (r=0.62, p<0.0001. This new sublingual tonometer may be an appropriate tool for the indirect evaluation of circulatory changes in shock.

  8. A Self-similar Flow Behind a Shock Wave in a Gravitating or Non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The propagation of a spherical shock wave in an ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, and with or without self-gravitational effects, is investigated. The initial density of the gas is assumed to obey a power law. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of ...

  9. Similarity solutions for unsteady flow behind an exponential shock in a self-gravitating non-ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Pathak, R. P.; Dutta, Mrityunjoy

    2018-01-01

    Similarity solutions for the flow of a non-ideal gas behind a strong exponential shock driven out by a piston (cylindrical or spherical) moving with time according to an exponential law is obtained. Solutions are obtained, in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic. The shock wave is driven by a piston moving with time according to an exponential law. Similarity solutions exist only when the surrounding medium is of constant density. The effects of variation of ambient magnetic field, non-idealness of the gas, adiabatic exponent and gravitational parameter are worked out in detail. It is shown that the increase in the non-idealness of the gas or the adiabatic exponent of the gas or presence of magnetic field have decaying effect on the shock wave. Consideration of the isothermal flow and the self-gravitational field increase the shock strength. Also, the consideration of isothermal flow or the presence of magnetic field removes the singularity in the density distribution, which arises in the case of adiabatic flow. The result of our study may be used to interpret measurements carried out by space craft in the solar wind and in neighborhood of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  10. FLOW FIELD IN SUPERSONIC MIXED-COMPRESSION INLETS AT ANGLE OF ATTACK USING THE THREE DIMENSIONAL METHOD OF CHARACTERISTICS WITH DISCRETE SHOCK WAVE FITTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the flow field in the supersonic portion of a mixed-compression aircraft inlet at non-zero angle of attack. This approach is based on the method of characteristics for steady three-dimensional flow. The results of this program agree with those produced by the two-dimensional method of characteristics when axisymmetric flow fields are calculated. Except in regions of high viscous interaction and boundary layer removal, the results agree well with experimental data obtained for threedimensional flow fields. The flow field in a variety of axisymmetric mixed compression inlets can be calculated using this program. The bow shock wave and the internal shock wave system are calculated using a discrete shock wave fitting procedure. The internal flow field can be calculated either with or without the discrete fitting of the internal shock wave system. The influence of molecular transport can be included in the calculation of the external flow about the forebody and in the calculation of the internal flow when internal shock waves are not discretely fitted. The viscous and thermal diffussion effects are included by treating them as correction terms in the method of characteristics procedure. Dynamic viscosity is represented by Sutherland's law and thermal conductivity is represented as a quadratic function of temperature. The thermodynamic model used is that of a thermally and calorically perfect gas. The program assumes that the cowl lip is contained in a constant plane and that the centerbody contour and cowl contour are smooth and have continuous first partial derivatives. This program cannot calculate subsonic flow, the external flow field if the bow shock wave does not exist entirely around the forebody, or the internal flow field if the bow flow field is injected into the annulus. Input to the program consists of parameters to control execution, to define the geometry, and the vehicle orientation. Output consists of a list of parameters

  11. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  12. Coronal rain in magnetic arcades: Rebound shocks, Limit cycles, and Shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-01-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer ($>6$ hour) timespan. We quantify how in-situ forming blob-like condensations grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the...

  13. Attenuation of Vane-Rotor Shock Interactions with Pulsating Coolant Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    consists on, pulsating coolant blowing through the trailing edge of the airfoils . This paper presents an unprecedented experimental and numerical...A transonic turbine airfoil was experimentally and numerically tested to resolve the effects of pulsating cooling The model was tested at four Mach...interactions are one of the major sources of losses in supersonic airfoils . Additionally, vane shocks cause large pressure fluctuations that may result in

  14. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  15. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  16. Coupled Rolling and Pitching Oscillation Effects on Transonic Shock-Induced Vortex-Breakdown Flow of a Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Menzies, Margaret A.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady, transonic vortex dominated flow over a 65 deg. sharp edged, cropped-delta wing of zero thickness undergoing forced coupled pitching and rolling oscillations is investigated computationally. The wing mean angle of attack is 20 deg. and the free stream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.85 and 3.23 x 10(exp 6), respectively. The initial condition of the flow is characterized by a transverse terminating shock and vortex breakdown of the leading edge vortex cores. The computational investigation uses the time-accurate solution of the laminar, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations with the implicit, upwind, Roe flux-difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The main focus is to analyze the effects of coupled motion on the wing response and vortex breakdown flow by varying oscillation frequency and phase angle while the maximum pitch and roll amplitude is kept constant at 4.0 deg. Four cases demonstrate the following: simultaneous motion at a frequency of 1(pi), motion with a 90 deg. phase lead in pitch, motion with a rolling frequency of twice the pitching frequency, and simultaneous motion at a frequency of 2(pi). Comparisons with single mode motion at these frequencies complete this study and illustrate the effects of coupling the oscillations.

  17. Traffic Jam and Shock Formation in Stochastic Traffic-Flow Model of a Two-Lane Roadway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    We present a stochastic cellular automaton (CA) model to simulate the traffic jam induced by a car accident in the traffic flow of a two-lane roadway. The CA model is an extended version of the one-dimensional asymmetric exclusion model to take into account the stochastic exchange of cars between the first and second lanes. We study the traffic flow of the system when the translation invariance is broken by the insertion of a blockage which is induced by a car accident on the first lane. Using the computer simulation, it is found that the dynamical jamming transions occur successively from the phase 1, through the phase 2, to the phase 3 with increasing the density of cars. The phase 1 is characterized by the property such that no cars exist in the first lane and the cars on the second lane move with the maximal velocity. The phase 2 is characterized by the shock formation (a discontinuity of density) and the maximal current. In the phase 3, the discontinuity disappears and the traffic flow is not affected by the car accident.

  18. Flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock: Magnetic field line topology and solar cycle imprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, S. T.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The topology of the magnetic field in the heliosheath is illustrated using plots of the field lines. It is shown that the Archimedean spiral inside the terminal shock is rotated back in the heliosheath into nested spirals that are advected in the direction of the interstellar wind. The 22-year solar magnetic cycle is imprinted onto these field lines in the form of unipolar magnetic envelopes surrounded by volumes of strongly mixed polarity. Each envelope is defined by the changing tilt of the heliospheric current sheet, which is in turn defined by the boundary of unipolar high-latitude regions on the Sun that shrink to the pole at solar maximum and expand to the equator at solar minimum. The detailed shape of the envelopes is regulated by the solar wind velocity structure in the heliosheath.

  19. Interaction of MHD shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundersen, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    A plane MHD shock wave of arbitrary strength meets a slender body moving at super-true-sonic speed in the opposite direction. The interaction between the given shock wave and the weak shock attached to the slender body is studied for aligned fields for axisymmetrical flow and for both aligned and transverse fields in the two-dimensional case. Formal solutions for the linearized flow in the interaction region are obtained by the use of integral transforms. (author)

  20. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  1. Study of thermochemical nonequilibrium flow in the radiative shock layer of the simulated atmosphere of Titan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffi-Kpante, Kossi

    1996-01-01

    Inviscid flow of the N 2 -CH 4 -Ar gas mixture in thermochemical nonequilibrium has been studied. We have specially modelled the thermal and the chemical processes, such as vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization and radiation which can occur in the hypersonic flows. Different vibrational models are tested and the effects of kinetic-vibration coupling modeling are studied on the flow-field properties. Therefore, the intensity of spontaneous emission of CN molecule from B 2 Σ + → X 2 Σ + electronic transition of the violet band, where Δν = 0 is computed. So, comparison is made between experimental and numerical results on: 1) The spontaneous emission of CN, 2) the rotational temperature of CN B state and 3) the vibrational temperature of CN B state. Because of the profiles of the measured intensity and the disagreement between numerical results and measurements, especially on the spontaneous emission and in the thermodynamic size, the inviscid flow and the unsteady boundary layer interaction study is made. Last, the thermal and the chemical processes models described in the first part of this thesis are used to compute the inviscid nonequilibrium flow around the Huygens probe. The equations system has been solved with a finite volume method, in with the fluxes have been split with Van-Leer methods. (author) [fr

  2. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  3. Effects of severe smoke inhalation injury and septic shock on global hemodynamics and microvascular blood flow in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O; Traber, Lillian D; Westphal, Martin; Nakano, Yoshimitsu Y; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Morita, Naoki; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L

    2006-11-01

    This prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study looks at the effects on global and regional microvascular blood flow (RMBF) in an ovine model of septic shock after severe smoke inhalation injury. Sixteen sheep were randomized into two groups, a control group (no injury, n = 8) and a smoke/sepsis (SS) group (n = 8), which received an insufflation of 4 sets of 12 breaths of cotton smoke (sheep were mechanically ventilated with 100% oxygen, and fluid resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution for the entire duration of the 24-h experimental period to maintain hematocrit at baseline (BL) levels. Healthy control animals were not subjected to the injury and received only 4 x 12 breaths of room air and instillation of the vehicle (normal saline). Blood flow was analyzed using colored microspheres. Control animals remained hemodynamically stable and had no statistical changes from BL in visceral or cerebral blood flow during the entire experimental period. All SS animals developed a hypotensive, hyperdynamic circulation, characterized by a significant increase in heart rate and cardiac output with a simultaneous significant fall in mean arterial pressure, which, in combination, led to a fall in systemic vascular resistance index versus BL (P < 0.001, each). In visceral organs, the trachea showed a significant increase in RMBF (P < 0.001). In addition, skeletal muscle significantly increased versus BL and versus controls over time (P < 0.01). Whereas the pancreas displayed a significant drop in RMBF versus BL and controls (P < 0.05), no statistical differences occurred in the renal cortex, spleen, and ileum. All investigated cerebral structures, such as the cortex cerebri, basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, pons, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum showed a significant increase in RMBF versus BL and versus control animals (P < 0.05, each). These data differ in areas of normal, increased, and decreased RMBF during septic shock after smoke inhalation injury and

  4. Boundary layer-shock interaction in hypersonic flows with chemical reaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, M.; Shadaram, A.; Jahantigh, N.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, viscous interaction phenomenon in hypersonic flows with chemical reactions is numerically simulated. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved to simulate this phenomenon. Inviscid fluxes are approximated using Van Leer flux vector splitting method and to increase the accuracy of this approximation, MUSCL approach with Van albada limiters is applied. Chemical reactions are considered to be in equilibrium conditions. With this assumption there is no closed form for equation of state for the gas (air) and relation between thermodynamic properties are calculated from thermodynamic tables. In addition, transport properties (viscosity and conductivity) are functions of two independent thermodynamic properties. These functions are calculated using kinetic theory. To evaluate the performance of the model used in this research, some test cases are studied. First test case is flow over a ramp with various angles. The results of this test case are compared with the results of other numerical methods and the effect of geometry on separation length is studied. The second case is a hypersonic flow over a 15-degree ramp. The results are in good agreement compared with experimental data. In addition, there results are compared with the results of ideal gas (non-reacting flow) calculations. It can be seen that ideal gas assumption for air introduces considerable deviation form experimental data. (author)

  5. Extension of a semi-implicit shock-capturing algorithm for 3-D fully coupled, chemically reacting flows in generalized coordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.L.; Yee, H.C.; Uenishi, K.; NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA; Vigyan Research Associates, Inc., Hampton, VA)

    1987-01-01

    A semiimplicit high-resolution shock-capturing method for multidimensional systems of hyperbolic conservation laws with stiff source terms has been developed by Yee and Shinn (1987). The goal of this work is to extend this method to solve the three-dimensional fully coupled Navier-Stokes equations for a hypersonic chemically reacting flow in generalized coordinates. In this formulation, the global continuity equation was replaced by all the species continuity equations. The shock-capturing technique is a second-order-accurate, symmetric total-variation-diminishing method which accounts fully and directly for the coupling among the fluid and all the species. To verify the current approach, it was implemented into an existing computer code which contained the MacCormack method. Test results for a five-species reacting flow are shown to be oscillation-free around the shock, and the time spent per iteration only doubles when compared to the result using classical way of supplying numerical dissipation. The extra computation is more than justified by the elimination of spurious oscillation and nonlinear instability associated with the classical shock-capturing schemes in computing hypersonic reacting flows. 27 references

  6. Shock, stress or signal? Implications of freshwater flows for a top-level estuarine predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Taylor

    Full Text Available Physicochemical variability in estuarine systems plays an important role in estuarine processes and in the lifecycles of estuarine organisms. In particular, seasonality of freshwater inflow to estuaries may be important in various aspects of fish lifecycles. This study aimed to further understand these relationships by studying the movements of a top-level estuarine predator in response to physicochemical variability in a large, temperate south-east Australian estuary (Shoalhaven River. Mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus, 47-89 cm total length were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters, and their movements and migrations monitored over two years via fixed-position VR2W acoustic receivers configured in a linear array along the length of the estuary. The study period included a high degree of abiotic variability, with multiple pulses (exponentially high flows over a short period of time in fresh water to the estuary, as well as broader seasonal variation in flow, temperature and conductivity. The relative deviation of fish from their modal location in the estuary was affected primarily by changes in conductivity, and smaller fish (n = 4 tended to deviate much further downstream from their modal position in the estuary than larger fish (n = 8. High-flow events which coincided with warmer temperatures tended to drive mature fish down the estuary and potentially provided a spawning signal to stimulate aggregation of adults near the estuary mouth; however, this relationship requires further investigation. These findings indicate that pulse and press effects of freshwater inflow and associated physicochemical variability play a role in the movements of mulloway, and that seasonality of large freshwater flows may be important in spawning. The possible implications of river regulation and the extraction of freshwater for consumptive uses on estuarine fishes are discussed.

  7. Evaluation of resuscitation fluids on endothelial glycocalyx, venular blood flow, and coagulation function after hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Luciana N; Sondeen, Jill L; Ji, Lisa; Dubick, Michael A; Torres Filho, Ivo

    2013-11-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (EG) plays an essential role in endothelium integrity and may be compromised by hemorrhagic shock. The effects of currently available resuscitation fluids such as Hextend (HEX) or lactated Ringer's solution (LR) on vascular function and coagulation are not well understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) with HEX or LR in their ability to repair EG structure, promote volume expansion, increase blood flow, and prevent coagulopathy. A total of 121 microvessels from cremaster muscle were studied in 32 anesthetized instrumented rats. After baseline systemic and microvascular measurements, 40% hemorrhage followed by resuscitation was performed, and measurements were repeated. Coagulation was evaluated using ROTEM to assay clot formation time, clotting time, firmness, strength, and lysis. Velocity and "platelet component" of strength were calculated. Fluorescein isothiocyanate or Texas Red bound to Dextrans was injected to estimate EG thickness in vivo. Respiratory rate, blood pH, base excess, and lactate returned to near-baseline levels in all treatments. Hemodilution caused by LR and HEX decreased firmness, prolonged clotting time, and lowered platelet counts. EG thickness in HEX- and LR-treated rats was 50% lower, and plasma syndecan 1 was 50% higher than sham and FFP groups. Blood flow and shear rate were restored in the HEX group. Resuscitation with FFP improved coagulation and blood flow. Our findings support the concept of cardiovascular and microvascular stabilization by infused FFP, in which the increase in microvascular perfusion associated with restored EG is essential for an optimal resuscitation strategy.

  8. Control of Triple-Shock Configurations and Vortex Structures Forming in High Speed Flows of Gaseous Media past an AD Body under the Action of External Energy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Azarova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of supersonic streamlining of an aerodynamic (AD body, “a plate blunted by a cylinder”, by a flow with the freestream Mach number M = 4 containing an external energy source has been studied, taking into account physicochemical transformations. The results of the effect of the ratio of specific heats γ changing in the range from 1.1 to 1.4 on the dynamics of triple-shock configurations and vortex-contact structures are presented for the interaction of an energy source with the bow shock wave. The energy source is modeled via the heated rarefied layer (filament. The angles in the triple-shock configurations, the stagnation pressure, together with the frontal drag force, have been studied dependent on the specific heats ratio γ, the characteristics of the energy source, and also on the angle of the incident shock. Vortex-contact structures have been researched for the Mach numbers 7, 8, 9, as well as the generation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability accompanying the formation of a triple-shock configuration. The results show a strong influence of the specific heats ratio of the gas medium and the parameters of the energy source on the triple-shock configuration and aerodynamic characteristics of the body. This conclusion can be useful for aerospace applications in the area of the design of nozzles, intakes, and high speed flying vehicles. Additionally, the results show the possibility of flow control in the atmospheres of other planets using external energy deposition.

  9. Gamma-ray dose rate surveys help investigating century-scale beach ridge progradation in the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Pedro A.; Pereira, Alcides C.; Quinzeca, Domingos; Jombi, Domingos

    2017-10-01

    A strandplain at the downdrift side of the wave-dominated Catumbela delta (Angola) includes distinguishable deposits with very high natural radioactivity (up to 0.44 microSv/hour). In order to establish the geometry of these sedimentary units and understand their genetic processes, dose rate surveys were performed with the portable equipment Rados RDS-40WE. In addition, grain-size distribution, heavy-mineral composition and gamma-ray mass spectra of the high dose rate deposits were analysed. High dose rate values are found in ribbon units aligned parallel to the shoreline, which are a few tens of meters wide and up to approximately 3 km long. These units reflect the concentration of Th-bearing grains in coastal deposits enriched in heavy minerals. An integrated analysis of the high dose rate ribbons in GIS environment with aerial photography and topographic maps suggests that parts of the high dose rate units formed during the last two centuries may be related with the erosion of older shoreline deposits, due to updrift displacements of the Catumbela river outlet and recycling of shoreline accumulations with downdrift deposition. Simple gamma-ray surveys carried out with a portable detector can unravel depositional units characterised by significant enrichment in heavy-mineral grains that are likely to correspond to key events in the evolution of wave-dominated accumulations. The location of such deposits should be taken into account when planning future work using more expensive or time-consuming techniques.

  10. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  11. Combustion waves and fronts in flows flames, shocks, detonations, ablation fronts and explosion of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Clavin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Combustion is a fascinating phenomenon coupling complex chemistry to transport mechanisms and nonlinear fluid dynamics. This book provides an up-to-date and comprehensive presentation of the nonlinear dynamics of combustion waves and other non-equilibrium energetic systems. The major advances in this field have resulted from analytical studies of simplified models performed in close relation with carefully controlled laboratory experiments. The key to understanding the complex phenomena is a systematic reduction of the complexity of the basic equations. Focusing on this fundamental approach, the book is split into three parts. Part I provides physical insights for physics-oriented readers, Part II presents detailed technical analysis using perturbation methods for theoreticians, and Part III recalls the necessary background knowledge in physics, chemistry and fluid dynamics. This structure makes the content accessible to newcomers to the physics of unstable fronts in flows, whilst also offering advanced mater...

  12. Unlimited Relativistic Shock Surfing Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucer, D.; Shapiro, V. D.

    2001-01-01

    Nonrelativistic shock surfing acceleration at quasiperpendicular shocks is usually considered to be a preacceleration mechanism for slow pickup ions to initiate diffusive shock acceleration. In shock surfing, the particle accelerates along the shock front under the action of the convective electric field of the plasma flow. However, the particle also gains kinetic energy normal to the shock and eventually escapes downstream. We consider the case when ions are accelerated to relativistic velocities. In this case, the ions are likely to be trapped for infinitely long times, because the energy of bounce oscillations tends to decrease during acceleration. This suggests the possibility of unlimited acceleration by shock surfing

  13. Invariability of rate dependences of normalized flow stress in niobium and molybdenum under conditions of shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure molybdenum and niobium at normal and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.03 to 5 mm. The experiments revealed that annealing of the metals substantially increases their Hugoniot elastic limits and, to a lesser degree, their spall strengths. Variations in the resistance of both the metals to fracture in tension with the test temperature can be described as modest. Measuring the decay of the elastic precursor waves with a propagation distance in the two metals has allowed a determining of the relationships between a flow stress τ and an initial plastic strain rate γ˙ p . It was found that, at the plastic strain rates greater than 3 ÷4 ×104s-1 , the temperature sensitivity of the transient values of τ is much lower than that at the strain rates below this range. The τ(γ˙ p ) data normalized on shear moduli of the metals have been approximated by simple functions that, despite substantial differences between the moduli and yield stresses, were found to be virtually identical for the two metals.

  14. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  15. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  16. Fascinating World of Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    travelling at supersonic speeds (more than the sound speed at local temperature) then one can see a shock wave around the body as shown in Figure 1. Dissipation of energy, rapid changes in velocity, presure, temperature and flow turning are some of the features associated with shock waves. Obviously the word 'shock.

  17. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1995-01-01

    In recent work we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered on Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM), is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence.

  18. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  19. Double shock experiments and reactive flow modeling on LX-17 to understand the reacted equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S; Garcia, Frank; Fried, Laurence E; Tarver, Craig M

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a double shock method involving the use of two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on the projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to or above the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. By measuring the parameters of the first and second shock waves, information on the reacted state can be obtained. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as detail on possible future experiments.

  20. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  1. Integrated sedimentological and ichnological characteristics of a wave-dominated, macrotidal coast: a case study from the intertidal shoreface of the Dongho coast, southwest Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byong Cheon; Chang, Tae Soo

    2018-04-01

    Generalized coastal facies models invariably assume that tidal flats and intertidally exposed shorefaces along macrotidal coasts are tide-dominated. Recent advances in coastal sedimentology, however, have revealed that wave-dominated macrotidal flats also occur in a wide range of coastal settings, in particular where tidal modulation forces the lateral translation of the wave-affected zone across the tidally exposed shoreface with the rising tide. Despite tidal modulation, the depositional character in the latter case (abundant storm deposits) exhibits a high degree of similarity with conventional subtidal shorefaces, implying that it is inherently difficult to distinguish between the two coastal systems in the rock record. In the present study, integrated sedimentological and ichnological data from the Dongho coast, which is located along the southwest coast of Korea, provide valuable information for the establishment of facies criteria that can assist in the recognition of such coastal deposits. In fact, the sedimentary character of the study area, which is dominated by an abundance of wave-formed structures, resembles that generally associated with subtidal shorefaces. In addition, the depositional processes responsible for sediment accumulation are, in the present case, also strongly influenced by pronounced seasonal variations in wave energy. In this context, the study has revealed a number of major features that appear to be characteristic of wave-dominated intertidal flats and shorefaces: (1) firmground muds may be encountered on the beach face, where intense swash-backwash motions are dominant; (2) the thickness of storm deposits decreases landward, reflecting the progressive decrease in wave energy; (3) ichnologically, there is an offshore shift in the dominance of trace fossils from the Skolithos ichnofacies, including Ophiomorpha, Thalassinoides and Psilonichnus, to a proximal expression of the Cruziana ichnofacies, which includes Siphonichnus and

  2. Integrated sedimentological and ichnological characteristics of a wave-dominated, macrotidal coast: a case study from the intertidal shoreface of the Dongho coast, southwest Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byong Cheon; Chang, Tae Soo

    2017-08-01

    Generalized coastal facies models invariably assume that tidal flats and intertidally exposed shorefaces along macrotidal coasts are tide-dominated. Recent advances in coastal sedimentology, however, have revealed that wave-dominated macrotidal flats also occur in a wide range of coastal settings, in particular where tidal modulation forces the lateral translation of the wave-affected zone across the tidally exposed shoreface with the rising tide. Despite tidal modulation, the depositional character in the latter case (abundant storm deposits) exhibits a high degree of similarity with conventional subtidal shorefaces, implying that it is inherently difficult to distinguish between the two coastal systems in the rock record. In the present study, integrated sedimentological and ichnological data from the Dongho coast, which is located along the southwest coast of Korea, provide valuable information for the establishment of facies criteria that can assist in the recognition of such coastal deposits. In fact, the sedimentary character of the study area, which is dominated by an abundance of wave-formed structures, resembles that generally associated with subtidal shorefaces. In addition, the depositional processes responsible for sediment accumulation are, in the present case, also strongly influenced by pronounced seasonal variations in wave energy. In this context, the study has revealed a number of major features that appear to be characteristic of wave-dominated intertidal flats and shorefaces: (1) firmground muds may be encountered on the beach face, where intense swash-backwash motions are dominant; (2) the thickness of storm deposits decreases landward, reflecting the progressive decrease in wave energy; (3) ichnologically, there is an offshore shift in the dominance of trace fossils from the Skolithos ichnofacies, including Ophiomorpha, Thalassinoides and Psilonichnus, to a proximal expression of the Cruziana ichnofacies, which includes Siphonichnus and

  3. Flow control of an oblique shock wave reflection with micro-ramp vortex generators : Effects of location and size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepman, R.H.M.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of micro-ramp height and location on a shock induced separation bubble were quantified using planar particle image velocimetry measurements. Conditional averaging was used to show that the amount of separation is related to the momentum flux in the near-wall region (< 0.5?) of the

  4. Improvements to embedded shock wave calculations for transonic flow-applications to wave drag and pressure rise predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebass, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The numerical solution of a single, mixed, nonlinear equation with prescribed boundary data is discussed. A second order numerical procedure for solving the nonlinear equation and a shock fitting scheme was developed to treat the discontinuities that appear in the solution.

  5. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  6. Effects of tham, isoprenaline and propranolol on blood flow and vascular resistances of the liver after in- and outflow occlusion. Relation with the splanchnic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoitchcov, E; Kawai, T; Bleser, F; Benichoux, R

    1976-01-01

    The responsibility of the portal and the hepatic artery circulations during shock states has been established by studying the effects of a 15-min occlusion of two of the following blood vessels on 23 dogs: inferior vena cava below the diaphragm, portal vein and hepatic artery. Intrahepatic vascular resistances were computed from blood pressure records in these vessels and transhepatic blood flow studies using the 133Xe clearance method. The animals were treated with THAM, plasmagel, isoprenaline, and propranolol. The tolerance of the occlusion is significantly improved when the animals are treated with the association of the four drugs. The portal and the systemic arterial blood pressures return to normal more promptly. Sinusoid and peribiliary resistances are remarkably stable if compared to the changes occurring in the control animals. The well-known benefit of THAM is improved by the apparently paradoxical association of isoprenaline and propranolol. In fact, at the doses which have been used, they counterbalance their mutual disadvantages. Finally, the analysis of the hepatic blood flow rates and vascular resistances suggests that the splanchnic shock has two components: hepatic and visceral.

  7. Imploding conical shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, R. T.; Skews, B. W.; Rubidge, S.; Snow, J.

    2013-07-01

    The behaviour of conical shock waves imploding axisymmetrically was first studied numerically by Hornung (J Fluid Mech 409:1-12, 2000) and this prompted a limited experimental investigation into these complex flow patterns by Skews et al. (Shock Waves 11:323-326, 2002). Modification of the simulation boundary conditions, resulting in the loss of self-similarity, was necessary to image the flow experimentally. The current tests examine the temporal evolution of these flows utilising a converging conical gap of fixed width fed by a shock wave impinging at its entrance, supported by CFD simulations. The effects of gap thickness, angle and incident shock strength were investigated. The wave initially diffracts around the outer lip of the gap shedding a vortex which, for strong incident shock cases, can contain embedded shocks. The converging shock at exit reflects on the axis of symmetry with the reflected wave propagating outwards resulting in a triple point developing on the incident wave together with the associated shear layer. This axisymmetric shear layer rolls up into a mushroom-shaped toroidal vortex ring and forward-facing jet. For strong shocks, this deforms the Mach disk to the extent of forming a second triple point with the primary shock exhibiting a double bulge. Separate features resembling the Richtmeyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were noted in some tests. Aside from the incident wave curvature, the reflection patterns demonstrated correspond well with the V- and DV-types identified by Hornung although type S was not clearly seen, possibly due to the occlusion of the reflection region by the outer diffraction vortex at these early times. Some additional computational work explicitly exploring the limits of the parameter space for such systems has demonstrated the existence of a possible further reflection type, called vN-type, which is similar to the von Neumann reflection for plane waves. It is recommended that the parameter space be

  8. Predicting optimal back-shock times in ultrafiltration hollow fiber modules II: Effect of inlet flow and concentration dependent viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Pinelo, Manuel; Brøns, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamics of back-shocking during hollow fibre ultrafiltration of dextran T500. In this paper we present a mathematical model based on first Principles, i.e., solving the Navier-Stokes equation along with the continuity equation...... fibre membranes, J. Membr. Sci. 470 (2014) 275-293 [33]).Furthermore, the simulations have been performed with two different inlet velocities, i.e., crossflow velocities and are clone with and without a concentration dependent viscosity. This enables us, for the first time, to investigate the effect...... in this paper.Furthermore, it is found that the optimal back-shock time increases when the viscosity is allowed to depend on the concentration It is found that this can be explained by a decrease in the velocity tangential to the membrane due to the increase in viscosity where the concentration is high...

  9. Short communication: Development of the first follicular wave dominant follicle on the ovary ipsilateral to the corpus luteum is associated with decreased conception rate in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, R; Haneda, S; Kayano, M; Matsui, M

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of the locations of the first-wave dominant follicle (DF) and corpus luteum (CL) on fertility. In total, 350 artificial insemination (AI) procedures were conducted (lactating dairy cows: n=238, dairy heifers: n=112). Ovulation was confirmed 24 h after AI. The locations of the first-wave DF and CL were examined 5 to 9d after AI using rectal palpation or transrectal ultrasonography. Lactating dairy cows and dairy heifers were divided into 2 groups: (1) the ipsilateral group (IG), in which the DF was ipsilateral to the CL; and (2) the contralateral group (CG), in which the DF was contralateral to the CL. Pregnancy was diagnosed using transrectal ultrasonography 40d after AI. Conception rates were 54.0% in all cattle: 48.9% in lactating dairy cows, and 58.9% in dairy heifers. The incidence of the first-wave DF location did not differ between IG and CG (all cattle: 184 vs. 166; lactating cows: 129 vs. 109; heifers: 55 vs. 57 for IG vs. CG). Conception rates were lower in IG than in CG (all cattle: 40.2 vs. 69.3%; lactating dairy cows: 38.0 vs. 67.0%; dairy heifers: 45.5 vs. 73.7%, for IG vs. CG). Conception rate was not affected by season or live weight in heifers and lactating cows. In addition, days in milk at AI, milk production, body condition score, and parity did not affect conception in lactating cows. In summary, development of the first-wave DF in the ovary ipsilateral to the CL was associated with reduced conception rates in both lactating cows and heifers. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Delayed Treatment with Sodium Hydrosulfide Improves Regional Blood Flow and Alleviates Cecal Ligation and Puncture (CLP)-Induced Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Akbar; Druzhyna, Nadiya; Szabo, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis is a serious medical condition, caused by a severe systemic infection resulting in a systemic inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested the therapeutic potential of donors of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel endogenous gasotransmitter and biological mediator in various diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of H2S supplementation in sepsis, with special reference to its effect on the modulation of regional blood flow. We infused sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a compound that produces H2S in aqueous solution (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg/h, for 1 h at each dose level) in control rats or rats 24 h after CLP, and measured blood flow using fluorescent microspheres. In normal control animals, NaHS induced a characteristic redistribution of blood flow, and reduced cardiac, hepatic, and renal blood flow in a dose-dependent fashion. In contrast, in rats subjected to CLP, cardiac, hepatic, and renal blood flow was significantly reduced; infusion of NaHS (1 mg/kg/h and 3 mg/kg/h) significantly increased organ blood flow. In other words, the effect of H2S on regional blood flow is dependent on the status of the animals (i.e., a decrease in blood flow in normal controls, but an increase in blood flow in CLP). We have also evaluated the effect of delayed treatment with NaHS on organ dysfunction and the inflammatory response by treating the animals with NaHS (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.) at 24 h after the start of the CLP procedure; plasma levels of various cytokines and tissue indicators of inflammatory cell infiltration and oxidative stress were measured 6 h later. After 24 h of CLP, glomerular function was significantly impaired, as evidenced by markedly increased (over 4-fold over baseline) blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels; this increase was also significantly reduced by treatment with NaHS. NaHS also attenuated the CLP-induced increases in malondialdehyde levels (an index of

  11. Evolution of disturbances in the shock layer on a flat plate in the flow of a mixture of vibrationally excited gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Tsyryulnikov, I. S.; Maslov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The results of the numerical and experimental investigations of the evolution of the disturbances in a hypersonic shock layer on a flat plate streamlined by a flow of the mixture of vibrationally excited gases are presented. The experimental study was conducted in the hot-shot high-enthalpy wind tunnel IT-302 of the ITAM SB RAS. The numerical simulation was carried out with the aid of the ANSYS Fluent package using the solution of the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with the incorporation of the user-created modules and enabling the consideration of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the carbon dioxide molecules within the framework of the model of the two-temperature aerodynamics. It was obtained that an increase in the carbon dioxide concentration in the mixture with air leads to a reduction of the intensity of pressure disturbances on the surface. The efficiency (up to 20 %) of the method of sound absorbing coatings in the vibrationally excited flows of the mixture of the carbon dioxide and air has been shown.

  12. Study on Reflected Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in a Shock Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong Nat’l Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer causes boundary layer separation, shock train, and in some cases, strong unsteadiness in the flow field. Such a situation is also observed in a shock tube, where the reflected shock wave interacts with the unsteady boundary layer. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the shock train phenomenon in a shock tube. In the present study, numerical studies were conducted using the two-dimensional axisymmetric domain of a shock tube, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved to clarify the flow characteristics of shock train phenomenon inside a shock tube. A detailed wave diagram was developed based on the present computational results, which were validated with existing experimental data.

  13. 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The University of Manchester hosted the 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves between 17 and 22 July 2011. The International Symposium on Shock Waves first took place in 1957 in Boston and has since become an internationally acclaimed series of meetings for the wider Shock Wave Community. The ISSW28 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reacting Flows, Dense Gases and Rarefied Flows, Detonation and Combustion, Diagnostics, Facilities, Flow Visualisation, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Multiphase Flow, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Shockwave Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shockwave Phenomena and Applications, as well as Medical and Biological Applications. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 28 and individuals interested in these fields.

  14. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demystifying the shock of shocking. Beyra Rossouw, MB ChB, MMed. (Paed), DTM, MSc (Sports Medicine),. Certificate Critical Care (Paed). Senior Registrar Paediatric Cardiology, Western. Cape Paediatric Cardiac Services, Red Cross. War Memorial Children's Hospital, University of. Cape Town, and Tygerberg Children's ...

  15. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occur during or after a heart attack (myocardial infarction). These complications include: A large section of heart ... high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides, or tobacco use Alternative Names Shock - cardiogenic Images Heart, section ...

  16. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  17. Supersonic flow with shock waves. Monte-Carlo calculations for low density plasma. I; Flujo supersonico de un plasma con ondas de choque, un metodo de montecarlo para plasmas de baja densidad, I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almenara, E.; Hidalgo, M.; Saviron, J. M.

    1980-07-01

    This Report gives preliminary information about a Monte Carlo procedure to simulate supersonic flow past a body of a low density plasma in the transition regime. A computer program has been written for a UNIVAC 1108 machine to account for a plasma composed by neutral molecules and positive and negative ions. Different and rather general body geometries can be analyzed. Special attention is played to tho detached shock waves growth In front of the body. (Author) 30 refs.

  18. Standing Shocks around Black Holes and Estimation of Outflow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    shock region, the specific energy (E) and the specific angular momentum. (λ) of the sub-Keplerian flow are estimated by dynamically mixing these two compo- nents. We analytically calculate the shock locations for a set of initial parameters fol-.

  19. Analytical extension of curved shock theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, G.

    2018-03-01

    Curved shock theory (CST) is limited to shock waves in a steady, two-dimensional or axisymmetric (2-Ax) flow of a perfect gas. A unique feature of CST is its use of intrinsic coordinates that result in an elegant and useful formulation for flow properties just downstream of a shock. For instance, the downstream effect of upstream vorticity, shock wave curvature, and the upstream pressure gradient along a streamline is established. There have been several attempts to extend CST, as mentioned in the text. Removal of the steady, 2-Ax, and perfect gas limitations, singly or in combination, requires an appropriate formulation of the shock wave's jump relations and the intrinsic coordinate Euler equations. Issues discussed include flow plane versus osculating plane, unsteady flow, vorticity, an imperfect gas, etc. The extension of CST utilizes concepts from differential geometry, such as the osculating plane, streamline torsion, and the Serret-Frenet equations.

  20. The Effects of Spanwise Structures and Unsteady Forcing of Vortex Generators on a Shock-Induced Separated Flow Using Planar Laser Scattering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Searcy, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    Through the use of planar laser scattering, the effects of vortex generators (VGs) on the separation shock in an unswept compression ramp interaction have been investigated in a Mach 2 and Mach 5 wind funnel...

  1. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  2. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  3. Shock tube Multiphase Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrooks, John; Allen, Roy; Paudel, Manoj; Young, Calvin; Musick, Ben; McFarland, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching practical applications in engineering and science. The instability is present in high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase interface is impulsively accelerated by the passage of a shockwave. It is similar in development to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability however, particle-to-gas coupling is the driving mechanism of the SDMI. As particle effects such as lag and phase change become more prominent, the SDMI's development begins to significantly deviate from the RM instability. We have developed an experiment for studying the SDMI in our shock tube facility. In our experiments, a multiphase interface is created using a laminar jet and flowed into the shock tube where it is accelerated by the passage of a planar shockwave. The interface development is captured using CCD cameras synchronized with planar laser illumination. This talk will give an overview of new experiments conducted to examine the development of a shocked cylindrical multiphase interface. The effects of Atwood number, particle size, and a second acceleration (reshock) of the interface will be discussed.

  4. 3D model of bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, M.; Ravkilde, T.; Kristensen, L. E.; Cabrit, S.; Field, D.; Pineau Des Forêts, G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Shocks produced by outflows from young stars are often observed as bow-shaped structures in which the H2 line strength and morphology are characteristic of the physical and chemical environments and the velocity of the impact. Aims: We present a 3D model of interstellar bow shocks propagating in a homogeneous molecular medium with a uniform magnetic field. The model enables us to estimate the shock conditions in observed flows. As an example, we show how the model can reproduce rovibrational H2 observations of a bow shock in OMC1. Methods: The 3D model is constructed by associating a planar shock with every point on a 3D bow skeleton. The planar shocks are modelled with a highly sophisticated chemical reaction network that is essential for predicting accurate shock widths and line emissions. The shock conditions vary along the bow surface and determine the shock type, the local thickness, and brightness of the bow shell. The motion of the cooling gas parallel to the bow surface is also considered. The bow shock can move at an arbitrary inclination to the magnetic field and to the observer, and we model the projected morphology and radial velocity distribution in the plane-of-sky. Results: The morphology of a bow shock is highly dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field and the inclination of the flow. Bow shocks can appear in many different guises and do not necessarily show a characteristic bow shape. The ratio of the H2 v = 2-1 S(1) line to the v = 1-0 S(1) line is variable across the flow and the spatial offset between the peaks of the lines may be used to estimate the inclination of the flow. The radial velocity comes to a maximum behind the apparent apex of the bow shock when the flow is seen at an inclination different from face-on. Under certain circumstances the radial velocity of an expanding bow shock can show the same signatures as a rotating flow. In this case a velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow direction is a projection

  5. Shock/shock interactions between bodies and wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxiang XIANG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the Shock/Shock Interactions (SSI between the body and wing of aircraft in supersonic flows. The body is simplified to a flat wedge and the wing is assumed to be a sharp wing. The theoretical spatial dimension reduction method, which transforms the 3D problem into a 2D one, is used to analyze the SSI between the body and wing. The temperature and pressure behind the Mach stem induced by the wing and body are obtained, and the wave configurations in the corner are determined. Numerical validations are conducted by solving the inviscid Euler equations in 3D with a Non-oscillatory and Non-free-parameters Dissipative (NND finite difference scheme. Good agreements between the theoretical and numerical results are obtained. Additionally, the effects of the wedge angle and sweep angle on wave configurations and flow field are considered numerically and theoretically. The influences of wedge angle are significant, whereas the effects of sweep angle on wave configurations are negligible. This paper provides useful information for the design and thermal protection of aircraft in supersonic and hypersonic flows. Keywords: Body and wing, Flow field, Hypersonic flow, Shock/shock interaction, Wave configurations

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic shocks in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernoff, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Part one develops the mathematical and physical theory of one-dimensional, time-independent subalfvenic flow in partially ionized gas with magnetic fields, for application to shocks in molecular clouds. Unlike normal gas-dynamic shocks, the neutral flow may be continuous and cool if the gas radiates efficiently and does not self-ionize. Analytic solutions are given in the limit that the neutral gas is either adiabatic or isothermal (cold). Numerical techniques are developed and applied to find the neutral flow under general circumstances. Part two extends the theory and results of part one in three ways: (1) to faster, superalfvenic flow, (2) to complex gases containing heavy charged particles (grains) in addition to ions, containing heavy charged particles (grains) in addition to ions, electrons and neutrals, and (3) to the entire range in (Omega tau), the ratio of charged particle damping time to gyroperiod, expected in gas flows in molecular clouds

  7. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aimed at depolarising a myocardium that is not generating a co-ordinated, perfusing rhythm. Organised QRS complexes cannot be identified and the electrical current is delivered without synchronising with the patient's native rhythm. DC shock should not be delayed once a shockable rhythm is recognised. The longer the ...

  8. Micas in experimentally shocked gneiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, P.; Mackinnon, I. D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Powder-propellant guns are used to shock biotites and muscovites from a gneiss at pressures between 18 and 70 GPa. It is shown that shock in biotite and muscovite can produce homogeneous and devolatilized glasses within microseconds. Shock-deformed micas are found to exhibit fracturing, kinking, and complex extinction patterns over the entire pressure range investigated. Localized melting of micas commences at 33 GPa and reaches completion at 70 GPa. Even though melted biotite and muscovite are opaque optically, they exhibit extensive microvesiculation and flow when observed with the SEM. It is confirmed through electron diffraction that biotite and muscovite have transformed to a glass. The distribution of vesicles in shock-vitrified mica reveals escape of volatiles within the short duration of the shock experiment. It is noted that experimentally shocked biotite and muscovite undergo congruent melting. It is noted that the compositions of the glasses are similar to the unshocked micas except for volatiles (H2O loss and and K loss). These unusual glasses produced from mica can be quenched by rapid cooling conditions during the shock experiment. On the basis of the results, it is pointed out that the extremely low H2O content of tektites can be reconciled with a terrestrial origin by impact.

  9. Double Shock Experiments Performed at -55°C on LX-17 with Reactive Flow Modeling to Understand the Reacted Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaven, Martin R.; Vandersall, Kevin S.; Strickland, Shawn L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-06-01

    Experiments were performed at -55°C to measure the reacted state of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight) using a double shock technique using two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on a projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. Information on the reacted state is obtained by measuring the relative timing and magnitude of the first and second shock waves. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include a comparison to prior work at ambient temperature, the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as detail on possible future experiments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study. We examined the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves. The necessity of counterpropagating shock waves studying occurs at designing of high Mach number modern internal compression air intakes, Ramjets with subsonic and supersonic combustion, in asymmetrical supersonic nozzles and in some other cases. In a sense, this problem is a generalization of the case of an oblique shock reflection from the wall or from the plane of symmetry. With the renewed vigor, the interest to this problem emerged at the end of the 90s. This was due to the start of the programs for flight study at hypersonic speeds. The first experiments performed with air intakes, which realized the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves have shown that the change in flow velocity is accompanied by abrupt alteration of shock-wave structure, the occurrence of nonstationary and oscillatory phenomena. With an increase of flow velocity these phenomena undesirable for aircraft structure became more marked. The reason is that there are two fundamentally different modes of interaction of counterpropagating shock waves: a four-wave regular and a five-wave irregular. The transition from one mode to another can be nonstationary abrupt or gradual, it can also be accompanied by hysteresis. Main results. Criteria for the transition from regular reflection of counterpropagating shock waves to irregular are described: the criterion of von Neumann and the stationary Mach configuration criterion. We described areas in which the transition from one reflection type to another is possible only in abrupt way, as well as areas of possible gradual transition. Intensity dependences of the reflected shock waves from the intensity of interacting counterpropagating shocks were given. Qualitative pictures of shock-wave structures arising from the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves were shown. Calculation results of the intensity of outgoing gas

  11. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  12. Cardiogenic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Joshua B; Levy, Zachary D; Slesinger, Todd L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Although early reperfusion strategies are essential to the management of these critically ill patients, additional treatment plans are often needed to stabilize and treat the patient before reperfusion may be possible. This article discusses pharmacologic and surgical interventions, their indications and contraindications, management strategies, and treatment algorithms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Discrete approximations of detonation flows with structured detonation reaction zones by discontinuous front models: A program burn algorithm based on detonation shock dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bdzil, J.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jackson, T.L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets; Stewart, D.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    1999-02-02

    In the design of explosive systems the generic problem that one must consider is the propagation of a well-developed detonation wave sweeping through an explosive charge with a complex shape. At a given instant of time the lead detonation shock is a surface that occupies a region of the explosive and has a dimension that is characteristic of the explosive device, typically on the scale of meters. The detonation shock is powered by a detonation reaction zone, sitting immediately behind the shock, which is on the scale of 1 millimeter or less. Thus, the ratio of the reaction zone thickness to the device dimension is of the order of 1/1,000 or less. This scale disparity can lead to great difficulties in computing three-dimensional detonation dynamics. An attack on the dilemma for the computation of detonation systems has lead to the invention of sub-scale models for a propagating detonation front that they refer to herein as program burn models. The program burn model seeks not to resolve the fine scale of the reaction zone in the sense of a DNS simulation. The goal of a program burn simulation is to resolve the hydrodynamics in the inert product gases on a grid much coarser than that required to resolve a physical reaction zone. The authors first show that traditional program burn algorithms for detonation hydrocodes used for explosive design are inconsistent and yield incorrect shock dynamic behavior. To overcome these inconsistencies, they are developing a new class of program burn models based on detonation shock dynamic (DSD) theory. It is hoped that this new class will yield a consistent and robust algorithm which reflects the correct shock dynamic behavior.

  14. Perpendicular relativistic shocks in magnetized pair plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Grassi, Anna; Grech, Mickael

    2018-04-01

    Perpendicular relativistic (γ0 = 10) shocks in magnetized pair plasmas are investigated using two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations. A systematic survey, from unmagnetized to strongly magnetized shocks, is presented accurately capturing the transition from Weibel-mediated to magnetic-reflection-shaped shocks. This transition is found to occur for upstream flow magnetizations 10-3 10-2, it leaves place to a purely electromagnetic precursor following from the strong emission of electromagnetic waves at the shock front. Particle acceleration is found to be efficient in weakly magnetized perpendicular shocks in agreement with previous works, and is fully suppressed for σ > 10-2. Diffusive Shock Acceleration is observed only in weakly magnetized shocks, while a dominant contribution of Shock Drift Acceleration is evidenced at intermediate magnetizations. The spatial diffusion coefficients are extracted from the simulations allowing for a deeper insight into the self-consistent particle kinematics and scale with the square of the particle energy in weakly magnetized shocks. These results have implications for particle acceleration in the internal shocks of AGN jets and in the termination shocks of Pulsar Wind Nebulae.

  15. Incremental balloon deflation following complete resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta results in steep inflection of flow and rapid reperfusion in a large animal model of hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Anders J; Russo, Rachel M; Ferencz, Sarah-Ashley E; Cannon, Jeremy W; Rasmussen, Todd E; Neff, Lucas P; Johnson, M Austin; Williams, Timothy K

    2017-07-01

    To avoid potential cardiovascular collapse after resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA), current guidelines recommend methodically deflating the balloon for 5 minutes to gradually reperfuse distal tissue beds. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that this approach may still result in unpredictable aortic flow rates and hemodynamic instability. We sought to characterize aortic flow dynamics following REBOA as the balloon is deflated in accordance with current practice guidelines. Eight Yorkshire-cross swine were splenectomized, instrumented, and subjected to rapid 25% total blood volume hemorrhage. After 30 minutes of shock, animals received 60 minutes of Zone 1 REBOA with a low-profile REBOA catheter. During subsequent resuscitation with shed blood, the aortic occlusion balloon was gradually deflated in stepwise fashion at the rate of 0.5 mL every 30 seconds until completely deflated. Aortic flow rate and proximal mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured continuously over the period of balloon deflation. Graded balloon deflation resulted in variable initial return of aortic flow (median, 78 seconds; interquartile range [IQR], 68-105 seconds). A rapid increase in aortic flow during a single-balloon deflation step was observed in all animals (median, 819 mL/min; IQR, 664-1241 mL/min) and corresponded with an immediate decrease in proximal MAP (median, 30 mm Hg; IQR, 14.5-37 mm Hg). Total balloon volume and time to return of flow demonstrated no correlation (r = 0.016). This study is the first to characterize aortic flow during balloon deflation following REBOA. A steep inflection point occurs during balloon deflation that results in an abrupt increase in aortic flow and a concomitant decrease in MAP. Furthermore, the onset of distal aortic flow was inconsistent across study animals and did not correlate with initial balloon volume or relative deflation volume. Future studies to define the factors that affect aortic flow during balloon

  16. Shock Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  17. Experiments in Numerical Studies of Low Density and Real Gas Effects on Regions of Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in Hypervelocity Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holden, Michael S; Wadhams, Timothy P; MacLean, Matthew; Parker, Ronald A

    2006-01-01

    .... An extensive series of calibration and validation studies were done defining the free stream flows in the LENS I and X tunnels for low density and high enthalpy flows at velocities up to 16,000 ft...

  18. Physico-Biochemical aspects of Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni M.D.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Shock is a clinical condition characterized by decreased blood flow to vital organs due to imbalance between size of vascular bed and effective circulating blood volume and the inability of body tissues to metabolize nutrients normally. The decreased blood flow to vital organs like kidney, liver, spleen, brain etc. is caused by pulling and stagnation blood elsewhere in circulation. The defective blood flow to tissues implies incomplete oxygen supply to the cells, tissues and organs consequent effect being interference with metabolism. It is very essential to study physicobiochemical aspect of shock because after knowing the pathways involved in various physio -pathological processes, we can undertake effective treatment and there by shock can be satisfactorily treated and prevented. Following are the various physico-biochemical processes stated by various workers to study the shock. [Vet. World 2009; 2(4.000: 161-162

  19. Shock, diaschisis and von Monakow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of shock apparently emerged in the middle of the 18th century (Whyett as an occurrence observed experimentally after spinal cord transection, and identified as "shock" phenomenon one century later (Hall. The concept was extended (Brown-Séquard and it was suggested that brain lesions caused functional rupture in regions distant from the injured one ("action à distance". The term "diaschisis" (von Monakow, proposed as a new modality of shock, had its concept broadened, underpinned by observations of patients, aiming at distinguishing between symptoms of focal brain lesions and transitory effects they produced, attributable to depression of distant parts of the brain connected to the injured area. Presently, diaschisis is related mainly to cerebrovascular lesions and classified according to the connection fibers involved, as proposed by von Monakow. Depression of metabolism and blood flow in regions anatomically separated, but related by connections with the lesion, allows observing diaschisis with neuroimaging.

  20. Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoop, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    FLOW. Orden i hovedet på den fede måde Oplevelsesmæssigt er flow-tilstanden kendetegnet ved at man er fuldstændig involveret, fokuseret og koncentreret; at man oplever stor indre klarhed ved at vide hvad der skal gøres, og i hvilket omfang det lykkes; at man ved at det er muligt at løse opgaven...

  1. The acceleration of cosmic ray by shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, W.I.; Leer, E.; Skadron, G.

    1977-01-01

    The acceleration of cosmic rays in flows involving shocks and other compressional waves is considered in terms of one-dimensionl, steady flows and the diffusion approximation. The results suggest that very substantial energy conversion can occur. (author)

  2. On the scaling and unsteadiness of shock induced separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) are a common phenomenon in transonic and supersonic flows. The presence of shock waves, induced by specific geometrical configurations, causes a rapid increase of the pressure, which can lead to flow separation. Examples of such interactions are found

  3. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  4. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  5. Effect of leading edge sweep on shock-shock interference at Mach 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    These Mach 8 experimental results are applicable to the details of a shock-shock interference that may occur on an engine inlet of a hypersonic vehicle from a swept forebody shock interacting with a swept cowl leading edge bow shock or from a swept splitter plate shock interacting with a swept fuel injection strut bow shock. Peak surface pressure and heat transfer rate on the cylinder were about 10 and 30 times the undisturbed flow stagnation point value, respectively, for the 0 deg sweep test. A comparison of the 15 deg and 30 deg swept results with the 0 deg swept results shows that peak pressure was reduced about 13 percent and 44 percent, respectively, and peak heat transfer rate was reduced about 7 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

  6. Nonequilibrium shock layer temperature profiles from arc jet radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Harvel E.; Yuen, Eric; Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram

    1989-01-01

    Shock layer temperature profiles are obtained through analysis of radiation from shock layers produced by a blunt body inserted in arc jet flow. Spectral measurements have been made in a nitrogen flow of 54.4 gm/s at an enthalpy of 8.72 MJ/kg. Vibrational temperatures for N2+ are obtained by matching spectral regions from arc jet spectra with spectra generated using the NEQAIR code. Temperature profiles obtained from the radiation layers show a vibrational temperature higher than the rotational temperature near the front of the shock and both temperatures decrease as the flow approaches the body. The spectral measurements are made and analysis completed for four distances, from the surface of the blunt body. The corresponding shock layer thickness is approximately 3.6 cm. Although the shock layer appears to be in thermal nonequilibrium, the measured rotational temperature approaches the single temperature results of viscous shock layer calculations at this test condition.

  7. Blood-flow restricted training leads to myocelullar macrophage infiltration and upregulation of heat-shock proteins, but no apparent muscle damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob L; Aagaard, Per; Prokhorova, Tatyana A

    2017-01-01

    into the intervention (Mid8) and 3 and 10 days after training cessation (Post3,Post10) to examine macrophage (M1/M2) content as well as heat-shock protein (HSP27/70) and tenascin-C expression. Blood samples (1 wk) were collected before and after (0.1-24 h) the first and last training session to examine markers...... of muscle damage (CK), oxidative stress (TAC,GSH) and inflammation (MCP1,IL-6,TNFa). M1-macrophage content increased 108-165% with BFRE and LLE at Post3 (P macrophages increased (163%) with BFRE only (P ... with BFRE (P markers of muscle damage, oxidative stress and inflammation. The amplitude, timing and localization of the above changes indicate that only limited muscle damage was evoked with BFRE. This study is the first to show...

  8. Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Shock waves in multiphase flows refers to a rich variety of phenomena of interest to physicists, chemists, and fluid dynamicists, as well as mechanical, biomedical and aeronautical engineers. This volume treats shock and expansion waves in (bullet) complex, bubbly liquids (L van Wijngaarden, Y Tomita, V Kedrinskii) and (bullet) cryogenic liquids (M Murakami) and examines the relationship of shock waves with (bullet) phase transitions (A Guha, CF Delale, G Schnerr, MEH van Dongen) (bullet) induced phase transitions (GEA Meier) as well as their interaction with (bullet) solid foams, textiles, porous and granular media (B Skews, DMJ Smeulders, MEH van Dongen, V Golub, O Mirova) All chapters are self-contained, so they can be read independently, although they are of course thematically interrelated. Taken together, they offer a timely reference on shock waves in multiphase flows, including new viewpoints and burgeoning developments. The book will appeal to beginners as well as professional scientists and engineer...

  9. Laboratory experiment to study collisionless shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Aoki, H.; Tanji, H.; Dono, S.; Waugh, J. N.; Gregory, C. D.; Koenig, M.; Woolsey, N.; Takabe, H.

    2010-08-01

    We report the experimental results of collisionless shock formation in counterstreaming plasmas produced by a high-power laser system. The experiment was performed with Gekko XII HIPER laser system at the Institute of Laser Engineering. In order to model collisionless shocks in the universe, supersonic counterstreaming plasma flows were generated using a CH double-plane target. By using the self-emission measurements, we observed the emission increase toward the shock through the downstream. We also observed the density jump associated with the emission increase. The width of the transition region is shorter than the ion-ion mean-free-path calculated from the measured plasma velocity and density.

  10. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  11. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may also be caused by toxins produced by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated ... syndrome. The syndrome can also be caused by group A streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Risk factors Toxic shock syndrome can ...

  12. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  13. MHD shocks in the ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, D. F.; Hollenbach, David J.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers survey shock solutions of a partially ionized gas with a magnetic field. The gas is modeled by interacting neutral, ion, electron and charged grain components. They employ a small neutral-ion chemical network to follow the dissociation and ionization of the major species. Cooling by molecular hydrogen (rotational, vibrational and dissociation), grains and dipole molecules is included. There are three basic types of solutions (C, C asterisk, and J) and some more complicated flows involving combinations of the basic types. The initial preshock conditions cover hydrogen nuclei densities of 1 less than n less than 10(exp 10) cm(-3) and shock velocities of 5 less than v(sub s) less than 60 km/s. The magnetic field is varied over 5 decades and the sensitivity of the results to grain parameters, UV and cosmic ray fluxes is ascertained. The parameter space is quite complicated, but there exist some simple divisions. When the initial ionization fraction is small (chi sub i less than 10(-5)), there is a sharp transition between fully C solutions at low velocity and strong J solutions at high velocity. When the initial ionization fraction is larger, C asterisk and/or very weak J shocks are present at low velocities in addition to the C solutions. The flow again changes to strong J shocks at high velocities. When the ionization fraction is large and the flow is only slightly greater than the bulk Alfven velocity, there is a complicated mixture of C, C asterisk and J solutions.

  14. Properties and structure of a plasma non-neutral shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yemin; Hu Xiwei

    2004-01-01

    The shock is described by the Navier-Stokes equations of the electron and ion fluids, and coupled with Poisson's equation for the self-induced electric field. Profiles of the flow and electric variables in the weak or moderate shock front with or without current for different Debye lengths are presented. Comparison of profiles of flow and electric variables in the front for different heat flow modes is given

  15. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  16. ON THE EXISTENCE OF SHOCKS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic flows are expected to exist in the atmospheres of irradiated exoplanets, but the question of whether shocks develop lingers. Specifically, it reduces to whether continuous flow in a closed loop may become supersonic and if some portions of the supersonic flow steepen into shocks. We first demonstrate that continuous, supersonic flow may exist in two flavors: isentropic and non-isentropic, with shocks being included in the latter class of solutions. Supersonic flow is a necessary but insufficient condition for shocks to develop. The development of a shock requires the characteristics of neighboring points in a flow to intersect. We demonstrate that the intersection of characteristics may be quantified via the knowledge of the Mach number. Finally, we examine three-dimensional simulations of hot Jovian atmospheres and demonstrate that shock formation is expected to occur mostly on the dayside hemisphere, upstream of the substellar point, because the enhanced temperatures near the substellar point provide a natural pressure barrier for the returning flow. Understanding the role of shocks in irradiated exoplanetary atmospheres is relevant to correctly modeling observables such as the peak offsets of infrared phase curves.

  17. A new class of solutions for interstellar magnetohydrodynamic shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, W. G.; Draine, B. T.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the equations of motion for steady MHD shock waves proopagating in interstellar clouds, for boundary conditions that preclude C shocks. In addition to J shocks, in which the neutral fluid component becomes subsonic at an adiabatic jump front, the equations admit a new class of solutions, called C-asterisk shocks, in which the transition to subsonic flow occurs continuously at a sonic point. Numerical methods are developed for computing the structure of J and C-asterisk shocks propagating in diffuse interstellar clouds. The effects of chemical, ionization, and recombination processes are included in this treatment. An alternative numerical method, which uses artificial viscosity to facilitate integration through sonic points, is analyzed and shown to be invalid. A set of exemplary solutions, computed for realistic shock parameters, shows that C-asterisk shocks occur for a broad range of conditions relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds.

  18. Laminar wave train structure of collisionless magnetic slow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    The laminar wave train structure of collisionless magnetic slow shocks is investigated using two fluid hydromagnetics with ion cyclotron radius dispersion. For shock strengths less than the maximally strong switch-off shock, in the shock leading edge dispersive steepening forms a magnetic field gradient, while in the downstream flow dispersive propagation forms a trailing wave train; dispersion scale lengths are the ion inertial length if beta is smaller than 1 and the ion cyclotron radius if beta is greater than 1. In the switch-off slow shock leading edge, dispersion only produced rotations of the magnetic field direction; the gradient of the magnetic field magnitude, and hence the shock steepening length, is determined solely by resistive diffusion. The switch-off shock structure consists of a long trailing of magnetic rotations which are gradually damped by resistivity.

  19. Special Course on Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows (Interactions entre Ondes de Choc et Couches Limites dans les Ecoulements Supersoniques et Hpersoniques).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Laser Corp.) was used as the flow was well-mixed in the wind tunnel stilling a light source. More recently, a 5-Watt Argon -Ion chamber by capturing...component capability, the ve- scattering mode. For all the tests presented here, the locimeter is equipped with two identical Argon lasers that forward...Directour dui Service des=oe o~us LUXEMBOURG Mmisirede l Ddw NVoireldgique Ottawa, Ontario KIA 0K2 I4ORVEGE DANEMAIU( Norwegia Defence Research

  20. ANALYSIS OF TRANSONIC FLOW PAST CUSPED AIRFOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Stodůlka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transonic flow past two cusped airfoils is numerically solved and achieved results are analyzed by means of flow behavior and oblique shocks formation.Regions around sharp trailing edges are studied in detail and parameters of shock waves are solved and compared using classical shock polar approach and verified by reduction parameters for symmetric configurations.

  1. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book, as a volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library, is primarily concerned with detonation waves or compression shock waves in reactive heterogeneous media, including mixtures of solid, liquid and gas phases. The topics involve a variety of energy release and control processes in such media - a contemporary research field that has found wide applications in propulsion and power, hazard prevention as well as military engineering. The six extensive chapters contained in this volume are: - Spray Detonation (SB Murray and PA Thibault) - Detonation of Gas-Particle Flow (F Zhang) - Slurry Detonation (DL Frost and F Zhang) - Detonation of Metalized Composite Explosives (MF Gogulya and MA Brazhnikov) - Shock-Induced Solid-Solid Reactions and Detonations (YA Gordopolov, SS Batsanov, and VS Trofimov) - Shock Ignition of Particles (SM Frolov and AV Fedorov) Each chapter is self-contained and can be read independently of the others, though, they are thematically interrelated. They offer a t...

  2. Deionization shocks in flat and thin microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Andersen, Mathias B.; Mani, Ali

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated dynamics of deionization shocks in flat and thin microchannel using two different approaches: (1) extension of Mani and Bazant's simple model [PRE 2011] to two-dimensions, and (2) development of a height-averaged model from tabulated solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The latter model is more accurate since it captures both thin and overlapped double-layer regimes as well as diffusion-osmotic flows. Both models describe ion transport and deionization shock dynamics in two dimensional space corresponding to the transverse flat dimensions. We compare prediction of these models for shock profile, speed and dynamical response, as well as onset conditions for hydrodynamic instability of deionization shocks. The outcome of this study has applications in deionization processes in lab-on-a-chip systems as well as porous microstructures.

  3. Numerical simulation of shock-induced combustion past blunt bodies using shock-fitting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock-induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A finite-difference, shock-fitting method is used to solve the complete set of Navier-Stokes and species conservation equations. In this approach, the bow shock represents a boundary of the computational domain and is treated as a discontinuity across which Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are applied. All interior details of the flow such as compression waves, reaction front, and the wall boundary layer are captured automatically in the solution. Since shock-fitting approach reduces the amount of artificial dissipation, all the intricate details of the flow are captured much more clearly than has been possible with the shock-capturing approach. This has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one-dimensional wave-interaction model than before.

  4. Jump phenomenon from jam to free flow in traffic flow

    OpenAIRE

    社本, 大輔; 友枝, 明保; 西成, 活裕; Daisuke, Shamoto; Akiyasu, Tomoeda; Katsuhiro, Nishinari; 東大工; 東大工; 東大工:独立行政法人科学技術振興機構さきがけ; Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo; Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo; Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo:PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Corporation

    2008-01-01

    In real traffic flow, we have found jamp phenomena from jam to free flow. From the viewpoints of fluids dynamics, we can say this phenomenon as 'expansion shock wave.' In conventional fuids dynamics, 'expansion shock wave' can never occur because this phenomenon goes against the 2nd law of themodynamics. We analyzed this phenomenon from viewpoints of fluids dynamics.

  5. PENETRATION OF A SHOCK WAVE IN A FLAME FRONT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan PANTAZOPOL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the interactions between a fully supersonic flame front, situated in a supersonic two-dimensional flow of an ideal homogeneous combustible gas mixture, and an incident shock wawe, which is penetrating in the space of the hot burnt gases. A possible configuration, which was named ,,simple penetration” is examined. For the anlysis of the interference phenomena, shock polar and shock-combustion polar are used. At the same time, the paper shows the possibility to produce similar but more complicated configurations, which may contain expansion fans and reflected shock waves.

  6. Vasogenic shock physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Gkisioti, Sotiria; Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D

    2011-01-01

    Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can un...

  7. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Marah A. Curtis; Hope Corman; Kelly Noonan; Nancy Reichman

    2011-01-01

    We exploit an exogenous health shock--the birth of a child with a severe health condition--to investigate the causal effect of a life shock on homelessness. Using survey data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study that have been augmented with information from hospital medical records, we find that the health shock increases the likelihood of homelessness three years later, particularly in cities with high housing costs. Homelessness is defined using both a traditional measure an...

  8. Shock transformations in quartzite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjukov, D. D.; Koslov, E. A.; Zhugin, Yu. N.; Abakshin, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    We report results of studies of experimental shock metamorphism in a quartzite sample. Shock pressure increases in the experiment from a rim to a center of the bowl-shaped sample due to a design of a recovery assembly. The section along an equatorial plane shows a progressive development of shock metamorphism. On the basis of observations, it is proposed that diaplectic glass can be a product of quenching a melt.

  9. Understanding Micro-Ramp Control for Shock Boundary Layer Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loth, Eric; Lee, Sang

    2008-01-01

    .... Of several candidate micro-VGs, micro-ramps have been found to significantly impact shock boundary layer interaction flows, while being cost-effective, physically robust, and requiring no power sources...

  10. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth / For Parents / Toxic Shock Syndrome What's ... en español Síndrome de shock tóxico About Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a serious ...

  11. Vorticity dynamics after the shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livescu, D.; Ryu, J.

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756:R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms=10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.

  12. Effects of Alfvénic Drift on Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2018-03-01

    Non-detection of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters has challenged diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of cosmic-ray (CR) protons at weak collisionless shocks that are expected to form in the intracluster medium. As an effort to address this problem, we here explore possible roles of Alfvén waves self-excited via resonant streaming instability during the CR acceleration at parallel shocks. The mean drift of Alfvén waves may either increase or decrease the scattering center compression ratio, depending on the postshock cross-helicity, leading to either flatter or steeper CR spectra. We first examine such effects at planar shocks, based on the transport of Alfvén waves in the small amplitude limit. For the shock parameters relevant to cluster shocks, Alfvénic drift flattens the CR spectrum slightly, resulting in a small increase of the CR acceleration efficiency, η. We then consider two additional, physically motivated cases: (1) postshock waves are isotropized via MHD and plasma processes across the shock transition, and (2) postshock waves contain only forward waves propagating along with the flow due to a possible gradient of CR pressure behind the shock. In these cases, Alfvénic drift could reduce η by as much as a factor of five for weak cluster shocks. For the canonical parameters adopted here, we suggest η ∼ 10‑4–10‑2 for shocks with sonic Mach number M s ≈ 2–3. The possible reduction of η may help ease the tension between non-detection of γ-rays from galaxy clusters and DSA predictions.

  13. Kinematical Compatibility Conditions for Vorticity Across Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work develops the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity across arbitrary shock waves in compressible, inviscid fluids. The vorticity compatibility conditions are derived from the curl of the momentum equation using singular distributions defined on two-dimensional shock wave surfaces embedded in three-dimensional flow fields. The singular distributions are represented as generalized differential operators concentrated on moving shock wave surfaces. The derivation of the compatibility conditions for vorticity requires the application of second-order generalized derivatives and elementary tensor algebra. The well-known vorticity jump conditions across a shock wave are then shown to follow from the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity by expressing the flow field velocity in vectorial components normal and tangential to a shock surface.

  14. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Toxic Shock Syndrome What's ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  15. Effects of explosion-generated shock waves in ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, M.R.; Kahn, J.E.; Belk, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    An explosion in a space causes an increase in temperature and pressure. To quantify the challenge that will be presented to essential components in a ventilation system, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics of a shock wave generated by an explosion, with attention directed to the propagation of such a wave in a duct. Using the equations of unsteady flow and shock tube theory, a theoretical model has been formulated to provide flow properties behind moving shock waves that have interacted with various changes in duct geometry. Empirical equations have been derived to calculate air pressure, temperature, Mach number, and velocity in a duct following an explosion

  16. Comparison of geometrical shock dynamics and kinematic models for shock-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridoux, J.; Lardjane, N.; Monasse, L.; Coulouvrat, F.

    2018-03-01

    Geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) is a simplified model for nonlinear shock-wave propagation, based on the decomposition of the shock front into elementary ray tubes. Assuming small changes in the ray tube area, and neglecting the effect of the post-shock flow, a simple relation linking the local curvature and velocity of the front, known as the A{-}M rule, is obtained. More recently, a new simplified model, referred to as the kinematic model, was proposed. This model is obtained by combining the three-dimensional Euler equations and the Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the front, which leads to an equation for the normal variation of the shock Mach number at the wave front. In the same way as GSD, the kinematic model is closed by neglecting the post-shock flow effects. Although each model's approach is different, we prove their structural equivalence: the kinematic model can be rewritten under the form of GSD with a specific A{-}M relation. Both models are then compared through a wide variety of examples including experimental data or Eulerian simulation results when available. Attention is drawn to the simple cases of compression ramps and diffraction over convex corners. The analysis is completed by the more complex cases of the diffraction over a cylinder, a sphere, a mound, and a trough.

  17. Shock Probation in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudouris, James; Turnbull, Bruce W.

    1985-01-01

    Compared characteristics and recidivism of 820 shock probationers with recidivism of parolees, straight probationers, and persons sentenced to residential facilities or halfway houses. The results indicated that age, prior juvenile or adult commitments, unemployment, and marital status were related to recidivism for all male shock probationers.…

  18. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The modern medium of film has long been hailed for its capacity for producing shocks of an entertaining, thought-provoking, or even politically emancipative nature. But what is a shock, how and when does it occur, how long does it last, and are there particular techniques for producing cinematic...

  19. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation

  20. Nonrelativistic grey Sn-transport radiative-shock solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that this monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2,3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel'dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel'dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibrium-diffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Finally, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.

  1. Introduction to Plasma Dynamo, Reconnection and Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    In our plasma universe, most of what we can observe is composed of ionized gas, or plasma. This plasma is a conducting fluid, which advects magnetic fields when it flows. Magnetic structure occurs from the smallest planetary to the largest cosmic scales. We introduce at a basic level some interesting features of non linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). For example, in our plasma universe, dynamo creates magnetic fields from gravitationally driven flow energy in an electrically conducting medium, and conversely magnetic reconnection annihilates magnetic field and accelerates particles. Shocks occur when flows move faster than the local velocity (sonic or Alfven speed) for the propagation of information. Both reconnection and shocks can accelerate particles, perhaps to gigantic energies, for example as observed with 10{sup 20} eV cosmic rays.

  2. Self-Excited Shock Train Dynamics in a Mach 2 Isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Mirko; Hunt, Robin; Driscoll, James

    2017-11-01

    A shock train is the complex system of shock waves that forms in a supersonic ducted flow when the back pressure is raised, and it is typically found in the isolator of air-breathing, high-speed systems. Its formation is due to a balance of the inviscid action of a system of shocks in the core of the flow and the viscous effects at walls. Although the typical description and understanding of shock trains is limited to its steady state behavior, a shock train exhibits significant dynamics, most of which are self-excited, even under nominally constant inflow and outflow conditions. Here we evaluate some of the dynamical properties of a shock train generated in a Mach 2.0 ducted flow. Cross-spectral analysis of pressure and shock position fluctuations are used to identify a complex, frequency dependent system of perturbations that affects the unsteady motion of the shock train. Specifically, we have identified two paths of propagation of perturbations that are associated with two different sources, one associated with the regions of separated flow and one external to the shock train, that affect the steadiness of the shock train, thus partially explaining the observed shock train inherent unsteadiness.

  3. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Symposium, Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule, Aachen, Federal Republic of Germany, July 26-31, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenig, Hans

    Topics discussed in this volume include shock wave structure, propagation, and interaction; shocks in condensed matter, dusty gases, and multiphase media; chemical processes and related combustion and detonation phenomena; shock wave reflection, diffraction, and focusing; computational fluid dynamic code development and shock wave application; blast and detonation waves; advanced shock tube technology and measuring technique; and shock wave applications. Papers are presented on dust explosions, the dynamics of shock waves in certain dense gases, studies of condensation kinetics behind incident shock waves, the autoignition mechanism of n-butane behind a reflected shock wave, and a numerical simulation of the focusing process of reflected shock waves. Attention is also given to the equilibrium shock tube flow of real gases, blast waves generated by planar detonations, modern diagnostic methods for high-speed flows, and interaction between induced waves and electric discharge in a very high repetition rate excimer laser.

  4. Echocardiography in shock management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-08-20

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock.

  5. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  6. Studies of Anomalous Shock Wave Propagation and Dispersion in Weakly Ionized Plasma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adamovich, I

    2001-01-01

    .... Temperatures and ionization levels in the flows were measured. It was demonstrated that shocks can be weakened by creating an electric discharge in the flow, but this effect is purely a consequence of the Joule heating of the plasma...

  7. Vulnerability to shocks in the global seafood trade network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Jessica A.; Rovenskaya, Elena; Dieckmann, Ulf; Pace, Michael L.; Brännström, Åke

    2016-03-01

    Trade can allow countries to overcome local or regional losses (shocks) to their food supply, but reliance on international food trade also exposes countries to risks from external perturbations. Countries that are nutritionally or economically dependent on international trade of a commodity may be adversely affected by such shocks. While exposure to shocks has been studied in financial markets, communication networks, and some infrastructure systems, it has received less attention in food-trade networks. Here, we develop a forward shock-propagation model to quantify how trade flows are redistributed under a range of shock scenarios and assess the food-security outcomes by comparing changes in national fish supplies to indices of each country’s nutritional fish dependency. Shock propagation and distribution among regions are modeled on a network of historical bilateral seafood trade data from UN Comtrade using 205 reporting territories grouped into 18 regions. In our model exposure to shocks increases with total imports and the number of import partners. We find that Central and West Africa are the most vulnerable to shocks, with their vulnerability increasing when a willingness-to-pay proxy is included. These findings suggest that countries can reduce their overall vulnerability to shocks by reducing reliance on imports and diversifying food sources. As international seafood trade grows, identifying these types of potential risks and vulnerabilities is important to build a more resilient food system.

  8. Life shocks and homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide.

  9. Electrical Shock: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using a dry, nonconducting object made of cardboard, plastic or wood. Begin CPR if the person shows ... org/first-aid/first-aid-electrical-shock/basics/art-20056695 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  10. Shock Waves in Supernova Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J. C.

    2018-02-01

    Astrophysical shock waves are a major mechanism for dissipating energy, and by heating and ionizing the gas they produce emission spectra that provide valuable diagnostics for the shock parameters, for the physics of collisionless shocks, and for the composition of the shocked material. Shocks in SN ejecta in which H and He have been burned to heavier elements behave differently than shocks in ordinary astrophysical gas because of their very large radiative cooling rates. In particular, extreme departures from thermal equilibrium among ions and electrons and from ionization equilibrium may arise. This paper discusses the consequences of the enhanced metal abundances for the structure and emission spectra of those shocks.

  11. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yee, Jennifer; King, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management....

  12. Evaluation of turbulence models for three primary types of shock-separated boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Viegas, J. R.; Horstman, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    Zero-equation (algebraic), one-equation (kinetic energy), and two-equation (kinetic energy plus length scale) turbulence eddy viscosity models were used in computing three basic types of shock-separated boundary-layer flows. The three basic types of shock boundary-layer interaction discussed are: (1) a normal shock wave at transonic speeds, (2) a compression corner shock at supersonic speeds, and (3) an incident oblique shock at hypersonic speeds. The models tested are simple, unmodified models used extensively for incompressible, unseparated flows. A comparison of computed and measured results for the compressible, separated flows described herein indicates that model performance is dependent on flow configuration with no distinct superiority of one model over the other for all three flow configurations.

  13. Pressurized thermal shock (PTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Ricardo D.; Ventura, Mirta A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, a description of Thermal Shock in Pressurized conditions (PTS), and its influence in the treatment of the integrity of the pressure vessel (RPV) of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and/or of a Heavy water Pressurized water Reactor (PHWR) is made. Generally, the analysis of PTS involves a process of three stages: a-) Modeling with a System Code of relevant thermohydraulics transients in reference with the thermal shock; b-) The local distribution of temperatures in the downcomer and the heat transference coefficients from the RPV wall to the fluid, are determined; c-) The fracture mechanical analysis. These three stages are included in this work: Results with the thermohydraulics code Relap5/mod.3, are obtained, for a LOCA scenario in the hot leg of the cooling System of the Primary System of the CAN-I reactor. The method used in obtaining results is described. A study on the basis of lumped parameters of the local evolutions of the temperature of the flow is made, in the downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. The purpose of this study is to determine how the intensification of the stress coefficient, varies in function of the emergency injected water during the thermohydraulic transients that take place under the imposed conditions in the postulated scene. Specially, it is considered a 50 cm 2 break, located in the neighborhoods of the pressurized with the corresponding hot leg connection. This size is considered like the most critical. The method used to obtain the results is described. The fracture mechanical analysis is made. From the obtained results we confirmed that we have a simple tool of easy application in order to analyze phenomena of the type PTS in the postulated scenes by break in the cold and hot legs of the primary system. This methodology of calculus is completely independent of the used ones by the Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA) in the analysis of the PTS phenomena in the CAN-I. The results obtained with the adopted

  14. High Temperature Phenomena in Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The high temperatures generated in gases by shock waves give rise to physical and chemical phenomena such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization, chemical reactions and inherently related radiation. In continuum regime, these processes start from the wave front, so that generally the gaseous media behind shock waves may be in a thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium state. This book presents the state of knowledge of these phenomena. Thus, the thermodynamic properties of high temperature gases, including the plasma state are described, as well as the kinetics of the various chemical phenomena cited above. Numerous results of measurement and computation of vibrational relaxation times, dissociation and reaction rate constants are given, and various ionization and radiative mechanisms and processes are presented. The coupling between these different phenomena is taken into account as well as their interaction with the flow-field. Particular points such as the case of rarefied flows an...

  15. Nonstandard jump functions for radically symmetric shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function.

  16. Electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities associated with electrostatic shocks: Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation with the realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio of 1836 is carried out to investigate the electrostatic collisionless shocks in relatively high-speed (∼3000 km s -1 ) plasma flows and also the influence of both electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities, which can develop around the shocks, on the shock dynamics. It is shown that the electrostatic ion-ion instability can develop in front of the shocks, where the plasma is under counterstreaming condition, with highly oblique wave vectors as was shown previously. The electrostatic potential generated by the electrostatic ion-ion instability propagating obliquely to the shock surface becomes comparable with the shock potential and finally the shock structure is destroyed. It is also shown that in front of the shock the beam-Weibel instability gradually grows as well, consequently suggesting that the magnetic field generated by the beam-Weibel instability becomes important in long-term evolution of the shock and the Weibel-mediated shock forms long after the electrostatic shock vanished. It is also observed that the secondary electrostatic shock forms in the reflected ions in front of the primary electrostatic shock.

  17. Nonlinear interactions in superfluid dynamics: Nonstationary heat transfer due to second sound shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound techniques were used to study superfluid helium. Second sound shock waves produced relative velocities in the bulk fluid. Maximum counterflow velocities produced in this way are found to follow the Langer-Fischer prediction for the fundamental critical velocity in its functional dependence on temperature and pressure. Comparison of successive shock and rotating experiments provides strong evidence that breakdown results in vorticity production in the flow behind the shock. Schlieren pictures have verified the planar nature of second sound shocks even after multiple reflections. The nonlinear theory of second sound was repeatedly verified in its prediction of double shocks and other nonlinear phenomena.

  18. Density filament and helical field line structures in three dimensional Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritaka, Toseo; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Sakawa, Youichi; Yamaura, Yuta; Ishikawa, Taishi; Takabe, Hideaki; Morita, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks mediated by Weibel instability are attracting attention for their relevance to experimental demonstrations of astrophysical shocks in high-intensity laser facilities. The three dimensional structure of Weibel-mediated shocks is investigated through a fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulation. The structures obtained are characterized by the following features: (i) helical magnetic field lines elongated in the direction upstream of the shock region, (ii) high and low density filaments inside the helical field lines. These structures originate from the interaction between counter-streaming plasma flow and magnetic vortexes caused by Weibel instability, and potentially affect the shock formation mechanism. (paper)

  19. Shock-hydrodynamics experiments on the Nova laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.; Peyser, T.; Stry, P.; Budil, K.; Wojtowicz, D.; Burke, E.

    1995-08-01

    We have conducted shock-induced hydrodynamics experiments using the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The laser provides a high-enthalpy source by depositing its energy (about 22 kJ) in a small gold cavity called a Hohlraum. The Hohlraum serves as a driver section, launching very strong (M ∼ 20) shocks into millimeter-scale cylindrical ''shock tubes.'' The flow is imaged radiographically by an electronic framing camera, using a laser-generated x-ray source. Several topics have been addressed with this configuration, including shock-induced mixing at density interfaces (seeded with a variety of perturbations); the development of high-speed, shaped-charge-like jets; the effects of geometry on the planarity of the generated shocks; and shock-shock interactions which develop in the flows. This paper describes the general configuration of our experiments, presents an overview of the high-speed jet work, discusses some of our findings, and compares our results with computer simulations

  20. Renal autoregulation and blood pressure management in circulatory shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Emiel Hendrik; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2018-03-22

    The importance of personalized blood pressure management is well recognized. Because renal pressure-flow relationships may vary among patients, understanding how renal autoregulation may influence blood pressure control is essential. However, much remains uncertain regarding the determinants of renal autoregulation in circulatory shock, including the influence of comorbidities and the effects of vasopressor treatment. We review published studies on renal autoregulation relevant to the management of acutely ill patients with shock. We delineate the main signaling pathways of renal autoregulation, discuss how it can be assessed, and describe the renal autoregulatory alterations associated with chronic disease and with shock.

  1. Computational and experimental investigation of dynamic shock reflection phenomena

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available , two-dimensional case were published by Ben-Dor [1]. These transition criteria are not valid for the rapidly pitching wedge in which there are significant dynamic effects. Transition between RR and MR and other unsteady phenomena observed... a strong dependence on wedge pitch rate, direction of rotation and pivot point. References 1. Ben-Dor G: Hysteresis phenomena in shock wave reflections in steady flows. Proceedings, 22nd International Symposium on Shock Waves, Paper 6000 (1999) 2...

  2. A Single Deformed Bow Shock for Titan-Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Omidi, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Madanian, H.; Cravens, T.; Sergis, N.; Dougherty, M. K.; Edberg, N. J. T.

    2017-12-01

    During periods of high solar wind pressure, Saturn's bow shock is pushed inside Titan's orbit exposing the moon and its ionosphere to the supersonic solar wind. The Cassini spacecraft's T96 encounter with Titan occurred during such a period and is the subject of this presentation. The observations during this encounter show evidence for the presence of outbound and inbound shock crossings associated with Saturn and Titan. They also reveal the presence of two foreshocks: one between the outbound Kronian and inbound Titan bow shocks (foreshock-1) and the other between the outbound Titan and inbound Kronian bow shocks (foreshock-2). Using electromagnetic hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations and Cassini observations we show that the origin of foreshock-1 is tied to the formation of a single deformed bow shock for the Titan-Saturn system. We also report for the first time, the observations of spontaneous hot flow anomalies (SHFAs) in foreshock-1 making Saturn the fourth planet this phenomenon has been observed and indicating its universal nature. The results of hybrid simulations also show the generation of oblique fast magnetosonic waves upstream of the outbound Titan bow shock in agreement with the observations of large amplitude magnetosonic pulsations in foreshock-2. The formation of a single deformed bow shock results in unique foreshock-bow shock or foreshock-foreshock geometries. For example, the presence of Saturn's foreshock upstream of Titan's quasi-perpendicular bow shock result in ion acceleration through a combination of shock drift and Fermi processes. We also discuss the implications of a single deformed bow shock for Saturn's magnetopause and magnetosphere.

  3. Normal Shocks with High Upstream Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirignano, William

    2017-11-01

    A normal compressive shockwave with supercritical upstream thermodynamic conditions is analyzed using Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state for real-gas density, enthalpy, and entropy relations for argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Upstream pressure and temperature varying from 10 to 500 bar and 160 to 800 K. At high pressures, the flow does not follow the calorically-perfect-gas behavior. For the perfect gas, the enthalpy and ratio of pressure-to-density are directly proportional to the square of the sound speed, allowing its direct substitution in the conservation equations. A new thermodynamic function is identified for the sound speed which is shown to remain as the proper characteristic speed. Although the sound speed does not emerge directly from the conservation equations as it does for a perfect gas, the shock speed goes to this limiting value as shock strength goes to zero. For the real-gas, modifications are obtained for Prandtl's relation and the Rankine-Hugoniot relation. The modified real-gas Riemann invariants are constructed and discussed for application to weak shocks. A foundation is presented for use with other cubic equations of state, multicomponent flows, and / or for more complex flow configurations. Support from AFOSR, Dr. Mitat Birkan, Program manger.

  4. Hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, C.-D.; Chang, C.-J.

    2009-04-01

    A chute contraction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as increase of bottom slope, transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, reduction of chute width due to bridges, transition structures in flood diversion works, among others. One of the significant chute contractions in Taiwan is that used in the Yuanshantzu Flood Diversion Project of Keelung River. The diversion project is designed to divert flood water from upper Keelung River into East Sea with a capasity of 1,310 cubic meters per second for mitigating the flood damage of lower part of Keelung River basin in Northern Taiwan. An inclined chute contraction is used to connect Keelung River and a diversion turnel. The inlet and outlet works of the diversion project is located at Ruifang in the Taipei County of north Taiwan. The diameter of diversion tunnel is 12 meters and the total length of tunnel is 2,484 meters. The diversion project has been completed and successfully executed many times since 2004 to lower the water level of Keelung River in typhoon seasons for avioding flooding problems in the lower part of Keelung River basin. Flow in a chute contraction has complicated flow pattern due to the existence of shock waves in it. A simple and useful calculation procedure for the maximum height and its position of shock waves is essentially needed for the preliminary design stage of a chute contraction. Hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction were experimentally and numerically investigated in this study with the consideration of the effects of sidewall deflection angle, bottom inclination angle and Froude number of approaching flow. The flow pattern of hydraulic shock waves in a chute contraction was observed. The main issue of designing chute contraction is to estimate the height and position of maximum shock wave for the consideration of freeboards. Achieving this aim, the experimental data are adopted and analyzed for the shock angle

  5. Effect of Pressure Gradients on the Initiation of PBX-9502 via Irregular (Mach) Reflection of Low Pressure Curved Shock Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Phillip Isaac [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    In the instance of multiple fragment impact on cased explosive, isolated curved shocks are generated in the explosive. These curved shocks propagate and may interact and form irregular or Mach reflections along the interaction loci, thereby producing a single shock that may be sufficient to initiate PBX-9501. However, the incident shocks are divergent and their intensity generally decreases as they expand, and the regions behind the Mach stem interaction loci are generally unsupported and allow release waves to rapidly affect the flow. The effects of release waves and divergent shocks may be considered theoretically through a “Shock Change Equation”.

  6. Development of a multiphase shock tube for energetic materials characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cooper, Marcia A.; Beresh, Steven Jay; Trott, Wayne Merle; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian O. M.

    2010-06-01

    A novel multiphase shock tube to study particle dynamics in gas-solid flows has been constructed and tested. Currently, there is a gap in data for flows having particle volume fractions between the dusty and granular regimes. The primary purpose of this new facility is to fill that gap by providing high quality data of shock-particle interactions in flows having dense gas particle volume fractions. Towards this end, the facility aims to drive a shock into a spatially isotropic field, or curtain, of particles. Through bench-top experimentation, a method emerged for achieving this challenging task that involves the use of a gravity-fed contoured particle seeder. The seeding method is capable of producing fields of spatially isotropic particles having volume fractions of about 1 to 35%. The use of the seeder in combination with the shock tube allows for the testing of the impingement of a planar shock on a dense field of particles. The first experiments in the multiphase shock tube have been conducted and the facility is now operational.

  7. Life Shocks and Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock—namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition—to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  8. Interaction of a conical shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, S. L.; Gai, S. L.

    The paper reports an investigation on the interaction of an incident conical shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. Although a conical shock theoretically creates a hyperbolic shock trace on the flat plate, the line joining all the experimental interaction origins takes a different form due to varying upstream influence. The existence of strong pressure gradients in the spanwise direction after the shock leads to the boundary-layer twist. A model based on the upstream influence of the shock when combined with McCabe's secondary-flow theory showed separation to occur at an external flow deflection of 11.8 deg. The oil flow measurements however show this to occur at 9.2 deg. This discrepancy is of the same order as that found by McCabe. Detailed data involving Schlieren and shadowgraph photography, surface-flow visualization, and surface-pressure measurements are presented.

  9. The Shock Routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hooren, Franca; Kaasch, Alexandra; Starke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands and Sweden over the course of four global economic shocks, we ask whether the notion of critical junctures is useful in understanding the nature of change triggered by crisis. The main empirical finding is that fundamental change in the aftermath of an exogenous shock...... is the exception rather than the rule. Instead, incremental ‘crisis routines’ based on existing policy instruments are overwhelmingly used to deal with economic hardship. We discuss these findings in the light of the psychological ‘threat-rigidity’ effect and reflect on their consequences for theories...

  10. Numerical Simulation of Shock-Induced Combustion Past Blunt Bodies Using Shock-Fitting Technique. Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, J. K.; Kumar, A.; Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric, reacting viscous flow over blunt projectiles is computed to study shock induced combustion at Mach 5.11 and Mach 6.46 in hydrogen-air mixture. A finite-difference, shock-fitting method is used to solve the complete set of Navier Stokes and species conservation equations. In this approach, the bow shock represents a boundary of the computational domain and is treated as a discontinuity across which Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are applied. All interior details of the flow such as compression waves, reaction front, and the wall boundary layer are captured automatically in the solution. Since shock-fitting approach reduces the amount of artificial dissipation, all the intricate details of the flow are captured much more clearly than has been possible with the shock-capturing approach. This has allowed an improved understanding of the physics of shock-induced combustion over blunt projectiles and the numerical results can now be explained more readily with one dimensional wave-interaction model than before.

  11. LIGS measurements in the nozzle reservoir of a free-piston shock tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhöfer, P.; Sander, T.; Koroll, F.; Mundt, Ch.

    2018-02-01

    Free-piston shock tunnels are ground-based test facilities allowing the simulation of reentry flow conditions in a simple and cost-efficient way. For a better understanding of the processes occurring in a shock tunnel as well as for an optimal comparability of experimental data gained in shock tunnels to numerical simulations, it is highly desirable to have the best possible characterization of the generated test gas flows. This paper describes the final step of the development of a laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) system capable of measuring the temperature in the nozzle reservoir of a free-piston shock tunnel during tests: the successful adaptation of the measurement system to the shock tunnel. Preliminary measurements were taken with a high-speed camera and a LED lamp in order to investigate the optical transmissibility of the measurement volume during tests. The results helped to successfully measure LIGS signals in shock tube mode and shock tunnel mode in dry air seeded with NO. For the shock tube mode, six successful measurements for a shock Mach number of about 2.35 were taken in total, two of them behind the incoming shock (p ≈ 1 MPa, T ≈ 600 K) and four after the passing of the reflected shock (p ≈ 4 MPa, T ≈ 1000 K). For five of the six measurements, the derived temperatures were within a deviation range of 6% to a reference value calculated from measured shock speed. The uncertainty estimated was less than or equal to 3.5% for all six measurements. Two LIGS signals from measurements behind the reflected shock in shock tunnel mode were analyzed in detail. One of the signals allowed an unambiguous derivation of the temperature under the conditions of a shock with Mach 2.7 (p ≈ 5 MPa, T ≈ 1200 K, deviation 0.5% , uncertainty 4.9% ).

  12. True versus apparent shapes of bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarango-Yong, Jorge A.; Henney, William J.

    2018-03-01

    Astrophysical bow shocks are a common result of the interaction between two supersonic plasma flows, such as winds or jets from stars or active galaxies, or streams due to the relative motion between a star and the interstellar medium. For cylindrically symmetric bow shocks, we develop a general theory for the effects of inclination angle on the apparent shape. We propose a new two-dimensional classification scheme for bow shapes, which is based on dimensionless geometric ratios that can be estimated from observational images. The two ratios are related to the flatness of the bow's apex, which we term planitude and the openness of its wings, which we term alatude. We calculate the expected distribution in the planitude-alatude plane for a variety of simple geometrical and physical models: quadrics of revolution, wilkinoids, cantoids, and ancantoids. We further test our methods against numerical magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar bow shocks and find that the apparent planitude and alatude measured from infrared dust continuum maps serve as accurate diagnostics of the shape of the contact discontinuity, which can be used to discriminate between different physical models. We present an algorithm that can determine the planitude and alatude from observed bow shock emission maps with a precision of 10 to 20%.

  13. Pediatric cardiogenic shock: Current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Subhranshu Sekhar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a pathophysiologic state where an abnormality of cardiac function is responsible for the failure of the cardiovascular system to meet the metabolic needs of the body tissues.Though it is less common than hypovolemia as the primary etiology in paediatric shock, eventually myocardial function is affected because of reduced perfusion in all forms of shock. Myocardial malfunction, in other forms of shock, is secondary to ischemia, acidosis, drugs, toxins or inflammation. Card...

  14. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  15. SHOCK-INDUCED LUMINESCENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a 270 kilobar shock wave emerges from an illuminated aluminum surface in a vacuum, blue light is emitted. This phenomenon is affected...acoustoelectric effect). The electrons reach the aluminum oxide layer and, falling into the ionized F’ centers, emit blue light .

  16. Health Shocks and Retirement:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    benefits in Denmark nor by the promotion of corporate social responsibility initiatives since the mid-1990s. In the late 1990s, however, the retirement rate following a health shock is reduced to 3% with the introduction of the subsidized employment program (fleksjob) but this effect is not strongly...

  17. Cures for the shock instability: Development of a shock-stable Roe scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S S; Rho, O H; Kyu-Hong, S

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of an improved Roe scheme that is free from the shock instability and still preserves the accuracy and efficiency of the original Roe's Flux Difference Splitting (FDS). Roe's FDS is known to possess good accuracy but to suffer from the shock instability, such as the carbuncle phenomenon. As the first step towards a shock-stable scheme, Roe's FDS is compared with the HLLE scheme to identify the source of the shock instability. Through a linear perturbation analysis on the odd-even decoupling problem, damping characteristic is examined and Mach number-based functions f and g are introduced to balance damping and feeding rates, which leads to a shock-stable Roe scheme. In order to satisfy the conservation of total enthalpy, which is crucial in predicting surface heat transfer rate in high-speed steady flows, an analysis of dissipation mechanism in the energy equation is carried out to find out the error source and to make the proposed scheme preserve total enthalpy. By modif...

  18. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  19. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ...

  20. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration. [Shrivastava S K and Kailash 2005 Shock wave treatment in medicine; J. Biosci. 30 269–275]. 1. Introduction. Extracorporeal generated shock waves have been intro- duced for medical therapy approximately 20 years back to disintegrate kidney stones.

  1. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2017-05-20

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  2. Errors when shock waves interact due to numerical shock width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, R.

    1993-03-04

    A simple test problem proposed by Noh, a strong shock reflecting from a rigid wall, demonstrates a generic problem with numerical shock capturing algorithms at boundaries that Noh called ``excess wall heating.`` We show that the same type of numerical error occurs in general when shock waves interact. The underlying cause is the non-uniform convergence to the hyperbolic solution of the inviscid limit of the solution to the PDEs with viscosity. The error can be understood from an analysis of the asymptotic solution. For a propagating shock, there is a difference in the total energy of the parabolic wave relative to the hyperbolic shock. Moreover, the relative energy depends on the strength of the shock. The error when shock waves interact is due to the difference in the relative energies between the incoming and outgoing shock waves. It is analogous to a phase shift in a scattering matrix. A conservative differencing scheme correctly describes the Hugoniot jump conditions for a steady propagating shock. Therefore, the error from the asymptotics occurs in the transient when the waves interact. The entropy error that occurs in the interaction region remains localized but does not dissipate. A scaling argument shows that as the viscosity coefficient goes to zero, the error shrinks in spatial extend but is constant in magnitude. Noh`s problem of the reflection of a shock from a rigid wall is equivalent to the symmetric impact of two shock waves of the opposite family. The asymptotic argument shows that the same type of numerical error would occur when the shocks are of unequal strength. Thus, Noh`s problem is indicative of a numerical error that occurs when shocks interact due to the numerical shock width.

  3. Errors when shock waves interact due to numerical shock width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, R.

    1993-03-04

    A simple test problem proposed by Noh, a strong shock reflecting from a rigid wall, demonstrates a generic problem with numerical shock capturing algorithms at boundaries that Noh called excess wall heating.'' We show that the same type of numerical error occurs in general when shock waves interact. The underlying cause is the non-uniform convergence to the hyperbolic solution of the inviscid limit of the solution to the PDEs with viscosity. The error can be understood from an analysis of the asymptotic solution. For a propagating shock, there is a difference in the total energy of the parabolic wave relative to the hyperbolic shock. Moreover, the relative energy depends on the strength of the shock. The error when shock waves interact is due to the difference in the relative energies between the incoming and outgoing shock waves. It is analogous to a phase shift in a scattering matrix. A conservative differencing scheme correctly describes the Hugoniot jump conditions for a steady propagating shock. Therefore, the error from the asymptotics occurs in the transient when the waves interact. The entropy error that occurs in the interaction region remains localized but does not dissipate. A scaling argument shows that as the viscosity coefficient goes to zero, the error shrinks in spatial extend but is constant in magnitude. Noh's problem of the reflection of a shock from a rigid wall is equivalent to the symmetric impact of two shock waves of the opposite family. The asymptotic argument shows that the same type of numerical error would occur when the shocks are of unequal strength. Thus, Noh's problem is indicative of a numerical error that occurs when shocks interact due to the numerical shock width.

  4. External Shocks and Banking Crises in Developing Countries: Does the Exchange Rate Regime Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Chandima Mendis

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines some determinants of banking crises in developing economies. Specifically, the effects of terms of trade shocks and capital flows are analyzed. The choice of the nominal exchange rate regime is found to be a crucial factor in the way various shocks are transmitted through the monetary sector. A logit model is used on panel data and preliminary results indicate that countries with flexible regimes were able to lessen the impact of external shocks on the domestic economy. Th...

  5. Dense particle cloud dispersion by a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, M.; Johansen, C.; Ciccarelli, G.; Zhang, F.

    2013-09-01

    A dense particle flow is generated by the interaction of a shock wave with an initially stationary packed granular bed. High-speed particle dispersion research is motivated by the energy release enhancement of explosives containing solid particles. The initial packed granular bed is produced by compressing loose powder into a wafer with a particle volume fraction of . The wafer is positioned inside the shock tube, uniformly filling the entire cross-section. This results in a clean experiment where no flow obstructing support structures are present. Through high-speed shadowgraph imaging and pressure measurements along the length of the channel, detailed information about the particle shock interaction was obtained. Due to the limited strength of the incident shock wave, no transmitted shock wave is produced. The initial solid-like response of the particle wafer acceleration forms a series of compression waves that eventually coalesce to form a shock wave. Breakup is initiated along the periphery of the wafer as the result of shear that forms due to the fixed boundary condition. Particle breakup is initiated by local failure sites that result in the formation of particle jets that extend ahead of the accelerating, largely intact, wafer core. In a circular tube, the failure sites are uniformly distributed along the wafer circumference. In a square channel, the failure sites, and the subsequent particle jets, initially form at the corners due to the enhanced shear. The wafer breakup subsequently spreads to the edges forming a highly non-uniform particle cloud.

  6. Shock-vortex interactions in a soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C. Y.; Wu, W. J.; Chen, H.

    2008-08-01

    This work experimentally visualizes the interaction of a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave with a two-dimensional vortex in a soap film for the first time. A vertical soap film shock tube was used to generate a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave and a NACA-0012 airfoil intruded into the soap film was towed to shed the starting vortex. The interesting interaction phenomena were then visualized using a traditional high-speed flash photography. The concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) used was 0.5 CMC (critical micelle concentration) to keep the surfactant molecules behave as two-dimensional gases. A sequence of pictures shows that the shock is distorted non-symmetrically as it passes through the spiral vortex flow field and the vortex structure is compressed in the direction normal to the shock. These flow features observed in soap films are qualitatively similar to their counterparts in gases. In addition, the visualization of the interactions of a quasi-one-dimensional moving shock wave with a K árm án vortex street are presented.

  7. Peculiarities of evolution of shock waves generated by boiling coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, M. V.; Vozhakov, I. S.; Lezhnin, S. I.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of compression wave generation and evolution at the disk target was performed for the case of explosive-type boiling of coolant; the boiling is initiated by endwall rupture of a high-pressure pipeline. The calculations were performed for shock wave amplitude at different times and modes of pipe rupture. The simulated pressure of a target-reflected shock wave is different from the theoretical value for ideal gas; this discrepancy between simulation and theory becomes lower at higher distances of flow from the nozzle exit. Comparative simulation study was performed for flow of two-phase coolant with account for slip flow effect and for different sizes of droplets. Simulation gave the limiting droplet size when the single-velocity homogeneous flow model is valid, i.e., the slip flow effect is insignificant.

  8. Wide Range Flow and Heat Flux Sensors for In-Flight Flow Characterization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The tracking of critical flow features (CFFs) such as stagnation point, flow separation, shock, and transition in flight provides insight into actual aircraft...

  9. Shock train unsteadiness induced by separation bubble instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Robin; Driscoll, James; Gamba, Mirko

    2017-11-01

    A shock train is a highly three-dimensional system of shock and compression waves that gradually decelerates a supersonic flow in a duct and is typically found in the isolator section of high-speed air breathing engines. These fluid systems exhibit what we term inherent unsteadiness, which are self-excited fluctuations of the shock train system about its time-average position even with nominally constant inflow and outflow conditions. We have found that the instabilities of the separation bubbles within the shock train system contribute to the shock unsteadiness. The existence of boundary layer separation along the shock train is generally an accepted or assumed feature of shock trains. However, its properties, such as the point of separation, its length and thickness, are not well defined from works in the literature. Here, we present two-component particle image velocimetry measurements to examine the separation bubble characteristics and determine the physical structure of the perturbations that the separation bubble creates.

  10. Broadband Shock Noise in Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Broadband shock noise (BBSN) has been studied in some detail in single-flow jets and recently in dual-stream jets with separate flow exhaust systems. Shock noise is of great concern in these latter cases because of the noise created for the aircraft cabin by the underexpanded nozzle flow at cruise. Another case where shock noise is of concern is in the case of future supersonic aircraft that are expected to have bypass ratios small enough to justify internally mixed exhaust systems, and whose mission will push cycles to the point of imperfectly expanded flows. Dual-stream jets with internally mixed plume have some simplifying aspects relative to the separate flow jets, having a single shock structure given by the common nozzle pressure. This is used to separate the contribution of the turbulent shear layer to the broadband shock noise. Shock structure is held constant while the geometry and strength of the inner and merged shear layers are varying by changing splitter area ratio and core stream temperature. Flow and noise measurements are presented which document the efforts at separating the contribution of the inner shear layer to the broadband shock noise.

  11. POSTURAL SHOCK IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Ralph L.; Knauer, John; Larson, Roger K.

    1955-01-01

    Signs and symptoms of shock may be produced in some patients in late pregnancy by putting them in the dorsal recumbent posture. Change from this position will relieve the condition. The features of the supine hypotensive syndrome can be duplicated by applying pressure to the abdomen with the patient in a lateral position. The postural variations of venous pressure, blood pressure, and pulse appear to be due to obstruction of venous return from the lower portion of the body caused by the large uterus of late pregnancy compressing the vena cava. When shock is observed in a woman in late pregnancy, she should be turned to a lateral position before more active measures of treatment are begun. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14351983

  12. Radiative relativistic shock adiabate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsintsadze, L.N.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    The influences of thermal radiation on the state equation of shock waves, derived in the previous paper [L. N. Tsintsadze, Phys. Plasmas 2, 4462 (1995)], are studied and a series of relations of thermodynamic quantities that hold for shock waves are derived. It is shown that the presence of radiation can strongly change the compressibility of the plasma. It is well known that for polytropic gases the compressibility cannot change more than four times the initial value in the case of nonrelativistic temperatures. The numerical calculations show that there are no such restrictions, when the radiation energy exceeds the kinetic energy of the plasma. The ultrarelativistic temperature range is also covered in our numerical calculations. Also studied are the influences of the radiation on the PT and the TV diagrams. A significant modification due to radiation is found in every case studied. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Shock resistance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouard, M.

    1984-03-01

    In the framework of mechanical tests and to answer the different requests for tests, the T.C.R (Transport Conditionnement et Retraitement) laboratory got test facilities. These installations allow to carry out tests of resistance to shocks, mainly at the safety level of components of nuclear power plants, mockups of transport casks for fuel elements and transport containers for radioactive materials. They include a tower and a catapult. This paper give a decription of the facilities and explain their operation way [fr

  14. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papin P.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have investigated the low-strain-rate constitutive response of beryllium, the combined influence of high strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior and microstructure of beryllium has received limited attention over the last 40 years. In the current work, high strain rate tests were conducted using both explosive drive and a gas gun to accelerate the material. Prior studies have focused on tensile loading behavior, or limited conditions of dynamic strain rate and/or temperature. Two constitutive strength (plasticity models, the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW and Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS models, were calibrated using common quasi-static and Hopkinson bar data. However, simulations with the two models give noticeably different results when compared with the measured experimental wave profiles. The experimental results indicate that, even if fractured by the initial shock loading, the Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading. Additional “arrested” drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  15. Quantitative assessment of the microcirculation in healthy volunteers and in patients with septic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edul, Vanina S. Kanoore; Enrico, Carolina; Laviolle, Bruno; Vazquez, Alejandro Risso; Ince, Can; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The microcirculation of septic patients has been characterized only semiquantitatively. Our goal was to characterize the sublingual microcirculation in healthy volunteers and patients with septic shock quantitatively. Our hypotheses were that 1) hyperdynamic blood flow is absent in septic shock; 2)

  16. Modeling and evaluation of HE driven shock effects in copper with the MTS model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.J.; Lassila, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    Many experimental studies have investigated the effect of shock pressure on the post-shock mechanical properties of OFHC copper. These studies have shown that significant hardening occurs during shock loading due to dislocation processes and twinning. It has been demonstrated that when an appropriate initial value of the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) is specified, the post-shock flow stress of OFE copper is well described by relationships derived independently for unshocked materials. In this study we consider the evolution of the MTS during HE driven shock loading processes and the effect on the subsequent flow stress of the copper. An increased post shock flow stress results in a higher material temperature due to an increase in the plastic work. An increase in temperature leads to thermal softening which reduces the flow stress. These coupled effects will determine if there is melting in a shaped charge jet or a necking instability in an EFP Ww. 'Me critical factor is the evolution path followed combined with the 'current' temperature, plastic strain, and strain rate. Preliminary studies indicate that in simulations of HE driven shock with very high resolution zoning, the MTS saturates because of the rate dependence in the evolution law. On going studies are addressing this and other issues with the goal of developing a version of the MT'S model that treats HE driven, shock loading, temperature, strain, and rate effects apriori

  17. Behandling af kardiogent shock med perkutan mekanisk cirkulationsstøtte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders; Kaltoft, Anne Kjer; Hassager, Christian

    2013-01-01

    a ventricular assist device which can be inserted in the acute setting using the Impella device, a catheter-based flow pump. DanShock is a Danish multicentre study that will assess whether circulatory support using the Impella device will improve the outcome of cardiogenic shock compared to conventional...

  18. Towards High Resolution Numerical Algorithms for Wave Dominated Physical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-30

    Simulation hochfrequenter elektromagnetischer Felder mit der Discontinuous Galerkin Fi- nite Elemente Methode [ Numerical Simulations of High...elektromagnetischer Felder mit der Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Elemente Methode [ Local Time Integration for Efficient Com- putation of High-Frequency...hochfrequenter elektromagnetischer Felder mit der Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Elemente Methode [ Local Time Integration for Efficient Com- putation of

  19. Simulation of a shock tube with a small exit nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yigang; Olzmann, Matthias; Magagnato, Franco

    2018-02-01

    Shock tubes are frequently used to rapidly heat up reaction mixtures to study chemical reaction mechanisms and kinetics in the field of combustion chemistry [1]. In the present work, the flow field inside a shock tube with a small nozzle in the end plate has been investigated to support the analysis of reacting chemical mixtures with an attached mass spectrometer and to clarify whether the usual assumptions for the flow field and the related thermodynamics are fulfilled. In the present work, the details of the flow physics inside the tube and the flow out of the nozzle in the end plate have been investigated. Due to the large differences in the typical length scales and the large pressure ratios of this special device, a very strong numerical stiffness prevails during the simulation process. Second-order ROE numerical schemes have been employed to simulate the flow field inside the shock tube. The simulations were performed with the commercial code ANSYS Fluent [2]. Axial-symmetric boundary conditions are employed to reduce the consumption of CPU time. A density-based transient scheme has been used and validated in terms of accuracy and efficiency. The simulation results for pressure and density are compared with analytical solutions. Numerical results show that a density-based numerical scheme performs better when dealing with shock-tube problems [5]. The flow field near the nozzle is studied in detail, and the effects of the nozzle to pressure and temperature variations inside the tube are investigated. The results show that this special shock-tube setup can be used to study high-temperature gas-phase chemical reactions with reasonable accuracy.

  20. Thermal shock behaviour of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantozzi, G.; Saadaoui, M.; Chevalier, J.; Olagnon, C. [Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique UMR, Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2000-07-01

    Thermal shock of ceramics is complex to analyse because of the important number of parameters to take into account. Thermal shock analysis has been refined by considering the dependence with temperature of the different parameters. From the temperature evolution in the specimen, the stress and stress intensity factor (SIF) profiles can be calculated. This allows the prediction of the crack evolution during thermal shock. Thermal shock experiments conducted by using an in-situ acoustic emission (AE) apparatus allow the determination of the time of unstable crack growth. The effect of crack growth resistance (R-curve behaviour) can be taken into account and, if it is significant, the thermal shock resistance of ceramics can be improved. The fracture mechanical analysis was used to determine the R-curve behaviour of alumina material subjected to thermal shock. A good agreement is observed between predictions of thermal fracture theory based on fracture mechanics and experimental results. (orig.)

  1. Finnish exchange students' culture shock

    OpenAIRE

    Pekkala, Karoliina

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor’s thesis is written about culture shock experienced by the exchange students from Finland. It is commissioned by an international students exchange organisation located in Finland. The aim of the research was to find out how much the host country affects the culture shock and to identify aspects that affect the adaptation of the students. The goal is to provide the future exchange students with advise on coping with culture shock. Theoretical framework consists of defining w...

  2. Eight Annual Conference on Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    University 2) "Role of Eicosanoids in Disease States Other Than Shock" Perry V. Halushka, MD, PhD Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston 3...anoxemia re- sults in improved myocardial function and augments energy reserves of myocardial gly- cogen(MG). As many patients with heart disease also have...pretreated (30 min) shocked and sham control rats. SAO shock was induced by occlusions of the coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries for 60 mins. Plasma

  3. Advances in CFD Prediction of Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knight, Doyle; Yan, Hong; Panaras, Argyris G; Zheltovodov, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    ... on the same topic by Knight and Degrez ("Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions in High Mach Number Flows - A Critical Survey of Current CFD Prediction Capabilities," AGARD Advisory Report AR-319, Volume II, December 1998...

  4. Establishing Relationship between Pressure & Normal Shocks for Convergent-Divergent Nozzle-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M. Lakdawal

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the present study is to analyze experimentally the pressure variation in a varying area circular passage at different supply pressures and compare these with the theoretical solutions. It has been observed that flow of stream of the normal shock is always supersonic while in downstream is always sub-sonic thus shocks slow down the flow rates by sudden increase in pressure ratios. Shock strength is determined uniquely by the mach no. higher the mach no. of upstream of supersonic flow , greater is the shock strength & lower is downstream subsonic mach no. Theoretically minimum pressure is always present at the throat during subsonic condition. But experimentally the position of minimum pressure might be varied because of variation in the stagnation properties of the fluid. This project also includes flow phenomenon over the entire length of nozzle for varying back pressure.

  5. Nitroglycerin reverts clinical manifestations of poor peripheral perfusion in patients with circulatory shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.P. Lima (Alexandre ); M.E. van Genderen (Michel); J. van Bommel (Jasper); E. Klijn (Elko); T. Jansem (Tim); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Recent clinical studies have shown a relationship between abnormalities in peripheral perfusion and unfavorable outcome in patients with circulatory shock. Nitroglycerin is effective in restoring alterations in microcirculatory blood flow. The aim of this study was to

  6. Interaction of Accretion Shocks with Winds Kinsuk Acharya , Sandip ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Black hole physics—accretion—winds—shock waves— hydrodynamics. 1. Introduction. In a black hole accretion, the flow must be sub-Keplerian close to the horizon and the specific angular momentum is almost constant. As a result, the centrifugal force dominates over gravity and a centrifugal barrier dominated boundary ...

  7. Standing Shocks around Black Holes and Estimation of Outflow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. We self-consistently obtain shock locations in an accretion flow by using an analytical method. One can obtain the spectral properties, quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and the outflow rates when the inflow parameters are known. Since temperature of the CENBOL decides the spectral states of the black hole, ...

  8. Myths of "shock therapy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, M

    1977-09-01

    The author discusses the myths of the ECT process--that shock and the convulsion are essential, memory loss and brain damage are inescapable, and little is known of the process--and assesses the fallacies in these ideas. Present views of the ECT process suggest that its mode of action in depression may best be described as a prolonged form of diencephalic stimulation, particularly useful to affect the hypothalamic dysfunctions that characterize depressive illness. The author emphasizes the need for further study of this treatment modality and for self-regulation by the profession.

  9. Bifurcation parameters of a reflected shock wave in cylindrical channels of different roughnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penyazkov, O.; Skilandz, A.

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effect of bifurcation on the induction time in cylindrical shock tubes used for chemical kinetic experiments, one should know the parameters of the bifurcation structure of a reflected shock wave. The dynamics and parameters of the shock wave bifurcation, which are caused by reflected shock wave-boundary layer interactions, are studied experimentally in argon, in air, and in a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture for Mach numbers M = 1.3-3.5 in a 76-mm-diameter shock tube without any ramp. Measurements were taken at a constant gas density behind the reflected shock wave. Over a wide range of experimental conditions, we studied the axial projection of the oblique shock wave and the pressure distribution in the vicinity of the triple Mach configuration at 50, 150, and 250 mm from the endwall, using side-wall schlieren and pressure measurements. Experiments on a polished shock tube and a shock tube with a surface roughness of 20 {μ }m Ra were carried out. The surface roughness was used for initiating small-scale turbulence in the boundary layer behind the incident shock wave. The effect of small-scale turbulence on the homogenization of the transition zone from the laminar to turbulent boundary layer along the shock tube perimeter was assessed, assuming its influence on a subsequent stabilization of the bifurcation structure size versus incident shock wave Mach number, as well as local flow parameters behind the reflected shock wave. The influence of surface roughness on the bifurcation development and pressure fluctuations near the wall, as well as on the Mach number, at which the bifurcation first develops, was analyzed. It was found that even small additional surface roughness can lead to an overshoot in pressure growth by a factor of two, but it can stabilize the bifurcation structure along the shock tube perimeter.

  10. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan-Miller, G. C.; Stone, W. D.

    2017-11-01

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in the shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky (Astrophys J 398:184-189. https://doi.org/10.1086/171847, 1992) on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and making use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. In particular, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.

  11. Off-center blast in a shocked medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan-Miller, G. C.; Stone, W. D.

    2017-01-01

    When multiple blasts occur at different times, the situation arises in which a blast wave is propagating into a medium that has already been shocked. Determining the evolution in the shape of the second shock is not trivial, as it is propagating into air that is not only non-uniform, but also non-stationary. To accomplish this task, we employ the method of Kompaneets to determine the shape of a shock in a non-uniform media. We also draw from the work of Korycansky (Astrophys J 398:184–189, 1992) on an off-center explosion in a medium with radially varying density. Extending this to treat non-stationary flow, and making use of approximations to the Sedov solution for the point blast problem, we are able to determine an analytic expression for the evolving shape of the second shock. In particular, we consider the case of a shock in air at standard ambient temperature and pressure, with the second shock occurring shortly after the original blast wave reaches it, as in a sympathetic detonation.

  12. On the shock cell structure and noise of supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Jackson, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A linear solution modeling the shock cell structure of an axisymmetric supersonic jet operated at off-design conditions is developed by the method of multiple-scales. The model solution takes into account the gradual spatial change of the mean flow in the downstream direction. Turbulence in the mixing layer of the jet has the tendency of smoothing out the sharp velocity and density gradients induced by the shocks. To simulate this effect, eddy viscosity terms are incorporated in the model. It is known that the interaction between the quasi-periodic shock cells and the downstream propagating large turbulence structures in the mixing layer of the jet is responsible for the generation of broadband shock associated noise. Experimentally, the dominant part of this noise has been found to originate from the part of the jet near the end of the potential core. Calculated shock cell spacing at the end of the jet core according to the present model is used to estimate the peak frequencies of the shock associated noise for a range of observation angles. Very favorable agreement with experimental measurements is found.

  13. Evaluation of XHVRB for Capturing Explosive Shock Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Leah; Schmitt, Robert; Kittell, Dave; Harstad, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Explosive shock desensitization phenomena have been recognized for some time. It has been demonstrated that pressure-based reactive flow models do not adequately capture the basic nature of the explosive behavior. Historically, replacing the local pressure with a shock captured pressure has dramatically improved the numerical modeling approaches. Models based upon shock pressure or functions of entropy have recently been developed. A pseudo-entropy based formulation using the History Variable Reactive Burn model, as proposed by Starkenberg, was implemented into the Eulerian shock physics code CTH. Improvements in the shock capturing algorithm were made. The model is demonstrated to reproduce single shock behavior consistent with published pop plot data. It is also demonstrated to capture a desensitization effect based on available literature data, and to qualitatively capture dead zones from desensitization in 2D corner turning experiments. This models shows promise for use in modeling and simulation problems that are relevant to the desensitization phenomena. Issues are identified with the current implementation and future work is proposed for improving and expanding model capabilities. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Hydrogen film cooling with incident and swept-shock interactions in a Mach 6.4 nitrogen free stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, George C.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of slot film cooling of a flat plate in a Mach 6.4 flow with and without incident and swept oblique shock interactions was experimentally investigated. Hydrogen was the primary coolant gas, although some tests were conducted using helium as the coolant. Tests were conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel with a nitrogen flow field to preclude combustion of the hydrogen coolant gas. A two-dimensional highly instrumented model developed in a previous test series was used. Parameters investigated included coolant mass flow rate, coolant gas, local free-stream Reynolds number, incident oblique shock strength, and a swept oblique shock. Both gases were highly effective coolants in undisturbed flow; however, both incident and swept shocks degraded that effectiveness.

  15. Electric field measurements at subcritical, oblique bow shock crossings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wygant, J.R.; Bensadoun, M.; Mozer, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements at oblique, subcritical bow shock crossings are presented from the ISEE 1 University of California, Berkeley, double-probe electric field experiment. The measurements averaged over the 3-s spin period of the spacecraft provide the first observations of the large-scale (100 km) laminar oscillations in the longitudinal component of the electric field associated with the whistler precursor which is characteristic of these dispersive shocks. The amplitude of the oscillations increases from ∼0.5 mV/m to a maximum of 6 mV/m across the magnetic ramp of the shock (directed along the shock normal). The calculated electric potential drops across the shocks varied from 340 to 550 volts, which is 40-60% of the observed loss of kinetic energy associated with the bulk flow of the ions. These measurements suggest that at these shocks the additional deceleration of incident ions is due to the Lorentz force. The contributions to the normal component of the large-scale electric field at the shock due to the parallel and perpendicular components (relative to the magnetic field) of the electric field are evaluated. It is shown that the perpendicular component of the electric field dominates, accounting for most of the cross-shock potential, but that there is a nonnegligible parallel component. This large-scale parallel component has a magnitude of 1-2 mV/m which sometimes results in a potential well for electrons with a depth of ∼150 eV. It is experimentally demonstrated that the dominance of the perpendicular over the parallel component of the electric field resulted in a correlation between the longitudinal component of the large-scale electric field and the fluctuations in the magnetic field component perpendicular to the coplanarity plane

  16. Two-state ion heating at quasi-parallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, M.F.; Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; Onsager, T.G.; Russell, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    In a previous study of ion heating at quasi-parallel shocks, the authors showed a case in which the ion distributions downstream from the shock alternated between a cooler, denser, core/shoulder type and a hotter, less dense, more Maxwellian type. In this paper they further document the alternating occurrence of two different ion states downstream from several quasi-parallel shocks. Three separate lines of evidence are presented to show that the two states are not related in an evolutionary sense, but rather both are produced alternately at the shock: (1) the asymptotic downstream plasma parameters (density, ion temperature, and flow speed) are intermediate between those characterizing the two different states closer to the shock, suggesting that the asymptotic state is produced by a mixing of the two initial states; (2) examples of apparently interpenetrating (i.e., mixing) distributions can be found during transitions from one state to the other; and (3) examples of both types of distributions can be found at actual crossings of the shock ramp. The alternation between the two different types of ion distribution provides direct observational support for the idea that the dissipative dynamics of at least some quasi-parallel shocks is non-stationary and cyclic in nature, as demonstrated by recent numerical simulations. Typical cycle times between intervals of similar ion heating states are ∼2 upstream ion gyroperiods. Both the simulations and the in situ observations indicate that a process of coherent ion reflection is commonly an important part of the dissipation at quasi-parallel shocks

  17. Evaluation of Euler fluxes by a high-order CFD scheme: shock instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Guohua; Zhao, Xiaohui; Mao, Meiliang; Chen, Jianqiang; Deng, Xiaogang; Liu, Huayong

    2014-05-01

    The construction of Euler fluxes is an important step in shock-capturing/upwind schemes. It is well known that unsuitable fluxes are responsible for many shock anomalies, such as the carbuncle phenomenon. Three kinds of flux vector splittings (FVSs) as well as three kinds of flux difference splittings (FDSs) are evaluated for the shock instability by a fifth-order weighted compact nonlinear scheme. The three FVSs are Steger-Warming splitting, van Leer splitting and kinetic flux vector splitting (KFVS). The three FDSs are Roe's splitting, advection upstream splitting method (AUSM) type splitting and Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) type splitting. Numerical results indicate that FVSs and high dissipative FDSs undergo a relative lower risk on the shock instability than that of low dissipative FDSs. However, none of the fluxes evaluated in the present study can entirely avoid the shock instability. Generally, the shock instability may be caused by any of the following factors: low dissipation, high Mach number, unsuitable grid distribution, large grid aspect ratio, and the relative shock-internal flow state (or position) between upstream and downstream shock waves. It comes out that the most important factor is the relative shock-internal state. If the shock-internal state is closer to the downstream state, the computation is at higher susceptibility to the shock instability. Wall-normal grid distribution has a greater influence on the shock instability than wall-azimuthal grid distribution because wall-normal grids directly impact on the shock-internal position. High shock intensity poses a high risk on the shock instability, but its influence is not as much as the shock-internal state. Large grid aspect ratio is also a source of the shock instability. Some results of a second-order scheme and a first-order scheme are also given. The comparison between the high-order scheme and the two low-order schemes indicates that high-order schemes are at a higher risk of the shock

  18. Electric Shock Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Electric Shock Injuries in Children Page Content ​When the human body comes into ... can cause anything from minor discomfort to serious injury (even death). Young children, particularly toddlers, experience electric shock most often when ...

  19. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    to open surgery, the cost of the ESWT is very reasonable. But nevertheless it is necessary to improve the basic un ... In second group, shock waves are used to measure distances because of the low energy loss over large distances ... pared to a piezoelectric hydrophone. The rise time of an electrohydraulic generated shock ...

  20. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  1. Numerical analysis on interactions of vortex, shock wave, and exothermal reaction in a supersonic planar shear layer laden with droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhaoxin; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Longxi

    2018-03-01

    The analysis on the interactions of a large-scale shearing vortex, an incident oblique shock wave, and a chemical reaction in a planar shear layer is performed by numerical simulations. The reacting flows are obtained by directly solving the multi-species Navier-Stokes equations in the Eulerian frame, and the motions of individual point-mass fuel droplets are tracked in the Lagrangian frame considering the two-way coupling. The influences of shock strength and spray equivalence ratio on the shock-vortex interaction and the induced combustion are further studied. Under the present conditions, the incident shock is distorted by the vortex evolution to form the complicated waves including an incident shock wave, a multi-refracted wave, a reflected wave, and a transmitted wave. The local pressure and temperature are elevated by the shock impingement on the shearing vortex, which carries flammable mixtures. The chemical reaction is mostly accelerated by the refracted shock across the vortex. Two different exothermal reaction modes could be distinguished during the shock-vortex interaction as a thermal mode, due to the additional energy from the incident shock, and a local quasi detonation mode, due to the coupling of the refracted wave with reaction. The former mode detaches the flame and shock wave, whereas the latter mode tends to occur when the incident shock strength is higher and local equivalence ratio is higher approaching to the stoichiometric value. The numerical results illustrate that those two modes by shock-vortex interaction depend on the structure of the post-shock flame kernel, which may be located either in the vortex-braids of post-shock flows or in the shock-vortex interaction regime.

  2. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  3. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  4. Shocks, singularities and oscillations in nonlinear optics and fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Santo, Daniele; Lannes, David

    2017-01-01

    The book collects the most relevant results from the INdAM Workshop "Shocks, Singularities and Oscillations in Nonlinear Optics and Fluid Mechanics" held in Rome, September 14-18, 2015. The contributions discuss recent major advances in the study of nonlinear hyperbolic systems, addressing general theoretical issues such as symmetrizability, singularities, low regularity or dispersive perturbations. It also investigates several physical phenomena where such systems are relevant, such as nonlinear optics, shock theory (stability, relaxation) and fluid mechanics (boundary layers, water waves, Euler equations, geophysical flows, etc.). It is a valuable resource for researchers in these fields. .

  5. Shock Wave Diffraction Phenomena around Slotted Splitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of aerospace engineering, the study of the characteristics of vortical flows and their unsteady phenomena finds numerous engineering applications related to improvements in the design of tip devices, enhancement of combustor performance, and control of noise generation. A large amount of work has been carried out in the analysis of the shock wave diffraction around conventional geometries such as sharp and rounded corners, but the employment of splitters with lateral variation has hardly attracted the attention of researchers. The investigation of this phenomenon around two-dimensional wedges has allowed the understanding of the basic physical principles of the flow features. On the other hand, important aspects that appear in the third dimension due to the turbulent nature of the vortices are omitted. The lack of studies that use three-dimensional geometries has motivated the current work to experimentally investigate the evolution of the shock wave diffraction around two splitters with spike-shaped structures for Mach numbers of 1.31 and 1.59. Schlieren photography was used to obtain an insight into the sequential diffraction processes that take place in different planes. Interacting among them, these phenomena generate a complicated turbulent cloud with a vortical arrangement.

  6. Study of magnetized accretion flow with cooling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Chattopadhyay, Indranil

    2018-02-01

    We have studied shock in magnetized accretion flow/funnel flow in case of neutron star with bremsstrahlung cooling and cyclotron cooling. All accretion solutions terminate with a shock close to the neutron star surface, but at some regions of the parameter space, it also harbours a second shock away from the star surface. We have found that cyclotron cooling is necessary for correct accretion solutions which match the surface boundary conditions.

  7. DO COROTATING INTERACTION REGION ASSOCIATED SHOCKS SURVIVE WHEN THEY PROPAGATE INTO THE HELIOSHEATH?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provornikova, E.; Opher, M.; Izmodenov, V.; Toth, G.

    2012-01-01

    During the solar minimum at the distance of 42-52 AU from the Sun, Voyager 2 observed recurrent sharp, shock-like increases in the solar wind speed that look very much like forward shocks (Lazarus et al.). The shocks were produced by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that originated near the Sun. After the termination shock (TS) crossing in 2007, Voyager 2 entered the heliosheath and has been observing the plasma emanated during the recent solar minima. Measurements show high variable flow, but there were no shocks detected in the heliosheath. When CIR-driven shocks propagate to the outer heliosphere, their structure changes due to collision and merging processes of CIRs. In this Letter, we explore an effect of the merging of CIRs on the structure of CIR-associated shocks. We use a three-dimensional MHD model to study the outward propagation of the shocks with characteristics similar to those observed by Voyager 2 at ∼45 AU (Lazarus et al. 1999). We show that due to merging of CIRs (1) reverse shocks disappear, (2) forward shocks become weaker due to interaction with rarefaction regions from preceding CIRs, and (3) forward shocks significantly weaken in the heliosheath. Merged CIRs produce compression regions in the heliosheath with small fluctuations of plasma parameters. Amplitudes of the fluctuations diminish as they propagate deeper in the sheath. We conclude that interaction of shocks and rarefaction regions could be one of the explanations, why shocks produced by CIRs are not observed in the heliosheath by Voyager 2 while they were frequently observed upstream the TS.

  8. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  9. Marangoni elasticity of flowing soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2017-08-01

    We measure the Marangoni elasticity of a flowing soap film to be 22 mN/m irrespective of its width, thickness, flow speed, or the bulk soap concentration. We perform this measurement by generating an oblique shock in the soap film and measuring the shock angle, flow speed, and thickness. We postulate that the elasticity is constant because the film surface is crowded with soap molecules. Our method allows nondestructive measurement of flowing soap film elasticity and the value 22 mN/m is likely applicable to other similarly constructed flowing soap films.

  10. Shock capturing in discontinuous Galerkin spectral elements via the entropy viscosity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Jason; Shringarpure, Mrugesh; Fischer, Paul; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2017-11-01

    We present a 3D discontinuous Galerkin spectral element solver for compressible flows with shock waves using artificial viscosity to regularize the solution for representation by nested tensor products of high-order Lagrange polynomials. The viscosity is constructed from a smoothed evaluation of the residual of an entropy inequality, localizing the artificial viscosity around shock waves and other flow features that would otherwise not be representable in spectral elements without thermodynamic violations due to Gibbs oscillations. Applied to the Guermond-Popov (2014) stress tensor, this smoothed, continuous artificial viscosity is easily integrated with the non-symmetric numerical fluxes of Baumann and Oden (1999). The method is implemented on top of nek5000, leveraging an outstanding high-performance spectral element code to solve shocked flows over curved surfaces. The interaction of a Mach 3 shock with a sphere is shown to demonstrate this capability. Supported by the Department of Energy Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Contract DE-NA0002378.

  11. The jumps of physical quantities at fast shocks under pressure anisotropy: theory versus observations at the bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, D.F.

    2000-10-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with magnetized planets leads to the formation of the so-called magnetosphere, a cavity generated by the geomagnetic field. The supersonic, superalfvenic, and magnetized solar wind flow interacting with blunt bodies produces a detached bow shock, separating the solar wind from the magnetosheath, the region between the shock wave and the magnetopause. On approach to a planetary obstacle, the solar wind becomes subsonic at the bow shock and then flows past the planet in the magnetosheath. At the bow shock, the plasma parameters and the magnetic field strength change from upstream to downstream, i.e., an increase of plasma density, temperature, pressure, and magnetic field strength, and a decrease of the velocity across the shock. In this PhD thesis we mainly concentrate on the variations of all physical quantities across the bow shock taking into account pressure anisotropy, which is an important feature in space plasma physics and observed by various spacecraft missions in the solar wind as well as in the magnetosheath. Dealing with anisotropic plasma conditions, one has to introduce the so-called pressure tensor, characterized by two scalar pressures, the pressure perpendicular (P p erp) and the pressure parallel (P p arallel) with respect to the magnetic field and in general one speaks of anisotropic conditions for P p erp is not P p arallel. Many spacecraft observations of the solar wind show P p arallel > P p erp, whereas observations of the magnetosheath show the opposite case, P p arallel p erp. Therefore, dissipation of kinetic energy into thermal energy plays an important role in studying the variations of the relevant physical quantities across the shock. It has to be mentioned that planetary bow shocks are good examples for fast MHD shock waves. Therefore, the basic equations for describing the changes across the shock can be obtained by integrating the MHD equations in conservative form. We note that these equations, the

  12. Shock-induced plasticity in tantalum single crystals: Interatomic potentials and large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo, R.; Germann, T. C.; Guerrero, O.; An, Q.; Holian, B. L.

    2013-10-01

    We report on large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shock wave compression in tantalum single crystals. Two new embedded atom method interatomic potentials of Ta have been developed and optimized by fitting to experimental and density functional theory data. The potentials reproduce the isothermal equation of state of Ta up to 300 GPa. We examined the nature of the plastic deformation and elastic limits as functions of crystal orientation. Shock waves along (100), (110), and (111) exhibit elastic-plastic two-wave structures. Plastic deformation in shock compression along (110) is due primarily to the formation of twins that nucleate at the shock front. The strain-rate dependence of the flow stress is found to be orientation dependent, with (110) shocks exhibiting the weaker dependence. Premelting at a temperature much below that of thermodynamic melting at the shock front is observed in all three directions for shock pressures above about 180 GPa.

  13. Converging cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic shock collapse onto a power-law-varying line current

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-03-16

    We investigate the convergence behaviour of a cylindrical, fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shock wave in a neutrally ionized gas collapsing onto an axial line current that generates a power law in time, azimuthal magnetic field. The analysis is done within the framework of a modified version of ideal MHD for an inviscid, non-dissipative, neutrally ionized compressible gas. The time variation of the magnetic field is tuned such that it approaches zero at the instant that the shock reaches the axis. This configuration is motivated by the desire to produce a finite magnetic field at finite shock radius but a singular gas pressure and temperature at the instant of shock impact. Our main focus is on the variation with shock radius, as, of the shock Mach number and pressure behind the shock as a function of the magnetic field power-law exponent, where gives a constant-in-time line current. The flow problem is first formulated using an extension of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) into the time domain to take account of the time-varying conditions ahead of the converging shock, coupled with appropriate shock-jump conditions for a fast, symmetric MHD shock. This provides a pair of ordinary differential equations describing both and the time evolution on the shock, as a function of, constrained by a collapse condition required to achieve tuned shock convergence. Asymptotic, analytical results for and are obtained over a range of for general, and for both small and large . In addition, numerical solutions of the GSD equations are performed over a large range of, for selected parameters using . The accuracy of the GSD model is verified for some cases using direct numerical solution of the full, radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the GSD solutions, it is found that the physical character of the shock convergence to the axis is a strong function of . For μ≤0.816, and both approach unity at shock impact owing to the dominance of the strong

  14. Pediatric cardiogenic shock: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhranshu Sekhar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiogenic shock is a pathophysiologic state where an abnormality of cardiac function is responsible for the failure of the cardiovascular system to meet the metabolic needs of the body tissues.Though it is less common than hypovolemia as the primary etiology in paediatric shock, eventually myocardial function is affected because of reduced perfusion in all forms of shock. Myocardial malfunction, in other forms of shock, is secondary to ischemia, acidosis, drugs, toxins or inflammation. Cardiogenic shock is a low output state characterized by elevated filling pressures, neurohormonal activation with the evidence of end-organ hypoperfusion. The management is challenging and consists of a combination of conventional cardio-respiratory support, vasoactive medications with correction of the anatomic cardiac defects. Treatment options like Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and Ventricular assist devices provide a bridge to recovery, surgery or transplant. As cardiogenic shock in children carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality, emphasis should be placed on expedient management to arrest the pathophysiological cascade and avoid hypotension.This article aims to review the aetio-pathophysiological basis of pediatric cardiogenic shock, diagnostic options, recent advances in management modalities and outcome.

  15. Impingement of a planar shock on a dense-field of particles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Beresh, Steven Jay; Trott, Wayne Merle; Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Baer, Melvin R.; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2010-11-01

    A novel multiphase shock tube has recently been developed to study particle dynamics in gas-solid flows having particle volume fractions that reside between the dilute and granular regimes. The method for introducing particles into the tube involves the use of a gravity-fed contoured particle seeder, which is capable of producing dense fields of spatially isotropic particles. The facility is capable of producing planar shocks having a maximum shock Mach number of about 2.1 that propagate into air at initially ambient conditions. The primary purpose of this new facility is to provide high fidelity data of shock-particle interactions in flows having particle volume fractions of about 1 to 50%. To achieve this goal, the facility drives a planar shock into a spatially isotropic field, or curtain, of particles. Experiments are conducted for two configurations where the particle curtain is either parallel to the spanwise, or the streamwise direction. Arrays of high-frequency-response pressure transducers are placed near the particle curtain to measure the attenuation and shape change of the shock owing to its interaction with the dense gas particle field. In addition, simultaneous high-speed imaging is used to visualize the impact of the shock on the particle curtain and to measure the particle motion induced downstream of the shock.

  16. The dynamics analysis of a ferrofluid shock absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jie; Chang, Jianjun [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Li, Decai, E-mail: dcli@bjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yang, Xiaolong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Guangxi University of Science and Technology, Liuzhou, Guangxi 545006 (China)

    2016-03-15

    The paper presents a shock absorber using three magnets as the inertial mass. Movement of the inertial mass inside a cylindrical body filled with ferrofluid will lead to a viscous dissipation of the oscillating system energy. The influence of a dumbbell-like ferrofluid structure on the energy dissipation is considered and the magnetic restoring force is investigated by experiment and theoretical calculation. A theoretical model of the hydrodynamics and energy dissipation processes is developed, which includes the geometrical characteristics of the body, the fluid viscosity, and the external magnetic field. The theory predicts the experimental results well under some condition. The shock absorber can be used in spacecraft technology. - Highlights: • We study a ferrofluid shock absorber. • The mechanical model of the flow of the ferrofluid has been built. • The theoretical model of the energy dissipation processes is developed. • The magnetic restoring force between the body and the magnets has been measured.

  17. Current concepts in the management of cardiogenic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trohman RG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Richard G TrohmanCardiology, Electrophysiology, Arrhythmia and Pacemaker Service, Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Cardiogenic shock most commonly results from myocardial infarction and is associated with mortality rates ranging from 40% to 50%. Early revascularization improves mortality. Mechanical complications of myocardial infarction require surgical intervention. Medical, device and mechanical therapies may improve hemodynamics, but are not associated with improvement in short term survival. Massive pulmonary embolism may also result in cardiogenic shock. Prevention of fatal RV failure requires treatment that will result in rapid restoration of flow through the occluded pulmonary arteries. This review summarizes these and other clinical entities that may result in cardiogenic shock with an emphasis placed on a guideline-based approach to their management.Keywords: myocardial infarction, revascularization, mechanical complications, surgery, pulmonary embolism

  18. A collisionless shock wave experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.; Sgro, A.G.; Thomas, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    Collisionless shock waves are a very important heating mechanism for plasmas and are commonly found in space and astrophysical environments. Collisionless shocks were studied in the laboratory more than 20 years ago, and more recently in space via in situ satellite measurements. The authors propose a new laboratory shock wave experiment to address unresolved issues related to the differences in the partition of plasma heating between electrons and ions in space and laboratory plasmas, which can have important implications for a number of physical systems

  19. Shocks in the Early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2016-09-23

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations of the kind observed on very large scales today, it also leads to the production of shocks in the radiation fluid of the very early Universe. Shocks cause departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as create vorticity and gravitational waves. For a scale-invariant spectrum and standard model physics, shocks form for temperatures 1  GeVUniverse as early as 10^{-30}  sec after the big bang.

  20. Simulation of mechanical shock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalanne, Christian.

    1975-07-01

    Shocks can produce a severe mechanical environment which must be taken into account when designing and developing new equipments. After some mathematical (Laplace and Fourier transforms) and mechanical recalls (response of a one degree freedom system to a sinusoidal excitation), different analysis methods are compared, these methods being the most used now to compare relative severities of tests and establish specifications. A few chapter deal with the different properties of simple, easy to produce, shock shapes. Then some now-in-use programmators or shock-machines specifications are shown. A final chapter concerns acceleration transducers [fr

  1. Effect of back-pressure forcing on shock train structures in rectangular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnani, F.; Zare-Behtash, H.; White, C.; Kontis, K.

    2018-04-01

    The deceleration of a supersonic flow to the subsonic regime inside a high-speed engine occurs through a series of shock waves, known as a shock train. The generation of such a flow structure is due to the interaction between the shock waves and the boundary layer inside a long and narrow duct. The understanding of the physics governing the shock train is vital for the improvement of the design of high-speed engines and the development of flow control strategies. The present paper analyses the sensitivity of the shock train configuration to a back-pressure variation. The complex characteristics of the shock train at an inflow Mach number M = 2 in a channel of constant height are investigated with two-dimensional RANS equations closed by the Wilcox k-ω turbulence model. Under a sinusoidal back-pressure variation, the simulated results indicate that the shock train executes a motion around its mean position that deviates from a perfect sinusoidal profile with variation in oscillation amplitude, frequency, and whether the pressure is first increased or decreased.

  2. Shock parameter calculations at weak interplanetary shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Gloag

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A large set of interplanetary shock waves observed using the Ulysses spacecraft is analysed in order to determine their local parameters. For the first time a detailed analysis is extended to the thermodynamic properties of a large number of events. The intention is to relate the shock parameters to the requirements set by MHD shock theory. A uniform approach is adopted in the selection of up and downstream regions for this analysis and applied to all the shock waves. Initially, the general case of a 3 component adiabatic plasma is considered. However, the calculation of magnetosonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers and the ratio of downstream to upstream entropy produce some unexpected results. In some cases there is no clear increase in entropy across the shock and also the magnetosonic Mach number can be less than 1. It is found that a more discerning use of data along with an empirical value for the polytropic index can raise the distribution of downstream to upstream entropy ratios to a more acceptable level. However, it is also realised that many of these shocks are at the very weakest end of the spectrum and associated phenomena may also contribute to the explanation of these results.

  3. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  4. Interaction of the interplanetary shock and tangential discontinuity in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Oleksandr; Koval, Andriy; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Prech, Lubomir; Szabo, Adam; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2017-04-01

    Collisionless shocks play a significant role in the solar wind interaction with the Earth. Fast forward interplanetary (IP) shocks driven by coronal mass ejections or by interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams can be encountered in the interplanetary space, while the bow shock is a standing fast reverse shock formed by the interaction of the supersonic solar wind with Earth's magnetic field. Both types of shocks are responsible for a transformation of a part of the energy of the directed solar wind motion to plasma heating and to acceleration of reflected particles to high energies. It is well known that the interaction of tangential discontinuities with the bow shock can create hot flow anomalies but interactions between IP shocks and tangential discontinuities in the solar wind are studied to a lesser extent due to lack of observations. A fortunate position of many spacecraft (Wind, ACE, DSCOVR, THEMIS, Spektr-R) on June 22, 2015 allows us detailed observations of an IP shock modification due to this interaction. We present an analysis of the event supported with MHD modeling that reveals basic features of the observed IP shock ramp splitting. However, a good matching of modeling and observations was found for DSCOVR and Spektr-R located above the ecliptic plane, whereas a timing of observations below this plane demonstrates problems of modeling of highly inclined discontinuities.

  5. Transonic conical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of inviscid, steady transonic conical flow, formulated in terms of the small disturbance theory, is studied. The small disturbance equation and similarity rules are presented, and a boundary value problem is formulated for the case of a supersonic freestream Mach number. The equation for the perturbation potential is solved numerically using an elliptic finite difference system. The difference equations are solved with a point relaxation algorithm that is also capable of capturing the shock wave during the iteration procedure by using the boundary conditions at the shock. Numerical calculations, for shock location, pressure distribution and drag coefficient, are presented for a family of nonlifting conical wings. The theory of slender wings is also presented and analytical results for pressure and drag coefficients are obtained.

  6. Experimental study of wall conductivity influence on shock wave reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skews, Beric; Berry, Richard

    2017-12-01

    In the conventional von Neumann theoretical treatment of two-dimensional shock wave reflection off a surface, it is assumed that the flow is inviscid and that the reflecting surface is perfectly smooth, rigid, non-porous, and adiabatic. These theoretical predictions have been found to be good predictions of reflection over a significant range where regular reflection exists and for a limited range around Mach 2 for strong shocks in the case of Mach reflection. However, experiments on regular reflection have shown that this pattern persists to a small extent beyond what the theory predicts. This effect has been ascribed to the development of a viscous boundary layer behind the point of reflection, and some studies have been done on the effect of surface roughness on reflection topology. The possibility of thermal effects and heat transfer from the shock-heated gas to the wall and on the boundary layer has, on the other hand, been almost totally neglected. To study this, two surfaces of different conductivities have been placed at the same angle, symmetrically in a shock tube, and impacted by a single plane shock wave and the reflection patterns examined. Tests were conducted over a range of Mach numbers between 1.28 and 1.4, and incident shock wave angles between 36° and 70° covering both regular and Mach reflection. Both quantitative and qualitative tests show that there is a difference in the angles between the reflected waves and the reflecting surfaces based on the material thermal conductivity. In the quantitative tests the value of this angle was larger for materials with a lower thermal conductivity, and vice versa. A material, such as aluminium, with mid-range thermal conductivity had angles that lay within the limits of the two extreme values for glass and copper. The qualitative images supported these findings, showing asymmetry in reflection topography, with the intersection of the two reflected shock waves lying closer to the material with a higher

  7. Shock wave dynamics derivatives and related topics

    CERN Document Server

    Emanuel, George

    2012-01-01

    "...this monograph develops an esoteric niche within shock wave theory. …treats shock waves from an analytical approach assuming perfect gas. Emanuel has made significant contributions to the theory of shock waves and has selected a number of topics that reflect those contributions."-Shock Waves, 2013.

  8. Reserves and Trade Jointly Determine Exposure to Food Supply Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Philippe; Carr, Joel A.; Dell'Angelo, Jampel; Fader, Marianela; Gephart, Jessica A.; Kummu, Matti; Magliocca, Nicholas; Porkka, Miina; Puma, Michael J.; Zak, Ratajczak

    2016-01-01

    While a growing proportion of global food consumption is obtained through international trade, there is an ongoing debate on whether this increased reliance on trade benefits or hinders food security, and specifically, the ability of global food systems to absorb shocks due to local or regional losses of production. This paper introduces a model that simulates the short-term response to a food supply shock originating in a single country, which is partly absorbed through decreases in domestic reserves and consumption, and partly transmitted through the adjustment of trade flows. By applying the model to publicly-available data for the cereals commodity group over a 17 year period, we find that differential outcomes of supply shocks simulated through this time period are driven not only by the intensification of trade, but as importantly by changes in the distribution of reserves. Our analysis also identifies countries where trade dependency may accentuate the risk of food shortages from foreign production shocks; such risk could be reduced by increasing domestic reserves or importing food from a diversity of suppliers that possess their own reserves. This simulation-based model provides a framework to study the short-term, nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium response of trade networks to supply shocks, and could be applied to specific scenarios of environmental or economic perturbations.

  9. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  10. The Crab nebula's ''wisps'' as shocked pulsar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallant, Y.A.; Arons, J.; Langdon, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Crab synchrotron nebula has been successfully modelled as the post-shock region of a relativistic, magnetized wind carrying most of the spindown luminosity from the central pulsar. While the Crab is the best-studied example, most of the highest spindown luminosity pulsars are also surrounded by extended synchrotron nebulae, and several additional supernova remnants with ''plerionic'' morphologies similar to the Crab are known where the central object is not seen. All these objects have nonthermal, power-law spectra attributable to accelerated high-energy particles thought to originate in a Crab-like relativistic pulsar wind. However, proposed models have so far treated the wind shock as an infinitesimally thin discontinuity, with an arbitrarily ascribed particle acceleration efficiency. To make further progress, investigations resolving the shock structure seemed in order. Motivated by these considerations, we have performed ''particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of perpendicularly magnetized shocks in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. The shocks in pure electron-positron plasmas were found to produce only thermal distributions downstream, and are thus poor candidates as particle acceleration sites. When the upstream plasma flow also contained a smaller population of positive ions, however, efficient acceleration of positrons, and to a lesser extent of electrons, was observed in the simulations

  11. Effects of low-dose extracorporeal shock waves on microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Walaa; Goertz, Ole; Lauer, Henrik; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Hauser, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    The extended wounds of burn patients remain a challenge due to wound infection and following septicemia. The aim of this study was to analyze microcirculation, angiogenesis and leukocyte endothelium interaction after burn injury with and without extracorporeal shock wave application (ESWA). A novel shockwave system was developed based on a commercially available device for orthopedics (Dornier Aries®) that was equipped with a newly developed applicator. This system is based on the electromagnetic shock wave emitter (EMSE) technology and was introduced to accomplish a localized treatment for wound healing. The system includes a novel field of focus for new applications, with high precision and ease of use. In the animal study, full-thickness burns were inflicted on to the ears of hairless mice (n=51). Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte behavior. ESWA was performed on day 1, 3 and 7. Values were obtained immediately after burn, as well as at days 1, 3, 7, and 12 post burn. All shockwave treated groups showed an accelerated angiogenesis with a less non-perfused area and an improved blood flow after burn injury compared to the placebo control group. After three treatments, the shock waves increased the number of rolling leukocytes significantly compared to the non-treated animals. Shock waves seem to have a positive effect on several parameters of wound healing after burn injury. However, further investigations are necessary to detect positive influence of shock waves on microcirculation after burn injuries.

  12. Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) facility, within Sandia’s Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a...

  13. The performance of proper orthogonal decomposition in discontinuous flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, flow reconstruction accuracy and flow prediction capability of discontinuous transonic flow field by means of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD method is studied. Although linear superposition of “high frequency waves” in different POD modes can achieve the reconstruction of the shock wave, the smoothness of the solution near the shock wave cannot be guaranteed. The modal coefficients are interpolated or extrapolated and different modal components are superposed to realize the prediction of the flow field beyond the snapshot sets. Results show that compared with the subsonic flow, the transonic flow with shock wave requires more POD modes to reach a comparative reconstruction accuracy. When a shock wave exists, the interpolation prediction ability is acceptable. However, large errors exist in extrapolation, and increasing the number of POD modes cannot effectively improve the prediction accuracy of the flow field.

  14. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new

  15. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new

  16. Sepsis and septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Opal, Steven M.; Reinhart, Konrad; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    For more than two decades, sepsis was defined as a microbial infection that produces fever (or hypothermia), tachycardia, tachypnoea and blood leukocyte changes. Sepsis is now increasingly being considered a dysregulated systemic inflammatory and immune response to microbial invasion that produces organ injury for which mortality rates are declining to 15–25%. Septic shock remains defined as sepsis with hyperlactataemia and concurrent hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy, with in-hospital mortality rates approaching 30–50%. With earlier recognition and more compliance to best practices, sepsis has become less of an immediate life-threatening disorder and more of a long-term chronic critical illness, often associated with prolonged inflammation, immune suppression, organ injury and lean tissue wasting. Furthermore, patients who survive sepsis have continuing risk of mortality after discharge, as well as long-term cognitive and functional deficits. Earlier recognition and improved implementation of best practices have reduced in-hospital mortality, but results from the use of immunomodulatory agents to date have been disappointing. Similarly, no biomarker can definitely diagnose sepsis or predict its clinical outcome. Because of its complexity, improvements in sepsis outcomes are likely to continue to be slow and incremental. PMID:28117397

  17. Astrophysically relevant radiatively cooled hypersonic bow shocks in nested wire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampleford, David

    2009-11-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments which introduce obstructions into hypersonic plasma flows to study the formation of shocks. Astrophysical observations have demonstrated many examples of equivalent radiatively cooled bow shocks, for example the head of protostellar jets or supernova remnants passing through the interstellar medium or between discrete clumps in jets. Wire array z-pinches allow us to study quasi-planar radiatively cooled flows in the laboratory. The early stage of a wire array z-pinch implosion consists of a steady flow of the wire material towards the axis. Given a high rate of radiative cooling, these flows reach high sonic- Mach numbers, typically up to 5. The 2D nature of this configuration allows the insertion of obstacles into the flow, such as a concentric ``inner'' wire array, as has previously been studied for ICF research. Here we study the application of such a nested array to laboratory astrophysics where the inner wires act as obstructions perpendicular to the flow, and induce bow shocks. By varying the wire array material (W/Al), the significance of radiative cooling on these shocks can be controlled, and is shown to change the shock opening angle. As multiple obstructions are present, the experiments show the interaction of multiple bow shocks. It is also possible to introduce a magnetic field around the static object, increasing the opening angle of the shocks. Further experiments can be designed to control the flow density, magnetic field structure and obstruction locations. In collaboration with: S.V. Lebedev, M.E. Cuneo, C.A. Jennings, S.N. Bland, J.P. Chittenden, A. Ciardi, G.N. Hall, S.C. Bott, M. Sherlock, A. Frank, E. Blackman

  18. Theoretical Insight into Shocked Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiding, Jeffery Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    I present the results of statistical mechanical calculations on shocked molecular gases. This work provides insight into the general behavior of shock Hugoniots of gas phase molecular targets with varying initial pressures. The dissociation behavior of the molecules is emphasized. Impedance matching calculations are performed to determine the maximum degree of dissociation accessible for a given flyer velocity as a function of initial gas pressure.

  19. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active...... galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space....... It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments...

  20. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your heart muscle. It also makes it more likely that blood clots will form in your arteries. Blood clots can partially or completely block blood flow. Conditions Caused by Heart Attack Heart attacks can cause some serious heart conditions that can lead to ...

  1. Shock propagation and mixing though a stratified gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Fabian; Gamba, Mirko

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the characteristics of a shock wave propagating through a stratified gas. The objective is to understand the formation and evolution of the system of waves that results from the interaction, as well as the induced mixing. This work is motivated by understanding the shock-induced mixing and system of waves that arise by the interaction of a detonation wave with the fuel/air injection system in a rotating detonation engine. In these devices, one of the key limiting factors in achieving stable detonation and pressure gain is associated with the stratification induced by a non-uniform and incomplete mixing process. To investigate some of the fundamental aspects of the rapid distortion induced by a detonation wave on the non-uniform flow, we conduct a combined analytical and experimental analysis on a simplified and reduced problem. Experimentally, we consider a single row of injectors of regular spacing that generate a non-reacting turbulent non-uniform flow and are subject to an incident transverse normal shock. Different gasses and shock strengths are used to generate a range of density and velocity ratios that are comparable to what could be experienced through a detonation. Using Schlieren and PLIF imaging, the evolution of mixture fraction throughout the flowfield is investigated. The presence of instabilities and the formation of a system of reflected waves is observed and investigated. A variable property, 1-D, multi-isentropic method of characteristics model is constructed to theoretically investigate the shock propagation and interaction with the stratified flow. This work is supported by the DOE/UTSR program under project DE-FE0025315.

  2. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  3. Neutrophil Activation During Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Laure; Meziani, Ferhat; Helms, Julie

    2018-04-01

    In addition to their well-known role as the cellular mediators of immunity, key other roles have been identified for neutrophils during septic shock. Importantly, neutrophils indeed play a critical role in the recently described immunothrombosis concept and in septic shock-induced coagulopathy. Septic shock is one of the most severe forms of infection, characterized by an inadequate host response to the pathogenic organism. This host response involves numerous defense mechanisms with an intense cellular activation, including neutrophil activation. Neutrophils are key cells of innate immunity through complex interactions with vascular cells and their activation may participate in systemic tissue damages. Their activation also leads to the emission of neutrophil extracellular traps, which take part in both pathogen circumscription and phagocytosis, but also in coagulation activation. Neutrophils thus stand at the interface between hemostasis and immunity, called immunothrombosis.The present review will develop a cellular approach of septic shock pathophysiology focusing on neutrophils as key players of septic shock-induced vascular cell dysfunction and of the host response, associating immunity and hemostasis. We will therefore first develop the role of neutrophils in the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity, and will then highlight recent advances in our understanding of immunothrombosis septic shock-induced coagulopathy.

  4. Computations of slowly moving shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karni, S.; Canic, S.

    1997-01-01

    Computations of slowly moving shocks by shock capturing schemes may generate oscillations are generated already by first-order schemes, but become more pronounced in higher-order schemes which seem to exhibit different behaviors: (i) the first-order upwind (UW) scheme which generates strong oscillations and (ii) the Lax-Friedrichs scheme which appears not to generate any disturbances at all. A key observation is that in the UW case, the numerical viscosity in the shock family vanishes inside the slow shock layer. Simple scaling arguments show the third-order effects on the solution may no longer be neglected. We derive the third-order modified equation for the UW scheme and regard the oscillatory solution as a traveling wave solution of the parabolic modified equation for the perturbation. We then look at the governing equation for the perturbation, which points to a plausible mechanism by which postshock oscillations are generated. It contains a third-order source term that becomes significant inside the shock layer, and a nonlinear coupling term which projects the perturbation on all characteristic fields, including those not associated with the shock family. 5 refs., 8 figs

  5. Observation of dust acoustic shock wave in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sumita K.; Boruah, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-01-01

    Dust acoustic shock wave is observed in a strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasma. A supersonic flow of charged microparticles is allowed to perturb a stationary dust fluid to excite dust acoustic shock wave. The evolution process beginning with steepening of initial wave front and then formation of a stable shock structure is similar to the numerical results of the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. The measured Mach number of the observed shock wave agrees with the theoretical results. Reduction of shock amplitude at large distances is also observed due to the dust neutral collision and viscosity effects. The dispersion relation and the spatial damping of a linear dust acoustic wave are also measured and compared with the relevant theory.

  6. Experimental techniques in unsteady flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, M. L. G.

    1990-12-01

    Notes for four lectures intended as a practical user guide to some unsteady aerodynamic flow experimental measurement techniques are presented. Unsteady flows to be measured, including frequency and length scale, large scale unsteadiness, turbulence, boundary layer transition, shear layers and wakes, periodically time varying flows, shock waves and vortex flows, are explained. Wind tunnel requirements, intrusive measurements by hot wire and film anemometry and pressure probes, and surface measurements are described. Optical techniques covered include Schlieren photography, shadowgraph, holography, laser anemometry and flow tracing. Instrumentation and data acquisition and processing of unsteady data, using frequency analysis by fast Fourier transforms, convolution and correlation are described.

  7. Shocking findings in Manipur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, P N

    1991-08-01

    A sero-surveillance program in the state of Manipur, India revealed an alarmingly high rate of HIV infection, detected primarily among intravenous drug users. Previous surveillance had indicated that heterosexual intercourse was the leading mode of HIV transmission, and in 1989, no HIV infections had been detected in Manipur. But in February 1990, 5 HIV-positive cases were reported, and by May 1991, 1263 had been reported -- 93.9% of them among intravenous drug users. This came as shocking news, considering that at the same time only 5131 HIV cases had been reported in all of India. Although Manipur makes up only 0.91% of the country's population, the state's intravenous drug account for 23.1% of the nation's HIV cases. Manipur has an estimated 30,000 drug addicts, approximately 1/2 of which are intravenous drug users. Heroin is easily available in Manipur, due to the fact that the state shares a common international border of 352 km with Myanmar, one of the 3 countries that make up Southeast Asia's heroin producing "Golden Triangle." The author stresses, however, that drug abuse is not the cause of the transmission of HIV. It is the sharing of needles and syringes among intravenous drug users that creates the risk of infection, and preventive measures should reflect that fact. Besides discouraging drug use, preventive measures will require a dual strategy: 1) until they are cured, intravenous drug users should be given sterilized needles and syringes to avoid sharing; and 2) the law needs to be revised so that drug addicts are treated as patients and not as criminals. The Voluntary Health Association of India has begun to discuss such measures with governmental and nongovernmental organizations involved in the prevention and control of AIDS.

  8. Back-pressure effects on unsteadiness of separation shock in a rectangular duct at Mach 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bing; Fan, Xiao-qiang; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Liang; Tao, Yuan

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate back-pressure effects on unsteadiness of separation shock in a rectangular duct, some test cases were designed and conducted in a supersonic air-breathing wind tunnel. High-speed Schlieren technique and high-frequency pressure measurements were utilized for data acquisition. Different back-pressure levels were applied by changing downstream throttling ratio. Some parameters for estimating canonical separation flows, such as zero-crossing frequency and intermittency, have been introduced to analyze the duct separation flow. The experimental results show that the separation shock oscillation frequencies increase and the intermittent region lengths decrease with the increasing back-pressure level. A comparison between the unsteadiness of shock/boundary layer interactions for the canonical flow and the duct internal flow were made. It is found that the normalized Strouhal number for the duct internal separation flow ranges from 0.01 to 0.03, which share the similar range with canonical separation flows. That is to say, the physics of separation shock unsteadiness is similar over a wide range of interaction flows, which may share the inherent flow mechanism.

  9. Reignition of detonations by reflected shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. A.; Sichel, M.; Oran, E. S.

    1995-06-01

    Numerical simulations are used to study the diffraction, decay, and reignition that occurs when a detonation propagates past an increase in cross-sectional area in a rectangular tube. The computations solve the time-dependent two-dimensional equations describing a reactive flow in an argon-diluted stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. Previous studies have shown that soon after transmission to a larger area, the reaction front decouples from the leading shock and forms a decaying blast wave (“bubble”) in the larger tube. Then, depending on the initial conditions, the detonation either continues to decay or is reignited as the bubble reflects off confining surfaces. For a strongly overdriven initiating detonation, reignition occurs through an interaction between the bubble and the original contact surface. For a more weakly driven system, reignition can occur in two ways: either in the slip line and Mach stem of the Mach reflection formed when the bubble reflects off the bottom surface of the tube, or by multiple shock interactions that occur when the reflected bubble overtakes the initial detonation front. The computations show the evolution and development of the cellular structure of the steady detonation front.

  10. Strain measurements during pressurized thermal shock experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarso Vida Gomes, P. de; Julio Ricardo Barreto Cruz; Tanius Rodrigues Mansur; Denis Henrique Bianchi Scaldaferri; Miguel Mattar Neto

    2005-01-01

    For the life extension of nuclear power plants, the residual life of most of their components must be evaluated along all their operating time. Concerning the reactor pressure vessel, the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) is a very important event to be considered. For better understanding the effects of this kind of event, tests are made. The approach described here consisted of building a simplified in-scale physical model of the reactor pressure vessel, submitting it to the actual operating temperature and pressure conditions and provoking a thermal shock by means of cold water flow in its external surface. To conduct such test, the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has been conducting several studies related to PTS and has also built a laboratory that has made possible the simulation of the PTS loading conditions. Several cracks were produced in the external surface of the reactor pressure vessel model. Strain gages were fixed by means of electrical discharge welding over the cracks regions in both external and internal surfaces. The temperature was monitored in 10 points across the vessel wall. The internal pressure was manually controlled and monitored using a pressure transducer. Two PTS experiments were conducted and this paper presents the strain measurement procedures applied to the reactor pressure vessel model, during the PTS, using strain gages experimental methodology. (authors)

  11. Shock-driven fluid-structure interaction for civil design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Stephen L [ORNL; Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. The Virtual Test Facility combines a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation in a generic software framework of flow solvers using hydrodynamic finite volume upwind schemes that are coupled to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers (Deiterding et al., 2006). This paper gives a brief overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that utilize the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D for complex 3D structures of interest in civil engineering. Results from simulations of a reinforced column, highway bridge, multistory building, and nuclear reactor building are presented.

  12. Propagation of a Strong Shock Over a Random Bed of Spherical Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Y. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Neal, C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Salari, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jackson, T. L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Balachandar, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Thakur, S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Propagation of a strong shock through a bed of particles results in complex wave dynamics such as a reflected shock, a transmitted shock, and highly unsteady flow inside the particle bed. In this paper we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of shock propagation in air over a random bed of particles. We assume the flow is inviscid and governed by the Euler equations of gas dynamics. Simulations are carried out by varying the volume fraction of the particle bed at a fixed shock Mach number. We compute the unsteady inviscid streamwise and transverse drag coefficients as a function of time for each particle in the random bed as a function of volume fraction. We show that (i) there are significant variations in the peak drag for the particles in the bed, (ii) the mean peak drag as a function of streamwise distance through the bed decreases with a slope that increases as the volume fraction increases, and (iii) the deviation from the mean peak drag does not correlate with local volume fraction. We also present the local Mach number and pressure contours for the different volume fractions to explain the various observed complex physical mechanisms occurring during the shock-particle interactions. Since the shock interaction with the random bed of particles leads to transmitted and reflected waves, we compute the average flow properties to characterize the strength of the transmitted and reflected shock waves and quantify the energy dissipation inside the particle bed. Finally, to better understand the complex wave dynamics in a random bed, we consider a simpler approximation of a planar shock propagating in a duct with a sudden area change. We obtain Riemann solutions to this problem, which are used to compare with fully resolved numerical simulations.

  13. On the Effects of Viscosity on the Shock Waves for a Hydrodynamical Case—Part I: Basic Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Cavus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of shock waves with viscosity is one of the central problems in the supersonic regime of compressible fluid flow. In this work, numerical solutions of unmagnetised fluid equations, with the viscous stress tensor, are investigated for a one-dimensional shock wave. In the algorithm developed the viscous stress terms are expressed in terms of the relevant Reynolds number. The algorithm concentrated on the compression rate, the entropy change, pressures, and Mach number ratios across the shock wave. The behaviour of solutions is obtained for the Reynolds and Mach numbers defining the medium and shock wave in the supersonic limits.

  14. Influence of shock waves from plasma actuators on transonic and supersonic airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursenkova, I. V.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Lutsky, A. E.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents experimental and numerical investigations of high-current sliding surface discharges of nanosecond duration and their effect on high-speed flow as plasma actuators in a shock tube. This study deals with the effectiveness of a sliding surface discharge at low and medium air pressure. Results cover the electrical characteristics of the discharge and optical visualization of the discharge and high-speed post-discharge flow. A sliding surface discharge is first studied in quiescent air conditions and then in high-speed flow, being initiated in the boundary layer at a transverse flow velocity of 50-950 m s-1 behind a flat shock wave in air of density 0.04-0.45 kg m-3. The discharge is powered by a pulse voltage of 25-30 kV and the electric current is ~0.5 kA. Shadow imaging and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are used to measure the flow field parameters after the pulse surface discharge. Shadow imaging reveals shock waves originating from the channels of the discharge configurations. PIV is used to measure the velocity field resulting from the discharge in quiescent air and to determine the homogeneity of energy release along the sliding discharge channel. Semicylindrical shock waves from the channels of the sliding discharge have an initial velocity of more than 600 m s-1. The shock-wave configuration floats in the flow along the streamlined surface. Numerical simulation based on the equations of hydrodynamics matched with the experiment showed that 25%-50% of the discharge energy is instantly transformed into heat energy in a high-speed airflow, leading to the formation of shock waves. This energy is comparable to the flow enthalpy and can result in significant modification of the boundary layer and the entire flow.

  15. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  16. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  17. Shock Capturing with PDE-Based Artificial Viscosity for an Adaptive, Higher-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barter, Garrett E

    2008-01-01

    ...), adaptive computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Since these cases involve flow velocities greater than the speed of sound, an appropriate shock capturing for higher-order, adaptive methods is necessary...

  18. Prediction of massive bleeding. Shock index and modified shock index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terceros-Almanza, L J; García-Fuentes, C; Bermejo-Aznárez, S; Prieto-Del Portillo, I J; Mudarra-Reche, C; Sáez-de la Fuente, I; Chico-Fernández, M

    2017-12-01

    To determine the predictive value of the Shock Index and Modified Shock Index in patients with massive bleeding due to severe trauma. Retrospective cohort. Severe trauma patient's initial attention at the intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Patients older than 14 years that were admitted to the hospital with severe trauma (Injury Severity Score >15) form January 2014 to December 2015. We studied the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive and negative predictive value (PV+ and PV-), positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR+ and LR-), ROC curves (Receiver Operating Characteristics) and the area under the same (AUROC) for prediction of massive hemorrhage. 287 patients were included, 76.31% (219) were male, mean age was 43,36 (±17.71) years and ISS was 26 (interquartile range [IQR]: 21-34). The overall frequency of massive bleeding was 8.71% (25). For Shock Index: AUROC was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.84 to 0.94), with an optimal cutoff at 1.11, Se was 91.3% (95% CI: 73.2 to 97.58) and Sp was 79.69% (95% CI: 74.34 to 84.16). For the Modified Shock Index: AUROC was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.86 to 0.95), with an optimal cutoff at 1.46, Se was 95.65% (95% CI: 79.01 to 99.23) and Sp was 75.78% (95% CI: 70.18 to 80.62). Shock Index and Modified Shock Index are good predictors of massive bleeding and could be easily incorporated to the initial workup of patients with severe trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. A Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Two-Dimensional Shock Wave Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical scheme based on discontinuous Galerkin method is proposed for the two-dimensional shallow water flows. The scheme is applied to model flows with shock waves. The form of shallow water equations that can eliminate numerical imbalance between flux term and source term and simplify computation is adopted here. The HLL approximate Riemann solver is employed to calculate the mass and momentum flux. A slope limiting procedure that is suitable for incompressible two-dimensional flows is presented. A simple method is adapted for flow over initially dry bed. A new formulation is introduced for modeling the net pressure force and gravity terms in discontinuous Galerkin method. To validate the scheme, numerical tests are performed to model steady and unsteady shock waves. Applications include circular dam break with shock, shock waves in channel contraction, and dam break in channel with 45∘ bend. Numerical results show that the scheme is accurate and efficient to model two-dimensional shallow water flows with shock waves.

  20. Measurements of Transient Phenomena in a Shock Tube using Pulse-Burst PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin; Beresh, Steven; Demauro, Edward; Pruett, Brian; Farias, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) measurements are made in a shock tube using a pulse-burst laser. Two transient flowfields are investigated including the baseline flow in the empty shock tube and the wake growth downstream of a cylinder spanning the width of the test section. Boundary layer growth is observed following the passage of the incident shock in the baseline flow, while the core flow velocity increases with time. Comparison of this measured core flow acceleration to that predicted using classical unsteady boundary layer growth models shows good agreement in some instances. As a result of wall boundary layers, a significant amount of spatial non-uniformity remains in the flow following the passage of the end-wall reflected shock. In the transient wake growth measurements, the wake downstream of the cylinder is symmetric immediately following the passage of the incident shock. At later times, the wake transitions to von Karman vortex shedding. The TR-PIV data are bandpass filtered about the vortex shedding frequency and its harmonics to reveal additional details on the transient wake growth.

  1. Electron heating at interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Zwickl, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Data for 41 forward interplanetary shocks measured between August 1978 and December 1979 show that the ratio of downstream to upstream electron temperatures, T/sub e/(d/u) is variable in the range between 1.0 (isothermal) and 3.0. On average, (T/sub e/(d/u) = 1.5 with a standard deviation, sigma e = 0.5. This ratio is less than the average ratio of proton temperatures across the same shocks, (T/sub p/(d/u)) = 3.3 with sigma p = 2.5 as well as the average ratio of electron temperatures across the earth's bow shock. Individual samples of T/sub e/(d/u) and T/sub p/(d/u) appear to be weakly correlated with the number density ratio. However the amounts of electron and proton heating are well correlated with each other as well as with the bulk velocity difference across each shock. The stronger shocks appear to heat the protons relatively more efficiently than they heat the electrons

  2. Shock processing of interstellar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seab, C.G.; Shull, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Shock processing plays an important role in the life of a typical interstellar grain. Shocks of 100 km/s-l or greater can destroy about 50% of the grain material under appropriate preshock conditions of density and magnetic field. The destruction occurs by grain-grain collisions and nonthermal sputtering for steady state radiative shocks and by thermal sputtering for fast adiabatic shocks. The evaluation of the lifetime of grains against shock destruction depends on models of the interstellar medium (ISM) structure and on supernova remnants (SNR) evolution. Results from various authors give lifetimes between 10 to the 8th and 10 to the 9th power years, compared to typical injection times for new grains of a few times 10 to the 9th power years. These numbers require that a major portion of the interstellar silicon bearing grain material must be formed by grain growth in the ISM. At the same time, the presence of isotopic anomalies in some meteorites implies that at least some grains must survive from their formation in SNRs or red giant winds through incorporation into the solar system

  3. ION ACCELERATION AT THE QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK: DECODING THE SIGNATURE OF INJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Mazelle, Christian X. [IRAP, Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III-CNRS, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2016-03-20

    Collisionless shocks are efficient particle accelerators. At Earth, ions with energies exceeding 100 keV are seen upstream of the bow shock when the magnetic geometry is quasi-parallel, and large-scale supernova remnant shocks can accelerate ions into cosmic-ray energies. This energization is attributed to diffusive shock acceleration; however, for this process to become active, the ions must first be sufficiently energized. How and where this initial acceleration takes place has been one of the key unresolved issues in shock acceleration theory. Using Cluster spacecraft observations, we study the signatures of ion reflection events in the turbulent transition layer upstream of the terrestrial bow shock, and with the support of a hybrid simulation of the shock, we show that these reflection signatures are characteristic of the first step in the ion injection process. These reflection events develop in particular in the region where the trailing edge of large-amplitude upstream waves intercept the local shock ramp and the upstream magnetic field changes from quasi-perpendicular to quasi-parallel. The dispersed ion velocity signature observed can be attributed to a rapid succession of ion reflections at this wave boundary. After the ions’ initial interaction with the shock, they flow upstream along the quasi-parallel magnetic field. Each subsequent wavefront in the upstream region will sweep the ions back toward the shock, where they gain energy with each transition between the upstream and the shock wave frames. Within three to five gyroperiods, some ions have gained enough parallel velocity to escape upstream, thus completing the injection process.

  4. Strong Shock Propagating Over A Random Bed of Spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yash; Salari, Kambiz; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S.; Thakur, Siddharth

    2017-11-01

    The study of shock interaction with particles has been largely motivated because of its wide-ranging applications. The complex interaction between the compressible flow features, such as shock wave and expansion fan, and the dispersed phase makes this multi-phase flow very difficult to predict and control. In this talk we will be presenting results on fully resolved inviscid simulations of shock interaction with random bed of particles. One of the fascinating observations from these simulations are the flow field fluctuations due to the presence of randomly distributed particles. Rigorous averaging (Favre averaging) of the governing equations results in Reynolds stress like term, which can be classified as pseudo turbulence in this case. We have computed this ``Reynolds stress'' term along with individual fluctuations and the turbulent kinetic energy. Average pressure was also computed to characterize the strength of the transmitted and the reflected waves. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program.

  5. Pressure Hull Analysis under Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Jung Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hull of high performance submarines must resist underwater shock loading due to exploding torpedoes or depth bombs. An underwater shock involving an initial shock wave and successive bubble pulsating waves is so complex that a theoretical technique for deriving shock pressure distribution is required for improving simulation efficiency. Complete shock loading is obtained theoretically in this work, and responses of a submarine pressure hull are calculated using ABAQUS USA (Underwater Shock Analysis codes. In the long run, this deflection and stress data will assist in examining the structural arrangement of the submarine pressure hull.

  6. Why the Nature of Oil Shocks Matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archanskaia, Elizaveta; Hubert, Paul; Creel, Jerome

    2009-03-01

    This article studies the impact of oil shocks on the macro-economy in two ways insofar unexploited in the literature. The analysis is conducted at the global level, and it explicitly accounts for the potentially changing nature of oil shocks. Based on an original world GDP series and a grouping of oil shocks according to their nature, we find that oil supply shocks negatively impact world growth, contrary to oil demand shocks, pro-cyclical in their nature. This result is robust at the national level for the US. Furthermore, endogenous monetary policy is shown to have no counter-cyclical effects in the context of an oil demand shock. (authors)

  7. Integration of regenerative shock absorber into vehicle electric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongxiao; Li, Peng; Xing, Shaoxu; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative/Energy harvesting shock absorbers have a great potential to increase fuel efficiency and provide suspension damping simultaneously. In recent years there's intensive work on this topic, but most researches focus on electricity extraction from vibration and harvesting efficiency improvement. The integration of electricity generated from regenerative shock absorbers into vehicle electric system, which is very important to realize the fuel efficiency benefit, has not been investigated. This paper is to study and demonstrate the integration of regenerative shock absorber with vehicle alternator, battery and in-vehicle electrical load together. In the presented system, the shock absorber is excited by a shaker and it converts kinetic energy into electricity. The harvested electricity flows into a DC/DC converter which realizes two functions: controlling the shock absorber's damping and regulating the output voltage. The damping is tuned by controlling shock absorber's output current, which is also the input current of DC/DC converter. By adjusting the duty cycles of switches in the converter, its input impedance together with input current can be adjusted according to dynamic damping requirements. An automotive lead-acid battery is charged by the DC/DC converter's output. To simulate the working condition of combustion engine, an AC motor is used to drive a truck alternator, which also charges the battery. Power resistors are used as battery's electrical load to simulate in-vehicle electrical devices. Experimental results show that the proposed integration strategy can effectively utilize the harvested electricity and power consumption of the AC motor is decreased accordingly. This proves the combustion engine's load reduction and fuel efficiency improvement.

  8. Sepsis and Septic Shock Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bracken A; Betzold, Richard D; May, Addison K

    2017-12-01

    Three therapeutic principles most substantially improve organ dysfunction and survival in sepsis: early, appropriate antimicrobial therapy; restoration of adequate cellular perfusion; timely source control. The new definitions of sepsis and septic shock reflect the inadequate sensitivity, specify, and lack of prognostication of systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria. Sequential (sepsis-related) organ failure assessment more effectively prognosticates in sepsis and critical illness. Inadequate cellular perfusion accelerates injury and reestablishing perfusion limits injury. Multiple organ systems are affected by sepsis and septic shock and an evidence-based multipronged approach to systems-based therapy in critical illness results in improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic Simulations of Particle Acceleration at Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Damiano [Princeton University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-16

    Collisionless shocks are mediated by collective electromagnetic interactions and are sources of non-thermal particles and emission. The full particle-in-cell approach and a hybrid approach are sketched, simulations of collisionless shocks are shown using a multicolor presentation. Results for SN 1006, a case involving ion acceleration and B field amplification where the shock is parallel, are shown. Electron acceleration takes place in planetary bow shocks and galaxy clusters. It is concluded that acceleration at shocks can be efficient: >15%; CRs amplify B field via streaming instability; ion DSA is efficient at parallel, strong shocks; ions are injected via reflection and shock drift acceleration; and electron DSA is efficient at oblique shocks.

  10. Shock and Vibration. Volume 1, Issue 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pilkey, Walter D

    1994-01-01

    ..., and earthquake engineering. Among the specific areas to be covered are vibration testing and control, vibration condition monitoring and diagnostics, shock hardenings, modal technology, shock testing, data acquisition, fluid...

  11. Etiology of Shock in the Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Jensen, Helene Kildegaard; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

    2018-01-01

    were included. Discharge diagnoses defined the etiology and were grouped as; distributive septic shock (SS), distributive non-septic shock (NS)), cardiogenic shock (CS), hypovolemic shock (HS), obstructive shock (OS) and other conditions (OC). Outcomes were etiology-based characteristics, annual IR per......INTRODUCTION: The knowledge of the etiology and associated mortality of undifferentiated shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. We aimed to describe the etiology based proportions and incidence rates (IR) of shock, as well as the associated mortality in the ED. METHODS: Population......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Patients aged ≥18 years living in the ED-catchment area (N = 225,000) with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1,646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ failures...

  12. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  13. SHOCK WAVE IN IONOSPHERE DURING EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kuznetsov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud

  14. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ 0 /p 0 ) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ 0 is the permeability, and p 0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  15. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  16. 3D numerical modeling of YSO accretion shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsakos T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of YSO accretion shocks is determined by radiative processes as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field. A quasi-periodic emission signature is theoretically expected to be observed, but observations do not confirm any such pattern. In this work, we assume a uniform background field, in the regime of optically thin energy losses, and we study the multi-dimensional shock evolution in the presence of perturbations, i.e. clumps in the stream and an acoustic energy flux flowing at the base of the chromosphere. We perform 3D MHD simulations using the PLUTO code, modelling locally the impact of the infalling gas onto the chromosphere. We find that the structure and dynamics of the post-shock region is strongly dependent on the plasma-beta (thermal over magnetic pressure, different values of which may give distinguishable emission signatures, relevant for observations. In particular, a strong magnetic field effectively confines the plasma inside its flux tubes and leads to the formation of quasi-independent fibrils. The fibrils may oscillate out of phase and hence the sum of their contributions in the emission results in a smooth overall profile. On the contrary, a weak magnetic field is not found to have any significant effect on the shocked plasma and the turbulent hot slab that forms is found to retain its periodic signature.

  17. Multiphase Modeling of Secondary Atomization in a Shock Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Jeffrey; McGrath, Thomas; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2017-06-01

    Understanding and developing accurate modeling strategies for shock-particulate interaction remains a challenging and important topic, with application to energetic materials development, volcanic eruptions, and safety/risk assessment. This work presents computational modeling of compressible multiphase flows with shock-induced droplet atomization. Droplet size has a strong influence on the interphase momentum and heat transfer. A test case is presented that is sensitive to this, requiring the dynamic modeling of the secondary atomization process occurring when the shock impacts the droplets. An Eulerian-Eulerian computational model that treats all phases as compressible, is hyperbolic and satisfies the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics is applied. Four different breakup models are applied to the test case in which a planar shock wave encounters a cloud of water droplets. The numerical results are compared with both experimental and previously-generated modeling results. The effect of the drag relation used is also investigated. The computed results indicate the necessity of using a droplet breakup model for this application, and the relative accuracy of results obtained with the different droplet breakup and drag models is discussed.

  18. Characterization of a piezoelectric valve for an adaptive pneumatic shock absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikułowski, Grzegorz; Wiszowaty, Rafał; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes a pneumatic valve based on a multilayer piezoelectric actuator and Hörbiger plates. The device was designed to operate in an adaptive pneumatic shock absorber. The adaptive pneumatic shock absorber was considered as a piston-cylinder device and the valve was intended to be installed inside the piston. The main objective for the valve application was regulating the gas flow between the cylinder’s chambers in order to maintain the desired value of the reaction force generated by the shock absorber. The paper describes the design constraints and requirements, together with results of analytical modelling of fluid flow verified versus experimentally obtained data. The presented results indicate that the desired performance characteristics of the valve were obtained. The geometrical constraints of the flow ducts were studied and the actuator’s functional features analysed.

  19. EVOLUTION OF SHOCKS AND TURBULENCE IN MAJOR CLUSTER MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.; Mannheim, K.; Iapichino, L.; Miniati, F.; Bagchi, J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a set of cosmological simulations of major mergers in galaxy clusters, in order to study the evolution of merger shocks and the subsequent injection of turbulence in the post-shock region and in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The computations have been performed with the grid-based, adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical code Enzo, using a refinement criterion especially designed for refining turbulent flows in the vicinity of shocks. When a major merger event occurs, a substantial amount of turbulence energy is injected in the ICM of the newly formed cluster. Our simulations show that the shock launched after a major merger develops an ellipsoidal shape and gets broken by the interaction with the filamentary cosmic web around the merging cluster. The size of the post-shock region along the direction of shock propagation is of the order of 300 kpc h -1 , and the turbulent velocity dispersion in this region is larger than 100 km s -1 . We performed a scaling analysis of the turbulence energy within our cluster sample. The best fit for the scaling of the turbulence energy with the cluster mass is consistent with M 5/3 , which is also the scaling law for the thermal energy in the self-similar cluster model. This clearly indicates the close relation between virialization and injection of turbulence in the cluster evolution. As for the turbulence in the cluster core, we found that within 2 Gyr after the major merger (the timescale for the shock propagation in the ICM), the ratio of the turbulent to total pressure is larger than 10%, and after about 4 Gyr it is still larger than 5%, a typical value for nearly relaxed clusters. Turbulence at the cluster center is thus sustained for several gigayears, which is substantially longer than typically assumed in the turbulent re-acceleration models, invoked to explain the statistics of observed radio halos. Striking similarities in the morphology and other physical parameters between our simulations and the

  20. Electric shock and electrical fire specialty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-02-01

    This book deals with electric shock and electrical fire, which is made up seven chapters. It describes of special measurement for electric shock and electrical fire. It mentions concretely about electrical fire analysis and precautionary measurement, electrical shock analysis cases, occurrence of static electricity and measurement, gas accident, analysis of equipment accident and precautionary measurement. The book is published to educate the measurement on electric shock and electrical fire by electrical safety technology education center in Korea Electrical Safety Corporation.

  1. Attenuation of Shock Waves using Perforated Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, CH V. L. C. S.; Hitesh Reddy, C.; Rahul Sai, L.; Dharani Kumar, K. S. S.; Nagaraja, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    The shock/blast waves generated due to explosions cause wide spread damage to the objects in its path. Different techniques have been used to attenuate shock wave over pressure, to reduce the catastrophic effects. Perforated plates can be used effectively to attenuate the shock wave pressure. In this paper shock wave interaction with perforated plates is simulated using COMSOL multiphysics software. The pressure drop varied from 43.75% to 26% for porosity varying from 10% to 40.

  2. Suppressive and Facilitative Effects of Shock Intensity and Interresponse Times Followed by Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, Jessica B.; Perone, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although response-dependent shock often suppresses responding, response facilitation can occur. In two experiments, we examined the suppressive and facilitative effects of shock by manipulating shock intensity and the interresponse times that produced shock. Rats' lever presses were reinforced on a variable-interval 40-s schedule of food…

  3. Numerical study of shock waves in non-ideal magnetogasdynamics (MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addepalli Ramu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow of strong converging shock waves in cylindrical or spherical symmetry in MHD, which is propagating into plasma, is analyzed. The plasma is assumed to be non-ideal gas whose equation of state is of Mie–Gruneisen type. Suitable transformations reduce the governing equations into ordinary differential equations of Poincare type. In the present work, McQueen and Royce equations of state (EOS have been considered with suitable material constants and the spherical and cylindrical cases are worked out in detail to investigate the behavior and the influence on the shock wave propagation by energy input and β(ρ/ρ0, the measure of shock strength. The similarity solution is valid for adiabatic flow as long as the counter pressure is neglected. The numerical technique applied in this paper provides a global solution to the implosion problem for the flow variables, the similarity exponent α for different Gruneisen parameters. It is shown that increasing β(ρ/ρ0 does not automatically decelerate the shock front but the velocity and pressure behind the shock front increases quickly in the presence of the magnetic field and decreases slowly and become constant. This becomes true whether the piston is accelerated, is moving at constant speed or is decelerated. These results are presented through the illustrative graphs and tables. The magnetic field effects on the flow variables through a medium and total energy under the influence of strong magnetic field are also presented.

  4. Shock Response of Silicon Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandekar, D. P.; Casem, D. T.; Motoyashiki, Y.; Sato, E.

    2009-06-01

    Silicon nitride is suitable for varied applications. The properties of silicon nitride have been tailored through processing and doping. The current work presents shock response of silicon nitride marketed as SN282. The density of this material, 3.4 Mg/m^3, exceeds its single crystal density due to the presence of lutetium oxide as an additive in ca. 5% by weight in the material. While the average grain size is 3.4 microns, aspect ratio of the grains exceed 3. Preliminary results of shock wave experiments may be summarized as follows: (1) The Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of SN282 is 11.2 GPa. (2) The magnitude of the inelastic wave velocity just above the HEL is 8.73 km/s, suggesting that inelastic deformation above the HEL is due to shock induced plasticity in the material. (3) The estimated value of the spall strength is 0.5 GPa. The spall strength of SN282 remains unchanged even when shocked beyond the HEL. The non-vanishing spall strength suggests that doping plays a role in the retention of spall strength of SN282. The role of doping needs to be further investigated.

  5. Prenatal temperature shocks reduce cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchoslav, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Climate change has not only led to a sustained rise in mean global temperature over the past decades, but also increased the frequency of extreme weather events. This paper explores the effect of temperature shocks in utero on later-life taste for cooperation. Using historical climate data combined

  6. Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks. Part I : Genuine Nonlinearity and Discontinuous Solutions. Phoolan Prasad is with the. Department of. Mathematics, Indian. Institute of Science and has been working in the area of nonlinear waves and hyperbolic partial differential equations. He is deeply interested in.

  7. Fascinating World of Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    elements in a fluid approach one another with a velocity higher than the local ... observed in nature. The dissipation of mechanical, nuclear, chemi- cal, and electrical energy in a limited space will usually result in the formation of a shock wave. Because of ..... aerodynamics, chemical kinetics, medicine, process engineering,.

  8. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY AS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) as a monotherapy for urolithiasis in patients with solitary kidney and to determine the factors that may affect its results. Patients and Methods Using the Dornier MFL 5000 lithotriptor, 106 patients with solitary kidney (80 men and 26 women) were treated for ...

  9. Shock treatment of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Austin; Rughoonundun, Hema; Petersen, Eric; Holtzapple, Carol; Holtzapple, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Corn stover digestibility was enhanced via shock treatment. A slurry of lime-treated corn stover was placed in a partially filled closed vessel. From the ullage space, either a shotgun shell was fired into the slurry, or a gas mixture was detonated. Various conditions were tested (i.e., pressures, depth, solids concentrations, gas mixtures). A high pressurization rate (108,000 MPa/s shotgun shells; 4,160,000 MPa/s hydrogen/oxygen detonation) was the only parameter that improved enzymatic digestibility. Stoichiometric propane/air deflagration had a low pressurization rate (37.2 MPa/s) and did not enhance enzymatic digestibility. Without shock, enzymatic conversion of lime-treated corn stover was 0.80 g glucan digested/g glucan fed with an enzyme loading of 46.7 mg protein/g glucan. With shock, the enzyme loading was reduced by ∼2× while maintaining the same conversion. Detonations are extraordinarily fast; rapidly cycling three small vessels (0.575 m 3 each) every 7.5 s enables commercially relevant shock treatment (2,000 tone/day). © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:815-823, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  11. 33 CFR 183.584 - Shock test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shock test. 183.584 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Tests § 183.584 Shock test. A fuel tank is tested by... surface of the tank. The duration of each vertical acceleration pulse is measured at the base of the shock...

  12. 33 CFR 159.105 - Shock test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shock test. 159.105 Section 159... MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.105 Shock test. The device, with liquid... shocks that are ten times the force of gravity (10g) and have a duration of 20-25 milliseconds measured...

  13. Percutaneous mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweneel, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the most common cause of death in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Around 10% of the patients with an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction develop cardiogenic shock. Mortality in cardiogenic shock has been reduced over the last few decades, but it still remains

  14. Streptococcus pyogenes toxic-shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, R; Diogo, M; Carvalho, A; Pimentel, T; Oliveira, J

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been an exponential increase in invasive infections caused by Streptococcus ß hemolyticcus group A. In about one third of cases they are complicated by toxic shock syndrome, characterized by septic shock and multiorgan failure. The authors, by their rarity, report a case of bacteraemia caused by Streptococcus pyogenes complicated by toxic shock syndrome.

  15. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Carl; Brown, Eric; Gray, George; Adams, Chris; Hull, Lawrence; Wynn, Thomas; Prime, Michael; Cooley, James; Bronkhorst, Curt; Addessio, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Explosively driven arrested beryllium experiments were performed with post mortem characterization to evaluate the microstructure and failure behaviors. The test samples were encapsulated in an aluminum assembly that was large relative to the sample, and the assembly features both axial and radial momentum traps. The sample carrier was inserted from the explosively loaded end and has features to lock the carrier to the surrounding cylinder using the induced plastic flow. Calculations with Lagrangian codes showed that the tensile stresses experienced by the Be sample were below the spall stress. Metallographic characterization of the arrested Be showed radial cracks present in the samples may have been caused by bending moments. Fractography showed the fractures propagated from the side of the sample closest to the explosives, the side with the highest tensile stress. There was evidence that the fractures may have propagated from the circumferential crack outward and downward radially. The EBSD results were the most informative of the characterization techniques used. EBSD provides information regarding texture, residual strain, and twinning. There was clear evidence of grain rotation as evidenced by the pole figures, the inverse pole figures and the Kernel Average Misorientation figures.

  16. A note on supersonic flow control with nanosecond plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J. G.; Cui, Y. D.; Li, J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2018-04-01

    A concept study on supersonic flow control using nanosecond pulsed plasma actuator is conducted by means of numerical simulation. The nanosecond plasma discharge is characterized by the generation of a micro-shock wave in ambient air and a residual heat in the discharge volume arising from the rapid heating of near-surface gas by the quick discharge. The residual heat has been found to be essential for the flow separation control over aerodynamic bodies like airfoil and backward-facing step. In this study, novel experiment is designed to utilize the other flow feature from discharge, i.e., instant shock wave, to control supersonic flow through shock-shock interaction. Both bow shock in front of a blunt body and attached shock anchored at the tip of supersonic projectile are manipulated via the discharged-induced shock wave in an appropriate manner. It is observed that drag on the blunt body is reduced appreciably. Meanwhile, a lateral force on sharp-edged projectile is produced, which can steer the body and give it an effective angle of attack. This opens a promising possibility for extending the applicability of this flow control technique in supersonic flow regime.

  17. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Taylor, B. D. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zalesak, S. T. [Berkeley Research Associates, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States); Iwamoto, Y. [Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime Pref. 790-8577 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case, the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic, decay with time for all the eigenmodes. This conclusion has been supported by our simulations done both on a Cartesian grid and on a curvilinear grid in spherical coordinates. Dispersion equation determining the eigenvalues of the problem and explicit formulas for the eigenfunction profiles corresponding to these eigenvalues are presented, making it possible to use the theory for hydrocode verification in two and three dimensions.

  18. Kappa-Electrons Downstream of the Solar Wind Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical description of the solar wind electron distribution function downstream of the termination shock under the influence of the shock-induced injection of overshooting KeV-energetic electrons will be presented. A kinetic phasespace transport equation in the bulk frame of the heliosheath plasma flow is developed for the solar wind electrons, taking into account shock-induced electron injection, convective changes, magnetic cooling processes and whistler wave-induced energy diffusion. Assuming that the local electron distribution under the prevailing Non-LTE conditions can be represented by a local kappa function with a local kappa parameter that varies with the streamline coordinates, we determine the parameters of the resulting, initial kappa distribution for the downstream electrons. From this initial function spectral electron fluxes can be derived and can be compared with those measured by the VOYAGER-1 spacecraft in the range between 40 to 70 KeV. It can then be shown that with kappa values around kappa = 6 one can in fact fit these data very satisfactorily. In addition it is shown that for isentropic electron flows kappa-distributed electrons have to undergo simultaneous changes of both parameters, i.e. kappa and theta, of the electron kappa function. It is also shown then that under the influence of energy sinks and sources the electron flux becomes non-isentropic with electron entropies changing along the streamline.

  19. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Murakami, M.; Taylor, B. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case, the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic, decay with time for all the eigenmodes. This conclusion has been supported by our simulations done both on a Cartesian grid and on a curvilinear grid in spherical coordinates. Dispersion equation determining the eigenvalues of the problem and explicit formulas for the eigenfunction profiles corresponding to these eigenvalues are presented, making it possible to use the theory for hydrocode verification in two and three dimensions.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic shock wave formation: Effect of area and density variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujith, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear steepening of finite amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating perpendicular to the magnetic field is investigated. The nonlinear evolution of a planar fast magnetosonic wave in a homentropic flow field is understood well through simple waves. However, in situations where the wave is moving through a variable area duct or when the flow field is nonhomentropic, the concept of simple waves cannot be used. In the present paper, the quasi-one-dimensional MHD equations that include the effect of area variation and density gradients are solved using the wave front expansion technique. The analysis is performed for a perfectly conducting fluid and also for a weakly conducting fluid. Closed form solutions are obtained for the nonlinear evolution of the slope of the wave front in the limits of infinitely large and small conductivity. A general criterion for a compression wave to steepen into a shock is obtained. An analytical expression for the location of shock formation is derived. The effect of area variation and density gradient on shock formation is studied and examples highlighting the same are presented

  1. Laser Beam Propagation Through Inhomogeneous Media with Shock-Like Profiles: Modeling and Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Ida, Nathan

    1997-01-01

    Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media has been studied for such diverse applications as propagation of radiowaves in atmosphere, light propagation through thin films and in inhomogeneous waveguides, flow visualization, and others. In recent years an increased interest has been developed in wave propagation through shocks in supersonic flows. Results of experiments conducted in the past few years has shown such interesting phenomena as a laser beam splitting and spreading. The paper describes a model constructed to propagate a laser beam through shock-like inhomogeneous media. Numerical techniques are presented to compute the beam through such media. The results of computation are presented, discussed, and compared with experimental data.

  2. Propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a gravitating or non-gravitating dusty gas with exponentially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of a strong spherical shock wave in a dusty gas with or without self-gravitational effects is investigated in the case of isothermal and adiabatic flows. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of small solid particles and perfect gas. The equilibrium flow conditions are assumed to be maintained, and the density of the mixture is assumed to be varying and obeying an exponential law. Non-similarity solutions are obtained and the effects of variations of the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the presence of self-gravitational field on the flow variables are investigated at given times. Our analysis reveals that after inclusion of gravitational field effects surprisingly the shock strength increases and remarkable differences are found in the distribution of flow variables. An increase in time also, increases the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that the consideration of isothermal flow increases the shock strength, and removes the singularity in the density distribution. Also, the presence of gravitational field increases the compressibility of the medium, due to which it is compressed and therefore the distance between the inner contact surface and the shock surface is reduced. The shock waves in self-gravitating dusty gas can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, star formation and shocks in stellar explosion, nuclear explosion, in industry, rupture of a pressurized vessel and explosion in the ionosphere. Other potential applications of this study include analysis of data from exploding wire experiments and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or re-entry of vehicles etc. A comparison is made between the solutions in the cases of the gravitating and the non-gravitating media. The obtained solutions are applicable for

  3. Toxic shock syndrome responsive to steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergis Nikhil

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toxic Shock Syndrome is a dangerous disease with clinical features mimicking bacterial sepsis. The best management of Toxic Shock Syndrome is not determined. Case presentation A 28 year-old woman presenting with high fever, tachycardia and widespread erythroderma is described. She failed to respond to intravenous antibiotics and required ITU admission. High dose corticosteroids dramatically improved her clinical condition. Conclusion Toxic Shock Syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained fever, rash and features resembling septic shock. Corticosteroids should be considered in the treatment of Toxic Shock Syndrome.

  4. Shock Wave Structure in Polyurethane Foam

    OpenAIRE

    ONODERA, Hideki; TAKAYAMA, Kazuyoshi

    1994-01-01

    Shock wave propagation in polyurethane (PU(R)) foam was experimentally studied. The experiment was conducted in a shock tube by measuring pressure along the PU(R) foam in a shock tube, by means of holographic interferometry and streak camera recording. It was found that the stress-strain curve of PU(R) has an inflection point. When the pressure behind the incident shock wave was below the inflection-point pressure P_c, the wave impedance ratio of the incident shock wave and transmitted pressu...

  5. The impact of oil-market shocks on stock returns in major oil-exporting countries: A Markov-switching approach

    OpenAIRE

    Basher, Syed Abul; Haug, Alfred A.; Sadorsky, Perry

    2017-01-01

    The impact that oil shocks have on stock prices in oil exporting countries has implications for both domestic and international investors. We derive the shocks driving oil prices from a fully-identified structural model of the oil market. We study their nonlinear relationship with stock market returns in major oil-exporting countries in a multi-factor Markov-switching framework. Flow oil-demand shocks have a statistically significant impact on stock returns in Canada, Norway, Russia, Kuwait, ...

  6. Post-Shock Sampling of Shock-Heated Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-07

    has four analytical columns, which allow for the precise measurement of permanent gases (e.g. O2, N2, CO, CO2, CH4), clear separation (and therefore...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Gas sampling, shock tube, jet fuel, gas chromatography REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...four analytical columns, which allow for the precise measurement of permanent gases (e.g. O2, N2, CO, CO2, CH4), clear separation (and therefore

  7. Systemic not just mesenteric lymph causes acute lung injury following hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Lawrence N; Liberati, David M; Ledgerwood, Anna M; Lucas, Charles E

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a significant role for factor(s) present in mesenteric lymph following hemorrhagic shock in the etiology of post-hemorrhagic shock acute lung injury (ALI). Earlier studies have shown that ischemia-reperfusion insults to systemic tissue beds can also result in ALI. We therefore hypothesized that factors in systemic lymph may cause lung injury after hemorrhagic shock; this was studied in vitro. Confluent human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) maintained in a 2-chamber cell culture system were exposed to systemic lymph obtained from dogs exposed to sham operation or hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. HMVEC injury was indexed by apoptosis (% Apo, Hoechst staining) and permeability to albumin (microL/min). HMVEC activation was indexed by surface expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressed as mean fluorescence intensity using flow cytometry. There was a 2-fold increase in HMVEC permeability and apoptotic rate after incubation with postshock systemic lymph. A similar effect was noted with ICAM expression, which was 2.5 fold higher after incubation with postshock lymph. These biologic effects were first noted with the 120-minute postresuscitation lymph. Lymph obtained during shock or from sham animals had no effect. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial dysfunction is evident after exposure to lymph obtained from systemic sites after hemorrhagic shock. The "unique" properties ascribed to post-hemorrhagic shock mesenteric lymph in causing ALI seem to be shared by lymph from systemic sites as well.

  8. Do oil shocks predict economic policy uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mobeen Ur

    2018-05-01

    Oil price fluctuations have influential role in global economic policies for developed as well as emerging countries. I investigate the role of international oil prices disintegrated into structural (i) oil supply shock, (ii) aggregate demand shock and (iii) oil market specific demand shocks, based on the work of Kilian (2009) using structural VAR framework on economic policies uncertainty of sampled markets. Economic policy uncertainty, due to its non-linear behavior is modeled in a regime switching framework with disintegrated structural oil shocks. Our results highlight that Indian, Spain and Japanese economic policy uncertainty responds to the global oil price shocks, however aggregate demand shocks fail to induce any change. Oil specific demand shocks are significant only for China and India in high volatility state.

  9. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  10. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10 14 W cm −2 to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code

  11. Exploratory laser-driven shock wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.

    1977-11-01

    We show the results of a feasibility study for investigating shock structure and for measuring equation-of-state parameters using high-energy, short-pulse lasers. We discuss the temporal and spatial structure of the luminosity from laser-driven shock unloading in aluminum foils. We demonstrate that shock velocity can be measured by observing the time interval between shock emergence across two thicknesses and show data for shocks of 1.3 and 2.1 Mbar. The fact that we observe shock fronts cleanly breaking through steps as small as 3 μm indicates that the shock front thickness is very small in the few megabar region; this is the first experimental verification that these fronts are not more than a few micrometers thick. We present approximate measurements of free-surface velocity. Finally, we speculate on the use of these techniques to obtain detailed equation-of-state data

  12. Testing the numerical method for one-dimensional shock treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvat, A.

    1998-01-01

    In the early 80's the SMUP computer code was developed at the Jozef Stefan Institute for simulation of two-phase flow in steam generators. It was suitable only for steady-state problems and was unable to simulate transient behavior. In this paper, efforts are presented to find suitable numerical method to renew the old SMUP computer code. The obsolete numerical code has to be replaced with a more efficient one that would be able to treat time-dependent problems. It also has to ensure accurate solution during shock propagation. One-dimensional shock propagation in a tube were studied at zero viscosity. To simplify the equation of state the ideal gas was chosen as a working fluid. Stability margins in the form of transport matrix eigenvalues were calculated. Results were found to be close to those already published.(author)

  13. Experimental results of astrophysical collisionless shock experiments from NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Higginson, D.; Huntington, C.; Pollock, B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H.; Ross, J.; Ryutov, D.; Swadling, G.; Wilks, S.; Fiuza, F.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Petrasso, R.; Li, C.; Zylstra, A.; Lamb, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Manuel, M.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss our laboratory experiments using the Omega and NIF lasers to investigate the dynamics of high Mach number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. It is believed that in astrophysical environments such shocks are the sites where seed magnetic fields are generated on a cosmologically fast timescale via the Weibel instability. Particle-in-cell (PIC) numerical simulations generate magnetic fields whose magnitude and scale are consistent with this concept. We will present recent experimental results as well as simulations and theoretical interpretations of these observations. The NIF experiments were able to observe the counter-streaming flow interactions through the transition from collisional to collisionless regimes. The latest proton radiography results will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Multispacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and magnetopause during extreme solar wind disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatrallyay, M.; Erdos, G.; Nemeth, Z.

    2012-01-01

    of three magnetopause and four bow shock models which describe them in considerably different ways using statistical methods based on observations. A new 2-D magnetopause model is introduced (based on Verigin et al., 2009) which takes into account the pressure of the compressed magnetosheath field raised...... by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component transverse to the solar wind flow. The observed magnetopause crossings could be predicted with a reasonable accuracy (0.1-0.2 RE) by one of the presented models at least. For geosynchronous magnetopause crossings observed by the GOES satellites, (1) the new model...... by the Cluster spacecraft were best predicted by the 3-D model of Lin et al. (2010). The applied empirical bow shock models and the 3-D semi-empiric bow shock model combined with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solution proved to be insufficient for predicting the observed unusual bow shock locations during large...

  15. Stochastic model theory of broadband shock associated noise from supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1987-01-01

    A method based on the work of Tam and Tanna (1982) for calculating the near field noise spectrum and the spatial distribution of broadband shock associated noise from supersonic jets is proposed. Multiple-scales expansion is used to decompose the quasi-periodic shock cells into time-independent waveguide modes of the jet flow, and the interaction of the instability waves with each of the waveguide modes is shown to generate unsteady disturbances which become part of the broadband shock associated noise when radiated to the far field. The observed broadband shock associated noise is composed of a superposition of the various distinct spectra of the different waveguide modes, and the multispectra can be easily identified in many of the existing far and near field noise measurements.

  16. Generation and propagation of shock waves in the exhaust pipe of a 4 cycle automobile engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, N.; Matsumura, S.; Aoki, K.; Takayama, K.

    1990-07-01

    An experimental investigation was made of reduction of noise generated in the exhaust pipe of a half liter 4-cycle water-cooled automobile gasoline engine. The pressure measurement along the exhaust pipe showed the nonlinear transition of compression waves discharged from the exhaust port of the engine into shock waves. In order to obtain a direct evidence of shock waves in the exhaust pipe, a flow visualization study was also conducted using a double exposure holographic interferometry. Weak shock waves of Mach number 1.09 exist in the exhaust pipe. For the purpose of collecting the data for designing optimum muffler configurations, additional shock tube experiments were carried out. The results indicates that the study of the non-linear wave interaction and propagation is important for the design of muffler.

  17. Behandling af kardiogent shock med perkutan mekanisk cirkulationsstøtte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders; Kaltoft, Anne Kjer; Hassager, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Despite rapid revascularisation with circulatory support using inotropes and intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, the mortality of cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction still exceeds 50%. An alternative treatment strategy is restoration of cardiac output by using a ventricu......Despite rapid revascularisation with circulatory support using inotropes and intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, the mortality of cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction still exceeds 50%. An alternative treatment strategy is restoration of cardiac output by using...... a ventricular assist device which can be inserted in the acute setting using the Impella device, a catheter-based flow pump. DanShock is a Danish multicentre study that will assess whether circulatory support using the Impella device will improve the outcome of cardiogenic shock compared to conventional...

  18. BOP Crises and External Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Shigeto

    2003-01-01

    This is a theoretical study of BOP crises in emerging markets in East Asia and LatinAmerica in the l990s. These BOP crises tend to be preceded by the current account deterioration, the real exchange rate appreciation, and inflationary pressures. The paper develops a model of BOP crises preceded by these macroeconomic phenomena. The model shows that an external shock (a decrease in the world nominal interest rate) leads to this type of BOP crises.

  19. Early Treatment in Shock. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    to injured soldiers, and must be easy to administer under combat conditions. In previous work, allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, was found...survival benefit in the canine shock model 20 years ago, by the PI and others (1). It appears to act by inhibiting xanthine oxidase , and hence...elevation of all ATP metabolites.9–11 Xanthine accumulates during ischemia. Then, when oxygenation is restored, the action of xanthine oxidase on

  20. Point-of-care optical tool to detect early stage of hemorrhage and shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Rajan S.; Riccardi, Suzannah L.; Johnson, Blair D.; Johnson, Christopher P.; Paradis, Norman A.; Joyner, Michael J.; Wolf, David E.

    2014-02-01

    There is a critical unmet clinical need for a device that can monitor and predict the onset of shock: hemorrhagic shock or bleeding to death, septic shock or systemic infection, and cardiogenic shock or blood flow and tissue oxygenation impairment due to heart attack. Together these represent 141 M patients per year. We have developed a monitor for shock based on measuring blood flow in peripheral (skin) capillary beds using diffuse correlation spectroscopy, a form of dynamic light scattering, and have demonstrated proof-of-principle both in pigs and humans. Our results show that skin blood flow measurement, either alone or in conjunction with other hemodynamic properties such as heart rate variability, pulse pressure variability, and tissue oxygenation, can meet this unmet need in a small self-contained patch-like device in conjunction with a hand-held processing unit. In this paper we describe and discuss the experimental work and the multivariate statistical analysis performed to demonstrate proof-of-principle of the concept.

  1. Effect of a transverse plasma jet on a shock wave induced by a ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu WANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted experiments in a wind tunnel with Mach number 2 to explore the evolution of a transverse plasma jet and its modification effect on a shock wave induced by a ramp with an angle of 24°. The transverse plasma jet was created by arc discharge in a small cylindrical cavity with a 2 mm diameter orifice. Three group tests with different actuator arrangements in the spanwise or streamwise direction upstream from the ramp were respectively studied to compare their disturbances to the shock wave. As shown by a time-resolved schlieren system, an unsteady motion of the shock wave by actuation was found: the shock wave was significantly modified by the plasma jet with an upstream motion and a reduced angle. Compared to spanwise actuation, a more intensive impact was obtained with two or three streamwise actuators working together. From shock wave structures, the control effect of the plasma jet on the shock motion based on a thermal effect, a potential cause of shock modification, was discussed. Furthermore, we performed a numerical simulation by using the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES method to simulate the evolution of the transverse plasma jet plume produced by two streamwise actuators. The results show that flow structures are similar to those identified in schlieren images. Two streamwise vortices were recognized, which indicates that the higher jet plume is the result of the overlap of two streamwise jets. Keywords: Flow control, Improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method, Plasma synthetic jet, Shock wave/boundary layer interaction, Time resolved schlieren system

  2. Post electric shock reactive thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Richa; Patne, Shashikant C U; Pankaj, Pranjal

    2015-04-01

    Thrombocytosis is defined as a platelet count greater than 400×10(9)/L. Electric shock may lead to tissue injury and marked thrombocytosis. We herein report a case of 45-year-old woman, who was hospitalized with progressively increasing weakness, tingling sensation, and numbness of the bilateral lower limbs. She had a history of receiving electric shock during household work, 15 days prior to her admission. Her laboratory investigations revealed a markedly increased platelet count (1,570×10(9)/L) along with increased level of serum uric acid (12 mg/dL), and mild increase in serum potassium (6.7 mmol/L), and serum alanine transaminase (50 U/L). She was treated with intravenous fluids, calcium, and multivitamins. Following hospitalization and treatment, condition of the patient improved, her symptoms resolved, and her platelet counts declined. We report this case because of rare presentation of marked thrombocytosis secondary to electric shock with a brief discussion on pathophysiology of this condition.

  3. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  4. Cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction; prognostic impact of early and late shock development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, M G; Køber, L; Boesgaard, S

    2003-01-01

    incidence, outcome and prognostic significance of cardiogenic shock in 6676 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Demographic and clinical data including the presence of cardiogenic shock were prospectively collected in 6676 non-invasively managed patients...... with myocardial infarction consecutively admitted to 27 different hospitals during a 2-year period. Six-year mortality data were collected in 99.9% of the population. Cardiogenic shock developed in 444 patients (6.7%). In 59% of these patients cardiogenic shock developed within 48 h, 11% developed shock during...... or late shock development (>80%) (Pcollected registry, non-invasively managed consecutive myocardial infarct...

  5. Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Na; Shan, Hao [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Giacalone, Joe [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Yan, Yihua [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Ding, Mingde, E-mail: wangxin@xao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University) Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-06-20

    Observations by spacecraft such as ACE , STEREO , and others show that there are proton spectral “breaks” with energy E {sub br} at 1–10 MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. Generally, a single shock with the diffusive acceleration mechanism would not predict the “broken” energy spectrum. The present paper focuses on two converging shocks to identify this energy spectral feature. In this case, the converging shocks comprise one forward CME-driven shock on 2006 December 13 and another backward Earth bow shock. We simulate the detailed particle acceleration processes in the region of the converging shocks using the Monte Carlo method. As a result, we not only obtain an extended energy spectrum with an energy “tail” up to a few 10 MeV higher than that in previous single shock model, but also we find an energy spectral “break” occurring on ∼5.5 MeV. The predicted energy spectral shape is consistent with observations from multiple spacecraft. The spectral “break,” then, in this case is caused by the interaction between the CME shock and Earth’s bow shock, and otherwise would not be present if Earth were not in the path of the CME.

  6. Intense Shock Waves and Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2005-07-01

    The report presents the recent results of experimental investigations of equations of state, compositions, thermodynamical and transport properties, electrical conductivity and opacity of strongly coupled plasmas generated by intense shock and rarefaction waves. The experimental methods for generation of high energy densities in matter, drivers for shock waves and fast diagnostic tools are discussed. Application of intense shock waves to solid and porous targets generates nonideal plasmas in megabar-gigabar pressure range. Compression of plasma by a series of reverberating shock waves allows us to decrease irreversible heating effects. To increase the irreversibility effects and to generate high temperature plasma states the experiments on shock compression of porous samples (fine metal powder, aerogels) were performed. The adiabatic expansion of matter initially compressed by intense shocks up to megabars allows investigating the intermediate region between the solid and vapor phase of nonideal plasmas, including the metal-insulator transition phase and the high temperature saturation curve with critical points of metals. The shock-wave-induced non-equilibrium phenomena at fast melting, spallation and adiabatic condensation are analyzed in the framework of the interspinodal decomposition model. The spall strength of single and polycrystal metals at extremely fast deformation produced by fast shock waves is discussed. The ``pressure ionization'' phenomena in hydrogen, helium, argon, xenon, krypton, neon, iodine, silica, sulfur, fullerenes, and some metals are analyzed on the base of multiple shock compression experiments. For some simple metals (Li, Na, Ca) the effect of ``dielectrization'' as a result of multiple shock compression are discussed.

  7. Kinetic instabilities in plasmas: from electromagnetic fluctuations to collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruyer, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks play a major role in powerful astrophysical objects (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants, pulsar winds, etc.), where they are thought to be responsible for non-thermal particle acceleration and radiation. Numerical simulations have shown that, in the absence of an external magnetic field, these self-organizing structures originate from electromagnetic instabilities triggered by high-velocity colliding flows. These Weibel-like instabilities are indeed capable of producing the magnetic turbulence required for both efficient scattering and Fermi-type acceleration. Along with rapid advances in their theoretical understanding, intense effort is now underway to generate collisionless shocks in the laboratory using energetic lasers. In a first part we study the (w,k)-resolved electromagnetic thermal spectrum sustained by a drifting relativistic plasma. In particular, we obtain analytical formulae for the fluctuation spectra, the latter serving as seeds for growing magnetic modes in counterstreaming plasmas. Distinguishing between sub-luminal and supra-luminal thermal fluctuations, we derived analytical formulae of their respective spectral contributions. Comparisons with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are made, showing close agreement in the sub-luminal regime along with some discrepancy in the supra-luminal regime. Our formulae are then used to estimate the saturation time of the Weibel instability of relativistic pair plasmas. Our predictions are shown to match 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations over a three-decade range in flow energy. We then develop a predictive kinetic model of the nonlinear phase of the Weibel instability induced by two counter-streaming, symmetric and non-relativistic ion beams. This self consistent, fully analytical model allows us to follow the evolution of the beams' properties up to a stage close to complete isotropization and thus to shock formation. Its predictions are supported by 2D and 3D particle

  8. Intermittency and Topology of Shock Induced Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Redondo, Jose M.; Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Malik, Nadeem; Vila, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The advance of a Rayleigh-Taylor front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991),[1-3] and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time where the width of the growing region of instability depends on the local mixing efficiency of the different density fluids that accelerate against each other g is the acceleration and A is the Atwood number defined as the diference of densities divided by their sum. This results show the independence of the large amplitude structures on the initial conditions the width of the mixing region depends also on the intermittency of the turbulence. Then dimensional analysis may also depend on the relevant reduced acceleration driven time and the molecular reactive time akin to Damkholer number and the fractal structure of the contact zone [2,4]. Detailed experiments and simulations on RT and RM shock induced fronts analized with respect to structure functions are able to determine which mechanisms are most effective in local mixing which increase the effective fractal dimension, as well as the effect of higher order geometrical parameters, such as the structure functions, in non-homogeneous fluids (Mahjoub et al 1998)[5]. The structure of a Mixing blob shows a relatively sharp head with most of the mixing taking place at the sides due to what seems to be shear instability very similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, but with sideways accelerations. The formation of the blobs and spikes with their secondary instabilities produces a turbulent cascade, evident just after about 1 non-dimensional time unit, from a virtual time origin that takes into account the linear growth phase, as can be seen by the growth of the fractal dimension for different volume fractions. Two-dimensional cuts of the 3D flow also show that vortex flows have closed or spiral streamlines around their core. Examples of such flows can be also seen in the laboratory, for example at the interface of atwo-layer stratified fluid in a tank in which case streamlines

  9. Modeling of energy transfer in hypersonic shocks using high fidelity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong

    The spectra of high-temperature, chemically reacting hypersonic flows provides the most powerful diagnostic available for testing thermochemically nonequilibrium models in re-entry conditions. Several shock tube experiments have revealed that conventional phenomenological approach can not accurately predict the internal temperature of the gas and also the corresponding radiation. In particular, large rotational nonequilibrium in strong shocks has been observed in several experiments with high peak translational temperatures. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a particlebased simulation method that is capable of properly simulating flows with large nonequilibrium. In the experiments above, one dimensional shocks are most widely studied but they are challenging to simulate using the DSMC method due to the unsteady nature of the flows and especially for hypersonic flows with chemical reactions taking place. Therefore, efficient approaches for simulating one-dimensional shocks are developed for use in DSMC simulations. Both a shock stabilization technique and a modified DSMC unsteady sampling approach are used in simulating one dimensional, unsteady shocks. In the latter approach, a moving sampling region is used to obtain an accurate profile of the reflected shock in air. The shock number density and temperature profiles are obtained and used to calculate excitation and radiation. The Quasi-Steady-State (QSS) assumption is made in the excitation calculation where both electron impact and heavy particle impact excitation for the NO(A2sum +) and the N+2 (B2sum +u ) states are studied. The calculated NOradiation in the wavelength range o lambda = 235 +/- 7 nm for shock speeds below 7 km/s are in good agreement with the experiment, but, the predicted radiation is lower than the experiment for shock speeds above 7 km/s. In addition, the N+2 radiation in the wavelength range of lambda = 391.4 +/- 0.2 nm are in good agreement with the experimental data for

  10. Shock wave calibration of under-expanded natural gas fuel jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T. R.; Milton, B. E.

    2008-10-01

    Natural gas, a fuel abundant in nature, cannot be used by itself in conventional diesel engines because of its low cetane number. However, it can be used as the primary fuel with ignition by a pilot diesel spray. This is called dual-fuelling. The gas may be introduced either into the inlet manifold or, preferably, directly into the cylinder where it is injected as a short duration, intermittent, sonic jet. For accurate delivery in the latter case, a constant flow-rate from the injector is required into the constantly varying pressure in the cylinder. Thus, a sonic (choked) jet is required which is generally highly under-expanded. Immediately at the nozzle exit, a shock structure develops which can provide essential information about the downstream flow. This shock structure, generally referred to as a “barrel” shock, provides a key to understanding the full injection process. It is examined both experimentally and numerically in this paper.

  11. Propagating Structure Of A Microwave Driven Shock wave Inside A Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Shibata, Teppei; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The thrust generation process of a microwave rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine, and understanding the interactions between microwave plasma and shock waves is important. Shadowgraph images of the microwave plasma generated in a tube under atmospheric air were taken. The observed plasma and shock wave were propagating one-dimensionally at constant velocity inside the tube. In order to understand the flow field inside the rocket, one-dimensional CFD analysis was conducted. With the change of microwave power density, the structure of the flow field was classified into two regimes: Microwave Supported Combustion (MSC), and Microwave Supported Detonation (MSD). The structure of the MSD was different from the structure of a chemical detonation, which implied the existence of a preheating in front of the shock wave. Furthermore, the flight performance was estimated by calculating the momentum coupling coefficient. It was confirmed that the efficiency was nearly constant in the MSD regime, with the increase of microwave power density.

  12. Evolution of scalar and velocity dynamics in planar shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukharfane, R.; Bouali, Z.; Mura, A.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the short residence time of air in supersonic combustors, achieving efficient mixing in compressible turbulent reactive flows is crucial for the design of supersonic ramjet (Scramjet) engines. In this respect, improving the understanding of shock-scalar mixing interactions is of fundamental importance for such supersonic combustion applications. In these compressible flows, the interaction between the turbulence and the shock wave is reciprocal, and the coupling between them is very strong. A basic understanding of the physics of such complex interactions has already been obtained through the analysis of relevant simplified flow configurations, including propagation of the shock wave in density-stratified media, shock-wave-mixing-layer interaction, and shock-wave-vortex interaction. Amplification of velocity fluctuations and substantial changes in turbulence characteristic length scales are the most well-known outcomes of shock-turbulence interaction, which may also deeply influence scalar mixing between fuel and oxidizer. The effects of the shock wave on the turbulence have been widely characterized through the use of so-called amplification factors, and similar quantities are introduced herein to characterize the influence of the shock wave on scalar mixing. One of the primary goals of the present study is indeed to extend previous analyses to the case of shock-scalar mixing interaction, which is directly relevant to supersonic combustion applications. It is expected that the shock wave will affect the scalar dissipation rate (SDR) dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the modification of the so-called turbulence-scalar interaction as a leading-order contribution to the production of mean SDR, i.e., a quantity that defines the mixing rate and efficiency. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this issue has never been addressed in detail in the literature, and the objective of the present study is to scrutinize this influence. The turbulent mixing of a

  13. Mitigation of shock-induced flow separation using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The CERANS-MHD code has been used to solve the governing resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations discretized in finite-volume framework. The AUSM-PW? flux function is used in modellingthe advection terms and central differencing is used in modelling the resistive terms. Powell's source term method is used for ...

  14. Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    WORDS (Conllnum on rtvmf tldm II nocfmry Td Idmnllly by block number) Turbulent boundary layers Skin friction, heat transfer and pressure High... tD t{> • y rp < J -o ill ... |i| ;| ilh |I ti i llii ffPtffin i ini I ! til. ;■ ; ’ ! ’ : in •■•: \\1’. T ill j i i i...III [lii 5 ft" t H "H— im BJITT i’i 1 i Mt- B ianj ii ( !l!l Mi IF Ii ig| M»-H J , ■*« J J j 1JJ J 4^ Ul CD S D Z V) D -I O z > Ul QC

  15. Propagation of exponential shock wave in an axisymmetric rotating non-ideal dusty gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional unsteady isothermal and adiabatic flow behind a strong exponential shock wave propagating in a rotational axisymmetric mixture of non-ideal gas and small solid particles, which has variable azimuthal and axial fluid velocities, is analyzed. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to exponential law. The azimuthal and axial components of the fluid velocity in the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obeying exponential laws. In the present work, small solid particles are considered as pseudo-fluid with the assumption that the equilibrium flow-conditions are maintained in the flow-field, and the viscous-stress and heat conduction of the mixture are negligible. Solutions are obtained in both the cases, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal or adiabatic by taking into account the components of vorticity vector and compressibility. It is found that the assumption of zero temperature gradient brings a profound change in the density, axial component of vorticity vector and compressibility distributions as compared to that of the adiabatic case. To investigate the behavior of the flow variables and the influence on the shock wave propagation by the parameter of non-idealness of the gas overline{b} in the mixture as well as by the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture Kp and by the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas G1 are worked out in detail. It is interesting to note that the shock strength increases with an increase in G1 ; whereas it decreases with an increase in overline{b} . Also, a comparison between the solutions in the cases of isothermal and adiabatic flows is made.

  16. Shock ignition: modelling and target design robustness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeyre, X; Lafon, M; Schurtz, G; Olazabal-Loume, M; Breil, J; Galera, S; Weber, S, E-mail: ribeyre@celia.u-bordeaux1.f [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS, CEA, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351, cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France)

    2009-12-15

    Shock ignition of a pre-compressed deuterium tritium fuel is considered here. When properly timed, a converging shock launched in the target prior to stagnation time strongly enhances the hot spot pressure. This allows ignition to be reached in a nonisobaric configuration. We show in this work that the igniting mechanism is pressure amplification by shock convergence and shock collision. The shock ignition applied to the HiPER target allows one to study the robustness of this method. It is shown that the spike energy is not a critical parameter and that the spike power delivered on the target depends mainly on the shell implosion velocity. Finally, a family of homothetic targets ignited with a shock wave is studied.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of laser shock phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Ichirou [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kansai Research Establishment, Advanced Photon Research Center, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan).

    2001-10-01

    Recently, ultrashort-pulse lasers with high peak power have been developed, and their application to materials processing is expected as a tool of precision microfabrication. When a high power laser irradiates, a shock wave propagates into the material and dislocations are generated. In this paper, laser shock phenomena of the metal were analyzed using the modified molecular dynamics method, which has been developed by Ohmura and Fukumoto. The main results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The shock wave induced by the Gaussian beam irradiation propagates radially from the surface to the interior. (2) A lot of dislocations are generated at the solid-liquid interface by the propagation of a shock wave. (3) Some dislocations are moved instantaneously with the velocity of the longitudinal wave when the shock wave passes, and their velocity is not larger than the transverse velocity after the shock wave has passed. (author)

  18. Shock heating of the solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.; Liu, Shaoliang; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    The role played by shocks in heating solar-wind plasma is investigated using data on 413 shocks which were identified from the plasma and magnetic-field data collected between 1973 and 1982 by Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft. It is found that the average shock strength increased with the heliocentric distance outside 1 AU, reaching a maximum near 5 AU, after which the shock strength decreased with the distance; the entropy of the solar wind protons also reached a maximum at 5 AU. An MHD simulation model in which shock heating is the only heating mechanism available was used to calculate the entropy changes for the November 1977 event. The calculated entropy agreed well with the value calculated from observational data, suggesting that shocks are chiefly responsible for heating solar wind plasma between 1 and 15 AU.

  19. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig

    2015-01-01

    shocks have been reported. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, predictors and management of inappropriate shocks in the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry, which collects S-ICD implantation information and follow-up data from clinical centers in Europe and New Zealand. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 21 ± 13...... months, 48 out of 581 S-ICD patients (71% male, age 49 ± 18 years) experienced 101 inappropriate shocks (8.3%). The most common cause was cardiac signal oversensing (73%), such as T-wave oversensing. Eighteen shocks (18%) were due to supraventricular tachycardias (SVT), of which 15 occurred in the shock......-only zone. Cox-proportional hazard modeling using time-dependent covariates demonstrated that patients with a history of atrial fibrillation (HR 2.4) and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HR 4.6) had an increased risk for inappropriate shocks, while programming the primary vector for sensing (from...

  20. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; hide

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  1. Dynamics of desalination shocks in microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ali; Bazant, Martin

    2010-11-01

    We describe a nonlinear regime of ion transport that results from coupled conduction effects of electric double layers (surface conduction) in electrokinetic systems. Mani, Zangle, and Santiago (Langmuir, 25, 3898--3916) recently showed that sharp concentration gradients can be formed and propagate away from a microchannel/nanochannel junction, analogous to shock waves in gases. Propagation of these shocks in microchannels leaves behind a region with orders of magnitude lower salt concentration acting to desalinate the bulk electrolyte. In this talk we describe the basic dynamics of desalination shocks and present the mathematical theory of shock existence and propagation in complex microstructures. We predict that desalination shocks accelerate and sharpen in narrowing structures and decelerate and weaken, even disappear, in widening channels. We will also discuss mathematical models for propagation of desalination shocks in porous media.

  2. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Britton, Charles L.; Pearce, James; Jagadish, Usha; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2008-11-11

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  3. Shock-induced deformation twinning in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.; Niou, C.S.; Pappu, S.; Kennedy, C.; Meyers, M.A.; Chen, Y.J.

    1997-01-01

    Shock-wave deformation of tantalum to a pressure of 45 GPa and duration of 1.8 micros generates profuse twinning. The post-shock mechanical response is significantly affected, with shock hardening exceeding the expected hardening due to the transient shock strain ε s = (4/3)ln(V/V 0 ); this enhanced hardening, and other alterations in response, are attributed to the barriers presented to plastic deformation by the deformation twins. A constitutive model is proposed that predicts the threshold shock stress for mechanical twinning; it is based on the application of the Swegle-Grady relationship between shock stress and strain rate to constitute equations describing the critical stress for slip and twinning. This constitutive model incorporates grain-size effects and predicts a threshold twinning stress that is a function of temperature and grain size; predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with experimental results

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of the cap-shock structure in over expanded thrust-optimized nozzles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijasse, P.; Bouvier, F.; Servel, P.

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the aerodynamics of an over-expanded nozzle, when the internal parabolic contour of the nozzle extension is highly thrust-optimized in terms of specific impulse-to-weight ratio. This optimization leads to an internal focusing shock issuing from a little downstream from the throat, even when the nozzle is running at nearly vacuum conditions. When such a nozzle is over-expanded, the focusing shock thus interferes with the over-expansion shock, and it forms from this shock interference a particular shock system, named 'cap-shock' because of the cap-like luminous shape seen in the over-expanded plumes of some real engines. Navier-Stokes calcinations performed in Europe had permitted to numerically analyze such a flow pattern, and they have revealed notably a recirculation bubble on the centerline downstream of the Mach disk, which had never been measured yet. A test campaign characterizing the flow separation in over-expanded sub-scale nozzles has been performed in the R2Ch blowdown wind tunnel of the Onera Chalais-Meudon center. Schlieren photographs of the exhaust jet have authorized a detailed description of the cap-shock pattern. Two-components Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements have confirmed the existence of a recirculation bubble surrounded by an annular supersonic jet and has given its size. In addition to the calculations and the Schlieren interpretative sketches, these first quantitative experimental characterization of the cap-shock structure permit to state a physical description of the cap-shock induced flow field in the thrust-optimized nozzles. (authors)

  5. Shock wave, fluid instability and implosion studies with a kinetic particle approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley P.; Strother, Terrance T.

    2016-10-01

    Many problems in laboratory plasma physics are subject to flows that move between the continuum and the kinetic regime. The correct description of these flows is crucial in order to capture their impact on the system's dynamical evolution. Examples are capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Although their dynamics is predominantly shaped by shock waves and fluid instabilities, non-equilibrium flows in form of deuterium/tritium ions have been shown to play a significant role. We present recent studies with our Monte Carlo kinetic particle code that is designed to capture continuum and kinetic flows in large physical systems with possible applications in ICF studies. Discussed results will include standard shock wave and fluid instability tests and simulations that are adapted towards future ICF studies with comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations. This work used the Wolf TriLAB Capacity Cluster at LANL. I.S. acknowledges support through a Director's fellowship (20150741PRD3) from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. An experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave induced turbulent boundary layer separation at hypersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, J. G.; Horstman, C. C.; Rubesin, M. W.; Coakley, T. J.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    A thoroughly documented experiment is reported that was specifically designed to test and guide computations of the interaction of an impinging shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. Detailed mean flow field and surface data are presented for two shock strengths which resulted in attached and separated flows, respectively. Numerical computations are used to illustrate the dependence of the computations on the particulars of the turbulence models. Models appropriate for zero pressure gradient flows predicted the overall features of the flow fields, but were deficient in predicting many of the details of the interaction regions. Improvements to the turbulence model parameters were sought through a combination of detailed data analysis and computer simulations which tested the sensitivity of the solutions to model parameter changes. Computer simulations using these improvements are presented and discussed.

  7. Role of echocardiography in reducing shock reversal time in pediatric septic shock: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. EL‐Nawawy

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Serial echocardiography provided crucial data for early recognition of septic myocardial dysfunction and hypovolemia that was not apparent on clinical assessment, allowing a timely management and resulting in shock reversal time reduction among children with septic shock.

  8. RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON SHOCK DRIFT ACCELERATION IN LOW MACH NUMBER GALAXY CLUSTER SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukiyo, S.; Ohira, Y.; Yamazaki, R.; Umeda, T.

    2011-01-01

    An extreme case of electron shock drift acceleration (SDA) in low Mach number collisionless shocks is investigated as a plausible mechanism for the initial acceleration of relativistic electrons in large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters, where the upstream plasma temperature is of the order of 10 keV and the degree of magnetization is not too small. One-dimensional electromagnetic full particle simulations reveal that, even when a shock is rather moderate, a part of the thermal incoming electrons are accelerated and reflected through relativistic SDA and form a local non-thermal population just upstream of the shock. The accelerated electrons can self-generate local coherent waves and further be back-scattered toward the shock by those waves. This may be a scenario for the first stage of the electron shock acceleration occurring at the large-scale shocks in galaxy clusters, such as CIZA J2242.8+5301, which have well-defined radio relics.

  9. A search for shock-excited optical emission from the outflows of massive young stellar objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez, C; Hoare, MG

    We have searched for optical shock-excited emission lines in the outer parts of the bipolar outflows from massive young stellar objects where the flow terminates and the extinction is expected to be low. The Taurus Tunable Filter (TTF) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) was used to obtain

  10. Sublingual microcirculatory changes during high-volume hemofiltration in hyperdynamic septic shock patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Carolina; Hernandez, Glenn; Godoy, Cristian; Downey, Patricio; Andresen, Max; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) may contribute to revert hypotension in severe hyperdynamic septic shock patients. However, arterial pressure stabilization occurs due to an increase in systemic vascular resistance, which could eventually compromise microcirculatory blood flow and perfusion. The goal of this study was to determine if HVHF deteriorates sublingual microcirculation in severe hyperdynamic septic shock patients. This was a prospective, non-randomized study at a 16-bed, medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. We included 12 severe hyperdynamic septic shock patients (norepinephrine requirements > 0.3 μg/kg/min and cardiac index > 3.0 L/min/m2) who underwent a 12-hour HVHF as a rescue therapy according to a predefined algorithm. Sublingual microcirculation (Microscan for NTSC, Microvision Medical), systemic hemodynamics and perfusion parameters were assessed at baseline, at 12 hours of HVHF, and 6 hours after stopping HVHF. Microcirculatory flow index increased after 12 hours of HVHF and this increase persisted 6 hours after stopping HVHF. A similar trend was observed for the proportion of perfused microvessels. The increase in microcirculatory blood flow was inversely correlated with baseline levels. There was no significant change in microvascular density or heterogeneity during or after HVHF. Mean arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased while lactate levels decreased after the 12-hour HVHF. The use of HVHF as a rescue therapy in patients with severe hyperdynamic septic shock does not deteriorate sublingual microcirculatory blood flow despite the increase in systemic vascular resistance.

  11. Effect of air jet vortex generators on a shock wave boundary layer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souverein, L.J.; Debiève, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous air jet vortex generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5degrees and a Mach number Me = 2.3.

  12. Numerical investigation of three-dimensional cloud cavitation with special emphasis on collapse induced shock dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnerr, Günter; Sezal, I.H.; Schmidt, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to model and analyze compressible three-dimensional (3D) cavitating liquid flows with special emphasis on the detection of shock formation and propagation. We recently developed the conservative finite volume method CATUM (Cavitation Technische Universität

  13. Theoretical investigation of nonequilibrium processes in shock wave in bubbly liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bityurin, V. A.; Velikodnyi, V. Yu.; Bykov, A. A.

    The effects related to a translational nonequilibrium at the shock wave front in a bubbly liquid flow with volume gas contents within 0.3 a parts per thousand currency sign phi a parts per thousand currency sign 0.98 have been theoretically studied. Analytical expressions for the longitudinal and

  14. Condensed matter at high shock pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Hamilton, D.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental techniques are described for shock waves in liquids: Hugoniot equation-of-state, shock temperature and emission spectroscopy, electrical conductivity, and Raman spectroscopy. Experimental data are reviewed and presented in terms of phenomena that occur at high densities and temperatures in shocked He, Ar, N 2 , CO, SiO 2 -aerogel, H 2 O, and C 6 H 6 . The superconducting properties of Nb metal shocked to 100 GPa (1 Mbar) and recovered intact are discussed in terms of prospects for synthesizing novel, metastable materials. Ultrahigh pressure data for Cu is reviewed in the range 0.3 to 6TPa (3 to 60 Mbar). 56 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  15. Radio emission from coronal and interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cane, H.V.

    1987-01-01

    Observational data on coronal and interplanetary (IP) type II burst events associated with shock-wave propagation are reviewed, with a focus on the past and potential future contributions of space-based observatories. The evidence presented by Cane (1983 and 1984) in support of the hypothesis that the coronal (metric) and IP (kilometric) bursts are due to different shocks is summarized, and the fast-drift kilometric events seen at the same time as metric type II bursts (and designated shock-accelerated or shock-associated events) are characterized. The need for further observations at 0.5-20 MHz is indicated. 20 references

  16. Benchtop Insensitivity: First Steps with Shocked PETN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, William K; Fajardo, Mario E

    2008-01-01

    "Insensitive Munitions (IM) are conventional weapons and ordnance that fulfill their performance objectives while minimizing collateral damage if exposed to stimuli including fires, impact and shock threats...

  17. Advanced and Exploratory Shock Sensing Mechanisms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelsen, Nicholas H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kolb, James D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kulkarni, Akshay G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorscher, Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Habing, Clayton D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mathis, Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beller, Zachary J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical component response to shock environments must be predictable in order to ensure reliability and safety. Whether the shock input results from accidental drops during transportation to projectile impact scenarios, the system must irreversibly transition into a safe state that is incapable of triggering the component . With this critical need in mind, the 2017 Nuclear Weapons Summer Product Realization Institute (NW SPRINT) program objective sought the design of a passive shock failsafe with emphasis on additively manufactured (AM) components. Team Advanced and Exploratory (A&E) responded to the challenge by designing and delivering multiple passive shock sensing mech anisms that activate within a prescribed mechanical shock threshold. These AM failsafe designs were tuned and validated using analytical and computational techniques including the shock response spectrum (SRS) and finite element analysis (FEA). After rapid prototyping, the devices experienced physical shock tests conducted on Sandia drop tables to experimentally verify performance. Keywords: Additive manufacturing, dynamic system, failsafe, finite element analysis, mechanical shock, NW SPRINT, shock respon se spectrum

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SHOCK WAVE REFRACTION ON INCLINED CONTACT DISCONTINUITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider numerical simulation of shock wave refraction on plane contact discontinuity, separating two gases with different density. Discretization of Euler equations is based on finite volume method and WENO finite difference schemes, implemented on unstructured meshes. Integration over time is performed with the use of the third-order Runge–Kutta stepping procedure. The procedure of identification and classification of gas dynamic discontinuities based on conditions of dynamic consistency and image processing methods is applied to visualize and interpret the results of numerical calculations. The flow structure and its quantitative characteristics are defined. The results of numerical and experimental visualization (shadowgraphs, schlieren images, and interferograms are compared.

  19. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  20. Multiple transonic solutions with a new class of shock transitions in steady isothermal solar and stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habbal, S.R.; Tsinganos, K.

    1983-01-01

    A new class of shock transitions are shown to arise in the transonic solutions of the steady isothermal solar wind equations when, for example, momentum deposition gives rise to multiple critical points in the flow. These shock transitions between critical solutions occur for a certain range of the parameters characterizing the momentum deposition function. In the presence of such shock transitions, the isothermal wind equations admit multiple transonic solutions, namely a continuous solution passing through an inner critical point and solutions involving a shock transition between critical solutions. These multiple transonic solutions have the same flow speed at the base but different supersonic flow speeds at infinity. An additional interesting feature of the isothermal equations is the equivalence of nonradial flow tube divergence and momentum addition in giving rise to multiple critical points and hence to multiple transonic solutions with shock transitions. The physical relevance of these properties for astrophysical systems such as the inner solar wind, flows in extragalactic jets and accretion discs are discussed

  1. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated. (paper)

  2. Application of the space-time conservation element and solution element method to shock-tube problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    1994-01-01

    An Euler solver based on the method of space-time conservation element and solution element is in this paper to simulate shock-tube flows involving shock waves, contact discontinuities, expansion waves and their intersections. Seven test problems are considered to examine the capability of this method. The numerical results, when compared with exact solutions and/or numerical solutions by other methods, indicate that the present method can accurately resolve strong shock and contact discontinuities without using any ad hoc techniques which are used only at the neighborhood of a discontinuity.

  3. Shock induced chemistry in granular Ni/Al nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Germann, Timothy; Kober, Edward; Strachan, Alejandro

    Intermolecular reactive composites find diverse applications in defense, microelectronics and medicine, where strong, localized sources of heat are required. However, fundamental questions of the initiation and propagation mechanisms on the nanoscale remain to be addressed, which is a roadblock to their widespread application. Motivated by experimental work which has shown that high-energy ball milling can significantly improve the reactivity as well as the ease of ignition of Ni/Al inter-metallic composites, we present large scale (~ 41 million atom) molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in granular Ni/Al nano-composites, which are designed to capture the microstructure that is obtained post milling. Shock propagation in these granular composites is observed to be extremely diffuse at low piston velocities, leading to a large inhomogeneity in the local stress states of the material. At higher piston velocities, the shock front is more homogeneous as a consequence of a change in the compaction mechanism; from plastic deformation mediated pore collapse at low piston velocities, to fluid filling of the pores at higher impact velocities. The flow of molten ejecta into the pores subsequently leads to the formation of vortices, where the reaction progresses much faster than in the bulk.

  4. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  5. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Profuse sweating , moist skin Rapid but weak pulse Shallow breathing Unconsciousness First Aid Take the following steps ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  6. BOW SHOCK FRAGMENTATION DRIVEN BY A THERMAL INSTABILITY IN LABORATORY ASTROPHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Pickworth, L. A.; Swadling, G. F.; Skidmore, J.; Hall, G. N.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G.; De Grouchy, P.; Music, J.; Suttle, L. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Ciardi, A. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 6, UMR 8112, LERMA, F-75005, Paris (France); Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G. [Departamento de Fisica de la Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, E-35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Hartigan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 S. Main, Houston, TX 77521-1892 (United States); Hansen, E.; Frank, A., E-mail: f.suzuki@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    The role of radiative cooling during the evolution of a bow shock was studied in laboratory-astrophysics experiments that are scalable to bow shocks present in jets from young stellar objects. The laboratory bow shock is formed during the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic plasma jets produced by an opposing pair of radial foil Z-pinches driven by the current pulse from the MAGPIE pulsed-power generator. The jets have different flow velocities in the laboratory frame, and the experiments are driven over many times the characteristic cooling timescale. The initially smooth bow shock rapidly develops small-scale nonuniformities over temporal and spatial scales that are consistent with a thermal instability triggered by strong radiative cooling in the shock. The growth of these perturbations eventually results in a global fragmentation of the bow shock front. The formation of a thermal instability is supported by analysis of the plasma cooling function calculated for the experimental conditions with the radiative packages ABAKO/RAPCAL.

  7. Analytical solution of the problem of a shock wave in the collapsing gas in Lagrangian coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuropatenko, V. F.; Shestakovskaya, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    It is proposed the exact solution of the problem of a convergent shock wave and gas dynamic compression in a spherical vessel with an impermeable wall in Lagrangian coordinates. At the initial time the speed of cold ideal gas is equal to zero, and a negative velocity is set on boundary of the sphere. When t > t0 the shock wave spreads from this point into the gas. The boundary of the sphere will move under the certain law correlated with the motion of the shock wave. The trajectories of the gas particles in Lagrangian coordinates are straight lines. The equations determining the structure of the gas flow between the shock front and gas border have been found as a function of time and Lagrangian coordinate. The dependence of the entropy on the velocity of the shock wave has been found too. For Lagrangian coordinates the problem is first solved. It is fundamentally different from previously known formulations of the problem of the self-convergence of the self-similar shock wave to the center of symmetry and its reflection from the center, which was built up for the infinite area in Euler coordinates.

  8. Research on shock wave characteristics in the isolator of central strut rocket-based combined cycle engine under Ma5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianggeng; Xue, Rui; Qin, Fei; Hu, Chunbo; He, Guoqiang

    2017-11-01

    A numerical calculation of shock wave characteristics in the isolator of central strut rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine fueled by kerosene was carried out in this paper. A 3D numerical model was established by the DES method. The kerosene chemical kinetic model used the 9-component and 12-step simplified mechanism model. Effects of fuel equivalence ratio, inflow total temperature and central strut rocket on-off on shock wave characteristics were studied under Ma5.5. Results demonstrated that with the increase of equivalence ratio, the leading shock wave moves toward upstream, accompanied with higher possibility of the inlet unstart. However, the leading shock wave moves toward downstream as the inflow total temperature rises. After the central strut rocket is closed, the leading shock wave moves toward downstream, which can reduce risks of the inlet unstart. State of the shear layer formed by the strut rocket jet flow and inflow can influence the shock train structure significantly.

  9. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  10. Design of a Facility for Studying Shock-Cell Noise on Single and Coaxial Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Guariglia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Shock-cell noise occurs in aero-engines when the nozzle exhaust is supersonic and shock-cells are present in the jet. In commercial turbofan engines, at cruise, the secondary flow is often supersonic underexpanded, with the formation of annular shock-cells in the jet and consequent onset of shock-cell noise. This paper aims at describing the design process of the new facility FAST (Free jet AeroacouSTic laboratory at the von Karman Institute, aimed at the investigation of the shock-cell noise phenomenon on a dual stream jet. The rig consists of a coaxial open jet, with supersonic capability for both the primary and secondary flow. A coaxial silencer was designed to suppress the spurious noise coming from the feeding lines. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations of the coaxial jet and acoustic simulations of the silencer have been carried out to support the design choices. Finally, the rig has been validated by performing experimental measurements on a supersonic single stream jet and comparing the results with the literature. Fine-scale PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry coupled with a microphone array in the far field have been used in this scope. Preliminary results of the dual stream jet are also shown.

  11. Internal Shock Interactions in Propulsion/Airframe Integrated Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and design requirements of propulsion/airframe integration for high Mach number flight have led to extensive study of the three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet in recent years. Recent research publications have indicated testing over a broad range of Mach number (2 to 18) in a variety of test gases, such as air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane. Multiple experimental techniques have been employed to obtain detailed internal shock interaction data, performance data, and inlet starting limits. Computational fluid dynamics has been effectively used for preliminary parametric studies as well as in parallel with experiments to aid in the explanation of unusual or unexpected flow phenomena. Inlets of this genre afford a relatively simple, generic geometry while producing a highly complex, three-dimensional flow field dominated by shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions. While the importance of the viscous effects in high speed inlet interactions is recognized, the present work addresses in a parametric fashion the inviscid effects of leading edge sweep, sidewall compression, and inflow Mach number on the internal shock structure in terms of inlet compression and mass capture. In the process, the source of the of the Mach number invariance with leading edge sweep for a constant sidewall compression class of inlet is identified, and a previously undocumented spillage phenomenon in a constant effective wedge angle class of inlets is discussed.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of shock wave propagation through a bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, A.; Daniel, E.; Massoni, J.; Biamino, L.; Houas, L.; Leriche, D.; Jourdan, G.

    2018-02-01

    The propagation of a planar shock wave through a split channel is both experimentally and numerically studied. Experiments were conducted in a square cross-sectional shock tube having a main channel which splits into two symmetric secondary channels, for three different shock wave Mach numbers ranging from about 1.1 to 1.7. High-speed schlieren visualizations were used along with pressure measurements to analyze the main physical mechanisms that govern shock wave diffraction. It is shown that the flow behind the transmitted shock wave through the bifurcation resulted in a highly two-dimensional unsteady and non-uniform flow accompanied with significant pressure loss. In parallel, numerical simulations based on the solution of the Euler equations with a second-order Godunov scheme confirmed the experimental results with good agreement. Finally, a parametric study was carried out using numerical analysis where the angular displacement of the two channels that define the bifurcation was changed from 90° , 45° , 20° , and 0° . We found that the angular displacement does not significantly affect the overpressure experience in either of the two channels and that the area of the expansion region is the important variable affecting overpressure, the effect being, in the present case, a decrease of almost one half.

  13. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  14. Shock in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    , comorbidity level and number of organ failure were associated with 90-day mortality. CONCLUSION: Shock is a frequent and critical finding in the ED, carrying a 7- and, 90- day mortality of 23.1 and 40.7 %, respectively. Age and number of organ failures are independent prognostic factors for death within 7......-based cohort study at an University Hospital ED in Denmark from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. All patients aged ≥18 years living in the hospital catchment area with a first time ED presentation with shock (n = 1646) defined as hypotension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤100 mmHg)) and ≥1 organ......,000 pyar. The 7-day, and 90-day mortality was 23.1 % (95 % CI: 21.1-25.1) and 40.7 % (95 % CI: 38.3-43.1), respectively. Independent predictors of 7-day mortality were: age (adjusted HR 1.03 (95 % CI: 1.03-1.04), and number of organ failures (≥3 organ failures; adjusted HR 3.13 95 % CI: 2.28-4.30). Age...

  15. Flow Rounding

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Donggu; Payor, James

    2015-01-01

    We consider flow rounding: finding an integral flow from a fractional flow. Costed flow rounding asks that we find an integral flow with no worse cost. Randomized flow rounding requires we randomly find an integral flow such that the expected flow along each edge matches the fractional flow. Both problems are reduced to cycle canceling, for which we develop an $O(m \\log(n^2/m))$ algorithm.

  16. Cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction; prognostic impact of early and late shock development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm, M G; Køber, L; Boesgaard, S

    2003-01-01

    incidence, outcome and prognostic significance of cardiogenic shock in 6676 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Demographic and clinical data including the presence of cardiogenic shock were prospectively collected in 6676 non-invasively managed patients...... or late shock development (>80%) (Ppatients without cardiogenic shock but with post-infarction heart failure. CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide prospectively collected registry, non-invasively managed consecutive myocardial infarct......AIMS: Cardiogenic shock accounts for the majority of deaths following acute myocardial infarction. The majority of outcome data on this issue are, however, derived from single hospitals, referral centers or selected patients in randomized studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate...

  17. Introduction to Shock Waves and Shock Wave Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, William Wyatt [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    M-9 and a number of other organizations at LANL and elsewhere study materials in dynamic processes. Often, this is described as “shock wave research,” but in reality is broader than is implied by that term. Most of our work is focused on dynamic compression and associated phenomena, but you will find a wide variety of things we do that, while related, are not simple compression of materials, but involve a much richer variety of phenomena. This tutorial will introduce some of the underlying physics involved in this work, some of the more common types of phenomena we study, and common techniques. However, the list will not be exhaustive by any means.

  18. Septisk shock på intensivafdeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Carlsen, Sarah; Marcussen, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Patients in septic shock have a 33-42% 30-day mortality, but characteristics and outcome have not been assessed in Danish intensive care units (ICUs).......Patients in septic shock have a 33-42% 30-day mortality, but characteristics and outcome have not been assessed in Danish intensive care units (ICUs)....

  19. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Justesen, Mogens Kamp

    This paper examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals’ evaluations of well-being. We do so by using...

  20. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-Being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Kamp Justesen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals’ evaluations of well-being. We do so by using...

  1. Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-Being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Bjørnskov, Christian; Justesen, Mogens Kamp

    This paper examines how economic shocks affect individual well-being in developing countries. Using the case of a sudden and unanticipated currency devaluation in Botswana as a quasi-experiment, we examine how this monetary shock affects individuals’ evaluations of well-being. We do so by using...

  2. Anaphylactic shock during hydatid cyst surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Bensghir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative anaphylactic shock is an unusual complication. Different causes can be involved. Surgery of hydatid cyst is rarely responsible. About a case report of anaphylactic shock due to hydatid cyst surgery, the authors discuss the mechanisms, principles of treatment, and prevention measures of this complication.

  3. Turbulence modeling for high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Huang, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of turbulence models for high speed flows is presented. The flows consist of simple 2D flows over flat plates and complex shock-wave boundary-layer interaction flows over ramps and wedges. The flows are typical of those encountered by high speed vehicles such as the NASP. The turbulence models investigated include various two-equation models which, as a class, are considered to be well suited to the design of high speed vehicles. A description and discussion of the specific models is given and includes both baseline or uncorrected models, and model corrections which are needed to improve predictions of complex flows. It is found that most of the models studied are able to give good predictions of the flat plate flows, and some of the models are able to predict some of the complex flows, but none of them are able to accurately predict all of the complex flows. Recommendations for future model improvements are discussed.

  4. Effect of Seeding Particles on the Shock Structure of a Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, David; Echeverría, Carlos; Stern, Catalina

    2012-11-01

    The original goal of our work was to measure. With PIV, the velocity field of a supersonic flow produced by the discharge of air through a 4mm cylindrical nozzle. The results were superposed to a shadowgraph and combined with previous density measurements made with a Rayleigh scattering technique. The idea was to see if there were any changes in the flow field, close to the high density areas near the shocks. Shadowgraphs were made with and without seeding particles, (spheres of titanium dioxide). Surprisingly, it was observed that the flow structure with particles was shifted in the direction opposite to the flow with respect to the flow structure obtained without seeds. This result might contradict the belief that the seeding particles do not affect the flow and that the speed of the seeds correspond to the local speed of the flow. We acknowledge support from DGAPA UNAM through project IN117712 and from Facultad de Ciencias UNAM.

  5. Shock waves in helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepmann, H.W.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from studies of the properties of low temperature He-4 using shock waves as a probe. Ideal shock tube theory is used to show that sonic speeds of Mach 40 are attainable in He at 300 K. Viscosity reductions at lower temperatures minimize boundary layer effects at the side walls. A two-fluid model is described to account for the phase transition which He undergoes at temperatures below 2.2 K, after which the quantum fluid (He II) and the normal compressed superfluid (He I) coexist. Analytic models are provided for pressure-induced shocks in He I and temperature-induced shock waves (called second sound) which appear in He II. The vapor-fluid interface of He I is capable of reflecting second and gasdynamic sound shocks, which can therefore be used as probes for studying phase transitions between He I and He II. 17 references

  6. Historic Food Production Shocks: Quantifying the Extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aled W. Jones

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding global food production trends is vital for ensuring food security and to allow the world to develop appropriate policies to manage the food system. Over the past few years, there has been an increasing attention on the global food system, particularly after the extreme shocks seen in food prices after 2007. Several papers and working groups have explored the links between food production and various societal impacts however they often categorise production shocks in different ways even to the extent of identifying different levels, countries and timings for shocks. In this paper we present a simple method to quantify and categorise cereal production shocks at a country level. This method can be used as a baseline for other studies that examine the impact of these production shocks on the global food system.

  7. Spherical shock waves in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutku, Y.

    1991-01-01

    We present the metric appropriate to a spherical shock wave in the framework of general relativity. This is a Petrov type-N vacuum solution of the Einstein field equations where the metric is continuous across the shock and the Riemann tensor suffers a step-function discontinuity. Spherical gravitational waves are described by type-N Robinson-Trautman metrics. However, for shock waves the Robinson-Trautman solutions are unacceptable because the metric becomes discontinuous in the Robinson-Trautman coordinate system. Other coordinate systems that have so far been introduced for describing Robinson-Trautman solutions also suffer from the same defect. We shall present the C 0 -form of the metric appropriate to spherical shock waves using Penrose's approach of identification with warp. Further extensions of Penrose's method yield accelerating, as well as coupled electromagnetic-gravitational shock-wave solutions

  8. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  9. Barrier experiment: Shock initiation under complex loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The barrier experiments are a variant of the gap test; a detonation wave in a donor HE impacts a barrier and drives a shock wave into an acceptor HE. The question we ask is: What is the trade-off between the barrier material and threshold barrier thickness to prevent the acceptor from detonating. This can be viewed from the perspective of shock initiation of the acceptor subject to a complex pressure drive condition. Here we consider key factors which affect whether or not the acceptor undergoes a shock-to-detonation transition. These include the following: shock impedance matches for the donor detonation wave into the barrier and then the barrier shock into the acceptor, the pressure gradient behind the donor detonation wave, and the curvature of detonation front in the donor. Numerical simulations are used to illustrate how these factors affect the reaction in the acceptor.

  10. [Diagnostic apparatus in the shock trauma room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A; Bischoff, M; Gebhard, F; Huber-Lang, M; Kinzl, L; Schmelz, A

    2004-10-01

    Opinions vary with regard to the equipment and structural furnishings required for adequate management of the trauma patient in the dedicated shock suite. In order to assess the current situation in Germany, we conducted a survey of the 76 centers participating in the Polytrauma Registry of the DGU. Fifty-one questionnaires were returned by centers representing all levels of care. Responses revealed, for example, that not all centers possess capabilities for conventional radiography in the shock suite (7/51). Only 20 centers had a fixed table; the remaining 24 hospitals used either an image converter or a mobile X-ray unit. A dedicated ultrasound scanner was provided for the shock suite in 39 of 51 centers responding. Dedicated computed tomography scanners were provided for the shock suite in only eight centers (one dedicated trauma center, three level 3 centers, four university hospitals). All eight scanners use helical CT technology; at least three of the units are 8- or 16-slice. Of 51 shock suites, 12 are air-conditioned in compliance with sterile criteria (and are officially designated as surgical suites), while the remaining 39 are not. In acute cases, emergency surgeries can be performed in the shock suite in 37 centers, but not in the remaining 14 shock suites. According to the survey, slightly less than half of the hospitals responding are un-satisfied with the shock suite infrastructure ( n=24) and, of these, 13 centers are actively planning changes (the necessary financial resources have been guaranteed in 10 centers). Fourteen centers desire changes but do not currently have the required money. Information provided by Philips and Siemens suggests that the cost of furnishing a new shock suite ranges between 1.4 and 1.7 million euros. Responses to our survey show that a large gap remains between wishes and reality in the technical infrastructure in many shock suites in Germany.

  11. Surface instabilities in shock loaded granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandan, K.; Khaderi, S. N.; Wadley, H. N. G.; Deshpande, V. S.

    2017-12-01

    The initiation and growth of instabilities in granular materials loaded by air shock waves are investigated via shock-tube experiments and numerical calculations. Three types of granular media, dry sand, water-saturated sand and a granular solid comprising PTFE spheres were experimentally investigated by air shock loading slugs of these materials in a transparent shock tube. Under all shock pressures considered here, the free-standing dry sand slugs remained stable while the shock loaded surface of the water-saturated sand slug became unstable resulting in mixing of the shocked air and the granular material. By contrast, the PTFE slugs were stable at low pressures but displayed instabilities similar to the water-saturated sand slugs at higher shock pressures. The distal surfaces of the slugs remained stable under all conditions considered here. Eulerian fluid/solid interaction calculations, with the granular material modelled as a Drucker-Prager solid, reproduced the onset of the instabilities as seen in the experiments to a high level of accuracy. These calculations showed that the shock pressures to initiate instabilities increased with increasing material friction and decreasing yield strain. Moreover, the high Atwood number for this problem implied that fluid/solid interaction effects were small, and the initiation of the instability is adequately captured by directly applying a pressure on the slug surface. Lagrangian calculations with the directly applied pressures demonstrated that the instability was caused by spatial pressure gradients created by initial surface perturbations. Surface instabilities are also shown to exist in shock loaded rear-supported granular slugs: these experiments and calculations are used to infer the velocity that free-standing slugs need to acquire to initiate instabilities on their front surfaces. The results presented here, while in an idealised one-dimensional setting, provide physical understanding of the conditions required to

  12. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrne, Shawn D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eakins, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  13. Nonoscillatory shock capturing scheme using flux limited dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, A.

    1985-01-01

    A method for modifying the third order dissipative terms by the introduction of flux limiters is proposed. The first order dissipative terms can then be eliminated entirely, and in the case of a scalar conservation law the scheme is converted into a total variation diminishing scheme provided that an appropriate value is chosen for the dissipative coefficient. Particular attention is given to: (1) the treatment of the scalar conservation law; (2) the treatment of the Euler equations for inviscid compressible flow; (3) the boundary conditions; and (4) multistage time stepping and multigrid schemes. Numerical results for transonic flows suggest that a central difference scheme augmented by flux limited dissipative terms can lead to an effective nonoscillatory shock capturing method. 20 references

  14. Mechanical response of shock conditioned HPNS-5 (R-1) grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plannerer, H.N.

    1997-01-01

    HPNS-5 (R-1) grout is a portland cement formulated mix designed for use as a rigid containment plug in vertical boreholes at the Nevada Test Site. Coincident with field testing of this grout in 1991 and 1992 , two arums of the grout mix were collected and positioned in the by pass drift of the DISTANT ZENITH event to expose the grout to passage of a nuclear driven stress wave. The drums were later retrieved to determine the mechanical behavior of the shock conditioned grout. Sealed hollow tubes positioned within the grout-filled drums to detect ductile flow on passage of the stress wave were found partially to completely filled with HPNS-5 grout following the experiment. Static mechanical tests support the evidence for ductile flow and place the transition from brittle fracture failure to ductile behavior in the shock conditioned grout at a confining stress between ambient and 5 MPa (725 psi). Uniaxial and triaxial tests delineated a stress-strain field for interstice collapse that interposes between the mechanics of linear elastic deformation and dilatancy. Hydrostatic stress loading between 25 MPa (3.6 ksi) and 60 MPa (8.7 ksi) results in a significant change of permanent set from 1% to greater than 15% volume strain

  15. The Phage Shock Protein Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Kim, Josué; Darwin, Andrew J

    2016-09-08

    The phage shock protein (Psp) system was identified as a response to phage infection in Escherichia coli, but rather than being a specific response to a phage, it detects and mitigates various problems that could increase inner-membrane (IM) permeability. Interest in the Psp system has increased significantly in recent years due to appreciation that Psp-like proteins are found in all three domains of life and because the bacterial Psp response has been linked to virulence and other important phenotypes. In this article, we summarize our current understanding of what the Psp system detects and how it detects it, how four core Psp proteins form a signal transduction cascade between the IM and the cytoplasm, and current ideas that explain how the Psp response keeps bacterial cells alive. Although recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of this system, it is an understanding that is still far from complete.

  16. Optimum hypersonic airfoil with power law shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    In the present paper the flow field over a class of two-dimensional lifting surfaces is examined from the viewpoint of inviscid, hypersonic small-disturbance theory (HSDT). It is well known that a flow field in which the shock shape S(x) is similar to the body shape F(x) is only possible for F(x) = x k and the freestream Mach number M ∞ = ∞. This self-similar flow has been studied for several decades as it represents one of the few existing exact solutions of the equations of HSDT. Detailed discussions are found for example in papers by Cole, Mirels, Chernyi and Gersten and Nicolai but they are limited to convex body shapes, that is, k ≤ 1. The only study of concave body shapes was attempted by Sullivan where only special cases were considered. The method used here shows that similarity also exists for concave shapes and a complete solution of the flow field for any k > 2/3 is given. The effect of varying k on C L 3/2 /C D is then determined and an optimum shape is found. Furthermore, a wider class of lifting surfaces is constructed using the streamlines of the basic flow field and analysed with respect to the effect on C L 3/2 /C D . 9 refs., 3 figs

  17. New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Oliveira, A. C.; Gomes, F. A. A.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    2008-01-01

    The new 0.60-m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel was designed to study advanced air-breathing propulsion system such as supersonic combustion and/or laser technologies. In addition, it may be used for hypersonic flow studies and investigations of the electromagnetic (laser) energy addition for flow control. This new hypersonic shock tunnel was designed and installed at the Laboratory for of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu, IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The design of the tunnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for the experiments performed at the laboratory. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures up to 360 atm. and up to 9,000 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization

  18. Numerical simulation of transonic flows in diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M.-S.; Coakley, T. J.; Bergmann, M. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical simulations were made of two-dimensional transonic flows in diffusers, including flow separation induced by a shock or adverse pressure gradient. The mass-averaged, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations, simplified by the thin-layer approximation, were solved using MacCormack's hybrid method. The eddy-viscosity formulation was described by the Wilcox-Rubesin's two-equation, k-omega model. Detailed comparison of the computed results with measurements showed good agreement in all cases, including one with massive separation induced by a strong shock. The computation correctly predicted the details of a distinct lambda shock pattern, closely duplicating the configuration observed experimentally in spark-schlieren photographs.

  19. The flow over a 'high' aspect ratio gothic wing at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental investigation on a nonconical wing which supports an attached shock wave over a region of the leading edge near the vertex and a detached shock elsewhere. The shock detachment point is determined from planform schlieren photographs of the flow field and discrepancies are shown to exist between this and the one calculated by applying the oblique shock equations normal to the leading edge. On a physical basis, it is argued that the shock detachment has to obey the two-dimensional law normal to the leading edges. From this, and from other measurements on conical wings, it is thought that the planform schlieren technique may not be particularly satisfactory for detecting shock detachment. Surface pressure distributions are presented and are explained in terms of the flow over related delta wings which are identified as a vertex delta wing and a local delta wing.

  20. Effects of Atwood number on shock focusing in shock-cylinder interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junfeng; Ding, Juchun; Luo, Xisheng; Zhai, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of shock-accelerated heavy-gas cylinder surrounded by the air with different Atwood numbers (A_t=0.28, 0.50, 0.63) is investigated, concentrating on shock focusing and jet formation. Experimentally, a soap film technique is used to generate an ideal two-dimensional discontinuous gas cylinder with a clear surface, which can guarantee the observation of shock wave movements inside the cylinder. Different Atwood numbers are realized by different mixing ratios of SF_6 and air inside the cylinder. A high-speed schlieren system is adopted to capture the shock motions and jet morphology. Numerical simulations are also performed to provide more information. The results indicate that an inward jet is formed for low Atwood numbers, while an outward jet is generated for high Atwood numbers. Different Atwood numbers will lead to the differences in the relative velocities between the incident shock and the refraction shock, which ultimately results in the differences in shock competition near the downstream pole. The morphology and feature of the jet are closely associated with the position and intensity of shock focusing. The pressure and vorticity contours indicate that the jet formation should be attributed to the pressure pulsation caused by shock focusing, and the jet development is ascribed to the vorticity induction. Finally, a time ratio proposed in the previous work for determining the shock-focusing type is verified by experiments.